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Sample records for reservoir engineering stanford

  1. Reservoir technology - geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford. Fifth annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.

    1985-09-01

    The objective is to carry out research on geothermal reservoir engineering techniques useful to the geothermal industry. A parallel objective is the training of geothermal engineers and scientists. The research is focused toward accelerated development of hydrothermal resources through the evaluation of fluid reserves, and the forecasting of field behavior with time. Injection technology is a research area receiving special attention. The program is divided into reservoir definition research, modeling of heat extraction from fractured reservoirs, application and testing of new and proven reservoir engineering technology, and technology transfer. (ACR)

  2. Reservoir and injection technology: Geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford: Third annual report for the period October 1, 1986 through September 30, 1987: (Final report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.

    1988-02-01

    This paper discusses different aspects of geothermal reservoir engineering. General topics covered are: reinjection technology, reservoir technology, and heat extraction. (LSP)

  3. Fifteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The Fifteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23--25, 1990. Major topics included: DOE's geothermal research and development program, well testing, field studies, geosciences, geysers, reinjection, tracers, geochemistry, and modeling.

  4. Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1989-12-31

    The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  5. Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  6. PROCEEDINGS ELEVENTH WORKSHOP GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ELEVENTH WORKSHOP GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING January 21-23, 1986 Sponsored by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U.S. Department of Energy, Stanford-DOE Contract No. DE-AS03-80SF11459 and Contract No. DE-AS07-841D12529 SGP-TR-93-9 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or

  7. Seventeenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1992-01-31

    PREFACE The Seventeenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 29-31, 1992. There were one hundred sixteen registered participants which equaled the attendance last year. Participants were from seven foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Mexico and New Zealand. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in the papers. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Raffaele Cataldi. Dr. Cataldi gave a talk on the highlights of his geothermal career. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Cataldi. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award at the banquet. Thirty-eight papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Dr. Roland Horne opened the meeting and the key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who discussed the DOE Geothermal R. & D. Program. The talk focused on aiding long-term, cost effective private resource development. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: geochemistry, hot dry rock, injection, geysers, modeling, and reservoir mechanics. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: Sabodh Garg., Jim Lovekin, Jim Combs, Ben Barker, Marcel Lippmann, Glenn Horton, Steve Enedy, and John Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Francois Groff who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook -vii

  8. Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.

    1980-12-18

    INTRODUCTION TO THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTH GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WORKSHOP, STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and Paul Kruger Co-Principal Investigators Ian G. Donaldson Program Manager Stanford Geothermal Program The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on the numerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed in these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented. Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey (U.S.G.S.), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would like to thank Jean Cook and Joanne Hartford (Petroleum Engineering Department, Stanford University) without whom there may never have been a Sixth Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Ian G. Donaldson Stanford University December 31, 1980

  9. Nineteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1994-01-20

    PREFACE The Nineteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 18-20, 1994. This workshop opened on a sad note because of the death of Prof. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. on November 19, 1993. Hank had been fighting leukemia for a long time and finally lost the battle. Many of the workshop participants were present for the celebration of his life on January 21 at Stanford's Memorial Church. Hank was one of the founders of the Stanford Geothermal Program and the Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Workshop. His energy, kindness, quick wit, and knowledge will long be missed at future workshops. Following the Preface we have included a copy of the Memorial Resolution passed by the Stanford University Senate. There were one hundred and four registered participants. Participants were from ten foreign countries: Costa Rica, England, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines and Turkey. Workshop papers described the performance of fourteen geothermal fields outside the United States. Roland N. Home opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a presentation about the future of geothermal development. The banquet speaker was Jesus Rivera and he spoke about Energy Sources of Central American Countries. Forty two papers were presented at the Workshop. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: sciences, injection, production, modeling, and adsorption. Session chairmen are an important part of the workshop and our thanks go to: John Counsil, Mark Walters, Dave Duchane, David Faulder, Gudmundur Bodvarsson, Jim Lovekin, Joel Renner, and Iraj Ershaghi. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Xianfa Deng who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Roland N. Home Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

  10. Eighteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1993-01-28

    PREFACE The Eighteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 26-28, 1993. There were one hundred and seventeen registered participants which was greater than the attendance last year. Participants were from eight foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, Guatemala, and Iceland. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Dean Gary Ernst opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Mock who also spoke at the banquet. Thirty-nine papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: field operations, The Geysers, geoscience, hot-dry-rock, injection, modeling, slim hole wells, geochemistry, well test and wellbore. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: John Counsil, Kathleen Enedy, Harry Olson, Eduardo Iglesias, Marcelo Lippmann, Paul Atkinson, Jim Lovekin, Marshall Reed, Antonio Correa, and David Faulder. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to John Hornbrook who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

  11. Twentieth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-26

    PREFACE The Twentieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, dedicated to the memory of Professor Hank Ramey, was held at Stanford University on January 24-26, 1995. There were ninety-five registered participants. Participants came from six foreign countries: Japan, Mexico, England, Italy, New Zealand and Iceland. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Thirty-two papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into eleven sessions concerning: field development, modeling, well tesubore, injection, geoscience, geochemistry and field operations. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bob Fournier, Mark Walters, John Counsil, Marcelo Lippmann, Keshav Goyal, Joel Renner and Mike Shook. In addition to the technical sessions, a panel discussion was held on ''What have we learned in 20 years?'' Panel speakers included Patrick Muffler, George Frye, Alfred Truesdell and John Pritchett. The subject was further discussed by Subir Sanyal, who gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager

  12. Sixteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1991-01-25

    The Sixteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23-25, 1991. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Mohinder Gulati of UNOCAL Geothermal. Dr. Gulati gave an inspiring talk on the impact of numerical simulation on development of geothermal energy both in The Geysers and the Philippines. Dr. Gulati was the first recipient of The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award. The registered attendance figure of one hundred fifteen participants was up slightly from last year. There were seven foreign countries represented: Iceland, Italy, Philippines, Kenya, the United Kingdom, Mexico, and Japan. As last year, papers on about a dozen geothermal fields outside the United States were presented. There were thirty-six papers presented at the Workshop, and two papers were submitted for publication only. Attendees were welcomed by Dr. Khalid Aziz, Chairman of the Petroleum Engineering Department at Stanford. Opening remarks were presented by Dr. Roland Horne, followed by a discussion of the California Energy Commission's Geothermal Activities by Barbara Crowley, Vice Chairman; and J.E. ''Ted'' Mock's presentation of the DOE Geothermal Program: New Emphasis on Industrial Participation. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: hot dry rock, geochemistry, tracer injection, field performance, modeling, and chemistry/gas. As in previous workshops, session chairpersons made major contributions to the program. Special thanks are due to Joel Renner, Jeff Tester, Jim Combs, Kathy Enedy, Elwood Baldwin, Sabodh Garg, Marcel0 Lippman, John Counsil, and Eduardo Iglesias. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Angharad Jones, Rosalee Benelli, Jeanne Mankinen, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate the audiovisual equipment and to Michael Riley who coordinated the meeting arrangements for a second year. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

  13. Thirteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.; Cook, J.W.

    1988-01-21

    PREFACE The Thirteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 19-21, 1988. Although 1987 continued to be difficult for the domestic geothermal industry, world-wide activities continued to expand. Two invited presentations on mature geothermal systems were a keynote of the meeting. Malcolm Grant presented a detailed review of Wairakei, New Zealand and highlighted plans for new development. G. Neri summarized experience on flow rate decline and well test analysis in Larderello, Italy. Attendance continued to be high with 128 registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, New Zealand, Japan, Mexico and The Philippines. A discussion of future workshops produced a strong recommendation that the Stanford Workshop program continue for the future. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Four technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published. In addition to these forty five technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Gustavo Calderon from the Inter-American Development Bank. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants a description of the Bank???s operations in Costa Rica developing alternative energy resources, specifically Geothermal, to improve the country???s economic basis. His talk appears as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: J. Combs, G. T. Cole, J. Counsil, A. Drenick, H. Dykstra, K. Goyal, P. Muffler, K. Pruess, and S. K. Sanyal. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Marilyn King, Pat Oto, Terri Ramey, Bronwyn Jones, Yasmin Gulamani, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, especially Jeralyn Luetkehans. The Thirteenth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract No. DE-AS07-84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jean W. Cook

  14. Eleventh workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Counsil, J.R.

    1986-01-23

    The Eleventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 21-23, 1986. The attendance was up compared to previous years, with 144 registered participants. Ten foreign countries were represented: Canada, England, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand and Turkey. There were 38 technical presentations at the Workshop which are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Six technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published and one presentation is not published. In addition to these 45 technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by J. E. Mock from the Department of Energy. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Jim Combs of Geothermal Resources International, Inc. We thank him for his presentation on GEO geothermal developments at The Geysers. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the Workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, E. Iglesias, A. Moench, S. Prestwich, and K. Pruess. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank J.W. Cook, J.R. Hartford, M.C. King, A.E. Osugi, P. Pettit, J. Arroyo, J. Thorne, and T.A. Ramey for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Eleventh Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract DE-AS03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1986 H.J. Ramey, Jr. P. Kruger R.N. Horne W.E. Brigham F.G. Miller J.R. Counsil

  15. Twelfth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Rivera, J.

    1987-01-22

    Preface The Twelfth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 20-22, 1987. The year ending December 1986 was very difficult for the domestic geothermal industry. Low oil prices caused a sharp drop in geothermal steam prices. We expected to see some effect upon attendance at the Twelfth Workshop. To our surprise, the attendance was up by thirteen from previous years, with one hundred and fifty-seven registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, and Turkey. Despite a worldwide surplus of oil, international geothermal interest and development is growing at a remarkable pace. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Seven technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published; they concern geothermal developments and research in Iceland, Italy, and New Zealand. In addition to these forty-eight technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was John R. Berg from the Department of Energy. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants his thoughts on the expectations of this agency in the role of alternative energy resources, specifically geothermal, within the country???s energy framework. His talk is represented as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, K. Goyal, G.S. Bodvarsson, A.S. Batchelor, H. Dykstra, M.J. Reed, A. Truesdell, J.S. Gudmundsson, and J.R. Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Marilyn King, Amy Osugi, Terri Ramey, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, specially Jim Lovekin. The Twelfth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U. S. Department of Energy through Contract Nos. DE-AS03-80SF11459 and DE-AS07- 84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1987 Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jesus Rivera

  16. Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-22

    The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

  17. DOE-Funded Research at Stanford Sees Results in Reservoir Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Stanford Geothermal Program had a noteworthy result this week, having achieved a proof of concept in the use of tiny particles called nanoparticles as tracers to characterize fractured rocks.

  18. Deep Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in the Eastern Snake River...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ESRP. Masking much of the deep thermal potential of the ... apply the RTEst model to water compositions measured from ... on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering,Stanford,02242014,02...

  19. Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S.

    1983-12-15

    The attendance at the Workshop was similar to last year's with 123 registered participants of which 22 represented 8 foreign countries. A record number of technical papers (about 60) were submitted for presentation at the Workshop. The Program Committee, therefore, decided to have several parallel sessions to accommodate most of the papers. This format proved unpopular and will not be repeated. Many of the participants felt that the Workshop lost some of its unique qualities by having parallel sessions. The Workshop has always been held near the middle of December during examination week at Stanford. This timing was reviewed in an open discussion at the Workshop. The Program Committee subsequently decided to move the Workshop to January. The Tenth Workshop will be held on January 22-24, 1985. The theme of the Workshop this year was ''field developments worldwide''. The Program Committee addressed this theme by encouraging participants to submit field development papers, and by inviting several international authorities to give presentations at the Workshop. Field developments in at least twelve countries were reported: China, El Salvador, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States. There were 58 technical presentations at the Workshop, of which 4 were not made available for publication. Several authors submitted papers not presented at the Workshop. However, these are included in the 60 papers of these Proceedings. The introductory address was given by Ron Toms of the U.S. Department of Energy, and the banquet speaker was A1 Cooper of Chevron Resources Company. An important contribution was made to the Workshop by the chairmen of the technical sessions. Other than Stanford Geothermal Program faculty members, they included: Don White (Field Developments), Bill D'Olier (Hydrothermal Systems), Herman Dykstra (Well Testing), Karsten Pruess (Well Testing), John Counsil (Reservoir Chemistry), Malcolm Mossman (Reservoir Chemistry), Greg Raasch (Production), Manny Nathenson (Injection), Susan Petty (Injection), Subir Sanyal (Simulation), Marty Molloy (Petrothermal), and Allen Moench (Reservoir Physics). The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Joanne Hartford, Terri Ramey, Amy Osugi, and Marilyn King for their valued help with the Workshop arrangements and the Proceedings. We also owe thanks to the program students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Ninth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U . S . Department of Energy through contract DE-AT03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. H. J. Ramey, Jr., R. N. Horne, P. Kruger, W. E. Brigham, F. G. Miller, J. S . Gudmundsson -vii

  20. Twenty-first workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-26

    PREFACE The Twenty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at the Holiday Inn, Palo Alto on January 22-24, 1996. There were one-hundred fifty-five registered participants. Participants came from twenty foreign countries: Argentina, Austria, Canada, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey and the UK. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Sixty-six papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into twenty sessions concerning: reservoir assessment, modeling, geology/geochemistry, fracture modeling hot dry rock, geoscience, low enthalpy, injection, well testing, drilling, adsorption and stimulation. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bobbie Bishop-Gollan, Tom Box, Jim Combs, John Counsil, Sabodh Garg, Malcolm Grant, Marcel0 Lippmann, Jim Lovekin, John Pritchett, Marshall Reed, Joel Renner, Subir Sanyal, Mike Shook, Alfred Truesdell and Ken Williamson. Jim Lovekin gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet and highlighted the exciting developments in the geothermal field which are taking place worldwide. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager.

  1. PROCEEDINGS SIXTEENTH WORKSHOP GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SIXTEENTH WORKSHOP GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING JEUIU~IY 23-25, I991 SGP-TR-134-12 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents

  2. Alan Farquharson, SVP Reservoir Engineering Economics! Upstream

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    June 16, 2015 Alan Farquharson, SVP - Reservoir Engineering & Economics! Upstream Developments Generate Growing Hydrocarbon Gas Liquids Supply! 2 Forward-Looking Statements Certain statements and information in this presentation may constitute "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. The words "anticipate," "believe," "estimate," "expect," "forecast," "plan,"

  3. Stanford Geothermal Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Now in its 40th year, the Stanford Geothermal Workshop is one of the world's longest running technical meetings on geothermal energy. The conference brings together engineers, scientists and...

  4. Reservoir Engineering for Unconventional Gas Reservoirs: What Do We Have to Consider?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarkson, Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    The reservoir engineer involved in the development of unconventional gas reservoirs (UGRs) is required to integrate a vast amount of data from disparate sources, and to be familiar with the data collection and assessment. There has been a rapid evolution of technology used to characterize UGR reservoir and hydraulic fracture properties, and there currently are few standardized procedures to be used as guidance. Therefore, more than ever, the reservoir engineer is required to question data sources and have an intimate knowledge of evaluation procedures. We propose a workflow for the optimization of UGR field development to guide discussion of the reservoir engineer's role in the process. Critical issues related to reservoir sample and log analysis, rate-transient and production data analysis, hydraulic and reservoir modeling and economic analysis are raised. Further, we have provided illustrations of each step of the workflow using tight gas examples. Our intent is to provide some guidance for best practices. In addition to reviewing existing methods for reservoir characterization, we introduce new methods for measuring pore size distribution (small-angle neutron scattering), evaluating core-scale heterogeneity, log-core calibration, evaluating core/log data trends to assist with scale-up of core data, and modeling flow-back of reservoir fluids immediately after well stimulation. Our focus in this manuscript is on tight and shale gas reservoirs; reservoir characterization methods for coalbed methane reservoirs have recently been discussed.

  5. Integration of advanced geoscience and engineering techniques to quantify interwell heterogeneity in reservoir models. Final report, September 29, 1993--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, W.W.; Buckley, J.S.; Ouenes, A.

    1997-05-01

    The goal of this three-year project was to provide a quantitative definition of reservoir heterogeneity. This objective was accomplished through the integration of geologic, geophysical, and engineering databases into a multi-disciplinary understanding of reservoir architecture and associated fluid-rock and fluid-fluid interactions. This interdisciplinary effort integrated geological and geophysical data with engineering and petrophysical results through reservoir simulation to quantify reservoir architecture and the dynamics of fluid-rock and fluid-fluid interactions. An improved reservoir description allows greater accuracy and confidence during simulation and modeling as steps toward gaining greater recovery efficiency from existing reservoirs. A field laboratory, the Sulimar Queen Unit, was available for the field research. Several members of the PRRC staff participated in the development of improved reservoir description by integration of the field and laboratory data as well as in the development of quantitative reservoir models to aid performance predictions. Subcontractors from Stanford University and the University of Texas at Austin (UT) collaborated in the research and participated in the design and interpretation of field tests. The three-year project was initiated in September 1993 and led to the development and application of various reservoir description methodologies. A new approach for visualizing production data graphically was developed and implemented on the Internet. Using production data and old gamma rays logs, a black oil reservoir model that honors both primary and secondary performance was developed. The old gamma ray logs were used after applying a resealing technique, which was crucial for the success of the project. In addition to the gamma ray logs, the development of the reservoir model benefitted from an inverse Drill Stem Test (DST) technique which provided initial estimates of the reservoir permeability at different wells.

  6. Engineering at SLAC: Designing and constructing experimental devices for the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource - Final Paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djang, Austin

    2015-08-22

    Thanks to the versatility of the beam lines at SSRL, research there is varied and benefits multiple fields. Each experiment requires a particular set of experiment equipment, which in turns requires its own particular assembly. As such, new engineering challenges arise from each new experiment. My role as an engineering intern has been to help solve these challenges, by designing and assembling experimental devices. My first project was to design a heated sample holder, which will be used to investigate the effect of temperature on a sample's x-ray diffraction pattern. My second project was to help set up an imaging test, which involved designing a cooled grating holder and assembling multiple positioning stages. My third project was designing a 3D-printed pencil holder for the SSRL workstations.

  7. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Only the upper part of geo- thermal reservoir was penetrated by drillholes (up to 1200 m), therefore we have used a mathematical modelling to assess the conditions of water and ...

  8. Stanford Geothermal Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The goals of the conference are to bring together engineers, scientists and managers involved in geothermal reservoir studies and developments; provide a forum for the exchange of ideas on the...

  9. Fiber-optic sensors and geothermal reservoir engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angel, S.M.; Kasameyer, P.W. )

    1988-12-01

    Perhaps the first demonstrations of fiber-optic sensors in a geothermal well occurred in early 1988 on the Island of Hawaii. The first of two fiber-optic optrode tests was at the HGP-A well and 3-megawatt power plant facility managed by the Hawaii National Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii. The second test was in a nearby geothermal exploratory well, Geothermal Test Well 2. Both sites are in the Kilauea East Rift zone. A fiber-optic temperature sensor test will be undertaken soon in a deeper, hotter geothermal well. Problems will be examined that may occur with a stainless steel-sleeved, fiber-optic cable. The paper describes fiber optic technology and its use in geothermal reservoir engineering.

  10. Hydraulics and Well Testing of Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with downhole pumps from the reservoir than is injected. Authors Hugh Murphy, Donald W Brown, Reinhard Jung, Isao Matsunaga and Roger Parker Published Journal Geothermics, 1999...

  11. PULSE at Stanford University

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photon Science @ SLAC - LCLS - LUSI - SSRL - PULSE - Stanford University Go Search Home Publications Atomic & Molecular Physics Condensed Matter Physics Single Molecule Imaging...

  12. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA Operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Content Owner: Cathy...

  13. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to right: Ryan Toomey, U. South Florida; Mark Dadmun, U. Tennessee; Christopher Kim, Chapman U. (SNUG Chair); Hendrik Ohldag, Stanford U. SSRLUO functions include: sponsoring and...

  14. Nanosensors as Reservoir Engineering Tools to Map Insitu Temperature Distributions in Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan Ames

    2011-06-15

    The feasibility of using nanosensors to measure temperature distribution and predict thermal breakthrough in geothermal reservoirs is addressed in this report. Four candidate sensors were identified: melting tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles with covalently-attached dye, hollow silica nanoparticles with encapsulated dye and impermeable melting shells, and dye-polymer composite time-temperature indicators. Four main challenges associated with the successful implementation of temperature nanosensors were identified: nanoparticle mobility in porous and fractured media, the collection and detection of nanoparticles at the production well, engineering temperature sensing mechanisms that are both detectable and irreversible, and inferring the spatial geolocation of temperature measurements in order to map temperature distribution. Initial experiments were carried out to investigate each of these challenges. It was demonstrated in a slim-tube injection experiment that it is possible to transport silica nanoparticles over large distances through porous media. The feasibility of magnetic collection of nanoparticles from produced fluid was evaluated experimentally, and it was estimated that 3% of the injected nanoparticles were recovered in a prototype magnetic collection device. An analysis technique was tailored to nanosensors with a dye-release mechanism to estimate temperature measurement geolocation by analyzing the return curve of the released dye. This technique was used in a hypothetical example problem, and good estimates of geolocation were achieved. Tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles were synthesized using a sonochemical method, and a bench heating experiment was performed using these nanoparticles. Particle growth due to melting was observed, indicating that tin-bismuth nanoparticles have potential as temperature nanosensors

  15. SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the fund description (pdf) and to send contributions to (make checks payable to "Stanford University"): Stanford University co Cathy Knotts Manager, User Research...

  16. Reservoir engineering applications for development and exploitation of geothermal fields in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasquez, N.C.; Sarmiento, Z.F.

    1986-07-01

    After a geothermal well is completed, several tests and downhole measurements are conducted to help evaluate the subsurface fluid and reservoir properties intersected. From these tests, a conceptual model of the well can be developed by integrating data from the various parts of the field. This paper presents the completion techniques applied in geothermal wells, as well as the role of reservoir engineering science in delineating a field for development. Monitoring techniques and other reservoir engineering aspects of a field under exploitation are also discussed, with examples from the Philippines.

  17. An integrated approach to reservoir engineering at Pleasant Bayou Geopressured-Geothermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shook, G.M.

    1992-12-01

    A numerical model has been developed for the Pleasant Bayou Geothermal-Geopressured reservoir. This reservoir description is the result of integration of a variety of data, including geological and geophysical interpretations, pressure transient test analyses, and well operations. Transient test analyses suggested several enhancements to the geologic description provided by University of Texas Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG), including the presence of an internal fault not previously identified. The transient tests also suggested water influx from an adjacent aquifer during the long-term testing of Pleasant Bayou; comparisons between transient test analyses and the reservoir description from BEG suggests that this fault exhibits pressure-dependent behavior. Below some pressure difference across the fault, it remains a no-flow barrier; above this threshold pressure drop the barrier fails, and fluid moves across the fault. A history match exercise is presented, using the hypothesized {open_quotes}leaky fault.{close_quotes} Successful match of 4 years of production rates and estimates of average reservoir pressure supports the reservoir description developed herein. Sensitivity studies indicate that the degree of communication between the perforated interval and the upper and lower sands in the reservoir (termed {open_quotes}distal volume{close_quotes} by BEG) impact simulation results very little, whereas results are quite sensitive to storage and transport properties of this distal volume. The prediction phase of the study indicates that Pleasant Bayou is capable of producing 20,000 STB/d through 1997, with the final bottomhole pressure approximately 1600 psi above abandonment pressure.

  18. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Format for Proposal Extension Request Proposals are eligible for a one-time extension request. Submit extension requests by Email as a Word or PDF attachment to: Michelle Steger (steger@slac.stanford.edu) Proposal Number: Date of Extension Request: Spokesperson: 1. PROGRESS: Provide a progress report describing work accomplished at SSRL on this proposal to date (1-2 pages) 2. NEW ELEMENTS: Describe any new elements that may add interest to extending the

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Tenth Workshop on Geothe-1 Reservoir Engineering

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... currently housed at the College of Engineering, estab- lished renewable energy ... Drying of f a n products at high rates, food canning Sugar processing, extraction of ...

  20. YingYing Lu > Postdoc - Stanford University > Center Alumni > The Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Center at Cornell YingYing Lu Postdoc - Stanford University yl854@stanford.edu Formerly a graduate student with the Archer Group, she received her PhD in 2014. She is now a postdoc in Materials Science and Engineering at Stanford

  1. Integrated geologic and engineering reservoir characterization of the Hutton Sandstone, Jackson region, Australia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, D.S.; Holtz, M.H.; Yeh, J.

    1996-08-01

    An integrated geologic and engineering reservoir characterization study of the Hutton Sandstone was completed for the Jackson region, Eromanga Basin, Australia. Our approach involves four principal steps: (1) determine reservoir architecture within a high-resolution sequence stratigraphic framework, (2) investigate trends in reservoir fluid flow, (3) integrate fluid flow trends with reservoir architecture to identify fundamental reservoir heterogeneities, and (4) identify opportunities for reserve growth. Contrary to the existing perception, the Hutton Sandstone, a continental-scale bed-load fluvial system, does not behave as a large, homogeneous tank in which pistonlike displacement of produced oil occurs unimpeded by vertical migration of the aquifer. The sequence stratigraphic analysis identified numerous thin but widespread shale units, deposited during lacustrine flooding events that periodically interrupted episodes of coarse clastic Hutton deposition. These shales represent chronostratigraphically significant surfaces. More importantly, the trends established in reservoir fluid flow from monitoring aquifer encroachment, production response to water shut-off workovers, and differential depletion in Repeat Formation Tests indicate that these shale units act as efficient barriers to vertical fluid flow. Erosion of the upper part of the Hutton reservoir by the younger Birkhead mixed-load fluvial system caused further stratigraphic complexity and introduced additional barriers to vertical and lateral migration of mobile oil and aquifer encroachment. This integrated characterization targeted strategic infill and step-out drilling and recompletion candidates.

  2. Geothermal Technologies Program Overview Presentation at Stanford...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop Geothermal Technologies Program Overview Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop General overview of Geothermal ...

  3. Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - Geothermal Technologies Office Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office Presentation by Geothermal Technologies Director Doug Hollett at the Stanford ...

  4. Petrofacies analysis - the petrophysical tool for geologic/engineering reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watney, W.L.; Guy, W.J.; Gerlach, P.M.

    1997-08-01

    Petrofacies analysis is defined as the characterization and classification of pore types and fluid saturations as revealed by petrophysical measures of a reservoir. The word {open_quotes}petrofacies{close_quotes} makes an explicit link between petroleum engineers concerns with pore characteristics as arbiters of production performance, and the facies paradigm of geologists as a methodology for genetic understanding and prediction. In petrofacies analysis, the porosity and resistivity axes of the classical Pickett plot are used to map water saturation, bulk volume water, and estimated permeability, as well as capillary pressure information, where it is available. When data points are connected in order of depth within a reservoir, the characteristic patterns reflect reservoir rock character and its interplay with the hydrocarbon column. A third variable can be presented at each point on the crossplot by assigning a color scale that is based on other well logs, often gamma ray or photoelectric effect, or other derived variables. Contrasts between reservoir pore types and fluid saturations will be reflected in changing patterns on the crossplot and can help discriminate and characterize reservoir heterogeneity. Many hundreds of analyses of well logs facilitated by spreadsheet and object-oriented programming have provided the means to distinguish patterns typical of certain complex pore types for sandstones and carbonate reservoirs, occurrences of irreducible water saturation, and presence of transition zones. The result has been an improved means to evaluate potential production such as bypassed pay behind pipe and in old exploration holes, or to assess zonation and continuity of the reservoir. Petrofacies analysis is applied in this example to distinguishing flow units including discrimination of pore type as assessment of reservoir conformance and continuity. The analysis is facilitated through the use of color cross sections and cluster analysis.

  5. Quantum simulation of dissipative processes without reservoir engineering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Di Candia, R.; Pedernales, J. S.; del Campo, A.; Solano, E.; Casanova, J.

    2015-05-29

    We present a quantum algorithm to simulate general finite dimensional Lindblad master equations without the requirement of engineering the system-environment interactions. The proposed method is able to simulate both Markovian and non-Markovian quantum dynamics. It consists in the quantum computation of the dissipative corrections to the unitary evolution of the system of interest, via the reconstruction of the response functions associated with the Lindblad operators. Our approach is equally applicable to dynamics generated by effectively non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. We confirm the quality of our method providing specific error bounds that quantify its accuracy.

  6. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Extension Application for Macromolecular Crystallography Proposals Please submit via email attachment to Lisa Dunn (lisa@slac.stanford.edu) Proposal Number: Date of Extension Request: Spokesperson: 1. PROGRESS: Provide a progress report describing work accomplished at SSRL on this proposal to date (1-2 pages) 2. NEW ELEMENTS: Describe any new elements that may add interest to extending the proposal, if applicable (1-2 paragraphs) 3. FUTURE PLANS: Describe future plans or the next steps that you

  7. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instructions for International User Shipments If, at the end of your experiment, you plan to ship samples, equipment or other scientific items from SLAC to a location outside of the U.S., please complete a Power of Attorney for Individual accounts or Group accounts and review the terms and conditions set forth below. NOTE: All EXPORTS MUST BE APPROVED BY STANFORD. DELAYS IN PROVIDING THIS INFORMATION WILL DELAY YOUR SHIPMENT. For more information on user exports, macromolecular crystallography

  8. Scientists Pass Solid Particles Through Rock in DOE-Sponsored Research at Stanford University

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE-sponsored research at Stanford University under the direction of Dr. Roland Horne is advancing the application of nanotechnology in determining fluid flow through enhanced geothermal system reservoirs at depth.

  9. About the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Lightsource About the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource SSRL is a forefront lightsource providing bright X-rays and oustanding user support. The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), a directorate of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), is an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Stanford University. Located in Menlo Park, California, SLAC is a multi-program national laboratory exploring frontier

  10. Berkeley-Stanford Summer School

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Berkeley-Stanford Summer School in Synchrotron Radiation July 8-14, 2001 The first Berkeley-Stanford summer school will provide basic lectures on the synchrotron radiation process, requisite technologies, and a broad range of scientific applications.Visits to both the Advanced Light Source (ALS) in Berkeley and the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) will be included, with opportunities to interact with the professional staff and graduate students at both facilities. The Summer

  11. Stanford Geothermal Workshop 2012 Annual Meeting | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2012 Annual Meeting Stanford Geothermal Workshop 2012 Annual Meeting Presentation slides for the Stanford Geothermal Workshop Annual Meeting presentation by Doug Hollett, ...

  12. History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource SPEAR Based on new applications of synchrotron radiation, SSRL began in 1973 as the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project (SSRP). The first synchrotron scientific user activities were originally attached to the SPEAR ring and were operated in "parasitic mode" on the SPEAR high-energy physics program. SSRL/SSRP was the first multi-GeV storage ring based synchrotron radiation source in the

  13. EERE Days at Stanford University

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy hosts the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Days at Stanford University to engage students and faculty on key energy issues aligned with EERE’s...

