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Sample records for reservoir engineering stanford

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University The Triassic sandstone reservoirs of the Paris Basin (France) have attractive geothermal potential for district heating. However, previous exploitations of these reservoirs have revealed re-injection problems

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Stanford University

    to develop in Oligocene time (approximately 30 million years ago) and continues to be an active tectonic zonePROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 RESERVOIR RESPONSE TO 28 YEARS OF PRODUCTION

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Stanford University

    carried out. Basic design and process-dependent variables of NSGH, exergy and economic parameters. Engineering-and-physical research and technical and economic substantiation of NSGH constructionPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30 -February 1, 2012

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    Santos, Juan

    in the reservoir around this fracture can be harvested, which is highly undesired for enhanced geothermal system be hydraulically stimulated to create enhanced (or engineered) geothermal reservoirs with enhanced permeabilityPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30 -February 1, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30 - February 1, 2011 Geothermal Seismology: The State of the Art Bruce R into crustal rocks for purposes such as engineering geothermal systems and sequestering CO2 often has

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University resources and the practical technological and economic aspects of resource exploitation while remaining continued in use until the present. For example, the basic framework for geothermal resource

  7. \\PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    Stanford University

    to the analysis of stress induced micro-seismicity and fracture propagations in geothermal reservoirs. Simulation of the reservoir rock. Generally, the strain-stress behavior of rocks in triaxial tests shows hardening and post\\PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Stanford University

    be able to be maintained for more than 30 years with small decreases in reservoir pressure and temperaturePROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University RESERVOIR MODEL OF THE TAKIGAMI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, OITA, JAPAN Saeid Jalilinasrabady1 , Ryuichi Itoi1

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    Stanford University

    for more than 30 years with small decreases in reservoir pressure and temperature in the production zonePROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR, OITA, JAPAN Saeid Jalilinasrabady1 , Ryuichi Itoi1 , Hiroki Gotoh2 , Toshiaki Tanaka1 1

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 MONITORING GEOTHERMAL PROCESSES WITH MICROEARTHQUAKE-tensor) mechanisms of microearthquakes at geothermal areas are valuable for diagnosing processes such as shear

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 MAPPING DEEP STRUCTURE IN GEOTHERMAL AREAS of volcanic and geothermal areas has always been limited by the absence of local microearthquakes at depth

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 Mapping Deep Structure in Geothermal Areas 3LE U.K. g.r.foulger@durham.ac.uk Tomographic study of volcanic and geothermal areas has always been

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Third Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 28-30, 2008

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    Foulger, G. R.

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Third Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 28-30, 2008 SGP-TR-185 SEISMIC MONITORING OF EGS TESTS AT THE COSO GEOTHERMAL Middlefield Rd., Menlo Park, CA 94306, e-mail: julian@usgs.gov 3 Geothermal Program Office, U.S. Navy, China

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Stanford University

    % capacity factor over a typical project life of 30 years; and (b) innovations in field management have led1 PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 FIFTY YEARS OF POWER GENERATION

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Twenty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 28-30, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . INTRODUCTION During on a previous geothermal exploration phase done 30 years ago in the Lamentin areaPROCEEDINGS, Twenty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 28-30, 2002 SGP-TR-171 PRELIMINARY GEOLOGICAL RESULTS OF RECENT EXPLORATORY

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Stanford University

    reservoirs are characterized by high temperatures and saline formation waters. Figure 1: Regions of potential1 PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University and to characterize the various fluid- material surface interactions in an EGS. These interactions were described

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Stanford University

    EGS site (Nevada) were used for the modeling analysis. A five-spot well configuration in a twoPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University the thermal and hydraulic aspects of a CO2-EGS system look promising, major uncertainties remain with regard

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    Stanford University

    of uncertainty associated with expected bottomhole temperatures during cementing. Temperature modeling has shownPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University properties, and crystalline-phase analysis are discussed. A discussion of this work and ongoing research

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 11-13, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University in the summer to monitor the EGS growth. Eight geophones were installed in 213-246 m deep boreholes, four and shift stimulation to new fractures. The Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration will allow geothermal

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University commercially exploited to date; there are still technical or economic barriers to exploiting the others dozen countries to date, but their distribution worldwide is limited. There are two basic classes

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Third Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 28-30, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Third Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University TO THE COSO GEOTHERMAL AREA, 1996-2006 Bruce R. Julian1 , Gillian R. Foulger2 , Francis C. Monastero3 1 U.r.foulger@durham.ac.uk 3 Geothermal Program Office, U.S. Navy, China Lake, CA 93555-6001, e-mail: francis

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30-February 1, 2006

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    Foulger, G. R.

    1 PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University GEOTHERMAL AREA, 1996-2004 Bruce R. Julian1 , Gillian R. Foulger1,2 , Keith Richards-Dinger3 , Francis Dept. Earth Sciences University of Durham Durham DH1 3LE, U.K. 3 Geothermal Program Office, U.S. Navy 1

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University INJECTION IN A PRODUCING INDONESIAN GEOTHERMAL FIELD Gillian R. Foulger1 & Luciana De Luca2 1 Dept. Earth injection experiment in a geothermal field in Indonesia. We calculated an optimal a-priori one- dimensional

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    with Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) experiments and other geothermal operations. With support from the Dept in geothermal operations and EGS experiments. Two of these are: 1. Enhanced relative hypocenter locationPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    .long@sa.gov.au See author affiliations at end. ABSTRACT Australia is amongst the forefront of Enhanced Geothermal high-permeability systems of fluid-borne crustal heat, commercially-viable geothermal systemsPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    to provide state-of-the-art tools that are customized for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). This includesPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AT THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA, USING MICROEARTHQUAKE LOCATIONS AND MOMENT TENSORS Bruce R. Julian1

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    and the resource has been cooled by the 30 years of reinjection. The thermal breakthrough (Tb) is expected to occur are next to 30 years old. They would need to be restored or shut down for scaling and/or corrosion problemsPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    for lifetimes between 30-100 years, with a 90% confidence interval of 98-1200 MWth. Lumped parameter modeling the past 20 years. INTRODUCTION The OBGA comprises the regions of low temperature geothermal activityPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and the resource has been cooled by the 30 years of reinjection. The thermal breakthrough (Tb) is expected to occurPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AT THE SCALE OF THE GEOTHERMAL HEATING DOUBLET IN THE PARIS BASIN, FRANCE. M.Le Brun1* , V.Hamm1 , S.Lopez1 , P

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Stanford University

    transferred to Zorlu Energy Group for 30 years. After this transfer, the Group has started to work on bothPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University OF KIZILDERE GEOTHERMAL FIELD IN TURKEY Füsun S. Tut Haklidir, Taylan Akin, Aygün Güney, Aye Alpagut Bükülmez

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Stanford University

    TESTS IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS M.R. Safari and A. Ghassemi Department of Petroleum Engineering at Texas into a fracture using 2.D-ROCMAS finite element software which has a coupled flow- geomechanic capability. Mathias

  12. Julian, B.R. and G.R. Foulger, Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    Julian, B.R. and G.R. Foulger, Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms, Thirty- Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9- 11, 2009. Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms Bruce R. Julian, U. S

  13. Julian, B.R. and G.R. Foulger, Time-Dependent Seismic Tomography of Geothermal Systems, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009.

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    Foulger, G. R.

    Julian, B.R. and G.R. Foulger, Time-Dependent Seismic Tomography of Geothermal Systems, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009. Time-Dependent Seismic Tomography of Geothermal Systems Bruce R. Julian, U. S. Geological Survey

  14. Reservoir technology - geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford. Fifth annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.

    1985-09-01

    The objective is to carry out research on geothermal reservoir engineering techniques useful to the geothermal industry. A parallel objective is the training of geothermal engineers and scientists. The research is focused toward accelerated development of hydrothermal resources through the evaluation of fluid reserves, and the forecasting of field behavior with time. Injection technology is a research area receiving special attention. The program is divided into reservoir definition research, modeling of heat extraction from fractured reservoirs, application and testing of new and proven reservoir engineering technology, and technology transfer. (ACR)

  15. ENGINEERING STANFORD UNIVERSITY

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    SEISMIC ENGINEERING GUIDELINES STANFORD UNIVERSITY Land, Buildings and Real Estate (LBRE) 3160 guidelines are to be applied in conjunction with The Project Delivery Process at Stanford Department of Project Management (DPM) August 2010, Version 2.0) #12;Stanford University Seismic Engineering Guidelines

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    . While geomechanics in conventional reservoir simulator is often governed by change in pore addresses the modelling of the geomechanical effects induced by reservoir production and reinjection, the optimum production rate and the reservoir performance, reservoir geomechanics tries to capture rock

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    -mail: hector.carlos.pulido@pemex.com ABSTRACT Complex reservoir geometries can influence the results obtained

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 FULLY COUPLED GEOMECHANICS AND DISCRETE FLOW and the existing fracture network, and the coupling between geomechanics and fluid dynamics, have not been

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Stanford University

    parameters. A sensitivity analysis has revealed that within this step a crucial parameter is the uncertainty by running the results of the second step through a simple analytical reservoir model. This reservoir model that covers the most significant uncertainties for geothermal reservoir feasibility studies in sedimentary

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 OIL PRODUCTION WASTE STREAM, A SOURCE OF ELECTRICAL volume of water is produced with the oil. In a majority of the fields, water is a waste stream and has from oil field waste streams. The program started with a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE PACIFIC ISLANDS: THE POTENTIAL OF POWER GENERATION TO BENEFIT INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES Alex J. McCoy-West1,2 , Sarah Milicich1 their untapped geothermal resources) for cost effective power production and direct-use applications. As part

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 DISTRICT HEATING MODELLING AND SIMULATION Lei Haiyan1 air pollution and save conventional energy, geothermal energy as a heat source for district heating. This paper describes the geothermal resource and district heating system in Tianjin. Heat load for one sample

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    Stanford University

    , Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 STRENGTH RETROGRESSION IN CEMENTS UNDER HIGH-TEMPERATURE designs for high-temperature geothermal applications have typically included 35 to 40% additional be inadequate to provide a high-strength, low-permeability cement at temperatures typical for geothermal

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    Stanford University

    an uncertainty analysis of thermo-hydro- mechanical (THM) coupled processes in a typical hot-dry-rock (HDR) reservoir in crystalline rock. The conceptual model is an equivalent porous media approach which is adequate taking parameter uncertainties into account for geothermal reservoir evaluation in order to assess

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30 -February1, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    processes at the doublet scale. For the numerical simulations we used a 3D numerical block obtained of the reservoir to the injected fluid paths. MODEL DESCRIPTION In this study we carried out numerical simulations of reservoir characterization as they may have a significant impact on dynamic processes such as water flooding

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 3, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    of numerical experiments have been carried out to study the impact of cold water injection on the reservoir of the reservoir rock. Generally, the strain-stress behavior of rocks in triaxial tests shows hardening and post that for granite permeability can increase by a factor of four. Other studies present different magnitudes

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    be effectively used to image structures inside/around the seismically activated EGS reservoirs. In the multiplet and monitoring of EGS reservoirs. However, in practice, conventional seismic techniques, which have been mainly. Reflected waves are identified by evaluation of linearity of three dimensional motion of the seismic wave

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    Stanford University

    /cm2 sec up to 10-7 g/cm2 sec. The thermal evolution was calculated for up to 30,000 years. The deep and the performance of reservoir was predicted for 30 years production. Depths of the reservoir are assumed from 0 province about 30 Km southwest of Semarang, Indonesia as shown in Figure 1, is still undeveloped geothermal

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    Stanford University

    the efficiency of multi-parameter analysis of underground reservoirs hydrodynamics conditions (Finsterle, 2004; Kiryukhin et al., 2008). Inverse modeling analysis performed in this paper with iTOUGH2, a computer program statistical information about residuals, estimation uncertainties, and the ability to discriminate among model

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Stanford University

    -rock interactions, and changes in reservoir porosity. The properties of CO2-rich fluids are particularly relevant-CONFINED SUPERCRITICAL CO2 BY VIBRATING TUBE DENSIMETRY Miroslaw S. Gruszkiewicz1 , David J. Wesolowski1 and David R. INTRODUCTION Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) using CO2 as the heat mining fluid Development of two

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Twenty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 28-30, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and with magmatic CO2 emanations (minimum CO2 partial pressure estimated to 1 bar). Relative to a diluted sea water laterally from NW to SE at relatively low depths. No major evidence of a high temperature geothermal, 1984 and 1985 showed no major shallow evidences of the occurrence of an high temperature reservoir

  12. Julian, B.R., G.R. Foulger and F. Monastero, Microearthquake moment tensors from the Coso Geothermal area, Thirty-Second Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    Geothermal area, Thirty-Second Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 22-24, 2007. Microearthquake Moment Tensors from the Coso Geothermal Area Bruce R. Julian of Durham, Durham, U. K. Francis Monastero, Geothermal Program Office, US Navy, China Lake, California

  13. -Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

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    Stanford University

    For the Period October 1, 1985 through September 30, 1986 DE-ASO7-84ID12529 Stanford Geothermal Program was initiated in fiscal year 1981. The report covers the period from October 1, 1985 through September 30, 1986SGP-TR-107 - Injection Technology - Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research at Stanford Principal

  14. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

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    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 34105 Stanford Geothermal, California SGP-TR-72 A RESERVOIR ENGINEERING ANALYSIS OF A VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL FIELD BY John Forrest Dee June 1983 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department

  15. STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    , 3 to 5 units. See Engineering Fundamentals list earlier in Handbook. (4) The two systems electives representative. Changes must be initialed in ink. · Transfer credits in Math, Science, Fundamentals, and TIS mustSTANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 2001-02 Sample Program Sheet Computer Science Name: Local

  16. STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    (see note 3) Science Total (11 units minimum) Engineering Fundamentals (13 units minimum required) CSE Undergraduate Handbook science list, plus Psych 30. AP Chemistry also meets this requirement. EitherSTANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 2006-07 Computer Science Name: Local Phone: Local Address

  17. STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    (see note 3) Science Total (11 units minimum) Engineering Fundamentals (13 units minimum required) CSE Undergraduate Handbook science list, plus Psych 30 or 40. AP Chemistry also meets this requirement. EitherSTANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 2005-06 Computer Science Name: Local Phone: Local Address

  18. Fifteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The Fifteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23--25, 1990. Major topics included: DOE's geothermal research and development program, well testing, field studies, geosciences, geysers, reinjection, tracers, geochemistry, and modeling.

  19. STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    Fundamentals list earlier in Handbook. (5) The two systems electives must be chosen from the following set: CS be initialed in ink. · Transfer credits in Math, Science, Fundamentals, and TIS must be approved by the SeniorSTANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING 2003-04 Computer Science Name: Local Phone: Local Address

  20. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

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    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94305 SGP-TR-35 SECOND ANNUAL #12;INTRODUCTION The research e f f o r t of t h e Stanford Geothermal Program is focused on geothermal reservoir engineering. The major o b j e c t i v e of t h e protiram is t o develop techniques f o

  1. Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  2. Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1989-12-31

    The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  3. STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    Handbook) Totals This Page NOTES: 1 One course required, 3 to 5 units. See Engineering Fundamentals list. Changes must be initialed in ink. · Transfer credits in Math, Science, Fundamentals, and TIS must. · Minimum Grade Point Average (GPA) for all courses in Engineering Fundamentals and Computer Science Depth

  4. STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    Handbook) Totals This Page NOTES: 1 One course required, 3 to 5 units. See Engineering Fundamentals list be initialed in ink. · Transfer credits in Math, Science, Fundamentals, and TIS must be approved by the Senior Average (GPA) for all courses in Engineering Fundamentals and Computer Science Depth (combined) is 2

  5. Stanford Geothermal Program Tnterdisciplinary Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Tnterdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences Stanford University Stanford, California A LABORATORY MODEL OF STWLATED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS by A. Hunsbedt P. Kruger created by artificial stimulation of geothermal reservoirs has been con- structed. The model has been used

  6. STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    Handbook) Totals This Page NOTES: 1 One course required, 3 to 5 units. See Engineering Fundamentals list in Gates room 182 Changes must be initialed in ink. · Transfer credits in Math, Science, Fundamentals or CME 106) 3 to 5 Mathematics Total (23 units minimum) Science (12 units minimum required) PHYSICS 41

  7. STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    of "Courses Approved for the Engineering Fundamentals Requirement" in front of Handbook. 3 Students who take) see note 1 3 Mathematics Total (23 units minimum) Science (12 units minimum required) PHYSICS 51 Light and Heat 4 PHYSICS 53 Mechanics 4 PHYSICS 55 Electricity and Magnetism 4 Science Total (12 units minimum

  8. STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    Fundamentals Requirement" in front of Handbook. 3 Students who take CS103A/B must complete two electives credits in Math, Science, Fundamentals, and TIS must be approved by the Senior Associate Dean for Student in Engineering Fundamentals and Computer Science Depth (combined) is 2.0. #12;

  9. STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    Handbook) Totals This Page NOTES: 1 One course required, 3 to 5 units. See Engineering Fundamentals list in ink. · Transfer credits in Math, Science, Fundamentals, and TIS must be approved by the Senior or CME 106) 3 to 5 Mathematics Total (23 units minimum) Science (12 units minimum required) PHYSICS 41

  10. STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    Handbook) Totals This Page NOTES: 1 One course required, 3 to 5 units. See Engineering Fundamentals list, Science, Fundamentals, and TIS must be approved by the Senior Associate Dean for Student Affairs in Terman or CME 106) 3 to 5 Mathematics Total (23 units minimum) Science (12 units minimum required) PHYSICS 41

  11. STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    (see note 3) Science Total (11 units minimum) Engineering Fundamentals (13 units minimum required) CSE Undergraduate Handbook science list, plus Psych 30 or 40. AP Chemistry also meets this requirement. Either Handbook for details. #12;Computer Science if Transfer Credit Dept No Title Total Grade Trans- Course

  12. STANFORD UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    Handbook) Totals This Page NOTES: 1 One course required, 3 to 5 units. See Engineering Fundamentals list. · Transfer credits in Math, Science, Fundamentals, and TIS must be approved by the Senior Associate Dean or CME 106) 3 to 5 Mathematics Total (23 units minimum) Science (12 units minimum required) PHYSICS 41

  13. *jplynch@stanford.edu; phone 1-650-723-6213; fax 1-650-725-9755; The John A. Blume Earthquake Engineering Center, Stanford University; Stanford, CA 94305;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University b Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University c. The Alamosa Canyon Bridge in New Mexico is instrumented with wireless sensing units and a traditional cable impact in modernizing structural monitoring systems. The use of wireless

  14. . Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    . Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford, California SGP-TR- 80 DEPLETION MODELING OF LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS BY Gudmund 01sen June 1984 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under

  15. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORTI UNIVERSITY Stanford, California SGP-TR-85 ANALYSIS OF THE STANFORD GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR MODEL EXPERIMENTS was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459

  16. Seventeenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1992-01-31

    PREFACE The Seventeenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 29-31, 1992. There were one hundred sixteen registered participants which equaled the attendance last year. Participants were from seven foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Mexico and New Zealand. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in the papers. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Raffaele Cataldi. Dr. Cataldi gave a talk on the highlights of his geothermal career. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Cataldi. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award at the banquet. Thirty-eight papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Dr. Roland Horne opened the meeting and the key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who discussed the DOE Geothermal R. & D. Program. The talk focused on aiding long-term, cost effective private resource development. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: geochemistry, hot dry rock, injection, geysers, modeling, and reservoir mechanics. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: Sabodh Garg., Jim Lovekin, Jim Combs, Ben Barker, Marcel Lippmann, Glenn Horton, Steve Enedy, and John Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Francois Groff who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook -vii

  17. Eighteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1993-01-28

    PREFACE The Eighteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 26-28, 1993. There were one hundred and seventeen registered participants which was greater than the attendance last year. Participants were from eight foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, Guatemala, and Iceland. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Dean Gary Ernst opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Mock who also spoke at the banquet. Thirty-nine papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: field operations, The Geysers, geoscience, hot-dry-rock, injection, modeling, slim hole wells, geochemistry, well test and wellbore. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: John Counsil, Kathleen Enedy, Harry Olson, Eduardo Iglesias, Marcelo Lippmann, Paul Atkinson, Jim Lovekin, Marshall Reed, Antonio Correa, and David Faulder. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to John Hornbrook who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

  18. Nineteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1994-01-20

    PREFACE The Nineteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 18-20, 1994. This workshop opened on a sad note because of the death of Prof. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. on November 19, 1993. Hank had been fighting leukemia for a long time and finally lost the battle. Many of the workshop participants were present for the celebration of his life on January 21 at Stanford's Memorial Church. Hank was one of the founders of the Stanford Geothermal Program and the Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Workshop. His energy, kindness, quick wit, and knowledge will long be missed at future workshops. Following the Preface we have included a copy of the Memorial Resolution passed by the Stanford University Senate. There were one hundred and four registered participants. Participants were from ten foreign countries: Costa Rica, England, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines and Turkey. Workshop papers described the performance of fourteen geothermal fields outside the United States. Roland N. Home opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a presentation about the future of geothermal development. The banquet speaker was Jesus Rivera and he spoke about Energy Sources of Central American Countries. Forty two papers were presented at the Workshop. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: sciences, injection, production, modeling, and adsorption. Session chairmen are an important part of the workshop and our thanks go to: John Counsil, Mark Walters, Dave Duchane, David Faulder, Gudmundur Bodvarsson, Jim Lovekin, Joel Renner, and Iraj Ershaghi. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Xianfa Deng who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Roland N. Home Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

  19. Twentieth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-01-26

    PREFACE The Twentieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, dedicated to the memory of Professor Hank Ramey, was held at Stanford University on January 24-26, 1995. There were ninety-five registered participants. Participants came from six foreign countries: Japan, Mexico, England, Italy, New Zealand and Iceland. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Thirty-two papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into eleven sessions concerning: field development, modeling, well tesubore, injection, geoscience, geochemistry and field operations. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bob Fournier, Mark Walters, John Counsil, Marcelo Lippmann, Keshav Goyal, Joel Renner and Mike Shook. In addition to the technical sessions, a panel discussion was held on ''What have we learned in 20 years?'' Panel speakers included Patrick Muffler, George Frye, Alfred Truesdell and John Pritchett. The subject was further discussed by Subir Sanyal, who gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager

  20. Sixteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1991-01-25

    The Sixteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23-25, 1991. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Mohinder Gulati of UNOCAL Geothermal. Dr. Gulati gave an inspiring talk on the impact of numerical simulation on development of geothermal energy both in The Geysers and the Philippines. Dr. Gulati was the first recipient of The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award. The registered attendance figure of one hundred fifteen participants was up slightly from last year. There were seven foreign countries represented: Iceland, Italy, Philippines, Kenya, the United Kingdom, Mexico, and Japan. As last year, papers on about a dozen geothermal fields outside the United States were presented. There were thirty-six papers presented at the Workshop, and two papers were submitted for publication only. Attendees were welcomed by Dr. Khalid Aziz, Chairman of the Petroleum Engineering Department at Stanford. Opening remarks were presented by Dr. Roland Horne, followed by a discussion of the California Energy Commission's Geothermal Activities by Barbara Crowley, Vice Chairman; and J.E. ''Ted'' Mock's presentation of the DOE Geothermal Program: New Emphasis on Industrial Participation. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: hot dry rock, geochemistry, tracer injection, field performance, modeling, and chemistry/gas. As in previous workshops, session chairpersons made major contributions to the program. Special thanks are due to Joel Renner, Jeff Tester, Jim Combs, Kathy Enedy, Elwood Baldwin, Sabodh Garg, Marcel0 Lippman, John Counsil, and Eduardo Iglesias. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Angharad Jones, Rosalee Benelli, Jeanne Mankinen, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate the audiovisual equipment and to Michael Riley who coordinated the meeting arrangements for a second year. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

  1. 120 GRC BULLETIN Reservoir Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    of The Geysers geothermal area. The production area is shaded grey. Red dots: seismometers with vertical sensors120 GRC BULLETIN Reservoir Engineering nergy production at geothermal areas causes physical changes Tool Use of Time-Dependent MEQ Tomography for Monitoring Producing Geothermal Reservoirs G. R. Foulger

  2. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01

    reservoir engineering research program a t the University of Colorado is described. Physical characterization

  3. Thirteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.; Cook, J.W.

    1988-01-21

    PREFACE The Thirteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 19-21, 1988. Although 1987 continued to be difficult for the domestic geothermal industry, world-wide activities continued to expand. Two invited presentations on mature geothermal systems were a keynote of the meeting. Malcolm Grant presented a detailed review of Wairakei, New Zealand and highlighted plans for new development. G. Neri summarized experience on flow rate decline and well test analysis in Larderello, Italy. Attendance continued to be high with 128 registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, New Zealand, Japan, Mexico and The Philippines. A discussion of future workshops produced a strong recommendation that the Stanford Workshop program continue for the future. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Four technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published. In addition to these forty five technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Gustavo Calderon from the Inter-American Development Bank. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants a description of the Bank???s operations in Costa Rica developing alternative energy resources, specifically Geothermal, to improve the country???s economic basis. His talk appears as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: J. Combs, G. T. Cole, J. Counsil, A. Drenick, H. Dykstra, K. Goyal, P. Muffler, K. Pruess, and S. K. Sanyal. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Marilyn King, Pat Oto, Terri Ramey, Bronwyn Jones, Yasmin Gulamani, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, especially Jeralyn Luetkehans. The Thirteenth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract No. DE-AS07-84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jean W. Cook

  4. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 and by the Departnent by water cir- culated in a " hot dry rock" geothermal reservoir will induce tensile thermal stresses i n

  5. Eleventh workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Counsil, J.R. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1986-01-23

    The Eleventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 21-23, 1986. The attendance was up compared to previous years, with 144 registered participants. Ten foreign countries were represented: Canada, England, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand and Turkey. There were 38 technical presentations at the Workshop which are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Six technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published and one presentation is not published. In addition to these 45 technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by J. E. Mock from the Department of Energy. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Jim Combs of Geothermal Resources International, Inc. We thank him for his presentation on GEO geothermal developments at The Geysers. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the Workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, E. Iglesias, A. Moench, S. Prestwich, and K. Pruess. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank J.W. Cook, J.R. Hartford, M.C. King, A.E. Osugi, P. Pettit, J. Arroyo, J. Thorne, and T.A. Ramey for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Eleventh Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract DE-AS03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1986 H.J. Ramey, Jr. P. Kruger R.N. Horne W.E. Brigham F.G. Miller J.R. Counsil

  6. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 heat sweep model for estimating energy recovery from fractured geothermal reservoirs based on early

  7. HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, R.C.

    2009-01-01

    on the Cerro P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Mexicali,e C e r r o P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Baja C a l i1979 HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING R.

