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1

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 ASSESSMENT OF LOW-TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL Fujimitsu and Sachio Ehara Geothermic Laboratory, Earth Resources Engineering Department, Kyushu University

Stanford University

2

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AND PDM SYSTEMS IMPROVE DRILLING PERFORMANCE IN A CALIFORNIA GEOTHERMAL WELL Dennis Lovett, Terra system allows data transmission without a continuous fluid column. Operating the Coso geothermal field

Stanford University

3

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 GEOTHERMAL FLUID FLOW MONITORING BY THE REPEAT GRAVITY MEASUREMENT AT THE TAKIGAMI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, JAPAN -APPLICATION OF HYBRID GRAVITY

Stanford University

4

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 SUSTAINABILITY OF GEOTHERMAL DOUBLETS-in the natural energy flow will slowly replenish the geothermal system and it will again be available

Stanford University

5

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 CONVERTING GEOTHERMAL PLAYS TO PROJECTS and Resources SA, Petroleum and Geothermal Group GPO Box 1671 Adelaide, South Australia, 5000, Australia e

Stanford University

6

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 DISTRIBUTION OF ARSENIC IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS FROM SABALAN GEOTHERMAL FIELD, N-W IRAN Haeri A.,1 Strelbitskaya S., Porkhial S2 ., Ashayeri, A1 . 1

Stanford University

7

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE PACIFIC ISLANDS their untapped geothermal resources) for cost effective power production and direct-use applications. As part

Stanford University

8

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Geothermal System (EGS) were coupled with wellbore flow simulations. The 3D reservoir simulations used at par with H2O based EGS. The total exergy that can be generated in 1 km2 area of a geothermal reservoir

Stanford University

9

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Germany iulia.ghergut@geo.uni-goettingen.de ABSTRACT In fluid-based geothermal reservoirs, thermal between "heat exchange area" and RTD features of a geothermal reservoir feel natural, but act highly

Stanford University

10

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Berkeley, California 94720 e-mail: Kboyle@lbl.gov ABSTRACT The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir experiences, and processing system. INTRODUCTION Geological Setting The Geysers geothermal reservoir is located just south

Stanford University

11

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University SAND PROPPANTS UNDER GEOTHERMAL CONDITIONS Daniel Brinton, Kristie McLin, Joseph Moore Energy@egi.utah.edu ABSTRACT Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) can be developed in reservoirs otherwise lacking sufficient

Stanford University

12

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University electrical generation capacity of a geothermal system. The methodology consists of combining probability of a geothermal reservoir to obtain the probability distribution function for the stored energy ("heat in place

Stanford University

13

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University RESERVOIR MODEL OF THE TAKIGAMI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, OITA, JAPAN Saeid Jalilinasrabady1 , Ryuichi Itoi1@kyudai.jp ABSTRACT The natural state model was developed in the Takigami geothermal field, using TOUGH2 simulator

Stanford University

14

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University ON OPTIMAL LOCATION AND SIZE OF A HEAT SINK IN A GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Y. Feng, M. Tyagi and C.D. White Louisiana State University Baton Rouge, LA, 70802, USA E-mail: yfeng1@tigers.lsu.edu ABSTRACT Geothermal

Stanford University

15

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-WATER INJECTION INTO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMBINED WITH CO2 STORAGE Hamidreza Salimi Stevinweg 1 Delft, 2628 CN, The Netherlands e-mail: h.salimi@tudelft.nl ABSTRACT The Delft Geothermal

Stanford University

16

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University into fracture system geometry, fluid conduits and fluid compartmentalization critical to geothermal reservoir for the seismic velocity structure within the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF). The CGF has been continuously operated

Stanford University

17

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-mail: sass@geo.tu-darmstadt.de ABSTRACT The investigation and exploration of potential deep geothermal important in the exploration of potentially engineered geothermal systems and of mid to low enthalpy

Stanford University

18

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

given by l v q q . 1 1 1 - + = . (5) Using numerical formulae for (1b) and for specific volumes was 23.4 m/s which occurred at 1.0=p MPa and 000626.0=q , i.e. at atmospheric pressure, when the vapour1 PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

Stanford University

19

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University OF COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CA Kelly Blake and Nicholas C. Davatzes Temple University 1901 North 13th Street structures in image logs of wells from the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF), CA record variation in the azimuth

Stanford University

20

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Talang geothermal field lies in Solok Regency- West Sumatra Province. Low gravity anomaly (bouguer source of the geothermal system in the area. The gravity anomaly leneament trending NW-SE coincident

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir engineering stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University OF KIZILDERE GEOTHERMAL FIELD IN TURKEY Füsun S. Tut Haklidir, Taylan Akin, Aygün Güney, Aye Alpagut Bükülmez In Kizildere Geothermal Field, there were 25 drilled wells until 2009, 9 of which are currently being produced

Stanford University

22

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University OF THE GEOTHERMAL PARAMETERS OF THE GROUND IN CYPRUS FOR THE EXPLOITATION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY AND THE IMPACT OF THE RESULTS IN THE DESIGN OF THE GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS. G. Partasides1 , A. Lizides1 , S. Kassinis1 , G. Florides

Stanford University

23

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AT THE PAILAS GEOTHERMAL FIELD - A RECENTLY DESIGNED DIGITAL BOREHOLE LOG DATA SHEET USING MICROSOFT EXCEL of the borehole log data compiled at the Pailas Geothermal Borehole Field (rate of penetration, weight on bit, mud

Stanford University

24

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University problems associated with geothermal utilization. Hellisheiði Power Plant annually emits around 13000 tons of 2011. H2S will be separated from other geothermal gases at a pilot gas separation plant, dissolved

Stanford University

25

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University THE SOLUTION OF GEOTHERMAL HEAT-CARRIER Belova .P. Research Geotechnological Centre, Far Eastern Branch of geothermal power plants operation. Silica extraction from the solution of geothermal plants and its cleaning

Stanford University

26

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University APPRAISAL SYSTEM FOR DEEP GEOTHERMAL ENERGY SYSTEMS IN AQUIFERS W.A. van Leeuwen, C.N.P.J. Maaijwee and N.a.vanleeuwen@geo.uu.nl ABSTRACT Pursuit and use of geothermal energy in the Netherlands is developing steadily. However, in order

Stanford University

27

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AT OLKARIA I, KENYA Cornel O. Ofwona Geothermal Development Company Ltd., P. O. Box 100746 - 00101 Nairobi, Kenya e-mail: cofwona@gdc.co.ke ABSTRACT Exploitation of Olkaria geothermal field started in 1981 when

Stanford University

28

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-THERMAL INFRARED BAND AND MAGNETOTELLURIC METHOD TO SIMULATE A GEOTHERMAL SITTING AT MT. CIREMAI, WEST JAVA at surface is crucial for geothermal exploration. Since field observations to map surface manifestation

Stanford University

29

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University RIVER GEOTHERMAL SITE Earl Mattson1 , Mitchell Plummer1 , Carl Palmer1 , Larry Hull1 , Samantha Miller1 and Randy Nye2 1 Idaho National Laboratory PO Box 1625 Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2107 2 US Geothermal Inc 1505

Stanford University

30

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University TEMPERATURE DATA OBTAINED AT AND AROUND THE LAS PAILAS GEOTHERMAL PROJECT AND IN RINC?N DE LA VIEJA NATIONAL the existence of subsoil thermal anomalies that may be correlated with local faults in the Pailas Geothermal

Stanford University

31

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University out in Salavatli geothermal field, Turkey. Since reinjection returns as relatively colder water seismometers at the Salavatli, Kök, Aydin, Turkey geothermal area was deployed in May 2010 in connection

Stanford University

32

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University-mail:john.lund@nrel.gov ABSTRACT A geothermal direct-use project utilizes a natural resource, a flow of geothermal fluid, aquaculture ponds, and industrial processes. Geothermal utilization requires matching the varied needs

Stanford University

33

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University FOR GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION AT JEMEZ PUEBLO IN NEW MEXICO Lianjie Huang1 and Michael Albrecht2 1 Los Alamos Geothermal Technology Center 4200 West Jemez Road, Suite 301-13 Los Alamos, NM 87544, USA e-mail: michael

Stanford University

34

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Group Zorlu Plaza, Avcilar stanbul, 34310, TURKEY e-mail: aygun.guney@zorlu.com ABSTRACT Geothermal well that Petroleum and Geothermal fluids have similar properties in terms of well testing. In this regard, almost

Stanford University

35

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Keyan Zheng1 Fang He2 1 Geothermal Council of China Energy Society 20 Da Hui Si Road, Haidian District of Renewable Energy of PRC" had clearly explained that geothermal energy belongs to renewable energy

Stanford University

36

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University CASING IN A HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL WELL Gunnar Skúlason Kaldal1 *, Magnús ?. Jónsson1 , Halldór@hi.is ABSTRACT The production casing of a high temperature geothermal well is subjected to multiple thermo

Stanford University

37

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University BINARY POWER PLANTS IN REMOTE GEOTHERMAL AREAS OF INDONESIA Huenges E., K. Erbas, M. Jaya, and A. Saadat in remote areas. Geothermal is one of these and has huge resources in Indonesia. Today, geothermal provides

Stanford University

38

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University GEOTHERMAL FIELD, SW-ICELAND Samuel W. Scott1 , Ingvi Gunnarsson2 , Andri Stefánsson1 , Stefán Arnórsson1 sampling campaign has recently been carried out at the Hellisheiði geothermal field in southwest Iceland

Stanford University

39

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University GEOTHERMAL SOFTWARE S. Alcaraz1 , R. Lane2 , K. Spragg2 , S. Milicich1,3 , F. Sepulveda4 and G. Bignall1 1 Geothermal is an innovative 3-D modelling visualisation software and resource management tool, developed

Stanford University

40

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University IN KOTAMOBAGU GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NORTH SULAWESI, INDONESIA Riogilang, H.1, 3 , Itoi, R.1 , Taguchi, S2 from thermal spring, river, and shallow well in Kotamobagu geothermal field. Temperature of waters

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir engineering stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Heat Extraction Project, geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of the SGP Heat Extraction Project is to provide a means for estimating the thermal behavior of geothermal fluids produced from fractured hydrothermal resources. The methods are based on estimated thermal properties of the reservoir components, reservoir management planning of production and reinjection, and the mixing of reservoir fluids: geothermal, resource fluid cooled by drawdown and infiltrating groundwater, and reinjected recharge heated by sweep flow through the reservoir formation. Several reports and publications, listed in Appendix A, describe the development of the analytical methods which were part of five Engineer and PhD dissertations, and the results from many applications of the methods to achieve the project objectives. The Heat Extraction Project is to evaluate the thermal properties of fractured geothermal resource and forecasted effects of reinjection recharge into operating reservoirs.

Kruger, P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Geothermal-reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. Second annual report, October 1, 1981-September 30, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in the following tasks is discussed: heat extraction from hydrothermal reservoirs, noncondensable gas reservoir engineering, well test analysis and bench-scale experiments, DOE-ENEL Cooperative Research, Stanford-IIE Cooperative Research, and workshop and seminars. (MHR)

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TEMPERATURE DURING POWER GENERATION IN OIL FIELDS Bin Gong1 , Hongbin Liang2 , Shouliang Xin2 , and Kewen Li Stanford, CA94305, USA e-mail: kewenli@stanford.edu 1 Peking University, 2 PetroChina ABSTRACT The effects in these petroleum reservoirs. As Erdlac et al (2007) reported, Texas has thousands of oil and gas wells

Stanford University

44

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stanford Geothermal Program Department of Energy Resources Engineering, 367 Panama Street Stanford the effect of shear-induced pore dilation, injection schedule, and the characteristic displacement scale dc/dynamic friction in McClure and Horne (2010). The effect of increasing characteristic displacement scale, dc

Stanford University

45

Geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. First annual report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect

The work on energy extraction experiments concerns the efficiency with which the in-place heat and fluids can be produced. The work on noncondensable gas reservoir engineering covers both the completed and continuing work in these two interrelated research areas: radon emanation from the rock matrix of geothermal reservoirs, and radon and ammonia variations with time and space over geothermal reservoirs. Cooperative research programs with Italy and Mexico are described. The bench-scale experiments and well test analysis section covers both experimental and theoretical studies. The small core model continues to be used for the study of temperature effects on absolute permeability. The unconsolidated sand study was completed at the beginning of this contract period. The Appendices describe some of the Stanford Geothermal program activities that results in interactions with the geothermal community. These occur in the form of SGP Technical Reports, presentations at technical meetings and publications in the open literature.