  14. The Stanford Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emma, P.

    1995-06-01

    The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) is the first and only high-energy e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} linear collider in the world. Its most remarkable features are high intensity, submicron sized, polarized (e{sup {minus}}) beams at a single interaction point. The main challenges posed by these unique characteristics include machine-wide emittance preservation, consistent high intensity operation, polarized electron production and transport, and the achievement of a high degree of beam stability on all time scales. In addition to serving as an important machine for the study of Z{sup 0} boson production and decay using polarized beams, the SLC is also an indispensable source of hands-on experience for future linear colliders. Each new year of operation has been highlighted with a marked improvement in performance. The most significant improvements for the 1994-95 run include new low impedance vacuum chambers for the damping rings, an upgrade to the optics and diagnostics of the final focus systems, and a higher degree of polarization from the electron source. As a result, the average luminosity has nearly doubled over the previous year with peaks approaching 10{sup 30} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} and an 80% electron polarization at the interaction point. These developments as well as the remaining identifiable performance limitations will be discussed.

  15. SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management of SPEAR3 Project at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory wins DOE Award for Excellence Friday, August 13, 2004 Secretary of Energy Spencer Abraham, Hanley Lee (DOE Stanford Site Office), Richard Boyce, Bob Hettel, Tom Elioff, and Deputy Secretary of Energy Kyle McSlarrow (L to R). The SPEAR3 Management Team and Hanley Lee received the award from The Secretary. Trophy awarded to the laboratory. Each of the members of the Project Management Team also received individual plaques.

  16. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Polymers Earth Sciences Environmental Sciences Optics Engineering Instrumentation ... University for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Content Owner: Cathy Knotts ...

  17. Preliminary reservoir engineering studies of the Miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haukwa, C.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Lippmann, M.J.; Mainieri, A.

    1992-01-01

    The Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in cooperation with the Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad is conducting a reservoir engineering study of the Miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica. Using data from eight exploration wells, a two-dimensional areal, natural-state model of Miravalles has been developed. The model was calibrated by fitting the observed temperature and pressure distributions and requires a geothermal upflow zone in the northern part of the field, associated with the Miravalles volcano and an outflow towards the south. The total hot (about 260 C) water recharge is 130 kg/s, corresponding to a thermal input of about 150 MWt. On the basis of the natural-state model a two-dimensional exploitation model was developed. The field has a production area of about 10 km{sup 2}, with temperatures exceeding 220 C. The model indicated that power generation of 55 MWe can be maintained for 30 years, with or without injection of the separated geothermal brine. Generation of 110 MWe could be problematic. Until more information becomes available on the areal extent of the field and the properties of the reservoir rocks, especially their relative permeability characteristics, it is difficult to ascertain if 110 MWe can be sustained during a 30-year period.

  18. Stanford - Woods Institute for the Environment | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stanford - Woods Institute for the Environment Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Stanford- Woods Institute for the Environment Name: Stanford- Woods Institute for the Environment...

  19. A History of Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United States. Reservoir Engineering 1976-2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, B. Mack; Pruess, Karsten; Lippmann, Marcelo J.; Majer, Ernest L.; Rose, Peter E.; Adams, Michael; Roberston-Tait, Ann; Moller, Nancy; Weare, John; Clutter, Ted; Brown, Donald W.

    2010-09-01

    This report, the third in a four-part series, summarizes significant research projects performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) over 30 years to overcome challenges in reservoir engineering and to make generation of electricity from geothermal resources more cost-competitive.

  20. SSRLUO 1999 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford CA 94305 Work: 650-723-7513 Fax: Email: trainor@pangea.stanford.edu Joe Wong Dept of Chem & Mat Science PO Box 808, L-356 Livermore CA 94551 Work:(510) 423-6385...

  1. Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia

  2. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource December 2008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia

  3. Independent Oversight Inspection, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 2007 | Department of Energy Stanford Linear Accelerator Center - January 2007 Independent Oversight Inspection, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center - January 2007 January 2007 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center This report provides the results of an inspection of the environment, safety, and health programs at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The inspection was conducted during October

  4. Stanford Geothermal Workshop- Geothermal Technologies Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Geothermal Technologies Director Doug Hollett at the Stanford Geothermal Workshop on February 11-13, 2013.

  5. User Facility Access Policy | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility Access Policy 1. Summary The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science national user facility that provides synchrotron radiation to researchers in many fields of science and technology, including biology, catalysis, chemistry, energy, engineering, forensics, geoscience, materials science, medicine, molecular environmental science, and physics. With a pioneering start in 1974, the

  6. SPEAR History | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPEAR History Experimental Facilities : The SPEAR Storage Ring Stanford University has a long history of involvement in the development and use of colliding-beam storage rings for particle physics research. The first such machine at Stanford was a small electron-electron collider, shaped like a figure eight, located on the main campus. A collaborative effort between physicists from Princeton and Stanford Universities, this project produced the first physics results ever obtained with the

  7. M.; Weaver, J.N.; Wiedemann, H. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Stanford

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the 2 MeV microwave gun for the SSRL 150 MeV linac Borland, M.; Weaver, J.N.; Wiedemann, H. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Green, M.C.; Nelson,...

  8. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2002-09-25

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of rockfluid interactions, (2) petrophysical and engineering characterization, (3) data integration, (4) 3-D geologic modeling, (5) 3-D reservoir simulation and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 2. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions is near completion. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been essentially completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The model represents an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic model served as the framework for the simulations. A technology workshop on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields was conducted to transfer the results of the project to the petroleum industry.

  9. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford, California, conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the SLAC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the SLAC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team is developing a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the SLAC facility. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the SLAC Survey. 95 refs., 25 figs., 25 tabs.

  10. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Stanford University | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stanford University employs best practices to minimize the environmental impact of its operations, including its award-winning Transportation Demand Management program. As part of ...

  11. Stanford University | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... to UC Berkeley, Stanford to lower cost of solar power Stanford's 2010 Department of Energy Office of Science Graduate Fellows Nanopillars yield more precise molecular photography

  12. Doug Hollett Gives Keynote Presentation at Stanford Geothermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Doug Hollett Gives Keynote Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop Doug Hollett Gives Keynote Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop January 30, 2012 - 3:55pm Addthis ...

  13. Doug Hollett Gives Keynote Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Program Manager of the Geothermal Technologies Program, Doug Hollett gave a keynote address at the 37th Stanford Geothermal Workshop in Stanford, California.

  14. Stanford- Precourt Energy Efficiency Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Precourt Energy Efficiency Center Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Stanford- Precourt Energy Efficiency Center Name: Stanford- Precourt Energy Efficiency Center Address: 473 Via...

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Leland Stanford University...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Leland Stanford University - CA 0-04 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Leland Stanford University (CA.0-04 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site...

  16. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-09-25

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling that utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling, testing of the geologic-engineering model, and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of seismic attributes, (2) petrophysical characterization, (3) data integration, (4) the building of the geologic-engineering model, (5) the testing of the geologic-engineering model and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 3. Progress on the project is as follows: geoscientific reservoir characterization is completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been completed. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The models represent an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic models served as the framework for the simulations. The geologic-engineering models of the Appleton and Vocation Field reservoirs have been developed. These models are being tested. The geophysical interpretation for the paleotopographic feature being tested has been made, and the study of the data resulting from drilling of a well on this paleohigh is in progress. Numerous presentations on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been made at professional meetings and conferences and a short course on microbial reservoir characterization and modeling based on these fields has been prepared.

  17. Reservoir Engineering Optimization Strategies for Subsurface CO{sub 2} Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mclntire, Blayde; McPherson, Brian

    2013-09-30

    The purpose of this report is to outline a methodology for calculating the optimum number of injection wells for geologic CCS. The methodology is intended primarily for reservoir pressure management, and factors in cost as well. Efficiency may come in many forms depending on project goals; therefore, various results are presented simultaneously. The developed methodology is illustrated via application in a case study of the Rocky Mountain Carbon Capture and Storage (RMCCS) project, including a CCS candidate site near Craig, Colorado, USA. The forecasting method provided reasonable estimates of cost and injection volume when compared to simulated results.

  18. Status of the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coupal, D.P.

    1989-07-01

    This report presents a brief review of the status of the Stanford Linear Collider. Topics covered are: Beam luminosity, Detectors and backgrounds; and Future prospects. 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab. (LSP)

  19. Contact Us | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contact Us Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS 69 Menlo Park, CA 94025 Tel: 650-926-4000 Fax: 650-926-4100 SSRL...

  20. The Research Program | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ssrl.slac.stanford.educontentsciencehighlight2013-03-31b.... A large fraction of sediment-bound uranium at the Rifle site occurs within organic-rich lenses of sediment. Slow...

  1. SSRL Meetings, Workshops & Training Archive | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oct 2003 SSRL Users' Meeting and Workshops (SSRL30) 16-19 Sep 2003 SSRL Structural Molecular Biology Summer School 25-29 Aug 2003 SRI 2003 9-13 Jun 2003 Stanford-Berkeley SR...

  2. History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    government labs and foreign institutions in numerous disciplines including chemistry, biology, medicine, environmental science, materials science, and engineering as well as...

  3. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-02-25

    The University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company, has undertaken an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary goal of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. Geoscientific reservoir property, geophysical seismic attribute, petrophysical property, and engineering property characterization has shown that reef (thrombolite) and shoal reservoir lithofacies developed on the flanks of high-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Vocation Field example) and on the crest and flanks of low-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Appleton Field example). The reef thrombolite lithofacies have higher reservoir quality than the shoal lithofacies due to overall higher permeabilities and greater interconnectivity. Thrombolite dolostone flow units, which are dominated by dolomite intercrystalline and vuggy pores, are characterized by a pore system comprised of a higher percentage of large-sized pores and larger pore throats. Rock-fluid interactions (diagenesis) studies have shown that although the primary control on reservoir architecture and geographic distribution of Smackover reservoirs is the fabric and texture of the depositional lithofacies, diagenesis (chiefly dolomitization) is a significant factor that preserves and enhances reservoir quality. The evaporative pumping mechanism is favored to explain the dolomitization of the thrombolite doloboundstone and dolostone reservoir flow units at Appleton and Vocation Fields. Geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and the testing and applying the resulting integrated geologic-engineering models have shown that little oil remains to be recovered at Appleton Field and a significant amount of oil remains to be recovered at Vocation Field through a strategic infill drilling program. The drive mechanisms for primary production in Appleton and Vocation Fields remain effective; therefore, the initiation of a pressure maintenance program or enhanced recovery project is not required at this time. The integrated geologic-engineering model developed for a low-relief paleohigh (Appleton Field) was tested for three scenarios involving the variables of present-day structural elevation and the presence/absence of potential reef thrombolite lithofacies. In each case, the predictions based upon the model were correct. From this modeling, the characteristics of the ideal prospect in the basement ridge play include a low-relief paleohigh associated with dendroidal/chaotic thrombolite doloboundstone and dolostone that has sufficient present-day structural relief so that these carbonates rest above the oil-water contact. Such a prospect was identified from the modeling, and it is located northwest of well Permit No. 3854B (Appleton Field) and south of well No. Permit No.11030B (Northwest Appleton Field).

  4. Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    :"","visitedicon":"" Hide Map References: Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Web Site1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Stanford- Global...

  5. SSRLUO 2015 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource 2015 Executive Committee Members The SSRL Users Executive Committee (UEC) encourages users to participate in SSRL events and contact UEC members to share feedback or suggestions: Edward Snell , Hauptman Woodward Institute, Buffalo, NY (SSRL UEC Chair) David Bushnell, Stanford University, Stanford, CA Kelly Chacón, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, OR Justin Chartron, Stanford University, Stanford, CA Scott R. Daly, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA Colleen

  6. Improving Geologic and Engineering Models of Midcontinent Fracture and Karst-Modified Reservoirs Using New 3-D Seismic Attributes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Nissen; Saibal Bhattacharya; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton

    2009-03-31

    Our project goal was to develop innovative seismic-based workflows for the incremental recovery of oil from karst-modified reservoirs within the onshore continental United States. Specific project objectives were: (1) to calibrate new multi-trace seismic attributes (volumetric curvature, in particular) for improved imaging of karst-modified reservoirs, (2) to develop attribute-based, cost-effective workflows to better characterize karst-modified carbonate reservoirs and fracture systems, and (3) to improve accuracy and predictiveness of resulting geomodels and reservoir simulations. In order to develop our workflows and validate our techniques, we conducted integrated studies of five karst-modified reservoirs in west Texas, Colorado, and Kansas. Our studies show that 3-D seismic volumetric curvature attributes have the ability to re-veal previously unknown features or provide enhanced visibility of karst and fracture features compared with other seismic analysis methods. Using these attributes, we recognize collapse features, solution-enlarged fractures, and geomorphologies that appear to be related to mature, cockpit landscapes. In four of our reservoir studies, volumetric curvature attributes appear to delineate reservoir compartment boundaries that impact production. The presence of these compartment boundaries was corroborated by reservoir simulations in two of the study areas. Based on our study results, we conclude that volumetric curvature attributes are valuable tools for mapping compartment boundaries in fracture- and karst-modified reservoirs, and we propose a best practices workflow for incorporating these attributes into reservoir characterization. When properly calibrated with geological and production data, these attributes can be used to predict the locations and sizes of undrained reservoir compartments. Technology transfer of our project work has been accomplished through presentations at professional society meetings, peer-reviewed publications, Kansas Geological Survey Open-file reports, Master's theses, and postings on the project website: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/SEISKARST.

  7. Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico--waterflood performance analysis for the South Cowden Grayburg Reservoir, Ector County, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, J.W. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    A reservoir engineering study was conducted of waterflood performance in the South Cowden field, an Upper Permian Grayburg reservoir on the Central Basin Platform in West Texas. The study was undertaken to understand the historically poor waterflood performance, evaluate three techniques for incorporating petrophysical measurements and geological interpretation into heterogeneous reservoir models, and identify issues in heterogeneity modeling and fluid-flow scaleup that require further research. The approach included analysis of relative permeability data, analysis of injection and production data, heterogeneity modeling, and waterflood simulation. The poor South Cowden waterflood recovery is due, in part, to completion of wells in only the top half of the formation. Recompletion of wells through the entire formation is estimated to improve recovery in ten years by 6 percent of the original oil in place in some areas of the field. A direct three-dimensional stochastic approach to heterogeneity modeling produced the best fit to waterflood performance and injectivity, but a more conventional model based on smooth mapping of layer-averaged properties was almost as good. The results reaffirm the importance of large-scale heterogeneities in waterflood modeling but demonstrate only a slight advantage for stochastic modeling at this scale. All the flow simulations required a reduction to the measured whole-core k{sub v}/k{sub h} to explain waterflood behavior, suggesting the presence of barriers to vertical flow not explicitly accounted for in any of the heterogeneity models. They also required modifications to the measured steady-state relative permeabilities, suggesting the importance of small-scale heterogeneities and scaleup. Vertical flow barriers, small-scale heterogeneity modeling, and relative permeability scaleup require additional research for waterflood performance prediction in reservoirs like South Cowden.

  8. SSRL Site Map | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site Map Global Menu DOE Stanford SLAC SSRL LCLS AD PPA SUNCAT PULSE SIMES Main menu Home About SSRL What is SSRL? Director's Office Organization Advisory Panels History SSRL News SSRL News and Events Science Highlights Press Releases SSRL Newsletter Photon Science Seminars SSRL Presents User Resources User Resources User Portal Schedules Deadlines Forms & Applications Beam Lines Beam Lines Map By Number By Technique Photon Source Parameters SPEAR3 Status Science at SSRL Science at SSRL

  9. SSRL Users' Organization | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Users' Organization Charter | Committee Members | Committee Meetings | SSRLUO Activism SNUG Group Synchrotron and Neutron User's Group (SNUG) visit to Washington DC, April 2009. Left to right: Ryan Toomey, U. South Florida; Mark Dadmun, U. Tennessee; Christopher Kim, Chapman U. (SNUG Chair); Hendrik Ohldag, Stanford U. The SSRL Users' Organization (SSRLUO) is broadly concerned with representing the interests of the SSRL users (see Charter). Users elect members to serve on the Users' Executive

  10. Photon Science Seminar Series | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photon Science Seminar Series SLAC's Photon Science Seminar Series brings together scientists from SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, Photon Science and Accelerator directorates, including researchers from the Center for Sustainable Energy through Catalysis and two joint SLAC-Stanford institutes: the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Sciences and the Pulse Institute for Ultrafast Energy Science. The seminar series' main goals are to

  11. Experimental Station 11-1 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    controlled UV-Vis microspectrophotometer. For aditional information about the experimental capabilities, see http:smb.slac.stanford.eduindex.shtml. Status Open Supported...

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Stanford Linear Accelerator...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    The Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was established in 1962 as a research facility for high energy particle physics. The Environmental Management mission at this site is to ...

  13. Stanford's input to the Commission to Review the Effectiveness...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    President of SLAC National Acceleratory Laboratory and Chair, Board of Overseers, Stanford University. PDF icon Governance and Contracting Models More Documents & Publications...

  14. SPEAR3 Accelerator | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPEAR3 Accelerator SPEAR3 SSRL utilizes x-rays produced by its accelerator, the Stanford Positron Electron Asymmetric Ring (SPEAR3). Based on a 2004 upgrade funded by the Department of Energy and the National Institutes of Health, SPEAR3 is a 3-GeV, high-brightness third generation storage ring operating with high reliability and low emittance. SSRL runs in top-off mode, during which the beam current is kept constant with the frequent injection of electrons into the ring. SSRL plans to increase

  15. An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Abstract An analysis of production and reservoir engineering data of 42 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field (Mexico) allowed...

  16. Reservoir Claddings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-05-14

    This information sheet explains how to properly decouple reservoir claddings from water sensitive materials of the wall assembly.

  17. References Burkhardt, H. E., Brook, C. A., Smith, F. W., (1980...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Known Geothermal Resource Area." Proceedings, Fortieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, January 26-28, 2015 Future plans...

  18. Experimental Station 7-1 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    It is equipped with an ADSC Q315R CCD detector. For aditional information about the experimental capabilities, see http:smb.slac.stanford.eduindex.shtml. Status Open Supported...

  19. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source Facility at Dusk. (Source: SLAC) Location Menlo Park, California Start of Operations 1974 Number of Users 1,556 (FY 2014) The SSRL ...

  20. Data Collection & Analysis Software | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource Collection & Analysis Software Techniques Data Collection Packages Data Analysis Packages Macromolecular Crystallography See http://smb.slac.stanford.edu/facilities/ See http://smb.slac.stanford.edu/facilities/ Materials Scattering SPEC Super X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy XAS Collect uses an X Window-based graphical user interface. It is designed to allow quick and easy XAS experimental setup and data collection, and to make optimal use of available beam time. It has many

  1. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiggins, M.L.; Evans, R.D.; Brown, R.L.; Gupta, A.

    2001-03-28

    This report focuses on integrating geoscience and engineering data to develop a consistent characterization of the naturally fractured reservoirs. During this reporting period, effort was focused on relating seismic data to reservoir properties of naturally fractured reservoirs, scaling well log data to generate interwell descriptors of these reservoirs, enhancing and debugging a naturally fractured reservoir simulator, and developing a horizontal wellbore model for use in the simulator.

  2. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource December 2008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RF Sebek, J. Facilities Bayugo, A. Protection Systems Horton, M. Engineering Physicists Rabedeau, T. Beam Line Electronics Rafael, F. End Station Eng. & Development Van Campen, D....

  3. CanGEA Fifth Annual Geothermal Conference Presentation - Mapping...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mapping and Energy & Water Life Cycle Analysis http:... Conference, "Digging Deep" Mapping & Database Workshop ... Stanford Reservoir Engineering Oregon Institute of ...

  4. SSRL Science in SLAC Today | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science in SLAC Today Subscribe to SSRL Science in SLAC Today feed URL: https://www6.slac.stanford.edu/blog-tags/stanford-synchrotron-radiation-lightsource-ssrl Updated: 45 min 24 sec ago SLAC's Historic Linac Turns 50 and Gets a Makeover Wed, 2016/05/04 - 11:00am The lab's signature particle highway prepares to enter another era of transformative science as the home of the LCLS-II X-ray laser. Your One-stop Shop for Producing, Crystallizing Biomolecules Tue, 2016/04/26 - 11:46am The

  5. SSRL Events & Presentations | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Events & Presentations Subscribe to SSRL Events & Presentations feed URL: https://news.slac.stanford.edu/tags/programs-facilities/lightsources/stanford-synchrotron-radiation-lightsource-ssrl Updated: 9 hours 39 min ago SSRL Hosts 17th Annual RapiData Course in Macromolecular X-ray Diffraction Mon, 2015/05/18 - 9:30am The legacy of NSLS's practical course lives on at SSRL, which welcomed 41 scientists from around the world to learn about X-ray methods in the biosciences. From the Director

  6. Play Analysis and Digital Portfolio of Major Oil Reservoirs in the Permian Basin: Application and Transfer of Advanced Geological and Engineering Technologies for Incremental Production Opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

    2004-01-13

    A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest onshore petroleum-producing basin in the United States. Approximately 1,300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000. Of these significant-sized reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. There are 32 geologic plays that have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs, and each of the 1,300 major reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. The final reservoir shapefile for each play contains the geographic location of each reservoir. Associated reservoir information within the linked data tables includes RRC reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are smaller than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production of >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl [5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]). Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

  7. Department of Energy Cites Stanford University for Worker Safety and Health Violations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON – The U.S. Department of Energy has issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to Stanford University (Stanford) for four violations of the Department's worker safety and health regulations.

  8. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CITES STANFORD UNIVERSITY FOR WORKER SAFETY AND HEALTH

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    STANFORD UNIVERSITY FOR WORKER SAFETY AND HEALTH VIOLATIONS November 21, 2014 - 11:25am Share on emailShare on facebook NEWS MEDIA CONTACT * 202-586-4940 Department of Energy Cites Stanford University for Worker Safety and Health Violations WASHINGTON - The U.S. Department of Energy has issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to Stanford University (Stanford) for four violations of the Department's worker safety and health regulations. Worker safety is a priority for the Department, and

  9. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource: SPEAR3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SSRL AP&TD Home SPEAR3 Status AP elog Ops elog AP Projects Accelerator Toolbox Middlelayer LOCO Top-Up Beam Dynamics SLM EPICS Engineering Drawings General Controls Photos Power Supplies Documentation General Technical Operations SPEAR3 CDR SPEAR3 History SLAC Detailed Index | People Search | Sitemap Search SSRL Go Accelerator Physics and Technology Development SPEAR3 SPEAR3 Accelerator Status To better serve an expanding user community, SSRL replaced all technical systems in the SPEAR3

  10. PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

    2004-05-01

    The Permian Basin of west Texas and southeast New Mexico has produced >30 Bbbl (4.77 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000, most of it from 1,339 reservoirs having individual cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}). These significant-sized reservoirs are the focus of this report. Thirty-two Permian Basin oil plays were defined, and each of the 1,339 significant-sized reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Associated reservoir information within linked data tables includes Railroad Commission of Texas reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are <1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. This report contains a summary description of each play, including key reservoir characteristics and successful reservoir-management practices that have been used in the play. The CD accompanying the report contains a pdf version of the report, the GIS project, pdf maps of all plays, and digital data files. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 from these significant-sized reservoirs was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl 5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]).

  11. PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; William Raatz; Cari Breton; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans; Mark H. Holtz

    2003-04-01

    A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest petroleum-producing basin in the US. Approximately 1300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl of oil through 2000. Of these major reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. On a preliminary basis, 32 geologic plays have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs and assignment of each of the 1300 major reservoirs to a play has begun. The reservoirs are being mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonardian Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

  12. DOE-Funded Research at Stanford Sees Results in Reservoir Characteriza...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    effects. To investigate these issues, a nanofluid was created by suspending SiO2 nanoparticles in a liquid solution, and then injecting into a Berea sandstone core. The...

  13. Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim; Gilbert, Bob; Lake, Larry W.; Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett; Thomas, Sunil G.; Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo; Klie, Hector; Banchs, Rafael; Nunez, Emilio J.; Jablonowski, Chris

    2006-11-01

    The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging survivability issues. Our findings indicate that packaging represents the most significant technical challenge associated with application of sensors in the downhole environment for long periods (5+ years) of time. These issues are described in detail within the report. The impact of successful reservoir monitoring programs and coincident improved reservoir management is measured by the production of additional oil and gas volumes from existing reservoirs, revitalization of nearly depleted reservoirs, possible re-establishment of already abandoned reservoirs, and improved economics for all cases. Smart Well monitoring provides the means to understand how a reservoir process is developing and to provide active reservoir management. At the same time it also provides data for developing high-fidelity simulation models. This work has been a joint effort with Sandia National Laboratories and UT-Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and the Institute of Computational and Engineering Mathematics.

  14. STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE LINAC COHERENT LIGHT SOURCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE LINAC COHERENT LIGHT SOURCE INTERNATIONAL USER GROUP FOREIGN PRINCIPAL PARTY IN INTEREST (FPPI) / U.S. AGENT I, _______________________________on behalf of ___________________________________, (Name, Authorized Representative for Int'l User Group) (Name of Int'l User Group Organization) the Foreign Principal Party in Interest, that is subject to the jurisdiction of __________________________________ and having an office and place of business at (Name of

  15. New timing system for the Stanford Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paffrath, L.; Bernstein, D.; Kang, H.; Koontz, R.; Leger, G.; Ross, M.; Pierce, W.; Wilmunder, A.

    1984-11-01

    In order to be able to meet the goals of the Stanford Linear Collider, a much more precise timing system had to be implemented. This paper describes the specification and design of this system, and the results obtained from its use on 1/3 of the SLAC linac. The functions of various elements are described, and a programmable delay unit (PDU) is described in detail.

  16. Seeking New Approaches to Investigate Domestication Events | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Seeking New Approaches to Investigate Domestication Events Monday, October 29, 2012 - 3:30am SSRL Bldg. 137, Rm. 322 Krish Seetah, Stanford University, Department of Anthropology and Zooarcheology Laboratory The domestication of wild animal species has underpinned some of the most fundamental developments in human history. The inclusion of a range of fauna into the human menagerie has altered the way we feed and transport ourselves, not to mention how we

  17. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M.

    1992-12-31

    SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

  18. Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cellulosic materials (Patent) | DOEPatents Engineered microbes and methods for microbial oil overproduction from cellulosic materials Title: Engineered microbes and methods for microbial oil overproduction from cellulosic materials The invention relates to engineering microbial cells for utilization of cellulosic materials as a carbon source, including xylose. Inventors: Stephanopoulos, Gregory ; Tai, Mitchell Issue Date: 2015-08-04 OSTI Identifier: 1207280 Assignee: Massachusetts Institute

  19. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2003-02-11

    This research was directed toward developing a systematic reservoir characterization methodology which can be used by the petroleum industry to implement infill drilling programs and/or enhanced oil recovery projects in naturally fractured reservoir systems in an environmentally safe and cost effective manner. It was anticipated that the results of this research program will provide geoscientists and engineers with a systematic procedure for properly characterizing a fractured reservoir system and a reservoir/horizontal wellbore simulator model which can be used to select well locations and an effective EOR process to optimize the recovery of the oil and gas reserves from such complex reservoir systems.

  20. Type A Investigation of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Accelerator Complex on October 11, 2004 | Department of Energy of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Complex on October 11, 2004 Type A Investigation of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Complex on October 11, 2004 November 15, 2004 On October 11, 2004, at approximately 11:15 am, a subcontractor electrician working at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) received serious burn injuries requiring hospitalization due to an electrical

  1. DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker Safety and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Health Violations | Department of Energy Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker Safety and Health Violations DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker Safety and Health Violations April 3, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued Preliminary Notices of Violation (PNOVs) to three contractors - Stanford University, Pacific Underground Construction, Inc., and Western Allied Mechanical, Inc. - for violations in September 2007 of

  2. Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    assetsimagesicon-science.jpg Engineering National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of...

  3. Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Includes Engineering Standards Manual, Master Specifications Index, Drafting Manual, Design Guides, and more. IHS Standards Expert login information Collections include ANSI,...

  4. Type A Investigation of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    On October 11, 2004, at approximately 11:15 am, a subcontractor electrician working at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) received serious burn injuries requiring ...

  5. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC SO) (See also Science).

  6. Assessing the relative permeability of heterogeneous reservoir rock

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: Assessing the relative permeability of heterogeneous reservoir rock Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Assessing the relative permeability of heterogeneous reservoir rock Reservoir engineers are often faced with heterogeneous core material, for which conventional methods of estimating relative permeability are susceptible to error and may lead to incorrect conclusions regarding displacement efficiency, wettability and reservoir performance.

  7. engineering

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    an award last month for his 3D printing innovation. It could revolutionize additive manufacturing.

    Lawrence Livermore Lab engineer Bryan Moran wasn't necessarily...

  8. Geothermal Reservoir Dynamics - TOUGHREACT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, Karsten; Xu, Tianfu; Shan, Chao; Zhang, Yingqi; Wu,Yu-Shu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zhang,Guoxiang; Kennedy, Mack

    2005-03-15

    This project has been active for several years and has focused on developing, enhancing and applying mathematical modeling capabilities for fractured geothermal systems. The emphasis of our work has recently shifted towards enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) and hot dry rock (HDR), and FY05 is the first year that the DOE-AOP actually lists this project under Enhanced Geothermal Systems. Our overall purpose is to develop new engineering tools and a better understanding of the coupling between fluid flow, heat transfer, chemical reactions, and rock-mechanical deformation, to demonstrate new EGS technology through field applications, and to make technical information and computer programs available for field applications. The objectives of this project are to: (1) Improve fundamental understanding and engineering methods for geothermal systems, primarily focusing on EGS and HDR systems and on critical issues in geothermal systems that are difficult to produce. (2) Improve techniques for characterizing reservoir conditions and processes through new modeling and monitoring techniques based on ''active'' tracers and coupled processes. (3) Improve techniques for targeting injection towards specific engineering objectives, including maintaining and controlling injectivity, controlling non-condensable and corrosive gases, avoiding scale formation, and optimizing energy recovery. Seek opportunities for field testing and applying new technologies, and work with industrial partners and other research organizations.

  9. Thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.

    1996-12-31

    This report is a transcript of a practice lecture given in preparation for a review lecture on the operation of thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators. The author begins by a brief review of the thermodynamic principles underlying the operation of thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators. Remember from thermodynamics class that there are two kinds of heat engines, the heat engine or the prime mover which produces work from heat, and the refrigerator or heat pump that uses work to pump heat. The device operates between two thermal reservoirs at temperatures T{sub hot} and T{sub cold}. In the heat engine, heat flows into the device from the reservoir at T{sub hot}, produces work, and delivers waste heat into the reservoir at T{sub cold}. In the refrigerator, work flows into the device, lifting heat Q{sub cold} from reservoir at T{sub cold} and rejecting waste heat into the reservoir at T{sub hot}.