  8. Petroleum Engineering 310 Reservoir Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of oilfield brine properties: Salinity, Bubble Point, formation volume factor, density and solution gas water12 Petroleum Engineering 310 Reservoir Fluids Credit 4: (3-3) Required for Juniors Catalog: Gas Formation Volume Factor. Viscosity. Wet Gas Gravity and Isothermal Compressibility. 5. Definition

  9. Twelfth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Rivera, J.

    1987-01-22

    Preface The Twelfth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 20-22, 1987. The year ending December 1986 was very difficult for the domestic geothermal industry. Low oil prices caused a sharp drop in geothermal steam prices. We expected to see some effect upon attendance at the Twelfth Workshop. To our surprise, the attendance was up by thirteen from previous years, with one hundred and fifty-seven registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, and Turkey. Despite a worldwide surplus of oil, international geothermal interest and development is growing at a remarkable pace. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Seven technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published; they concern geothermal developments and research in Iceland, Italy, and New Zealand. In addition to these forty-eight technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was John R. Berg from the Department of Energy. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants his thoughts on the expectations of this agency in the role of alternative energy resources, specifically geothermal, within the country???s energy framework. His talk is represented as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, K. Goyal, G.S. Bodvarsson, A.S. Batchelor, H. Dykstra, M.J. Reed, A. Truesdell, J.S. Gudmundsson, and J.R. Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Marilyn King, Amy Osugi, Terri Ramey, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, specially Jim Lovekin. The Twelfth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U. S. Department of Energy through Contract Nos. DE-AS03-80SF11459 and DE-AS07- 84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1987 Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jesus Rivera

  10. Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-22

    The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

  11. Stanford Geothermal Program Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    s Stanford Geothermal Program Stanford University Stanford, California RADON MEASUEMENTS I N GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS ? d by * ** Alan K. Stoker and Paul Kruger SGP-TR-4 January 1975 :: raw at Lcs Alams S c i and water, o i l and n a t u r a l gas wells. with radon i n geothermal reservoirs. Its presence i n

  12. Stanford MBA/MS Electrical Engineering Joint Degree Program Page 1 of 20 August 18, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Stanford MBA/MS Electrical Engineering Joint Degree Program Page 1 of 20 August 18, 2014 Becky at the end of this transcript. Stanford MBA/MS Electrical Engineering Joint Degree Webinar August 18, 2014 on the Masters in Electrical Engineering and MBA Joint Degree Program. We are going to be together here for 45

  13. STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    the characteristics of a geothermal reservoir: Items 2, 6,new data important to geothermal reservoir engineering prac-forecast performance of the geothermal reservoir and bore

  14. Stanford Geothermal Program Interd is c i p l inary Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Interd is c i p l inary Research i n Engineering and Earth Sciences Stanford University Stanford, C a l i f o r n i a LABORATORY STUDIES OF STIMULATED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS.E geothermal energy from artificially stimu- lated systems by in-place flashing was studied experimentally

  15. Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S.

    1983-12-15

    The attendance at the Workshop was similar to last year's with 123 registered participants of which 22 represented 8 foreign countries. A record number of technical papers (about 60) were submitted for presentation at the Workshop. The Program Committee, therefore, decided to have several parallel sessions to accommodate most of the papers. This format proved unpopular and will not be repeated. Many of the participants felt that the Workshop lost some of its unique qualities by having parallel sessions. The Workshop has always been held near the middle of December during examination week at Stanford. This timing was reviewed in an open discussion at the Workshop. The Program Committee subsequently decided to move the Workshop to January. The Tenth Workshop will be held on January 22-24, 1985. The theme of the Workshop this year was ''field developments worldwide''. The Program Committee addressed this theme by encouraging participants to submit field development papers, and by inviting several international authorities to give presentations at the Workshop. Field developments in at least twelve countries were reported: China, El Salvador, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States. There were 58 technical presentations at the Workshop, of which 4 were not made available for publication. Several authors submitted papers not presented at the Workshop. However, these are included in the 60 papers of these Proceedings. The introductory address was given by Ron Toms of the U.S. Department of Energy, and the banquet speaker was A1 Cooper of Chevron Resources Company. An important contribution was made to the Workshop by the chairmen of the technical sessions. Other than Stanford Geothermal Program faculty members, they included: Don White (Field Developments), Bill D'Olier (Hydrothermal Systems), Herman Dykstra (Well Testing), Karsten Pruess (Well Testing), John Counsil (Reservoir Chemistry), Malcolm Mossman (Reservoir Chemistry), Greg Raasch (Production), Manny Nathenson (Injection), Susan Petty (Injection), Subir Sanyal (Simulation), Marty Molloy (Petrothermal), and Allen Moench (Reservoir Physics). The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Joanne Hartford, Terri Ramey, Amy Osugi, and Marilyn King for their valued help with the Workshop arrangements and the Proceedings. We also owe thanks to the program students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Ninth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U . S . Department of Energy through contract DE-AT03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. H. J. Ramey, Jr., R. N. Horne, P. Kruger, W. E. Brigham, F. G. Miller, J. S . Gudmundsson -vii

  16. Twenty-first workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-26

    PREFACE The Twenty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at the Holiday Inn, Palo Alto on January 22-24, 1996. There were one-hundred fifty-five registered participants. Participants came from twenty foreign countries: Argentina, Austria, Canada, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey and the UK. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Sixty-six papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into twenty sessions concerning: reservoir assessment, modeling, geology/geochemistry, fracture modeling hot dry rock, geoscience, low enthalpy, injection, well testing, drilling, adsorption and stimulation. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bobbie Bishop-Gollan, Tom Box, Jim Combs, John Counsil, Sabodh Garg, Malcolm Grant, Marcel0 Lippmann, Jim Lovekin, John Pritchett, Marshall Reed, Joel Renner, Subir Sanyal, Mike Shook, Alfred Truesdell and Ken Williamson. Jim Lovekin gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet and highlighted the exciting developments in the geothermal field which are taking place worldwide. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager.

  17. DOE-Funded Research at Stanford Sees Results in Reservoir Characteriza...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Systems (EGS). This research will help developers learn more about the fracture systems in geothermal reservoirs, so that they may better predict the results of...

  18. Reservoir Engineering for Unconventional Gas Reservoirs: What Do We Have to Consider?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarkson, Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    The reservoir engineer involved in the development of unconventional gas reservoirs (UGRs) is required to integrate a vast amount of data from disparate sources, and to be familiar with the data collection and assessment. There has been a rapid evolution of technology used to characterize UGR reservoir and hydraulic fracture properties, and there currently are few standardized procedures to be used as guidance. Therefore, more than ever, the reservoir engineer is required to question data sources and have an intimate knowledge of evaluation procedures. We propose a workflow for the optimization of UGR field development to guide discussion of the reservoir engineer's role in the process. Critical issues related to reservoir sample and log analysis, rate-transient and production data analysis, hydraulic and reservoir modeling and economic analysis are raised. Further, we have provided illustrations of each step of the workflow using tight gas examples. Our intent is to provide some guidance for best practices. In addition to reviewing existing methods for reservoir characterization, we introduce new methods for measuring pore size distribution (small-angle neutron scattering), evaluating core-scale heterogeneity, log-core calibration, evaluating core/log data trends to assist with scale-up of core data, and modeling flow-back of reservoir fluids immediately after well stimulation. Our focus in this manuscript is on tight and shale gas reservoirs; reservoir characterization methods for coalbed methane reservoirs have recently been discussed.

  19. Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    1 Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report July 1990 - June 1996 Stanford Geothermal Program. THE EFFECTS OF ADSORPTION ON VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL FIELDS.1 1.1 SUMMARY? ..............................................................................................2 1.4 ADSORPTION IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS ........................................................3

  20. A reservoir engineer characterization of the Austin Chalk trend 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Her-Yuan

    1985-01-01

    A RESERVOIR ENGINEER CHARACTERIZATION OF THE AUSTIN CHALK TREND A Thesis by HER-YUAN CHEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ALM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1985... Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A RESERVOIR ENGINEER CHARACTERIZATION OF THE AUSTIN CHALK TREND A Thesis by HER-YUAN CHEN Approved as to style and content by; Steven W. Poston (Chairman of Committee) hing H. Wu (Member) Robert R. Serg...

  1. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01

    and subsequent change t o a superheated steam state. Faust,for electric power of the superheated steam reservoir a ttwo-phase condition t o superheated steam. Knapp, R. M. and

  2. Integration of advanced geoscience and engineering techniques to quantify interwell heterogeneity in reservoir models. Final report, September 29, 1993--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, W.W.; Buckley, J.S.; Ouenes, A.

    1997-05-01

    The goal of this three-year project was to provide a quantitative definition of reservoir heterogeneity. This objective was accomplished through the integration of geologic, geophysical, and engineering databases into a multi-disciplinary understanding of reservoir architecture and associated fluid-rock and fluid-fluid interactions. This interdisciplinary effort integrated geological and geophysical data with engineering and petrophysical results through reservoir simulation to quantify reservoir architecture and the dynamics of fluid-rock and fluid-fluid interactions. An improved reservoir description allows greater accuracy and confidence during simulation and modeling as steps toward gaining greater recovery efficiency from existing reservoirs. A field laboratory, the Sulimar Queen Unit, was available for the field research. Several members of the PRRC staff participated in the development of improved reservoir description by integration of the field and laboratory data as well as in the development of quantitative reservoir models to aid performance predictions. Subcontractors from Stanford University and the University of Texas at Austin (UT) collaborated in the research and participated in the design and interpretation of field tests. The three-year project was initiated in September 1993 and led to the development and application of various reservoir description methodologies. A new approach for visualizing production data graphically was developed and implemented on the Internet. Using production data and old gamma rays logs, a black oil reservoir model that honors both primary and secondary performance was developed. The old gamma ray logs were used after applying a resealing technique, which was crucial for the success of the project. In addition to the gamma ray logs, the development of the reservoir model benefitted from an inverse Drill Stem Test (DST) technique which provided initial estimates of the reservoir permeability at different wells.

  3. Engineering Atomic Quantum Reservoirs for Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Susanne Pielawa; Luiz Davidovich; David Vitali; Giovanna Morigi

    2010-04-06

    We present protocols for creating entangled states of two modes of the electromagnetic field, by using a beam of atoms crossing microwave resonators. The atoms are driven by a transverse, classical field and pump correlated photons into (i) two modes of a cavity and (ii) the modes of two distant cavities. The protocols are based on a stochastic dynamics, characterized by random arrival times of the atoms and by random interaction times between atoms and cavity modes. The resulting effective model yields a master equation, whose steady state is an entangled state of the cavity modes. In this respect, the atoms act like a quantum reservoir, pulling the cavity modes into an entangled, Einstein-Podolski-Rosen (EPR) state, whose degree of entanglement is controlled by the intensity and the frequency of the transverse field. This scheme is robust against stochastic fluctuations in the atomic beam, and it does not require atomic detection nor velocity selection.

  4. Engineering Atomic Quantum Reservoirs for Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pielawa, Susanne; Vitali, David; Morigi, Giovanna

    2010-01-01

    We present protocols for creating entangled states of two modes of the electromagnetic field, by using a beam of atoms crossing microwave resonators. The atoms are driven by a transverse, classical field and pump correlated photons into (i) two modes of a cavity and (ii) the modes of two distant cavities. The protocols are based on a stochastic dynamics, characterized by random arrival times of the atoms and by random interaction times between atoms and cavity modes. The resulting effective model yields a master equation, whose steady state is an entangled state of the cavity modes. In this respect, the atoms act like a quantum reservoir, pulling the cavity modes into an entangled, Einstein-Podolski-Rosen (EPR) state, whose degree of entanglement is controlled by the intensity and the frequency of the transverse field. This scheme is robust against stochastic fluctuations in the atomic beam, and it does not require atomic detection nor velocity selection.

  5. Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report July 1996 - June 1999 Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG07-95ID13370 Stanford Geothermal Program Department of Petroleum ....................................................................................................................6 2. THE ROLE OF CAPILLARY FORCES IN THE NATURAL STATE OF FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Drilling and completing new wells are costly. Those costs account for 30 % to 70% of the initial capital possible future drilling systems. DRILLING COSTS The reduction of drilling costs is a task that has been challenged the drilling industry since centuries. However, the costs reduction must always be done while

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    point of view. INTRODUCTION Oil and gas resources are traditionally considered as high CO2 emissions to about 29-46 billion bbls of oil). Milliken (2007) reported that the geothermal resources at Naval TEMPERATURE DURING POWER GENERATION IN OIL FIELDS Bin Gong1 , Hongbin Liang2 , Shouliang Xin2 , and Kewen Li

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    AND LOW TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Timothy Reinhardt1 , Lyle A. Johnson2 and Neil Popovich3 1 U the production of power from coproduced and low temperature geothermal resources. To this end, and through production technologies. These technologies produce electricity by leveraging existing oil and gas field

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    of the geothermal heat-carriers began to be used for power generation. On the hydrothermal deposit in Turkey 10 % for 24 hours to

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    installed) as well as the operations-and-maintenance ("O&M") cost (¢ per kilowatt-hour generated spacing and injection rates that minimize the rate of decline in net generation with time. INTRODUCTION calls for minimizing the levelized cost of power (¢ per kilowatt-hour) over the project life. Minimizing

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    depends on both the reference temperature and the power cycle (flash, binary). A proper understanding

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    IN GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS USING SMALL ANGLE NEUTRON SCATTERING (SANS) Lawrence M1 . Anovitz, Gernot Rother1 , David angle and ultra-small angle neutron scattering (SANS/USANS) are powerful tools to characterize the pore summary of neutron scattering techniques, and discuss the utility of neutron scattering (NS) for EGS

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    between fracture growth and deformation of existing fracture networks with fluid flow makes meso-scale DEM

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 11-13, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    and accumulation of a permanent plastic strain. Elastic and hydrological properties are coupled with the damage properties are coupled with the state of damage, and seismic events are nucleated as damage grows to a value and hydrological properties on the level of material damage and stress. During loading (injection), the rock

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30 -February 1, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    : Organic Rankine Cycle) with maximal installed net capacity of 1.5MWe (Figure 1). Several deep geothermal

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    of an ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle) plant having a net power capacity of 1,5MWe. Surface equipments (turbine

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    design Ormat organic Rankine cycle (ORC) power plant with a nominal rating of 250 kW. The 250 kW ORC

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    loop type PE-HD heat exchanger pipes where a heating carrier fluid is pumped in a circuit- physical properties of a borehole heat exchanger (BHE) drilled into soft or hard rock (fig. 1). With a TRT. Ingersoll & Plass (1948) related Kelvin`s theory to the thermal dynamics for a single U-type borehole heat

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    exchangers in the district heating utility of the power plant. The district heating utility was commissioned. The brine which is 80°C when the district heating system is in operation is to be reinjected of the Area can be seen in Fig. 1. The power plant produces electricity and hot water for space heating using

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    of geothermal energy in Turkey has focused mainly on district heating. The first of these systems came on line at the low-temperature Gönen field in 1987. During 1991-2006 period other 19 district heating systems were like to #12;Figure 1: Locations of major geothermal fields, district heating and

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    and more been recognized by government and popular users. GHP district heating reached 18% of total meaning that GHP had very rapid growth but conventional geothermal district heating reduced its propotion Keyan Zheng1 Fang He2 1 Geothermal Council of China Energy Society 20 Da Hui Si Road, Haidian District

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Company, Salt Lake City, UT 84104 3 ORMAT Nevada Inc., Reno NV 89511 4 Schlumberger, Data and Consulting mineral grains, drilling induced fractures, and natural fractures. This paper describes selected geologic was drilled and then logged and analyzed using a multi-disciplinary approach to help evaluate the geothermal

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    geothermal resource in the US Gulf of Mexico region. In particular, geopressured sandstones near salt domes are potential sources of geothermal energy because salt diapirs with high thermal conductivity may pierce many low- grade geopressured systems subcommercial. These include a necessity to drill multiple wells

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ), water consumption, and land use from geothermal electricity generation than from traditional fossil-fuel-production activities allows us to more accurately assess and compare EGSs to fossil fuel-based electricity generators­based electricity generators. However, the environmental impacts from the construction of geothermal energy

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    and dollars. If enough energy can be produced, at a levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) that is reasonably

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    States and the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE), capital costs, and operating and maintenance costs

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    to "damped least squares" can solve it. We present an algorithm for performing this computation efficiently

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    EXPLORATION DATA William Cumming Cumming Geoscience 4728 Shade Tree Lane Santa Rosa, CA, 95405, USA e. A common alternative approach to both targeting and assessment is to focus on a data anomaly or, in some conceptual models based on information from typical geothermal exploration data sets. A conceptual model

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30 -February 1, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    on injecting fluid into rock formations. "Fracking" to increase permeability in gas shale formations has in particular become widespread in recent years. There are now several case histories of fracking causing

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , a floor deicing system was installed. This consists of a heating grid system placed in the floor emission from the oil burners, I recommended a geothermal solution for the floor and the roof heating.aniko@uni-miskolc.hu ABSTRACT The floor of the entrance tunnel to an underground waste deposit system in Hungary is exposed

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    fuel, geothermal energy is generally considered to be a benign energy source in regard to environmental characterized by two organisms: firstly, the photoautotrophic Cyanobacterium (blue-green microalgae), which represents the primary producers, using light as the energy source, gradually dominating the ecosystem

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Callahan1 , Will Osborn1 , Stephen Hickman2 and Nicholas Davatzes3 1 AltaRock Energy, 7900 E. Green Lake by AltaRock Energy (ARE) with participants from Newberry Geothermal, Davenport Power, Temple University

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    to solve a giant demand on food and energy. Existing resources of oil and gas are limited in Indonesia and the existing infrastructure to reach the customers of the energy is not sufficient as access to many areas in Indonesia is limited. Therefore, de-central, location adapted provision with energy is crucial. One third

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Lake City, UT 84104 2 Energy and Geoscience Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 3 field, most of the productive wells are located in Section 21. Wells circled in green represent

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    recipients. The Australian Geothermal Energy Group (AGEG) has also seen significant changes and developments. Additionally the joint AGEG ­ Australian Geothermal Energy Association (AGEA) Geothermal Reporting Code Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence at the University of Queensland, the Western Australian Geothermal

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    are all directed at achieving the Australian Geothermal Energy Group's (AGEG) aspirational targets (the Australian Geothermal Energy Association, AGEA) and the AGEG is to see geothermal energy providing the lowest cost, emissions-free, renewable base load energy for centuries to come. This paper summarizes: (1

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    which has potential for a geothermal sitting at the eastern flanks INTRODUCTION The geothermal energy), which is green geothermal area and as a lesson learned to apply in the similar area in order

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    . MOL, Enex ehf. of Iceland and Vulcan Kft. (its owner is Green Rock Energy Ltd. of Australia EXPLORATION IN HUNGARY Attila Kujbus CEGE Central-European Geothermal Energy Production Plc. Infopark D of this fact, there are hardly any geothermal energy facilities in Hungary, and those few are operated

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    INVESTIGATION PROGRAM K. Brockbank1 , C. Bromley2 and T. Glynn-Morris1 1 Contact Energy Wairakei Power Station.brockbank@contactenergy.co.nz ABSTRACT In 2008 Contact Energy undertook a comprehensive research program investigating subsidence by the green band. All wells are shown by green dots with the 13 boreholes drilled for the subsidence program

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    and aquaculture facilities, space heating and district heating, snow melting, agricultural drying, industrial applications and ground-source heat pumps. The installed capacity is 12,611 MWt and the annual energy use is 56,552 TJ or 15,709 GWh. The largest application is ground-source (geothermal) heat pumps (84% of the energy

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    pond heating, and industrial applications. Guidelines are provided for selecting the necessary equipment for successfully implementing a direct-use project, including downhole pumps, piping, heat, provides the necessary energy to the project. Larger projects, such as district heating and industrial

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    to the relatively high abundance and reactivity of the main geothermal gases (CO2, H2S, H2 and to a lesser extent. This high-temperature field is part of the Hengill volcanic system, and is host to the largest geothermal for the concentrations of the major reactive gases (CO2, H2S, H2 and CH4). Aquifer chemical compositions were calculated

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    77 to 120 bar, temperatures from 20 to 77°C, and a range of CO2 injection rates. Temperature data EXTRACTION FROM POROUS MEDIA BY MEANS OF CO2 Mario Magliocco1,2 , Timothy J. Kneafsey2 , Karsten Pruess2 The use of CO2 as a heat transfer fluid has been proposed as an alternative to water in enhanced

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    -of-the-art electrolyte models, to gain insight into CO2-induced fluid-rock interactions for temperatures in the range 10 GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS WITH CO2 AS HEAT TRANSFER FLUID John Apps and Karsten Pruess Earth Sciences Division to as an Enhanced Geothermal System with CO2 (EGSCO2). The concept has yet to be tested in the field

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    as a primary source of information, we found that the total thermal energy from 0 to 260° C used in 2008 was 33% of the total primary energy is consumed for electricity generation (U.S. Energy Information Administration supplied by high grade fossil fuels. For example, most of the energy we need for water and space heating

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Second Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 22-24, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    geothermal area, California, has produced hot water and steam for electricity generation for more than 20 microearthquakes occurred in the first 2 minutes. Accurate relative relocations and moment tensors for the best-recorded with industrial activities such as injection and production. Interpretation of moment tensors in terms of physical

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    -mail: hector.carlos.pulido@pemex.com ABSTRACT An alternative method, named to as direct synthesis, is proposed

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    design, performance, and likelihood of success #12;3. Clarify issues associated with accepting, managing, 80401-3305, United States e-mail: Katherine.Young@nrel.gov Chad Augustine National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO, 80401-3305, United States e-mail: Chad.Augustine@nrel.gov Arlene

  9. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    through September 30, 1982. The Stanford Geothermal Program conducts interdisciplinary research in the geothermal industry. In the first 10 years of the Program about 50 graduates have been trained in geotherSTANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94105 SGP-TR- 61 GEOTHERMAL

  10. Sustainable Stanford Protecting Stanford's assets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogyo, Matthew

    ... Benefits Labs Protect your samples ­ During energy and equipment failure ­ Reduce risk of valuable sampleSustainable Stanford Protecting Stanford's assets Sustainable Alternative Sample Storage Pilot Study #12;Protect Stanford's Assets & Save Energy Stanford `s Energy Retrofit Program has since 1993

  11. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94305 SGP-TR-42 PROCEEDINGS SPECIAL PANEL ON GEOTHERMAL MODEL INTERCOMPARISON STUDY held in conjunction with The Code Comparison Contracts issued by Department of Energy Division of Geothermal Energy San Francisco Operations Office

  12. Use of Topological Data Analysis in Reservoir Engineering: Application to Inverted 4D Seismic Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alfaleh, Abdulhamed A

    2014-12-15

    Data analysis is one of the most important topics in any industry. In petroleum engineering, the complexity of reservoir data presents a challenge for engineers to study and make decisions. A new approach to analyze complex data is called...

  13. Fiber-optic sensors and geothermal reservoir engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angel, S.M.; Kasameyer, P.W. )

    1988-12-01

    Perhaps the first demonstrations of fiber-optic sensors in a geothermal well occurred in early 1988 on the Island of Hawaii. The first of two fiber-optic optrode tests was at the HGP-A well and 3-megawatt power plant facility managed by the Hawaii National Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii. The second test was in a nearby geothermal exploratory well, Geothermal Test Well 2. Both sites are in the Kilauea East Rift zone. A fiber-optic temperature sensor test will be undertaken soon in a deeper, hotter geothermal well. Problems will be examined that may occur with a stainless steel-sleeved, fiber-optic cable. The paper describes fiber optic technology and its use in geothermal reservoir engineering.