Brigham, W.E.; Horne, R.N.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 THERMAL ENERGY RECOVERY FROM ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL to the thermal energy contained in the fractured volume comprising the reservoir. One approach to EGS resource crustal heat flow is most favorable for EGS development (Figure 1), were included in the recent USGS

Stanford University

47

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 34469, Turkey 2 Stanford University, Department of Energy Resources Engineering, 367 Panama Street works and in different mathematical forms. This can be seen in the classic paper of Harper and Jordan of parameters with poor predictive capacity. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT We gratefully acknowledge PNOC-EDC (now Energy

Stanford University

48

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROPERTIES AND FRACTURE ORIENTATIONS ON FAULT ACTIVATION Souheil M. Ezzedine1,2 , Joseph P. Morris3 , Lee G. Glascoe1 , Laura Chiaramonte4 , Tarabay H. Antoun4 , Walter W. McNab4 1 Lawrence Livermore National-mail: ezzedine1@llnl.gov 2 Stanford University, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 396 Via Ortega

Stanford University

49

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluid ­ A Novel Approach for Generation Renewable Energy with Simultaneous Sequestration of Carbon., and Horne, R.N. (2010), "CO2 as an EGS Working Fluid ­ The Effects of Dynamic Dissolution on CO2-Water IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS Sarah Pistone1 , Robert Stacey2 , and Roland Horne1 1 Energy Resources Engineering

Stanford University

50

Reservoir technology - geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford. Fifth annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to carry out research on geothermal reservoir engineering techniques useful to the geothermal industry. A parallel objective is the training of geothermal engineers and scientists. The research is focused toward accelerated development of hydrothermal resources through the evaluation of fluid reserves, and the forecasting of field behavior with time. Injection technology is a research area receiving special attention. The program is divided into reservoir definition research, modeling of heat extraction from fractured reservoirs, application and testing of new and proven reservoir engineering technology, and technology transfer. (ACR)

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 DISTRICT HEATING MODELLING AND SIMULATION Lei Haiyan1 air pollution and save conventional energy, geothermal energy as a heat source for district heating. This paper describes the geothermal resource and district heating system in Tianjin. Heat load for one sample

Stanford University

52

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 DESIGNING THERMAL-PHYSICAL, POWER out at expeditious development rates and there are about a million power plants of this type-energy power plant, that supplies consumers with heat within constrained by them parameters, standard

Stanford University

53

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the near the bottom at the hot aquifer level, a convection cell is induced and the well becomes very nearly providing around 171o F over the entire well depth and obviously creating a convection cell bringing hot, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 DESIGN OF A CONVECTION CELL FOR A DOWNHOLE HEAT

Stanford University

54

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to identify thermal characteristics in deep geothermal reservoirs during the long-term operation of a power at several stages during operation of the power plant to identify changes in the reservoir properties temperature changes in the reservoir during power plant operation. Based on the positive results

Stanford University

55

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper. REFERENCES Baria R., Garnish J., Baumgaertner J., Gérard A. and Jung R. (1995), "Recent., Sanjuan B., Soma N., Asanuma H., Dyer B. and Garnish J. (2006), "Creation of an HDR/EGS reservoir at 5000., Tran- Viet T., Gandy T., Aquilina L. and Garnish J. (1998), "Circulating the HDR reservoir at Soultz

Stanford University

56

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fractured reservoirs for the production of heat energy (e.g. EGS); proponents of developing coal bed methane. Formal agreements and policies explicate mutual expectations and underpin both the efficiency

Stanford University

57

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

crucial step in developing enhanced geothermal system (EGS) for commercial production is "reservoir with a base-case temperature of 80o C, representing steam condensate, was used for injection. Conductive heat

Stanford University

58

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

models. Hence relatively much shorter run-times are associated. These models provide a good alternative that is cooling the reservoir. Since the system is closed as shown in Figure 7, the fluid volume is decreased because of the cooling which causes a decrease in the pressure as well. The cooling effect of the injected

Stanford University

59

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a possible means of measuring thermal drawdown in a geothermal system before significant cooling occurs cooling. Results indicate that while the sensitivity of the method as generally proposed is low, it may- tracer breakthrough curves in EGS to reservoir and tracer properties and discuss alternative tracer

Stanford University

60

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 injection wells, varying locations of injection/production segments of wells, and exploiting years. In absence of production/injection wells and presence of a uniform geothermal gradient of 18 C injection well that sequesters CO2 into the geothermal reservoir. This allows assessment of the effect

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir engineering stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the length of the EGS cycle, power production, plant efficiency, and thermal drawdown. Each of the output the reservoir and extract the heat, which determines the size of the power plant that could be installed space for a given set of resource characteristics, and power plant and well configurations. This paper

Stanford University

62

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, that can be economically maintained over the amortized life time of a power plant. According to his review SYSTEMS: A CASE STUDY OF HEAT EXTRACTION AND THERMAL RECOVERY IN A MODEL EGS FRACTURED RESERVOIR Daniel as a representative "worst case" to estimate heat extraction during production and thermal recovery following shut

Stanford University

63

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and is in a 250-260 °C range. Under reservoir temperature and pressure conditions the geothermal fluid plant to 15 MWe (GB1+GB2) and was put into service in 2003. The consequent increase in geothermal fluid the geothermal fluid supplied to GB1. Over this period, the well-head pressures were monitored for each well

Stanford University

64

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

field in Indonesia and the sixth largest in the world. Commercial operations started in February 1994 and condensate was located on the periphery of the proven reservoir as an expedient measure at start-up (Murray strategies to be implemented include moving condensate injection from current infield location in West Salak

Stanford University

65

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluid (CO2- EGS). Numerical simulations of fluid dynamics and heat transfer indicate that CO2 may) for modeling heat transfer and fluid dynamics of a CO2-EGS system (Fig. 2). The EGS reservoir was modeled for Generating Renewable Energy With Simultaneous Sequestration of Carbon", Geothermics, 35, 351-367. Pruess, K

Stanford University

66

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluids); · Fluid loss from the reservoir does not change drying-out dynamics unless it affects other thermosiphon for competitive power generation." Energy & Fuels, 23, 553-557. Atrens, A. D., H. Gurgenci, et al for generating renewable energy with simultaneous sequestration of carbon." Geothermics, 35, 351­367. Pruess, K

Stanford University

67

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a reservoir has been an essential part in the planning process for geothermal projects for the past 30 years attainable with it. MOTIVATION The planning phase for facilities with groundwater utilization, either the required flow rates. Two specific flow rates are essential for the site dimensioning: · the annual maximum

Stanford University

68

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FOR MONITORING THERMAL DRAWDOWN IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS Mitchell A. Plummer, Carl D. Palmer, Earl D. Mattson. Second, by identifying fracture geometries that are consistent with operating conditions (well pressures of the Laplace transformed equation of Gringarten et al. (1975) (Figure 3). Transport of a reactive tracer slug

Stanford University

69

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Alternating Conditional Expectation) method was extended to different sectors of Leyte Geothermal Production about the underlying reservoir model. The method known as ACE (alternating conditional expectation by Breiman and Friedman (1985) for transformation/regression. It provides nonlinear transform functions which

Stanford University

70

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

constructed by Enertech Engineering and Research Co. for Sandia Laboratories to compute downhole temperatures for bottomhole temperature stabilization. Geophysics. 44, 1458- 1462. Mitchell, R.F. (February, 1982). Advanced

Stanford University

71

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BY AIR LIFTING Per-Gunnar Alm Lund University, Engineering Geology, P.O. Box 118, S-22100 Lund, Sweden geophysical logs in the wells during operation of the plant. By using a seal, where the logging cable run avoiding the water going in to the heat plant. By vary the flow rate of air and pressure during

Stanford University

72

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and with engineered heat exchanger surfaces for the flow systems, i.e. Hot Dry Rock (HDR) or Enhanced Geothermal Neumann boundary condition with prescribed flow at the four corner nodes of the rectangular cell 814 m ? 1490 m ? 814 m and is discretized into 29 ? 36 ? 29 orthogonal cells in x, y, and z direction

Stanford University

73

Reservoir and injection technology: Geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford: Third annual report for the period October 1, 1986 through September 30, 1987: (Final report)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses different aspects of geothermal reservoir engineering. General topics covered are: reinjection technology, reservoir technology, and heat extraction. (LSP)

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Stanford Geothermal Program, reservoir and injection technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report of the Stanford Geothermal Program presents major projects in reservoir and injection technology. The four include: (1) an application of the boundary element method to front tracking and pressure transient testing; (2) determination of fracture aperture, a multi-tracer approach; (3) an analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection; and, (4) pressure transient modeling of a non-uniformly fractured reservoir. (BN)

Horne, R.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Kruger, P.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Heat Extraction Project, geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford. Fourth annual report, January 1, 1988--December 1, 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main objective of the SGP Heat Extraction Project is to provide a means for estimating the thermal behavior of geothermal fluids produced from fractured hydrothermal resources. The methods are based on estimated thermal properties of the reservoir components, reservoir management planning of production and reinjection, and the mixing of reservoir fluids: geothermal, resource fluid cooled by drawdown and infiltrating groundwater, and reinjected recharge heated by sweep flow through the reservoir formation. Several reports and publications, listed in Appendix A, describe the development of the analytical methods which were part of five Engineer and PhD dissertations, and the results from many applications of the methods to achieve the project objectives. The Heat Extraction Project is to evaluate the thermal properties of fractured geothermal resource and forecasted effects of reinjection recharge into operating reservoirs.

Kruger, P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

-Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.A. Hsieh 1e$ Pressure Buildup Monitoring of the Krafla Geothermal Field, . . . . . . . . 1'1 Xceland - 0 Initial Chemical and Reservoir Conditions at Lo6 Azufres Wellhead Power Plant Startup - P. Kruger, LSGP-TR-92 - Injection Technology - Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research at Stanford Principal

Stanford University

77

Stanford Geothermal Program, reservoir and injection technology. Fourth annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This annual report of the Stanford Geothermal Program presents major projects in reservoir and injection technology. The four include: (1) an application of the boundary element method to front tracking and pressure transient testing; (2) determination of fracture aperture, a multi-tracer approach; (3) an analysis of tracer and thermal transients during reinjection; and, (4) pressure transient modeling of a non-uniformly fractured reservoir. (BN)

Horne, R.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Kruger, P.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

INTRODUCTION TO THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTH GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WORKSHOP, STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and Paul Kruger Co-Principal Investigators Ian G. Donaldson Program Manager Stanford Geothermal Program The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on the numerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed in these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented. Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey (U.S.G.S.), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would like

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P. (eds.)

1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir engineering stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION TO THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTH GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WORKSHOP, STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and Paul Kruger Co-Principal Investigators Ian G. Donaldson Program Manager Stanford Geothermal Program The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on the numerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed in these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented. Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey (U.S.G.S.), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would like to t

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P. (eds.)