  10. ENGINEERING

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ENGINEERING the Future of ENERGY Regional University Alliance National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Research and Development The Future of Energy The time to redraw America's energy blueprint is now. The challenges we face today are the most critical in decades-from the impact of energy use on global ecosystems to the difficulties of efficiently harnessing our natural resources. Because energy is fundamental to human welfare, we must develop sustainable systems that make clean,

  11. Status of Norris Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Norris Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses, conditions that impair reservoir uses, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most up-to-date publications and data available, and from interviews with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies, and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  12. WC_1996_001_CLASS_WAIVER_FOR_LELAND_STANFORD_JUNIOR_UNIVERSI.pdf |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy 1996_001_CLASS_WAIVER_FOR_LELAND_STANFORD_JUNIOR_UNIVERSI.pdf WC_1996_001_CLASS_WAIVER_FOR_LELAND_STANFORD_JUNIOR_UNIVERSI.pdf PDF icon WC_1996_001_CLASS_WAIVER_FOR_LELAND_STANFORD_JUNIOR_UNIVERSI.pdf More Documents & Publications WC_1993_002_CRADA_CLASS_WAIVER_SOUTHERN_UNIVERSITY_RESEARCH_.pdf WC_1993_008_CLASS_WAIVER_ROCKETDYNE_DIVISION_ROCKWELL_INTERN.pdf WC_1990_012_CLASS_WAIVER_of_Patent_Rights_in_Inventions_Made

  13. M.; /Bern U.; Auty, D.J.; /Alabama U.; Barbeau, P.S.; /Stanford...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay in 136Xe with EXO-200 Auger, M.; Bern U.; Auty, D.J.; Alabama U.; Barbeau, P.S.; Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Beauchamp, E.; Laurentian U.;...

  14. Big Machines and Big Science: 80 Years of Accelerators at Stanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loew, Gregory

    2008-12-16

    Longtime SLAC physicist Greg Loew will present a trip through SLAC's origins, highlighting its scientific achievements, and provide a glimpse of the lab's future in 'Big Machines and Big Science: 80 Years of Accelerators at Stanford.'

  15. Bio-Imaging With Liquid-Metal-Jet X-ray Sources | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bio-Imaging With Liquid-Metal-Jet X-ray Sources Wednesday, September 9, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Daniel Larsson, Stanford Program Description...

  16. Status of Cherokee Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This is the first in a series of reports prepared by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overviews of Cherokee Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports, publications, and data available, and interviews with water resource professionals in various Federal, state, and local agencies and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Status of Wheeler Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of status reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Wheeler Reservoir summarizes reservoir purposes and operation, reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, and water quality and aquatic biological conditions. The information presented here is from the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. If no recent data were available, historical data were summarized. If data were completely lacking, environmental professionals with special knowledge of the resource were interviewed. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Watching Spins Travel across Borders | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    30, 2015 Spintronics is a field that keeps both scientists and engineers excited from a fundamental physics and applications perspective. But what is "spintronics" exactly? ...

  19. A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    next generation of innovative discoveries in science, engineering, math and other technical disciplines. Each month, the Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) ...

  20. Systems for Electrical Power from Coproduced and Low Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University ... Background: Field History *Initial unit installed in ... Phase2 Optimum Actual Design Ambient Temperature ep 08 ...

  1. TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF FRACTURE DIRECTIONS AND FRACTURE DENSITIES...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD FROM ANALYSES OF SHEAR-WAVE SPLITTING. Proceedings of () ; () : PROCEEDINGS, Twenty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford...

  2. Classification of Geothermal Systems: A Possible Scheme | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Geothermal Systems: A Possible Scheme Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Subir K. Sanyal Conference Thirtieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering; Stanford,...

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TECHNIQUES AND PRODUCTION MODELS FOR EXPLOITING NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Wiggins; Raymon L. Brown; Faruk Civan; Richard G. Hughes

    2002-12-31

    For many years, geoscientists and engineers have undertaken research to characterize naturally fractured reservoirs. Geoscientists have focused on understanding the process of fracturing and the subsequent measurement and description of fracture characteristics. Engineers have concentrated on the fluid flow behavior in the fracture-porous media system and the development of models to predict the hydrocarbon production from these complex systems. This research attempts to integrate these two complementary views to develop a quantitative reservoir characterization methodology and flow performance model for naturally fractured reservoirs. The research has focused on estimating naturally fractured reservoir properties from seismic data, predicting fracture characteristics from well logs, and developing a naturally fractured reservoir simulator. It is important to develop techniques that can be applied to estimate the important parameters in predicting the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. This project proposes a method to relate seismic properties to the elastic compliance and permeability of the reservoir based upon a sugar cube model. In addition, methods are presented to use conventional well logs to estimate localized fracture information for reservoir characterization purposes. The ability to estimate fracture information from conventional well logs is very important in older wells where data are often limited. Finally, a desktop naturally fractured reservoir simulator has been developed for the purpose of predicting the performance of these complex reservoirs. The simulator incorporates vertical and horizontal wellbore models, methods to handle matrix to fracture fluid transfer, and fracture permeability tensors. This research project has developed methods to characterize and study the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs that integrate geoscience and engineering data. This is an important step in developing exploitation strategies for optimizing the recovery from naturally fractured reservoir systems. The next logical extension of this work is to apply the proposed methods to an actual field case study to provide information for verification and modification of the techniques and simulator. This report provides the details of the proposed techniques and summarizes the activities undertaken during the course of this project. Technology transfer activities were highlighted by a two-day technical conference held in Oklahoma City in June 2002. This conference attracted over 90 participants and included the presentation of seventeen technical papers from researchers throughout the United States.

  4. Improved characterization of reservoir behavior by integration of reservoir performances data and rock type distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, D.K.; Vessell, R.K.; Doublet, L.E.

    1997-08-01

    An integrated geological/petrophysical and reservoir engineering study was performed for a large, mature waterflood project (>250 wells, {approximately}80% water cut) at the North Robertson (Clear Fork) Unit, Gaines County, Texas. The primary goal of the study was to develop an integrated reservoir description for {open_quotes}targeted{close_quotes} (economic) 10-acre (4-hectare) infill drilling and future recovery operations in a low permeability, carbonate (dolomite) reservoir. Integration of the results from geological/petrophysical studies and reservoir performance analyses provide a rapid and effective method for developing a comprehensive reservoir description. This reservoir description can be used for reservoir flow simulation, performance prediction, infill targeting, waterflood management, and for optimizing well developments (patterns, completions, and stimulations). The following analyses were performed as part of this study: (1) Geological/petrophysical analyses: (core and well log data) - {open_quotes}Rock typing{close_quotes} based on qualitative and quantitative visualization of pore-scale features. Reservoir layering based on {open_quotes}rock typing {close_quotes} and hydraulic flow units. Development of a {open_quotes}core-log{close_quotes} model to estimate permeability using porosity and other properties derived from well logs. The core-log model is based on {open_quotes}rock types.{close_quotes} (2) Engineering analyses: (production and injection history, well tests) Material balance decline type curve analyses to estimate total reservoir volume, formation flow characteristics (flow capacity, skin factor, and fracture half-length), and indications of well/boundary interference. Estimated ultimate recovery analyses to yield movable oil (or injectable water) volumes, as well as indications of well and boundary interference.

  5. From corrosion to batteries: Electrochemical interface studies | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    From R&D to You: A Thriving Innovation Engine From R&D to You: A Thriving Innovation Engine October 25, 2011 - 11:04am Addthis David Moore Presidential Management Fellow, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? Commercial deployment of lab technologies creates globally competitive industries in the United States, enables significant cost-savings for industries and consumers, and creates good jobs for Americans. The Energy Department plays a key role

  6. Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With...

  7. Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEA Development Phase: Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: USGS Mean Reservoir Temp: USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: USGS Mean...

  8. NREL and Stanford Team up on Peel-and-Stick Solar Cells - News Releases |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL and Stanford Team up on Peel-and-Stick Solar Cells Devices could charge battery-powered products in the future January 10, 2013 It may be possible soon to charge cell phones, change the tint on windows, or power small toys with peel-and-stick versions of solar cells, thanks to a partnership between Stanford University and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). A scientific paper, "Peel and Stick: Fabricating Thin Film Solar Cells on Universal

  9. The Stanford Automated Mounter: Pushing the limits of sample exchange at the SSRL macromolecular crystallography beamlines

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Russi, Silvia; Song, Jinhu; McPhillips, Scott E.; Cohen, Aina E.

    2016-02-24

    The Stanford Automated Mounter System, a system for mounting and dismounting cryo-cooled crystals, has been upgraded to increase the throughput of samples on the macromolecular crystallography beamlines at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. This upgrade speeds up robot maneuvers, reduces the heating/drying cycles, pre-fetches samples and adds an air-knife to remove frost from the gripper arms. As a result, sample pin exchange during automated crystal quality screening now takes about 25 s, five times faster than before this upgrade.

  10. ARPA-E & Stanford University Explore the Hows and Whys of Energy Use |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy & Stanford University Explore the Hows and Whys of Energy Use ARPA-E & Stanford University Explore the Hows and Whys of Energy Use May 25, 2011 - 3:45pm Addthis Members of Girl Scout Troop #61373 from Santa Clara, CA create an instructional video for home energy use. | Photo courtesy of Troop Leader Sylvia Kennedy Members of Girl Scout Troop #61373 from Santa Clara, CA create an instructional video for home energy use. | Photo courtesy of Troop Leader Sylvia

  11. A Roadmap for Engineering Piezoelectricity in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roadmap for Engineering Piezoelectricity in Graphene A Roadmap for Engineering Piezoelectricity in Graphene Doping this 'Miracle Material' May Lead to New Array of Nanoscale Devices, Simulations Reveal February 23, 2012 Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 This illustration shows lithium atoms (red) doped on graphene (black hexagons) and generating electricity. Graphic courtesy of Mitchell Ong, Stanford University. Some scientists refer to graphene as the "miracle material" of the

  12. PROCEEDINGS THIRD WORKSHOP GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... energy in response to changing economic, social, ... in the course of systematic evaluation of Known ... students) broadens the education of these persons i n ...

  13. PROCEEDINGS SECOND WORKSHOP GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Sammis, The E f f e c t s o f a Step Change i n Water Flow o ... . . . . . . . . . . 159 r System i n R a f t R i v e r - J . ... Keer, L. M., 1964. A class of non-symmetrical punch ...

  14. Reservoir Temperature Estimator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-12-08

    The Reservoir Temperature Estimator (RTEst) is a program that can be used to estimate deep geothermal reservoir temperature and chemical parameters such as CO2 fugacity based on the water chemistry of shallower, cooler reservoir fluids. This code uses the plugin features provided in The Geochemist’s Workbench (Bethke and Yeakel, 2011) and interfaces with the model-independent parameter estimation code Pest (Doherty, 2005) to provide for optimization of the estimated parameters based on the minimization of themore » weighted sum of squares of a set of saturation indexes from a user-provided mineral assemblage.« less

  15. The Melvin P. Klein Scientific Development Award | Stanford Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manhattan Project National Historical Park » The Making of a National Park The Making of a National Park Beta Racetrack, Y-12, Oak Ridge Beta Racetrack, Y-12, Oak Ridge The Department of Energy, as the direct descendant of the Manhattan Engineer District, owns and manages the Federal properties at most of the major Manhattan Project sites, including Oak Ridge, Tennessee; Hanford, Washington; and Los Alamos, New Mexico. For over a decade, the Department, in cooperation with the National Park

  16. Watching Spins Travel across Borders | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lightsource Watching Spins Travel across Borders Wednesday, September 30, 2015 Spintronics is a field that keeps both scientists and engineers excited from a fundamental physics and applications perspective. But what is "spintronics" exactly? In order to understand this new field of magnetism research, it is necessary to take a step back and revisit conventional electronics. For almost a century, electronic devices - starting with the early vacuum tubes - have used the charge of

  17. Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below are the project presentations and respective peer review results for Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization.

  18. Reservoir Modeling Working Group Meeting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Reservoir Modeling working group meeting presentation on May 10, 2012 at the 2012 Peer Review Meeting.

  19. DOE Subsurface Technology and Engineering RD&D (SubTER) Overview...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fuel and waste * R&D: deep borehole disposal concept ... reservoir integrity Engineering Createconstruct desired ... * Protect drinking water resources Subsurface ...

  20. Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

    2006-09-30

    Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. The successful development of HPAI technology has tremendous potential for increasing the flow of oil from deep carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin, a target resource that can be conservatively estimated at more than 1.5 billion barrels. Successful implementation in the field chosen for demonstration, for example, could result in the recovery of more than 34 million barrels of oil that will not otherwise be produced. Geological and petrophysical analysis of available data at Barnhart field reveals the following important observations: (1) the Barnhart Ellenburger reservoir is similar to most other Ellenburger reservoirs in terms of depositional facies, diagenesis, and petrophysical attributes; (2) the reservoir is characterized by low to moderate matrix porosity much like most other Ellenburger reservoirs in the Permian Basin; (3) karst processes (cave formation, infill, and collapse) have substantially altered stratigraphic architecture and reservoir properties; (4) porosity and permeability increase with depth and may be associated with the degree of karst-related diagenesis; (5) tectonic fractures overprint the reservoir, improving overall connectivity; (6) oil-saturation profiles show that the oil-water contact (OWC) is as much as 125 ft lower than previous estimations; (7) production history and trends suggest that this reservoir is very similar to other solution-gas-drive reservoirs in the Permian Basin; and (8) reservoir simulation study showed that the Barnhart reservoir is a good candidate for HPAI and that application of horizontal-well technology can improve ultimate resource recovery from the reservoir.

  1. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K.

    1988-12-31

    During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

  2. Type B Accident Investigation of the January 28, 2003, Fall and Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report is an independent product of the Type B Accident Investigation Board appointed by John S. Muhlestein, Director, Stanford Site Office (DOE/SC), U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. In situ X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials Tuesday, July 9, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Johanna Nelson, Stanford Postdoctoral Scholar, SSRL MSD Hard X-ray Department A key factor in the global move towards clean, renewable energy is the electrification of the automobile. Current battery technology limits EV (electric vehicles) to a short travel range, slow recharge, and costly price tag. Li-ion batteries promise the high

  4. REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olsen; Deanna Combs; Dhiraj Dembla; Leonel Gomez

    2003-06-01

    The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plant that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data are being gathered during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The results of the demonstration are being closely monitored to provide a basis for improving the design of the HPAI field deployment plan. The results of the reservoir characterization field demonstration and monitoring program will be documented and widely disseminated to facilitate adoption of this technology by oil operators in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the US.

  5. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantwell, K.

    1987-12-31

    1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

  6. Reinjection into geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Stefansson, V.

    1987-08-01

    Reinjection of geothermal wastewater is practiced as a means of disposal and for reservoir pressure support. Various aspects of reinjection are discussed, both in terms of theoretical studies as well as specific field examples. The discussion focuses on the major effects of reinjection, including pressure maintenance and chemical and thermal effects. (ACR)

  7. Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry Methodologies for ...

  8. A STUDY ON GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGlNEERING APPROACH COMBINED WITH GEOLOGICAL INFORMATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirakawa, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Yoshinobu, F.

    1985-01-22

    This paper presents the combined approaches of reservoir geology and engineering to a geothermal field where geological characteristics are highly complex and heterogeneous.Especially,the concrete approaches are discussed for the case of geothermal reservoir performance studies with a developed numerical model, by showing example cases accompanied with reinjection of produced disposal hot water into underground in an object geothermal reservoir. This combined approach will be a great help in solving complicated problems encountered during the development of a geothermal field.

  9. An innovative secondary recovery approach for a marginal reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, T.J.; Hanafy, H.H.

    1995-11-01

    The Younis Lower Rudeis reservoir is operated by the Gulf of Suez Petroleum Company (GUPCO) in a remote area of the Gulf of Suez, Egypt. Before concluding that Younis had no future potential, GUPCO commissioned a reservoir/facility engineering team to study the reservoir development potential. First, reservoir simulation would be used to improve the understanding of the depletion mechanism and the original oil in place. Second, simulation would be used to determine the potential for waterflooding. Third, if waterflooding potential exists,the team must find a way to economically develop the incremental reserves. The reservoir simulation work clarified the depletion mechanism in Younis, and indicated a significant potential for waterflooding exists. History matching of the historical reservoir performance discovered that a much larger reservoir volume is actually present than mapped, and that ultimate recovery will actually reach only 22 percent of the OOIP. Furthermore, while gravity segregation of gas is occurring, significant unrecovered oil reserves will remain downdip of the current producers. Waterflooding could aid recovery of this downdip oil. With expected reserves from the waterflood project to total 5.3 MMBO, the facility engineers were challenged with providing up to 6000 BPD of water to the platform. An innovative technique was ultimately designed to install all needed equipment on the Younis unmanned platform for a remote waterflood. Since surface injection is expected to occur under a vacuum due to the low reservoir pressure, inexpensive equipment would be used to withdraw water from the Gulf, treat and filter, and deliver to the injection well at the required rate.

  10. Technological problems associated with subsea development of high pressure and high temperature hydrocarbon reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grillo, P.; Natarajan, S.

    1996-12-31

    The paper analyzes the implications in design of subsea completion for exploitation of HP/HT hydrocarbon reservoirs. The paper characterizes limitations associated with current subsea technology for HP/HT applications and outlines the engineering and technological development considered necessary to demonstrate the viability of subsea production technology for the exploitation of HP/HT reservoirs.

  11. Engineering Technician

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alternate Title(s):Civil Engineering Technician; Electrical Engineering Technician; Mechanical Engineering Technician; Environmental Engineering Technician

  12. Encapsulated microsensors for reservoir interrogation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Eddie Elmer; Aines, Roger D.; Spadaccini, Christopher M.

    2016-03-08

    In one general embodiment, a system includes at least one microsensor configured to detect one or more conditions of a fluidic medium of a reservoir; and a receptacle, wherein the receptacle encapsulates the at least one microsensor. In another general embodiment, a method include injecting the encapsulated at least one microsensor as recited above into a fluidic medium of a reservoir; and detecting one or more conditions of the fluidic medium of the reservoir.

  13. Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    M. Tibuleac, Joe Iovenitti, David von Seggern, Jon Sainsbury, Glenn Biasi and John G. Anderson Conference Stanford Geothermal Conference; Stanford, California; 20130101 Published...

  14. Upscaling verticle permeability within a fluvio-aeolian reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, S.D.; Corbett, P.W.M.; Jensen, J.L.

    1997-08-01

    Vertical permeability (k{sub v}) is a crucial factor in many reservoir engineering issues. To date there has been little work undertaken to understand the wide variation of k{sub v} values measured at different scales in the reservoir. This paper presents the results of a study in which we have modelled the results of a downhole well tester using a statistical model and high resolution permeability data. The work has demonstrates and quantifies a wide variation in k{sub v} at smaller, near wellbore scales and has implications for k{sub v} modelling at larger scales.

  15. Water resources review: Ocoee reservoirs, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, J.P.

    1990-08-01

    Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is preparing a series of reports to make technical information on individual TVA reservoirs readily accessible. These reports provide a summary of reservoir purpose and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and watershed; water quality conditions; aquatic biological conditions; and designated, actual and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those use. This reservoir status report addressed the three Ocoee Reservoirs in Polk County, Tennessee.

  16. Collapsible sheath fluid reservoirs for flow cytometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mark, Graham A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is a container in the form of a single housing for holding fluid, including a first collapsible reservoir having a first valve. The first reservoir initially contains a volume of fluid. The container also includes a second reservoir, initially empty (or substantially empty), expandable to a second volume. The second reservoir has a second valve. As the volume of said first reservoir decreases, the volume of the second reservoir proportionally increases.

  17. Reservoir-Stimulation Optimization with Operational Monitoring...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reservoir-Stimulation Optimization with Operational Monitoring for Creation of Enhanced Geothermal Systems Reservoir-Stimulation Optimization with Operational Monitoring for ...

  18. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock...

  19. Master plan: Guntersville Reservoir Aquatic Plant Management. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    In 1989, Congress provided funding to start a five-year comprehensive project to manage aquatic plants in Guntersville Reservoir, to be jointly implemented by the US Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). TVA serves as the overall project coordinator and is the lead agency for this project. Known as the Joint Agency Guntersville Project (JAGP), the project will test and demonstrate innovative management technologies, and incorporate the most effective technologies into a comprehensive aquatic plant management plan for Guntersville Reservoir. The JAGP is intended to serve as a National Demonstration Project for aquatic plant management. As part of this JAGP, the Master Plan for Aquatic Plant Management for the Guntersville Reservoir Project, Alabama-Tennessee is authorized by Corps Contract Number DACW62-90-C-0067.

  20. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan Kelkar

    2002-03-31

    The West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma is one of few newly discovered oil fields in Oklahoma. Although profitable, the field exhibits several unusual characteristics. These include decreasing water-oil ratios, decreasing gas-oil ratios, decreasing bottomhole pressures during shut-ins in some wells, and transient behavior for water production in many wells. This report explains the unusual characteristics of West Carney Field based on detailed geological and engineering analyses. We propose a geological history that explains the presence of mobile water and oil in the reservoir. The combination of matrix and fractures in the reservoir explains the reservoir's flow behavior. We confirm our hypothesis by matching observed performance with a simulated model and develop procedures for correlating core data to log data so that the analysis can be extended to other, similar fields where the core coverage may be limited.

  1. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koerner, R.; Clarke, D.; Walker, S.; Phillips, C.; Nguyen, J.; Moos, D.; Tagbor, K.

    1997-10-21

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period July - September 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the `Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist`. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with a pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to convert shear wave velocity measured through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius and ultra-short radius lateral recompletions as well as other techniques.

  2. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker.

    1998-01-26

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period October - December 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist . The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with cased-hole logging tools. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to translate measurements through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius lateral recompletions as well as other recompletion techniques such as the sand consolidation through steam injection.

  3. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

    1998-04-22

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period January - March 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the "Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist". The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with cased-hole logging tools. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to translate measurements through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius lateral recompletions as well as other recompletion techniques such as the sand consolidation through steam injection.

  4. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nauyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

    1997-07-28

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period April - June 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the `Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist`. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with a pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to convert shear wave velocity measured through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius and ultra-short radius lateral recompletions as well as other techniques.

  5. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

    1998-01-26

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period October - December 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the "Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist". The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with cased-hole logging tools. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to translate measurements through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius lateral recompletions as well as other recompletion techniques such as the sand consolidation through steam injection.

  6. SMALL, GEOLOGICALLY COMPLEX RESERVOIRS CAN BENEFIT FROM RESERVOIR SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard E. Bennett

    2002-06-24

    The Cascade Sand zone of the Mission-Visco Lease in the Cascade Oil field of Los Angeles County, California, has been under water flood since 1970. Increasing water injection to increase oil production rates was being considered as an opportunity to improve oil recovery. However, a secondary gas cap had formed in the up-dip portion of the reservoir with very low gas cap pressures, creating concern that oil could be displaced into the gas cap resulting in the loss of recoverable oil. Therefore, injecting gas into the gas cap to keep the gas cap pressurized and restrict the influx of oil during water injection was also being considered. Further, it was recognized that the reservoir geology in the gas cap area is very complex with numerous folding and faulting and thus there are potential pressure barriers in several locations throughout the reservoir. With these conditions in mind, there were concerns regarding well to well continuity in the gas cap, which could interfere with the intended repressurization impact. Concerns about the pattern of gas flow from well to well, the possibilities of cycling gas without the desired increased pressure, and the possible loss of oil displaced into the gas cap resulted in the decision to conduct a gas tracer survey in an attempt to better define inter-well communication. Following the gas tracer survey, a reservoir model would be developed to integrate the findings of the gas tracer survey, known geologic and reservoir data, and historic production data. The reservoir model would be used to better define the reservoir characteristics and provide information that could help optimize the waterflood-gas injection project under consideration for efficient water and gas injection management to increase oil production. However, due to inadequate gas sampling procedures in the field and insufficiently developed laboratory analytical techniques, the laboratory was unable to detect the tracer in the gas samples taken. At that point, focus on, and an expansion of the scope of the reservoir simulation and modeling effort was initiated, using DOE's BOAST98 (a visual, dynamic, interactive update of BOAST3), 3D, black oil reservoir simulation package as the basis for developing the reservoir model. Reservoir characterization, modeling, and reservoir simulation resulted in a significant change in the depletion strategy. Information from the reservoir characterization and modeling effort indicate that in-fill drilling and relying on natural water influx from the aquifer could increase remaining reserves by 125,000 barrels of oil per well, and that up to 10 infill wells could be drilled in the field. Through this scenario, field production could be increased two to three times over the current 65 bopd. Based on the results of the study, permits have been applied for to drill a directional infill well to encounter the productive zone at a high angle in order to maximize the amount of pay and reservoirs encountered.

  7. Chickamauga reservoir embayment study - 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinert, D.L.; Butkus, S.R.; McDonough, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    The objectives of this report are three-fold: (1) assess physical, chemical, and biological conditions in the major embayments of Chickamauga Reservoir; (2) compare water quality and biological conditions of embayments with main river locations; and (3) identify any water quality concerns in the study embayments that may warrant further investigation and/or management actions. Embayments are important areas of reservoirs to be considered when assessments are made to support water quality management plans. In general, embayments, because of their smaller size (water surface areas usually less than 1000 acres), shallower morphometry (average depth usually less than 10 feet), and longer detention times (frequently a month or more), exhibit more extreme responses to pollutant loadings and changes in land use than the main river region of the reservoir. Consequently, embayments are often at greater risk of water quality impairments (e.g. nutrient enrichment, filling and siltation, excessive growths of aquatic plants, algal blooms, low dissolved oxygen concentrations, bacteriological contamination, etc.). Much of the secondary beneficial use of reservoirs occurs in embayments (viz. marinas, recreation areas, parks and beaches, residential development, etc.). Typically embayments comprise less than 20 percent of the surface area of a reservoir, but they often receive 50 percent or more of the water-oriented recreational use of the reservoir. This intensive recreational use creates a potential for adverse use impacts if poor water quality and aquatic conditions exist in an embayment.

  8. Efficiency bounds for nonequilibrium heat engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehta, Pankaj; Polkovnikov, Anatoli

    2013-05-15

    We analyze the efficiency of thermal engines (either quantum or classical) working with a single heat reservoir like an atmosphere. The engine first gets an energy intake, which can be done in an arbitrary nonequilibrium way e.g. combustion of fuel. Then the engine performs the work and returns to the initial state. We distinguish two general classes of engines where the working body first equilibrates within itself and then performs the work (ergodic engine) or when it performs the work before equilibrating (non-ergodic engine). We show that in both cases the second law of thermodynamics limits their efficiency. For ergodic engines we find a rigorous upper bound for the efficiency, which is strictly smaller than the equivalent Carnot efficiency. I.e. the Carnot efficiency can be never achieved in single reservoir heat engines. For non-ergodic engines the efficiency can be higher and can exceed the equilibrium Carnot bound. By extending the fundamental thermodynamic relation to nonequilibrium processes, we find a rigorous thermodynamic bound for the efficiency of both ergodic and non-ergodic engines and show that it is given by the relative entropy of the nonequilibrium and initial equilibrium distributions. These results suggest a new general strategy for designing more efficient engines. We illustrate our ideas by using simple examples. -- Highlights: ? Derived efficiency bounds for heat engines working with a single reservoir. ? Analyzed both ergodic and non-ergodic engines. ? Showed that non-ergodic engines can be more efficient. ? Extended fundamental thermodynamic relation to arbitrary nonequilibrium processes.

  9. Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelkar, M.

    1992-09-01

    This annual report describes the progress during the second year of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description and scale-up procedures; (ii) outcrop investigation; (iii) in-fill drilling potential. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be characterized, can be described in three dimensions, and can be scaled up with respect to its properties, appropriate for simulation purposes. The second section describes the progress on investigation of an outcrop. The outcrop is an analog of Bartlesville Sandstone. We have drilled ten wells behind the outcrop and collected extensive log and core data. The cores have been slabbed, photographed and the several plugs have been taken. In addition, minipermeameter is used to measure permeabilities on the core surface at six inch intervals. The plugs have been analyzed for the permeability and porosity values. The variations in property values will be tied to the geological descriptions as well as the subsurface data collected from the Glen Pool field. The third section discusses the application of geostatistical techniques to infer in-fill well locations. The geostatistical technique used is the simulated annealing technique because of its flexibility. One of the important reservoir data is the production data. Use of production data will allow us to define the reservoir continuities, which may in turn, determine the in-fill well locations. The proposed technique allows us to incorporate some of the production data as constraints in the reservoir descriptions. The technique has been validated by comparing the results with numerical simulations.

  10. Geo-Engineering through Internet Informatics (GEMINI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watney, W. Lynn; Doveton, John H.; Victorine, John R.; Bohling, Goeffrey C.; Bhattacharya, Saibal; Byers, Alan P.; Carr, Timothy R.; Dubois, Martin K.; Gagnon, Glen; Guy, Willard J.; Look, Kurt; Magnuson, Mike; Moore, Melissa; Olea, Ricardo; Pakalapadi, Jayprakash; Stalder, Ken; Collins, David R.

    2002-06-25

    GEMINI will resolve reservoir parameters that control well performance; characterize subtle reservoir properties important in understanding and modeling hydrocarbon pore volume and fluid flow; expedite recognition of bypassed, subtle, and complex oil and gas reservoirs at regional and local scale; differentiate commingled reservoirs; build integrated geologic and engineering model based on real-time, iterate solutions to evaluate reservoir management options for improved recovery; provide practical tools to assist the geoscientist, engineer, and petroleum operator in making their tasks more efficient and effective; enable evaluations to be made at different scales, ranging from individual well, through lease, field, to play and region (scalable information infrastructure); and provide training and technology transfer to evaluate capabilities of the client.

  11. Stanford Precourt Institute for Energy Joins U.S. Department of Energy and MIT Energy Initiative Program to Advance Women’s Leadership in Clean Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has announced that the Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford University is joining the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Energy Initiative (MITEI) to...

  12. DOE Subsurface Technology and Engineering RD&D (SubTER) Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the environment (water and air resources, induced ... remotely within the deep subsurface reservoirs Requires fundamental through engineering RD&D 'Adaptive Control of ...

  13. Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    Infill drilling if wells on a uniform spacing without regard to reservoir performance and characterization foes not optimize reservoir development because it fails to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, and carbonate reservoirs in particular. New and emerging technologies, such as geostatistical modeling, rigorous decline curve analysis, reservoir rock typing, and special core analysis can be used to develop a 3-D simulation model for prediction of infill locations.

  14. REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olson; Deanna Combs; Dhiraj Dembla

    2004-06-01

    The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plan that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data were to be generated during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The demonstration phase has been delayed by Goldrus because of funding problems. Since the first of the year, Goldrus has been active in searching for partners to help finance the project. To this end it has commissioned several small consulting studies to technically support its effort to secure a partner. After financial support is obtained, the demonstration phase of the project will proceed. Since just after the beginning of the year, BEG has curtailed project activities and spending of DOE funds except for the continued support of one engineering student. This student has now completed his work and has written a thesis describing his research (titled ''Stimulating enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in west Texas light oil reservoir''). We plan to recommence our work on the project as soon as the operator obtains necessary funding to carry out the demonstration phase of the project. In order to complete all activities specified in the proposal, it will be necessary to request an extension of the project from the originally defined completion date. We are confident that Goldrus will obtain the necessary funding to continue and that we can complete the project if an extension is granted. We strongly believe that the results of this study will provide the impetus for a new approach to enhanced oil recovery in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the United States.

  15. HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olsen; Deanna Combs; Dhiraj Dembla; Leonel Gomez

    2003-12-10

    The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plan that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data are being gathered during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The results of the demonstration will being closely monitored to provide a basis for improving the design of the HPAI field deployment plan. The results of the reservoir characterization field demonstration and monitoring program will be documented and widely disseminated to facilitate adoption of this technology by oil operators in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the U.S.