  14. Top-Down Intelligent Reservoir Models, Integrating Reservoir Engineering with AI&DM Extended Abstract, 2009 AAPG Annual Conventions, Denver Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    1 Top-Down Intelligent Reservoir Models, Integrating Reservoir Engineering with AI&DM Extended Abstract, 2009 AAPG Annual Conventions, Denver Colorado TOP-DOWN INTELLIGENT RESERVOIR MODELING (TDIRM and the history matched model is used to strategize field development in order to improve recovery. Top

  15. Howard A. Zebker Professor of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zebker, Howard

    Howard A. Zebker Professor of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, Departments of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering (joint appt.), Stanford University, Stanford, CA. 1995-2006 Associate Professor, Departments of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering (joint appt.), Stanford University

  16. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford, California SGP-TR-81 TRACER TEST ANALYSIS OF THE KLAMATH FALLS GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 and by the Department

  17. SGP-TR-32 STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SGP- TR- 32 STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM PROGRESS REPORT NO. 7 t o U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Recent Radon Transient Experiments Energy Recovery from Fracture-Stimulated Geothermal Reservoirs 1 2 l e c t i o n of Summary presentations prepared by t h e Stanford Geothermal Program s t a f f

  18. Society of Petroleum Engineers Staggered In Time Coupling of Reservoir Flow Simulation and Geomechanical Defor-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peszynska, Malgorzata

    Society of Petroleum Engineers SPE 51920 Staggered In Time Coupling of Reservoir Flow Simulation, The University of Texas at Austin Copyright 1999, Society of Petroleum Engineers, Inc. Thispaperwas by the Society of Petroleum Engineers and are subject to correction by the author(s). The material, as presented

  19. Nanosensors as Reservoir Engineering Tools to Map Insitu Temperature Distributions in Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan Ames

    2011-06-15

    The feasibility of using nanosensors to measure temperature distribution and predict thermal breakthrough in geothermal reservoirs is addressed in this report. Four candidate sensors were identified: melting tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles with covalently-attached dye, hollow silica nanoparticles with encapsulated dye and impermeable melting shells, and dye-polymer composite time-temperature indicators. Four main challenges associated with the successful implementation of temperature nanosensors were identified: nanoparticle mobility in porous and fractured media, the collection and detection of nanoparticles at the production well, engineering temperature sensing mechanisms that are both detectable and irreversible, and inferring the spatial geolocation of temperature measurements in order to map temperature distribution. Initial experiments were carried out to investigate each of these challenges. It was demonstrated in a slim-tube injection experiment that it is possible to transport silica nanoparticles over large distances through porous media. The feasibility of magnetic collection of nanoparticles from produced fluid was evaluated experimentally, and it was estimated that 3% of the injected nanoparticles were recovered in a prototype magnetic collection device. An analysis technique was tailored to nanosensors with a dye-release mechanism to estimate temperature measurement geolocation by analyzing the return curve of the released dye. This technique was used in a hypothetical example problem, and good estimates of geolocation were achieved. Tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles were synthesized using a sonochemical method, and a bench heating experiment was performed using these nanoparticles. Particle growth due to melting was observed, indicating that tin-bismuth nanoparticles have potential as temperature nanosensors

  20. Reservoir engineering applications for development and exploitation of geothermal fields in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasquez, N.C.; Sarmiento, Z.F.

    1986-07-01

    After a geothermal well is completed, several tests and downhole measurements are conducted to help evaluate the subsurface fluid and reservoir properties intersected. From these tests, a conceptual model of the well can be developed by integrating data from the various parts of the field. This paper presents the completion techniques applied in geothermal wells, as well as the role of reservoir engineering science in delineating a field for development. Monitoring techniques and other reservoir engineering aspects of a field under exploitation are also discussed, with examples from the Philippines.

  1. Sustainable Infrastructure Systems using Engineered Cementitious Michael D. Lepech, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lepech, Michael D.

    significant sustainability challenges. Consuming 40% of US energy resources annually, the operation of residential and commercial buildings comprises a major portion of total US energy consumption [EIA 2007Sustainable Infrastructure Systems using Engineered Cementitious Composites Author: Michael D

  2. Soclety of Petroteum Engineers CT Scan and Neural Network Technology for Construction of Detailed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    `Department of Petroleum Engineering, Stanford University Copyright lYYh, society Df Petroleum Engimms TIM global demand for energy and simultaneous depletion of conventional hydrocarbon reserves impose reservoirs. Fractured petroleum reservoirs provide over 20 ?ZO of the world oil reserves [1]. Examples

  3. Hot Dry Rock Reservoir Engineering | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam: Energyarea,Magazine Jump to:II Wind FarmHorst andReservoir

  4. Petrofacies analysis - the petrophysical tool for geologic/engineering reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watney, W.L.; Guy, W.J.; Gerlach, P.M.

    1997-08-01

    Petrofacies analysis is defined as the characterization and classification of pore types and fluid saturations as revealed by petrophysical measures of a reservoir. The word {open_quotes}petrofacies{close_quotes} makes an explicit link between petroleum engineers concerns with pore characteristics as arbiters of production performance, and the facies paradigm of geologists as a methodology for genetic understanding and prediction. In petrofacies analysis, the porosity and resistivity axes of the classical Pickett plot are used to map water saturation, bulk volume water, and estimated permeability, as well as capillary pressure information, where it is available. When data points are connected in order of depth within a reservoir, the characteristic patterns reflect reservoir rock character and its interplay with the hydrocarbon column. A third variable can be presented at each point on the crossplot by assigning a color scale that is based on other well logs, often gamma ray or photoelectric effect, or other derived variables. Contrasts between reservoir pore types and fluid saturations will be reflected in changing patterns on the crossplot and can help discriminate and characterize reservoir heterogeneity. Many hundreds of analyses of well logs facilitated by spreadsheet and object-oriented programming have provided the means to distinguish patterns typical of certain complex pore types for sandstones and carbonate reservoirs, occurrences of irreducible water saturation, and presence of transition zones. The result has been an improved means to evaluate potential production such as bypassed pay behind pipe and in old exploration holes, or to assess zonation and continuity of the reservoir. Petrofacies analysis is applied in this example to distinguishing flow units including discrimination of pore type as assessment of reservoir conformance and continuity. The analysis is facilitated through the use of color cross sections and cluster analysis.

  5. Directed Regression Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Roy, Ben

    Directed Regression Yi-hao Kao Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305 yihaokao Stanford, CA 94305 xyan@stanford.edu Abstract When used to guide decisions, linear regression analysis typically involves esti- mation of regression coefficients via ordinary least squares and their subsequent

  6. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering 1500 Engineering Dr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Dept. of Mechanical Engineering 1500 Engineering Dr. University of Wisconsin ­ Madison Madison, WI. of Mechanical Engineering 2008 ­ Present Director of Engine Research Center 2003 ­ 2007 Associate Professor ­ 1995 Research Assistant Stanford University, Stanford, CA 1984 ­ 1989 Research Engineer Flow Research

  7. Stabilizing Open Quantum Systems by Markovian Reservoir Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. G. Schirmer; Xiaoting Wang

    2010-06-09

    We study open quantum systems whose evolution is governed by a master equation of Kossakowski-Gorini-Sudarshan-Lindblad type and give a characterization of the convex set of steady states of such systems based on the generalized Bloch representation. It is shown that an isolated steady state of the Bloch equation cannot be a center, i.e., that the existence of a unique steady state implies attractivity and global asymptotic stability. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a unique steady state are derived and applied to different physical models including two- and four-level atoms, (truncated) harmonic oscillators, composite and decomposable systems. It is shown how these criteria could be exploited in principle for quantum reservoir engineeing via coherent control and direct feedback to stabilize the system to a desired steady state. We also discuss the question of limit points of the dynamics. Despite the non-existence of isolated centers, open quantum systems can have nontrivial invariant sets. These invariant sets are center manifolds that arise when the Bloch superoperator has purely imaginary eigenvalues and are closely related to decoherence-free subspaces.

  8. Quantum simulation of dissipative processes without reservoir engineering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Di Candia, R.; Pedernales, J. S.; del Campo, A.; Solano, E.; Casanova, J.

    2015-05-29

    We present a quantum algorithm to simulate general finite dimensional Lindblad master equations without the requirement of engineering the system-environment interactions. The proposed method is able to simulate both Markovian and non-Markovian quantum dynamics. It consists in the quantum computation of the dissipative corrections to the unitary evolution of the system of interest, via the reconstruction of the response functions associated with the Lindblad operators. Our approach is equally applicable to dynamics generated by effectively non-Hermitian Hamiltonians. We confirm the quality of our method providing specific error bounds that quantify its accuracy.

  9. WAAS-Based Flight Inspection System Euiho Kim, Todd Walter, and J. David Powell, Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Engineer at Stanford University. He is a co- chair of the WAAS Integrity Performance Panel (WIPP) focused

  10. Chuck Stanford Oral History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford, Chuck; Bowman, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Oral history interview with Lama Chuck Stanford, co-founder and director of the Rime Buddhist Center in Kansas City, Missouri. This interview was conducted on June 4, 2015, at a Starbucks near Stanford’s home in Southern Johnson County, Kansas...

  11. Subscriber access provided by Stanford University Analytical Chemistry is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Jianghong

    Laboratory (SNL), Department of Material Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 We report here a protease sensing nanoplatform based on semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots. With their superior fluorescent properties in comparison with organic and genetically encoded fluorophores

  12. Standalone GPS-Based Flight Inspection System Euiho Kim, Todd Walter, and J.D. Powell, Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Engineer at Stanford University. He is a co-chair of the WAAS Integrity Performance Panel (WIPP) focused

  13. GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONS WITH SHAFT79

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    that well blocks must geothermal reservoir s·tudies, paperof Califomia. LBL-10066 GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONSbe presented at the Fifth Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

  14. History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource SPEAR Based on new applications of synchrotron radiation, SSRL began in 1973 as the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project...

  15. Preliminary reservoir engineering studies of the Miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haukwa, C.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Lippmann, M.J.; Mainieri, A.

    1992-01-01

    The Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in cooperation with the Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad is conducting a reservoir engineering study of the Miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica. Using data from eight exploration wells, a two-dimensional areal, natural-state model of Miravalles has been developed. The model was calibrated by fitting the observed temperature and pressure distributions and requires a geothermal upflow zone in the northern part of the field, associated with the Miravalles volcano and an outflow towards the south. The total hot (about 260 C) water recharge is 130 kg/s, corresponding to a thermal input of about 150 MWt. On the basis of the natural-state model a two-dimensional exploitation model was developed. The field has a production area of about 10 km{sup 2}, with temperatures exceeding 220 C. The model indicated that power generation of 55 MWe can be maintained for 30 years, with or without injection of the separated geothermal brine. Generation of 110 MWe could be problematic. Until more information becomes available on the areal extent of the field and the properties of the reservoir rocks, especially their relative permeability characteristics, it is difficult to ascertain if 110 MWe can be sustained during a 30-year period.

  16. A History of Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United States. Reservoir Engineering 1976-2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, B. Mack; Pruess, Karsten; Lippmann, Marcelo J.; Majer, Ernest L.; Rose, Peter E.; Adams, Michael; Roberston-Tait, Ann; Moller, Nancy; Weare, John; Clutter, Ted; Brown, Donald W.

    2010-09-01

    This report, the third in a four-part series, summarizes significant research projects performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) over 30 years to overcome challenges in reservoir engineering and to make generation of electricity from geothermal resources more cost-competitive.

  17. Society of Petroleum Engineers Staggered In Time Coupling of Reservoir Flow Simulation and Geomechanical Defor-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minkoff, Susan E.

    ) the flow of oil, gas, and water fluid phases in the reservoir while the lat- ter has been specialized

  18. A STUDY OF THE PROPOSED DIAMOND CREEK RESERVOIR Civil Engineering Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfree, Erik

    to Reservoir life 5. The Dam Table 6. Dimensions of the da~. Fig . 5. Max irnum: of the da rn . 6 . Type, turbine case, draft tube and tail race 8. The case and speed rin ~. Table 7 . Data for c en tre lin e · The dam which creats the reservoir is of the gravity type to be constructed across the river.· The walls

  19. Geothermal Technologies Program Overview Presentation at Stanford...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop Geothermal Technologies Program Overview Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop General overview of Geothermal...

  20. A reservoir engineering characterization of the north study area of the C2/VLE-305 reservoir, Lamar Field, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padron Cabral, Ricardo Javier

    1994-01-01

    Reservoir charactefimtion is the key to successful oil field development programs. The recovery efficiency of any reservoir is influenced by its heterogeneities, particularly the distributions of porosity and permeability. ...

  1. STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING RESEARCH PROJECTS SUPPORTED BY USDOE/DIVISION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    the authors. Wairakei geothermal field: Lawrence BerkeleyR. C. , Evaluation of potential geothermal well-head and17, "S"r78" for use in geothermal reservoir 25 p. (LBL-

  2. Applying Semantic Web Techniques to Reservoir Engineering: Challenges and Experiences from Event Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Kai

    domain experts deal with many tasks and operations, ranging from reservoir simulation to well maintenance of a pump exception can make a decision to either repair or replace the pump. In another scenario

  3. Jure Leskovec Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swarup, Samarth

    a skeleton for the diffusion and flow of contagions! Many behaviors that cascade from a node to node like, Stanford University #12; People send and receive product recommendations, purchase products Large online retailer: Jun `01 May `03 16M recommendations on 500k products 4M customers 7 [Leskovec

  4. Dry Gas Zone, Elk Hills field, Kern County, California: General reservoir study: Engineering text and exhibits: (Final report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-08-01

    The Dry Gas Zone in the Elk Hills field is comprised of fourteen separate productive horizons deposited in the MYA Group of the San Joaquin Formation of Pliocene Age. Eighty-six separate Reservoir Units have been identified within the interval over an area roughly ten miles long and four miles wide. One basal Tulare sand, the Tulare B, was also included in the geologic study. Five earlier studies have been made of the Dry Gas Zone; each is referenced in the Appendix of this report. Most of these studies were geologic in nature, and none provided in-depth reservoir analyses. This report is made up of ten (10) separate volumes which include: engineering text and exhibits (white dot); engineering data (black dot); geologic text and tables (green dot); structure and isochore maps (light blue dot); structural cross sections (dark blue dot); stratigraphic cross sections (brown dot); geologic data sheets -book 1 (yellow dot); geologic data sheets - book 2 (orange dot); geologic data sheets - book 3 (red dot); and geologic data sheets - book 4 (pink or coral dot). Basic production, injection, pressure, and other assorted technical data were provided by the US Department of Energy engineering staff at Elk Hills. These data were accepted as furnished with no attempt being made at independent verification.

  5. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-09-25

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling that utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling, testing of the geologic-engineering model, and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of seismic attributes, (2) petrophysical characterization, (3) data integration, (4) the building of the geologic-engineering model, (5) the testing of the geologic-engineering model and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 3. Progress on the project is as follows: geoscientific reservoir characterization is completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been completed. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The models represent an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic models served as the framework for the simulations. The geologic-engineering models of the Appleton and Vocation Field reservoirs have been developed. These models are being tested. The geophysical interpretation for the paleotopographic feature being tested has been made, and the study of the data resulting from drilling of a well on this paleohigh is in progress. Numerous presentations on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been made at professional meetings and conferences and a short course on microbial reservoir characterization and modeling based on these fields has been prepared.

  6. Stanford freedom begins with the space of an 8,180-acre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    ;STANFORD'S ACADEMIC ENTERPRISE--expressed by its motto, "the wind of freedom blows"-- embodies and Astronautics Architectural Design Atmosphere/Energy Bioengineering Biomechanical Engineering Biomedical Sciences Earth Systems Energy Resources Engineering Geological and Environmental Sciences Geophysics Pre

  7. Master Trainer Agreement and Certification Form October 2014 ~ 1 ~ STANFORD Stanford Patient Education Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Master Trainer Agreement and Certification Form October 2014 ~ 1 ~ STANFORD Stanford Patient Education Research Center SCHOOL OF MEDICINE http://patienteducation.stanford.edu Master Trainer Agreement the express written consent of Stanford University. #12;Master Trainer Agreement and Certification Form

  8. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveApril 2, 2014ApplicationLanceStaffStanford Nitrogen

  9. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveApril 2, 2014ApplicationLanceStaffStanford

  10. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveApril 2, 2014ApplicationLanceStaffStanfordSmall-Angle

  11. Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    by Geothermal Technologies Director Doug Hollett at the Stanford Geothermal Workshop on February 11-13, 2013. stanford2013hollett.pdf More Documents & Publications Geothermal...

  12. Naturally fractured reservoirs contain a significant amount of the world oil reserves. A number of these reservoirs contain several

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arbogast, Todd

    Summary Naturally fractured reservoirs contain a significant amount of the world oil reserves simulation of naturally fractured reservoirs is one of the most important, challenging, and computationally intensive problems in reservoir engineering. Parallel reservoir simulators developed for naturally fractured

  13. Contract NO. DE-FG22-93BC14862 Department of Petroleum Engineering

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Injectivity of Horizontal Wells Contract NO. DE-FG22-93BC14862 Department of Petroleum Engineering Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305 Contract Date: March 10, 1993...

  14. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PR0GRAh.I STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iv INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 TASK 1. HEAT EXTRACTION FROM HYDROTHERMAL RESERVOIRS . . . . . . 4 (a) Heat Extraction Experiments . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 (b- Radicondoli Reservoir . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 4 . 3 Study of Water Influx and Fluid

  15. Reservoir Engineering Optimization Strategies for Subsurface CO{sub 2} Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mclntire, Blayde; McPherson, Brian

    2013-09-30

    The purpose of this report is to outline a methodology for calculating the optimum number of injection wells for geologic CCS. The methodology is intended primarily for reservoir pressure management, and factors in cost as well. Efficiency may come in many forms depending on project goals; therefore, various results are presented simultaneously. The developed methodology is illustrated via application in a case study of the Rocky Mountain Carbon Capture and Storage (RMCCS) project, including a CCS candidate site near Craig, Colorado, USA. The forecasting method provided reasonable estimates of cost and injection volume when compared to simulated results.

  16. STANFORD REDWOOD CITY INFUSION THERAPY CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puglisi, Joseph

    STANFORD REDWOOD CITY INFUSION THERAPY CENTER Stanford Redwood City Infusion Therapy Center 450 that the new Stanford Redwood City Infusion Therapy Center opened on January 6, 2014. This new state previously received infusion treatments in the Infusion Treatment Area (ITA) at the Stanford Cancer Center

  17. Today's geophysicists work ever more closely with reser-voir engineers and geologists due to the advent of geo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta-Gupta, Akhil

    data consist of time-invariant information such as cores, well-logs, 3-D seismic, and geo- logic-wave propagation are distinct, many shared concepts are extremely useful in reservoir characterization characterization based on field production data. Computational challenges in reservoir characterization. Reservoir

  18. THE BULL RUN RIVER-RESERVOIR SYSTEM MODEL Robert L. Annear, Research Assistant, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Portland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Scott A.

    1 THE BULL RUN RIVER-RESERVOIR SYSTEM MODEL Robert L. Annear, Research Assistant, Civil selective withdrawal operations from historical patterns. INTRODUCTION The Bull Run River-Reservoir system from Reservoir #2 into the Lower Bull Run River during the summer months. Water temperatures

  19. 60yearsofFluidMechanicsSeminarsatStanford From Jumping Drops to Thermal Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    Drilling Muds Dr. Sourav Padhy Feb. 26 Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University Oil and Gas Releases in Deepwater: Processes, Behavior and Modeling Prof. Poojitha Yapa Mar. 5 Dept. of Civil

  20. Reservoir engineering of a mechanical resonator: generating a macroscopic superposition state and monitoring its decoherence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muhammad Asjad; David Vitali

    2013-10-26

    A deterministic scheme for generating a macroscopic superposition state of a nanomechanical resonator is proposed. The nonclassical state is generated through a suitably engineered dissipative dynamics exploiting the optomechanical quadratic interaction with a bichromatically driven optical cavity mode. The resulting driven dissipative dynamics can be employed for monitoring and testing the decoherence processes affecting the nanomechanical resonator under controlled conditions.

  1. Dry gas zone, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: General reservoir study: Engineering data, effective August 1, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-10

    This reservoir study of the dry gas zone of Elk Hills Field is a data compilation with information relating to well: completion; production; pressure; and back pressure. (JF)

  2. An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Abstract An analysis of production and reservoir engineering data of 42 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field (Mexico) allowed...

  3. Improving Geologic and Engineering Models of Midcontinent Fracture and Karst-Modified Reservoirs Using New 3-D Seismic Attributes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Nissen; Saibal Bhattacharya; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton

    2009-03-31

    Our project goal was to develop innovative seismic-based workflows for the incremental recovery of oil from karst-modified reservoirs within the onshore continental United States. Specific project objectives were: (1) to calibrate new multi-trace seismic attributes (volumetric curvature, in particular) for improved imaging of karst-modified reservoirs, (2) to develop attribute-based, cost-effective workflows to better characterize karst-modified carbonate reservoirs and fracture systems, and (3) to improve accuracy and predictiveness of resulting geomodels and reservoir simulations. In order to develop our workflows and validate our techniques, we conducted integrated studies of five karst-modified reservoirs in west Texas, Colorado, and Kansas. Our studies show that 3-D seismic volumetric curvature attributes have the ability to re-veal previously unknown features or provide enhanced visibility of karst and fracture features compared with other seismic analysis methods. Using these attributes, we recognize collapse features, solution-enlarged fractures, and geomorphologies that appear to be related to mature, cockpit landscapes. In four of our reservoir studies, volumetric curvature attributes appear to delineate reservoir compartment boundaries that impact production. The presence of these compartment boundaries was corroborated by reservoir simulations in two of the study areas. Based on our study results, we conclude that volumetric curvature attributes are valuable tools for mapping compartment boundaries in fracture- and karst-modified reservoirs, and we propose a best practices workflow for incorporating these attributes into reservoir characterization. When properly calibrated with geological and production data, these attributes can be used to predict the locations and sizes of undrained reservoir compartments. Technology transfer of our project work has been accomplished through presentations at professional society meetings, peer-reviewed publications, Kansas Geological Survey Open-file reports, Master's theses, and postings on the project website: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/SEISKARST.

  4. Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico--waterflood performance analysis for the South Cowden Grayburg Reservoir, Ector County, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, J.W. Jr.

    1997-05-01

    A reservoir engineering study was conducted of waterflood performance in the South Cowden field, an Upper Permian Grayburg reservoir on the Central Basin Platform in West Texas. The study was undertaken to understand the historically poor waterflood performance, evaluate three techniques for incorporating petrophysical measurements and geological interpretation into heterogeneous reservoir models, and identify issues in heterogeneity modeling and fluid-flow scaleup that require further research. The approach included analysis of relative permeability data, analysis of injection and production data, heterogeneity modeling, and waterflood simulation. The poor South Cowden waterflood recovery is due, in part, to completion of wells in only the top half of the formation. Recompletion of wells through the entire formation is estimated to improve recovery in ten years by 6 percent of the original oil in place in some areas of the field. A direct three-dimensional stochastic approach to heterogeneity modeling produced the best fit to waterflood performance and injectivity, but a more conventional model based on smooth mapping of layer-averaged properties was almost as good. The results reaffirm the importance of large-scale heterogeneities in waterflood modeling but demonstrate only a slight advantage for stochastic modeling at this scale. All the flow simulations required a reduction to the measured whole-core k{sub v}/k{sub h} to explain waterflood behavior, suggesting the presence of barriers to vertical flow not explicitly accounted for in any of the heterogeneity models. They also required modifications to the measured steady-state relative permeabilities, suggesting the importance of small-scale heterogeneities and scaleup. Vertical flow barriers, small-scale heterogeneity modeling, and relative permeability scaleup require additional research for waterflood performance prediction in reservoirs like South Cowden.

  5. SSRLUO 1999 Executive Committee Members | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stanford CA 94305 Work: 650-723-7513 Fax: Email: trainor@pangea.stanford.edu Joe Wong Dept of Chem & Mat Science PO Box 808, L-356 Livermore CA 94551 Work:(510) 423-6385...

  6. Stanford's nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones Stanford Report, December 18, 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yi

    Stanford's nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones Stanford Report, December 18, 2007 Stanford's nanowire battery holds 10 times the charge of existing ones BY DAN STOBER Stanford researchers have found a way to use silicon nanowires to reinvent the rechargeable lithium-ion batteries

  7. ONLINE 2013 IN REVIEW Harnessing New Technologies and Methods to Advance Teaching and Learning at Stanford and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurafsky, Daniel

    foothills, on the path to the Dish. Hoover Tower and the red tile roofs of campus in the middle ground of particular learners? And we are beginning to answer these questions: Stanford faculty from all seven schools- mediated instruction. A dedicated team of Stanford engineers is collaboratively developing an open- source

  8. For release Tuesday, Dec. 16, at 0600 PST Stanford to host 100-year study on artificial intelligence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvitz, Eric

    of artificial intelligence in all aspects of life. By Chris Cesare | Stanford Engineering Stanford University and anticipate how the effects of artificial intelligence will ripple through every aspect of how people work, live and play. This effort, called the One Hundred Year Study on Artificial Intelligence, or AI100

  9. Fourier Slice Photography Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Fourier Slice Photography Ren Ng Stanford University Abstract This paper contributes to the theory of photograph formation from light fields. The main result is a theorem that, in the Fourier do- main- rectional resolution. Second, the theorem yields a Fourier-domain algorithm for digital refocusing, where we

  10. Bioengineering/Chemical Engineering Building,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogyo, Matthew

    BioE/ChemE Building Bioengineering/Chemical Engineering Building, Under Construction Lucile Packard Graduate Residences Sterling Quad Mirrielees Pearce Mitchell Houses Stanford Hospital Varsity Lot Jordan

  11. Reservoir analysis study: Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: Phase 3 report, Recommended additional reservoir engineering analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    The basis for completion of the Phase III tasks above were the reports of Phases I and II and the associated backup material. The Phase II report was reviewed to identify the major uncertainties in all of the reserve assignments. In addition to the Proved, Probable and Possible reserves of Phase II, ''potential reserves'' or those associated with a greater degree of risk than the Possible reserves included in the Phase II report, were also identified based on the work performed by Bergeson through the Phase II reporting date. Thirty-three specific studies were identified to address the major Phase II reserve uncertainties or these potential reserves. These studies are listed in Table 1 and are grouped by the Elk Hills pool designation. The basis and need for each study are elaborated in the discussion which follows. Where possible, the need for the study was quantified by associating the study with a particular reserve estimate which would be clarified by the analysis. This reserve value was either the Probable or Possible reserves which were being studied, the potential reserves that were identified, or simply the uncertainty inherent in the proved reserves as identified in the study purpose. The costs associated with performing the study are also shown in Table 1 and were estimated based on Bergeson's knowledge of the Elk Hills reservoirs and data base following Phases I and II, as well as the company's experience in performing similar studies in other fields. The cost estimates are considered reasonable for general budgeting purposes, but may require refinement prior to actual initiation of these studies. This is particularly true for studies involving field testing to obtain additional log, core or test information as the cost of such items is not considered in this report. 51 figs., 46 tabs.