1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

82

Second workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Arab oil embargo of 1973 focused national attention on energy problems. A national focus on development of energy sources alternative to consumption of hydrocarbons led to the initiation of research studies of reservoir engineering of geothermal systems, funded by the National Science Foundation. At that time it appeared that only two significant reservoir engineering studies of geothermal reservoirs had been completed. Many meetings concerning development of geothermal resources were held from 1973 through the date of the first Stanford Geothermal Reservoir Engineering workshop December 15-17, 1975. These meetings were similar in that many reports dealt with the objectives of planned research projects rather than with results. The first reservoir engineering workshop held under the Stanford Geothermal Program was singular in that for the first time most participants were reporting on progress inactive research programs rather than on work planned. This was true for both laboratory experimental studies and for field experiments in producing geothermal systems. The Proceedings of the December 1975 workshop (SGP-TR-12) is a remarkable document in that results of both field operations and laboratory studies were freely presented and exchanged by all participants. With this in mind the second reservoir engineering workshop was planned for December 1976. The objectives were again two-fold. First, the workshop was designed as a forum to bring together researchers active in various physical and mathematical branches of the developing field of geothermal reservoir engineering, to give participants a current and updated view of progress being made in the field. The second purpose was to prepare this Proceedings of Summaries documenting the state of the art as of December 1976. The proceedings will be distributed to all interested members of the geothermal community involved in the development and utilization of the geothermal resources in the world. Many notable occurrences took place between the first workshop in December 1975 and this present workshop in December 1976. For one thing, the newly formed Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) has assumed the lead role in geothermal reservoir engineering research. The second workshop under the Stanford Geothermal Program was supported by a grant from ERDA. In addition, two significant meetings on geothermal energy were held in Rotarua, New Zealand and Taupo, New Zealand. These meetings concerned geothermal reservoir engineering, and the reinjection of cooled geothermal fluids back into a geothermal system. It was clear to attendees of both the New Zealand and the December workshop meetings that a great deal of new information had been developed between August and December 1976. Another exciting report made at the meeting was a successful completion of a new geothermal well on the big island of Hawaii which produces a geothermal fluid that is mainly steam at a temperature in excess of 600 degrees F. Although the total developed electrical power generating capacity due to all geothermal field developments in 1976 is on the order of 1200 megawatts, it was reported that rapid development in geothermal field expansion is taking place in many parts of the world. Approximately 400 megawatts of geothermal power were being developed in the Philippine Islands, and planning for expansion in production in Cerro Prieto, Mexico was also announced. The Geysers in the United States continued the planned expansion toward the level of more than 1000 megawatts. The Second Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford December 1976 with 93 attendees from 4 nations, and resulted in the presentation of 44 technical papers, summaries of which are included in these Proceedings. The major areas included in the program consisted of reservoir physics, well testing, field development, well stimulation, and mathematical modeling of geothermal reservoirs. The planning forth is year's workshop and the preparation of the proceedings was carried out mainly by my associate Paul

Kruger, P.; Ramey, H.J. Jr. (eds.)

1976-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

83

Third workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Third Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 14, 1977, with 104 attendees from six nations. In keeping with the recommendations expressed by the participants at the Second Workshop, the format of the Workshop was retained, with three days of technical sessions devoted to reservoir physics, well and reservoir testing, field development, and mathematical modeling of geothermal reservoirs. The program presented 33 technical papers, summaries of which are included in these Proceedings. Although the format of the Workshop has remained constant, it is clear from a perusal of the Table of Contents that considerable advances have occurred in all phases of geothermal reservoir engineering over the past three years. Greater understanding of reservoir physics and mathematical representations of vapor-dominated and liquid-dominated reservoirs are evident; new techniques for their analysis are being developed, and significant field data from a number of newer reservoirs are analyzed. The objectives of these workshops have been to bring together researchers active in the various physical and mathematical disciplines comprising the field of geothermal reservoir engineering, to give the participants a forum for review of progress and exchange of new ideas in this rapidly developing field, and to summarize the effective state of the art of geothermal reservoir engineering in a form readily useful to the many government and private agencies involved in the development of geothermal energy. To these objectives, the Third Workshop and these Proceedings have been successfully directed. Several important events in this field have occurred since the Second Workshop in December 1976. The first among these was the incorporation of the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) into the newly formed Department of Energy (DOE) which continues as the leading Federal agency in geothermal reservoir engineering research. The Third Workshop under the Stanford Geothermal Program was supported by a grant from DOE through a subcontract with the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory of the University of California. A second significant event was the first conference under the ERDA (DOE)-ENEL cooperative program where many of the results of well testing in both nations were discussed. The Proceedings of that conference should be an important contribution to the literature. These Proceedings of the Third Workshop should also make an important contribution to the literature on geothermal reservoir engineering. Much of the data presented at the Workshop were given for the first time, and full technical papers on these subjects will appear in the professional journals. The results of these studies will assist markedly in developing the research programs to be supported by the Federal agencies, and in reducing the costs of research for individual developers and utilities. It is expected that future workshops of the Stanford Geothermal Program will be as successful as this third one. Planning and execution of the Workshop... [see file; ljd, 10/3/2005] The Program Committee recommended two novel sessions for the Third Workshop, both of which were included in the program. The first was the three overviews given at the Workshop by George Pinder (Princeton) on the Academic aspect, James Bresee (DOE-DGE) on the Government aspect, and Charles Morris (Phillips Petroleum) on the Industry aspect. These constituted the invited slate of presentations from the several sectors of the geothermal community. The Program Committee acknowledges their contributions with gratitude. Recognition of the importance of reservoir assurance in opting for geothermal resources as an alternate energy source for electric energy generation resulted in a Panel Session on Various Definitions of Geothermal Reservoirs. Special acknowledgments are offered to Jack Howard and Werner Schwarz (LBL) and to Jack Howard as moderator; to the panelists: James Leigh (Lloyd's Bank of California), Stephen Lipman (Union Oil), Mark Mathisen (PG&E), Patrick M

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P. (eds.)

1977-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

Seventeenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Seventeenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 29-31, 1992. There were one hundred sixteen registered participants which equaled the attendance last year. Participants were from seven foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Mexico and New Zealand. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in the papers. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Raffaele Cataldi. Dr. Cataldi gave a talk on the highlights of his geothermal career. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Cataldi. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award at the banquet. Thirty-eight papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Dr. Roland Horne opened the meeting and the key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who discussed the DOE Geothermal R. & D. Program. The talk focused on aiding long-term, cost effective private resource development. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: geochemistry, hot dry rock, injection, geysers, modeling, and reservoir mechanics. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: Sabodh Garg., Jim Lovekin, Jim Combs, Ben Barker, Marcel Lippmann, Glenn Horton, Steve Enedy, and John Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Francois Groff who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook -vii

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program) [Stanford Geothermal Program

1992-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Nineteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Nineteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 18-20, 1994. This workshop opened on a sad note because of the death of Prof. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. on November 19, 1993. Hank had been fighting leukemia for a long time and finally lost the battle. Many of the workshop participants were present for the celebration of his life on January 21 at Stanford's Memorial Church. Hank was one of the founders of the Stanford Geothermal Program and the Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Workshop. His energy, kindness, quick wit, and knowledge will long be missed at future workshops. Following the Preface we have included a copy of the Memorial Resolution passed by the Stanford University Senate. There were one hundred and four registered participants. Participants were from ten foreign countries: Costa Rica, England, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines and Turkey. Workshop papers described the performance of fourteen geothermal fields outside the United States. Roland N. Home opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a presentation about the future of geothermal development. The banquet speaker was Jesus Rivera and he spoke about Energy Sources of Central American Countries. Forty two papers were presented at the Workshop. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: sciences, injection, production, modeling, and adsorption. Session chairmen are an important part of the workshop and our thanks go to: John Counsil, Mark Walters, Dave Duchane, David Faulder, Gudmundur Bodvarsson, Jim Lovekin, Joel Renner, and Iraj Ershaghi. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Xianfa Deng who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Roland N. Home Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program) [Stanford Geothermal Program

1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

86

Eighteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Eighteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 26-28, 1993. There were one hundred and seventeen registered participants which was greater than the attendance last year. Participants were from eight foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, Guatemala, and Iceland. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Dean Gary Ernst opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Mock who also spoke at the banquet. Thirty-nine papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: field operations, The Geysers, geoscience, hot-dry-rock, injection, modeling, slim hole wells, geochemistry, well test and wellbore. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: John Counsil, Kathleen Enedy, Harry Olson, Eduardo Iglesias, Marcelo Lippmann, Paul Atkinson, Jim Lovekin, Marshall Reed, Antonio Correa, and David Faulder. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to John Hornbrook who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program) [Stanford Geothermal Program

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

87

Twentieth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Twentieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, dedicated to the memory of Professor Hank Ramey, was held at Stanford University on January 24-26, 1995. There were ninety-five registered participants. Participants came from six foreign countries: Japan, Mexico, England, Italy, New Zealand and Iceland. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Thirty-two papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into eleven sessions concerning: field development, modeling, well tesubore, injection, geoscience, geochemistry and field operations. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bob Fournier, Mark Walters, John Counsil, Marcelo Lippmann, Keshav Goyal, Joel Renner and Mike Shook. In addition to the technical sessions, a panel discussion was held on ''What have we learned in 20 years?'' Panel speakers included Patrick Muffler, George Frye, Alfred Truesdell and John Pritchett. The subject was further discussed by Subir Sanyal, who gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager

None

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

88

ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bibliography Definition of Geothermal Reservoir EngineeringDevelopment of Geothermal Reservoir Engineering. * 1.4 DataF i r s t Geopressured Geothermal Energy Conference. Austin,

Sudo!, G.A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Thirteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

PREFACE The Thirteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 19-21, 1988. Although 1987 continued to be difficult for the domestic geothermal industry, world-wide activities continued to expand. Two invited presentations on mature geothermal systems were a keynote of the meeting. Malcolm Grant presented a detailed review of Wairakei, New Zealand and highlighted plans for new development. G. Neri summarized experience on flow rate decline and well test analysis in Larderello, Italy. Attendance continued to be high with 128 registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, New Zealand, Japan, Mexico and The Philippines. A discussion of future workshops produced a strong recommendation that the Stanford Workshop program continue for the future. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Four technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published. In addition to these forty five technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Gustavo Calderon from the Inter-American Development Bank. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants a description of the Bank???s operations in Costa Rica developing alternative energy resources, specifically Geothermal, to improve the country???s economic basis. His talk appears as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: J. Combs, G. T. Cole, J. Counsil, A. Drenick, H. Dykstra, K. Goyal, P. Muffler, K. Pruess, and S. K. Sanyal. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Marilyn King, Pat Oto, Terri Ramey, Bronwyn Jones, Yasmin Gulamani, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, especially Jeralyn Luetkehans. The Thirteenth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract No. DE-AS07-84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jean W. Cook

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

90

Eleventh workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The Eleventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 21-23, 1986. The attendance was up compared to previous years, with 144 registered participants. Ten foreign countries were represented: Canada, England, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand and Turkey. There were 38 technical presentations at the Workshop which are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Six technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published and one presentation is not published. In addition to these 45 technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by J. E. Mock from the Department of Energy. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Jim Combs of Geothermal Resources International, Inc. We thank him for his presentation on GEO geothermal developments at The Geysers. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the Workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, E. Iglesias, A. Moench, S. Prestwich, and K. Pruess. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank J.W. Cook, J.R. Hartford, M.C. King, A.E. Osugi, P. Pettit, J. Arroyo, J. Thorne, and T.A. Ramey for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Eleventh Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract DE-AS03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1986 H.J. Ramey, Jr. P. Kruger R.N. Horne W.E. Brigham F.G. Miller J.R. Counsil

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Counsil, J.R. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1986-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

91

Stanford University | .EDUconnections  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Prof. Wendy Mao create amorphous diamond Stanford University Dept. of Sustainability and Energy Management Stanford School of Engineering San Francisco, bordered by the Bay and...

92

HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Cerro P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Mexicali,e C e r r o P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Baja C a l i1979 HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING R.