  16. Reservoir characterization based on tracer response and rank analysis of production and injection rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Refunjol, B.T.; Lake, L.W.

    1997-08-01

    Quantification of the spatial distribution of properties is important for many reservoir-engineering applications. But, before applying any reservoir-characterization technique, the type of problem to be tackled and the information available should be analyzed. This is important because difficulties arise in reservoirs where production records are the only information for analysis. This paper presents the results of a practical technique to determine preferential flow trends in a reservoir. The technique is a combination of reservoir geology, tracer data, and Spearman rank correlation coefficient analysis. The Spearman analysis, in particular, will prove to be important because it appears to be insightful and uses injection/production data that are prevalent in circumstances where other data are nonexistent. The technique is applied to the North Buck Draw field, Campbell County, Wyoming. This work provides guidelines to assess information about reservoir continuity in interwell regions from widely available measurements of production and injection rates at existing wells. The information gained from the application of this technique can contribute to both the daily reservoir management and the future design, control, and interpretation of subsequent projects in the reservoir, without the need for additional data.

  17. Reversible CO-binding to the Active Site of Nitrogenase | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Reversible CO-binding to the Active Site of Nitrogenase Tuesday, March 31, 2015 All living organisms depend on the availability of nitrogen for incorporation into the basic biological building blocks such as amino acids and DNA. Globally the largest reservoir for nitrogen is the atmosphere, with an N2 content of roughly 78%. However, as a highly unreactive gas, most organisms are unable to directly utilize dinitrogen due to the severe energy barrier required

  18. Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy Monday, May 14, 2012 - 3:30pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Drew Pomerantz, Schlumberger Unconventional hydrocarbon resources such as gas shale and oil-bearing shale have emerged recently as economically viable sources of energy, dramatically altering America's energy landscape. Despite their importance, the basic chemistry and physics of shales are not understood as well as conventional reservoirs.

  19. INTEGRATED MODELING AND FIELD STUDY OF POTENTIAL MECHANISMS FOR...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... 2 km by 2 km block in the horizontal plane and 5.5 km deep. ... on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, ... results of after 1 year of water injection at Aidlin 11: ...

  20. Geo-Engineering through Internet Informatics (GEMINI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doveton, John H.; Watney, W. Lynn

    2003-03-06

    The program, for development and methodologies, was a 3-year interdisciplinary effort to develop an interactive, integrated Internet Website named GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through Internet Informatics) that would build real-time geo-engineering reservoir models for the Internet using the latest technology in Web applications.

  1. Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne D. Pennington

    2002-09-29

    The project, "Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Characterization," is now complete. Our original proposed scope of work included detailed analysis of seismic and other data from two to three hydrocarbon fields; we have analyzed data from four fields at this level of detail, two additional fields with less detail, and one other 2D seismic line used for experimentation. We also included time-lapse seismic data with ocean-bottom cable recordings in addition to the originally proposed static field data. A large number of publications and presentations have resulted from this work, inlcuding several that are in final stages of preparation or printing; one of these is a chapter on "Reservoir Geophysics" for the new Petroleum Engineering Handbook from the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Major results from this project include a new approach to evaluating seismic attributes in time-lapse monitoring studies, evaluation of pitfalls in the use of point-based measurements and facies classifications, novel applications of inversion results, improved methods of tying seismic data to the wellbore, and a comparison of methods used to detect pressure compartments. Some of the data sets used are in the public domain, allowing other investigators to test our techniques or to improve upon them using the same data. From the public-domain Stratton data set we have demonstrated that an apparent correlation between attributes derived along 'phantom' horizons are artifacts of isopach changes; only if the interpreter understands that the interpretation is based on this correlation with bed thickening or thinning, can reliable interpretations of channel horizons and facies be made. From the public-domain Boonsville data set we developed techniques to use conventional seismic attributes, including seismic facies generated under various neural network procedures, to subdivide regional facies determined from logs into productive and non-productive subfacies, and we developed a method involving cross-correlation of seismic waveforms to provide a reliable map of the various facies present in the area. The Wamsutter data set led to the use of unconventional attributes including lateral incoherence and horizon-dependent impedance variations to indicate regions of former sand bars and current high pressure, respectively, and to evaluation of various upscaling routines. The Teal South data set has provided a surprising set of results, leading us to develop a pressure-dependent velocity relationship and to conclude that nearby reservoirs are undergoing a pressure drop in response to the production of the main reservoir, implying that oil is being lost through their spill points, never to be produced. Additional results were found using the public-domain Waha and Woresham-Bayer data set, and some tests of technologies were made using 2D seismic lines from Michigan and the western Pacific ocean.

  2. CALIBRATION OF SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne D. Pennington; Horacio Acevedo; Aaron Green; Joshua Haataja; Shawn Len; Anastasia Minaeva; Deyi Xie

    2002-10-01

    The project, ''Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Calibration,'' is now complete. Our original proposed scope of work included detailed analysis of seismic and other data from two to three hydrocarbon fields; we have analyzed data from four fields at this level of detail, two additional fields with less detail, and one other 2D seismic line used for experimentation. We also included time-lapse seismic data with ocean-bottom cable recordings in addition to the originally proposed static field data. A large number of publications and presentations have resulted from this work, including several that are in final stages of preparation or printing; one of these is a chapter on ''Reservoir Geophysics'' for the new Petroleum Engineering Handbook from the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Major results from this project include a new approach to evaluating seismic attributes in time-lapse monitoring studies, evaluation of pitfalls in the use of point-based measurements and facies classifications, novel applications of inversion results, improved methods of tying seismic data to the wellbore, and a comparison of methods used to detect pressure compartments. Some of the data sets used are in the public domain, allowing other investigators to test our techniques or to improve upon them using the same data. From the public-domain Stratton data set we have demonstrated that an apparent correlation between attributes derived along ''phantom'' horizons are artifacts of isopach changes; only if the interpreter understands that the interpretation is based on this correlation with bed thickening or thinning, can reliable interpretations of channel horizons and facies be made. From the public-domain Boonsville data set we developed techniques to use conventional seismic attributes, including seismic facies generated under various neural network procedures, to subdivide regional facies determined from logs into productive and non-productive subfacies, and we developed a method involving cross-correlation of seismic waveforms to provide a reliable map of the various facies present in the area. The Wamsutter data set led to the use of unconventional attributes including lateral incoherence and horizon-dependent impedance variations to indicate regions of former sand bars and current high pressure, respectively, and to evaluation of various upscaling routines. The Teal South data set has provided a surprising set of results, leading us to develop a pressure-dependent velocity relationship and to conclude that nearby reservoirs are undergoing a pressure drop in response to the production of the main reservoir, implying that oil is being lost through their spill points, never to be produced. Additional results were found using the public-domain Waha and Woresham-Bayer data set, and some tests of technologies were made using 2D seismic lines from Michigan and the western Pacific ocean.

  3. Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nguyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

    2001-08-07

    This project was intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs, transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

  4. THMC Modeling of EGS Reservoirs -- Continuum through Discontinuum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Capturing Reservoir Stimulation, Evolution and Induced Seismicity Citation Details ... Capturing Reservoir Stimulation, Evolution and Induced Seismicity This work has ...

  5. THMC Modeling of EGS Reservoirs … Continuum through Discontinuum...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evolution and Induced Seismicity THMC Modeling of EGS Reservoirs Continuum through Discontinuum Representations: Capturing Reservoir Stimulation, Evolution and ...

  6. Sunset Reservoir Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reservoir Solar Power Plant Facility Sunset Reservoir Sector Solar Facility Type Photovoltaic Developer Recurrent Energy Location San Francisco, California Coordinates...

  7. 4. International reservoir characterization technical conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the Fourth International Reservoir Characterization Technical Conference held March 2-4, 1997 in Houston, Texas. The theme for the conference was Advances in Reservoir Characterization for Effective Reservoir Management. On March 2, 1997, the DOE Class Workshop kicked off with tutorials by Dr. Steve Begg (BP Exploration) and Dr. Ganesh Thakur (Chevron). Tutorial presentations are not included in these Proceedings but may be available from the authors. The conference consisted of the following topics: data acquisition; reservoir modeling; scaling reservoir properties; and managing uncertainty. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

  8. The role of reservoir characterization in the reservoir management process (as reflected in the Department of Energy`s reservoir management demonstration program)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, M.L.; Young, M.A.; Madden, M.P.

    1997-08-01

    Optimum reservoir recovery and profitability result from guidance of reservoir practices provided by an effective reservoir management plan. Success in developing the best, most appropriate reservoir management plan requires knowledge and consideration of (1) the reservoir system including rocks, and rock-fluid interactions (i.e., a characterization of the reservoir) as well as wellbores and associated equipment and surface facilities; (2) the technologies available to describe, analyze, and exploit the reservoir; and (3) the business environment under which the plan will be developed and implemented. Reservoir characterization is the essential to gain needed knowledge of the reservoir for reservoir management plan building. Reservoir characterization efforts can be appropriately scaled by considering the reservoir management context under which the plan is being built. Reservoir management plans de-optimize with time as technology and the business environment change or as new reservoir information indicates the reservoir characterization models on which the current plan is based are inadequate. BDM-Oklahoma and the Department of Energy have implemented a program of reservoir management demonstrations to encourage operators with limited resources and experience to learn, implement, and disperse sound reservoir management techniques through cooperative research and development projects whose objectives are to develop reservoir management plans. In each of the three projects currently underway, careful attention to reservoir management context assures a reservoir characterization approach that is sufficient, but not in excess of what is necessary, to devise and implement an effective reservoir management plan.

  9. Modeling dolomitized carbonate-ramp reservoirs: A case study of the Seminole San Andres unit. Part 2 -- Seismic modeling, reservoir geostatistics, and reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, F.P.; Dai, J.; Kerans, C.

    1998-11-01

    In part 1 of this paper, the authors discussed the rock-fabric/petrophysical classes for dolomitized carbonate-ramp rocks, the effects of rock fabric and pore type on petrophysical properties, petrophysical models for analyzing wireline logs, the critical scales for defining geologic framework, and 3-D geologic modeling. Part 2 focuses on geophysical and engineering characterizations, including seismic modeling, reservoir geostatistics, stochastic modeling, and reservoir simulation. Synthetic seismograms of 30 to 200 Hz were generated to study the level of seismic resolution required to capture the high-frequency geologic features in dolomitized carbonate-ramp reservoirs. Outcrop data were collected to investigate effects of sampling interval and scale-up of block size on geostatistical parameters. Semivariogram analysis of outcrop data showed that the sill of log permeability decreases and the correlation length increases with an increase of horizontal block size. Permeability models were generated using conventional linear interpolation, stochastic realizations without stratigraphic constraints, and stochastic realizations with stratigraphic constraints. Simulations of a fine-scale Lawyer Canyon outcrop model were used to study the factors affecting waterflooding performance. Simulation results show that waterflooding performance depends strongly on the geometry and stacking pattern of the rock-fabric units and on the location of production and injection wells.

  10. Fast Track Reservoir Modeling of Shale Formations in the Appalachian Basin. Application to Lower Huron Shale in Eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grujic, Ognjen; Mohaghegh, Shahab; Bromhal, Grant

    2010-07-01

    In this paper a fast track reservoir modeling and analysis of the Lower Huron Shale in Eastern Kentucky is presented. Unlike conventional reservoir simulation and modeling which is a bottom up approach (geo-cellular model to history matching) this new approach starts by attempting to build a reservoir realization from well production history (Top to Bottom), augmented by core, well-log, well-test and seismic data in order to increase accuracy. This approach requires creation of a large spatial-temporal database that is efficiently handled with state of the art Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining techniques (AI & DM), and therefore it represents an elegant integration of reservoir engineering techniques with Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining. Advantages of this new technique are a) ease of development, b) limited data requirement (as compared to reservoir simulation), and c) speed of analysis. All of the 77 wells used in this study are completed in the Lower Huron Shale and are a part of the Big Sandy Gas field in Eastern Kentucky. Most of the wells have production profiles for more than twenty years. Porosity and thickness data was acquired from the available well logs, while permeability, natural fracture network properties, and fracture aperture data was acquired through a single well history matching process that uses the FRACGEN/NFFLOW simulator package. This technology, known as Top-Down Intelligent Reservoir Modeling, starts with performing conventional reservoir engineering analysis on individual wells such as decline curve analysis and volumetric reserves estimation. Statistical techniques along with information generated from the reservoir engineering analysis contribute to an extensive spatio-temporal database of reservoir behavior. The database is used to develop a cohesive model of the field using fuzzy pattern recognition or similar techniques. The reservoir model is calibrated (history matched) with production history from the most recently drilled wells. The calibrated model is then further used for field development strategies to improve and enhance gas recovery.

  11. Increasing waterflood reserves in the Wilmington oil field through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. [Quarterly report], October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, D.; Clarke, D.; Walker, S.; Phillips, C.; Nguyen, J.; Moos, D.; Tagbor, K.

    1996-01-23

    The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with a pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to convert shear wave velocity measured through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius and ultra-short radius lateral recompletions as well as other techniques. Technical progress is reported for the following tasks; reservoir characterization, reservoir engineering; deterministic (3-D) geologic modeling; pulsed acoustic logging; and technology transfer.

  12. Characterization of oil and gas reservoirs and recovery technology deployment on Texas State Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.; Major, R.P.; Holtz, M.H.

    1997-08-01

    Texas State Lands oil and gas resources are estimated at 1.6 BSTB of remaining mobile oil, 2.1 BSTB, or residual oil, and nearly 10 Tcf of remaining gas. An integrated, detailed geologic and engineering characterization of Texas State Lands has created quantitative descriptions of the oil and gas reservoirs, resulting in delineation of untapped, bypassed compartments and zones of remaining oil and gas. On Texas State Lands, the knowledge gained from such interpretative, quantitative reservoir descriptions has been the basis for designing optimized recovery strategies, including well deepening, recompletions, workovers, targeted infill drilling, injection profile modification, and waterflood optimization. The State of Texas Advanced Resource Recovery program is currently evaluating oil and gas fields along the Gulf Coast (South Copano Bay and Umbrella Point fields) and in the Permian Basin (Keystone East, Ozona, Geraldine Ford and Ford West fields). The program is grounded in advanced reservoir characterization techniques that define the residence of unrecovered oil and gas remaining in select State Land reservoirs. Integral to the program is collaboration with operators in order to deploy advanced reservoir exploitation and management plans. These plans are made on the basis of a thorough understanding of internal reservoir architecture and its controls on remaining oil and gas distribution. Continued accurate, detailed Texas State Lands reservoir description and characterization will ensure deployment of the most current and economically viable recovery technologies and strategies available.

  13. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan Kelkar

    2003-10-01

    This report presents the work done so far on Hunton Formation in West Carney Field in Lincoln County, Oklahoma. West Carney Field produces oil and gas from the Hunton Formation. The field was developed starting in 1995. Some of the unique characteristics of the field include decreasing water oil ratio over time, decreasing gas-oil ratio at the beginning of production, inability to calculate oil reserves in the field based on log data, and sustained oil rates over long periods of time. To understand the unique characteristics of the field, an integrated evaluation was undertaken. Production data from the field were meticulously collected, and over forty wells were cored and logged to better understand the petrophysical and engineering characteristics. Based on the work done in this budget period so far, some of the preliminary conclusions can be listed as follows: (1) Based on PVT analysis, the field most likely contains volatile oil with bubble point close to initial reservoir pressure of 1,900 psia. (2) The initial oil in place, which is contact with existing wells, can be determined by newly developed material balance technique. The oil in place, which is in communication, is significantly less than determined by volumetric analysis, indicating heterogeneous nature of the reservoir. The oil in place, determined by material balance, is greater than determined by decline curve analysis. This difference may lead to additional locations for in fill wells. (3) The core and log evaluation indicates that the intermediate pores (porosity between 2 and 6 %) are very important in determining production potential of the reservoir. These intermediate size pores contain high oil saturation. (4) The limestone part of the reservoir, although low in porosity (mostly less than 6 %) is much more prolific in terms of oil production than the dolomite portion of the reservoir. The reason for this difference is the higher oil saturation in low porosity region. As the average porosity increases, the remaining oil saturation decreases. This is evident from log and core analysis. (5) Using a compositional simulator, we are able to reproduce the important reservoir characteristics by assuming a two layer model. One layer is high permeability region containing water and the other layer is low permeability region containing mostly oil. The results are further verified by using a dual porosity model. Assuming that most of the volatile oil is contained in the matrix and the water is contained in the fractures, we are able to reproduce important reservoir performance characteristics. (6) Evaluation of secondary mechanisms indicates that CO{sub 2} flooding is potentially a viable option if CO{sub 2} is available at reasonable price. We have conducted detailed simulation studies to verify the effectiveness of CO{sub 2} huff-n-puff process. We are in the process of conducting additional lab tests to verify the efficacy of the same displacement. (7) Another possibility of improving the oil recovery is to inject surfactants to change the near well bore wettability of the rock from oil wet to water wet. By changing the wettability, we may be able to retard the water flow and hence improve the oil recovery as a percentage of total fluid produced. If surfactant is reasonably priced, other possibility is also to use huff-n-puff process using surfactants. Laboratory experiments are promising, and additional investigation continues. (8) Preliminary economic evaluation indicates that vertical wells outperform horizontal wells. Future work in the project would include: (1) Build multi-well numerical model to reproduce overall reservoir performance rather than individual well performance. Special emphasis will be placed on hydrodynamic connectivity between wells. (2) Collect data from adjacent Hunton reservoirs to validate our understanding of what makes it a productive reservoir. (3) Develop statistical methods to rank various reservoirs in Hunton formation. This will allow us to evaluate other Hunton formations based on old well logs, and determine, apriori, if

  14. Low-to-moderate-temperature hydrothermal reservoir engineering handbook. [Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    This volume contains the following appendices: units and conversions, glossary of terms, instrumentation, fabrication of instruments, VARFLOW program user's guide, and reference bibliography.

  15. Proceedings of the eighth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Forty-seven papers are included. Nine were abstracted for EDB previously. Separate abstracts were prepared for thirty-eight. (MHR)

  16. Predicting Stimulation Response Relationships For Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Using existing LLNL computer programs, develop realistic models of EGS stimulation-response scenarios involving hydraulic and explosive propagation of tensile/shear fracture systems in hard rock formations where a pre-existing fracture network may be present along with regional stress and temperature distributions. Evaluate resulting heat transfer improvement of enhanced target formations using LLNL NUFT subsurface flow and transport program.

  17. Proceedings of the seventh workshop on geothermal-reservoir engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, P.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Donaldson, I.G.; Gudmundsson, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-three papers are included. Two were abstracted for EDB previously. Separate abstracts were prepared for thirty-one.

  18. Hot Dry Rock Reservoir Engineering | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hugh D. Murphy Published Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM, 1987 Report Number LA-UR-87-3388 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet...

  19. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  20. Final Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1107, analyzing the environmental effects relating to the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national facility operated by Stanford University, California, under contract with DOE. The center is dedicated to research in elementary particle physics and in those fields that make use of its synchrotron facilities. The objective for the construction and operation of an office building is to provide adequate office space for existing SLAC Waste Management (WM) personnel, so as to centralize WM personnel and to make WM operations more efficient and effective. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  1. Lead, Uranium, and Nickel Compound Data from the XAFS Library at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) library at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is intended to be a reference library of XAFS spectra for various lead, uranium, and nickel compounds. Compounds are organized by central atom and all spectra are transmission data. Molecular Environmental Science (MES) research at SSRL focuses on the fundamental interfacial, molecular- and nano-scale processes that control contaminant and nutrient cycling in the biosphere with the goal of elucidating global elemental cycles and anthropogenic influences on the environment. Key areas of investigation include the: (a) Structural chemistry of water and dissolved solutes, (b) Structural chemistry and reactivity of complex natural environmental materials with respect to heavy metals and metalloids (biominerals, Fe- and Mn-oxides, biofilms, and organic materials), (c) Reactions at environmental interfaces, including sorption, precipitation and dissolution processes that affect the bioavailability of heavy metals and other contaminants, and (d) Microbial transformations of metals and anions. SSRL-based MES research utilizes synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), x-ray standing wave (XSW) spectroscopy, and photoemission spectroscopy (PES) because of their unique capabilities to probe structure/composition relationships in complex, non-crystalline, and dilute materials. [copied from http://www-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/mes/index.html

  2. Skimming' a reservoir for trash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shenman, L.E. )

    1993-02-01

    Several hydropower facilities are using a new technology for removing floating trash in reservoirs. Representatives from the facilities say the boat, called a trashskimmer, is efficient, easy to maneuver, and transportable. Designed by United Marine International, Inc., the pontoon boat features an operators cab that straddles an open hull between the skis of the pontoon, and uses dual propellers to maneuver through the water. The Marineskimmer allows the operator to approach the trash from the water side upstream of the plant. The Tennessee Valley Authority has used the boat since 1990.

  3. Revitalizing a mature oil play: Strategies for finding and producing unrecovered oil in Frio Fluvial-Deltaic reservoirs of South Texas. Technical progress report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, N.; Dutton, S.

    1994-06-30

    Advanced reservoir characterization techniques are being applied to selected reservoirs in the Frio Fluvial-Deltaic Sandstone (Vicksburg Fault Zone) trend of South Texas in order to maximize the economic producibility of resources in this mature oil play. More than half of the reservoirs in this depositionally complex play have already been abandoned, and large volumes of oil may remain unproduced unless advanced characterization techniques are applied to define untapped, incompletely drained, and new pool reservoirs as suitable targets for near-term recovery methods. This project is developing interwell-scale geological facies models and assessing engineering attributes of Frio fluvial-deltaic reservoirs in selected fields in order to characterize reservoir architecture, flow unit boundaries, and the controls that these characteristics exert on the location and volume of unrecovered mobile and residual oil. The results of these studies will lead directly to the identification of specific opportunities to exploit these heterogeneous reservoirs for incremental recovery by recompletion and strategic infill drilling. Work during the second project quarter of 1994 focused on continuation of Phase 2 tasks associated with characterizing stratigraphic heterogeneity in selected Frio fluvial-deltaic sandstone reservoirs. Playwide reservoir assessment continued as reservoir engineering data from fields throughout the Frio Fluvial-Deltaic Sandstone trend were grouped within stratigraphic sub-intervals in order to characterize general reservoir heterogeneity, evaluate production behavior, and assess remaining resource potential in middle Frio, lower Frio, and upper Vicksburg reservoir sandstones.

  4. Full Reviews: Reservoir Characterization | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Reservoir Characterization. Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geothermal Reservoirs Ahmad Ghassmi, Texas A&M University Project Presentation | Peer Reviewer Comments Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a Geothermal Reservoir André Revil, Colorado School of Mines Project Presentation | Peer Reviewer Comments Detection and Characterization of Natural and Induced Fractures for the Development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems M. Nafi Toksoz, Massachusetts

  5. 201202 Reservoir System Modeling Technologies Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling Applied To The Columbia River - PSR Adjoint Modeling Framework for Real-Time Control of Water - Deltares Reservoir Operations Analysis in the Willamette Water 2100...

  6. Precise Gravimetry and Geothermal Reservoir Management | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Precise Gravimetry and Geothermal Reservoir Management Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Precise Gravimetry and Geothermal...

  7. Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geomechanics-Based Stochastic Analysis of Injection-Induced Seismicity Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics-Based Stochastic Analysis of ...

  8. Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation Using Geomechanics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation Using Geomechanics-based Stochastic Analysis of Injection-induced Seismicity; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report ...

  9. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Donald W.

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  10. Hydrothermal Convection Systems with Reservoir Temperatures greater...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Systems with Reservoir Temperatures greater than or equal to 90 degrees C Authors Brook, Mariner, Mabey, Swanson, Guffanti and Muffler Published Journal Assessment of...

  11. Geothermometry At Blackfoot Reservoir Area (Hutsinpiller & Parry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Blackfoot Reservoir Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Amy Hutsinpiller, W. T....

  12. Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  13. Characterization of Fractures in Geothermal Reservoirs Using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract The optimal design of production in fractured geothermal reservoirs requires knowledge of the resource's connectivity, therefore making fracture characterization highly...

  14. Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  15. International reservoir operations agreement helps NW fish &...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or 503-230-5131 International reservoir operations agreement helps Northwest fish and power Portland, Ore. - The Bonneville Power Administration and the British Columbia...

  16. Geothermal reservoirs in hydrothermal convection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Geothermal reservoirs commonly exist in hydrothermal convection systems involving fluid circulation downward in areas of recharge and upwards in areas of discharge. Because such reservoirs are not isolated from their surroundings, the nature of thermal and hydrologic connections with the rest of the system may have significant effects on the natural state of the reservoir and on its response to development. Conditions observed at numerous developed and undeveloped geothermal fields are discussed with respect to a basic model of the discharge portion of an active hydrothermal convection system. Effects of reservoir development on surficial discharge of thermal fluid are also delineated.

  17. Power control system for a hot gas engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berntell, John O.

    1986-01-01

    A power control system for a hot gas engine of the type in which the power output is controlled by varying the mean pressure of the working gas charge in the engine has according to the present invention been provided with two working gas reservoirs at substantially different pressure levels. At working gas pressures below the lower of said levels the high pressure gas reservoir is cut out from the control system, and at higher pressures the low pressure gas reservoir is cut out from the system, thereby enabling a single one-stage compressor to handle gas within a wide pressure range at a low compression ratio.

  18. Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, Don; Koerner, Roy; Moos, Dan; Nguyen, John; Phillips, Chris; Tagbor, Kwasi; Walker, Scott

    1999-11-09

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period July - September 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the ''Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist''. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology.

  19. Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott

    1999-11-09

    The objectives of this quarterly report was to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period April - June 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the ''Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist''. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology.

  20. Process and apparatus for reducing the loss of hydrogen from Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alger, D.L.

    1987-03-24

    A Stirling engine assembly is described which defines a working gas volume therein, the Stirling engine assembly comprising: a working gas reservoir for storing a working gas at a pressure greater than pressure of the working gas in the working volume of the Stirling engine; a trap cell operatively connected between an outlet of the reservoir and the Stirling engine working volume. The trap cell includes an enclosure having porous windows at either end thereof and a sorbent with an affinity for water vapor therein, such that water vapor adsorbed on the sorbent diffuses into the hydrogen passing from the reservoir into the working engine; a compressor means for drawing working gas from the Stirling engine working volume, through the trap cell and pumping the working gas into the hydrogen reservoir. The sorbent in the trap cell at the reduced pressure caused by the compressor adsorbs water vapor from the working gas such that substantially dry working gas is pumped by the compressor into the reservoir. The working gas is doped with water vapor by the tank cell as it passes into the Stirling engine and is dried by the trap cell as it is removed from the working engine for storage in the reservoir to prevent condensation of water vapor in the reservoir.

  1. Measurement of Lake Roosevelt Biota in Relation to Reservoir Operations; 1992 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, Janelle R.; McDowell, Amy C.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this research project is to collect data to model resident fish requirements for Lake Roosevelt as part of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Bureau of Reclamation (BoR), and U.S. Army Corps of Engineer`s (ACE) System Operation Review. The System Operation Review (SOR) is a tri-agency team functioning to review the use and partitioning of Columbia Basin waters. User groups of the Columbia have been defined as power, irrigation, flood control, anadromous fish, resident fish, wildlife, recreation, water quality, navigation, and cultural resources. Once completed the model will predict biological responses to different reservoir operation strategies. The model being developed for resident fish is based on Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks model for resident fish requirements within Hungry Horse and Libby Reservoirs. While the Montana model predicts fish growth based on the impacts of reservoir operation and flow conditions on primary and secondary production levels, the Lake Roosevelt model will also factor in the affects of water retention time on zooplankton production levels and fish entrainment. Major components of the Lake Roosevelt model include: (1) quantification of impacts to zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; (2) quantification of number, distribution, and use of fish food organisms in the reservoir by season; (3) determination of seasonal growth of fish species as related to reservoir operations, prey abundance and utilization; and (4) quantification of entrainment levels of fish as related to reservoir operations and water retention times. This report contains the results of the resident fish system operation review program for Lake Roosevelt from January through December 1992.

  2. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated reservoirs of Kansas--near-term. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1996-11-01

    Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep efficiency and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of injection wells due to solids in the injection water. In many instances the lack of reservoir management results from (1) poor data collection and organization, (2) little or no integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, (3) the presence of multiple operators within the field, and (4) not identifying optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. This field was in the latter stage of primary production at the beginning of this project and is currently being waterflooded as a result of this project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these type of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis. Results of these two field projects are discussed.

  3. Improved Oil Recovery In Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Don W.; McCune, D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite, G. Paul

    1999-01-14

    Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep efficiency and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of injection wells due to solids in the injection water. In many instances the lack of reservoir management results from (1) poor data collection and organization, (2) little or no integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, (3) the presence of multiple operators within the field, and (4) not identifying optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. This field was in the latter stage of primary production at the beginning of this project and is currently being waterflooded as a result of this project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these types of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management, and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis.

  4. Approaches to identifying reservoir heterogeneity and reserve growth opportunities from subsurface data: The Oficina Formation, Budare field, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, D.S.; Raeuchle, S.K.; Holtz, M.H.

    1997-08-01

    We applied an integrated geologic, geophysical, and engineering approach devised to identify heterogeneities in the subsurface that might lead to reserve growth opportunities in our analysis of the Oficina Formation at Budare field, Venezuela. The approach involves 4 key steps: (1) Determine geologic reservoir architecture; (2) Investigate trends in reservoir fluid flow; (3) Integrate fluid flow trends with reservoir architecture; and (4) Estimate original oil-in-place, residual oil saturation, and remaining mobile oil, to identify opportunities for reserve growth. There are three main oil-producing reservoirs in the Oficina Formation that were deposited in a bed-load fluvial system, an incised valley-fill, and a barrier-strandplain system. Reservoir continuity is complex because, in addition to lateral facies variability, the major Oficina depositional systems were internally subdivided by high-frequency stratigraphic surfaces. These surfaces define times of intermittent lacustrine and marine flooding events that punctuated the fluvial and marginal marine sedimentation, respectively. Syn and post depositional faulting further disrupted reservoir continuity. Trends in fluid flow established from initial fluid levels, response to recompletion workovers, and pressure depletion data demonstrated barriers to lateral and vertical fluid flow caused by a combination of reservoir facies pinchout, flooding shale markers, and the faults. Considerable reserve growth potential exists at Budare field because the reservoir units are highly compartment by the depositional heterogeneity and structural complexity. Numerous reserve growth opportunities were identified in attics updip of existing production, in untapped or incompletely drained compartments, and in field extensions.