  12. April, 2000 Stanford Biostatistics 1 Statistical challenges in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tibshirani, Robeert

    April, 2000 Stanford Biostatistics 1 ' & $ % Statistical challenges in the analysis of DNA:tibs@stat.stanford.edu http://www-stat.stanford.edu/~tibs hanks to NSF, NIH, NCI #12; April, 2000 Stanford Biostatistics 2 asks that he be executed #12;rst. #12; April, 2000 Stanford Biostatistics 3 ' & $ % #15; Exciting new

  13. Autism Research at Stanford The Stanford Psychophysiology Lab is looking to recruit children and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, James J.

    Autism Research at Stanford The Stanford Psychophysiology Lab is looking to recruit children and young adults aged 8-22 with Autism Spectrum Disorder children with autism. Each participant will be paid $30 for completing each

  14. M.; Weaver, J.N.; Wiedemann, H. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Stanford

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the 2 MeV microwave gun for the SSRL 150 MeV linac Borland, M.; Weaver, J.N.; Wiedemann, H. (Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab.); Green, M.C.; Nelson,...

  15. Applying reservoir characterization technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lake, L.W.

    1994-12-31

    While reservoir characterization is an old discipline, only within the last 10 years have engineers and scientists been able to make quantitative descriptions, due mostly to improvements in high-resolution computational power, sophisticated graphics, and geostatistics. This paper summarizes what has been learned during the past decade by using these technologies.

  16. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford, California, conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the SLAC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the SLAC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team is developing a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the SLAC facility. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the SLAC Survey. 95 refs., 25 figs., 25 tabs.

  17. Copyright 1999, Society of Petroleum Engineers Inc. This paper was prepared for presentation at the 1999 SPE Reservoir Simulation Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peszynska, Malgorzata

    Copyright 1999, Society of Petroleum Engineers Inc. This paper was prepared for presentation by the Society of Petroleum Engineers and are subject to correction by the author(s). The material, as presented, does not necessarily reflect any position of the Society of Petroleum Engineers, its officers

  18. 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    0 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC) 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC) Annual...

  19. Department of Energy Cites Stanford University for Worker Safety...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Cites Stanford University for Worker Safety and Health Violations Department of Energy Cites Stanford University for Worker Safety and Health Violations...

  20. DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker Safety and Health Violations DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker Safety and Health Violations...

  1. Stanford University Medical Center Lane Medical Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    of the library's privileges must be related to the instruction, research, patient care, and public welfare goals Library's resources and services must be related to the instruction, research, patient care and publicStanford University Medical Center Lane Medical Library 300 Pasteur Drive Room L109 Stanford, CA

  2. Integrated Hydraulic Fracture Placement and Design Optimization in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Xiaodan

    2013-12-10

    Unconventional reservoir such as tight and shale gas reservoirs has the potential of becoming the main source of cleaner energy in the 21th century. Production from these reservoirs is mainly accomplished through engineered hydraulic fracturing...

  3. Integrated Reservoir Characterization: Offshore Louisiana, Grand Isle Blocks 32 & 33 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey, Michael Chase

    2011-08-08

    This thesis integrated geology, geophysics, and petroleum engineering data to build a detailed reservoir characterization models for three gas pay sands in the Grand Isle 33 & 43 fields, offshore Louisiana. The reservoirs are Late Miocene in age...

  4. References Burkhardt, H. E., Brook, C. A., Smith, F. W., (1980...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Known Geothermal Resource Area." Proceedings, Fortieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, January 26-28, 2015 Future plans...

  5. Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim; Gilbert, Bob; Lake, Larry W.; Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett; Thomas, Sunil G.; Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo; Klie, Hector; Banchs, Rafael; Nunez, Emilio J.; Jablonowski, Chris

    2006-11-01

    The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging survivability issues. Our findings indicate that packaging represents the most significant technical challenge associated with application of sensors in the downhole environment for long periods (5+ years) of time. These issues are described in detail within the report. The impact of successful reservoir monitoring programs and coincident improved reservoir management is measured by the production of additional oil and gas volumes from existing reservoirs, revitalization of nearly depleted reservoirs, possible re-establishment of already abandoned reservoirs, and improved economics for all cases. Smart Well monitoring provides the means to understand how a reservoir process is developing and to provide active reservoir management. At the same time it also provides data for developing high-fidelity simulation models. This work has been a joint effort with Sandia National Laboratories and UT-Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and the Institute of Computational and Engineering Mathematics.

  6. Original articles The Stanford Digital Library metadata architecturec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravano, Luis

    Original articles The Stanford Digital Library metadata architecturec Michelle Baldonado, Chen / Accepted: 14 January 1997 Abstract. The overall goal of the Stanford Digital Library project is to provide an infrastructure that aords interoperability among heterogeneous, autono- mous digital library services

  7. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2003-02-11

    This research was directed toward developing a systematic reservoir characterization methodology which can be used by the petroleum industry to implement infill drilling programs and/or enhanced oil recovery projects in naturally fractured reservoir systems in an environmentally safe and cost effective manner. It was anticipated that the results of this research program will provide geoscientists and engineers with a systematic procedure for properly characterizing a fractured reservoir system and a reservoir/horizontal wellbore simulator model which can be used to select well locations and an effective EOR process to optimize the recovery of the oil and gas reserves from such complex reservoir systems.

  8. Stanford University November 2012 Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research on the web:http://siepr.stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zalta, Edward N.

    ) said was enough natural gas reserves to last fewer than 15 years at current rates of consumption, most notably China, have large shale gas reserves. Current landed prices for liquefied natural gas (LNG:http://siepr.stanford.edu SIEPRpolicy brief Energy industry observers have called the development of unconventional natural gas

  9. Stanford University June 2011 Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research on the web:http://siepr.stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Fei-Fei

    , purification, and metals production industry; a domestic rare earth metals alloying industry; and a domestic:http://siepr.stanford.edu SIEPRpolicy brief China produces 97 percent of all rare earth elements (REEs) consumed in the world today,1 is now paying attention, recently introducing the Rare Earth Supply-Chain Technology and Resource

  10. December 2001 Trevor Hastie, Stanford Statistics 1 Support Vector Machines,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hastie, Trevor

    December 2001 Trevor Hastie, Stanford Statistics 1 Support Vector Machines, Kernel Logistic in Optimization and Computational Algorithms (NTOC2001) December 9-13, 2001, Kyodai-Kaikan, Kyoto, Japan http://www-stat.stanford.edu/hastie/Papers/ivmtalk.pdf #12;December 2001 Trevor Hastie, Stanford Statistics 2 Outline · Optimal separating hyperplanes

  11. A New Grid Structure for Domain Extension Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedkiw, Ron

    reflecting off of grid boundaries thus allowing for a large amount of detail and grid resolution nearA New Grid Structure for Domain Extension Bo Zhu Stanford University Wenlong Lu Stanford University Stanford University Industrial Light + Magic Figure 1: Our far-field grid structure provides an extended

  12. Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering seminar From Jumping Drops to Thermal Diodes Abstract Scholar and Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science at Duke University since.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University (2004). Dr. Chen is a recipient of numerous

  13. PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

    2004-05-01

    The Permian Basin of west Texas and southeast New Mexico has produced >30 Bbbl (4.77 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000, most of it from 1,339 reservoirs having individual cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}). These significant-sized reservoirs are the focus of this report. Thirty-two Permian Basin oil plays were defined, and each of the 1,339 significant-sized reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Associated reservoir information within linked data tables includes Railroad Commission of Texas reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are <1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. This report contains a summary description of each play, including key reservoir characteristics and successful reservoir-management practices that have been used in the play. The CD accompanying the report contains a pdf version of the report, the GIS project, pdf maps of all plays, and digital data files. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 from these significant-sized reservoirs was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl 5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]).

  14. Provenance Collection in Reservoir Management Workflow Environments Fan Sun, Jing Zhao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Kai

    in reservoir engineering applications. Data provenance is metadata that pertains to the history of the data information from application logs in the domain of reservoir engineering. In doing so, we address challenges due to: 1) the lack of a workflow orchestration framework in reservoir engineering and 2

  15. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM FIRST ANNUAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM FIRST ANNUAL REPORT t o U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LAWRENCE BERKELEY PRESENTATIONS & PUBLICATIONS APPENDIX A: STANDARD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM WEEKLY SEMINAR ii 1 4 23 35 49 58 60 63 65 Geothermal Program has maintained momentum built up under the previous National Science Foundation support

  16. PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; William Raatz; Cari Breton; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans; Mark H. Holtz

    2003-04-01

    A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest petroleum-producing basin in the US. Approximately 1300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl of oil through 2000. Of these major reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. On a preliminary basis, 32 geologic plays have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs and assignment of each of the 1300 major reservoirs to a play has begun. The reservoirs are being mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonardian Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

  17. Sustaining and rapid response engineering in the reservoir sampling and pressure group of the commercial products and support organization at Schlumberger Sugar Land Technology Center 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerr, Bradley Gray

    2007-04-25

    Project Technician 7 complexity and capability of the tools experienced during the internship. The following list contains tool descriptions that are largely copied from MDT Modular Formation Dynamics Tester [2]. 1. Power Cartridge Module The modular... reservoir power cartridge (MRPC) module converts AC power from the surface to DC power for all the other modules in the tool. 2. Hydraulic Power Module The modular reservoir hydraulic power (MRHY) module contains an electric motor and hydraulic pump...

  18. Predicting reservoir sedimentation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooten, Stephanie

    1997-01-01

    Sediments accumulate in reservoirs and significantly decrease storage capacity. Predicting sedimentation is an important consideration in the design of new reservoir projects and in the management of existing reservoirs. Sedimentation rates may vary...

  19. The effects of production rates and some reservoir parameters on recovery in a strong water drive gas reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soemarso, Christophorus

    1978-01-01

    THE EFFECTS OF PRODUCTION RATES AND SOME RESERVOIR PARAMETERS ON RECOVERY IN A STRONG WATER DRIVE GAS RESERVOIR A Thesis by CHRISTOPHORUS SOEMARSO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE EFFECTS OF PRODUCTION RATES AND SOME RESERVOIR PARAMETERS ON RECOVERY IN A STRONG WATER DRIVE GAS RESERVOIR A Thesis by CHRISTOPHORUS SOEMARSO...

  20. HYDROPOWER RESERVOIR FOR FLOOD CONTROL: A CASE STUDY ON RINGLET RESERVOIR, CAMERON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    HYDROPOWER RESERVOIR FOR FLOOD CONTROL: A CASE STUDY ON RINGLET RESERVOIR, CAMERON HIGHLANDS, Malaysia 4 Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Colorado State University, USA ABSTRACT: Hydropower as possible for daily hydropower generation as well as to prevent any spillage at dam. However

  1. Discrete Fracture Reservoir Simulation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Discrete Fracture Reservoir Simulation Shale Gas Flow Simulation Shale Gas Flow Simulation FRACGENNFFLOW, fractured reservoir modeling software developed by NETL's Geological and...

  2. 166 GRC BULLETIN Reservoir Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    the effects of exploitation upon geothermal systems. The simplest physical explanation of observed mecha of geothermal systems. Introduction Traditionally, the term source mechanism in seismology has meant fault for Monitoring Geothermal Systems By Bruce R. Julian (U. S. Geological Survey - Menlo Park, CA) and Gillian R

  3. Stanford Geothermal Workshop | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report AppendicesAVideoSolarSpace-BasedFact Sheet |Stanford Geothermal

  4. Proceedings of the 9th International Scientific and Technical Conference "New Methods and Technologies in Petroleum Geology, Drilling and Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    and Technologies in Petroleum Geology, Drilling and Reservoir Engineering," Volume II, 311-317, AGH, Krakow, Poland

  5. In: J. Waterway, Port, Coastal, and Ocean Engineering, 126(3): 305-313, 2000. Reservoir Model of Ebb-Tidal Shoal Evolution and Sand Bypassing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    of Ebb-Tidal Shoal Evolution and Sand Bypassing By Nicholas C. Kraus,1 Member, ASCE ABSTRACT A mathematical model is presented for calculating the change in volume and sand-bypassing rate at ebb reservoir can fill to a maximum (equilibrium) volume. The ratio of the input longshore sand transport rate

  6. Oral History Editors and Writers for the Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurafsky, Daniel

    Oral History Editors and Writers for the Stanford Historical Society Oral History Program The Stanford Historical Society's Oral History Program documents the institutional history of the University, publication, dissemination and preservation of the history of the Leland Stanford Junior University

  7. Pressure maintenance in a volatile oil reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuster, Bruce Alan

    1989-01-01

    PRESSURE MAINTENANCE IN A VOLATILE OIL RESERVOIR A Thesis BRUCE ALAN SCHUSTER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1989 Major... Subject: Petroleum Engineering PRESSURE MAINTENANCE IN A VOLATILE OIL RESERVOIR A Thesis BRUCE ALAN SCHUSTER Approved as to style and content by: S. A. Holditch (Chair of Committee) W. J. Lee (Member) R. R, Berg (Member) , Jz W. D. Von Gonten...

  8. Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque|SensitiveApril 2, 2014ApplicationLanceStaffStanford Nitrogen

  9. Scientific Advisory Committee | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| StanfordOffice of ScienceDiscoveredScientific AdvisoryScientific

  10. Layered Pseudo-Steady-State Models for tight commingled gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Banbi, Ahmed

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of commingled reservoirs from limited data can be a challenge to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to find an effective and easy technique that can be used to estimate ...

  11. Type A Investigation of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Complex on October 11, 2004 Type A Investigation of the Electrical Arc Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator...

  12. Copyright 2001, Society of Petroleum Engineers Inc. This paper was prepared for presentation at the SPE Reservoir Simulation Symposium held in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmroth, Erik

    Copyright 2001, Society of Petroleum Engineers Inc. This paper was prepared for presentation by the Society of Petroleum Engineers and are subject to correction by the author(s). The material, as presented, does not necessarily reflect any position of the Society of Petroleum Engineers, its officers

  13. Report 01-136 Stanford University EH&S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3/21/2002 Report 01-136 Stanford University EH&S Approved Laboratory Ergonomic Products List This list contains laboratory equipment and furniture that have been evaluated and approved by Stanford University EH&S. No one product will guarantee proper ergonomics or necessarily be an improvement for every

  14. Status of Norris Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Norris Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses, conditions that impair reservoir uses, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most up-to-date publications and data available, and from interviews with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies, and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Yinyu Ye is currently the K.T. Li Chair Professor of Engineering at Department of Management Science and Engineering and Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, Yinyu

    Science and Engineering and Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Stanford University Sciences, the inaugural 2006 Farkas Prize on Optimization, the 2009 IBM Faculty Award, etc.. He has of government and industry funded research projects. He has been the Director of the Stanford Management Science

  16. Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonate Studies Executive Summary for 2014 Outcrop and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate Reservoirs for Improved Recovery of Remaining/Al 0.00 0.02 0.04 Eagle Ford Fm #12;#12; Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory Research Plans

  17. Status of Wheeler Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This is one in a series of status reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Wheeler Reservoir summarizes reservoir purposes and operation, reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, and water quality and aquatic biological conditions. The information presented here is from the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. If no recent data were available, historical data were summarized. If data were completely lacking, environmental professionals with special knowledge of the resource were interviewed. 12 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Status of Cherokee Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01

    This is the first in a series of reports prepared by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overviews of Cherokee Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports, publications, and data available, and interviews with water resource professionals in various Federal, state, and local agencies and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. The imbibition process of waterflooding in naturally fractured reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huapaya Lopez, Christian A.

    2005-02-17

    -1 THE IMBIBITION PROCESS OF WATERFLOODING IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS A Thesis by CHRISTIAN HUAPAYA LOPEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2003 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ii THE IMBIBITION PROCESS OF WATERFLOODING IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS A Thesis by CHRISTIAN HUAPAYA LOPEZ...

  20. Thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.

    1996-12-31

    This report is a transcript of a practice lecture given in preparation for a review lecture on the operation of thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators. The author begins by a brief review of the thermodynamic principles underlying the operation of thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators. Remember from thermodynamics class that there are two kinds of heat engines, the heat engine or the prime mover which produces work from heat, and the refrigerator or heat pump that uses work to pump heat. The device operates between two thermal reservoirs at temperatures T{sub hot} and T{sub cold}. In the heat engine, heat flows into the device from the reservoir at T{sub hot}, produces work, and delivers waste heat into the reservoir at T{sub cold}. In the refrigerator, work flows into the device, lifting heat Q{sub cold} from reservoir at T{sub cold} and rejecting waste heat into the reservoir at T{sub hot}.

  1. ZERO WASTE STANFORD WASTE REDUCTION, RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING GUIDELINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerdes, J. Christian

    ZERO WASTE STANFORD WASTE REDUCTION, RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING GUIDELINES PLASTICS, METALS & GLASS pleaseemptyandflatten COMPOSTABLES kitchenandyardwasteonly LANDFILL ONLY ifallelsefails All Plastic Containers Metal Material All Food Paper Plates & Napkins *including pizza & donut boxes Compostable & Biodegradable

  2. A reservoir management study of a mature oil field 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peruzzi, Tave

    1995-01-01

    An integrated geological, petrophysical and reservoir engineering review was performed for a mature, producing oil field. Like many older fields, important data are missing or were not collected. The techniques used in this thesis may be applied...

  3. Research on improved and enhanced oil recovery in Illinois through reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-25

    The Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources through a Memorandum of Understanding with the US Department of Energy has commenced a research program in Improved and Enhanced Oil Recovery from Illinois Reservoirs Through Reservoir Characterization.'' The program will include studies on mineralogy, petrography of reservoir rock, database management, engineering assessment, seismic studies and acoustic logs, and mapping. 8 figs. (CBS)

  4. Constant Asphaltene Molecular and Nanoaggregate Mass in a Gravitationally Segregated Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94350, United States Saudi Aramco

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TECHNIQUES AND PRODUCTION MODELS FOR EXPLOITING NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Wiggins; Raymon L. Brown; Faruk Civan; Richard G. Hughes

    2002-12-31

    For many years, geoscientists and engineers have undertaken research to characterize naturally fractured reservoirs. Geoscientists have focused on understanding the process of fracturing and the subsequent measurement and description of fracture characteristics. Engineers have concentrated on the fluid flow behavior in the fracture-porous media system and the development of models to predict the hydrocarbon production from these complex systems. This research attempts to integrate these two complementary views to develop a quantitative reservoir characterization methodology and flow performance model for naturally fractured reservoirs. The research has focused on estimating naturally fractured reservoir properties from seismic data, predicting fracture characteristics from well logs, and developing a naturally fractured reservoir simulator. It is important to develop techniques that can be applied to estimate the important parameters in predicting the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. This project proposes a method to relate seismic properties to the elastic compliance and permeability of the reservoir based upon a sugar cube model. In addition, methods are presented to use conventional well logs to estimate localized fracture information for reservoir characterization purposes. The ability to estimate fracture information from conventional well logs is very important in older wells where data are often limited. Finally, a desktop naturally fractured reservoir simulator has been developed for the purpose of predicting the performance of these complex reservoirs. The simulator incorporates vertical and horizontal wellbore models, methods to handle matrix to fracture fluid transfer, and fracture permeability tensors. This research project has developed methods to characterize and study the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs that integrate geoscience and engineering data. This is an important step in developing exploitation strategies for optimizing the recovery from naturally fractured reservoir systems. The next logical extension of this work is to apply the proposed methods to an actual field case study to provide information for verification and modification of the techniques and simulator. This report provides the details of the proposed techniques and summarizes the activities undertaken during the course of this project. Technology transfer activities were highlighted by a two-day technical conference held in Oklahoma City in June 2002. This conference attracted over 90 participants and included the presentation of seventeen technical papers from researchers throughout the United States.

  6. Improved characterization of reservoir behavior by integration of reservoir performances data and rock type distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, D.K.; Vessell, R.K.; Doublet, L.E.

    1997-08-01

    An integrated geological/petrophysical and reservoir engineering study was performed for a large, mature waterflood project (>250 wells, {approximately}80% water cut) at the North Robertson (Clear Fork) Unit, Gaines County, Texas. The primary goal of the study was to develop an integrated reservoir description for {open_quotes}targeted{close_quotes} (economic) 10-acre (4-hectare) infill drilling and future recovery operations in a low permeability, carbonate (dolomite) reservoir. Integration of the results from geological/petrophysical studies and reservoir performance analyses provide a rapid and effective method for developing a comprehensive reservoir description. This reservoir description can be used for reservoir flow simulation, performance prediction, infill targeting, waterflood management, and for optimizing well developments (patterns, completions, and stimulations). The following analyses were performed as part of this study: (1) Geological/petrophysical analyses: (core and well log data) - {open_quotes}Rock typing{close_quotes} based on qualitative and quantitative visualization of pore-scale features. Reservoir layering based on {open_quotes}rock typing {close_quotes} and hydraulic flow units. Development of a {open_quotes}core-log{close_quotes} model to estimate permeability using porosity and other properties derived from well logs. The core-log model is based on {open_quotes}rock types.{close_quotes} (2) Engineering analyses: (production and injection history, well tests) Material balance decline type curve analyses to estimate total reservoir volume, formation flow characteristics (flow capacity, skin factor, and fracture half-length), and indications of well/boundary interference. Estimated ultimate recovery analyses to yield movable oil (or injectable water) volumes, as well as indications of well and boundary interference.

  7. Accepted, subject to re-review, Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, ASCE, version of January 2006 Role of Ponded Turbidity Currents in Reservoir Trap Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary

    by a hydraulic jump. If the interface of this muddy pond rises above any vent or overflow point at the damAccepted, subject to re-review, Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, ASCE, version of January 2006 1. The dam causes a sustained turbidity current to reflect and form a muddy pond bounded upstream

  8. Reservoir CharacterizationReservoir Characterization Research LaboratoryResearch Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Reservoir CharacterizationReservoir Characterization Research LaboratoryResearch Laboratory at Austin Austin, Texas 78713Austin, Texas 78713--89248924 #12;Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonate Studies Research Plans for 2012 Outcrop and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate

  9. DOE-Funded Research at Stanford Sees Results in Reservoir Characterization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 2015 GATEWAY TakestoFlex Bulletin The information contained|

  10. ENGINEERING

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ENGINEERING the Future of ENERGY Regional University Alliance National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Research and Development The Future of Energy The time to redraw...

  11. Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Includes Engineering Standards Manual, Master Specifications Index, Drafting Manual, Design Guides, and more. IHS Standards Expert login information Collections include ANSI,...

  12. Horizontal well applications in complex carbonate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahman, M.; Al-Awami, H.

    1995-10-01

    Over the past four years, Saudi Aramco has drilled over eighty horizontal wells, onshore and offshore. It has successfully applied this technology to develop new reservoirs as well as enhance recovery from its mature fields. This paper presents the reservoir engineering aspects of `horizontal` and `high angle` wells drilled in a major offshore field in Saudi Arabia. It shows how horizontal wells have (a) increased the recovery of bypassed oil, (b) improved well productivity in tight reservoirs, (c) increased production from thin oil zones underlain by water, and (d) improved peripheral injection. The paper discusses the actual performance of the horizontal wells and compares them with offset conventional wells. It presents the results of logging and testing of these wells, and highlights actual field data on (a) relationship between productivity gain and horizontal length, (b) pressure loss along the horizontal wellbore, and (c) effect of heterogeneity on coning an inflow performance.

  13. Hispanic Poverty and Inequality Grant Competition Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Fei-Fei

    Hispanic Poverty and Inequality Grant Competition Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality Request for Proposals The Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality (CPI), a National Poverty Research Center funded by the Office

  14. JOINT CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS 7th International Conference on Urban Earthquake Engineering (7CUEE) &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Jack W.

    velocity pulses are of interest to engineers designing systems close to active faults. These ground motions effects are a special class of ground motions that are particularly challenging to characterize 94305 shrey@stanford.edu, bakerjw@stanford.edu Abstract: Near-fault ground motions containing strong

  15. An Extended Theory of Human Problem Solving Pat Langley (langley@csli.stanford.edu)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langley, Pat

    An Extended Theory of Human Problem Solving Pat Langley (langley@csli.stanford.edu) Seth Rogers and Information Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 USA Abstract Human problem solving has long been a central and directions for future research. Introductory Remarks Research on human problem solving has a venerable his

  16. Stanford School of Medicine ILC LK005 Project Classroom Safety Training Information and Certification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    : ______________ (must be Stanford faculty or management staff) Reserving space in the ILC Project Classroom LK005Stanford School of Medicine ILC LK005 Project Classroom Safety Training Information on the Stanford SU-17 form. LK005 Project Classroom Safety Rules and Procedures 1. Food and Beverages or Cosmetic

  17. Reservoir Operation in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.

    1985-01-01

    to store and to release or withdraw for flood control and various conservation purposes. The report is intended to provide a comprehensive, indepth description of how reservoirs are operated in Texas...