Schroeder, R.C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

Not Available

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

94

STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the characteristics of a geothermal reservoir: Items 2, 6,new data important to geothermal reservoir engineering prac-forecast performance of the geothermal reservoir and bore

Howard, J. H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The attendance at the Workshop was similar to last year's with 123 registered participants of which 22 represented 8 foreign countries. A record number of technical papers (about 60) were submitted for presentation at the Workshop. The Program Committee, therefore, decided to have several parallel sessions to accommodate most of the papers. This format proved unpopular and will not be repeated. Many of the participants felt that the Workshop lost some of its unique qualities by having parallel sessions. The Workshop has always been held near the middle of December during examination week at Stanford. This timing was reviewed in an open discussion at the Workshop. The Program Committee subsequently decided to move the Workshop to January. The Tenth Workshop will be held on January 22-24, 1985. The theme of the Workshop this year was ''field developments worldwide''. The Program Committee addressed this theme by encouraging participants to submit field development papers, and by inviting several international authorities to give presentations at the Workshop. Field developments in at least twelve countries were reported: China, El Salvador, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States. There were 58 technical presentations at the Workshop, of which 4 were not made available for publication. Several authors submitted papers not presented at the Workshop. However, these are included in the 60 papers of these Proceedings. The introductory address was given by Ron Toms of the U.S. Department of Energy, and the banquet speaker was A1 Cooper of Chevron Resources Company. An important contribution was made to the Workshop by the chairmen of the technical sessions. Other than Stanford Geothermal Program faculty members, they included: Don White (Field Developments), Bill D'Olier (Hydrothermal Systems), Herman Dykstra (Well Testing), Karsten Pruess (Well Testing), John Counsil (Reservoir Chemistry), Malcolm Mossman (Reservoir Chemistry), Greg Raasch (Production), Manny Nathenson (Injection), Susan Petty (Injection), Subir Sanyal (Simulation), Marty Molloy (Petrothermal), and Allen Moench (Reservoir Physics). The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Joanne Hartford, Terri Ramey, Amy Osugi, and Marilyn King for their valued help with the Workshop arrangements and the Proceedings. We also owe thanks to the program students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Ninth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U . S . Department of Energy through contract DE-AT03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. H. J. Ramey, Jr., R. N. Horne, P. Kruger, W. E. Brigham, F. G. Miller, J. S . Gudmundsson -vii

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The attendance at the Workshop was similar to last year's with 123 registered participants of which 22 represented 8 foreign countries. A record number of technical papers (about 60) were submitted for presentation at the Workshop. The Program Committee, therefore, decided to have several parallel sessions to accommodate most of the papers. This format proved unpopular and will not be repeated. Many of the participants felt that the Workshop lost some of its unique qualities by having parallel sessions. The Workshop has always been held near the middle of December during examination week at Stanford. This timing was reviewed in an open discussion at the Workshop. The Program Committee subsequently decided to move the Workshop to January. The Tenth Workshop will be held on January 22-24, 1985. The theme of the Workshop this year was ''field developments worldwide''. The Program Committee addressed this theme by encouraging participants to submit field development papers, and by inviting several international authorities to give presentations at the Workshop. Field developments in at least twelve countries were reported: China, El Salvador, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States. There were 58 technical presentations at the Workshop, of which 4 were not made available for publication. Several authors submitted papers not presented at the Workshop. However, these are included in the 60 papers of these Proceedings. The introductory address was given by Ron Toms of the U.S. Department of Energy, and the banquet speaker was A1 Cooper of Chevron Resources Company. An important contribution was made to the Workshop by the chairmen of the technical sessions. Other than Stanford Geothermal Program faculty members, they included: Don White (Field Developments), Bill D'Olier (Hydrothermal Systems), Herman Dykstra (Well Testing), Karsten Pruess (Well Testing), John Counsil (Reservoir Chemistry), Malcolm Mossman (Reservoir Chemistry), Greg Raasch (Production), Manny Nathenson (Injection), Susan Petty (Injection), Subir Sanyal (Simulation), Marty Molloy (Petrothermal), and Allen Moench (Reservoir Physics). The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Joanne Hartford, Terri Ramey, Amy Osugi, and Marilyn King for their valued help with the Workshop arrangements and the Proceedings. We also owe thanks to the program students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Ninth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U . S . Department of Energy through contract DE-AT03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. H. J. Ramey, Jr., R. N. Horne, P. Kruger, W. E. Brigham, F. G. Miller, J. S . Gudmundsson -vii

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Twenty-first workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PREFACE The Twenty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at the Holiday Inn, Palo Alto on January 22-24, 1996. There were one-hundred fifty-five registered participants. Participants came from twenty foreign countries: Argentina, Austria, Canada, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey and the UK. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Sixty-six papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into twenty sessions concerning: reservoir assessment, modeling, geology/geochemistry, fracture modeling hot dry rock, geoscience, low enthalpy, injection, well testing, drilling, adsorption and stimulation. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bobbie Bishop-Gollan, Tom Box, Jim Combs, John Counsil, Sabodh Garg, Malcolm Grant, Marcel0 Lippmann, Jim Lovekin, John Pritchett, Marshall Reed, Joel Renner, Subir Sanyal, Mike Shook, Alfred Truesdell and Ken Williamson. Jim Lovekin gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet and highlighted the exciting developments in the geothermal field which are taking place worldwide. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager.

None

1996-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

98

Reservoir technology research at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been conducting geothermal reservoir research and testing sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) since 1983. The INEL research program is primarily aimed at the development of reservoir engineering techniques for fractured geothermal reservoirs. Numerical methods have been developed which allow the simulation of fluid flow and heat transfer in complex fractured reservoirs. Sensitivity studies have illustrated the importance of incorporating the influence of fractures in reservoir simulations. Related efforts include fracture characterization, geochemical reaction kinetics and field testing.

Stiger, S.G.; Renner, J.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Reservoir Engineering for Unconventional Gas Reservoirs: What Do We Have to Consider?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reservoir engineer involved in the development of unconventional gas reservoirs (UGRs) is required to integrate a vast amount of data from disparate sources, and to be familiar with the data collection and assessment. There has been a rapid evolution of technology used to characterize UGR reservoir and hydraulic fracture properties, and there currently are few standardized procedures to be used as guidance. Therefore, more than ever, the reservoir engineer is required to question data sources and have an intimate knowledge of evaluation procedures. We propose a workflow for the optimization of UGR field development to guide discussion of the reservoir engineer's role in the process. Critical issues related to reservoir sample and log analysis, rate-transient and production data analysis, hydraulic and reservoir modeling and economic analysis are raised. Further, we have provided illustrations of each step of the workflow using tight gas examples. Our intent is to provide some guidance for best practices. In addition to reviewing existing methods for reservoir characterization, we introduce new methods for measuring pore size distribution (small-angle neutron scattering), evaluating core-scale heterogeneity, log-core calibration, evaluating core/log data trends to assist with scale-up of core data, and modeling flow-back of reservoir fluids immediately after well stimulation. Our focus in this manuscript is on tight and shale gas reservoirs; reservoir characterization methods for coalbed methane reservoirs have recently been discussed.

Clarkson, Christopher R [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the possible application of CO2 as a heat extraction fluid in these systems instead of water, due to a variety to a combination of lower heat capacity, and large frictional losses due to gas-phase flows in the production in what cases CO2 would be applicable as a geothermal heat extraction fluid. This should give some

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101

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Geothermal Salak, Jakarta 10270, Indonesia 2. Chevron Energy Technology Company, Houston TX 77002, USA e, he assumed a steady-state radial flow inside the acid bank and the pressure response can be expressed from Darcy's law as: +=- s wr br kh qB rpwfp ln 2.141 µ , (1) where br is the acid bank radius

Stanford University

102

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

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- physical and chemical variables. The equations for kinetically-controlled mineral dissolution, and zeolite (Table 3). Due to limited thermodynamic and kinetic data, we approximate the chemical and physical, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 63, 3525­ 3534. Lasaga, A. C. (1984), Chemical kinetics of water- rock

Stanford University

103

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

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.I. and Lasaga, A.C. (1994), "A coupled model for transport of multiple chemical species and kinetic. Because the DEM is formulated in a fully dynamical fashion, damping is necessary to dissipate kinetic), Numerical Simulation in Molecular Dynamics ­ Numerics, Algorithms, Parallelization, Applications, Springer

Stanford University

104

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

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of geothermal energy in Turkey has focused mainly on district heating. The first of these systems came on line at the low-temperature Gönen field in 1987. During 1991-2006 period other 19 district heating systems were like to #12;Figure 1: Locations of major geothermal fields, district heating and

Stanford University

105

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

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exchangers in the district heating utility of the power plant. The district heating utility was commissioned. The brine which is 80°C when the district heating system is in operation is to be reinjected of the Area can be seen in Fig. 1. The power plant produces electricity and hot water for space heating using

Stanford University

106

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

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to whirling of the bit. Bit whirl resulted in off rotation axis motion and cutters engaging the formation the cutter at angles of up to 30 degrees off-axis. Since the impact strength held steady up to 17 degrees shear PDC cutters. Stinger PDC's were also impact tested against round top inserts such as are commonly

Stanford University

107

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

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alternative involves single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tests, variously referred to as "huff and puff is a multi-scale process, in which after time t the cooling front will penetrate to a depth of x = Dtht . Fig-fracture case. Accordingly, the cooling rate in each fracture will be smaller than for the single-fracture case

Stanford University

108

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

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fractures to keep them open, include silica sand, ceramic, and sintered bauxite. In geothermal systems for mineral precipitates. INTRODUCTION In the oil and gas industry, hydraulic fracturing is often accompanied, ceramic and resin coated sands, and bauxite. In enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), proppant will need

Stanford University

109

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

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); they are a generalization of the classical two-dimensional complex numbers (x, y) = x + i y, where i 2 = - 1. Quaternions@gmail.com ABSTRACT Quaternions are hypercomplex quantities in four dimensions (q0, q1, q2, q3 decline, which can shorten the pore volume. This reduction of the pore volume can be the principal source

Stanford University

110

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

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, J and Garnish, J. (1999), "European HDR research programme at Soultz-sous-Foretz (France) 1987- 1996

Stanford University

111

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

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and state governments have provided more than AU$290 million (US$264 million)1 in grant funding for targeted the coast of Victoria and a project integrating wind, solar and biofuels in Tasmania. The two geothermal to reach the target. The company intends to start stage one of their projects in the second half of 2010

Stanford University

112

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

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of air that remained in each reactor after sealing and then escaped when this air was bled from then sealed (with a titanium flange/cap equipped with a sampling tube) and inserted into the stainless steel pressure vessels. Once inside the pressure vessels, the reactors were purged of air, and a sample

Stanford University

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PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

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. These are mostly sealed and probably help support the rocks against compressive stress, but a few of the larger performed with air as the pore fluid and pore pressure drained to the atmosphere. Results of triaxial

Stanford University

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PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

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at the interval of 1 hr. Air temperature and precipitation data were also recorded. Data collected from Jan. 25), precipitation (mm/day), air temperature (o C). Figure 3: Well fluid pressure, converted from original water , respectively. The relatively large compressibility values may caused by drilling mud sealing of the fracture

Stanford University

115

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

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, air cooling system, heat exchanger) as well as two different types of down- hole pumps were installed and connected to this one through a seal section which compensates oil expansion and metallic dilatation around the geothermal site, an air-cooling system was required for the power plant, which also limits

Stanford University

116

PROCEEDINGS, Twenty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 22-24, 1996  

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with no spacer. The blocks are sealed in epoxy so that saturation measure- ments can be made throughout air experiment. These results suggest that it is incor- rect to assume negligible capillary continuity in. Tilting the mold re- duced the number of air bubbles which can form along the bottom of the core

117

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

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the production wells. Future plans are to install a 280 kW binary power plant using the existing well water needs for campus. Thus, the campus would become the first in the world to provide 100% of its energy for interested investors and developers of geothermal energy. PAST (PURVINE, 1974, LIENAU, 1996) In 1959

Stanford University

118

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

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, they have been abandoned or converted to injection wells in spite of their sufficient productivity). This system employs injection of NaOH (NaOH) solution with tubing at a specified depth of wells. This system/s 0.15kg/ s 0.2kg/s(B ase case) 0.25kg/ s #12;As a result, NaOH injection at the well bottom

Stanford University

119

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

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.Lim@mightyriver.co.nz; ABSTRACT Brine at the Kawerau Geothermal Limited (KGL) plant was injected into three injection wells (KA43-rate injection tests which found that the injection index of the wells had declined significantly with the deeper zones. Post well injection tests identified that the acidising had recovered the injectivity

Stanford University

120

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

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of thermal stresses. For a cold, constant temperature line with heat conducting towards it, tensile normal stress reaches a maximum at the tips of the line and a minimum at the center. Compressive normal stress reaches a maximum just beyond the tips of the line. For a line with a temperature minimum at the center

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir engineering stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