  5. Time-resolved Spectroscopy of Laser-heated Copper Foils | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Time-resolved Spectroscopy of Laser-heated Copper Foils Tuesday, July 16, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Kelly Cone, PhD Engineering, Dept. of Applied Science, University of California, Davis The volumetric heating of a thin copper target has been studied with time resolved x-ray spectroscopy. The copper target was heated by a plasma produced using the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Compact Multipulse Terawatt (COMET)

  6. Reservoir geology of Landslide field, southern San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, T.R.; Tucker, R.D.; Singleton, M.T. )

    1991-02-01

    The Landslide field, which is located on the southern margin of the San Joaquin basin, was discovered in 1985 and consists of 13 producers and six injectors. Cumulative production as of mid-1990 was approximately 10 million bbl of oil with an average daily production of 4700 BOPD. Production is from a series of late Miocene turbidite sands (Stevens Sand) that were deposited as a small constructional submarine fan (less than 2 mi in diameter). Based on interpretation of wireline logs and engineering data, deposition of the fan and of individual lobes within the fan was strongly influenced by preexisting paleotopography and small syndepositional slump features. Based on mapping of individual depositional units and stratigraphic dipmeter analysis, transport direction of the sand was to the north-north across these paleotopographic breaks in slope. Dipmeter data and pressure data from individual sands are especially useful for recognition and mapping of individual flow units between well bores. Detailed engineering, geophysical and geological studies have increased our understanding of the dimensions, continuity, geometry, and inherent reservoir properties of the individual flow units within the reservoir. Based on the results of these studies a series of water isolation workovers and extension wells were proposed and successfully undertaken. This work has increased recoverable reserves and arrested the rapid production decline.

  7. Reservoir facies architecture of microtidal barrier systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galloway, W.E.

    1986-06-01

    Sandstone reservoirs deposited in microtidal barrier systems contain large oil and gas reserves in several Gulf Coast basin plays. Three representative Frio Sandstone reservoirs in West Ranch field show that barrier-island sand bodies are complex mosaics of barrier-core, inlet-fill, flood-tidal-delta, washover-fan, barrier-flat, and shoreface facies. The proportions of these facies differ within progradational, aggradational, and transgressive barrier sand bodies. The 41-A reservoir is a progradational barrier sand body. The most important producing facies include the barrier core and crosscutting inlet fill. Permeability and distributions of irreducible water saturation reveal depositional patterns and subdivisions of the sand body into numerous facies-controlled compartments. Both original hydrocarbon saturation and irregularities in water encroachment show that the facies compartments locally affect fluid movement within the reservoir. The Greta reservoir is an aggradational barrier complex. This massive sand body consists of intermixed barrier-core and inlet-fill units. Prominent resistivity compartments are dip oriented, indicating the importance of inlet development during barrier aggradation. Despite the uniform appearance of the Greta reservoir, water encroachment has been irregular. The Glasscock reservoir is characterized by comparatively low permeability and is an atypically thin and discontinuous Frio reservoir. It is interpreted to be a transgressive barrier deposit that consists mainly of large washover-fan and associated barrier-flat sands. Hydrocarbon saturation, drainage, and injection response all reflect the facies geometry typical of a transgressive barrier complex.

  8. Economics of Developing Hot Stratigraphic Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Mines; Hillary Hanson; Rick Allis; Joseph Moore

    2014-09-01

    Stratigraphic geothermal reservoirs at 3 – 4 km depth in high heat-flow basins are capable of sustaining 100 MW-scale power plants at about 10 c/kWh. This paper examines the impacts on the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of reservoir depth and temperature, reservoir productivity, and drillhole/casing options. For a reservoir at 3 km depth with a moderate productivity index by hydrothermal reservoir standards (about 50 L/s/MPa, 5.6 gpm/psi), an LCOE of 10c/kWh requires the reservoir to be at about 200°C. This is the upper temperature limit for pumps. The calculations assume standard hydrothermal drilling costs, with the production interval completed with a 7 inch liner in an 8.5 inch hole. If a reservoir at 4 km depth has excellent permeability characteristics with a productivity index of 100 L/s/MPa (11.3 gpm/psi), then the LCOE is about 11 c/kWh assuming the temperature decline rate with development is not excessive (< 1%/y, with first thermal breakthrough delayed by about 10 years). Completing wells with modest horizontal legs (e.g. several hundred meters) may be important for improving well productivity because of the naturally high, sub-horizontal permeability in this type of reservoir. Reducing the injector/producer well ratio may also be cost-effective if the injectors are drilled as larger holes.

  9. Water resources review: Wheeler Reservoir, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallus, R.; Cox, J.P.

    1990-09-01

    Protection and enhancement of water quality is essential for attaining the full complement of beneficial uses of TVA reservoirs. The responsibility for improving and protecting TVA reservoir water quality is shared by various federal, state, and local agencies, as well as the thousands of corporations and property owners whose individual decisions affect water quality. TVA's role in this shared responsibility includes collecting and evaluating water resources data, disseminating water resources information, and acting as a catalyst to bring together agencies and individuals that have a responsibility or vested interest in correcting problems that have been identified. This report is one in a series of status reports that will be prepared for each of TVA's reservoirs. The purpose of this status report is to provide an up-to-date overview of the characteristics and conditions of Wheeler Reservoir, including: reservoir purposes and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and the watershed; water quality conditions: aquatic biological conditions: designated, actual, and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those uses; ongoing or planned reservoir management activities. Information and data presented here are form the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. 21 refs., 8 figs., 29 tabs.

  10. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

    1997-04-10

    This project is intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

  11. The Potosi Reservoir Model 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adushita, Yasmin; Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    As a part of a larger project co-funded by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon as potential targets for carbon sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins, the Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI) requested Schlumberger to evaluate the potential injectivity and carbon dioxide (CO2) plume size of the Cambrian Potosi Formation. The evaluation of this formation was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from the US DOE-funded Illinois Basin–Decatur Project (IBDP) being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium in Macon County, Illinois. In 2010, technical performance evaluations on the Cambrian Potosi Formation were performed through reservoir modeling. The data included formation tops from mud logs, well logs from the VW1 and the CCS1 wells, structural and stratigraphic formation from three dimensional (3D) seismic data, and field data from several waste water injection wells for Potosi Formation. Intention was for two million tons per annum (MTPA) of CO2 to be injected for 20 years. In the preceding, the 2010 Potosi heterogeneous model (referred to as the "Potosi Dynamic Model 2010" in this topical report) was re-run using a new injection scenario; 3.2 MTPA for 30 years. The extent of the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010, however, appeared too small for the new injection target. It was not sufficiently large enough to accommodate the evolution of the plume. The new model, Potosi Dynamic Model 2013a, was built by extending the Potosi Dynamic Model 2010 grid to 30 miles x 30 miles (48.3km x48.3km), while preserving all property modeling workflows and layering. This model was retained as the base case of Potosi Dynamic Model 2013a. The Potosi reservoir model was updated to take into account the new data from the verification well VW2 which was drilled in 2012. The new porosity and permeability modeling was performed to take into account the log data from the new well. Revisions of the 2010 modeling assumptions were also done on relative permeability, capillary pressures, formation water salinity, and the maximum allowable well bottomhole pressure. Dynamic simulations were run using the injection target of 3.2 MTPA for 30 years. This new dynamic model was named Potosi Dynamic Model 2013b. Due to the major uncertainties on the vugs permeability, two models were built; the Pessimistic and Optimistic Cases. The Optimistic Case assumes vugs permeability of 9,000 mD, which is analog to the vugs permeability identified in the pressure fall off test of a waste water injector in the Tuscola site, approx. 40 miles (64.4km) away from the IBDP area. The Pessimistic Case assumes that the vugs permeability is equal to the log data, which does not take into account the permeability from secondary porosity. The probability of such case is deemed low and could be treated as the worst case scenario, since the contribution of secondary porosity to the permeability is neglected and the loss circulation events might correspond to a much higher permeability. It is considered important, however, to identify the range of possible reservoir performance since there are no rigorous data available for the vugs permeability. The Optimistic Case gives an average CO2 injection rate of 0.8 MTPA and cumulative injection of 26 MT in 30 years, which corresponds to 27% of the injection target. The injection rate is approx. 3.2 MTPA in the first year as the well is injecting into the surrounding vugs, and declines rapidly to 0.8 MTPA in year 4 once the surrounding vugs are full and the CO2 start to reach the matrix. This implies that according to this preliminary model, a minimum of four (4) wells could be required to achieve the injection target. This result is lower than the injectivity estimated in the Potosi Dynamic Model 2013a (43 MT in 30 years), since the permeability model applied in the Potosi Dynamic Model 2013b is more conservative. This revision was deemed necessary to treat the uncertainty in a more appropriate manner. As the CO2 follows the paths where vugs interconnection exists, a reasonably large and irregular plume extent was created. For the Optimistic Case, the plume extends 17 miles (27.4km) in E-W and 14 miles (22.5km) in N-S directions after 30 years. After injection is completed, the plume continues to migrate laterally, mainly driven by the remaining pressure gradient. After 100 years post injection, the plume extends 20 miles (32.2km) in E-W and 15.5 miles (24.9km) in N-S directions. Should the targeted cumulative injection of 96 MT be achieved; a much larger plume extent could be expected. For the Optimistic Case, the increase of reservoir pressure at the end of injection is approximately 1200 psia (8,274 kPa) around the injector and gradually decreases away from the well. The reservoir pressure increase is less than 30 psia (206.8 kPa) beyond 14 miles (22.5km) away from injector. Should the targeted cumulative injection of 96 MT be achieved; a much larger areal pressure increase could be expected. The initial reservoir pressure is nearly restored after approximately 100 years post injection. The presence of matrix slows down the pressure dissipations. The Pessimistic Case gives an average CO2 injection rate of 0.2 MTPA and cumulative injection of 7 MT in 30 years, which corresponds to 7% of the injection target. This implies that in the worst case scenario, a minimum of sixteen (16) wells could be required to achieve the injection target. The present evaluation is mainly associated with uncertainty on the vugs permeability, distribution, and interconnectivity. The different results indicated by the Optimistic and Pessimistic Cases signify the importance of vugs permeability characterization. Therefore, injection test and pressure interference test among the wells could be considered to evaluate the local vugs permeability, extent, and interconnectivity. Porosity mapping derived from the seismic inversion could also be used in the succeeding task to characterize the lateral porosity distribution within the reservoir. With or without seismic inversion porosity mapping, it is worth exploring whether increased lateral heterogeneity plays a significant role in Potosi injectivity. Investigations on vugular, dolomitic outcrops suggest that there may be significantly greater lateral heterogeneity than what has been modeled here. Facies modeling within the Potosi has yet to be thoroughly addressed. The carbonates during the time of deposition are believed to be regionally extensive. However, it may be worth delineating the reservoir with other regional wells or modern day analogues to understand the extent of the Potosi. More specifically, the model could incorporate lateral changes or trends if deemed necessary to represent facies transition. Data acquisitions to characterize the fracture pressure gradient, the formation water properties, the relative permeability, and the capillary pressure could also be considered in order to allow a more rigorous evaluation of the Potosi storage performance. A simulation using several injectors could also be considered to determine the required number of wells to achieve the injection target while taking into account the pressure interference.

  12. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; McCune, D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite G.P.

    1999-10-29

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. Te Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2.

  13. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Don W.; McCune, A.D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite, G. Paul

    1999-11-03

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. Te Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) Identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2.

  14. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Depleted Reservoir Storage

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Configuration Depleted Reservoir Storage Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Depleted Production Reservoir Underground Natural Gas Storage Well Configuration Depleted Production Reservoir Storage

  15. Property:USGSMeanReservoirTemp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search Property Name USGSMeanReservoirTemp Property Type Temperature Description Mean estimated reservoir temperature at location based on the USGS 2008 Geothermal...

  16. Sustainability of Shear-Induced Permeability for EGS Reservoirs...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sustainability of Shear-Induced Permeability for EGS Reservoirs A Laboratory Study Sustainability of Shear-Induced Permeability for EGS Reservoirs A Laboratory Study ...

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Pantex Sewage Reservoir...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Pantex Sewage Reservoir - TX 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Pantex Sewage Reservoir (TX.03 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site...

  18. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Depleted Reservoir Storage...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Depleted Reservoir Storage Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting ... Depleted Production Reservoir Underground Natural Gas Storage Well Configuration Depleted ...

  19. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Salt Cavern Storage Reservoir...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Source: PB Energy Storage Services Inc.

  20. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Aquifer Storage Reservoir Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting ... Aquifer Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Aquifer Underground ...

  1. Dispersed Fluid Flow in Fractured Reservoirs- an Analysis of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reservoirs- an Analysis of Tracer-Determined Residence Time Distributions Abstract A methodology for analyzing the internal flow characteristics of a fractured geothermal reservoir...

  2. Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir...

  3. Texas--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Texas--State Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  4. IPGT Reservoir Modeling Working Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IPGT Reservoir Modeling Working Group Summary of recommendations and geothermal reservoir benchmarking workshop PDF icon gtp2012peerreviewreservoirmodeling.pdf More Documents & ...

  5. Deep Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in the Eastern Snake River...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Geothermal Reservoir Temperatures in the Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho using Multicomponent Geothermometry Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Deep Geothermal Reservoir ...

  6. Flow and Thermal Behavior of an EGS Reservoir - Geothermal Code...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of an EGS Reservoir - Geothermal Code Comparison Study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Flow and Thermal Behavior of an EGS Reservoir - Geothermal Code Comparison Study ...

  7. Two-dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and wells. (SINDA-3G program) Abstract Computer models describing both the transient reservoir pressure behavior and the time...

  8. Geysers Hi-T Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geysers Hi-T Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geysers Hi-T Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and...

  9. Louisiana--North Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Louisiana--North Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ...

  10. ,"West Virginia Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","West Virginia Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs ... to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs ...

  11. ,"New York Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels)" ,"Click worksheet name or ... Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs ...

  12. ,"Miscellaneous States Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    for" ,"Data 1","Miscellaneous States Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs ... Contents","Data 1: Miscellaneous States Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs ...

  13. ,"North Dakota Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data for" ,"Data 1","North Dakota Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs ... to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs ...

  14. Inversion of multicomponent seismic data and rock-physics intepretation for evaluating lithology, fracture and fluid distribution in heterogeneous anisotropic reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilya Tsvankin; Kenneth L. Larner

    2004-11-17

    Within the framework of this collaborative project with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Stanford University, the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) group developed and implemented a new efficient approach to the inversion and processing of multicomponent, multiazimuth seismic data in anisotropic media. To avoid serious difficulties in the processing of mode-converted (PS) waves, we devised a methodology for transforming recorded PP- and PS-wavefields into the corresponding SS-wave reflection data that can be processed by velocity-analysis algorithms designed for pure (unconverted) modes. It should be emphasized that this procedure does not require knowledge of the velocity model and can be applied to data from arbitrarily anisotropic, heterogeneous media. The azimuthally varying reflection moveouts of the PP-waves and constructed SS-waves are then combined in anisotropic stacking-velocity tomography to estimate the velocity field in the depth domain. As illustrated by the case studies discussed in the report, migration of the multicomponent data with the obtained anisotropic velocity model yields a crisp image of the reservoir that is vastly superior to that produced by conventional methods. The scope of this research essentially amounts to building the foundation of 3D multicomponent, anisotropic seismology. We have also worked with the LLNL and Stanford groups on relating the anisotropic parameters obtained from seismic data to stress, lithology, and fluid distribution using a generalized theoretical treatment of fractured, poroelastic rocks.

  15. Performance testing the Phase 2 HDR reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponden, R.F.; Dreesen, D.S. ); Thomson, J.C. )

    1991-01-01

    The geothermal energy program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is directed toward developing the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) technology as an alternate energy source. Positive results have been obtained in previous circulation tests of HDR reservoirs at the Laboratory's test site in Fenton Hill, New Mexico. There still remains however, the need to demonstrate that adequate geothermal energy can be extracted in an efficient manner to support commercial power production. This year, the Laboratory will begin a circulation test of its Phase 2, reservoir. The objectives of this test are to characterize steady-state power production and long-term reservoir performance. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Intelligent Computing System for Reservoir Analysis and Risk Assessment of Red River Formation, Class Revisit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippel, Mark A.

    2002-09-24

    Integrated software was written that comprised the tool kit for the Intelligent Computing System (ICS). The software tools in ICS are for evaluating reservoir and hydrocarbon potential from various seismic, geologic and engineering data sets. The ICS tools provided a means for logical and consistent reservoir characterization. The tools can be broadly characterized as (1) clustering tools, (2) neural solvers, (3) multiple-linear regression, (4) entrapment-potential calculator and (5) combining tools. A flexible approach can be used with the ICS tools. They can be used separately or in a series to make predictions about a desired reservoir objective. The tools in ICS are primarily designed to correlate relationships between seismic information and data obtained from wells; however, it is possible to work with well data alone.

  17. Welcome to Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SSRL Science in SLAC Today Q&A: Biologist Describes Milestone toward a Universal Flu Vaccine SSRL Upgrades, Adds Equipment for Next Round of Experiments X-ray Microscope Reveals...

  18. STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE The Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the very nature of bacteria and viruses, exposed how genetic mutations may cause diabetes, and mapped the structures of proteins for use in biology and medicine. Opportunities...

  19. About the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The DOE Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical ... to design new materials, in atom by atom detail, that precisely fit society's needs. ...

  20. Chemical Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ARPA-E Basic Energy Sciences Materials Sciences and Engineering Chemical Sciences ... SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Chemical Engineering HomeTag:Chemical ...

  1. General Engineers

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    areas: statics, dynamics, strength of circuits, chemical engineering, refinery engineering, nature and property of materials, optics, heat transfer, soil mechanics, or electronics. ...

  2. Reliability Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This document is approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited Reliability Engineering Reliability Engineering Current practice in reliability is often fragmented, ...

  3. INTELLIGENT COMPUTING SYSTEM FOR RESERVOIR ANALYSIS AND RISK ASSESSMENT OF THE RED RIVER FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark A. Sippel; William C. Carrigan; Kenneth D. Luff; Lyn Canter

    2003-11-12

    Integrated software has been written that comprises the tool kit for the Intelligent Computing System (ICS). The software tools in ICS have been developed for characterization of reservoir properties and evaluation of hydrocarbon potential using a combination of inter-disciplinary data sources such as geophysical, geologic and engineering variables. The ICS tools provide a means for logical and consistent reservoir characterization and oil reserve estimates. The tools can be broadly characterized as (1) clustering tools, (2) neural solvers, (3) multiple-linear regression, (4) entrapment-potential calculator and (5) file utility tools. ICS tools are extremely flexible in their approach and use, and applicable to most geologic settings. The tools are primarily designed to correlate relationships between seismic information and engineering and geologic data obtained from wells, and to convert or translate seismic information into engineering and geologic terms or units. It is also possible to apply ICS in a simple framework that may include reservoir characterization using only engineering, seismic, or geologic data in the analysis. ICS tools were developed and tested using geophysical, geologic and engineering data obtained from an exploitation and development project involving the Red River Formation in Bowman County, North Dakota and Harding County, South Dakota. Data obtained from 3D seismic surveys, and 2D seismic lines encompassing nine prospective field areas were used in the analysis. The geologic setting of the Red River Formation in Bowman and Harding counties is that of a shallow-shelf, carbonate system. Present-day depth of the Red River formation is approximately 8000 to 10,000 ft below ground surface. This report summarizes production results from well demonstration activity, results of reservoir characterization of the Red River Formation at demonstration sites, descriptions of ICS tools and strategies for their application.

  4. Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the time delays of the split waves they determined tomographically the 3-D fracture density distribution in the reservoir. Authors Lou, M.; Rial and J.A. Published Journal...

  5. Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    110C383.15 K 230 F 689.67 R 1 USGS Estimated Reservoir Volume: 2 km 1 USGS Mean Capacity: 9 MW 1 Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and...

  6. INTELLIGENT COMPUTING SYSTEM FOR RESERVOIR ANALYSIS AND RISK ASSESSMENT OF THE RED RIVER FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth D. Luff

    2002-09-30

    Integrated software has been written that comprises the tool kit for the Intelligent Computing System (ICS). Luff Exploration Company is applying these tools for analysis of carbonate reservoirs in the southern Williston Basin. The integrated software programs are designed to be used by small team consisting of an engineer, geologist and geophysicist. The software tools are flexible and robust, allowing application in many environments for hydrocarbon reservoirs. Keystone elements of the software tools include clustering and neural-network techniques. The tools are used to transform seismic attribute data to reservoir characteristics such as storage (phi-h), probable oil-water contacts, structural depths and structural growth history. When these reservoir characteristics are combined with neural network or fuzzy logic solvers, they can provide a more complete description of the reservoir. This leads to better estimates of hydrocarbons in place, areal limits and potential for infill or step-out drilling. These tools were developed and tested using seismic, geologic and well data from the Red River Play in Bowman County, North Dakota and Harding County, South Dakota. The geologic setting for the Red River Formation is shallow-shelf carbonate at a depth from 8000 to 10,000 ft.

  7. Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling. Quarterly technical progress report, December 13, 1994--March 12, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-12

    Results are presented concerning reservoir performance analysis and effectiveness of hydraulic fracture treatments. A geostatistical analysis task, reservoir simulation, and integrated reservoir description tasks are also described.

  8. Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reader, G.T.; Hooper

    1983-01-01

    The Stirling engine was invented by a Scottish clergyman in 1816, but fell into disuse with the coming of the diesel engine. Advances in materials science and the energy crisis have made a hot air engine economically attractive. Explanations are full and understandable. Includes coverage of the underlying thermodynamics and an interesting historical section. Topics include: Introduction to Stirling engine technology, Theoretical concepts--practical realities, Analysis, simulation and design, Practical aspects, Some alternative energy sources, Present research and development, Stirling engine literature.

  9. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Walton; Don W. Green; G. Paul Whillhite; L. Schoeling; L. Watney; M. Michnick; R. Reynolds

    1997-07-15

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are 1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, 2) waterflood optimization, and 3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included 1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, 2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, 3) reservoir modeling, 4) laboratory work, 5) identification of operational problems, 6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and 7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were 1) geological and engineering analysis, 2) laboratory testing, and 3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2. Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of the design, construction, and operation of a field-wide waterflood utilizing state-of-the-art, off-the-shelf technologies in an attempt to optimize secondary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period was subdivided into five major tasks. The tasks were 1) design and construction of a waterflood plant, 2) design and construction of a water injection system, 3) design and construction of tank battery consolidation and gathering system, 4) initiation of waterflood operations and reservoir management, and 5) technology transfer. Tasks 1-3 have been completed and water injection began in October 1995. In the Savonburg Project, the reservoir management portion involves performance evaluation. This work included 1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, 2) identification of operational problems, 3) identification of near wellbore problems such as plugging caused from poor water quality, 4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and 5) preliminary identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process i.e., polymer augmented waterflooding or infill drilling (vertical or horizontal wells). To accomplish this work the initial budget period was subdivided into four major tasks. The tasks included 1) geological and engineering analysis, 2) waterplant optimization, 3) wellbore cleanup and pattern changes, and 4) field operations. This work was completed and the project has moved into Budget Period 2. The Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of continual optimization of this mature waterflood in an attempt to optimize secondary and tertiary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period is subdivided into six major tasks. The tasks were 1) waterplant development, 2) profile modification treatments, 3) pattern changes, new wells and wellbore cleanups, 4) reservoir development (polymer flooding), 5) field operations, and 6) technology transfer.

  10. Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas Near Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhlte, C.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1997-04-15

    The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. The Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period I involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2. Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of the design, construction, and operation of a field-wide waterflood utilizing state-of-the-art, off-the-shelf technologies in an attempt to optimize secondary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period was subdivided into five major tasks. The tasks were (1) design and construction of a waterflood plant, (2) design and construction of a water injection system, (3) design and construction of tank battery consolidation and gathering system, (4) initiation of waterflood operations and reservoir management, and (5) technology transfer. In the Savonburg Project, the reservoir management portion involves performance evaluation. This work included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) identification of operational problems, (3) identification of near wellbore problems such as plugging caused from poor water quality, (4) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (5) preliminary identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process i.e., polymer augmented waterflooding or infill drilling (vertical or horizontal wells). To accomplish this work the initial budget period was subdivided into four major tasks. The tasks included (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) waterplant optimization, (3) wellbore cleanup and pattern changes, and (4) field operations. This work was completed and the project has moved into Budget Period 2. The Budget Period 2 objectives consisted of continual optimization of this mature waterflood in an attempt to optimize secondary and tertiary oil recovery. To accomplish these objectives the second budget period was subdivided into six major tasks. The tasks were (1) waterplant development, (2) profile modification treatments, (3) pattern changes, new wells and wellbore cleanups, (4) reservoir development (polymer flooding), (5) field operations, and (6) technology transfer.

  11. A seven-crystal Johann-type hard x-ray spectrometer at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokaras, D.; Weng, T.-C.; Nordlund, D.; Velikov, P.; Wenger, D.; Garachtchenko, A.; George, M.; Borzenets, V.; Johnson, B.; Rabedeau, T.; Alonso-Mori, R.; Bergmann, U.

    2013-05-15

    We present a multicrystal Johann-type hard x-ray spectrometer ({approx}5-18 keV) recently developed, installed, and operated at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. The instrument is set at the wiggler beamline 6-2 equipped with two liquid nitrogen cooled monochromators - Si(111) and Si(311) - as well as collimating and focusing optics. The spectrometer consists of seven spherically bent crystal analyzers placed on intersecting vertical Rowland circles of 1 m of diameter. The spectrometer is scanned vertically capturing an extended backscattering Bragg angular range (88 Degree-Sign -74 Degree-Sign ) while maintaining all crystals on the Rowland circle trace. The instrument operates in atmospheric pressure by means of a helium bag and when all the seven crystals are used (100 mm of projected diameter each), has a solid angle of about 0.45% of 4{pi} sr. The typical resolving power is in the order of (E/{Delta}E){approx}10 000. The spectrometer's high detection efficiency combined with the beamline 6-2 characteristics permits routine studies of x-ray emission, high energy resolution fluorescence detected x-ray absorption and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering of very diluted samples as well as implementation of demanding in situ environments.

  12. Predicting interwell heterogeneity in fluvial-deltaic reservoirs: Outcrop observations and applications of progressive facies variation through a depositional cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, P.R.; Barton, M.D.

    1997-08-01

    Nearly 11 billion barrels of mobile oil remain in known domestic fluvial-deltaic reservoirs despite their mature status. A large percentage of this strategic resource is in danger of permanent loss through premature abandonment. Detailed reservoir characterization studies that integrate advanced technologies in geology, geophysics, and engineering are needed to identify remaining resources that can be targeted by near-term recovery methods, resulting in increased production and the postponement of abandonment. The first and most critical step of advanced characterization studies is the identification of reservoir architecture. However, existing subsurface information, primarily well logs, provides insufficient lateral resolution to identify low-permeability boundaries that exist between wells and compartmentalize the reservoir. Methods to predict lateral variability in fluvial-deltaic reservoirs have been developed on the basis of outcrop studies and incorporate identification of depositional setting and position within a depositional cycle. The position of a reservoir within the framework of a depositional cycle is critical. Outcrop studies of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone of Utah have demonstrated that the architecture and internal heterogeneity of sandstones deposited within a given depositional setting (for example, delta front) vary greatly depending upon whether they were deposited in the early, progradational part of a cycle or the late, retrogradational part of a cycle. The application of techniques similar to those used by this study in other fluvial-deltaic reservoirs will help to estimate the amount and style of remaining potential in mature reservoirs through a quicklook evaluation, allowing operators to focus characterization efforts on reservoirs that have the greatest potential to yield additional resources.

  13. Pressure behavior of laterally composite reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuchuk, F.J.; Habashy, T.

    1997-03-01

    This paper presents a new general method for solving the pressure diffusion equation in laterally composite reservoirs, where rock and fluid properties may change laterally as a function of y in the x-y plane. Composite systems can be encountered as a result of many different types of depositional and tectonic processes. For example, meandering point bar reservoirs or reservoirs with edgewater encroachment are examples of such systems. The new solution method presented is based on the reflection-transmission concept of electromagnetics to solve fluid-flow problems in 3D nonhomogeneous reservoirs, where heterogeneity is in only one (y) direction. A general Green`s function for a point source in 3D laterally composite systems is developed by using the reflection-transmission method. The solutions in the Laplace transform domain are then developed from the Green`s function for the pressure behavior of specific composite reservoirs. The solution method can also be applied to many different types of wells, such as vertical, fractured, and horizontal in composite reservoirs. The pressure behavior of a few well-known laterally composite systems are investigated. It is shown that a network of partially communicating faults and fractures in porous medium can be modeled as composite systems. It is also shown that the existing solutions for a partially communicating fault are not valid when the fault permeability is substantially larger than the formation permeability. The derivative plots are presented for selected faulted, fractured, channel, and composite reservoirs as diagnostic tools for well-test interpretation. It is also shown that if the composite system`s permeability varies moderately in the x or y direction, it exhibits a homogeneous system behavior. However, it does not yield the system`s average permeability. Furthermore, the composite systems with distributed low-permeability zones behave as if the system has many two no-flow boundaries.

  14. Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling, Class II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergeron, Jack; Blasingame, Tom; Doublet, Louis; Kelkar, Mohan; Freeman, George; Callard, Jeff; Moore, David; Davies, David; Vessell, Richard; Pregger, Brian; Dixon, Bill; Bezant, Bryce

    2000-03-16

    The major purpose of this project was to demonstrate the use of cost effective reservoir characterization and management tools that will be helpful to both independent and major operators for the optimal development of heterogeneous, low permeability carbonate reservoirs such as the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit.

  15. Reservoir Characterization, Production Characteristics, and Research Needs for Fluvial/Alluvial Reservoirs in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, E.L.; Fowler, M.L.; Jackson, S.R.; Madden, M.P.; Raw-Schatzinger, V.; Salamy, S.P.; Sarathi, P.; Young, M.A.

    1999-04-28

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Oil Recovery Field Demonstration Program was initiated in 1992 to maximize the economically and environmentally sound recovery of oil from known domestic reservoirs and to preserve access to this resource. Cost-shared field demonstration projects are being initiated in geology defined reservoir classes which have been prioritized by their potential for incremental recovery and their risk of abandonment. This document defines the characteristics of the fifth geological reservoir class in the series, fluvial/alluvial reservoirs. The reservoirs of Class 5 include deposits of alluvial fans, braided streams, and meandering streams. Deposit morphologies vary as a complex function of climate and tectonics and are characterized by a high degree of heterogeneity to fluid flow as a result of extreme variations in water energy as the deposits formed.

  16. Multiple volume compressor for hot gas engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stotts, Robert E.

    1986-01-01

    A multiple volume compressor for use in a hot gas (Stirling) engine having a plurality of different volume chambers arranged to pump down the engine when decreased power is called for and return the working gas to a storage tank or reservoir. A valve actuated bypass loop is placed over each chamber which can be opened to return gas discharged from the chamber back to the inlet thereto. By selectively actuating the bypass valves, a number of different compressor capacities can be attained without changing compressor speed whereby the capacity of the compressor can be matched to the power available from the engine which is used to drive the compressor.