  18. Low Overhead Broadcast Encryption from Multilinear Maps Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Low Overhead Broadcast Encryption from Multilinear Maps Dan Boneh Stanford University dabo. We say that the system has low overhead if the ciphertext overhead depends at most logarithmically on the number of users N in the system. Existing constructions with low ciphertext overhead. Several broadcast

  19. Stanford University December 2011, page 1 Office of Postdoctoral Affairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    administrators who would like to enter aid that would offset the amount owed by a postdoc for covering children Stanford ePay. Aid may be entered directly in GFS, as described below. This will apply a credit to Item Type it accordingly. Under Item Type Setup, enter your PTA information, and navigate to the main

  20. DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS, STANFORD UNIVERSITY FOURTH YEAR ORAL PRESENTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS, STANFORD UNIVERSITY FOURTH YEAR ORAL PRESENTATION REQUIREMENT Fourth year is completed. The form is due to the student services manager by the end of March of the fourth year for fourth year students and on February by the end of the fifth year for student in year five and above who have

  1. A Comparison of Chinese Parsers for Stanford Dependencies Wanxiang Che

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    A Comparison of Chinese Parsers for Stanford Dependencies Wanxiang Che car@ir.hit.edu.cn Valentin I for producing automatic (rather than gold) part- of-speech tags to train Chinese dependency parsers. Finally, we) and sentiment analysis (Meena and Prabhakar, 2007). In addition to English, there is a Chinese ver- sion

  2. STANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER Winter 1999, Vol. 29, No. 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    STANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER Winter 1999, Vol. 29, No. 3 #12;The Beam Line is published GEORGE TRILLING, KARL VAN BIBBER HERMAN WINICK Illustrations TERRY ANDERSON Distribution CRYSTAL TILGHMAN A PERIODICAL OF PARTICLE PHYSICS WINTER 1999 VOL. 29, NUMBER 3 Printed on recycled paper FEATURES 2 GOLDEN

  3. Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

    2006-09-30

    Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. The successful development of HPAI technology has tremendous potential for increasing the flow of oil from deep carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin, a target resource that can be conservatively estimated at more than 1.5 billion barrels. Successful implementation in the field chosen for demonstration, for example, could result in the recovery of more than 34 million barrels of oil that will not otherwise be produced. Geological and petrophysical analysis of available data at Barnhart field reveals the following important observations: (1) the Barnhart Ellenburger reservoir is similar to most other Ellenburger reservoirs in terms of depositional facies, diagenesis, and petrophysical attributes; (2) the reservoir is characterized by low to moderate matrix porosity much like most other Ellenburger reservoirs in the Permian Basin; (3) karst processes (cave formation, infill, and collapse) have substantially altered stratigraphic architecture and reservoir properties; (4) porosity and permeability increase with depth and may be associated with the degree of karst-related diagenesis; (5) tectonic fractures overprint the reservoir, improving overall connectivity; (6) oil-saturation profiles show that the oil-water contact (OWC) is as much as 125 ft lower than previous estimations; (7) production history and trends suggest that this reservoir is very similar to other solution-gas-drive reservoirs in the Permian Basin; and (8) reservoir simulation study showed that the Barnhart reservoir is a good candidate for HPAI and that application of horizontal-well technology can improve ultimate resource recovery from the reservoir.

  4. Flood control reservoir operations for conditions of limited storage capacity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivera Ramirez, Hector David

    2005-02-17

    -1 FLOOD CONTROL RESERVOIR OPERATIONS FOR CONDITIONS OF LIMITED STORAGE CAPACITY A Dissertation by HECTOR DAVID RIVERA RAMIREZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2004 Major Subject: Civil Engineering FLOOD CONTROL RESERVOIR OPERATIONS FOR CONDITIONS OF LIMITED STORAGE CAPACITY A Dissertation by HECTOR DAVID RIVERA...

  5. Analysis of a geopressured gas reservoir using solution plot method 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hussain, Syed Muqeedul

    1992-01-01

    ANALYSIS OF A GEOPRESSURED GAS RESERVOIR USING SOLUTION PLOT METHOD A Thesis by SYED MUQEEDUL HUSSAIN Submitted to the Office of Cuaduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ANALYSIS OF A GEOPRESSURED GAS RESERVOIR USING SOLUTION PLOT METHOD A Thesis by SYED MUQEEDUL HUSSAIN Approved as to style and content by: S. W. Poston (Chair of Committee) R. R. Berg...

  6. Recovery of oil from fractured reservoirs by gas displacement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unneberg, Arild

    1974-01-01

    RECOVERY OF OIL FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY GAS DISPLACEMENT A Thesis by ARILD UNNE BE RG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AlkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974... Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering RECOVERY OF OIL FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY GAS DISPLACEMENT A Thesis by ARILD UNNEBERG Approved as, to style and content by: . ( y (Chairman of Cornrnittee) (Head of Depar nt) / (Membe r) (Member) M b...

  7. Analyzing aquifers associated with gas reservoirs using aquifer influence functions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Targac, Gary Wayne

    1988-01-01

    ANALYZING AQUIFERS ASSOCIATED WITH GAS RESERVOIRS USING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE TARGAC Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE V z May 1988 z V z z I- Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ANALYZING AQUIFERS ASSOCIATED WITH GAS RESERVOIRS USING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE TARGAC Approved as to style and content by: (Chair of Committ R...

  8. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

  9. Engineering Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Engineering Engineering Technology & A T P E N N S T A T E 2 0 1 0 ­ 2 0 1 1 #12;2 Join us at penn state! Since 1896, Penn State has been a leader in engineering and engineering technology education varieties of engineering and engineering technology majors found anywhere in the United States. This means

  10. 4th International Conference on Earthquake Engineering Taipei, Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    4th International Conference on Earthquake Engineering Taipei, Taiwan October 12-13, 2006 Paper No, law@stanford.edu 5 Research Assistant, Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Taiwan Univ., Taipei, Taiwan, r92521247@ntu.edu.tw 6 Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Taiwan Univ., Taipei

  11. 4th International Conference on Earthquake Engineering Taipei, Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    4th International Conference on Earthquake Engineering Taipei, Taiwan October 12-13, 2006 Paper No., USA, law@stanford.edu 5 Research Assistant, Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Taiwan Univ., Taipei, Taiwan, r92521247@ntu.edu.tw 6 Professor, Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Taiwan Univ., Taipei

  12. 3D Magnetotelluic characterization of the Coso Geothermal Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Gregory A.; Hoversten, G. Michael; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Gasperikova, Erika

    2008-01-01

    130, 475-496. the Coso Geothermal Field, Proc.28 th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanfords ratio and porosity at Coso geothermal area, California: J.

  13. A reservoir management strategy for multilayered reservoirs in eastern Venezuela 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinel Diaz, Arnaldo Leopoldo

    1998-01-01

    A reservoir management strategy has been developed for a field located in eastern Venezuela. The field contains deep, high pressure, multilayer reservoirs. A thorough formation evaluation was accomplished using the log data, core data, PVT data...

  14. *jplynch@stanford.edu; phone 1-650-723-6213; fax 1-650-725-9755; The John A. Blume Earthquake Engineering Center, Stanford University; Stanford, CA 94305;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , such as advanced integrated circuits, solid-state sensors, and wireless communications, can have an immediate, Los Alamos National Laboratory ABSTRACT A state-of-art design of a wireless sensing unit, which serves. The Alamosa Canyon Bridge in New Mexico is instrumented with wireless sensing units and a traditional cable

  15. Evolution of analyzing reservoir simulation data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, R.E.; Huang, A.Y.

    1994-12-31

    Numerical Reservoir Simulation is routinely used by the petroleum producing companies world-wide as an engineering tool to efficiently manage their hydrocarbon reservoirs. The task of building models with a large number of grid-blocks is not easy, and to analyze the voluminous results produced by such models is even more difficult. This paper discusses the historical evolution of techniques used to analyze reservoir simulation data over the past decade. It outlines how the advancement of workstation technology and the introduction of X-Window System opened up an entirely new way of utilizing mainframe computing power and workstation graphical display capabilities, simultaneously. The paper also discusses Saudi Aramco`s experience in the development of sophisticated reservoir simulation post-processing packages. The need for direct communication between the programmer and end-users to facilitate a user-friendly package is emphasized. A practical example illustrating the benefit of these post-processing packages in the construction and history matching of a large model with approximately 52,000 cells is presented. Savings in manpower and computer resources using current technology are estimated.

  16. Evolution of analyzing reservoir simulation data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, R.E.; Huang, A.Y.

    1995-12-01

    Petroleum-producing companies world-wide routinely use numerical reservoir simulation as an engineering tool to manage their hydrocarbon reservoirs efficiently. The task of building models with a large number of gridblocks is not easy, and analyzing the voluminous results produced by such models is even more difficult. This paper discusses the historical evolution of techniques used to analyze reservoir simulation data over the past decade. It outlines how the advancement of workstation technology and the introduction of an X-Window system opened up an entirely new way of using mainframe computing power and workstation graphical display capabilities simultaneously. The paper also discusses Saudi Aramco`s experience in the development of sophisticated reservoir simulation postprocessing packages. The authors emphasize the need for direct communication between the programmer and end users to facilitate a user-friendly package. They present a practical example illustrating the benefit of these postprocessing packages in the construction and history matching of a large model with approximately 52,000 cells. They estimate savings in manpower and computer resources using current technology.

  17. Hydrocarbon Reservoir Parameter Estimation Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    Hydrocarbon Reservoir Parameter Estimation Using Production Data and Time-Lapse Seismic #12;#12;Hydrocarbon Reservoir Parameter Estimation Using Production Data and Time-Lapse Seismic PROEFSCHRIFT ter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2 Recovery process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.3 Field

  18. Dual-porosity reservoir modeling of the fractured Hanifa reservoir, Abqaiq Field, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthy, S.T. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-31

    Fractures play a significant role in the transmissibility of the Hanifa reservoir at Abqaiq Field. The Hanifa is a Type 2 fractured reservoir characterized by a finely-crystalline carbonate matrix which contains most of the reservoir storage porosity, and a stylolitic fracture system which provides essential permeability. Comparisons of over 5000 fractures identified from core and borehole image data with open-hole log data showed that porosity is negatively correlated with fracture density and mechanical rock strength. From these relationships, it was possible to utilize additional wells where porosity log data was available to calculate fracture densities. These wells were used to generate matrix porosity and permeability as well as fracture density attributes in a 12-sequence, 29-layer geocellular model. The effect of structural curvature on fracture intensity in the reservoir was estimated by mapping the derivative of structural dip. Incorporation of structural curvature explained variations in well test behavior not predicted by initial estimates of fracture density from porosity alone. Resultant fracture permeabilities compared favorably with well-test derived productivity indices. Three-dimensional visualization of model attributes showed that a monotonous and low (<10 md) distribution of matrix-related permeability contrasts sharply with highly variable and relatively high (>50 md) permeabilities of the fracture system. Reliability of the geocellular model to predict fracture densities and associated permeabilities has been confirmed by subsequent drilling of high cost horizontal wells, and is being used in reservoir engineering and development drilling planning efforts.

  19. Dual-porosity reservoir modeling of the fractured Hanifa reservoir, Abqaiq Field, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthy, S.T. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1996-01-01

    Fractures play a significant role in the transmissibility of the Hanifa reservoir at Abqaiq Field. The Hanifa is a Type 2 fractured reservoir characterized by a finely-crystalline carbonate matrix which contains most of the reservoir storage porosity, and a stylolitic fracture system which provides essential permeability. Comparisons of over 5000 fractures identified from core and borehole image data with open-hole log data showed that porosity is negatively correlated with fracture density and mechanical rock strength. From these relationships, it was possible to utilize additional wells where porosity log data was available to calculate fracture densities. These wells were used to generate matrix porosity and permeability as well as fracture density attributes in a 12-sequence, 29-layer geocellular model. The effect of structural curvature on fracture intensity in the reservoir was estimated by mapping the derivative of structural dip. Incorporation of structural curvature explained variations in well test behavior not predicted by initial estimates of fracture density from porosity alone. Resultant fracture permeabilities compared favorably with well-test derived productivity indices. Three-dimensional visualization of model attributes showed that a monotonous and low (<10 md) distribution of matrix-related permeability contrasts sharply with highly variable and relatively high (>50 md) permeabilities of the fracture system. Reliability of the geocellular model to predict fracture densities and associated permeabilities has been confirmed by subsequent drilling of high cost horizontal wells, and is being used in reservoir engineering and development drilling planning efforts.

  20. Stanford University EH&S: Chemical Waste Manager Quick Start Guide Revision: August, 2009 1/2 Stanford University EH&S Presents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University EH&S: Chemical Waste Manager Quick Start Guide Revision: August, 2009 1/2 Stanford University EH&S Presents: Chemical Waste Manager ­ Quick Start Guide Welcome to the new Chemical Waste Manager. This quick start guide will help you get started with logging in, creating new waste tags

  1. Geochemical analysis of reservoir continuity and connectivity, Arab-D and Hanifa Reservoirs, Abqaiq Field, Saudia Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahdi, A.A.; Grover, G. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Hwang, R. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01

    Organic geochemistry and its integration with geologic and reservoir engineering data is becoming increasingly utilized to assist geologists and petroleum engineers in solving production related problems. In Abqaiq Field of eastern Saudi Arabia, gas chromatographic analysis (FSCOT) of produced oils from the Arab-D and Hanifa reservoirs was used to evaluate vertical and lateral continuity within and between these reservoirs. Bulk and molecular properties of produced Arab-D oils do not vary significantly over the 70 km length and 10 km width of the reservoir. Hanifa oils, however, do reflect two compositionally distinct populations that are hot in lateral communication, compatible with the occurrence of a large oil pool in the southern part of the field, and a separate, and smaller northern accumulation. The Arab-D and underlying Hanifa oil pools are separated by over 450 feet of impermeable carbonates of the Jubaila Formation, yet the Southern Hanifa pool and the Arab-D have been in pressure communication since onset of Hanifa production in 1954. Recent borehole imaging and core data from horizontal Hanifa wells confirmed the long suspected occurrence of fractures responsible for fluid transmissibility within the porous (up to 35%) but tight (<10md matrix K) Hanifa reservoir, and between the Hanifa and Arab-D. The nearly identical hydrocarbon composition of oils from the Arab-D and southern Hanifa pool provided the final confirmation of fluid communication between the two reservoirs, and extension of a Hanifa fracture-fault network via the Jubaila Formation. This work lead to acquisition of 3-D seismic to image and map the fracture-fault system. The molecular fingerprinting approach demonstrated that produced oils can be used to evaluate vertical and lateral reservoir continuity, and at Abqaiq Field confirmed, in part, the need to produce the Hanifa reservoir via horizontal wells to arrest the reservoir communication that occurs with existing vertical wells.

  2. ENGINEERING

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear Profile 2010 KansasMarketsHanford TankENGINEERING the Future

  3. Reinjection into geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Stefansson, V.

    1987-08-01

    Reinjection of geothermal wastewater is practiced as a means of disposal and for reservoir pressure support. Various aspects of reinjection are discussed, both in terms of theoretical studies as well as specific field examples. The discussion focuses on the major effects of reinjection, including pressure maintenance and chemical and thermal effects. (ACR)

  4. Core Analysis for the Development and Constraint of Physical Models of Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg N. Boitnott

    2003-12-14

    Effective reservoir exploration, characterization, and engineering require a fundamental understanding of the geophysical properties of reservoir rocks and fracture systems. Even in the best of circumstances, spatial variability in porosity, fracture density, salinity, saturation, tectonic stress, fluid pressures, and lithology can all potentially produce and/or contribute to geophysical anomalies. As a result, serious uniqueness problems frequently occur when interpreting assumptions based on a knowledge base founded in validated rock physics models of reservoir material.

  5. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01

    for effective energy yields hydraulic fracturlng or ex .tohydraulic fracture that can cracks, and (2) the development ductivity and longevity o rsion of mass, momentum, and energy;

  6. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01

    f a Hawaii Geothermal Well-- HGP-A. It Geothermal ResourcesPrelimin 11 Test Results from HGP-A." Resources Counci 1and others. e s t Results Trom HGP-A." Geothermat 2 (Part 1,

  7. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01

    I 2nd Geopressured Geothermal Energy Conference. UniversityExperiment t o Extract Geothermal Energy From Hot Dry Rock."2nd Geo- pressured Geothermal Energy Conference, Austin,

  8. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01

    i o n o f Geothermal Resources. Pisa, Sept. 22-Oct. 1, 1970:n o f Geothermal Resources. Pisa, Sept. 22-Oct. 1 1970: 516-o f Geothermal Resources, Pisa, Sept. 22-Oct. 1 1970: .1440-

  9. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01

    characteristics of geothermal boreholes are studied.Maini, Tidu. "Geothermal Energy From a Borehole i n H o t28 (1967): Borehole Temperature Survey Analysis Geothermal

  10. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01

    Phenomena i n Geothermal Systems. I' U.N. Symposium on theModeling o f Geothermal Systems." 2nd U.N. Symposium on theassociations of geothermal systems and postulates on a

  11. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01

    data base from which general management procedures , interpretive techniques , and conceptual models for producin geothermal systems

  12. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01

    J. Jr. "Wellbore Heat Transmission." JowlnaZ of PetroZewnt o wellbore heat- transmission. The solution permits

  13. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01

    M. and Abe, H. Shape by Hydraulic Fracturing s e r v o i rprinciples involved i n hydraulic fracturing are out1 ined.crack during hydraulic fracturing has been investigated. I t

  14. PROCEEDINGS SECOND WORKSHOP GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLEDSpeeding accessSpeedingPATENTS- 05 - - A75 I30518 18

  15. PROCEEDINGS SIXTEENTH WORKSHOP GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLEDSpeeding accessSpeedingPATENTS- 05 - - A75 I30518

  16. PROCEEDINGS THIRD WORKSHOP GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLEDSpeeding accessSpeedingPATENTS- 05 - - A75 I30518THIRD

  17. Alan Farquharson, SVP Reservoir Engineering Economics! Upstream

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1 Table 1.10 CoolingNotes

  18. Three dimensional geologic modeling of a fractured reservoir, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthy, S.T.; Grover, G.A. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-11-01

    A geological assessment of a large carbonate reservoir in Saudi Arabia shows that it is a Type 2 fractured reservoir in which fractures provide the essential permeability. Intercrystalline microporosity, found within the basinally deposited mudstones and wackestones, is the dominant porosity type. Near-vertical, east-west-oriented extension fractures are preferentially localized in low-to-moderate porosities associated with stylolites. Porosity/fracture density relationships, combined with the results of structural curvature mapping, yielded a 3-dimensional model of fracture density. Fracture permeability and fracture porosity distributions were generated by integrating fracture density modeling results with average fracture aperture information derived from well test data. Dramatic differences exist between matrix- and fracture-related porosity, permeability models that help explain observed production behavior within the field. These models are being used by reservoir and simulation engineers for daily reservoir management, history matching, and long-term development drilling planning.

  19. Technological problems associated with subsea development of high pressure and high temperature hydrocarbon reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grillo, P.; Natarajan, S.

    1996-12-31

    The paper analyzes the implications in design of subsea completion for exploitation of HP/HT hydrocarbon reservoirs. The paper characterizes limitations associated with current subsea technology for HP/HT applications and outlines the engineering and technological development considered necessary to demonstrate the viability of subsea production technology for the exploitation of HP/HT reservoirs.

  20. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC SO) (See also Science).

  1. Engine breather oil recovery system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speer, S.R.; Norton, J.G.; Wilson, J.D.

    1990-08-14

    This patent describes an engine breather oil recovery system, for use with reciprocating engines having an oil breather and an oil reservoir recovery system. It comprises:an engine breather outlet from the engine; a vapor and oil separator device in fluid flow connection with the engine breather outlet; a motive flow suction means in fluid flow connection between the separator device and the engine, so as to provide a substantially continuous pressure drop between the separator device and the engine oil reservoir; an engine fluid system in parallel with the separator device; and an engine driven pump in fluid flow connection with such other engine fluid system, wherein the motive force for the motive flow suction means is provided by the fluid from the engine pump.

  2. Reservoir Outflow (RESOUT) Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purvis, Stuart Travis

    1988-01-01

    rating tables for a comprehensive range of outlet structure types and configurations, simulating a dam breach, routing a hydrograph through the reservoir, and performing drawdown analyses. The thesis describes the basic equations and computational... of Rating Curves Rating Curves for Uncontrolled Ogee Spillways Rating Curves for Uncontrolled Broad-crested Spillways Rating Curves for Spillway Gates Rating Curves for Drop Inlet Spillways Rating Curves for Outlet Works Breach Simulation Storage...

  3. Comprehensive Analysis of Enhanced CBM Production via CO2 Injection Using a Surrogate Reservoir Model Jalal Jalali, Shahab D. Mohaghegh, Dept. of Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Model Jalal Jalali, Shahab D. Mohaghegh, Dept. of Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia

  4. Reservoir Characterization of Upper Devonian Gordon Sandstone, Jacksonburg, Stringtown Oil Field, Northwestern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ameri, S.; Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Bilgesu, H.I.; Hohn, M.E.; McDowell, R.R.; Patchen, D.L.

    2002-05-21

    The purpose of this work was to establish relationships among permeability, geophysical and other data by integrating geologic, geophysical and engineering data into an interdisciplinary quantification of reservoir heterogeneity as it relates to production.

  5. Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogatchev, Kirill Y.

    2009-05-15

    and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions...

  6. Seeking New Approaches to Investigate Domestication Events | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation ofAlbuquerque| StanfordOfficeImplementation andCommodity

  7. All-optical Reservoir Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duport, François; Smerieri, Anteo; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Reservoir Computing is a novel computing paradigm which uses a nonlinear recurrent dynamical system to carry out information processing. Recent electronic and optoelectronic Reservoir Computers based on an architecture with a single nonlinear node and a delay loop have shown performance on standardized tasks comparable to state-of-the-art digital implementations. Here we report an all-optical implementation of a Reservoir Computer, made of off-the-shelf components for optical telecommunications. It uses the saturation of a semiconductor optical amplifier as nonlinearity. The present work shows that, within the Reservoir Computing paradigm, all-optical computing with state-of-the-art performance is possible.

  8. STANFORD HPNG TECHNICAL REPORT TR01-HPNG-081501 Techniques for Fast Shared Memory Switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKeown, Nick

    STANFORD HPNG TECHNICAL REPORT TR01-HPNG-081501 Techniques for Fast Shared Memory Switches Sundar, nickm}@stanford.edu Abstract -- Shared memory is commonly used to build output queued (OQ) switches. An OQ switch is known to maximize throughput, minimize delay and can offer QoS guarantees. However

  9. P/1WINTER 2014 Welcome to the Winter 2014 issue of the Stanford Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puglisi, Joseph

    P/1WINTER 2014 Welcome to the Winter 2014 issue of the Stanford Cancer Institute Clinical Research, and especially physicians who are considering treatment options for their patients with cancer, about clinical trials and programs available at the Stanford Cancer Institute. We have more than 300 cancer clinical

  10. GPS Receiver Satellite/Antenna Selection Algorithm for the Stanford Gravity Probe B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    & Technologies Corporation Saps Buchman, Stanford University BIOGRAPHY Jie Li, Ph.D., is a visiting scholar Academy of Space Technology in Beijing, P. R. China. Awele Ndili, Ph.D., is the project manager for GPS.D. and M.S. degrees from Stanford University. He has been working on GPS systems since 1992. Lisa Ward, Ph

  11. The Price of Anarchy in Games of Incomplete Information TIM ROUGHGARDEN, Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiat, Amos

    The Price of Anarchy in Games of Incomplete Information TIM ROUGHGARDEN, Stanford University We 94705 USA. Email: tim@cs.stanford.edu. Permission to make digital or hard copies of part or all of this work for personal or classroom use is granted without fee provided that copies are not made

  12. Texas Tech University | Whitacre College of Engineering | Box 43103 | Lubbock, Texas 79409-3103 | 806.742.3451 | www.coe.ttu.edu Preparing for a Degree in Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    engineering; artificial lift and system analysis; reservoir engineering, hyrdraulic fracking, fluidless fracking, surface operations and facilities design energetics, biomechanics, superhard materials

  13. Discrete Fracture Reservoir Simulation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory | National NuclearDiscoveringDiscrete Fracture Reservoir

  14. The Stanford Mark III linear accelerator and speculations concerning the multi-Bev applications of electron linear accelerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neal, R B

    1956-01-01

    The Stanford Mark III linear accelerator and speculations concerning the multi-Bev applications of electron linear accelerators

  15. Upscaling verticle permeability within a fluvio-aeolian reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, S.D.; Corbett, P.W.M.; Jensen, J.L.

    1997-08-01

    Vertical permeability (k{sub v}) is a crucial factor in many reservoir engineering issues. To date there has been little work undertaken to understand the wide variation of k{sub v} values measured at different scales in the reservoir. This paper presents the results of a study in which we have modelled the results of a downhole well tester using a statistical model and high resolution permeability data. The work has demonstrates and quantifies a wide variation in k{sub v} at smaller, near wellbore scales and has implications for k{sub v} modelling at larger scales.

  16. Water resources review: Ocoee reservoirs, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, J.P.

    1990-08-01

    Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is preparing a series of reports to make technical information on individual TVA reservoirs readily accessible. These reports provide a summary of reservoir purpose and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and watershed; water quality conditions; aquatic biological conditions; and designated, actual and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those use. This reservoir status report addressed the three Ocoee Reservoirs in Polk County, Tennessee.

  17. ANALYSIS OF PRODUCTION DECLINE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zais, E.J.; Bodvarsson, G.

    2008-01-01

    Petroleum Reservoirs. Geothermal Reservoirs IV. DATA1970, Superheating of Geothermal Steam, Proc. of the U.N.the Development & Utilization of Geothermal Resources, Pisa.

  18. Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract This article attempts to critically evaluate the present state of the art of geothermal reservoir simulation. Methodological aspects of geothermal reservoir...

  19. Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Jack W.

    and evaluate the effect of structural modeling uncertainties, along with ground motion and hazard uncertainties and robust uncertainty characterization. 1 Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University the effect of structural modeling uncertainties, along with ground motion and hazard uncertainties

  20. Hydrological and Geochemical Investigations of Selenium Behavior at Kesterson Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zawislanski, P.T.