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against independently gathered geophysical datasets (Guillen et al., 2008). Faults The 3D interpretation, P., J. P. Chiles, G. Courrioux and A. Guillen (2008). "Geological modelling from field data to the knowledge of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS)." Comptes Rendus Geoscience 342(7-8): 502- 516. Guillen, A

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122

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

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-Europe. C. R. Acad. Sci. Paris 290(D), p. 1521-1524. Calcagno P., Chilès J.P., Courrioux G., Guillen A

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123

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

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-6 geothermal power plants and 50 direct thermal heat service units can be established. CEGE is developing. organized a consortium to develop a geothermal pilot project to explore power plant opportunities offered, as well as the unusual depth of the wells, the fairly high temperature, and the focus on power plant

Stanford University

124

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

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10 Joules of heat. The Joule of fossil fuel could be burnt in a thermal power plant and the resulting-3 this is 15.2 km/l (35.6 mi/gal). If diesel14 is burned in a existing15 fossil fuel power plant with a nominal in the development of a geothermal power plant with a nominal EROI of 36 , the effectiveness becomes 10.8 kWh/l * 3

Stanford University

125

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

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). As a third step, the producible thermal power values of the 19 relatively medium temperature geothermal and encouraging the installation of power generating plant are underway. New geothermal legislation calls with a deviation of ±1x1023 J. Producible Thermal Power Study Probabilistic methods were employed to provide

Stanford University

126

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

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(2006). Once at surface, heated fluids can be used to generate electric energy in a thermal power plant High temperature logging tools and sensors o Improve power plant design o High temperature flow survey emissions yield of partially open cycle, hydrothermal flash and direct steam electric power plants yield

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127

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

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Thermal conductivity wall W/(m K) µi Stoichiometry - µ Mean - total Efficiency power plant (electrical that are associated with the Northern German Basin, a geothermal power plant will need to incorporate an Enhanced to reduce the probability of downtime in such geothermal power systems in order to achieve higher plant

Stanford University

128

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

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is in turn used to power a Reverse Osmosis (RO) plant or an MED plant. #12;The principles of geothermal the seawater (green line in Figure 2). Having expended only its thermal energy to the distillation plant expended only its thermal energy to the distillation plant the cool ground water will be pumped back

Stanford University

129

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

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PLANNING AT THE NEWBERRY VOLCANO EGS DEMONSTRATION PROJECT Trenton T. Cladouhos1 , Susan Petty1 , Owen on the Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Demonstration Project at Newberry Volcano in central Oregon. The tectonic building a preliminary 3-D stress model for Newberry by collecting new field and laboratory data, including

Stanford University

130

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

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temperatures from a network of Artesian Monitoring (AM) bores in the Perth Basin. The ultimate aim values. #12;The Western Australian State Department of Water maintains the network of AM boreholes around data. Borehole Selection Initial selection of AM wells to log was at the discretion of the land title

Stanford University

131

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

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-Sultanhisar- Salavatli Geothermal Field and AS-1 and AS-2 Wells, MTA report No. 9956, Izmir. Ozalbey, S. (2010). Personal

Stanford University

132

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

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, Washington, D.C. http://www.geo-energy.org/publications/ reports/Environmental%20Guide.pdf. Kubo, B.M. (2003 SYSTEMS Corrie Clark Argonne National Laboratory 955 L'Enfant Plaza, SW, Suite 6000 Washington, DC, 20024-2112, USA e-mail: ceclark@anl.gov ABSTRACT Research into the sustainability of geothermal energy previously

Stanford University

133

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

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of Technology, Klamath Falls, OR 97601 2 Geothermal Energy Association, Washington, DC, 20003 john) pp. 6-8. EIA: Energy Information Agency, Washington, D.C., (2009) from their website: www and Development Update, Geothermal Energy Association, Washington, DC (2009). Kagel, A.: A Handbook

Stanford University

134

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

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Park, CA 94025 2. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program Washington, DC e-mail: colin of energy resources, including geothermal energy. Stakeholders at all levels of government, within in the 1970s during a time of rapid development and new interest in geothermal energy. That many

Stanford University

135

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

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% of electricity consumption fueled by renewable energy supplies by 2020; · Supportive Federal and State Government the Federal Government's Aus$435 million (US$305 million) Renewable Energy Demonstration Program (DRET 2008b of Australia. See: http://www.ret.gov.au/energy/energy%20progra ms/RenewableEnergyFund

Stanford University

136

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

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and unconventional sources (oil and sands and oil shale), Fisher-Tropsch jet fuel from natural gas, coal and biomass....................................................................................27 6 Fischer-Tropsch Jet Fuel.....................................................................................................29 6.1 Carbon Capture and Sequestration with Fischer-Tropsch Facilities

Stanford University

137

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

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. This is relevant for geothermal exploration in hot sedimentary aquifers where upwelling zones of convection cells influences the single- phase flow field by studying the onset of convection in a hot sedimentary aquifer. We of the model (e.g. #12;a regular mesh) and thus derive a mesh with cell values 0 or 1 for each formation

Stanford University

138

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

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electricity and hot water for district heating with minimum impact on the environment while keeping cell with Metrohm Aquatrode pH electrode connected directly to the cooling loop. Following p

Stanford University

139

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of water and gas chemistry used to interpret hot spring, fumarole and well samples in geothermal be reliable. The gas spreadsheet includes input cells for all of the chemical species relevant to most by fixed cell address to prevent accidental moves of data in the input field which can mix up cell

Stanford University

140

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

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with the sleeve (dotted line) removed. B) a schematic of the cell showing how particles are entrained TRACERS - A POTENTIAL TOOL FOR DETERMINING EFFECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER AREA IN HOT FRACTURED ROCK SYSTEMS

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir engineering stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30 -February 1, 2012  

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with the scientific and technical monitoring of the power plant during geothermal exploitation between 2010 and 2012 plant is on-going with a scientific and technical monitoring. Several hydraulic circulation tests have conditions. Down-hole pump technology was also tested in various geothermal conditions during exploitation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

142

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plants. At several regions, hot spa owners against to construct geothermal power plants and this is one of reason of preventing to development of geothermal in Japan. And owners of geothermal power plants have to monitor of flow and geochemical condition of nearby hot spa. Figure 7 Hot spa monitoring site near Hijiori

Stanford University

143

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center for a Sustainable Future and the Cornell Energy Institute Cornell University Ithaca, NY 14853, USA.5 EJ (31.7 quads), about one third of the entire U.S. demand. More than half of the thermal energy demand below 260°C (55%) comes from the residential sector, while the rest comes from the industrial (24

Stanford University

144

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

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, Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE), under DOE Idaho Operations Office in nuclear reactor fuel performance analysis. This computational framework allows for rapid development, momentum, and energy. Fluid Mass Balance The mass balance for the fluid may be written as: (1) where

Stanford University

145

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

frequencies above 8 Hz) and solar activity (for periods longer than 0.125 s). By Faraday's law of induction parameters calculated from models with estimates provided by the field data. The observed and synthetic

Stanford University

146

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resistive strain gage outside the oven for calibration and reference. The FBG sensor is bonded with a high considered include AFL/Fujikura Ltd., Corning Inc., Draka Communications, Fiberguide Industries, Fibertronix, IVG Fiber Ltd., Nufern, OFS Specialty Photonics, Sumitomo Electric Industries, and Verrillon. Table 1

Stanford University

147

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for commercial use. This paper focuses on the island of Nevis. The objective of this paper is to theoretically, usually accompanied by dissolved solids and non-condensable gases. Large quantities of heat. Approximately 10,000 MW of commercial geothermal power capacity developed worldwide to date is established

Stanford University

148

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water produced during normal oil field operations can reliably generate commercial electricity- tube condensers (Figure 3). The unit was wired directly into a 480 volt leg of the field power

Stanford University

149

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GP) which started its commercial operation in June 1999. The steam supplied to this plant comes from are for cold condensate injection. Shown also in Figure 1 is the location of the wells. Figure 1: Location map forecast its behavior in response to commercial exploitation. The study employed a larger three dimensional

Stanford University

150

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In the current research Soultz HDR project (Ledru, 2007) and commercial Cooper Basin HFR project (Vörös, 2007 and Ingebritsen, 1994). In two years the condensation front spreads in larger horizontal cross section of the zone of exploitation the full condensation occurs in the producer bottom. With larger r (250, 450, 550 m

Stanford University

151

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercial operation in June 2000 at 110 MWe. A second unit came on line in March 2009, to produce a total. The depths of the producing wells are between 1120 m and 2510 m. The commercial production of Unit-1 started in June 2000 with a 110 MWe single condensing turbine. A second condensing turbine was fully commissioned

Stanford University

152

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, although there are two phases, steam and water (a very small amount of non-condensate gas such as CO2 Council Transactions, 29, 467-474. Sanyal, S. K. (2007), "Ensuring Resource Adequacy for a Commercial

Stanford University

153

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's modeling and analysis of the Ormat ORC system. NREL is currently evaluating commercially available hybrid condenser to a hybrid air/water cooled system. Modifications/improvements to the UTC PureCycle ORC system

Stanford University

154

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the microalgae growth: a gas from the geothermal power plant in Svartsengi and a pure CO2 gas (commercial gas, which is released as non-condensable gas from the condenser, contains approximately 2% vol. of H2 is connected to power plant's non-condensable exhaust gas line. The pipe is then passing through a condenser

Stanford University

155

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies are increasingly viewed as central to a sustainable energy future: 1) commercially viable methods investigated by measuring adsorption (capillary condensation) isotherms in porous materials such as Vycor pore; 2009). The isotherms show large increase in density due to the onset of condensation in the pores which

Stanford University

156

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resources on the continent. It is one of the first world commercial projects of such kind. By the end magma-geotechnological system for commercial producing of chemical raw materials and ore constituents 20, condensation, melting, degassing, magma crystallization and forming of contraction fractures. Three probable

Stanford University

157

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

commercially exploitable resource and possible expansion over a likely resource area of 19 km2 . A first stage 2 and Aghsu springs produce typical acid-SO4 waters formed by condensation and oxidation of H2S

Stanford University

158

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accept between 70 and 450 kg/s of separated geothermal fluids each (Moya and Nietzen, 2010). Commercial 2002, the steam has been sent to Unit 2, because the latter has a greater capacity to handle the non-condensable, the steam from Satellite 4 has been sent to Unit 1, because Unit 1 has a lower capacity to handle non-condensable

Stanford University

159

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to vaporize the working fluid, isopentane. Because of the lack of sufficient cooling water for the condenser organic Rankine cycle (ORC) power system to generate commercial electricity from hot water produced generation system that uses the hot water produced by an oilfield can reliably generate commercial

Stanford University

160

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of commercial power generation at The Geysers geothermal field in California as six distinct and consecutive the largest source of commercial geothermal power tapped to date in the world, and its history presents geothermal field in California has been supplying commercial electric power continuously for the last half

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir engineering stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

underbalanced or managed pressure drilling and technologies like casing drilling or coiled tubing drilling: underbalanced drilling, managed pressure drilling, casing drilling, coiled tubing drilling. Casing drilling tubing drilling improves safety, lowers the footprint impact and enables underbalanced conditions

Stanford University

162

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,5] and high-temperature heaters for the in-situ production of oil shale [6]. EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE

Stanford University

163

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a heat mining operation rather than tapping an instantly renewable energy source, such as, solar, wind production rate of the water (Sanyal and Butler, 2009). A type of geothermal energy resource of very energy is considered a renewable resource. Therefore, we examine next this apparent contradiction. Figure

Stanford University

164

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Ulmishek, 1991. H.D. Klemme and G.F. Ulmishek, Effective petroleum source rocks of the world: stratigraphic in kerogen, coal and petroleum formation. In: M.H. Engel and S.A. Macko, Editors, Organic Geochemistry, France Abstract Rock-Eval pyrolysis of a large set of Cenomanian samples, collected from the black levels

Stanford University

165

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluid ­ A Novel Approach for Generating Renewable Energy with Simultaneous Sequestration of Carbon is the fluid density, and µ is the dynamic viscosity of the fluid (Freeze and Cherry 1979). The large fluid at a rate greater than 150 ml/min which reduced the range of dynamics that could be studied. Both