  17. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2000-02-18

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through March 1999, project work has been completed related to data preparation, basic reservoir engineering, developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model, and a rock-log model, well drilling and completions, and surface facilities. Work is continuing on the stochastic geologic model, developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Fault Block IIA Tar (Tar II-A) Zone, and operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction. Thermal-related formation compaction is a concern of the project team due to observed surface subsidence in the local area above the steamflood project. Last quarter on January 12, the steamflood project lost its inexpensive steam source from the Harbor Cogeneration Plant as a result of the recent deregulation of electrical power rates in California. An operational plan was developed and implemented to mitigate the effects of the two situations. Seven water injection wells were placed in service in November and December 1998 on the flanks of the Phase 1 steamflood area to pressure up the reservoir to fill up the existing steam chest. Intensive reservoir engineering and geomechanics studies are continuing to determine the best ways to shut down the steamflood operations in Fault Block II while minimizing any future surface subsidence. The new 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulator model is being used to provide sensitivity cases to optimize production, steam injection, future flank cold water injection and reservoir temperature and pressure. According to the model, reservoir fill up of the steam chest at the current injection rate of 28,000 BPD and gross and net oil production rates of 7,700 BPD and 750 BOPD (injection to production ratio of 4) will occur in October 1999. At that time, the reservoir should act more like a waterflood and production and cold water injection can be operated at lower net injection rates to be determined. Modeling runs developed this quarter found that varying individual well injection rates to meet added production and local pressure problems by sub-zone could reduce steam chest fill-up by up to one month.

  18. Experience in operating the Bratsk Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nazarov, A.V.

    1984-04-01

    The Bratsk reservoir is the largest in the USSR and second largest in the world. Initially, the reservoir was expected to be filled by the end of 1966. However, the actual filling was not completed until September of 1967. During filling and in the first years of operation it was constantly necessary to deal with floating timber in order to ensure normal operation of the hydrostation, navigation safety, conditions for fishery, and fulfillment of the sanitary requirements. During seasonal variations of the reservoir level about 160 sq km of the shore zone was subjected to variable flooding and waterlogging. Maximum erosion occurred on expanded stretches, and within their limits on slopes composed of loam and sand deposits. Within the narrows, where the banks are composed mainly of hard and soft rocks and wave action is weak, erosion is negligible. Wind setup and setdown cause maximum denivellation of the water surface. The maximum increase of the level during setup reaches 232 cm and the maximum decrease during setdown is 24 cm. Seiche oscillations with various amplitudes and periods are observed on the reservoir surface. The main uses of the complex are hydropower, water transport, timber floating, water supply, and fishery. For the successful development of the shores of reservoirs it is necessary to select the construction sites with consideration of possible occurrence of karstic and landslide processes; the construction of heavy structures requires special karst-control measures. 3 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  19. Eolian reservoir characteristics predicted from dune type

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kocurek, G.; Nielson, J.

    1985-02-01

    The nature of eolian-dune reservoirs is strongly influenced by stratification types (in decreasing order of quality: grain-flow, grain-fall, wind-ripple deposits) and their packaging by internal bounding surfaces. These are, in turn, a function of dune surface processes and migration behavior, allowing for predictive models of reservoir behavior. Migrating, simple crescentic dunes produce tabular bodies consisting mainly of grain-flow cross-strata, and form the best, most predictable reservoirs. Reservoir character improves as both original dune height and preserved set thickness increase, because fewer grain-fall deposits and a lower percentage of dune-apron deposits occur in the cross-strata, respectively. It is probable that many linear and star dunes migrate laterally, leaving a blanket of packages of wind ripple laminae reflecting deposition of broad, shifting aprons. This is distinct from models generated by freezing large portions of these dunes in place. Trailing margins of linear and star dunes are prone to reworking by sand-sheet processes that decrease potential reservoir quality. The occurrence of parabolic dunes isolated on vegetated sand sheets results in a core of grain-flow and grain-fall deposits surrounded by less permeable and porous deposits. Compound crescentic dunes, perhaps the most preservable dune type, may yield laterally (1) single sets of cross-strate, (2) compound sets derived from superimposed simple dunes, or (3) a complex of diverse sets derived from superimposed transverse and linear elements.

  20. Acoustic cooling engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hofler, Thomas J.; Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1988-01-01

    An acoustic cooling engine with improved thermal performance and reduced internal losses comprises a compressible fluid contained in a resonant pressure vessel. The fluid has a substantial thermal expansion coefficient and is capable of supporting an acoustic standing wave. A thermodynamic element has first and second ends and is located in the resonant pressure vessel in thermal communication with the fluid. The thermal response of the thermodynamic element to the acoustic standing wave pumps heat from the second end to the first end. The thermodynamic element permits substantial flow of the fluid through the thermodynamic element. An acoustic driver cyclically drives the fluid with an acoustic standing wave. The driver is at a location of maximum acoustic impedance in the resonant pressure vessel and proximate the first end of the thermodynamic element. A hot heat exchanger is adjacent to and in thermal communication with the first end of the thermodynamic element. The hot heat exchanger conducts heat from the first end to portions of the resonant pressure vessel proximate the hot heat exchanger. The hot heat exchanger permits substantial flow of the fluid through the hot heat exchanger. The resonant pressure vessel can include a housing less than one quarter wavelength in length coupled to a reservoir. The housing can include a reduced diameter portion communicating with the reservoir. The frequency of the acoustic driver can be continuously controlled so as to maintain resonance.

  1. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas - Near-term. Annual report, June 18, 1993--June 18, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1995-10-01

    Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of water injection wells with solids as a result of poor water quality. In many instances the lack of reservoir management is due to lack of (1) data collection and organization, (2) integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, and (3) identification of optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The Stewart Field (on the latter stage of primary production) is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by Sharon Resources, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these type of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management, and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis.

  2. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs of Kansas - near - term. Technical progress report, June 17, 1994--June 17, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-07-01

    Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of water injection wells with solids as a result of poor water quality. In many instances the lack of reservoir management is due to lack of (1) data collection and organization, (2) integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, and (3) identification of optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in the project. The Stewart Field (on the latter stage of primary production) is located in Finney County, Kansas, and was operated by Sharon Resources, Inc. and is now operated by North American Resources Company. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these type of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management, and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis.

  3. Outboard motor provided with a four-stroke engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumigawa, Y.

    1986-09-16

    This patent describes a lubricating system for an internal combustion engine having a lubricant reservoir adapted to contain a lubricant for the engine. The system includes an inlet line depending into the lubricant reservoir for supplying lubricant for an engine lubricating system, a strainer disposed at the inlet end of the inlet line for removing foreign particles from the lubricant entering the inlet line, a drain opening in the lubricant reservoir for draining lubricant therefrom, and a drain plug for closing the drain opening, the improvement is described comprising the drain opening and the strainer being sized and related for servicing of the strainer through the drain opening, and relief valve means for bypassing the strainer in providing unfiltered lubricant to the inlet line in the event the strainer becomes plugged.

  4. Value Engineering

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2002-12-30

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) value engineering policy that establishs and maintains cost-effective value procedures and processes.

  5. Jeff Tsao

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... School, Stanford University (AB in Mathematics, MS in Electrical Engineering) and ... Education and Training B. S. in Mathematics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, 1977 M. S. ...

  6. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2001-08-08

    The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The hope is that successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs, including: (1) Development of three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic reservoir simulation models--thermal or otherwise--to aid in reservoir management of the steamflood and post-steamflood phases and subsequent development work. (2) Development of computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid reservoir surveillance and operations. (3) Perform detailed studies of the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (4) Testing and proposed application of a novel alkaline-steam well completion technique for the containment of the unconsolidated formation sands and control of fluid entry and injection profiles. (5) Installation of a 2100 ft, 14 inch insulated, steam line beneath a harbor channel to supply steam to an island location. (6) Testing and proposed application of thermal recovery technologies to increase oil production and reserves: (a) Performing pilot tests of cyclic steam injection and production on new horizontal wells. (b) Performing pilot tests of hot water-alternating-steam (WAS) drive in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Perform a pilot steamflood with the four horizontal injectors and producers using a pseudo steam-assisted gravity-drainage (SAGD) process. (8) Advanced reservoir management, through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring and evaluation.

  7. A University Consortium on Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engine Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Assanis, Dennis; Atreya, Arvind; Bowman, Craig; Chen, Jyh-Yuan; Cheng, Wai; Davidson, David; Dibble, Robert; Edwards, Chris; Filipi, Zoran; Golden, David; Green, William; Hanson, Ronald; Hedrick, J Karl; Heywood, John; Im, Hong; Lavoie, George; Sick, Volker; Wooldridge, Margaret

    2007-03-31

    Over the course of this four year project, the consortium team members from UM, MIT, Stanford, and Berkeley along with contributors from Sandia National Labs and LLNL, have produced a wide range of results on gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The work spanned a wide range of activities including engine experiments, fundamental chemical kinetics experiments, and an array of analytical modeling techniques and simulations. Throughout the project a collaborative approach has produced a many significant new insights into HCCI engines and their behavior while at the same time we achieved our key consortium goal: to develop workable strategies for gasoline HCCI control and implementation. The major accomplishments in each task are summarized, followed by detailed discussion.

  8. INCREASING WATERFLOOD RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH IMPROVED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Walker; Chris Phillips; Roy Koerner; Don Clarke; Dan Moos; Kwasi Tagbor

    2002-02-28

    This project increased recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project. This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate. Although these reservoirs have been waterflooded over 40 years, researchers have found areas of remaining oil saturation. Areas such as the top sand in the Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the western fault slivers of Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the bottom sands of the Tar Zone Fault Block V, and the eastern edge of Fault Block IV in both the Upper Terminal and Lower Terminal Zones all show significant remaining oil saturation. Each area of interest was uncovered emphasizing a different type of reservoir characterization technique or practice. This was not the original strategy but was necessitated by the different levels of progress in each of the project activities.

  9. System for lubrication of a brake air compressor associated with a turbocharged internal combustion engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, J.C.

    1992-10-13

    This patent describes a system for use with a vehicle which includes a turbocharged internal combustion engine having a lubricating system wherein lubricating oil from an engine oil reservoir is circulated within the engine and also to and from an associated brake system air compressor which supplies compressed air for operation of the vehicle air braking system. This patent describes improvement in passing supercharged air to an oil crankcase of the air compressor to cause lubricating oil to drain therefrom and return to the engine oil reservoir.

  10. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2001-05-07

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through September 2000, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on improving core analysis techniques, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post steamflood projects. Work was discontinued on the stochastic geologic model and developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Tar II-A Zone so the project team could use the 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model to provide alternatives for the Tar II-A post steamflood operations and shale compaction studies. The project team spent the fourth quarter 2000 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and the Tar V horizontal well steamflood pilot. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being evaluated.

  11. Tight gas reservoirs: A visual depiction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    Future gas supplies in the US will depend on an increasing contribution from unconventional sources such as overpressured and tight gas reservoirs. Exploitation of these resources and their conversion to economically producible gas reserves represents a major challenge. Meeting this challenge will require not only the continuing development and application of new technologies, but also a detailed understanding of the complex nature of the reservoirs themselves. This report seeks to promote understanding of these reservoirs by providing examples. Examples of gas productive overpressured tight reservoirs in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming are presented. These examples show log data (raw and interpreted), well completion and stimulation information, and production decline curves. A sampling of wells from the Lewis and Mesaverde formations are included. Both poor and good wells have been chosen to illustrate the range of productivity that is observed. The second section of this document displays decline curves and completion details for 30 of the best wells in the Greater Green River Basin. These are included to illustrate the potential that is present when wells are fortuitously located with respect to local stratigraphy and natural fracturing, and are successfully hydraulically fractured.

  12. Underground natural gas storage reservoir management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

    1995-06-01

    The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

  13. Waterflood surveillance techniques; A reservoir management approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thakur, G.C. )

    1991-10-01

    The reservoir management aspects of waterflooding span the time before the start of waterflood to the time when the secondary recovery either is uneconomic or is changed to an enhanced recovery. This paper reviews waterflood techniques and reports on surveillance techniques in the management of waterflooding of oil wells.

  14. Selection of reservoirs amenable to micellar flooding. First annual report, October 1978-December 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldburg, A.; Price, H.

    1980-12-01

    The overall project objective is to build a solid engineering base upon which the Department of Energy (DOE) can improve and accelerate the application of micellar-polymer recovery technology to Mid-Continent and California sandstone reservoirs. The purpose of the work carried out under these two contracts is to significantly aid, both DOE and the private sector, in gaining the following Project Objectives: to select the better micellar-polymer prospects in the Mid-Continent and California regions; to assess all of the available field and laboratory data which has a bearing on recovering oil by micellar-polymer projects in order to help identify and resolve both the technical and economic constraints relating thereto; and to design and analyze improved field pilots and tests and to develop a micellar-polymer applications matrix for use by the potential technology users; i.e., owner/operators. The report includes the following: executive summary and project objectives; development of a predictive model for economic evaluation of reservoirs; reservoir data bank for micellar-polymer recovery evaluation; PECON program for preliminary economic evaluation; ordering of candidate reservoirs for additional data acquisition; validation of predictive model by numerical simulation; and work forecast. Tables, figures and references are included.

  15. Michigan Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  16. Wyoming Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ...

  17. Ohio Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ...

  18. Mississippi Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Mississippi Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  19. California Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) California Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  20. Montana Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ...

  1. Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  2. North Dakota Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  3. Alabama Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ...

  4. Florida Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ... Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Florida Dry Natural Gas Proved ...

  5. Colorado Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  6. Louisiana Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  7. Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  8. Alaska Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 ...

  9. Kentucky Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  10. Arkansas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  11. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Aquifer Storage Reservoir

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Configuration Aquifer Storage Reservoir Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Aquifer Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Aquifer Underground Natural Gas Well

  12. Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing EGS Reservoir

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Better understand and model fluid injection into a tight reservoir on the edges of a hydrothermal field. Use seismic data to constrain geomechanical/hydrologic/thermal model of reservoir.

  13. Tracer testing in geothermal reservoirs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geothermal reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Tracer testing in geothermal reservoirs Author PetroWiki Published PetroWiki,...

  14. Advancing Reactive Tracer Methods for Measurement of Thermal Evolution in Geothermal Reservoirs: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell A. Plummer; Carl D. Palmer; Earl D. Mattson; Laurence C. Hull; George D. Redden

    2011-07-01

    The injection of cold fluids into engineered geothermal system (EGS) and conventional geothermal reservoirs may be done to help extract heat from the subsurface or to maintain pressures within the reservoir (e.g., Rose et al., 2001). As these injected fluids move along fractures, they acquire heat from the rock matrix and remove it from the reservoir as they are extracted to the surface. A consequence of such injection is the migration of a cold-fluid front through the reservoir (Figure 1) that could eventually reach the production well and result in the lowering of the temperature of the produced fluids (thermal breakthrough). Efficient operation of an EGS as well as conventional geothermal systems involving cold-fluid injection requires accurate and timely information about thermal depletion of the reservoir in response to operation. In particular, accurate predictions of the time to thermal breakthrough and subsequent rate of thermal drawdown are necessary for reservoir management, design of fracture stimulation and well drilling programs, and forecasting of economic return. A potential method for estimating migration of a cold front between an injection well and a production well is through application of reactive tracer tests, using chemical whose rate of degradation is dependent on the reservoir temperature between the two wells (e.g., Robinson 1985). With repeated tests, the rate of migration of the thermal front can be determined, and the time to thermal breakthrough calculated. While the basic theory behind the concept of thermal tracers has been understood for some time, effective application of the method has yet to be demonstrated. This report describes results of a study that used several methods to investigate application of reactive tracers to monitoring the thermal evolution of a geothermal reservoir. These methods included (1) mathematical investigation of the sensitivity of known and hypothetical reactive tracers, (2) laboratory testing of novel tracers that would improve method sensitivity, (3) development of a software tool for design and interpretation of reactive tracer tests and (4) field testing of the reactive tracer temperature monitoring concept.

  15. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, D.; Koerner, R.; Moos D.; Nguyen, J.; Phillips, C.; Tagbor, K.; Walker, S.

    1999-04-05

    This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate.

  16. Incorporating reservoir heterogeneity with geostatistics to investigate waterflood recoveries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolcott, D.S. ); Chopra, A.K. )

    1993-03-01

    This paper presents an investigation of infill drilling performance and reservoir continuity with geostatistics and a reservoir simulator. The geostatistical technique provides many possible realizations and realistic descriptions of reservoir heterogeneity. Correlation between recovery efficiency and thickness of individual sand subunits is shown. Additional recovery from infill drilling results from thin, discontinuous subunits. The technique may be applied to variations in continuity for other sandstone reservoirs.

  17. Water Sampling At Blackfoot Reservoir Area (Hutsinpiller & Parry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Water Sampling At Blackfoot Reservoir Area (Hutsinpiller & Parry, 1985) Exploration Activity...

  18. THMC Modeling of EGS Reservoirs -- Continuum through Discontinuum...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 58 ... seismicity; permeability evolution; heat recovery; fault reactivation; reservoir ...

  19. Shockwave Engine: Wave Disk Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-01-14

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: MSU is developing a new engine for use in hybrid automobiles that could significantly reduce fuel waste and improve engine efficiency. In a traditional internal combustion engine, air and fuel are ignited, creating high-temperature and high-pressure gases which expand rapidly. This expansion of gases forces the engine’s pistons to pump and powers the car. MSU’s engine has no pistons. It uses the combustion of air and fuel to build up pressure within the engine, generating a shockwave that blasts hot gas exhaust into the blades of the engine’s rotors causing them to turn, which generates electricity. MSU’s redesigned engine would be the size of a cooking pot and contain fewer moving parts—reducing the weight of the engine by 30%. It would also enable a vehicle that could use 60% of its fuel for propulsion.

  20. Relation between facies, diagenesis, and reservoir quality of Rotliegende reservoirs in north Germany

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, F.; Gast, R.; Kraft, T. (BEB Erdgas Erdol GmbH, Hannover (Germany))

    1993-09-01

    In north Germany, the majority of Rotliegende gas fields is confined to an approximately 50 km-wide east-west-orientated belt, which is situated on the gently north-dipping flank of the southern Permian basin. Approximately 400 billion m[sup 3] of natural gas has been found in Rotliegende reservoir sandstones with average porosities of depths ranging from 3500 to 5000 m. Rotliegende deposition was controlled by the Autunian paleo-relief, and arid climate and cyclic transgressions of the desert lake. In general, wadis and large dunefields occur in the hinterland, sebkhas with small isolate dunes and shorelines define the coastal area, and a desert lake occurs to the north. The sandstones deposited in large dunefields contain only minor amounts of illite, anhydrite, and calcite and form good reservoirs. In contrast, the small dunes formed in the sebkha areas were affected by fluctuations of the desert lake groundwaters, causing the infiltration of detrital clay and precipitation of gypsum and calcite. These cements were transformed to illite, anhydrite, and calcite-II during later diagenesis, leading to a significant reduction of the reservoir quality. The best reservoirs occur in the shoreline sandstones because porosity and permeability were preserved by early magnesium-chlorite diagenesis. Since facies controls diagenesis and consequently reservoir quality, mapping of facies also indicates the distribution of reservoir and nonreservoir rocks. This information is used to identify play area and to interpret and calibrate three-dimensional seismic data.

  1. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2003-09-04

    The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

  2. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2003-06-04

    The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

  3. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2004-03-05

    The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

  4. EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline Network - Salt Cavern Storage Reservoir

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Configuration Salt Cavern Storage Reservoir Configuration About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Salt Cavern Underground Natural Gas Storage Reservoir Configuration Source: PB Energy Storage Services Inc.

  5. THMC Modeling of EGS Reservoirs … Continuum through Discontinuum Representations: Capturing Reservoir Stimulation, Evolution and Induced Seismicity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    THMC Modeling of EGS Reservoirs … Continuum through Discontinuum Representations: Capturing Reservoir Stimulation, Evolution and Induced Seismicity presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  6. Engineering Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Engineering Institute Multidisciplinary engineering research that integrates advanced modeling and simulations, novel sensing systems and new developments in information technology. May 14, 2013 Los Alamos Research Park Los Alamos Research Park, the home of Engineering Institute Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Executive Administrator Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Administrative Assistant Rebecca Duran (505)

  7. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between the two sub-domains, highlighting, in particular, a deep pocket that could be a prime target for anti-virals. (Courtesy of the Ollmann Saphire lab, The Scripps Research...

  8. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as a dissociative anesthetic acting as a noncompetitive antagonist on the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, it is also a potent inhibitor of neuronal nAChRs, and the sites of...

  9. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    follow a single nanoscale catalytic particle, a bulk iron oxide promoted with titanium, zinc and potassium oxides, during activation and under Fischer-Tropsch reaction conditions. ...

  10. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    much is yet to be determined regarding their fate, transport, and toxicity in the environment, including the implications of the potential storage of these ENPs or their...

  11. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the next steps that you propose to pursue under this proposal (1-2 paragraphs) 4. COLLABORATORS: If different from the original proposal, list current collaborators, including...

  12. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    under this proposal. Please cover safety concerns -if any. (1-2 paragraphs) 4. COLLABORATORS: If different from the original proposal, list current collaborators, including...

  13. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoparticulate FeS as an Effective Redox Buffer to Prevent Uraninite (UO2) Oxidation August 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida Figure A major concern in the nuclear age is...

  14. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Structure and Dynamics of Eukaryotic Glutaminyl-tRNA Synthetase May 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure Full-length Gln4 shown...

  15. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantification of the Mercury Adsorption Mechanism on Brominated Activated Carbon August 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida Figure Emissions from coal-fired power plants are...

  16. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystal Structure and Functional Analysis Identify Evolutionary Secret of SerRS in Vascular Development July 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida, SLAC Office of...

  17. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structural Basis for Iron Piracy by Pathogenic Neisseria January 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure (Courtesy of the Buchanan Lab...

  18. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Navigating Fermi Arcs SSRL Science Summary - November 2012 Figure In solids, Fermi surfaces are the boundaries between occupied and unoccupied electron levels, as defined in...

  19. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    while slightly nonstoichiometric material gives rises to magnetic order. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis performed on Beam Line 10-2 provides part...

  20. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    it can cause rare metabolic diseases such as Tay-Sachs and Gaucher, which often cause death in affected children by their early teens. Three years ago, researchers discovered...

  1. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Area: (hold Ctrl to select multiple options) Biological & Life Sciences Medical Applications Chemistry Materials Science Physics Polymers Earth Sciences Environmental...

  2. Stanford Geothermal Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... technologies Identifies potential surface signals that can reveal deeper, hidden ... Innovative Exploration Drilling and Testing Foro: Drill bits with laser beams attached to ...

  3. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Turner, M. Wolf, W. Wurth and A. Nilsson, "Real-Time Observation of Surface Bond Breaking with an X-ray Laser", Science 339, 1302 (2013) Related Links Science Highlight - HTML ...

  4. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supporting the User Community Register | Submit Proposals | Request Time | Check-In Plus Sign Overview SSRL experimental facilities are scheduled and managed centrally to...

  5. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stroke: hemorrhagic, caused by a broken artery or vein leaking blood into the brain tissue, and ischemic, in which a blockage in a blood vessel starves part of the brain of oxygen. ...

  6. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LASER USE yes no If yes, please fill out all of the fields in this section. ANSI classification Wavelength Total Power Laser hazard controls you will apply. HAZARDOUS...

  7. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mesoscale Phase Distribution in Li-ion Battery Electrode Materials May 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure Figure 1a) Chemical phase...

  8. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    white due to high attenuation of lead-uranyl acetate, with bone tissue appearing grey and voids black. Scale bar: A,C,E 50 m; B,D,F 5 m. Sample created in the...

  9. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cone center is the "Dirac point"; which is equivalent to the "Fermi level" in graphene. Grey indicates electrons. If there are electrons (shaded grey) above the Fermi level, the...

  10. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the cytoskeleton. In their study, published in the journal Nature Structural & Molecular Biology, Rangarajan and Izard reported the structure of nearly full-length human...

  11. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This limited understanding of the molecular mechanism and the scope of drug design for these enzymes. A team of researchers from SSRL and the University of Iowa used SSRL's Beam ...

  12. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    melanoma, and degenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's and Type 2 diabetes. Understanding of how Wnt proteins bind and activate Frizzled receptors is important...

  13. Stanford Geothermal Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Timothy Reinhardt Acting Program Manager Systems Analysis and Low Temperature (SALT) Geothermal Technologies Office Geothermal Vision Study May 11th, 2015 Courtesy GRC Courtesy E ...

  14. Stanford Geothermal Workshop

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Power Plant Construction Increasing value ... of the current rare earth and near- critical metal ... ten years. 25 Geothermal History 1976-2014 2008: Economic ...

  15. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    coming to SSRL) before beam time. Spokesperson: Institution: Email: Degree: Work Phone: Fax: Principal Investigator: Email: Work Phone: Collaborators: Institution: (if...

  16. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Water-Rock Reactions Produce Hydrogen Gas at Temperatures within the Limits of Life June 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida, SLAC Office of Communications and Lisa E. Mayhew, University of Colorado - Boulder Figure Hydrogen gas is produced in chemical reactions between anoxic water and iron-rich rocks at temperatures above 200°C - conditions too hot to support life. However, at hydrothermal vents or hot springs, where hydrogen-rich fluids mix with cooler waters and temperatures have

  17. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enzyme Created in Test Tube Promises Biocatalysts for a Range of Uses December 2012 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure [larger image] In recent years, enzymes have gained an important role in industry as cheap and environmentally friendly alternatives to traditional chemical catalysts. Learning to create such enzymes from scratch is necessary in order to provide biocatalysts for the wealth of non-natural reaction chemistries and substrates that have

  18. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    preparation and data analysis. This will help new users efficiently utilize their beam time, and prepare them for successful future experiments. Spokesperson: Institution:...

  19. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systematic Expansion of Porous Crystals to Include Large Molecules February 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure Recently, scientists...

  20. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structure of Human Argonaute2: A Programmable Ribonuclease July 2013 SSRL Science Summary by Manuel Gnida, SLAC Office of Communications Figure RNA degradation is an important...

  1. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study had three components: low-temperature measurements that revealed three distinct ground states at different dopings; temperature-dependence measurements that revealed that...

  2. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (SIRAS) method using x-ray diffraction data collected at SSRL's Beam Line 9-2 and NE-CAT at the Advanced Photon Source. Surprisingly, the non-toxic NTNHA exhibited a...

  3. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy storage materials, such as batteries, are of increasing importance in the modern world. They support the storage and distribution of electricity generated by different ...

  4. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    oxygenic photosynthesis approximately 2.3 to 2.4 billion years ago revolutionized life on Earth. For most modern-day terrestrial life, oxygen has become indispensable. At the heart...

  5. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This investigation was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (DOE-BES) Chemical and Geosciences Programs, the National Science Foundation (NSF) ...

  6. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... This research was funded by was funded by the U.S. DOE Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research (FWP 10094) and Office of Basic Energy Sciences. Primary ...

  7. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary by Lori Ann White, SLAC Office of Communications Figure For the first ... Research supported by the Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and ...

  8. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Work was supported by the Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (OBES), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. X-ray data were ...

  9. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the design principles of natural functional sites. The team targeted a surface on the influenza hemagglutinin protein that enables flu viruses to attach to and invade cells lining...

  10. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Read Self-Assembled Nanoparticle Superlattices X-ray Reflectivity X-ray reflectometry is a technique for investigating the near-surface structure of many materials. It probes the electron density with a depth resolution of less than one nm for depths of up to several hundred nm. The method involves measuring the reflected X-ray intensity as a function of X-ray incidence angle (typically small angles are used). The method is used for studies of thin films and

  11. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advance notification of intent to send radioactive material to SLAC/SSRL Many of you have requested the ability to save information on required notices about shipments of radioactive material to SSRL. We have implemented an Excel spread sheet that can be saved to your desktop, providing you the flexibility to save data that can be used to update 30, 7 and 1 day notices or provide the basis for new experiments. The downloadable MS Excel spreadsheet should represent the most complete and accurate

  12. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BL4-2 Bio-SAXS Rapid Access Application Form Blocks of 3 shifts, including first shift for change-over and setup, are set aside periodically for Rapid Access beam time. Applications are reviewed by SSRL's SMB & Biophysics Proposal Review Panel for scientific merit and feasibility. Rapid Access will in general only be granted once for a user group during a single scheduling period. Only one project per Principal Investigator may be scheduled for Rapid Access time within a given month. If

  13. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SSRL Gas Ordering SSRL supplies liquid nitrogen at no charge to users. The main filling station is located in the Bldg. 131 Annex. There is also a smaller tank for filling small dewars. When handling liquid nitrogen, please follow the posted instructions carefully and wear the safety gloves and glasses that have been provided for your use. SSRL provides liquid helium (LHe) for use with SSRL cryostats, and user accounts are assessed a per-shift charge for LHe use during scheduled beam time.

  14. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Access to High Technology User Facilities at DOE National Laboratories In recognition of the nation's expanding need to engage businesses and universities in the areas of commercial and basic science research, the Department of Energy has developed two special types of agreements for use at all DOE National Laboratories with approved designated user facilities, see http://www.gc.doe.gov/1002.htm. User Agreements All user experiments must be run under the terms of a User Agreement executed by the

  15. Mechanical Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Engineering Services (PEJD) organization of Program Implementation Energy Efficiency, Power Services, Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). As part of the Power...

  16. Environmental Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will be an environmental technical expert and advisor to integrate science and engineering principles to improve the natural environment and direct and...

  17. Electrical Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Contract Management Office (CMO) (TED), Engineering and Technical Services (TE), Transmission Services (T). The function of the Contract Management Office (CMO) is...

  18. Engine Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... with the U.S. automotive and heavy-duty diesel engine industries, energy companies, and other ... The strategies include: ultra-low-emission, low-temperature combustion; ...

  19. Electrical Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region Power System Operation Operations Engineering, (J4200) 5555...

  20. Rotary engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leas, A. M.; Leas, L. E.

    1985-02-12

    Disclosed are an engine system suitable for use with methyl alcohol and hydrogen and a rotary engine particularly suited for use in the engine system. The rotary engine comprises a stator housing having a plurality of radially directed chamber dividers, a principal rotor, a plurality of subordinate rotors each having an involute gear in its periphery mounted on the principal rotor, and means for rotating the subordinate rotors so that their involute gears accept the radially directed dividers as the subordinate rotors move past them.

  1. Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs. Volume III (of 4): Characterization and simulation of representative resources. Final report, February 14, 1995--October 13, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbrell, W.C.; Bassiouni, Z.A.; Bourgoyne, A.T.

    1997-01-13

    Significant innovations have been made in seismic processing and reservoir simulation. In addition, significant advances have been made in deviated and horizontal drilling technologies. Effective application of these technologies along with improved integrated resource management methods offer opportunities to significantly increase Gulf of Mexico production, delay platform abandonments, and preserve access to a substantial remaining oil target for both exploratory drilling and advanced recovery processes. In an effort to illustrate the impact that these new technologies and sources of information can have upon the estimates of recoverable oil in the Gulf of Mexico, additional and detailed data was collected for two previously studied reservoirs: a South March Island reservoir operated by Taylor Energy and Gulf of Mexico reservoir operated by Mobil, whose exact location has been blind-coded at their request, and an additional third representative reservoir in the Gulf of Mexico, the KEKF-1 reservoir in West Delta Block 84 Field. The new data includes reprocessed 2-D seismic data, newly acquired 3-D data, fluid data, fluid samples, pressure data, well test data, well logs, and core data/samples. The new data was used to refine reservoir and geologic characterization of these reservoirs. Further laboratory investigation also provided additional simulation input data in the form of PVT properties, relative permeabilities, capillary pressures, and water compatibility. Geologic investigations were also conducted to refine the models of mud-rich submarine fan architectures used by seismic analysts and reservoir engineers. These results were also used, in part, to assist in the recharacterization of these reservoirs.