    2010-01-01

    Ecological Characterization of Kesterson Reservoir. AnnualEcological Characterization of Kesterson Reservoir. Annual

  1. FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    1999-06-11

    The four chapters that are described in this report cover a variety of subjects that not only give insight into the understanding of multiphase flow in fractured porous media, but they provide also major contribution towards the understanding of flow processes with in-situ phase formation. In the following, a summary of all the chapters will be provided. Chapter I addresses issues related to water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. There are two parts in this chapter. Part I covers extensive set of measurements for water injection in water-wet fractured porous media. Both single matrix block and multiple matrix blocks tests are covered. There are two major findings from these experiments: (1) co-current imbibition can be more efficient than counter-current imbibition due to lower residual oil saturation and higher oil mobility, and (2) tight fractured porous media can be more efficient than a permeable porous media when subjected to water injection. These findings are directly related to the type of tests one can perform in the laboratory and to decide on the fate of water injection in fractured reservoirs. Part II of Chapter I presents modeling of water injection in water-wet fractured media by modifying the Buckley-Leverett Theory. A major element of the new model is the multiplication of the transfer flux by the fractured saturation with a power of 1/2. This simple model can account for both co-current and counter-current imbibition and computationally it is very efficient. It can be orders of magnitude faster than a conventional dual-porosity model. Part II also presents the results of water injection tests in very tight rocks of some 0.01 md permeability. Oil recovery from water imbibition tests from such at tight rock can be as high as 25 percent. Chapter II discusses solution gas-drive for cold production from heavy-oil reservoirs. The impetus for this work is the study of new gas phase formation from in-situ process which can be significantly different from that of gas displacement processes. The work is of experimental nature and clarifies several misconceptions in the literature. Based on experimental results, it is established that the main reason for high efficiency of solution gas drive from heavy oil reservoirs is due to low gas mobility. Chapter III presents the concept of the alteration of porous media wettability from liquid-wetting to intermediate gas-wetting. The idea is novel and has not been introduced in the petroleum literature before. There are significant implications from such as proposal. The most direct application of intermediate gas wetting is wettability alteration around the wellbore. Such an alteration can significantly improve well deliverability in gas condensate reservoirs where gas well deliverability decreases below dewpoint pressure. Part I of Chapter III studies the effect of gravity, viscous forces, interfacial tension, and wettability on the critical condensate saturation and relative permeability of gas condensate systems. A simple phenomenological network model is used for this study, The theoretical results reveal that wettability significantly affects both the critical gas saturation and gas relative permeability. Gas relative permeability may increase ten times as contact angle is altered from 0{sup o} (strongly liquid wet) to 85{sup o} (intermediate gas-wetting). The results from the theoretical study motivated the experimental investigation described in Part II. In Part II we demonstrate that the wettability of porous media can be altered from liquid-wetting to gas-wetting. This part describes our attempt to find appropriate chemicals for wettability alteration of various substrates including rock matrix. Chapter IV provides a comprehensive treatment of molecular, pressure, and thermal diffusion and convection in porous media Basic theoretical analysis is presented using irreversible thermodynamics.

  2. Master plan: Guntersville Reservoir Aquatic Plant Management. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31

    In 1989, Congress provided funding to start a five-year comprehensive project to manage aquatic plants in Guntersville Reservoir, to be jointly implemented by the US Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) and Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA). TVA serves as the overall project coordinator and is the lead agency for this project. Known as the Joint Agency Guntersville Project (JAGP), the project will test and demonstrate innovative management technologies, and incorporate the most effective technologies into a comprehensive aquatic plant management plan for Guntersville Reservoir. The JAGP is intended to serve as a National Demonstration Project for aquatic plant management. As part of this JAGP, the Master Plan for Aquatic Plant Management for the Guntersville Reservoir Project, Alabama-Tennessee is authorized by Corps Contract Number DACW62-90-C-0067.

  3. Rock Physics Based Determination of Reservoir Microstructure for Reservoir Characterization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adesokan, Hamid 1976-

    2013-01-09

    of pore shape distribution is needed to explain the often-encountered complex interrelationship between seismic parameters (e.g. seismic velocity) and the independent physical properties (e.g. porosity) of hydrocarbon reservoirs. However, our knowledge...

  4. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

    1998-01-26

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period October - December 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the "Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist". The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with cased-hole logging tools. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to translate measurements through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius lateral recompletions as well as other recompletion techniques such as the sand consolidation through steam injection.

  5. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koerner, R.; Clarke, D.; Walker, S.; Phillips, C.; Nguyen, J.; Moos, D.; Tagbor, K.

    1997-10-21

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period July - September 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the `Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist`. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with a pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to convert shear wave velocity measured through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius and ultra-short radius lateral recompletions as well as other techniques.

  6. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker.

    1998-01-26

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period October - December 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist . The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with cased-hole logging tools. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to translate measurements through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius lateral recompletions as well as other recompletion techniques such as the sand consolidation through steam injection.

  7. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

    1998-04-22

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period January - March 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the "Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist". The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with cased-hole logging tools. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to translate measurements through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius lateral recompletions as well as other recompletion techniques such as the sand consolidation through steam injection.

  8. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nauyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

    1997-07-28

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period April - June 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the `Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist`. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with a pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to convert shear wave velocity measured through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius and ultra-short radius lateral recompletions as well as other techniques.

  9. Engineering Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis President APS Neil E. Hejny Engineering Manager Raytheon Joseph W. Jackson Director Retrofit Manager Brooks-PRI Bill Twardy Manager, Research for SRP SRP Sam Werner IBM John Wood Hardware Design

  10. Reservoir characterization using wavelet transforms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivera Vega, Nestor

    2004-09-30

    Automated detection of geological boundaries and determination of cyclic events controlling deposition can facilitate stratigraphic analysis and reservoir characterization. This study applies the wavelet transformation, a recent advance in signal...

  11. M.; /Bern U.; Auty, D.J.; /Alabama U.; Barbeau, P.S.; /Stanford...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay in 136Xe with EXO-200 Auger, M.; Bern U.; Auty, D.J.; Alabama U.; Barbeau, P.S.; Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Beauchamp, E.; Laurentian U.;...

  12. ENN http://ehs.stanford.edu/aboutus/news.htmlEH&S News & Notes Edition: December 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    time in the Bay Area, it is now ille- gal to burn wood, pellets or manufactured fire ENVIRONMENTAL- tions. http://trainingadvisor.stanford.edu WOOD BURNING FIREPLACES Environmental Programs For the first

  13. Bio-Imaging With Liquid-Metal-Jet X-ray Sources | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bio-Imaging With Liquid-Metal-Jet X-ray Sources Wednesday, September 9, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Daniel Larsson, Stanford Program Description...

  14. Rethinking the Conference Reviewing Process Moderators: Michael J. Franklin (UC Berkeley) and Jennifer Widom (Stanford)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ailamaki, Anastassia

    ) and Jennifer Widom (Stanford) Panelists: Anastassia Ailamaki (Carnegie Mellon), Philip A. Bernstein (Microsoft), David DeWitt (Wisconsin), Alon Halevy (Washington), Zachary Ives (U Penn), and Gerhard Weikum (Max

  15. Chickamauga reservoir embayment study - 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meinert, D.L.; Butkus, S.R.; McDonough, T.A.

    1992-12-01

    The objectives of this report are three-fold: (1) assess physical, chemical, and biological conditions in the major embayments of Chickamauga Reservoir; (2) compare water quality and biological conditions of embayments with main river locations; and (3) identify any water quality concerns in the study embayments that may warrant further investigation and/or management actions. Embayments are important areas of reservoirs to be considered when assessments are made to support water quality management plans. In general, embayments, because of their smaller size (water surface areas usually less than 1000 acres), shallower morphometry (average depth usually less than 10 feet), and longer detention times (frequently a month or more), exhibit more extreme responses to pollutant loadings and changes in land use than the main river region of the reservoir. Consequently, embayments are often at greater risk of water quality impairments (e.g. nutrient enrichment, filling and siltation, excessive growths of aquatic plants, algal blooms, low dissolved oxygen concentrations, bacteriological contamination, etc.). Much of the secondary beneficial use of reservoirs occurs in embayments (viz. marinas, recreation areas, parks and beaches, residential development, etc.). Typically embayments comprise less than 20 percent of the surface area of a reservoir, but they often receive 50 percent or more of the water-oriented recreational use of the reservoir. This intensive recreational use creates a potential for adverse use impacts if poor water quality and aquatic conditions exist in an embayment.

  16. SMALL, GEOLOGICALLY COMPLEX RESERVOIRS CAN BENEFIT FROM RESERVOIR SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard E. Bennett

    2002-06-24

    The Cascade Sand zone of the Mission-Visco Lease in the Cascade Oil field of Los Angeles County, California, has been under water flood since 1970. Increasing water injection to increase oil production rates was being considered as an opportunity to improve oil recovery. However, a secondary gas cap had formed in the up-dip portion of the reservoir with very low gas cap pressures, creating concern that oil could be displaced into the gas cap resulting in the loss of recoverable oil. Therefore, injecting gas into the gas cap to keep the gas cap pressurized and restrict the influx of oil during water injection was also being considered. Further, it was recognized that the reservoir geology in the gas cap area is very complex with numerous folding and faulting and thus there are potential pressure barriers in several locations throughout the reservoir. With these conditions in mind, there were concerns regarding well to well continuity in the gas cap, which could interfere with the intended repressurization impact. Concerns about the pattern of gas flow from well to well, the possibilities of cycling gas without the desired increased pressure, and the possible loss of oil displaced into the gas cap resulted in the decision to conduct a gas tracer survey in an attempt to better define inter-well communication. Following the gas tracer survey, a reservoir model would be developed to integrate the findings of the gas tracer survey, known geologic and reservoir data, and historic production data. The reservoir model would be used to better define the reservoir characteristics and provide information that could help optimize the waterflood-gas injection project under consideration for efficient water and gas injection management to increase oil production. However, due to inadequate gas sampling procedures in the field and insufficiently developed laboratory analytical techniques, the laboratory was unable to detect the tracer in the gas samples taken. At that point, focus on, and an expansion of the scope of the reservoir simulation and modeling effort was initiated, using DOE's BOAST98 (a visual, dynamic, interactive update of BOAST3), 3D, black oil reservoir simulation package as the basis for developing the reservoir model. Reservoir characterization, modeling, and reservoir simulation resulted in a significant change in the depletion strategy. Information from the reservoir characterization and modeling effort indicate that in-fill drilling and relying on natural water influx from the aquifer could increase remaining reserves by 125,000 barrels of oil per well, and that up to 10 infill wells could be drilled in the field. Through this scenario, field production could be increased two to three times over the current 65 bopd. Based on the results of the study, permits have been applied for to drill a directional infill well to encounter the productive zone at a high angle in order to maximize the amount of pay and reservoirs encountered.

  17. Dual-porosity reservoir modeling of the fractured Hanifa reservoir, Abqaiq Field, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthy, S.T. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-08-01

    Fractures play a significant role in the transmissibility of the Hanifa reservoir at Abqaiq Field. The Hanifa is a Type 2 fractured reservoir characterized by a finely-crystalline carbonate matrix which contains most of the reservoir storage porosity, and a stylolitic fracture system which provides essential permeability. Integration of borehole imaging data with available open-hole log, core, and well-test data from horizontal and vertical wells allowed for the distribution of fracture parameters, including fracture density, aperture, porosity, and permeability throughout a geocellular model. Analysis of over 5000 fractures showed that changes in lithology, grain size, and/or bed thickness do not correlate with changes in fracture densities. Review of P- and S-wave log data showed that porosity is negatively correlated with fracture density and mechanical rock strength. From these relationships, it was possible to utilize additional wells where porosity log data was available to calculate fracture densities. These wells were used to generate matrix porosity and permeability as well as fracture density attributes in a 12-sequence, 29-layer geocellular model. Fracture permeabilities compare favorably with well-test derived productivity indices. Three-dimensional visualization of model attributes showed that a monotonous and low (<10 md) distribution of matrix- related permeability contrasts sharply with highly variable and relatively high (ER 50 md) permeabilities of the fracture system. Reliability of the geocellular model to predict fracture densities and associated permeabilities has been confirmed by subsequent drilling of high cost horizontal wells, and is being used in reservoir engineering and development drilling planning efforts.

  18. Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelkar, M.

    1992-09-01

    This annual report describes the progress during the second year of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description and scale-up procedures; (ii) outcrop investigation; (iii) in-fill drilling potential. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be characterized, can be described in three dimensions, and can be scaled up with respect to its properties, appropriate for simulation purposes. The second section describes the progress on investigation of an outcrop. The outcrop is an analog of Bartlesville Sandstone. We have drilled ten wells behind the outcrop and collected extensive log and core data. The cores have been slabbed, photographed and the several plugs have been taken. In addition, minipermeameter is used to measure permeabilities on the core surface at six inch intervals. The plugs have been analyzed for the permeability and porosity values. The variations in property values will be tied to the geological descriptions as well as the subsurface data collected from the Glen Pool field. The third section discusses the application of geostatistical techniques to infer in-fill well locations. The geostatistical technique used is the simulated annealing technique because of its flexibility. One of the important reservoir data is the production data. Use of production data will allow us to define the reservoir continuities, which may in turn, determine the in-fill well locations. The proposed technique allows us to incorporate some of the production data as constraints in the reservoir descriptions. The technique has been validated by comparing the results with numerical simulations.

  19. Feasibility of seasonal multipurpose reservoir operation in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tibbets, Michael N

    1986-01-01

    Intervals 142 TABLE LIST OF TABLES (CONTINUED) Page 23 Order, Magnitude, and Change in EAD for Various Operating Policies 160 24 Conservation Storage Capacities 25 Flowrates at Hempstead 26 Flowrates at Richmond 27 Change of Available Storage Space... decisions tc be made by an operator. These small uncontrolled flood control reservoirs are not addressed in this report. The Fort Worth District (FWD) of the Corps of Engineers is responsible for about 68 percent of the flood control storage capacity...

  20. Using multi-layer models to forecast gas flow rates in tight gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerez Vera, Sergio Armando

    2007-04-25

    USING MULTI-LAYER MODELS TO FORECAST GAS FLOW RATES IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by SERGIO ARMANDO JEREZ VERA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2006 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering USING MULTI-LAYER MODELS TO FORECAST GAS FLOW RATES IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by SERGIO ARMANDO JEREZ VERA Submitted...

  1. The effects of production rate and gravitational segregation on gas injection performance of oil reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Ed Martin

    1972-01-01

    THE EFFECTS OF PRODUCTION RATE AND GRAVITATIONAL SEGREGATION ON GAS INJECTION PERFORMANCE OF OIL RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ED MARTIN FERGUSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1972 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING THE EFFECTS OF PRODUCTION RATE AND GRAVITATIONAL SEGREGATION ON GAS INJECTION PERFORMANCE OF OIL RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ED MARTIN FERGUSON Approved as. to style...

  2. Accounting for Adsorbed gas and its effect on production bahavior of Shale Gas Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mengal, Salman Akram

    2010-10-12

    FOR ADSORBED GAS AND ITS EFFECT ON PRODUCTION BEHAVIOR OF SHALE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by SALMAN AKRAM MENGAL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 2010 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ACCOUNTING FOR ADSORBED GAS AND ITS EFFECT ON PRODUCTION BEHAVIOR OF SHALE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by SALMAN AKRAM MENGAL Submitted to the Office...

  3. The performance of a volatile oil reservoir overlain by a gas cap 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Joseph Ralph, Jr

    1960-01-01

    THE PERFORMANCE OF A VOLATILE OIL RESERVOIR OVERLAIN BY A GAS CAP A Thesis By J. RALPH ELLIS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1960 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING THE PERFORMANCE OF A VOLATILE OIL RESERVOIR OVERLAIN BY A GAS CAP A Thesis By J. RALPH ELLIS, JR. Approved as to style and content by: hairxnan of Coxnxnittee) (Head...

  4. Simulation of heavy oil reservoir performance using a non-Newtonian flow model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narahara, Gene Masao

    1983-01-01

    SIMULATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE USING A NON-NEWTONIAN FLOW MODEL A Thesis by GENE MASAO NARAHARA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AILM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering SIMULATION OF HEAVY OIL RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE USING A NON-NEWTONIAN FLOW MODEL A Thesis by GENE MASAO NARAHARA Approved as to style and content by: lng . U an of Committee) R. . Morse...

  5. Displacement of oil from reservoir rock using high molecular weight polymer solutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barzi, Houshang

    1972-01-01

    DISPLACEMENT OF OIL FROM RESERVOIR ROCK USING HIGH MOLECULAR MEIGHT POLYMER SOLUTIONS A Thesis by HOUSHANG BARZI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AIM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE Aup;ust l972 Major Subject; Petroleum Engineering DISPLACENJENT OF OIL FROM RESERVOIR ROCK USING HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT POLYMER SOLUTIONS A Thesis by HOUSHANG BARZI Approved as +o style and content by~ airman of Commi+tee Member ~ed f' D p...

  6. Abqaiq Hanifa reservoir: Geologic attributes controlling hydrocarbon production and water injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grover, G. Jr. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1993-09-01

    The Hanifa reservoir at Abqaiq field consists entirely of mudsupported (>90% matrix) limestones that were deposited in the deeper water interior of the Arabian Intrashelf basin. The Hanifa mudstones lack megascopic pore spaces; porosity is evidenced by high porosities (5-32%) within these fine-grained rocks, based on porosity logs and core-plug analyses, absence of visible pore spaces to account for these high pore volumes, and 2000x SEM images that show a crystal framework texture composed of micro-rhombic (clay-size) calcite crystals with 2 - 5 [mu]m-size pore spaces between these calcite crystals. Flow meters indicate that the reservoir is capable of producing/injecting large volumes of oil/water. But there is little stratigraphic predictability to the flow, and thin (2-10 ft) low porosity (<15%) intervals can contribute over 60% of the entire flow. These reservoir attributes, coupled with the low [open quotes]matrix[close quotes] permeabilities (0.1-10 md) of the reservoir indicate the presence of an apparent permeability that is controlling fluid flow. Core studies have revealed that this apparent permeability is in the form of high-angle fractures. These fractures are [le]1 mm wide, contain hydrocarbon residue and calcite cement, and many are in close association with high-amplitude stylolites, suggesting a genetic link between stylolitization and fracturing. Borehole imaging logs are critical for fracture location, abundance, orientation, and size. The Hanifa is separated from the giant Arab-D reservoir by over 450 ft of fine-grained carbonates of the Jubaila Formation. These two reservoirs, however, are in pressure-fluid communication via a network of fractures through the Jubaila carbonates. Reservoir communication and reservoir heterogeneity is a challenge to reservoir geologists and reservoir engineers in formulating a development plan, involving horizontal producer and injector wells, to extract the reserves within the Abqaiq Hanifa reservoir.

  7. Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Development of a deep water oil reservoir is a multi, pipelines, and export infrastructure). Maintaining flow (Flow Assurance) of the well fluids (oil, gas, water College. He obtained his Ph.D. in the field of Organic Chemistry from the University of North Carolina. He

  8. Reservoir characterization based on tracer response and rank analysis of production and injection rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Refunjol, B.T.; Lake, L.W.

    1997-08-01

    Quantification of the spatial distribution of properties is important for many reservoir-engineering applications. But, before applying any reservoir-characterization technique, the type of problem to be tackled and the information available should be analyzed. This is important because difficulties arise in reservoirs where production records are the only information for analysis. This paper presents the results of a practical technique to determine preferential flow trends in a reservoir. The technique is a combination of reservoir geology, tracer data, and Spearman rank correlation coefficient analysis. The Spearman analysis, in particular, will prove to be important because it appears to be insightful and uses injection/production data that are prevalent in circumstances where other data are nonexistent. The technique is applied to the North Buck Draw field, Campbell County, Wyoming. This work provides guidelines to assess information about reservoir continuity in interwell regions from widely available measurements of production and injection rates at existing wells. The information gained from the application of this technique can contribute to both the daily reservoir management and the future design, control, and interpretation of subsequent projects in the reservoir, without the need for additional data.

  9. Integration of well test analysis into naturally fractured reservoir simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez Garcia, Laura Elena

    2006-04-12

    Naturally fractured reservoirs (NFR) represent an important percentage of the worldwide hydrocarbon reserves and production. Reservoir simulation is a fundamental technique in characterizing this type of reservoir. Fracture ...

  10. A STOCHASTIC METHOD FOR MODELING FLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, C.

    2011-01-01

    FLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS C. Anderson andFLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS C. Anderson andachieve optimal recovery of petroleum from a reservoir, it

  11. THMC Modeling of EGS Reservoirs ? Continuum through Discontinuum...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    THMC Modeling of EGS Reservoirs Continuum through Discontinuum Representations: Capturing Reservoir Stimulation, Evolution and Induced Seismicity THMC Modeling of EGS Reservoirs...

  12. Research on improved and enhanced oil recovery in Illinois through reservoir characterization, March 28, 1992--June 28, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oltz, D.F.

    1992-09-01

    This project will provide information that can maximize hydrocarbon production, minimize formation damage and stimulate new production in Illinois. Such information includes definition of hydrocarbon resources, characterization of hydrocarbon reservoirs, and the implementation of methods that will improve hydrocarbon extractive technology. Increased understanding of reservoir heterogeneities that affect oil recovery can aid in identifying producible resources. The transfer of technology to industry and the general public is a significant component of the program. The project is designed to examine selected subsurface oil reservoirs in Illinois. Scientists use advanced scientific techniques to gain a better understanding of reservoir components and behavior and address ways of potentially increasing the amount of recoverable oil. Initial production rates for wells in the Illinois Basin commonly decline quite rapidly and as much as 60 percent of the oil in place can be unrecoverable using standard operating procedures. Heterogeneities (geological differences in reservoir make-up) affect a reservoir`s capability to release fluids. By-passed mobile and immobile oil remain in the reservoir. To learn how to get more of the oil out of reservoirs, the ISGS is studying the nature of reservoir rock heterogeneities and their control on the distribution and production of bypassed, mobile oil. Accomplishment for this period are summarized for the following tasks: mapping, cross-sections; subsurface depo-systems; outcrop studies; oil and gas development maps; engineering work; SEM/EDX; and clay minerals.

  13. Geological Engineering Geological Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehlau, David

    1 Geological Engineering l 1 Geological Engineering www.geol.ca Queen's Geological Engineering Vicki Remenda, PEng ­ GEOENG Head Department of Geological Sciences and Geological Engineering Miller Hall Welcome to... Orientation CLASS OF 2018 What is Geological Engineering ? Geological Engineering

  14. Seismic modeling of complex stratified reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Hung-Liang

    2009-05-15

    Turbidite reservoirs in deep-water depositional systems, such as the oil fields in the offshore Gulf of Mexico and North Sea, are becoming an important exploration target in the petroleum industry. Accurate seismic reservoir characterization...

  15. Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Nurudeen

    2008-10-10

    for consolidated reservoir cases while synthetic data (generated by the model using known parameters) was used for unconsolidated reservoir cases. In both cases, the Compartmentalized Depletion Model was used to analyze data, and estimate the OGIP and Jg of each...

  16. Optimizing injected solvent fraction in stratified reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Gary Michael

    1993-01-01

    Waterflooding has become standard practice for extending the productive life of many solution gas drive reservoirs, but has the disadvantage of leaving a substantial residual oil volume in the reservoir. Solvent flooding has been offered as a...

  17. Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Nurudeen

    2009-05-15

    and performance characteristics of each compartment in such reservoirs given production data. A geomechanics model was developed using available correlation in the industry to estimate variable pore volume compressibility, reservoir compaction and permeability...

  18. Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    between micro-seismicity; reservoir flow and geomechanical characteristics. seismicghassmireservoirstimulation.pdf More Documents & Publications Analysis of...

  19. GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONS WITH SHAFT79

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    Krafla reservoir. Temperature, pressure and vapor saturationreservoirs because i·t does not residual immobile steam saturation

  20. Reservoir-Stimulation Optimization with Operational Monitoring...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Optimization with Operational Monitoring for Creation of Enhanced Geothermal Systems Reservoir-Stimulation Optimization with Operational Monitoring for Creation...

  1. Geo-Engineering through Internet Informatics (GEMINI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watney, W. Lynn; Doveton, John H.; Victorine, John R.; Bohling, Goeffrey C.; Bhattacharya, Saibal; Byers, Alan P.; Carr, Timothy R.; Dubois, Martin K.; Gagnon, Glen; Guy, Willard J.; Look, Kurt; Magnuson, Mike; Moore, Melissa; Olea, Ricardo; Pakalapadi, Jayprakash; Stalder, Ken; Collins, David R.

    2002-06-25

    GEMINI will resolve reservoir parameters that control well performance; characterize subtle reservoir properties important in understanding and modeling hydrocarbon pore volume and fluid flow; expedite recognition of bypassed, subtle, and complex oil and gas reservoirs at regional and local scale; differentiate commingled reservoirs; build integrated geologic and engineering model based on real-time, iterate solutions to evaluate reservoir management options for improved recovery; provide practical tools to assist the geoscientist, engineer, and petroleum operator in making their tasks more efficient and effective; enable evaluations to be made at different scales, ranging from individual well, through lease, field, to play and region (scalable information infrastructure); and provide training and technology transfer to evaluate capabilities of the client.

  2. Simulation of naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saidi, A.M.

    1983-11-01

    A three-dimensional, three-phase reservoir simulator was developed to study the behavior of fully or partially fractured reservoirs. It is also demonstrated, that when a fractured reservoir is subject to a relatively large rate of pressure drop and/or it composed of relatively large blocks, the pseudo steady-state pressure concept gives large errors as compared with transient fromulation. In addition, when gravity drainage and imbibitum processes, which is the most important mechanism in the fractured reservoirs, are represented by a ''lumped parameter'' even larger errors can be produced in exchange flow between matrix and fractures. For these reasons, the matrix blocks are gridded and the transfer between matrix and fractures are calculated using pressure and diffusion transient concept. In this way the gravity drainage is also calculated accurately. As the matrix-fracture exchange flow depends on the location of each matrix grid relative to the GOC and/or WOC in fracture, the exchange flow equation are derived and given for each possible case. The differential equation describing the flow of water, oil, and gas within the matrix and fracture system, each of which may contain six unknowns, are presented. The two sets of equations are solved implicitly for pressure water, and gas stauration in both matrix and fractures. The first twenty two years of the history of Haft Kel field was successfully matched with this model and the results are included.

  3. Hydroelectric Reservoirs -the Carbon Dioxide and Methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Hydroelectric Reservoirs - the Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions of a "Carbon Free" Energy an overview on the greenhouse gas production of hydroelectric reservoirs. The goals are to point out the main how big the greenhouse gas emissions from hydroelectric reservoirs are compared to thermo-power plants

  4. Analysis of reservoir performance and forecasting for the eastern area of the C-2 Reservoir, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urdaneta Anez, Jackeline C

    2001-01-01

    for the entire reservoir that considers the new geological model developed during reservoir description. Furthermore, it provides PDVSA with a powerful tool for planning and reservoir management decisions, especially in the eastern area of the reservoir...