Stanford University

166

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluid pressure, k intrinsic permeability, µ fluid dynamic viscosity, g gravity acceleration, z balance equations for fluid mass, momentum, and thermal energy as well as constitutive equations and their realizations are generated using conditional Gaussian simulation. The related Monte-Carlo analysis

Stanford University

167

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO2 as Working Fluid ­ A Novel Approach for Generating Renewable Energy with Simultaneous the problems of aqueous fluids, make heretofore inaccessible energy resources available for human use by considering the theoretical and practical issues of fluid dynamics, heat transfer, and rock-fluid chemical

Stanford University

168

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fouth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were investigated: density, viscosity, sizes of silica particles, stability. Silica sols can-potential of nanoparticles surface, mV -32,4 ... - 42,5 Sol dynamic viscosity µ, Pas (200 ) (1,00 ­1,15)10-3 conductivity , m of lithium, rubidium, caesium and other useful chemical compounds presenting in initial solution in ionic

Stanford University

169

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a feasibility study based on historical data and the current technical understanding of the geological used to perform those tasks. Rental, service and consumable cost estimates are also provided in order and the particular tasks that employ them. Service rates, on the other hand, can be allocated on more than one basis

Stanford University

170

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIELD, SUPPORTING GEOLOGICAL AND STRUCTURAL DATA FOR THE GEOTHERMAL MODEL Hakanson, Edward Charles by the Geothermal Resources Service Center (CSRG) Geology Department (GD), and by the consulting company West Japan structural field data and permit the estimation of fault dip. Also, with directional drilling we have found

Stanford University

171

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and decommission the facility (steel, cement, fuel, chemicals, etc.) have inherent value. That is, it can be used materials (iron ore, coal, etc.), transporting raw materials to the foundry, forging the steel, machining used in the building construction industry?' Herendeen and Plant (1979a) results are summarized

Stanford University

172

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in this study estimates the supply of electricity generation potential from geothermal resources in the United States and the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE), capital costs, and operating and maintenance costs and represent the supply of electricity generation potential from geothermal resources in the United States

Stanford University

173

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-sheath failure that can occur as a result of stresses induced from thermal cycling and carbon- dioxide (CO2 surface-temperature conditions. These factors potentially make conventional cementing a costly process-sheath failure caused by carbonation and mechanical stresses, cement properties can be enhanced to maintain

Stanford University

174

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, ammonia-water mixture, carbon dioxide and others uses in the development of HPPs as working substance to improve them. Also, defined the exergy efficiency of the HPP (1): , (1) where, - Carnot temperature factor

Stanford University

175

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) are suitable for electric power generation and the rest 38 are suitable for non-electric usages. According potential. Presently with the existing four power plants, Turkey's installed capacity of electricity power capacity of electricity power plants is 80 MWe and this amount is expected to reach about 100 MWe in 2010

Stanford University

176

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and containing a lot of natural gas. It is very suitable for development and utilization, including geothermal energy (and natural gas) electricity generation, heating and cooling, bathing and swimming, tourism, and it is important to control the oil, gas and geothermal water in the fault. GEOTHERMAL GEOLOGICAL CONDITIONS

Stanford University

177

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fouth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Technological Department, chair of "Multypurpose use and protection of water resources", Petropavlovsk HCO3 - CO3 2- H3BO3 SiO2 l - Concentration, mg/l 251.8 220.9 45.2 61.8 91.8 780 251.8 To develop of the technology of membrane silica concentration the main stages must be worked out: #12;nucleation

Stanford University

178

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the dispersed sol. The possibility to retain high chemical uniformity is determined by different conditions is equipped with a system of heat supply to the product and devices for monitoring and controlling the process thermocouple transformer, and detecting device (VT-3 thermocouple vacuummeter). The installation operates

Stanford University

179

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: A REMOTE SENSING TOOL TO MONITOR STEAM CAP MIGRATIONS? Franklin G. Horowitz1,2 , Peter Hornby2 , Eric J deformations over an operating geothermal field is emerging that might serve to monitor steam cap migrations/supplement to microgravity surveying for monitoring the migration of steam caps in an operating geothermal field

Stanford University

180

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for scattering experiments are generated either from the decay of 235 U in a nuclear reactor (e.g. High Flux of the theory and practice of small angle scattering (e.g Guinier and Fournet, 1955; Hammouda, 2009; Radlinski Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, HFIR/ORNL; NIST Center for Neutron Research, NCNR

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir engineering stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System (EGS) and Hot Sedimentary Aquifer (HSA) ventures. With no active extensional regimes generating distances; such spatial variations are largely unpredictable and are not usefully handled by statistical exploration tools for hot rock geothermal systems; and, Transmission: research on electricity grid interaction

Stanford University

182

Scales of geologic reservoir description for engineering applications  

SciTech Connect

A consequence of the increased interaction between geologists and engineers in resolving reservoir problems has been an awareness on the part of geologists of the need to vary the scale of their geologic description according to particular engineering applications. Conventional geological descriptions are normally too detailed for reservoir engineering simulations and often are not in an appropriate form for relating to reservoir performance. An example is presented of two scales of description of a North Sea oil field for two different applications. The field is a Tertiary submarine slope-fan deposit consisting of thick unconsolidated channel sand facies, a lobe sand facies, and a slope claystone facies, all arranged into 12 stratigraphic units and several subunits. Permeability of the channel sands is about twice that of lobe sands, demonstrating a facies control on reservoir quality. For the purpose of calculating reservoir volumetrics, it was possible to scale up the stratigraphy, by combining similar stratigraphic units, into a simple four-layer reservoir model. Average porosity and permeability vary among the layers in this geologically based model. For the purpose of improving understanding of the reservoir, a more complex flow unit model was developed according to geological and petrophysical properties that would influence the flow of fluids in the reservoir. This model is partly based upon sedimentary facies distribution, but differs from a geologic facies model and is in a more suitable form for relating to reservoir performance.

Slatt, R.M.; Hopkins, G.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

PROCEEDINGS TWENTIETH WORKSHOP GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a global reservoir value of the amount of adsorbed liquid water per kg of rock (called ADS in the present paper). We simulated the natural state with different values of ADS,...

184

Recent geothermal reservoir engineering activities at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper briefly describes the most recent activities in reservoir engineering for the geothermal group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). The primary emphasis of the geothermal program of LBL is dedicated to reservoir engineering including theoretical investigations, the development and application of mathematical models, and field studies. The objectives of these activities are to develop and validate methods and instruments which will be utilized in the determination of the parameters of geothermal systems, and the identification and evaluation of the importance of the distinct processes which occur in reservoirs. The ultimate goal of the program is the development of state of the art technologies which characterize geothermal reservoirs and evaluate their productive capacity and longevity.

Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Benson, S.M.; Pruess, K.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Geothermal reservoir engineering code: comparison and validation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

INTERCOMP has simulated six geothermal reservoir problems. INTERCOMP's geothermal reservoir model was used for all problems. No modifications were made to this model except to provide tabular output of the simulation results in the units used in RFP No. DE-RP03-80SF-10844. No difficulty was encountered in performing the problems described herein, although setting up the boundary and grid conditions exactly as specified were sometimes awkward, and minor modifications to the grid system were necessitated. The results of each problem are presented in tabular and (for many) graphical form.

Not Available

1981-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

186

Hot dry rock Phase II reservoir engineering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Early attempts to hydraulically fracture and connect two wells drilled at the Hot Dry Rock site at Fenton Hill in New Mexico failed. Microearthquakes triggered by hydraulic fracturing indicated that the fracture zones grew in unexpected directions. Consequently one of the wells was sidetracked at a depth of 2.9 km; was redrilled into the zones of most intense microseismic activity; and a flow connection was achieved. Hydraulic communication was improved by supplemental fracturing using recently developed high temperature and high pressure open hole packers. Preliminary testing indicates a reservoir with stimulated joint volume which already surpasses that attained in the earlier phase I reservoir after several years of development. 12 refs., 6 figs.

Murphy, H.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Stanford University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Ernest Ryu, Civil Engineering Nicholas Tatonetti, Biomedical Informatics Basic Energy Sciences John Goodfellow, Engineering Michael Kozina, Applied Physics Artit...

188

STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94305  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

delivered to the power plants is about 330 kg/s. Around 1,235 kg/s of residual (separated) geothermal water the second half of 2006. The geothermal reservoir conditions around PGM-29 seem to be somewhat different from geothermal field. #12;PRESSURE RESPONSE Reservoir pressure has been monitored routinely at the Miravalles

Stanford University

189

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation the Seismic Analysis Component Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation the Seismic Analysis Component Authors Ileana M. Tibuleac, Joe Iovenitti, David von Seggern, Jon Sainsbury, Glenn Biasi and John G. Anderson Conference Stanford Geothermal Conference; Stanford University; 2013 Published PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University;, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

190

Internal Technical Report, Low-To-Moderate Temperature Reservoir Engineering Research Program - Fiscal Year 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerous low (<90 C) to moderate (90 C-150 C) geothermal resources occur in many areas of the United States. The reservoir research conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is designed to develop innovative techniques that can be used to evaluate reservoir characteristics and improve reservoir management for low-to-moderate temperature resources. The purpose of this report is to review the program accomplishments for FY 1982 and present the initial data and results obtained from the ongoing research program. The project tasks reported in this document are: (1) Low-To-Moderate Temperature Hydrothermal Reservoir Engineering Handbook; and (2) Reservoir Assessment Technique Development--data analysis and reaction kinetics.

Russell, B.F.; Dolenc, M.R.; Downs, W.F.; Hull, L.C.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

*Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

*Department of Computer Science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305. E- mail: manchoso@cs.stanford.edu. Department of Management Science and...

192

Low-to-moderate-temperature hydrothermal reservoir engineering handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Guidelines are provided for evaluating reservoir characteristics containing setions on reservoir classification, conceptual modeling, testing during drilling, current theory of testing, test planning and methodology, instrumentation, and a sample computer program. Sections on test planning and methodology, geochemistry, reservoir monitoring, and the appendixes, containing technical detail, are included. Background information needed to monitor the program of reservoir evaluation is provided.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Equation Chapter 1 Section 1PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will depend, for example, the flow rate through the fracture and the types of boundary conditions intersections were eliminated. The key element in their approach was to apply the star- delta transformation: Intersections of multiple fractures can be converted to simpler connections using the star-delta transformation

Stanford University

194

2008-09 Stanford University Parking and Circulation Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Residences, under construction School of Engineering Center Nanotechnology Building, under construction Li Ka Shing Center Stanford Institutes of Medicine, under construction...

195

Scales of geologic reservoir description for engineering applications: North Sea oil field example  

SciTech Connect

A consequence of the increased interaction between geologists and engineers in resolving reservoir problems has been an awareness on the part of geologists of the need to vary the scale of their geologic description according to particular engineering applications. Conventional geological descriptions are normally too detailed for reservoir engineering simulations and often are not in an appropriate form for relating to reservoir performance. An example is presented of two scales of description of a North Sea oil field for two different applications. The field is a Tertiary submarine slope-fan deposit consisting of thick unconsolidated channel sand facies, a lobe sand facies, and a slope claystone facies, all arranged into 12 stratigraphic units and several subunits. Permeability of the channel sands is about twice that of lobe sands, demonstrating a facies control on reservoir quality. For the purpose of calculating reservoir volumetrics, it was possible to scale up the stratigraphy, by combining similar stratigraphic units, into a simple four-layer reservoir model. Average porosity and permeability vary among the layers in this geologically based model. For the purpose of improving understanding of the reservoir, a more complex flow unit model was developed according to geological and petrophysical properties that would influence the flow of fluids in the reservoir. This model is partly based upon sedimentary facies distribution, but differs from a geologic facies model and is in a more suitable form for relating to reservoir performance.