  2. Method of extracting heat from dry geothermal reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Potter, R.M.; Robinson, E.S.; Smith, M.C.

    1974-01-22

    Hydraulic fracturing is used to interconnect two or more holes that penetrate a previously dry geothermal reservoir, and to produce within the reservoir a sufficiently large heat-transfer surface so that heat can be extracted from the reservoir at a usefully high rate by a fluid entering it through one hole and leaving it through another. Introduction of a fluid into the reservoir to remove heat from it and establishment of natural (unpumped) convective circulation through the reservoir to accomplish continuous heat removal are important and novel features of the method. (auth)

  3. Metal-gas cell with electrolyte reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, L.E.; Carr, D.D.

    1984-10-16

    A metal-gas electrochemical cell is disclosed wherein electrolyte is progressively supplied from a reservoir into the electrode or cell stack as needed, so as to maintain each stack component with adequate electrolyte, as the plates ''grow'' and absorb electrolyte with repeated cycling. The reservoir preferably is a compressible bladder positioned between on end of the plate stack and a retaining plate. As the plate stack ''grows'' with repeated cycling, the bladder is slowly compressed, forcing electrolyte from the bladder through an electrolyte distribution tube located within the plate stack. One end of the electrolyte distribution tube is fixed to an end plate of the plate stack and the second end of the distribution tube may be connected to a Belleville washer or other spring which acts through the distribution tube to compress the plate stack. The elasticity of the spring permits the stack to expand as the electrodes grow.

  4. Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hitzman, D.O.; Stepp, A.K.; Dennis, D.M.; Graumann, L.R.

    2003-02-11

    This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal was to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with inorganic nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents.

  5. The Role of Research Universities in Helping Solve our Energy Challenges: A Case Study at Stanford and SLAC (2011 EFRC Summit)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hennessey, John (President, Stanford University)

    2012-03-14

    The first speaker in the 2011 EFRC Summit session titled "Leading Perspectives in Energy Research" was John Hennessey, President of Stanford University. He discussed the important role that the academic world plays as a partner in innovative energy research by presenting a case study involving Stanford and SLAC. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  6. A Roadmap for Strategic Development of Geothermal Exploration Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 11-13, 2013 SGP-TR-198 A ROADMAP FOR STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT OF GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION TECHNOLOGIES Benjamin R. Phillips 1,2 , John Ziagos 3 , Hildigunnur Thorsteinsson 2 *, and Eric Hass 4 1 SRA International, Inc. 2 Geothermal Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave. SW, Washington, DC 20585, USA e-mail: benjamin.phillips@ee.doe.gov 3 Lawrence

  7. A Technology Roadmap for Strategic Development of Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 11-13, 2013 SGP-TR-198 A TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP FOR STRATEGIC DEVELOPMENT OF ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS John Ziagos 1 , Benjamin R. Phillips 2,3 , Lauren Boyd 3 , Allan Jelacic 2 , Greg Stillman 3 , and Eric Hass 4 1 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550 2 SRA International, Inc. 3 Geothermal Technologies Office, U.S. DOE, 1000

  8. RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF UPPER DEVONIAN GORDON SANDSTONE, JACKSONBURG STRINGTOWN OIL FIELD, NORTHWESTERN WEST VIRGINIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Ameri; K. Aminian; K.L. Avary; H.I. Bilgesu; M.E. Hohn; R.R. McDowell; D.L. Matchen

    2001-07-01

    The Jacksonburg-Stringtown oil field contained an estimated 88,500,000 barrels of oil in place, of which approximately 20,000,000 barrels were produced during primary recovery operations. A gas injection project, initiated in 1934, and a pilot waterflood, begun in 1981, yielded additional production from limited portions of the field. The pilot was successful enough to warrant development of a full-scale waterflood in 1990, involving approximately 8,900 acres in three units, with a target of 1,500 barrels of oil per acre recovery. Historical patterns of drilling and development within the field suggests that the Gordon reservoir is heterogeneous, and that detailed reservoir characterization is necessary for understanding well performance and addressing problems observed by the operators. The purpose of this work is to establish relationships among permeability, geophysical and other data by integrating geologic, geophysical and engineering data into an interdisciplinary quantification of reservoir heterogeneity as it relates to production. Conventional stratigraphic correlation and core description shows that the Gordon sandstone is composed of three parasequences, formed along the Late Devonian shoreline of the Appalachian Basin. The parasequences comprise five lithofacies, of which one includes reservoir sandstones. Pay sandstones were found to have permeabilities in core ranging from 10 to 200 mD, whereas non-pay sandstones have permeabilities ranging from below the level of instrumental detection to 5 mD; Conglomeratic zones could take on the permeability characteristics of enclosing materials, or could exhibit extremely low values in pay sandstone and high values in non-pay or low permeability pay sandstone. Four electrofacies based on a linear combination of density and scaled gamma ray best matched correlations made independently based on visual comparison of geophysical logs. Electrofacies 4 with relatively high permeability (mean value > 45 mD) was determined to be equivalent to the pay sandstone within the Gordon reservoir. Three-dimensional models of the electrofacies in the pilot waterflood showed that electrofacies 4 is present throughout this area, and the other electrofacies are more disconnected. A three-layer, back-propagation artificial neural network with three slabs in the middle layer can be used to predict permeability and porosity from gamma ray and bulk density logs, the first and the second derivatives of the log data with respect to depth, well location, and log baselines. Two flow units were defined based on the stratigraphic model and geophysical logs. A three-dimensional reservoir model including the flow units, values of permeability calculated through the artificial neural network and injection pressure-rate information were then used as inputs for a reservoir simulator to predict oil production performance for the center producers in the pilot area. This description of the reservoir provided significantly better simulation results than earlier results obtained using simple reservoir models. Bulk density and gamma ray logs were used to identify flow units throughout the field. As predicted by the stratigraphic analysis, one of the flow units crosses stratigraphic units in the reservoir. A neural network was used to predict permeability values for each flow unit in producer and injection wells. The reservoir simulator was utilized to predict the performance of two flood patterns located to the north of the pilot area. Considering the simple model utilized for simulation, the results are in very good agreement with the field history.

  9. ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOODING AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BRIDGEPORT AND CYPRESS RESERVOIRS OF THE LAWRENCE FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Ron Damm; Bev Seyler

    2003-04-01

    Feasibility of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood for the Lawrence Field in Lawrence County, Illinois is being studied. Two injected formulations are being designed; one for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs and one for Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. Fluid-fluid and coreflood evaluations have developed a chemical solution that produces incremental oil in the laboratory from the Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. A chemical formulation for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs is being developed. A reservoir characterization study is being done on the Bridgeport A, B, & D sandstones, and on the Cypress sandstone. The study covers the pilot flood area and the Lawrence Field.

  10. ALKALINE-SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOODING AND RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION OF THE BRIDGEPORT AND CYPRESS RESERVOIRS OF THE LAWRENCE FIELD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malcolm Pitts; Ron Damm; Bev Seyler

    2003-03-01

    Feasibility of alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood for the Lawrence Field in Lawrence County, Illinois is being studied. Two injected formulations are being designed; one for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs and one for Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. Fluid-fluid and coreflood evaluations have developed a chemical solution that produces incremental oil in the laboratory from the Cypress and Paint Creek reservoirs. A chemical formulation for the Bridgeport A and Bridgeport B reservoirs is being developed. A reservoir characterization study is being done on the Bridgeport A, B, & D sandstones, and on the Cypress sandstone. The study covers the pilot flood area and the Lawrence Field.

  11. Assessing the relative permeability of heterogeneous reservoir...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Volume 1; PB: 607 p. Publisher: Society of Petroleum Engineers, Richardson, TX (United States) Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 02 PETROLEUM; 03 ...

  12. Geothermal direct use engineering and design guidebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomquist, R.G.; Culver, G.; Ellis, P.F.; Higbee, C.; Kindle, C.; Lienau, P.J.; Lunis, B.C.; Rafferty, K.; Stiger, S.; Wright, P.M.

    1989-03-01

    The Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook is designed to be a comprehensive, thoroughly practical reference guide for engineers and designers of direct heat projects. These projects could include the conversion of geothermal energy into space heating cooling of buildings, district heating, greenhouse heating, aquaculture and industrial processing. The Guidebook is directed at understanding the nature of geothermal resources and the exploration of these resources, fluid sampling techniques, drilling, and completion of geothermal wells through well testing, and reservoir evaluation. It presents information useful to engineers on the specification of equipment including well pumps, piping, heat exchangers, space heating equipment, heat pumps and absorption refrigeration. A compilation of current information about greenhouse, aquaculture and industrial applications is included together with a discussion of engineering cost analysis, regulation requirements, and environmental considerations. The purpose of the Guidebook is to provide an integrated view for the development of direct use projects for which there is a very potential in the United States.

  13. Geothermal direct use engineering and design guidebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lienau, P.J.; Lunis, B.C.

    1991-01-01

    The Geothermal Direct Use Engineering and Design Guidebook is designed to be a comprehensive, thoroughly practical reference guide for engineers and designers of direct heat projects. These projects could include the conversion of geothermal energy into space heating and cooling of buildings, district heating, greenhouse heating, aquaculture and industrial processing. The Guidebook is directed at understanding the nature of geothermal resources and the exploration of the resources, fluid sampling techniques, drilling, and completion of geothermal wells through well testing, and reservoir evaluation. It presents information useful to engineers on the specification of equipment including well pumps, piping, heat exchangers, space heating equipment, heat pumps and absorption refrigeration. A compilation of current information about greenhouse aquaculture and industrial applications is included together with a discussion of engineering cost analysis, regulation requirements, and environmental consideration. The purpose of the Guidebook is to provide an integrated view for the development of direct use projects for which there is a very large potential in the United States.

  14. Thermoacoustic engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.W.

    1988-10-01

    Thermoacoustic engines, or acoustic heat engines, are energy-conversion devices that achieve simplicity and concomitant reliability by use of acoustic technology. Their efficiency can be a substantial fraction of Carnot's efficiency. In thermoacoustic prime movers, heat flow from a high-temperature source to a low-temperature sink generates acoustic power (which may be converted to electric power using a transducer). In thermoacoustic heat pumps and refrigerators, acoustic power is used to pump heat from a low-temperature source to a high-temperature sink. This review teaches the fundamentals of thermoacoustic engines, by analysis, intuition, and example.

  15. Quantification of Libby Reservoir Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chisholm, Ian

    1985-01-01

    The goal was to quantify seasonal water levels needed to maintain or enhance the reservoir fishery in Libby. This report summarizes data collected from July 1984 through July 1985, and, where appropriate, presents data collected since 1983. The Canada, Rexford, and Tenmile areas of the reservoir are differentially affected by drawdown. Relative changes in water volume and surface area are greatest in the Canada area and smallest in the Tenmile area. Reservoir morphology and hydraulics probably play a major role in fish distribution through their influence on water temperature. Greatest areas of habitat with optimum water temperature for Salmo spp. and kokanee occurred during the spring and fall months. Dissolved oxygen, pH and conductivity levels were not limiting during any sampling period. Habitat enhancement work was largely unsuccessful. Littoral zone vegetation plantings did not survive well, primarily the result of extreme water level fluctuations. Relative abundances of fish species varied seasonally within and between the three areas. Water temperature is thought to be the major influence in fish distribution patterns. Other factors, such as food availability and turbidity, may mitigate its influence. Sampling since 1975 illustrates a continued increase in kokanee numbers and a dramatic decline in redside shiners. Salmo spp., bull trout, and burbot abundances are relatively low while peamouth and coarsescale sucker numbers remain high. A thermal dynamics model and a trophic level components model will be used to quantify the impact of reservoir operation on the reservoir habitat, primary production, secondary production and fish populations. Particulate carbon will be used to track energy flow through trophic levels. A growth-driven population dynamics simulation model that will estimate the impacts of reservoir operation on fish population dynamics is also being considered.

  16. General Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in Office of Standard Contract Management, within the Office of the General Counsel (GC). The purpose of the position is to conduct technical and engineering reviews of the...

  17. Electrical Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    THIS IS A FIELD ENGINEER POSITION REQUIRING 100% TRAVEL TO WORK SITES LOCATED IN A FOUR STATE REGION (IDAHO, MONTANA, OREGON AND WASHINGTON); LOCATION AND DURATION OF ASSIGNMENTS CHANGE FREQUENTLY....

  18. Civil Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Engineering and Construction (G5600) 615 S. 43rd Avenue...

  19. Combustion Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Pictured here is an animation showing the basic mechanics of how an internal combustion engine works. With support from the Energy Department, General Motors researchers developed a new technology ...

  20. Civil Engineer

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This announcement is open to Recent Graduates who have graduated within the last two years with a bachelor's degree in Civil Engineering and meet the requirements listed under the Qualifications...

  1. Engineering Technician

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region Engineering and Construction (G5600) 615 S. 43rd Avenue...

  2. Harmonic engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2009-10-20

    A high efficiency harmonic engine based on a resonantly reciprocating piston expander that extracts work from heat and pressurizes working fluid in a reciprocating piston compressor. The engine preferably includes harmonic oscillator valves capable of oscillating at a resonant frequency for controlling the flow of working fluid into and out of the expander, and also preferably includes a shunt line connecting an expansion chamber of the expander to a buffer chamber of the expander for minimizing pressure variations in the fluidic circuit of the engine. The engine is especially designed to operate with very high temperature input to the expander and very low temperature input to the compressor, to produce very high thermal conversion efficiency.

  3. microbial engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    microbial engineering - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  4. Reliability Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LA-UR 15-27450 This document is approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited Reliability Engineering Reliability Engineering Current practice in reliability is often fragmented, does not cover the full system lifecycle * Reliability needs to be addressed in design, development, and operational life * Reliability analysis should integrate information from components and systems Integrate proven reliability methods with world-class statistical science * Use methods and tools

  5. structured engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    engineering - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  6. Increased oil production and reserves utilizing secondary/tertiary recovery techniques on small reservoirs in the Paradox basin, Utah. Annual report, February 9, 1996--February 8, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chidsey, T.C. Jr.

    1997-08-01

    The Paradox basin of Utah, Colorado, and Arizona contains nearly 100 small oil fields producing from carbonate buildups or mounds within the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation. These fields typically have one to four wells with primary production ranging from 700,000 to 2,000,000 barrels of oil per field at a 15 to 20% recovery rate. At least 200 million barrels of oil is at risk of being unrecovered in these small fields because of inefficient recovery practices and undrained heterogeneous reservoirs. Five fields (Anasazi, Mule, Blue Hogan, Heron North, and Runway) within the Navajo Nation of southeastern Utah are being evaluated for waterflood or carbon-dioxide-miscible flood projects based upon geological characterization and reservoir modeling. The results can be applied to other fields in the Paradox basin and the Rocky Mountain region, the Michigan and Illinois basins, and the Midcontinent. The Anasazi field was selected for the initial geostatistical modeling and reservoir simulation. A compositional simulation approach is being used to model primary depletion, waterflood, and CO{sub 2}-flood processes. During this second year of the project, team members performed the following reservoir-engineering analysis of Anasazi field: (1) relative permeability measurements of the supra-mound and mound-core intervals, (2) completion of geologic model development of the Anasazi reservoir units for use in reservoir simulation studies including completion of a series of one-dimensional, carbon dioxide-displacement simulations to analyze the carbon dioxide-displacement mechanism that could operate in the Paradox basin system of reservoirs, and (3) completion of the first phase of the full-field, three-dimensional Anasazi reservoir simulation model, and the start of the history matching and reservoir performance prediction phase of the simulation study.

  7. Innovative MIOR Process Utilizing Indigenous Reservoir Constituents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hitzman, D.O.; Stepp, A.K.

    2003-02-11

    This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions for improving oil production. The goal was to identify indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with inorganic nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents. The potential of the system will be illustrated and demonstrated by the example of biopolymer production on oil recovery.

  8. Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    A literature search on reservoir and/or well stimulation techniques suitable for application in geothermal fields is presented. The literature on stimulation techniques in oil and gas field applications was also searched and evaluated as to its relevancy to geothermal operations. The equivalent low-temperature work documented in the open literature is cited, and an attempt is made to evaluate the relevance of this information as far as high-temperature stimulation work is concerned. Clays play an important role in any stimulation work. Therefore, special emphasis has been placed on clay behavior anticipated in geothermal operations. (MHR)

  9. Geothermal Reservoir Technology Research Program: Abstracts of selected research projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, M.J.

    1993-03-01

    Research projects are described in the following areas: geothermal exploration, mapping reservoir properties and reservoir monitoring, and well testing, simulation, and predicting reservoir performance. The objectives, technical approach, and project status of each project are presented. The background, research results, and future plans for each project are discussed. The names, addresses, and telephone and telefax numbers are given for the DOE program manager and the principal investigators. (MHR)

  10. Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone reservoirs. Quarterly progress report, January 1, 1991--March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelkar, B.G.

    1993-08-08

    The overall objectives of this work are: (i) to investigate the importance of various qualities and quantities of data on the optimization of waterflooding performance; and (ii) to study the application of newly developed geostatistical techniques to analyze available production data to predict future proposals of infill drilling. The study will be restricted to Pennsylvanian sandstone reservoirs commonly found in Oklahoma.

  11. Flow and Thermal Behavior of an EGS Reservoir - Geothermal Code...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Flow and Thermal Behavior of an EGS Reservoir - Geothermal Code Comparison Study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Flow and Thermal Behavior of an EGS ...

  12. 5641_FrozenReservoirs | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Little is known about how to produce conventional oil from a frozen reservoir. Most prior work has been on developing production techniques for heavy oil in unconsolidated but ...

  13. Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title...

  14. Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada, Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper:...

  15. Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    applied to thermal systems of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Long Valley, California, and Raft River, Idaho to estimate deep reservoir temperatures of 360, 240, and 142C,...

  16. ,"New Mexico Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

  17. Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    eastern California Optimum development of this reservoir requires an understanding of the fracture hydrology of the Coso Mountains crystalline terrain and its hydrologic connection...

  18. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude...

  19. A Simple, Fast Method of Estimating Fractured Reservoir Geometry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fractured Reservoir Geometry from Tracer Tests Abstract A simple method of estimating flow geometry and pore geometry from conservative tracer tests in single phase geothermal...

  20. Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    geothermal reservoir characteristics. Authors Sabodh K. Garg, John W. Pritchett, Philip E. Wannamaker and Jim Combs Published GRC, 2007 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI...

  1. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Blackfoot Reservoir Area ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References Amy Hutsinpiller, W. T. Parry (1985) Geochemistry And Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot Reservoir Region, Southeastern Idaho Additional References...

  2. ,"Texas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Dry Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic...

  3. Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geeothermal Reservoirs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geeothermal Reservoirs presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  4. Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR and MEQ Monitoring EGS Stimulation and ... and Productivity in Enhanced Geothermal Systems GBCGE Resarch, Education and Outreach ...

  5. Numerical simulation of water injection into vapor-dominated reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, K.

    1995-01-01

    Water injection into vapor-dominated reservoirs is a means of condensate disposal, as well as a reservoir management tool for enhancing energy recovery and reservoir life. We review different approaches to modeling the complex fluid and heat flow processes during injection into vapor-dominated systems. Vapor pressure lowering, grid orientation effects, and physical dispersion of injection plumes from reservoir heterogeneity are important considerations for a realistic modeling of injection effects. An example of detailed three-dimensional modeling of injection experiments at The Geysers is given.

  6. Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Methodologies for Reservoir Characterization Using Fluid Inclusion Gas Chemistry presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  7. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2002-04-30

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through December 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the First Quarter 2002, the project team developed an accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and began implementing the associated well work in March. The Tar V pilot steamflood project will be converted to post-steamflood cold water injection in April 2002. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Most of the 2001 well work resulted in maintaining oil and gross fluid production and water injection rates. Reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are at 88% and 91% hydrostatic levels, respectively. Well work during the first quarter and plans for 2002 are described in the Reservoir Management section. The steamflood operation in the Tar V pilot project is mature and profitable. Recent production performance has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that have been addressed during this quarter. As the fluid production temperatures were beginning to exceed 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and will be converted to cold water injection next quarter.

  8. INNOVATIVE MIOR PROCESS UTILIZING INDIGENOUS RESERVOIR CONSTITUENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.O. Hitzman; A.K. Stepp; D.M. Dennis; L.R. Graumann

    2003-09-01

    This research program was directed at improving the knowledge of reservoir ecology and developing practical microbial solutions and technologies for improving oil production. The goal was to identify and utilize indigenous microbial populations which can produce beneficial metabolic products and develop a methodology to stimulate those select microbes with nutrient amendments to increase oil recovery. This microbial technology has the capability of producing multiple oil-releasing agents. Experimental laboratory work in model sandpack cores was conducted using microbial cultures isolated from produced water samples. Comparative laboratory studies demonstrating in situ production of microbial products as oil recovery agents were conducted in sand packs with natural field waters using cultures and conditions representative of oil reservoirs. Increased oil recovery in multiple model sandpack systems was achieved and the technology and results were verified by successful field studies. Direct application of the research results has lead to the development of a feasible, practical, successful, and cost-effective technology which increases oil recovery. This technology is now being commercialized and applied in numerous field projects to increase oil recovery. Two field applications of the developed technology reported production increases of 21% and 24% in oil recovery.

  9. Rotary engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyman, U.

    1987-02-03

    A rotary engine is described comprising: two covers spaced from one another; rotors located between the covers and rotating and planetating in different phases; the rotors interengaging to form working chambers therebetween; means to supply fluid to the working chambers and means to exhaust fluid from the working chambers during the operating cycle of the engine; gearing for synchronizing rotation and planetation of the rotors and each including first and second gears arranged so that one of the gears is connected with the rotors while the other of the gears is connected with an immovable part of the engine and the gears engage with one another; carriers interconnecting the rotors and planetating in the same phase with the planetation of the rotors for synchronizing the rotation and planetation of the rotors; shafts arranged to support the carriers during their planetations; and elements for connecting the covers with one another.

  10. The Economic Benefits Of Multipurpose Reservoirs In The United States- Federal Hydropower Fleet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadjerioua, Boualem; Witt, Adam M.; Stewart, Kevin M.; Bonnet Acosta, Marisol; Mobley, Miles

    2015-09-01

    The United States is home to over 80,000 dams, of which approximately 3% are equipped with hydroelectric generating capabilities. When a dam serves as a hydropower facility, it provides a variety of energy services that range from clean, reliable power generation to load balancing that supports grid stability. In most cases, the benefits of dams and their associated reservoirs go far beyond supporting the nation s energy demand. As evidenced by the substantial presence of non-powered dams with the ability to store water in large capacities, the primary purpose of a dam may not be hydropower, but rather one of many other purposes. A dam and reservoir may support navigation, recreation, flood control, irrigation, and water supply, with each multipurpose benefit providing significant social and economic impacts on a local, regional, and national level. When hydropower is one of the services provided by a multipurpose reservoir, it is then part of an integrated system of competing uses. Operating rules, management practices, consumer demands, and environmental constraints must all be balanced to meet the multipurpose project s objectives. When federal dams are built, they are authorized by Congress to serve one or more functions. Legislation such as the Water Resources Development Act regulates the operation of the facility in order to coordinate the authorized uses and ensure the dam s intended objectives are being met. While multipurpose reservoirs account for billions of dollars in contributions to National Economic Development (NED) every year, no attempt has been made to evaluate their benefits on a national scale. This study is an on-going work conducted by Oak Ridge National Laboratory in an effort to estimate the economic benefits of multipurpose hydropower reservoirs in the United States. Given the important role that federal hydropower plays in the U.S., the first focus of this research will target the three main federal hydropower owners Tennessee Valley Authority, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. Together these three agencies own and operate 157 powered dams which account for almost half of the total installed hydropower capacity in the U.S. Future work will include engaging publicly-owned utilities and the private sector in order to quantify the benefits of all multipurpose hydropower reservoirs in the U.S.

  11. Potosi Reservoir Modeling; History and Recommendations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Valerie; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    As a part of a larger project co-funded by the United States Department of Energy (US DOE) to evaluate the potential of formations within the Cambro-Ordovician strata above the Mt. Simon as potential targets for carbon sequestration in the Illinois and Michigan Basins, the Illinois Clean Coal Institute (ICCI) requested Schlumberger to evaluate the potential injectivity and carbon dioxide (CO₂) plume size of the Cambrian Potosi Formation. The evaluation of this formation was accomplished using wireline data, core data, pressure data, and seismic data from two projects: the US DOE-funded Illinois Basin–Decatur Project being conducted by the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium in Macon County, Illinois, as well as data from the Illinois – Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (IL-ICCS) project funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. In 2010, technical performance evaluations on the Cambrian Potosi Formation were performed through reservoir modeling. The data included formation tops from mud logs, well logs from the Verification Well 1 (VW1) and the Injection Well (CCS1), structural and stratigraphic formation from three dimensional (3D) seismic data, and field data from several waste water injection wells for the Potosi Formation. The intention was for two million tonnes per annum (MTPA) of CO₂ to be injected for 20 years into the Potosi Formation. In 2013, updated reservoir models for the Cambrian Potosi Formation were evaluated. The data included formation tops from mud logs, well logs from the CCS1, VW1, and Verification Well 2 (VW2) wells, structural and stratigraphic formation from a larger 3D seismic survey, and field data from several waste water injection wells for Potosi Formation. The objective is to simulate the injection of CO₂ at a rate 3.5 million tons per annum (3.2 million tonnes per annum [MTPA]) for 30 years 106 million tons (96 MT total) into the Potosi Formation. The Potosi geomodeling efforts have evolved from using data from a single well in 2010 to the inclusion of data from three wells in 2013 which largely leverage the porosity and permeability logs plus knowledge of lost circulation zones. The first Potosi model (Potosi Geobody Model 2010) attempted to use the available seismic inversion data to inform the geomodel and predict vugular zones in advance of drilling VW1. Lost circulation zones in VW1 came in as the geologists predicted. The model was not implemented in subsequent simulation work. To date, reservoir models used for flow simulation work have relied predominately on Gaussian distributed properties (porosity and permeability) and have employed a single injection well. Potosi Model 2013b incorporated the new VW2 logs, and exhibited an extra level of sophistication by delineating the vugular intervals. This method added further realism that likely represents the best reservoir approximation to date. Where the 2010 reservoir models were 10 by 10 mi (16 by 16 km) in area, the 2013 models were expanded in size to 30 by 30 mi (48 by 48 km). The latest reservoir simulations show that a minimum of four injectors might be required to meet target injection rates. Still, there is data that requires further scrutiny and modeling methodologies that require testing for the Potosi Formation. This work is currently ongoing, and the next phase of the reservoir modeling intends to implement valuable data like porosity derived from seismic inversion, seismically derived geobodies, or a combination of both to further define vugular zones and the porosity distribution within the Potosi Formation. Understanding the dual porosity, dual permeability character of the Potosi remains the greatest challenge in representing this formation. Further analysis of the FMI* fullbore formation microimager data may aid in assessing this uncertainty. The Potosi Formation is indeed an interesting formation, and recommendations to further characterize it are included in the following list: - Data acquisition to identify the vugs permeability, distribution, and interconnectivity could be considered to perform a more rigorous evaluation of the Potosi Formation injectivity and capacity. This could be achieved by performing an injection test on a vugular interval to determine the vugs permeability, and an interference test between wells to evaluate the local vugs extent and interconnectivity. - A thorough study of the available FMI data may reveal specifics on estimating the vug to matrix ratio. This estimate could be used to further condition the porosity distribution. Porosity logs alone might underestimate the formation’s porosity associated with vugs. Porosity mapping derived from the seismic inversion could also be used in the succeeding task to characterize the lateral porosity distribution within the reservoir. This could involve the geobody methodology previously attempted in 2010. With or without seismic inversion porosity mapping, it is worth exploring whether increased lateral heterogeneity plays a significant role in Potosi injectivity. Investigations on vugular, dolomitic outcrops suggest that there may be significantly greater lateral heterogeneity than what has been modeled here. - The FMI data also reveals the presence of and helps describe open fractures. The presence of fractures will further enhance the formation’s permeability. The task of leveraging this data in the geomodeling effort still remains. Under the best of circumstances, this data describing open fractures may be combined with seismic attributes to delineate fracture corridors. Fracture modeling would certainly add another layer of sophistication to the model. Its contribution and applicability remain to be explored. - Facies modeling within the Potosi has yet to be thoroughly addressed. The carbonates during the time of deposition are believed to be regionally extensive. However, it may be worth delineating the reservoir with other regional wells or modern day analogues to understand the extent of the Potosi. More specifically, the model could incorporate lateral changes or trends if deemed necessary to represent facies transition. - Currently there is no fracture gradient data available for the Potosi in the Decatur project area. The acquisition of the fracture pressure data could be considered to determine an appropriate maximum allowable bottomhole injection pressure. This would allow the evaluation of injectivity and the required number of wells in a more precise manner. - Special core analysis (SCAL) to determine the relative permeability and capillary pressure of the vugs and matrix could be considered to have a better estimation of the reservoir injectivity and plume extent. - Formation water sampling and analysis could be considered for the Potosi to estimate the water salinity and properties. A vertical flow performance evaluation could be considered for the succeeding task to determine the appropriate tubing size, the required injection tubing head pressure, and to investigate whether the corresponding well injection rate falls within the tubing erosional velocity limit. - A simulation using several injectors could also be considered to determine the required number of wells to achieve the injection target while taking into account the pressure interference.

  12. Value Engineering

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-01-07

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) value engineering policy that meets the requirements of Public Law 104-106, Section 4306 as codified by 41 United States Code 432. Canceled by DOE N 251.94. Does not cancel other directives.

  13. Harmonic engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, Charles L.; Sewall, Noel; Boroa, Carl

    2014-08-19

    An engine based on a reciprocating piston engine that extracts work from pressurized working fluid. The engine includes a harmonic oscillator inlet valve capable of oscillating at a resonant frequency for controlling the flow of working fluid into of the engine. In particular, the inlet valve includes an inlet valve head and a spring arranged together as a harmonic oscillator so that the inlet valve head is moveable from an unbiased equilibrium position to a biased closed position occluding an inlet. Upon releasing the inlet valve the inlet valve head undergoes a single oscillation past the equilibrium positio to a maximum open position and returns to a biased return position close to the closed position to choke the flow and produce a pressure drop across the inlet valve causing the inlet valve to close. Protrusions carried either by the inlet valve head or piston head are used to bump open the inlet valve from the closed position and initiate the single oscillation of the inlet valve head, and protrusions carried either by the outlet valve head or piston head are used to close the outlet valve ahead of the bump opening of the inlet valve.

  14. Aligned vertical fractures, HTI reservoir symmetry, and Thomsenseismic anisotropy parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, James G.

    2007-06-27

    The Sayers and Kachanov (1991) crack-influence parametersare shown to be directly related to Thomsen (1986) weak-anisotropyseismic parameters for fractured reservoirs when the crack density issmall enough. These results are then applied to seismic wave propagationin reservoirs having HTI symmetry due to aligned vertical fractures. Theapproach suggests a method of inverting for fracture density from wavespeed data.

  15. Gypsy Field project in reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castagna, John P.; Jr., O'Meara, Daniel J.