  5. Gates Room 242, 353 Serra Mall Stanford, CA, USA 94305

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Fei-Fei

    Francisco, CA, USA Ø Growth hacking in the Activation and Messaging team for Twitter user retension Apr integration, enterprise IT solutions and business information systems Aug 2011 - Aug 2013 Software Engineer

  6. Loran Coverage Availability Simulation Tool Sherman C. Lo, Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    on the Department of Transportation's technical evaluation of Loran. C. O. Lee Boyce Jr. is a consultant with Harbor served as head of the Engineering Department at the U. S. Coast Guard Academy, in New London, CT. After

  7. Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nguyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

    2001-08-07

    This project was intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs, transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

  8. Engineering Technician

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Alternate Title(s):Civil Engineering Technician; Electrical Engineering Technician; Mechanical Engineering Technician; Environmental Engineering Technician

  9. Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne D. Pennington

    2002-09-29

    The project, "Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Characterization," is now complete. Our original proposed scope of work included detailed analysis of seismic and other data from two to three hydrocarbon fields; we have analyzed data from four fields at this level of detail, two additional fields with less detail, and one other 2D seismic line used for experimentation. We also included time-lapse seismic data with ocean-bottom cable recordings in addition to the originally proposed static field data. A large number of publications and presentations have resulted from this work, inlcuding several that are in final stages of preparation or printing; one of these is a chapter on "Reservoir Geophysics" for the new Petroleum Engineering Handbook from the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Major results from this project include a new approach to evaluating seismic attributes in time-lapse monitoring studies, evaluation of pitfalls in the use of point-based measurements and facies classifications, novel applications of inversion results, improved methods of tying seismic data to the wellbore, and a comparison of methods used to detect pressure compartments. Some of the data sets used are in the public domain, allowing other investigators to test our techniques or to improve upon them using the same data. From the public-domain Stratton data set we have demonstrated that an apparent correlation between attributes derived along 'phantom' horizons are artifacts of isopach changes; only if the interpreter understands that the interpretation is based on this correlation with bed thickening or thinning, can reliable interpretations of channel horizons and facies be made. From the public-domain Boonsville data set we developed techniques to use conventional seismic attributes, including seismic facies generated under various neural network procedures, to subdivide regional facies determined from logs into productive and non-productive subfacies, and we developed a method involving cross-correlation of seismic waveforms to provide a reliable map of the various facies present in the area. The Wamsutter data set led to the use of unconventional attributes including lateral incoherence and horizon-dependent impedance variations to indicate regions of former sand bars and current high pressure, respectively, and to evaluation of various upscaling routines. The Teal South data set has provided a surprising set of results, leading us to develop a pressure-dependent velocity relationship and to conclude that nearby reservoirs are undergoing a pressure drop in response to the production of the main reservoir, implying that oil is being lost through their spill points, never to be produced. Additional results were found using the public-domain Waha and Woresham-Bayer data set, and some tests of technologies were made using 2D seismic lines from Michigan and the western Pacific ocean.

  10. CALIBRATION OF SEISMIC ATTRIBUTES FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne D. Pennington; Horacio Acevedo; Aaron Green; Joshua Haataja; Shawn Len; Anastasia Minaeva; Deyi Xie

    2002-10-01

    The project, ''Calibration of Seismic Attributes for Reservoir Calibration,'' is now complete. Our original proposed scope of work included detailed analysis of seismic and other data from two to three hydrocarbon fields; we have analyzed data from four fields at this level of detail, two additional fields with less detail, and one other 2D seismic line used for experimentation. We also included time-lapse seismic data with ocean-bottom cable recordings in addition to the originally proposed static field data. A large number of publications and presentations have resulted from this work, including several that are in final stages of preparation or printing; one of these is a chapter on ''Reservoir Geophysics'' for the new Petroleum Engineering Handbook from the Society of Petroleum Engineers. Major results from this project include a new approach to evaluating seismic attributes in time-lapse monitoring studies, evaluation of pitfalls in the use of point-based measurements and facies classifications, novel applications of inversion results, improved methods of tying seismic data to the wellbore, and a comparison of methods used to detect pressure compartments. Some of the data sets used are in the public domain, allowing other investigators to test our techniques or to improve upon them using the same data. From the public-domain Stratton data set we have demonstrated that an apparent correlation between attributes derived along ''phantom'' horizons are artifacts of isopach changes; only if the interpreter understands that the interpretation is based on this correlation with bed thickening or thinning, can reliable interpretations of channel horizons and facies be made. From the public-domain Boonsville data set we developed techniques to use conventional seismic attributes, including seismic facies generated under various neural network procedures, to subdivide regional facies determined from logs into productive and non-productive subfacies, and we developed a method involving cross-correlation of seismic waveforms to provide a reliable map of the various facies present in the area. The Wamsutter data set led to the use of unconventional attributes including lateral incoherence and horizon-dependent impedance variations to indicate regions of former sand bars and current high pressure, respectively, and to evaluation of various upscaling routines. The Teal South data set has provided a surprising set of results, leading us to develop a pressure-dependent velocity relationship and to conclude that nearby reservoirs are undergoing a pressure drop in response to the production of the main reservoir, implying that oil is being lost through their spill points, never to be produced. Additional results were found using the public-domain Waha and Woresham-Bayer data set, and some tests of technologies were made using 2D seismic lines from Michigan and the western Pacific ocean.

  11. The role of reservoir characterization in the reservoir management process (as reflected in the Department of Energy`s reservoir management demonstration program)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, M.L.; Young, M.A.; Madden, M.P.

    1997-08-01

    Optimum reservoir recovery and profitability result from guidance of reservoir practices provided by an effective reservoir management plan. Success in developing the best, most appropriate reservoir management plan requires knowledge and consideration of (1) the reservoir system including rocks, and rock-fluid interactions (i.e., a characterization of the reservoir) as well as wellbores and associated equipment and surface facilities; (2) the technologies available to describe, analyze, and exploit the reservoir; and (3) the business environment under which the plan will be developed and implemented. Reservoir characterization is the essential to gain needed knowledge of the reservoir for reservoir management plan building. Reservoir characterization efforts can be appropriately scaled by considering the reservoir management context under which the plan is being built. Reservoir management plans de-optimize with time as technology and the business environment change or as new reservoir information indicates the reservoir characterization models on which the current plan is based are inadequate. BDM-Oklahoma and the Department of Energy have implemented a program of reservoir management demonstrations to encourage operators with limited resources and experience to learn, implement, and disperse sound reservoir management techniques through cooperative research and development projects whose objectives are to develop reservoir management plans. In each of the three projects currently underway, careful attention to reservoir management context assures a reservoir characterization approach that is sufficient, but not in excess of what is necessary, to devise and implement an effective reservoir management plan.

  12. Characterization of oil and gas reservoirs and recovery technology deployment on Texas State Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.; Major, R.P.; Holtz, M.H.

    1997-08-01

    Texas State Lands oil and gas resources are estimated at 1.6 BSTB of remaining mobile oil, 2.1 BSTB, or residual oil, and nearly 10 Tcf of remaining gas. An integrated, detailed geologic and engineering characterization of Texas State Lands has created quantitative descriptions of the oil and gas reservoirs, resulting in delineation of untapped, bypassed compartments and zones of remaining oil and gas. On Texas State Lands, the knowledge gained from such interpretative, quantitative reservoir descriptions has been the basis for designing optimized recovery strategies, including well deepening, recompletions, workovers, targeted infill drilling, injection profile modification, and waterflood optimization. The State of Texas Advanced Resource Recovery program is currently evaluating oil and gas fields along the Gulf Coast (South Copano Bay and Umbrella Point fields) and in the Permian Basin (Keystone East, Ozona, Geraldine Ford and Ford West fields). The program is grounded in advanced reservoir characterization techniques that define the residence of unrecovered oil and gas remaining in select State Land reservoirs. Integral to the program is collaboration with operators in order to deploy advanced reservoir exploitation and management plans. These plans are made on the basis of a thorough understanding of internal reservoir architecture and its controls on remaining oil and gas distribution. Continued accurate, detailed Texas State Lands reservoir description and characterization will ensure deployment of the most current and economically viable recovery technologies and strategies available.

  13. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Mark B.

    1999-02-24

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico is a cost-shared field demonstration project in the US Department of Energy Class II Program. A major goal of the Class III Program is to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques are being used at the Nash Draw project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geologic, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description is being used as a risk reduction tool to identify ''sweet spots'' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well simulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir.

  14. Research on improved and enhanced oil recovery in Illinois through reservoir characterization, March 28, 1992--June 28, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oltz, D.F.

    1992-01-01

    This project will provide information that can maximize hydrocarbon production, minimize formation damage and stimulate new production in Illinois. Such information includes definition of hydrocarbon resources, characterization of hydrocarbon reservoirs, and the implementation of methods that will improve hydrocarbon extractive technology. Increased understanding of reservoir heterogeneities that affect oil recovery can aid in identifying producible resources. The transfer of technology to industry and the general public is a significant component of the program. The project is designed to examine selected subsurface oil reservoirs in Illinois. Scientists use advanced scientific techniques to gain a better understanding of reservoir components and behavior and address ways of potentially increasing the amount of recoverable oil. Initial production rates for wells in the Illinois Basin commonly decline quite rapidly and as much as 60 percent of the oil in place can be unrecoverable using standard operating procedures. Heterogeneities (geological differences in reservoir make-up) affect a reservoir's capability to release fluids. By-passed mobile and immobile oil remain in the reservoir. To learn how to get more of the oil out of reservoirs, the ISGS is studying the nature of reservoir rock heterogeneities and their control on the distribution and production of bypassed, mobile oil. Accomplishment for this period are summarized for the following tasks: mapping, cross-sections; subsurface depo-systems; outcrop studies; oil and gas development maps; engineering work; SEM/EDX; and clay minerals.

  15. 4. International reservoir characterization technical conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    This volume contains the Proceedings of the Fourth International Reservoir Characterization Technical Conference held March 2-4, 1997 in Houston, Texas. The theme for the conference was Advances in Reservoir Characterization for Effective Reservoir Management. On March 2, 1997, the DOE Class Workshop kicked off with tutorials by Dr. Steve Begg (BP Exploration) and Dr. Ganesh Thakur (Chevron). Tutorial presentations are not included in these Proceedings but may be available from the authors. The conference consisted of the following topics: data acquisition; reservoir modeling; scaling reservoir properties; and managing uncertainty. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

  16. Increasing waterflood reserves in the Wilmington oil field through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. [Quarterly report], October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, D.; Clarke, D.; Walker, S.; Phillips, C.; Nguyen, J.; Moos, D.; Tagbor, K.

    1996-01-23

    The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with a pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to convert shear wave velocity measured through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius and ultra-short radius lateral recompletions as well as other techniques. Technical progress is reported for the following tasks; reservoir characterization, reservoir engineering; deterministic (3-D) geologic modeling; pulsed acoustic logging; and technology transfer.

  17. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan Kelkar

    2004-10-01

    West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we present the data on surfactant injection in near well bore region. We demonstrate that by injecting the surfactant, the relative permeability of water could be decreased, and that of gas could be increased. This should result in improved gas recovery from the reservoir. Our geological analysis of the reservoir develops the detailed stratigraphic description of the reservoir. Two new stratigraphic units, previously unrecognized, are identified. Additional lithofacies are recognized in new core descriptions. Our engineering analysis has determined that well density is an important parameter in optimally producing Hunton reservoirs. It appears that 160 acre is an optimal spacing. The reservoir pressure appears to decline over time; however, recovery per well is only weakly influenced by the pressure. This indicates that additional opportunity to drill wells exists in relatively depleted fields. A simple material balance technique is developed to validate the recovery of gas, oil and water. This technique can be used to further extrapolate recoveries from other fields with similar field characteristics.

  18. INJECTION AND THERMAL BREAKTHROUGH IN FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2012-01-01

    Applications & Operations, Geothermal Energy Division of theP. , and Otte, C. , Geothermal energy: Stanford, California,Applications & Operations, Geothermal Energy Division of the

  19. DAVID G. MEYER Ph.D. 1987, Electrical Engineering, Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    based control for small wind turbines," Renewable Energy, vol. 50, pp. 259-267 February, 2013 Refereed

  20. Improving the performance of MARS reservoir simulator on Cray-2 supercomputer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, K.G.; Dogru, A.H.; McDonald, A.E.; Merchant, A.R.; Al-Mulhem, A.A.; Al-Ruwaili, S.B.; Sobh, N.A.; Al-Sunaidi, H.A.

    1995-10-01

    The computational efficiency of a reservoir simulator-MARS-that is heavily used in Saudi Aramco, was significantly enhanced by improving the vectorization, parallelization and a key algorithm of the simulator. In particular, a state-of-the-art parallel linear equation solver was developed and implemented in the simulator. This new solver ran three to five times faster than the existing solvers. With the new solver and the other improvements in the simulator, the optimized code ran 1.3 to 1.8 times faster than the original code on a single processor and more than four times faster on four processors of Cray-2 supercomputer for typical Saudi Aramco reservoir models. This translates into great savings for the company since it, in effect, creates additional computational resources at no additional cost and improves the reservoir engineer`s productivity by shortening the job turnaround time.

  1. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-12-01

    We have developed and tested technology for a new type of direct hydrocarbon detection. The method uses inelastic rock properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic methods to the presence of oil and gas saturation. These methods include use of energy absorption, dispersion, and attenuation (Q) along with traditional seismic attributes like velocity, impedance, and AVO. Our approach is to combine three elements: (1) a synthesis of the latest rock physics understanding of how rock inelasticity is related to rock type, pore fluid types, and pore microstructure, (2) synthetic seismic modeling that will help identify the relative contributions of scattering and intrinsic inelasticity to apparent Q attributes, and (3) robust algorithms that extract relative wave attenuation attributes from seismic data. This project provides: (1) Additional petrophysical insight from acquired data; (2) Increased understanding of rock and fluid properties; (3) New techniques to measure reservoir properties that are not currently available; and (4) Provide tools to more accurately describe the reservoir and predict oil location and volumes. These methodologies will improve the industry's ability to predict and quantify oil and gas saturation distribution, and to apply this information through geologic models to enhance reservoir simulation. We have applied for two separate patents relating to work that was completed as part of this project.

  2. Making a Computational Splash Ronald Fedkiw, Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thrun, Sebastian

    scenes with natural phenomena such as water waves, smoke, tornados or even lava erupting from volcanoes easier to make waves out of math than out of water. For centuries, applied mathematicians and physicists solutions provide useful information for practical problems of interest to both scientists and engineers

  3. Engineering Electrical &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Computer Engineering Electrical & Electronic Engineering Mechatronics Engineering Mechanical Engineering Civil Engineering Natural Resources Engineering Forest Engineering Chemical & Process Engineering ELECTIVE 2 Required Engineering Intermediate Year 2011 Eight Required Courses Chart: 120 points College

  4. Engineering Electrical &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Computer Engineering Electrical & Electronic Engineering Mechatronics Engineering Mechanical Engineering Civil Engineering Natural Resources Engineering Forest Engineering Chemical & Process Engineering ELECTIVE 2 Required Engineering Intermediate Year 2012 Eight Required Courses Chart: 120 points College

  5. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, D.W.

    1997-11-11

    A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

  6. ICORR '99: International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, Stanford, CA AUTONOMY AND LEARNING IN MOBILE ROBOTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duckett, Tom

    - 1 - ICORR '99: International Conference on Rehabilitation Robotics, Stanford, CA AUTONOMY AND LEARNING IN MOBILE ROBOTS George A. Bekey Computer Science Department University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA 90089-0781 bekey@robotics.usc.edu http://www-robotics.usc.edu/ Abstract Recent trends

  7. IH 10-156 -10/10 _______ File No. (EHS use) STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ' Comp cases: Employee must complete ergonomics training and receive an EH&S workstation evaluation. 4. Preventative cases: Employee must complete ergonomics training and workstation self-evaluation. 5. TimelineIH 10-156 - 10/10 _______ File No. (EHS use) STANFORD UNIVERSITY COMPUTER WORKSTATION ERGONOMIC

  8. Faculty Observations: John Scofield An Energy-Monitoring System for Stanford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scofield, John H.

    and Usage, a course that has evolved over the years into Introduction to Solar Energy and, this semesterFaculty Observations: John Scofield An Energy-Monitoring System for Stanford University's Leslie to make a major change in my research field. In graduate school and at Bell Labs I had studied noise

  9. Recreational mathematics in Leonardo of Pisa's Liber abbaci Keith Devlin, Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devlin, Keith

    1 Recreational mathematics in Leonardo of Pisa's Liber abbaci Keith Devlin, Stanford University Leonardo of Pisa's classic, medieval text Liber abbaci was long believed to have been the major work in Pisa. As a teenager, he traveled to Bugia, in North Africa, to join his father who had moved

  10. Stanford Exploration Project, Report SERGEY, November 9, 2000, pages 455?? A variational formulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    Stanford Exploration Project, Report SERGEY, November 9, 2000, pages 455­?? A variational computation is one of the most important tasks in seismic processing (Kirchhoff depth migration and related in seismic imaging (Vidale, 1990; van Trier and Symes, 1991; Podvin and Lecomte, 1991). A recent con

  11. McIlraith, Stanford University 05/23/2003 Semantic Web Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McIlraith, Stanford University 05/23/2003 Semantic Web Services Panel WWW12 Sheila Mc 05/23/2003 Obstacles: Need for Wide-spread Adoption · Many of the benefits of Semantic Web Services (SWS) are dependent upon relatively wide-spread adoption of Web Service descriptions in a Semantic Web

  12. Geoencryption Using Loran Di Qiu, Sherman Lo, Per Enge, Dan Boneh, Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    of a traditional cryptographic system. The information is used to generate an additional security key, a "geolock- tolerant Authentication (TESLA) is proposed. We propose a mean on implementing TESLA on Loran a detailed discussion of TESLA and its implementation on Loran. Stanford University is developing

  13. Source: Proceedings of the 5th International Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring, Stanford,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    Source: Proceedings of the 5th International Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring, Stanford, CA Computation in a Structural Health Monitoring System R. Andrew Swartz, Deokwoo Jung, Jerome P. Lynch Yang Wang amounts of empirical data for monitoring structural health. In addition to being a low cost alternative

  14. Source: Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring, Stanford,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    Source: Proceedings of the 4th International Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring, Stanford, CA is still a daunting problem in structural health monitoring and extreme event damage evaluation [1 series analysis of vibration signals was proposed by [3,4,5,6]. The structural health monitoring problem

  15. Source: Proceedings of the 5th International Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring, Stanford,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Jerome P.

    Source: Proceedings of the 5th International Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring, Stanford, CA for structural health monitoring. To provide the structural health monitoring system with data that captures, a structural health monitoring system emerges. Historically, the high costs associated with structural

  16. International Workshop of Structural Health Monitoring, Sept. 8-10, 1999, Stanford University.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    1 2nd International Workshop of Structural Health Monitoring, Sept. 8-10, 1999, Stanford University. Title: Recent Progress in the Application of E/M Impedance Method to Structural Health Monitoring method for structural health monitoring, damage detection and failure prevention is a new technology

  17. Sequencing the Human Genome http://biochem118.stanford.edu/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brutlag, Doug

    Human Genome Project: Should we do it? · Service, R. F. (2001). The human genome: Objection #1: big Human Genome Project: How should we do it? · Weber, J. L., & Myers, E. W. (1Sequencing the Human Genome http://biochem118.stanford.edu/ Doug Brutlag, Professor Emeritus

  18. Finishing the Human Genome http://biochem118.stanford.edu/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brutlag, Doug

    ;Public Human Genome Project Strategy http://www.nhgri.nih.gov/ #12;Celera Scaffolds #12;Chromosome 8Finishing the Human Genome http://biochem118.stanford.edu/ Doug Brutlag, Professor Emeritus:Public vs. Celera #12;Finishing Strategy for the Public Genome Project #12;Finished Sequence in 2004

  19. Combined Simple Biosphere/Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach terrestrial carbon cycle model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    Combined Simple Biosphere/Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach terrestrial carbon cycle model Kevin and physical processes to test our understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle and to predict ecosystem biomass and carbon fluxes. We combine the photosynthesis and biophysical calculations in the Simple

  20. 2011 SUPRI-A Industrial Advisory Committee Meeting Stanford University, Black Community Services Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    2011 SUPRI-A Industrial Advisory Committee Meeting Stanford University, Black Community Services Diatomite and Steam 10:15 10:30 Fractured Diatomites Have Feelings Too, Bolivia Vega 10:30 10:45 Effects of Thermal EOR Processes on Opal-A Diatomites, Cindy Ross 10:45 11:00 Steam Injection & Heat Loss Calculation

  1. EXPLOITATION AND OPTIMIZATION OF RESERVOIR PERFORMANCE IN HUNTON FORMATION, OKLAHOMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohan Kelkar

    2005-07-01

    West Carney field--one of the newest fields discovered in Oklahoma--exhibits many unique production characteristics. These characteristics include: (1) decreasing water-oil ratio; (2) decreasing gas-oil ratio followed by an increase; (3) poor prediction capability of the reserves based on the log data; and (4) low geological connectivity but high hydrodynamic connectivity. The purpose of this investigation is to understand the principal mechanisms affecting the production, and propose methods by which we can extend the phenomenon to other fields with similar characteristics. In our experimental investigation section, we continue to describe the use of surfactant to alter the wettability of the rock. By altering the wettability, we should be able to change the water-gas ratio in the reservoir and, hence, improve the productivity from the well. In our Engineering and Geological Analysis section, we present our rock typing analysis work which combines the geological data with engineering data to develop a unique rock characteristics description. The work demonstrates that it is possible to incorporate geological description in engineering analysis so that we can come up with rock types which have unique geological characteristics, as well as unique petrophysical characteristics. Using this rock typing scheme, we intend to develop a detailed reservoir description in our next quarterly report.

  2. Computer Simulation of Reservoir Depletion and Oil Flow from the Macondo Well Following the Deepwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................................................................... 2 Reservoir Model ............................................................................................................................................. 7 Uncertainty Analysis........................................................................................................................................... 8 Tables Table 1. Reservoir and fluid properties used in the reservoir simulation model

  3. Engineering Engineering Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simaan, Nabil

    E School of Engineering Engineering Education in a University Setting 292 Degree Programs in Engineering 294 Special Programs 296 Honors 298 Academic Regulations 300 Courses of Study 305 Engineering of Engineering is the largest and oldest private engineering school in the South. Classes offering engineering

  4. The effect of cross flow in a stratified reservoir during a water flood 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommers, Gordon Edmund

    1970-01-01

    of the displacement of oil by water in a porous medium. In most conventional engineer- ing methods used to predict the reservoir performance of a water- flood, crossflow between beds of different permeability is neglected, This study was concerned... in a water flood. Conventional engineering methods assuming no crossflow and the numerical model solution were in agreement when the effects of vertical communication were neglected. However, when vertical communication was considered, model...

  5. Experimental Study of Water Vapor Adsorption on Geothermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SGP-TR-148 Experimental Study of Water Vapor Adsorption on Geothermal Reservoir Rocks Shubo Shang Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG07-90IDI2934,and by the Department of Petroleum Engineering, Stanford University Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering

  6. The effects of fracture fluid cleanup upon the analysis of pressure buildup tests in tight gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Atle Thomas

    1988-01-01

    THE EFFECTS OF FRACTURE FLUID CLEANUP UPON THE ANALYSIS OF PRESSURE BUILDUP TESTS IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ATLE THOMAS JOHANSEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE EFFECTS OF FRACTURE FLUID CLEANUP UPON THE ANALYSIS OF PRESSURE BUILDUP TESTS IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by ATLE THOMAS JOHANSEN Approved...

  7. The construction and use of aquifer influence functions in determining original gas in place for water-drive gas reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gajdica, Ronald Joseph

    1986-01-01

    THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS IN DETERMINING ORIGINAL GAS IN PLACE FOR WATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by RONALD JOSEPH GAJDICA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE CONSTRUCTION AND USE OF AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS IN DETERMINING ORIGINAL GAS IN PLACE FOR MATER-DRIVE GAS RESERVOIRS A Thesis by RONALD JOSEPH...

  8. Sedimentation in Shallow ReservoirsPoster n 21 Large shallow reservoirs of run-of-river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalang, Robert C.

    Sedimentation in Shallow ReservoirsPoster n° 21 Large shallow reservoirs of run-of-river power plants on rivers with high suspended sediments are endangered by significant sedimentation. INTRODUCTION

  9. A better understanding of a Uinta Basin channelized analog reservoir through geostatistics and reservoir simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbana, Enis

    2002-01-01

    The Green River Formation is located in the Uinta basin of northeastern Utah. It contains several reservoirs that can be classified as lacustrine such as the Altamont-Bluebell and Red Wash. Lacustrine reservoirs are ...

  10. Approaches to identifying reservoir heterogeneity and reserve growth opportunities from subsurface data: The Oficina Formation, Budare field, Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, D.S.; Raeuchle, S.K.; Holtz, M.H.