Slatt, R.M.; Hopkins, G.L.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Nanosensors as Reservoir Engineering Tools to Map Insitu Temperature Distributions in Geothermal Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of using nanosensors to measure temperature distribution and predict thermal breakthrough in geothermal reservoirs is addressed in this report. Four candidate sensors were identified: melting tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles with covalently-attached dye, hollow silica nanoparticles with encapsulated dye and impermeable melting shells, and dye-polymer composite time-temperature indicators. Four main challenges associated with the successful implementation of temperature nanosensors were identified: nanoparticle mobility in porous and fractured media, the collection and detection of nanoparticles at the production well, engineering temperature sensing mechanisms that are both detectable and irreversible, and inferring the spatial geolocation of temperature measurements in order to map temperature distribution. Initial experiments were carried out to investigate each of these challenges. It was demonstrated in a slim-tube injection experiment that it is possible to transport silica nanoparticles over large distances through porous media. The feasibility of magnetic collection of nanoparticles from produced fluid was evaluated experimentally, and it was estimated that 3% of the injected nanoparticles were recovered in a prototype magnetic collection device. An analysis technique was tailored to nanosensors with a dye-release mechanism to estimate temperature measurement geolocation by analyzing the return curve of the released dye. This technique was used in a hypothetical example problem, and good estimates of geolocation were achieved. Tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles were synthesized using a sonochemical method, and a bench heating experiment was performed using these nanoparticles. Particle growth due to melting was observed, indicating that tin-bismuth nanoparticles have potential as temperature nanosensors

Morgan Ames

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

197

Stanford Geothermal Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reliable measurement of steam-water relative permeability functions is of great importance for geothermal reservoir performance simulation. Despite their importance, these functions are poorly known due to the lack of fundamental understanding of steam-water flows, and the difficulty of making direct measurements. The Stanford Geothermal Program has used an X-ray CT (Computer Tomography) scanner to obtain accurate saturation profiles by direct measurement. During the last five years, the authors have carried out experiments with nitrogen-water flow and with steam-water flow, and examined the effects of heat transfer and phase change by comparing these sets of results. In porous rocks, it was found that the steam-water relative permeabilities follow Corey type relationships similar to those in nitrogen-water flow, but that the irreducible gas phase saturation is smaller for steam than for nitrogen. The irreducible saturations represent substantial fractions of the recoverable energy in place yet are hard to determine in the field. Understanding the typical magnitude of irreducible saturations will lead to a much clearer forecast of geothermal field performance. In fracture flow, indirect measurements suggested that the relative permeabilities follow a linear (or ''X-curve'') behavior - but there is still considerable uncertainty in the knowledge of this behavior.

R. Horn

1999-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

198

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Laboratory SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA Operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Content Owner: Lisa Dunn |...

199

PULSE at Stanford University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photon Science @ SLAC - LCLS - LUSI - SSRL - PULSE - Stanford University Go Search Home Publications Atomic & Molecular Physics Condensed Matter Physics Single Molecule Imaging...

200

Geothermal reservoir engineering computer code comparison and validation calculations using MUSHRM and CHARGR geothermal reservoir simulators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The essential features of the reservoir codes CHARGR and MUSHRM are described. Solutions obtained for the problem set posed by DOE are presented. CHARGR was used for all six problems; MUSHRM was used for one. These problems are: the 1-D Avdonin solution, the 1-D well test analysis, 2-D flow to a well in fracture/block media, expanding two-phase system with drainage, flow in a 2-D areal reservoir, and flow in a 3-D reservoir. Results for the last problem using both codes are compared. (MHR)

Pritchett, J.W.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

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201

Geothermal reservoir engineering, second workshop summaries, December 1-3, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Workshop proceedings included the following: (1) During the Overview Session some papers, among others, discussed 'Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research' and 'Geothermal Reservoir Engineering in Industry'; (2) Session I, Reservoir Physics, included papers on 'Steam Zone Temperature Gradients at the Geysers' and 'Water Influx in a Steam Producing Well'; (3) Session II, Well Testing, included papers on 'Borehole Geophysics in Geothermal Wells--Problems and Progress' and 'Herber-Pressure Interference Study'; (4) Session III, Field Development, included papers on 'A Reservoir Engineering Study of the East Mesa KGRA' and 'Determining the Optimal Rate of Geothermal Energy Extraction'; (5) Session IV, Well Stimulation, included papers on 'Fluid Flow Through a Large Vertical Crack in the Earth's Crust' and 'Explosive Stimulation of Geothermal Wells'; and (6) Session V, Modeling, included papers on 'Steam Transport in Porous Media' and 'Large-Scale Geothermal Field Parameters and Convection Theory.'

Kruger, P.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford...  

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History of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource SPEAR Based on new applications of synchrotron radiation, SSRL began in 1973 as the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project...

203

STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-926-4100 SLAC is operated by Stanford University for the U.S. Department of Energy SSRL Facility Research Associate for Small Angle X-ray Scattering The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) has) program. This position has a component (roughly 50%) that involves beam line development at SSRL

Ford, James

204

Reservoir engineering studies of small low-temperature hydrothermal systems in Iceland  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal energy provides more than one third of the energy consumed in Iceland. Its primary use is for space heating and most of the 28 public hitaveitur (district heating services) in Iceland utilize small low-temperature geothermal fields that have a natural heat output of only a few 100 kW{sub t} to a few MW{sub t}. All of these small reservoirs respond to production by declining pressure and some by declining temperature. During the 1980's the emphasis in geothermal research in Iceland shifted from exploration to reservoir engineering. The reservoir engineering work carried out concurrent with the exploitation of these small fields includes: testing of individual wells, field wide tests, monitoring the response of reservoirs to long-term production and simple modeling.

Axelsson, Gudni

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Engineering a thermal squeezed reservoir by system energy-modulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that a thermal reservoir can effectively act as a squeezed reservoir on atoms that are subject to energy-level modulation. For sufficiently fast and strong modulation, for which the rotating-wave-approximation is broken, the resulting squeezing persists at long times. These effects are analyzed by a master equation that is valid beyond the rotating wave approximation. As an example we consider a two-level-atom in a cavity with Lorentzian linewidth, subject to sinusoidal energy modulation. A possible realization of these effects is discussed for Rydberg atoms.

Shahmoon, Ephraim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Welcome to Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

content Skip to search content Skip to search SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory DOE Stanford SLAC SSRL LCLS AD PPA SUNCAT PULSE SIMES Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource An Office of Science User Facility Home About SSRL What is SSRL? Director's Office Organization Advisory Panels History SSRL News SSRL News and Events Science Highlights Press Releases SSRL Newsletter Photon Science Seminars SSRL Presents User Resources User Resources User Portal Schedules Deadlines Forms & Applications Beam Lines Beam Lines Map By Number By Technique Photon Source Parameters SPEAR3 Status Science at SSRL Science at SSRL Science Highlights Photon Science Faculty SSRL Imaging Group SSRL SMB Program Publications Publications & Reports SSRL Headline News SSRL Fact Sheet SSRL Brochure SLAC Discovery Brochure SPEAR3 SPEAR3

207

Status of geothermal reservoir engineering research projects supported by USDOE/Division of Geothermal Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the fall of 1977, the US Department of Energy (DOE), Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) proposed that Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) assume lead responsibility, on DGE's behalf, for geothermal reservoir engineering. This summary discusses briefly the DOE/DGE-sponsored geothermal reservoir engineering research program which includes LBL in-house research and research done by others through LBL. LBL in-house research has emphasized improvement of well test analysis methods and the development of geothermal reservoir performance simulators. Work by others has included 18 separate contracts on a variety of technical and scientific projects. Altogether, 29 distinguishable research topics have been addressed. Fourteen institutions, including eight private companies, have interacted with the program. Table 1, along with figures 2 and 3 summarized the status of the work.

Howard, J.H.; Schwarz, W.J.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Progress report on the DOE/DGE/LBL reservoir engineering and subsidence programs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fiscal year 1978 was the second year of LBL's responsibility for the Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Management Program (GREMP) on behalf of the Division of Geothermal Energy of the Department of Energy. The history of this program through FY 1977 is explained in LBL's Earth Sciences Division Annual Report for 1978. Administrative highlights of the program in FY 1978 are given.

Howard J.H.; Noble, J.E.; Schwarz, W.J.; Graf, A.N.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Summary of reservoir engineering data: Wairakei geothermal field, New Zealand  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is an abbreviated summary of the final project report on an extensive collection of fundamental field information concerning the history of the Wairakei geothermal field in New Zealand. The purpose of the effort was to accumulate any and all pertinent data so that various theoretical reservoir simulation studies may be carried out in the future in a meaningful way. Categories of data considered include electrical resistivity measurements, magnetic force surveys, surface heat flow data and a catalog of surface manifestations of geothermal activity, geological and stratigraphic information, residual gravity anomaly surveys, laboratory measurements of formation properties, seismic velocity data, measurements of fluid chemical composition, monthly well-by-well mass and heat production histories for 1953 through 1976, reservoir pressure and temperature data, and measurements of subsidence and horizontal ground deformation. The information is presented in three forms. A review of all the data is contained in the final project report. The present report summarizes that information. In addition, a magnetic tape suitable for use on a computer has been prepared. The magnetic tape contains a bank of information for each well in the field, on a well-by-well basis. For each well, the tape contains the completion date, the surface altitude, the bottomhole depth, the geographic location, the slotted and perforated interval locations, the bottomhole diameter, locations of known casing breaks, the geologic drilling log, fault intersections, shut-in pressure measurements, and month-by-month production totals of both mass and heat for each month from January 1953 through December 1976.

Pritchett, J.W.; Rice, L.F.; Garg, S.K.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Potential Impact of Reservoir Engineering R&D on Geothermal Energy Costs  

SciTech Connect

A tutorial program for use on personal computers is being developed to evaluate the sensitivity of geothermal energy costs to potential technological improvements. Reservoir engineering R&D will reduce risk to the funding organization and in turn reduce the risk premium paid on a loan. The use of a risk premium was described as an investment bankers option at the November 1986 Future of Geothermal Energy Conference in San Diego, California. In the sensitivity analysis, we propose to calculate an energy cost: (1) at the predicted production parameters of temperature, drawdown rate, etc., and (2) at the most likely worse case values. The differential higher cost of the worse case over the predicted case is the risk premium. Thus R&D that improves reservoir definition will reduce the worse-case-minus-predicted-case difference and the financial risk premium. Improvements in reservoir engineering can then be quantified in terms of reduced energy costs. This paper will discuss the proposed approach to obtain critique of the procedure and provide the best logic for use in evaluating the potential impact of reservoir engineering R&D.

Traeger, Richard K.; Entingh, Daniel

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

211

A comprehensive study of fracture patterns and densities in the Geysers geothermal reservoir using microearthquake shear-wave splitting tomography. Quarterly report for Sep-Dec 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We start organizing the computer programs needed for crack density inversion into an easy to follow scripts. These programs were collection of bits and pieces from many sources and we want to organize those separate programs into coherent product. We also gave a presentation (enclosed) in the Twenty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering in Stanford University on our Geyser and Mammoth results.

Malin, Peter E.; Shalev, Eylon

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

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light shines brilliantly these days at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL)". The Secretary of Energy sent these words to be conveyed at the formal opening of...

213

Team | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Team Team Research team: John R. Bargar (SLAC), Research manager and co-principle investigator, bargar@slac.stanford.edu Scott Fendorf (Stanford), co-principle investigator, fendorf@stanford.edu Gordon E. Brown, Jr. (Stanford), gordon.brown@stanford.edu Sharon Bone (SLAC), Post doctoral scientist Noémie Janot (SLAC), Post doctoral scientist Morris Jones (SLAC), Post doctoral scientist Collaborators: D.S. Alessi (University of Alberta) R. Bernier-Latmani (EPFL) J.A. Davis (LBNL) J. Dynes (Canadian Light Source) P.A. Fox (LBNL) E. Herndon (Kent State) D.E. Giammar (WUStL) D.E. Graham (ORNL) B. Gu (ORNL) E. Ilton (PNNL) L. Liang (ORNL) P.E. Long (LBNL) B. Mann (ORNL) P.S. Nico (LBNL) L. Pasa-Tolic (EMSL) P. Persson (University of Lund) T. Regier (Canadian Light Source) J.O. Sharp (School of Mines)

214

Annual Planning Summaries: Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) Annual Planning Summaries: Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) Document(s) Available For Download January 11, 2012 2012 Annual Planning Summary...