    2000-01-12

    The overall objective of this project was to use extensive Gypsy Field Laboratory and data as a focus for developing and testing reservoir characterization methods that are targeted at improved recovery of conventional oil. This report describes progress since project report DOE/BC/14970-7 and covers the period June 1997-September 1998 and represents one year of funding originally allocated for the year 1996. During the course of the work previously performed, high resolution geophysical and outcrop data revealed the importance of fractures at the Gypsy site. In addition, personnel changes and alternative funding (OCAST and oil company support of various kinds) allowed the authors to leverage DOE contributions and focus more on geophysical characterization.

  16. High resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Changmin; Lin Kexiang; Liu Huaibo

    1997-08-01

    This is China`s first case study of high resolution reservoir geological modelling using outcrop information. The key of the modelling process is to build a prototype model and using the model as a geological knowledge bank. Outcrop information used in geological modelling including seven aspects: (1) Determining the reservoir framework pattern by sedimentary depositional system and facies analysis; (2) Horizontal correlation based on the lower and higher stand duration of the paleo-lake level; (3) Determining the model`s direction based on the paleocurrent statistics; (4) Estimating the sandbody communication by photomosaic and profiles; (6) Estimating reservoir properties distribution within sandbody by lithofacies analysis; and (7) Building the reservoir model in sandbody scale by architectural element analysis and 3-D sampling. A high resolution reservoir geological model of Youshashan oil field has been built by using this method.

  17. Opportunities to improve oil productivity in unstructured deltaic reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This report contains presentations presented at a technical symposium on oil production. Chapter 1 contains summaries of the presentations given at the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored symposium and key points of the discussions that followed. Chapter 2 characterizes the light oil resource from fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoirs in the Tertiary Oil Recovery Information System (TORIS). An analysis of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and advanced secondary recovery (ASR) potential for fluvial-dominated deltaic reservoirs based on recovery performance and economic modeling as well as the potential resource loss due to well abandonments is presented. Chapter 3 provides a summary of the general reservoir characteristics and properties within deltaic deposits. It is not exhaustive treatise, rather it is intended to provide some basic information about geologic, reservoir, and production characteristics of deltaic reservoirs, and the resulting recovery problems.

  18. Transient well testing in two-phase geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aydelotte, S.R.

    1980-03-01

    A study of well test analysis techniques in two-phase geothermal reservoirs has been conducted using a three-dimensional, two-phase, wellbore and reservoir simulation model. Well tests from Cerro Prieto and the Hawaiian Geothermal project have been history matched. Using these well tests as a base, the influence of reservoir permeability, porosity, thickness, and heat capacity, along with flow rate and fracturing were studied. Single and two-phase transient well test equations were used to analyze these tests with poor results due to rapidly changing fluid properties and inability to calculate the flowing steam saturation in the reservoir. The injection of cold water into the reservoir does give good data from which formation properties can be calculated.

  19. Chickamauga Reservoir 1992 fisheries monitoring cove rotenone results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerley, B.L.

    1993-06-01

    The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is required by the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Permit for Sequoyah Nuclear Plant (SQN) to conduct and report annually a nonradiological operational monitoring program to evaluate potential effects of SQN on Chickamauga Reservoir. This monitoring program was initially designed to identify potential changes in water quality and biological communities in Chickamauga Reservoir resulting from operation of SQU. Chickamauga Reservoir cove rotenone sampling has also been conducted as part of the preoperational monitoring program for Watts Bar Nuclear Plant (WBN) to evaluate the combined effects of operating two nuclear facilities on one reservoir once WBU becomes operational. The purpose of this report is to present results of cove rotenone sampling conducted on Chickamauga Reservoir in 1992.

  20. Integration of the geological/engineering model with production performance for Patrick Draw Field, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, S.

    1993-03-01

    The NIPER Reservoir Assessment and Characterization Research Program incorporates elements of the near-term, mid-term and long-term objectives of the National Energy Strategy-Advanced Oil Recovery Program. The interdisciplinary NIPER team focuses on barrier island reservoirs, a high priority class of reservoirs, that contains large amounts of remaining oil in place located in mature fields with a high number of shut-in and abandoned wells. The project objectives are to: (1) identify heterogeneities that influence the movement and trapping of reservoir fluids in two examples of shoreline barrier reservoirs (Patrick Draw Field, WY and Bell Creek Field, MT); (2) develop geological and engineering reservoir characterization methods to quantify reservoir architecture and predict mobile oil saturation distribution for application of targeted infill drilling and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes; and (3) summarize reservoir and production characteristics of shoreline barrier reservoirs to determine similarities and differences. The major findings of the research include: (1) hydrogeochemical analytical techniques were demonstrated to be an inexpensive reservoir characterization tool that provides information on reservoir architecture and compartmentalization; (2) the formation water salinity in Patrick Draw Field varies widely across the field and can result in a 5 to 12% error in saturation values calculated from wireline logs if the salinity variations and corresponding resistivity values are not accounted for; and (3) an analysis of the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of Patrick Draw Field indicates that CO[sub 2] flooding in the Monell Unit and horizontal drilling in the Arch Unit are potential methods to recover additional oil from the field.

  1. Integration of the geological/engineering model with production performance for Patrick Draw Field, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, S.

    1993-03-01

    The NIPER Reservoir Assessment and Characterization Research Program incorporates elements of the near-term, mid-term and long-term objectives of the National Energy Strategy-Advanced Oil Recovery Program. The interdisciplinary NIPER team focuses on barrier island reservoirs, a high priority class of reservoirs, that contains large amounts of remaining oil in place located in mature fields with a high number of shut-in and abandoned wells. The project objectives are to: (1) identify heterogeneities that influence the movement and trapping of reservoir fluids in two examples of shoreline barrier reservoirs (Patrick Draw Field, WY and Bell Creek Field, MT); (2) develop geological and engineering reservoir characterization methods to quantify reservoir architecture and predict mobile oil saturation distribution for application of targeted infill drilling and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes; and (3) summarize reservoir and production characteristics of shoreline barrier reservoirs to determine similarities and differences. The major findings of the research include: (1) hydrogeochemical analytical techniques were demonstrated to be an inexpensive reservoir characterization tool that provides information on reservoir architecture and compartmentalization; (2) the formation water salinity in Patrick Draw Field varies widely across the field and can result in a 5 to 12% error in saturation values calculated from wireline logs if the salinity variations and corresponding resistivity values are not accounted for; and (3) an analysis of the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of Patrick Draw Field indicates that CO{sub 2} flooding in the Monell Unit and horizontal drilling in the Arch Unit are potential methods to recover additional oil from the field.

  2. An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres reservoir, Foster and south Cowden fields, Ector County, Texas. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trentham, R.C.; Weinbrandt, R.; Reeves, J.J.

    1996-06-17

    The principal objective of this research is to demonstrate in the field that 3D seismic data can be used to aid in identifying porosity zones, permeability barriers and thief zones and thereby improve waterflood design. Geologic and engineering data will be integrated with the geophysical data to result in a detailed reservoir characterization. Reservoir simulation will then be used to determine infill drilling potential and the optimum waterflood design for the project area. This design will be implemented and the success of the waterflood evaluated.

  3. An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres reservoir, Foster and South Cowden fields, Ector County, Texas. Quarterly report, April 1--June 31, 1996. Revision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trentham, R.C.; Weinbrandt, R.; Robertson, W.

    1996-10-17

    The principal objective of this research is to demonstrate in the field that 3D seismic data can be used to aid in identifying porosity zones, permeability barriers and thief zones and thereby improve waterflood design. Geologic and engineering data will be integrated with the geophysical data to result in a detailed reservoir characterization. Reservoir simulation will then be used to determine infill drilling potential and the optimum waterflood design for the project area. This design will be implemented and the success of the waterflood evaluated.

  4. An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres Reservoir, Foster and South Cowden fields, Ector County, Texas. Quarterly report, April 1--June 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trentham, R.C.; Weinbrandt, R.; Robertson, W.

    1996-10-17

    The principal objective of this research is to demonstrate in the field that 3D seismic data can be used to aid in identifying porosity zones, permeability barriers and thief zones and thereby improve waterflood design. Geologic and engineering data will be integrated with the geophysical data to result in a detailed reservoir characterization. Reservoir simulation will then be used to determine infill drilling potential and the optimum waterflood design for the project area. This design will be implemented and the success of the waterflood evaluated.

  5. Qualitative assessment of the impacts of proposed system operating strategies to resident fish within selected Columbia River Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shreffler, D.K.; Geist, D.R.; Mavros, W.V.

    1994-01-01

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), and US Army Corps of Engineers (COE) are presently conducting the System Operation Review (SOR) for the Columbia River basin. The SOR began in 1990 and is expected to provide an operating strategy that will take into consideration multiple uses of the Columbia River system including navigation, flood control, irrigation, power generation, fish migration, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, water supply, and water quality. This report provides descriptions of each of the non-modeled reservoirs and other specified river reaches. The descriptions focus on the distinct management goals for resident fish: biodiversity, species-specific concerns, and sport fisheries. In addition, this report provides a qualitative assessment of impacts to the resident fish within these reservoirs and river reaches from the 7 alternative system operating strategies. In addition to this introduction, the report contains four more sections. Section 2.0 provides the methods that were used. Reservoir descriptions appear in Section 3.0, which is a synthesis of our literature review and interviews with resident fish experts. Section 4.0 contains a discussion of potential impacts to fish within each of these reservoirs and river reaches from the 7 proposed system operating strategies. The references cited are listed in Section 5.0.

  6. Methods and systems using encapsulated tracers and chemicals for reservoir interrogation and manipulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roberts, Jeffery; Aines, Roger D; Duoss, Eric B; Spadaccini, Christopher M

    2014-11-04

    An apparatus, method, and system of reservoir interrogation. A tracer is encapsulating in a receptacle. The receptacle containing the tracer is injected into the reservoir. The tracer is analyzed for reservoir interrogation.

  7. Rotary engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fawcett, S.L.

    1987-03-03

    In an internal combustion engine, external heat engine, heat pump, gaseous expander, pump or gas compressor, the combustion is described including means forming a cylindrical working chamber having intake and exhaust port means for gases, and two pistons having an arcuate length within the range of 90/sup 0/ to 120/sup 0/ of the cylindrical portion of the working chamber to move toward and away from each other for compression and expansion of gases by rotation on separate concentrically-arranged shafts. A seal means is carried by the walls of the cylindrical working chamber at each of spaced apart locations to continuously form a gas sealing relation with both of the pistons while the pistons rotate toward and away from each other in the cylindrical working chamber.

  8. Rotary engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larson, T. G.

    1985-10-22

    The rotary engine has a circumferential main chamber and at least one smaller combustion chamber spaced from the main chamber. The rotor includes a plurality of radially-projecting sealing members in spaced relationship thereabout for maintaining a fluid-sealed condition along a single fixed transverse strip area on the interior surface of the main chamber. A single radially-oriented axially-parallel piston vane is also carried by the rotor and moves through the fixed strip area of the main chamber at each revolution of the rotor. Plural passages for intake, compression, expansion, and exhaust are ported into the main chamber at locations proximate to the fixed strip area. Valve means in the passages selectively open and close the same for a cycle of engine operation involving intake, compression, burning, and exhaust.

  9. Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems (ARES) program is designed to promote separate but parallel engine development between the major stationary, gaseous fueled engine manufacturers in the...

  10. Systems Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  11. Systems Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  12. Systems Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy Nuclear

  13. Rotary engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fawcett, S.L.

    1988-02-09

    In an internal combustion engine, external heat engine, heat pump, gaseous expander, pump or gas compressor, the combination is described including means forming a cylindrical working chamber communicating with intake and exhaust port means for gases, two pistons having an arcuate length within the range of 90/sup 0/ to 120/sup 0/ of the cylindrical surface of the working chamber. The pistons are movable toward and away from each other for compression and expansion of gases in the working chamber while separately rotating concentrically-arranged shafts, a drive shaft, three sets of gearing for connecting the pistons to the drive shaft, a first set of the gearing drivingly coupled to a first of the separate concentric shafts, a second set of the gearing drivingly coupled to a second of the concentric shaft, and a third set of the gearing comprising non-circular gears. The drive shaft is secured to one gear of each of the first, second and third gear sets of gearing for rotating the drive shaft with a substantially constant velocity and torque output throughout the several phases of the working cycle of the engine, compressor or pump.

  14. Class III Mid-Term Project, "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2007-03-31

    The overall objective of this project was to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involved improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective has been to transfer technology that can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The first budget period addressed several producibility problems in the Tar II-A and Tar V thermal recovery operations that are common in SBC reservoirs. A few of the advanced technologies developed include a three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic geologic model, a 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model to aid in reservoir management and subsequent post-steamflood development work, and a detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rocks and fluids. State of the art operational work included drilling and performing a pilot steam injection and production project via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors), implementing a hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steamflood area to improve thermal efficiency, installing a 2400-foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location, testing a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems, and starting on an advanced reservoir management system through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. The second budget period phase (BP2) continued to implement state-of-the-art operational work to optimize thermal recovery processes, improve well drilling and completion practices, and evaluate the geomechanical characteristics of the producing formations. The objectives were to further improve reservoir characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, test the proficiency of the three-dimensional geologic and thermal reservoir simulation models, identify the high permeability thief zones to reduce water breakthrough and cycling, and analyze the nonuniform distribution of the remaining oil in place. This work resulted in the redevelopment of the Tar II-A and Tar V post-steamflood projects by drilling several new wells and converting idle wells to improve injection sweep efficiency and more effectively drain the remaining oil reserves. Reservoir management work included reducing water cuts, maintaining or increasing oil production, and evaluating and minimizing further thermal-related formation compaction. The BP2 project utilized all the tools and knowledge gained throughout the DOE project to maximize recovery of the oil in place.

  15. HCCI in a Variable Compression Ratio Engine: Effects of Engine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in a Variable Compression Ratio Engine: Effects of Engine Variables HCCI in a Variable Compression Ratio Engine: Effects of Engine Variables 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction ...

  16. Project Engineer (Nuclear/Mechanical Engineer) | Princeton Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project Engineer (NuclearMechanical Engineer) Department: Engineering Supervisor(s): ... Its Mechanical Engineering Division (MED) is seeking to hire a NuclearMechanical Engineer ...

  17. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2002-11-08

    The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through June 2002, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V post-steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the Third Quarter 2002, the project team essentially completed implementing the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project developed in March 2002 and is proceeding with additional related work. The project team has completed developing laboratory research procedures to analyze the sand consolidation well completion technique and will initiate work in the fourth quarter. The Tar V pilot steamflood project terminated hot water injection and converted to post-steamflood cold water injection on April 19, 2002. Proposals have been approved to repair two sand consolidated horizontal wells that sanded up, Tar II-A well UP-955 and Tar V well J-205, with gravel-packed inner liner jobs to be performed next quarter. Other well work to be performed next quarter is to convert well L-337 to a Tar V water injector and to recomplete vertical well A-194 as a Tar V interior steamflood pattern producer. Plans have been approved to drill and complete well A-605 in Tar V in the first quarter 2003. Plans have been approved to update the Tar II-A 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and run sensitivity cases to evaluate the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Well work related to the Tar II-A accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan began in March 2002 with oil production increasing from 1009 BOPD in the first quarter to 1145 BOPD in the third quarter. Reservoir pressures have been increased during the quarter from 88% to 91% hydrostatic levels in the ''T'' sands and from 91% to 94% hydrostatic levels in the ''D'' sands. Well work during the quarter is described in the Reservoir Management section. The post-steamflood production performance in the Tar V pilot project has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations and the loss of a horizontal producer a second time to sand inflow that are being addressed in the fourth quarter. As the fluid production temperatures exceeded 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and converted to cold water injection on April 19, 2002.

  18. U.S. Federal Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) U.S. Federal Offshore Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

  19. Texas--RRC District 1 Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 1 Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  20. Texas--RRC District 9 Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 9 Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  1. Texas--RRC District 5 Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 5 Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  2. Texas--RRC District 6 Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 6 Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  3. Texas--RRC District 10 Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 10 Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  4. Texas--RRC District 8 Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Texas--RRC District 8 Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 ...

  5. Novel use of 4D Monitoring Techniques to Improve Reservoir Longevity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Novel use of 4D Monitoring Techniques to Improve Reservoir Longevity and Productivity in Enhanced Geothermal Systems Novel use of 4D Monitoring Techniques to Improve Reservoir ...

  6. Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    Each of the following types of well stimulation techniques are summarized and explained: hydraulic fracturing; thermal; mechanical, jetting, and drainhole drilling; explosive and implosive; and injection methods. Current stimulation techniques, stimulation techniques for geothermal wells, areas of needed investigation, and engineering calculations for various techniques. (MHR)

  7. Putting integrated reservoir characterization into practice - in house training

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, F.M. Jr.; Best, D.A.; Clarke, R.T.

    1997-08-01

    The need for even more efficient reservoir characterization and management has forced a change in the way Mobil Oil provides technical support to its production operations. We`ve learned that to be successful, a good understanding of the reservoir is essential. This includes an understanding of the technical and business significance of reservoir heterogeneities at different stages of field development. A multi-disciplinary understanding of the business of integrated reservoir characterization is essential and to facilitate this understanding, Mobil has developed a highly successful {open_quotes}Reservoir Characterization Field Seminar{close_quotes}. Through specific team based case studies that incorporate outcrop examples and data the program provides participants the opportunity to explore historic and alternative approaches to reservoir description, characterization and management. We explore appropriate levels and timing of data gathering, technology applications, risk assessment and management practices at different stages of field development. The case studies presented throughout the course are a unique element of the program which combine real life and hypothetical problem sets that explore how different technical disciplines interact, the approaches to a problem solving they use, the assumptions and uncertainties contained in their contributions and the impact those conclusions may have on other disciplines involved in the overall reservoir management process. The team building aspect of the course was an added bonus.

  8. Engineering at SLAC: Designing and Constructing Experimental Devices for SSRL - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djang, Austin

    2015-08-21

    This presentation describes the design and construction of three experimental devices for the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource.

  9. Stirling engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolger, S.R.

    1992-03-17

    This patent describes an engine. It comprises at least two variable volume compartments joined by a porous medium regenerator; heat exchangers in heat exchange relationships with the variable volume compartments; a fixed quantity of gas in the compartments; a piston in each of the compartments; means to control the pistons to vary the volumes of the gas transferring between the compartments in the form of overlapping quadrilateral waveforms to compress the gas in both compartments through the same cycle pressure ratio during a cycle compression step, to shift the gas between compartments and to expand the gas in both compartments through the same cycle pressure ratio during a cycle expansion step.

  10. Engineers Constructors

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Engineers - Constructors ~ /:~ ( ' r,.... I!~\ l.,_",z;(J;' Bechtel National, Inc. Oak Ridge Office Jackson Plaza Tower 800 Oak Ridge Turnpike Oak Ridge. Tennessee Mail Address: P. O. B01l 350. Oak Ridge. TN 37830 bce-. R. Barber C. t1iller E. Wal ker C. Knoke G. Phillips G. Scott L. Blevins K. Harer DOE File No. 030-04G Professional Land Surveying 1404 Second Street Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 Attn: Mr. Robert Benavides Reference: Purchase Contract l4501-01j04-PC-19 Bayo Canyon Survey Dear

  11. An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres reservoir, Foster and South Cowden fields, Ector County, Texas, Class II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trentham, DGS, Robert C.; Robinson, M.S., William C.; Wider, Kevin; Weinbrandt, Ph.D.,PE, Richard

    2000-04-14

    A project to recover economic amounts of oil from a very mature oil field is being conducted by Laguna Petroleum Corporation of Midland, Texas, with partial funding from a U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant to study shallow carbonate rock reservoirs. The objectives of the project are to use modern engineering methods to optimize oil field management and to use geological and geophysical data to recover untapped potential within the petroleum reservoirs. The integration of data and techniques from these disciplines has yielded results greater than those achievable without their cooperation. The cost of successfully accomplishing these goals is to be low enough for even small independent operators to afford. This article is a report describing accomplishments for the fiscal year 1998-1999.

  12. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2000-12-06

    Through March 2000, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar (Tar II-A) Zone. Work is continuing on improving core analysis techniques, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post steamflood project. Work was discontinued on the stochastic geologic model and developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Tar II-A Zone so the project team could use the 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model to provide alternatives for the Tar II-A post steamflood operations and shale compaction studies. The project team spent the second quarter 2000 writing the 1997-2000 Annual Report, completing research for the project on the subjects mentioned above, and operating the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and the Tar V horizontal well steamflood pilot. Thermal-related formation compaction is a concern of the project team due to observed surface subsidence in the local area above the Tar II-A steamflood project. On January 12, 1999, the steamflood project lost its inexpensive steam source from the Harbor Cogeneration Plant as a result of the recent deregulation of electrical power rates in California. An operational plan was developed and implemented to mitigate the effects of the two situations by injecting cold water into the flanks of the steamflood. The purpose of flank injection has been to increase and subsequently maintain reservoir pressures at a level that would fill-up the steam chests in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands before they can collapse and cause formation compaction and to prevent the steam chests from reoccurring. A new 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model was used to provide operations with the necessary water injection rates and allowable production rates by well to minimize future surface subsidence and to accurately project reservoir steam chest fill-up by October 1999. A geomechanics study and a separate reservoir simulation study have been performed to determine the possible indicators of formation compaction, the temperatures at which specific indicators are affected and the projected temperature profiles in the over and underburden shales over a ten year period following steam injection. Further geomechanics work should be conducted. It was believed that once steam chest fill-up occurred, the reservoir would act more like a waterflood and production and cold water injection could be operated at lower Injection to production ratios (I/P) and net injection rates. In mid-September 1999, net water injection was reduced substantially in the ''D'' sands following steam chest fill-up. This caused reservoir pressures to plummet about 100 psi within six weeks. Starting in late-October 1999, net ''D'' sand injection was increased and reservoir pressures have slowly increased back to steam chest fill-up pressures as of the end of March 2000. When the ''T'' sands reached fill-up, net ''T'' sand injection remained at a high rate and reservoir pressures stabilized. A more detailed discussion of the operational changes is in the Reservoir Management section of this report. A reservoir pressure monitoring program was developed as part of the poststeamflood reservoir management plan. This bi-monthly sonic fluid level program measures the static fluid levels in all idle wells an average of once a month. The fluid levels have been calibrated for liquid and gas density gradients by comparing a number of them with Amerada bomb pressures taken within a few days. This data allows engineering to respond quickly to rises or declines in reservoir pressure by either increasing injection or production or idling production. Expanding thermal recovery oper

  13. INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Hara

    2000-12-06

    Through December 1999, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar (Tar II-A) Zone. Work is continuing on improving core analysis techniques, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post steamflood project. Work was discontinued on the stochastic geologic model and developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Tar II-A Zone in order to focus the remaining time on using the 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model to provide alternatives for the Tar II-A post steamflood operations and shale compaction studies. Thermal-related formation compaction is a concern of the project team due to observed surface subsidence in the local area above the Tar II-A steamflood project. On January 12, 1999, the steamflood project lost its inexpensive steam source from the Harbor Cogeneration Plant as a result of the recent deregulation of electrical power rates in California. An operational plan was developed and implemented to mitigate the effects of the two situations by injecting cold water into the flanks of the steamflood. The purpose of flank injection has been to increase and subsequently maintain reservoir pressures at a level that would fill-up the steam chests in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands before they can collapse and cause formation compaction and to prevent the steam chests from reoccurring. A new 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model was used to provide operations with the necessary water injection rates and allowable production rates by well to minimize future surface subsidence and to accurately project reservoir steam chest fill-up by October 1999. A geomechanics study and a separate reservoir simulation study have been performed to determine the possible indicators of formation compaction, the temperatures at which specific indicators are affected and the projected temperature profiles in the over and underburden shales over a ten year period following steam injection. It was believed that once steam chest fill-up occurred, the reservoir would act more like a waterflood and production and cold water injection could be operated at lower Injection to production ratios (I/P) and net injection rates. In mid-September 1999, net water injection was reduced substantially in the ''D'' sands following steam chest fill-up. This caused reservoir pressures to plummet about 100 psi within six weeks. Starting in late-October 1999, net ''D'' sand injection was increased and reservoir pressures have slowly increased back to steam chest fill-up pressures as of the end of March 2000. When the ''T'' sands reached fill-up, net ''T'' sand injection was lowered only slightly and reservoir pressures stabilized. A more detailed discussion of the operational changes is in the Reservoir Management section of this report. A reservoir pressure monitoring program was developed as part of the poststeamflood reservoir management plan. This bi-monthly sonic fluid level program measures the static fluid levels in all idle wells an average of once a month. The fluid levels have been calibrated for liquid and gas density gradients by comparing a number of them with Amerada bomb pressures taken within a few days. This data allows engineering to respond quickly to rises or declines in reservoir pressure by either increasing injection or production or idling production. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current thermal operations in the Wilm

  14. Computed microtomography of reservoir core samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coles, M.E.; Muegge, E.L.; Spanne, P.; Jones, K.W.

    1995-03-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) is often utilized to evaluate and characterize structural characteristics within reservoir core material systems. Generally, medical CT scanners have been employed because of their availability and ease of use. Of interest lately has been the acquisition of three-dimensional, high resolution descriptions of rock and pore structures for characterization of the porous media and for modeling of single and multiphase transport processes. The spatial resolution of current medical CT scanners is too coarse for pore level imaging of most core samples. Recently developed high resolution computed microtomography (CMT) using synchrotron X-ray sources is analogous to conventional medical CT scanning and provides the ability to obtain three-dimensional images of specimens with a spatial resolution on the order of micrometers. Application of this technique to the study of core samples provides two- and three-dimensional high resolution description of pore structure and mineral distributions. Pore space and interconnectivity is accurately characterized and visualized. Computed microtomography data can serve as input into pore-level simulation techniques. A generalized explanation of the technique is provided, with comparison to conventional CT scanning techniques and results. Computed microtomographic results of several sandstone samples are presented and discussed. Bulk porosity values and mineralogical identification were obtained from the microtomograms and compared with gas porosity and scanning electron microscope results on tandem samples.

  15. An integrated study of the Grayburg/San Andres Reservoir, Foster and South Cowden Fields, Ector County, Texas. Annual report, August 1, 1996--July 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trentham, R.C.; Weinbrandt, R.; Robinson, W.

    1997-12-01

    The objective of this two-phase study is to demonstrate an integrated methodology for reservoir characterization of shallow shelf carbonate reservoir that is feasible, and cost effective for the independent operator. Furthermore, it will provide one of the first public demonstrations of the enhancement of reservoir characterization using high-resolution three dimensional (3D) seismic data. This particular project is evaluating the Grayburg and San Andres reservoirs in the Foster and South Cowden Fields, Ector County, Texas. This 68 year old field was approaching its economic limit and the leases evaluated would have been abandoned in 10 years. A multidisciplinary approach to waterflood design and implementation, along with the addition of reserves by selective infill drilling and deepening, is being applied to this field. This approach in reservoir development will be applicable to a wide range of shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs throughout the US. The first phase of the project included the design, acquisition, and interpretation of the 3D seismic survey, the collection and evaluation of geologic (core and log) data, and engineering (historical production, well test, injection) data from a variety of sources. From this work, a geologically based production history model was simulated. Based on the recommendations made at the end of Phase One, three new wells were drilled, one existing well was deepened, two wells were worked over, one TA`d well was re-entered, and one well was converted to injection. In addition, the quality of the injection water was greatly improved, a step necessary prior to increasing injection in the project area. The realignment of the waterflood and all additional well work await the completion of the seismic based history match and engineering simulation.

  16. Helium isotope study of geothermal features in Chile with field and laboratory data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dobson, Patrick

    2013-02-11

    Dobson, P.F., Kennedy, B.M., Reich, M., Sanchez, P., and Morata, D. (2013) Effects of volcanism, crustal thickness, and large scale faulting on the He isotope signatures of geothermal systems in Chile. Proceedings, 38th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Feb. 11-13, 2013

  17. Helium isotope study of geothermal features in Chile with field and laboratory data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dobson, Patrick

    Dobson, P.F., Kennedy, B.M., Reich, M., Sanchez, P., and Morata, D. (2013) Effects of volcanism, crustal thickness, and large scale faulting on the He isotope signatures of geothermal systems in Chile. Proceedings, 38th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Feb. 11-13, 2013

  18. Reservoir characterization of the Ordovician Red River Formation in southwest Williston Basin Bowman County, ND and Harding County, SD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippel, M.A.; Luff, K.D.; Hendricks, M.L.; Eby, D.E.

    1998-07-01

    This topical report is a compilation of characterizations by different disciplines of the Red River Formation in the southwest portion of the Williston Basin and the oil reservoirs which it contains in an area which straddles the state line between North Dakota and South Dakota. Goals of the report are to increase understanding of the reservoir rocks, oil-in-place, heterogeneity, and methods for improved recovery. The report is divided by discipline into five major sections: (1) geology, (2) petrography-petrophysical, (3) engineering, (4) case studies and (5) geophysical. Interwoven in these sections are results from demonstration wells which were drilled or selected for special testing to evaluate important concepts for field development and enhanced recovery. The Red River study area has been successfully explored with two-dimensional (2D) seismic. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing 3-dimensional (3D) and has been investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Targeted drilling from predictions using 3D seismic for porosity development were successful in developing significant reserves at close distances to old wells. Short-lateral and horizontal drilling technologies were tested for improved completion efficiency. Lateral completions should improve economics for both primary and secondary recovery where low permeability is a problem and higher density drilling is limited by drilling cost. Low water injectivity and widely spaced wells have restricted the application of waterflooding in the past. Water injection tests were performed in both a vertical and a horizontal well. Data from these tests were used to predict long-term injection and oil recovery.

  19. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; Dwasi Tagbor; John Nguygen; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

    1997-04-10

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period January - March 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the "Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist". The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology.

  20. A high resolution and large solid angle x-ray Raman spectroscopy end-station at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokaras, D.; Nordlund, D.; Weng, T.-C.; Velikov, P.; Wenger, D.; Garachtchenko, A.; George, M.; Borzenets, V.; Johnson, B.; Rabedeau, T.; Mori, R. Alonso; Bergmann, U.; Qian, Q.

    2012-04-15

    We present a new x-ray Raman spectroscopy end-station recently developed, installed, and operated at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource. The end-station is located at wiggler beamline 6-2 equipped with two monochromators-Si(111) and Si(311) as well as collimating and focusing optics. It consists of two multi-crystal Johann type spectrometers arranged on intersecting Rowland circles of 1 m diameter. The first one, positioned at the forward scattering angles (low-q), consists of 40 spherically bent and diced Si(110) crystals with 100 mm diameters providing about 1.9% of 4{pi} sr solid angle of detection. When operated in the (440) order in combination with the Si (311) monochromator, an overall energy resolution of 270 meV is obtained at 6462.20 eV. The second spectrometer, consisting of 14 spherically bent Si(110) crystal analyzers (not diced), is positioned at the backward scattering angles (high-q) enabling the study of non-dipole transitions. The solid angle of this spectrometer is about 0.9% of 4{pi} sr, with a combined energy resolution of 600 meV using the Si (311) monochromator. These features exceed the specifications of currently existing relevant instrumentation, opening new opportunities for the routine application of this photon-in/photon-out hard x-ray technique to emerging research in multidisciplinary scientific fields, such as energy-related sciences, material sciences, physical chemistry, etc.