    1997-08-01

    We applied an integrated geologic, geophysical, and engineering approach devised to identify heterogeneities in the subsurface that might lead to reserve growth opportunities in our analysis of the Oficina Formation at Budare field, Venezuela. The approach involves 4 key steps: (1) Determine geologic reservoir architecture; (2) Investigate trends in reservoir fluid flow; (3) Integrate fluid flow trends with reservoir architecture; and (4) Estimate original oil-in-place, residual oil saturation, and remaining mobile oil, to identify opportunities for reserve growth. There are three main oil-producing reservoirs in the Oficina Formation that were deposited in a bed-load fluvial system, an incised valley-fill, and a barrier-strandplain system. Reservoir continuity is complex because, in addition to lateral facies variability, the major Oficina depositional systems were internally subdivided by high-frequency stratigraphic surfaces. These surfaces define times of intermittent lacustrine and marine flooding events that punctuated the fluvial and marginal marine sedimentation, respectively. Syn and post depositional faulting further disrupted reservoir continuity. Trends in fluid flow established from initial fluid levels, response to recompletion workovers, and pressure depletion data demonstrated barriers to lateral and vertical fluid flow caused by a combination of reservoir facies pinchout, flooding shale markers, and the faults. Considerable reserve growth potential exists at Budare field because the reservoir units are highly compartment by the depositional heterogeneity and structural complexity. Numerous reserve growth opportunities were identified in attics updip of existing production, in untapped or incompletely drained compartments, and in field extensions.

  11. The Idea Available Data The Method Results Conclusion Center for Energy Resources Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    of the porosity levels in the subsurface of a reservoir. Well-known fact that seismic attributes can be used for Energy Resources Engineering Test Case: The South Arne Field The South Arne Field is a chalk reservoir Data The Method Results Conclusion CERE Center for Energy Resources Engineering To evaluate the quality

  12. Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    using Geomechanics-Based Stochastic Analysis of Injection-Induced Seismicity Analysis of Geothermal Reservoir Stimulation using Geomechanics-Based Stochastic Analysis of...

  13. 201202 Reservoir System Modeling Technologies Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling Applied To The Columbia River - PSR Adjoint Modeling Framework for Real-Time Control of Water - Deltares Reservoir Operations Analysis in the Willamette Water 2100...

  14. International reservoir operations agreement helps NW fish &...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    or 503-230-5131 International reservoir operations agreement helps Northwest fish and power Portland, Ore. - The Bonneville Power Administration and the British Columbia...

  15. Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

  16. Assessing the relative permeability of heterogeneous reservoir...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    susceptible to error and may lead to incorrect conclusions regarding displacement efficiency, wettability and reservoir performance. This paper focuses on new techniques for...

  17. Geothermal reservoirs in hydrothermal convection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Geothermal reservoirs commonly exist in hydrothermal convection systems involving fluid circulation downward in areas of recharge and upwards in areas of discharge. Because such reservoirs are not isolated from their surroundings, the nature of thermal and hydrologic connections with the rest of the system may have significant effects on the natural state of the reservoir and on its response to development. Conditions observed at numerous developed and undeveloped geothermal fields are discussed with respect to a basic model of the discharge portion of an active hydrothermal convection system. Effects of reservoir development on surficial discharge of thermal fluid are also delineated.

  18. Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    with form History Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  19. Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Evaluation Of Chemical Geothermometers For Calculating Reservoir Temperatures At Nevada Geothermal Power Plants Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  20. NATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    fields are partially depleted gas (or oil) fields which have been converted to storage. Where depleted oil and gas reservoir are not available, gas can be stored in water bearing sandstones or aquifersNATURAL GAS STORAGE ENGINEERING Kashy Aminian Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia

  1. Geo-Engineering through Internet Informatics (GEMINI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doveton, John H.; Watney, W. Lynn

    2003-03-06

    The program, for development and methodologies, was a 3-year interdisciplinary effort to develop an interactive, integrated Internet Website named GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through Internet Informatics) that would build real-time geo-engineering reservoir models for the Internet using the latest technology in Web applications.

  2. Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering & Materials Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Chongwu

    conductivity of nanocolloids in the heat transfer course." These lab modules then culminate with an independent engineering can be applied to advanced topics, Mork Family Department students will be better prepared) Naturally Fractured Reservoirs, Pressure Transient Modeling, Reservoir Characterization (Executive Director

  3. Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated reservoirs of Kansas--near-term. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

    1996-11-01

    Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep efficiency and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of injection wells due to solids in the injection water. In many instances the lack of reservoir management results from (1) poor data collection and organization, (2) little or no integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, (3) the presence of multiple operators within the field, and (4) not identifying optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. This field was in the latter stage of primary production at the beginning of this project and is currently being waterflooded as a result of this project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these type of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis. Results of these two field projects are discussed.

  4. Improved Oil Recovery In Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near Term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Don W.; McCune, D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite, G. Paul

    1999-01-14

    Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep efficiency and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of injection wells due to solids in the injection water. In many instances the lack of reservoir management results from (1) poor data collection and organization, (2) little or no integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, (3) the presence of multiple operators within the field, and (4) not identifying optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. This field was in the latter stage of primary production at the beginning of this project and is currently being waterflooded as a result of this project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these types of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management, and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis.

  5. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2002-04-01

    Wave-induced variations of pore pressure in a partially-saturated reservoir result in oscillatory liquid flow. The viscous losses during this flow are responsible for wave attenuation. The same viscous effects determine the changes in the dynamic bulk modulus of the system versus frequency. These changes are necessarily linked to attenuation via the causality condition. We analytically quantify the frequency dependence of the bulk modulus of a partially saturated rock by assuming that saturation is patchy and then link these changes to the inverse quality factor. As a result, the P-wave attenuation is quantitatively linked to saturation and thus can serve as a saturation indicator.

  6. MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING Manufacturing engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MANUFACTURING ENGINEERING Manufacturing engineering transforms raw materials, parts, and operations, following a well- organized plan for each activity. Manufacturing engineering involves designing assuring a competitive level of productivity. The manufacturing engineering curriculum at WSU focuses

  7. The verification of a semi-analytical reservoir simulator using a finite difference reservoir simulator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dube, Hans Gerhardt

    1990-01-01

    of Cases Fundamental Difference Between the Reservoir Simulators. Data Sets. . General Process of Verification. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 24 25 25 26 29 32 36 SINGLE LAYER, RADIAL FLOW DRAWDOWN CASES. . 38 viii Page Infinite Cylindrical... Drawdown Problems. . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 41 43 45 49 50 52 MULTIPLE LAYER RESERVOIR, RADIAL FLOW DRAWDOWN CASES. 63 Simulation of Multiple Layer Reservoirs. . . . . . Simulation Parameters. Constant Rate Drawdown Tests in an Infinite...

  8. Interactive software integrates geological and engineering data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srivastava, G.S. (Oxy USA Inc., Tulsa, OK (United States))

    1994-09-05

    A comprehensive software package provides Oxy USA Inc. a set of interactive tools for rapid and easy integration of geological, geophysical, petrophysical, and reservoir engineering data for the purpose of reservoir characterization. The stacked curves system (SCPC), proprietary software of Oxy USA Inc., is used extensively within Occidental Petroleum Corp. to determine detailed knowledge of reservoir geometry and associated parameters crucial in infill drilling, field extension, and enhanced recovery projects. SCPC has all the desk top management and mapping software tools necessary to fully address, analyze, and resolve three components of reservoir characterization: defining the geometry; calculating reservoir properties; and making volumetric estimates. The paper discusses the background of the software, describes its functions of data base management and transformation, and explains the types of displays it is capable of producing.

  9. *Correspondence to: Ronaldo I. Borja, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4020, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borja, Ronaldo I.

    element (FE) model is presented to account for soil column e!ects on strong ground motion. A three the earthquake of 20 May 1986; as well as the ground motion recorded at Gilroy 2 reference site during the Loma of computed ground motions, and must be accommodated in the non-linear constitutive relations to realistically

  10. Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory Research Plans for 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate Reservoirs for Improved Recovery of Remaining Hydrocarbons Charles#12; Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory Research Plans for 2013 Outcrop for heavy oil deposits within the Canadian Grosmont Formation. #12;iii Reservoir Characterization Research

  11. The Performance of Fractured Horizontal Well in Tight Gas Reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiajing

    2012-02-14

    Horizontal wells have been used to increase reservoir recovery, especially in unconventional reservoirs, and hydraulic fracturing has been applied to further extend the contact with the reservoir to increase the efficiency of development...

  12. Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR and MEQ Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics with InSAR and MEQ Monitoring EGS Stimulation and Reservoir Dynamics...

  13. Geomechanical Development of Fractured Reservoirs During Gas Production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jian

    2013-04-05

    Within fractured reservoirs, such as tight gas reservoir, coupled processes between matrix deformation and fluid flow are very important for predicting reservoir behavior, pore pressure evolution and fracture closure. To study the coupling between...

  14. Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, Don; Koerner, Roy; Moos, Dan; Nguyen, John; Phillips, Chris; Tagbor, Kwasi; Walker, Scott

    1999-11-09

    The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period July - September 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the ''Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist''. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology.

  15. The project design flood and spillway for the Arroyo Seco Reservoir near San Antonio, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbreth, Joe Clyde

    1961-01-01

    THE PROJECT DESIGN FLOOD AND SPILLWAY FOR THE ARROYO SECO RESERVOIR SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS A Thesis By Joe Clyde Gilbreth Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in Partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of CIVIL ENGINEER ~ll 1961 Major Sub)ect: @r~drolo Pf THE PROJECT DESIGN FLOOD AND SPILLWAY FOR THE ARROYO SECO RESERVOIR NEI! R SAN ANTONIO& TEXAS A Thesis By Joe Clyde Gilbreth Approved as to style and content by...

  16. Effect of connate water on miscible displacement of reservoir oil by flue gas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, H. D.

    1960-01-01

    EFFECT OF CONNATE WATER ON MISCIBLE DISPLACEMENT OF RESERVOIR OIL BY FLUE GAS A Thesis By H. D. MAXWELL, JR. Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Au gus t, 19 60 Major Subject: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING EFFECT OF CONNATE WATER ON MISCIBLE DISPLACEMENT OF RESERVOIR OIL BY FLUE GAS A Thesis H. D. MAXWELL, JR. Approved as to style and content by: haxrman of ommitte...

  17. Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

    1997-04-10

    This project is intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

  18. A Fast Relighting Engine for Interactive Cinematic Lighting Design Reid Gershbein Pat Hanrahan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    A Fast Relighting Engine for Interactive Cinematic Lighting Design Reid Gershbein Pat Hanrahan Stanford University Abstract We present new techniques for interactive cinematic lighting design of complex both the lighting and texturing units of the graphics hardware. A similar factorization is used

  19. REVIEW OF RECENT GROUND MOTION STUDIES FOR PERFORMANCE-BASED ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Jack W.

    REVIEW OF RECENT GROUND MOTION STUDIES FOR PERFORMANCE-BASED ENGINEERING Jack Baker Stanford of near-fault directivity effects in hazard analysis and ground motion selection, and characterization subjected to a recorded or simulated ground motions. Experience has shown that the procedure used to obtain

  20. ICED'09/148 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN, ICED'09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    , marketing, and psychology. Quantitative models from these disciplines can be integrated into a design for teaching product design and for designing products taking into account market and policy environments alongICED'09/148 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN, ICED'09 24 - 27 AUGUST 2009, STANFORD

  1. Type B Accident Investigation of the January 28, 2003, Fall and Injury at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report is an independent product of the Type B Accident Investigation Board appointed by John S. Muhlestein, Director, Stanford Site Office (DOE/SC), U.S. Department of Energy.

  2. American Association for Artificial Intelligence Spring Symposium 3/2004, Stanford University Keynote Lecture. FFrroomm HHuummaann EEmmoottiioonnss ttoo RRoobboott EEmmoottiioonnss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fellous, Jean-Marc

    1 American Association for Artificial Intelligence ­ Spring Symposium 3/2004, Stanford University © 2004, American Association for Artificial Intelligence (www.aaai.org). All rights reserved. open a new

  3. Geothermal reservoir insurance study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-09

    The principal goal of this study was to provide analysis of and recommendations on the need for and feasibility of a geothermal reservoir insurance program. Five major tasks are reported: perception of risk by major market sectors, status of private sector insurance programs, analysis of reservoir risks, alternative government roles, and recommendations.

  4. GEOMECHANICAL MODELING AS A RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TOOL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOMECHANICAL MODELING AS A RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TOOL AT RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN _______________ ____________________ Dr. Terence K. Young Department Head Department of Geophysics ii #12;ABSTRACT Geomechanics is a powerful reservoir characterization tool. Geomechanical modeling is used here to understand how the in

  5. Water resources review: Wheeler Reservoir, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallus, R.; Cox, J.P.

    1990-09-01

    Protection and enhancement of water quality is essential for attaining the full complement of beneficial uses of TVA reservoirs. The responsibility for improving and protecting TVA reservoir water quality is shared by various federal, state, and local agencies, as well as the thousands of corporations and property owners whose individual decisions affect water quality. TVA's role in this shared responsibility includes collecting and evaluating water resources data, disseminating water resources information, and acting as a catalyst to bring together agencies and individuals that have a responsibility or vested interest in correcting problems that have been identified. This report is one in a series of status reports that will be prepared for each of TVA's reservoirs. The purpose of this status report is to provide an up-to-date overview of the characteristics and conditions of Wheeler Reservoir, including: reservoir purposes and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and the watershed; water quality conditions: aquatic biological conditions: designated, actual, and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those uses; ongoing or planned reservoir management activities. Information and data presented here are form the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. 21 refs., 8 figs., 29 tabs.

  6. Economics of Developing Hot Stratigraphic Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Mines; Hillary Hanson; Rick Allis; Joseph Moore

    2014-09-01

    Stratigraphic geothermal reservoirs at 3 – 4 km depth in high heat-flow basins are capable of sustaining 100 MW-scale power plants at about 10 c/kWh. This paper examines the impacts on the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of reservoir depth and temperature, reservoir productivity, and drillhole/casing options. For a reservoir at 3 km depth with a moderate productivity index by hydrothermal reservoir standards (about 50 L/s/MPa, 5.6 gpm/psi), an LCOE of 10c/kWh requires the reservoir to be at about 200°C. This is the upper temperature limit for pumps. The calculations assume standard hydrothermal drilling costs, with the production interval completed with a 7 inch liner in an 8.5 inch hole. If a reservoir at 4 km depth has excellent permeability characteristics with a productivity index of 100 L/s/MPa (11.3 gpm/psi), then the LCOE is about 11 c/kWh assuming the temperature decline rate with development is not excessive (< 1%/y, with first thermal breakthrough delayed by about 10 years). Completing wells with modest horizontal legs (e.g. several hundred meters) may be important for improving well productivity because of the naturally high, sub-horizontal permeability in this type of reservoir. Reducing the injector/producer well ratio may also be cost-effective if the injectors are drilled as larger holes.

  7. Heat engine Device that transforms heat into work.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    adiabats Stirling engines The SES solar Stirling system isotherms the Stirling cycle 1 2 3 4 #12;6 Power less work than -Ws, because when the gas cooled its pressure also dropped. Stirling Engine (Beta1 Heat engine Device that transforms heat into work. It requires two energy reservoirs at different

  8. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions....

  9. Assessment of Latent Heat Reservoirs for Thermal Management of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Assessment of Latent Heat Reservoirs for Thermal Management of QCW Laser Diodes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Assessment of Latent Heat Reservoirs for Thermal...

  10. The classical mechanics of autonomous microscopic engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lukas Gilz; Eike P. Thesing; James R. Anglin

    2015-09-08

    Even microscopic engines have hitherto been defined to require macroscopic elements such as heat reservoirs, but here we observe that what makes engines useful is energy transfer across a large ratio of dynamical time scales ("downconversion"), and that small, closed dynamical systems which could perform steady downconversion ("Hamiltonian daemons") would fulfill the practical requirements of autonomous microscopic engines. We show that such daemons are possible, and obey mechanical constraints comparable to, but different from, the laws of thermodynamics.

  11. When is a quantum heat engine quantum?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Friedenberger; Eric Lutz

    2015-08-17

    Quantum thermodynamics studies quantum effects in thermal machines. But when is a heat engine, which cyclically interacts with external reservoirs that unavoidably destroy its quantum coherence, really quantum? We here use the Leggett-Garg inequality to assess the nonclassical properties of a single two-level Otto engine. We provide the complete phase diagram characterizing the quantumness of the engine as a function of its parameters and identify three distinct phases. We further derive an explicit expression for the transition temperature.

  12. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K.

    1988-12-31

    During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

  13. Process and apparatus for reducing the loss of hydrogen from Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alger, D.L.

    1987-03-24

    A Stirling engine assembly is described which defines a working gas volume therein, the Stirling engine assembly comprising: a working gas reservoir for storing a working gas at a pressure greater than pressure of the working gas in the working volume of the Stirling engine; a trap cell operatively connected between an outlet of the reservoir and the Stirling engine working volume. The trap cell includes an enclosure having porous windows at either end thereof and a sorbent with an affinity for water vapor therein, such that water vapor adsorbed on the sorbent diffuses into the hydrogen passing from the reservoir into the working engine; a compressor means for drawing working gas from the Stirling engine working volume, through the trap cell and pumping the working gas into the hydrogen reservoir. The sorbent in the trap cell at the reduced pressure caused by the compressor adsorbs water vapor from the working gas such that substantially dry working gas is pumped by the compressor into the reservoir. The working gas is doped with water vapor by the tank cell as it passes into the Stirling engine and is dried by the trap cell as it is removed from the working engine for storage in the reservoir to prevent condensation of water vapor in the reservoir.

  14. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantwell, K.

    1987-12-31

    1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

  15. Performance testing the Phase 2 HDR reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ponden, R.F.; Dreesen, D.S. ); Thomson, J.C. )

    1991-01-01

    The geothermal energy program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is directed toward developing the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) technology as an alternate energy source. Positive results have been obtained in previous circulation tests of HDR reservoirs at the Laboratory's test site in Fenton Hill, New Mexico. There still remains however, the need to demonstrate that adequate geothermal energy can be extracted in an efficient manner to support commercial power production. This year, the Laboratory will begin a circulation test of its Phase 2, reservoir. The objectives of this test are to characterize steady-state power production and long-term reservoir performance. 6 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Integrating Provenance Information in Reservoir Engineering Jing Zhao, Na Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Kai

    and logging while drilling (LWD) 2 . Designed to replace wireline logging, LWD captures a wealth of additional

  17. STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    DOE), Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) proposed thatof Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy, through Lawrence

  18. GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloomster, C.H.

    2010-01-01

    2 Mission of Division of Geothermal Energy . . . . .Milora and J . W. Tester, Geothermal Energy as a Source o fNations Symposium on Geothermal Energy, San Francisco, May

  19. SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchett, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    Bfxley, P. F. ,-"Land Subsidence i n the Wairakei Geothermalformation effects (i .e. , subsidence) are of interest, theof the ground surface (subsidence) and to net mass changes

  20. SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchett, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    Bfxley, P. F. ,-"Land Subsidence i n the Wairakei Geothermalformation effects (i .e. , subsidence) are of interest, theof the ground surface (subsidence) and to net mass changes

  1. GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloomster, C.H.

    2010-01-01

    2 Mission of Division of Geothermal Energy . . . . .Coordination with Other Geothermal Programs . . . . . . 6the Behavior of Geothermal Systems . . . . . . . . . 1 6

  2. GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloomster, C.H.

    2010-01-01

    environment o f a geothermal borehole. (The problems of f ra data bank of geothermal borehole information. EvaluationBOREHOLE GEOPHYSICS IT-c MATERIALS WELL TESTING L lU-A FUNDAMENTAL STUDIES OF THE BEHAVIOR OF GEOTHERMAL

  3. SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchett, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    has been garnered from well drilling charts. The geologicdrilling alone, and that much more might exist i f deep wellswell are summarized i n tabular form i n Table 10.1 of Pritchett, e t al.1 Drilling

  4. SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchett, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    has been garnered from well drilling charts. The geologicdrilling alone, and that much more might exist i f deep wellswell are summarized i n tabular form i n Table 10.1 of Pritchett, e t al.1 Drilling

  5. STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, J. H.

    2012-01-01

    are applicable to geothermal systems, and esta- blish aof an unexploited geothermal system has been constructed inment methods for geothermal well system param- eters,

  6. GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloomster, C.H.

    2010-01-01

    the Behavior of Geothermal Systems . . . . . . . . . 1 6energy transport in geothermal systems. Analysis o f shortthe Behavior of Geothermal Systems B. Numerical Model i ng

  7. Predicting Stimulation Response Relationships For Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Using existing LLNL computer programs, develop realistic models of EGS stimulation-response scenarios involving hydraulic and explosive propagation of tensile/shear fracture systems in hard rock formations where a pre-existing fracture network may be present along with regional stress and temperature distributions. Evaluate resulting heat transfer improvement of enhanced target formations using LLNL NUFT subsurface flow and transport program.

  8. SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchett, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    t r i Island consist c power stations a as i t s o r i g i nrelative distance from the power station, only bore 216 hasone-half d e s WNW of the power station and extending ap-

  9. SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchett, J.W.

    2012-01-01

    t r i Island consist c power stations a as i t s o r i g i nrelative distance from the power station, only bore 216 hasone-half d e s WNW of the power station and extending ap-

  10. Nonreciprocal Photon Transmission and Amplification via Reservoir Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Metelmann; A. A. Clerk

    2015-06-05

    We discuss a general method for constructing nonreciprocal, cavity-based photonic devices, based on matching a given coherent interaction with its corresponding dissipative counterpart; our method generalizes the basic structure used in the theory of cascaded quantum systems, and can render an extremely wide class of interactions directional. In contrast to standard interference-based schemes, our approach allows directional behavior over a wide bandwidth. We show how it can be used to devise isolators and directional, quantum-limited amplifiers. We discuss in detail how this general method allows the construction of a directional, noise-free phase-sensitive amplifier that is not limited by any fundamental gain-bandwidth constraint. Our approach is particularly well-suited to implementations using superconducting microwave circuits and optomechanical systems.

  11. Proceedings of the eighth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Forty-seven papers are included. Nine were abstracted for EDB previously. Separate abstracts were prepared for thirty-eight. (MHR)

  12. Proceedings of the seventh workshop on geothermal-reservoir engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, P.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Donaldson, I.G.; Gudmundsson, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Thirty-three papers are included. Two were abstracted for EDB previously. Separate abstracts were prepared for thirty-one.

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Tenth Workshop on Geothe-1 Reservoir Engineering

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLEDSpeeding accessSpeedingPATENTS- 05 - - A75

  14. Fluid Circulation and Heat Extraction from Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskey flatsInformationFlint GeothermalSilver PeakWister| Open

  15. Hydraulics and Well Testing of Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam: Energyarea,Magazine JumpEnergyHyEnergy SystemsHybridsEnergy

  16. INTELLIGENT COMPUTING SYSTEM FOR RESERVOIR ANALYSIS AND RISK ASSESSMENT OF THE RED RIVER FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark A. Sippel; William C. Carrigan; Kenneth D. Luff; Lyn Canter

    2003-11-12

    Integrated software has been written that comprises the tool kit for the Intelligent Computing System (ICS). The software tools in ICS have been developed for characterization of reservoir properties and evaluation of hydrocarbon potential using a combination of inter-disciplinary data sources such as geophysical, geologic and engineering variables. The ICS tools provide a means for logical and consistent reservoir characterization and oil reserve estimates. The tools can be broadly characterized as (1) clustering tools, (2) neural solvers, (3) multiple-linear regression, (4) entrapment-potential calculator and (5) file utility tools. ICS tools are extremely flexible in their approach and use, and applicable to most geologic settings. The tools are primarily designed to correlate relationships between seismic information and engineering and geologic data obtained from wells, and to convert or translate seismic information into engineering and geologic terms or units. It is also possible to apply ICS in a simple framework that may include reservoir characterization using only engineering, seismic, or geologic data in the analysis. ICS tools were developed and tested using geophysical, geologic and engineering data obtained from an exploitation and development project involving the Red River Formation in Bowman County, North Dakota and Harding County, South Dakota. Data obtained from 3D seismic surveys, and 2D seismic lines encompassing nine prospective field areas were used in the analysis. The geologic setting of the Red River Formation in Bowman and Harding counties is that of a shallow-shelf, carbonate system. Present-day depth of the Red River formation is approximately 8000 to 10,000 ft below ground surface. This report summarizes production results from well demonstration activity, results of reservoir characterization of the Red River Formation at demonstration sites, descriptions of ICS tools and strategies for their application.

  17. Why the Efficiency of a Carnot Engine is Independent of the Kind of Working Material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronis, David M.

    Why the Efficiency of a Carnot Engine is Independent of the Kind of Working Material Chemistry 223 Here are two proofs that the efficiency of any reversible Carnot engine is the same and depends only W = the work produced by the engine, Q H = the heat absorbed by the engine from the hot reservoir, Q

  18. 33engineering EnginEEring and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Stephan

    33engineering EnginEEring and ThE builT EnvironmEnT www.wits.ac.za/ebe #12;34 guide for applicants 2015 The study of Engineering Career opportunities for engineers are limitless and extend beyond the formal engineering sector. A career in engineering requires special talents ­ engineers need

  19. Bayesian Methods in Reservoir Operations: The Zambezi River Case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    West, Mike

    reservoirs in the Zambezi river: Lake Kariba and Cahora Bassa. KEYWORDS: Reservoir operations, Dynamic models, Multiattribute utility, Dynamic programming, Sensitivity analysis. 1 #12; 1 Reservoir operations Many reservoirs, uncertainty has been included, both explicitly (via probabilistic models and techniques) and implic­ itly (via

  20. Reservoir performance characterized in mature steam pattern

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.D.; McPherson, J.G.; Covington, T.E.

    1989-04-01

    A detailed reservoir description provided new insight in an investigation of a ten-year-old steam flood. Mobil Oil Corporation conducted this study of the Pleistocene upper Tulare sands in South Belridge field, located in the San Joaquin basin, Kern County, California. The study area is on the gently dipping (6/degrees/) southwestern flank of the South Belridge anticline. Wireline logs from 19 wells in a 10-ac (660 ft x 660 ft) pattern were correlated in detail. Seven post-steam conventional cores (1523 ft) aided (1) the evaluation of vertical and lateral steam-sweep efficiency, (2) evaluation of reservoir and fluid changes due to steam, (3) influence of lithofacies in reservoir quality, and (4) provided insight to the three-dimensional reservoir flow-unit geometries.