215

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Access to High Technology User Facilities at DOE National Laboratories Access to High Technology User Facilities at DOE National Laboratories In recognition of the nation's expanding need to engage businesses and universities in the areas of commercial and basic science research, the Department of Energy has developed two special types of agreements for use at all DOE National Laboratories with approved designated user facilities, see http://www.gc.doe.gov/1002.htm. User Agreements All user experiments must be run under the terms of a User Agreement executed by the appropriate institutional officer(s) at your institution and their counterpart at Stanford University. A single User Agreement covers all experimenters from that institution (User Institution = "user"). Collaborators who are not coming to SSRL do not require a User Agreement.

216

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structural Basis of Wnt Recognition by Frizzled Structural Basis of Wnt Recognition by Frizzled SSRL Science Summary - September 2012 Figure 1. XWnt8 has an unusual two-domain structure. Wnts are a family of signaling proteins that regulate the development and growth of an organism, as well as tissue regeneration and wound healing. Misregulated Wnt signaling is associated with the development of many types of cancers, including colon cancer, breast cancer and melanoma, and degenerative diseases like multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's and Type 2 diabetes. Understanding of how Wnt proteins bind and activate Frizzled receptors is important for the development of effective anti-Wnt and anti-Frizzled drugs for the treatment of Wnt-related disease. To understand how Wnts function, a team of researchers from Stanford

217

Stanford University Precourt Institute for Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Energy Efficiency · 2009 ­ Precourt Institute for Energy Current Faculty Stanford History ManyStanford University Precourt Institute for Energy The Precourt Institute for Energy at Stanford Lynn Orr Director Stanford University Senate February 18, 2010 #12;2 Observations · Energy

Ford, James

218

Welcome to Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed Percolation Explains How Earth's Iron Core Formed Using r-Space Phase Information in EXAFS to Characterize Possible Off-center Displacements in PbTe Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a Platinum Fuel Cell Cathode Structure of Chinese Herbal-based Medicine Captured by ATP on a Human tRNA Synthetase Previous Pause Next Supporting the User Community ginter Register Submit Proposals Request Beam Time Check-In Visiting scientists ("users") from universities, industries and laboratories around the world use SSRL experimental facilities to conduct experiments across a broad range of scientific, engineering, and environmental disciplines. Our Experimental Facilities SPEAR Plot Click for Full Status Beam Lines Labs Schedules

219

Preliminary reservoir engineering studies of the Miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in cooperation with the Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad is conducting a reservoir engineering study of the Miravalles geothermal field, Costa Rica. Using data from eight exploration wells a two-dimensional areal, natural-state model of Miravalles has been developed. The model was calibrated by fitting the observed temperature and pressure distributions and requires a geothermal upflow zone in the northern part of the field, associated with the Miravalles volcano and an outflow towards the south. The total hot (about 260{degrees}C) water recharge is 130 kg/s, corresponding to a thermal input of about 150 MWt. On the basis of the natural-state model a two-dimensional exploitation model was develope. The field has a production area of about 10 km{sup 2}, with temperatures exceeding 220{degrees}C. The model indicated that power generation of 55 MWe can be maintained for 30 years, with or without injection of the separated geothermal brine. Generation of 110 MWe could be problematic. Until more information becomes available on the areal extent of the field and the properties of the reservoir rocks, especially their relative permeability characteristics, it is difficult to ascertain if 110 MWe can be sustained during a 30-year period.

Haukwa, C.; Bodvarsson, G.S. Lippmann, M.J. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Mainieri, A. [Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad, San Jose (Costa Rica)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

DOE Solar Decathlon: Stanford University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stanford University Stanford University Start.Home solardecathlon.stanford.edu For the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2013, Stanford University designed the Start.Home to provide energy efficiency at the push of a button to a new generation of environmentally conscious occupants. With modular architecture and advanced controls to optimize each component, the house aims to spark a revolution by lowering the entry barrier for an ultra-efficient house and making sustainability trendy, social, and affordable. Design Philosophy The Start.Home is built on a simple, three-by-three modular grid and integrates core, public, and private modules as well as multiple technologies to optimize value and energy efficiency. These spaces can be added or subtracted to allow the house to grow with the family by filling

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir engineering stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Integration of advanced geoscience and engineering techniques to quantify interwell heterogeneity in reservoir models. First annual report, September 29, 1993--September 30, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to provide a more quantitative definition of reservoir heterogeneity. This objective will be accomplished through the integration of geologic, geophysical, and engineering databases into a multidisciplinary understanding of reservoir architecture and associated fluid-rock and fluid-fluid interactions. The intent is to obtain a quantitative reservoir description incorporating outcrop, field, well-to-well, and laboratory core and fluid data of widely varying scales. This interdisciplinary effort will integrate geological and geophysical data with engineering and petrophysical results through reservoir simulation to quantify reservoir architecture and the dynamics of fluid-rock and fluid-fluid interactions. A more accurate reservoir description will allow greater accuracy and confidence during simulation and modeling as steps toward gaining greater recovery efficiency from existing reservoirs. A field laboratory, the Sulimar Queen Unit, is available for the field research activities that will be conducted.

Martin, F.D.; Buckley, J.S.; Weiss, W.W.; Ouenes, A.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Microsoft Word - Cooper Stanford_Modeling_Paper__final__1_.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equilibrium Models for Testing Geothermometry Approaches 38 th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering D. Craig Cooper Carl D. Palmer Robert W. Smith Travis L....

223

GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONS WITH SHAFT79  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that well blocks must geothermal reservoir studies, paperof Califomia. LBL-10066 GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONSbe presented at the Fifth Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

Pruess, Karsten

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 of 13 10/16/2006 FACILITY EMERGENCY PLAN February, 2006 SSRL Safety Office Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Menlo Park, California TABLE OF CONTENTS PREFACE SSRL EMERGENCY PLAN SECTION A: SAFETY RESPONSIBILITIES 1.0 SSRL Emergency Personnel 1.1 SLAC Person - In - Charge (PIC) 1.2 SSRL Beamline Duty Operator

Ford, James

225

Geothermal reservoir engineering of HGP-A: a summary report of activities up to October 31, 1976. Technical report No. 19  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The history of geothermal well drilling in Hawaii is reviewed briefly. The following are discussed: the geophysical program, pre-drilling speculative models, geothermal reservoir engineering, the drilling program, the measurement activities, a preliminary reservoir analysis of HGP-A well, and future activities. (MHR)

Chen, B.; Kihara, D.; Seki, A.; Takahashi, P.K.; Yuen, P.C.

1976-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

THE STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE STRATEGIC PLAN:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

THE STANFORD SYNCHROTRON THE STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE STRATEGIC PLAN: 2013 - 2018 MEETING THE SCIENTIFIC CHALLENGES OF THE FUTURE FEBRUARY 2013 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1 Executive Summary ................................................................................................................................................. 1 2 Synchrotron Radiation - A Unique Tool .................................................................................................................. 1 3 Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource .......................................................................................................... 3 3.1 Looking into the Future: Building a New User Facility Paradigm at SSRL ....................................................... 4

227

Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research. Fourth annual report, October 1, 1983-September 30, 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reservoir definition research consisted of well test analysis and bench-scale experiments. Well testing included both single-well pressure drawdown and buildup testing, and multiple-well interference testing. The development of new well testing methods continued to receive major emphasis during the year. Work included a project on multiphase compressibility, including the thermal content of the rock. Several projects on double-porosity systems were completed, and work was done on relative-permeability. Heat extraction from rock will determine the long-term response of geothermal reservoirs to development. The work in this task area involved a combination of physical and mathematical modeling of heat extraction from fractured geothermal reservoirs. International cooperative research dealt with adsorption of water on reservoir cores, the planning of tracer surveys, and an injection and tracer test in the Los Azufres fields. 32 refs.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING RESEARCH PROJECTS SUPPORTED BY USDOE/DIVISION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the authors. Wairakei geothermal field: Lawrence BerkeleyR. C. , Evaluation of potential geothermal well-head and17, "S"r78" for use in geothermal reservoir 25 p. (LBL-

Howard, J.H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Geothermal Exploration and Assessment Technology Program (review), including a report of the Reservoir Engineering Technical Advisory Group  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The FY 1979 Program, recommended seismic surveys in conjunction with DOE/DGE's industry coupled program in the Northern Basin and Range Province, and the objectives of the Marina del Rey conference are presented. Final reports of six committees which met to define the state-of-the-art in geothermal exploration and to recommend exploration technology development are included. These committees are: structure, stratigraphy, and igneous processes; exploration architecture; electrical methods; seismic methods; thermal methods; water/rock interaction; and reservoir engineering. (MHR)

Nielson, D.L. (ed.)

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

SPEAR History | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPEAR History SPEAR History Experimental Facilities : The SPEAR Storage Ring Stanford University has a long history of involvement in the development and use of colliding-beam storage rings for particle physics research. The first such machine at Stanford was a small electron-electron collider, shaped like a figure eight, located on the main campus. A collaborative effort between physicists from Princeton and Stanford Universities, this project produced the first physics results ever obtained with the colliding-beam technique. Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring The next in the succession of Stanford colliders was the SPEAR (Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring) machine at SLAC, completed in 1972. SPEAR consists of a single ring some 80 meters in diameter, in which counter-rotating beams of electrons

231

SSRL Users' Organization | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U. Tennessee; Christopher Kim, Chapman U. (SNUG Chair); Hendrik Ohldag, Stanford U. The SSRL Users' Organization (SSRLUO) is broadly concerned with representing the interests of...

232

Environmental Survey preliminary report, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford, California, conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the SLAC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the SLAC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team is developing a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the SLAC facility. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the SLAC Survey. 95 refs., 25 figs., 25 tabs.

Not Available

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Reservoir related research at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) conduct research in reservoir engineering, geophysics, and geochemistry, respectively, in support of the DOE Reservoir Technology Research Program. INEL's research has centered on the development of a reservoir simulation code to predict heat and solute transfer in fractured, porous media. In support of the initiatives for research at the The Geysers, INEL will initiate in cooperation with Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, studies of injection and related interference effects at The Geysers. Work at LLNL is centered on analysis of the seismicity associated with production and injection at geothermal systems and effects of geothermal systems on seismic signals. LLNL is continuing studies of seismic attenuation related to the presence of steam at The Geysers. ORNL conducts research to obtain the thermodynamic and kinetic data needed as input into geochemical models such as those being developed by John Weare of the University of California, San Diego that predict the phase behavior and corrosion characteristics of geothermal brines. The current program at ORNL addresses the ion interaction parameters of bisulfate ion (HSO{sup {minus}}) with H{sup +} and Na{sup +}, the dissociation constant of HSO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}, OH{sup {minus}}, and the solubility and specification of aluminum in the system H{sup +}-Na{sup +}-K{sup +}-Cl{sup {minus}}-OH{sup {minus}}. ORNL is initiating studies of the distribution of HCl in steam in support of the expanded research program at The Geysers. 3 refs.

Renner, J.L. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Kasameyer, P.W. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Mesmer, R.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen. Wastewater treatment facilities experience dual financial pressures - rising energy costs and meeting increasingly stringent nitrogen discharge

235

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen. Wastewater treatment facilities experience dual financial pressures - rising energy costs and meeting increasingly stringent nitrogen discharge

236

Independent Oversight Inspection, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Linear Accelerator Stanford Linear Accelerator Center - January 2007 Independent Oversight Inspection, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center - January 2007 January 2007 Inspection of Environment, Safety, and Health Programs at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security, conducted an inspection of environment, safety, and health (ES&H) programs at the DOE Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) during October and November 2006. The inspection was performed by Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations. Since the 2004 Type A electrical accident, SSO and SLAC have made improvements in many aspects of ES&H programs. However, the deficiencies in

237

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource: SPEAR3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPEAR History SPEAR History Experimental Facilities : The SPEAR Storage Ring Stanford University has a long history of involvement in the development and use of colliding-beam storage rings for particle physics research. The first such machine at Stanford was a small electron-electron collider, shaped like a figure eight, located on the main campus. A collaborative effort between physicists from Princeton and Stanford Universities, this project produced the first physics results ever obtained with the colliding-beam technique. Linac map showing SPEAR The next in the succession of Stanford colliders was the SPEAR (Stanford Positron Electron Accelerating Ring) machine at SLAC, completed in 1972. SPEAR consists of a single ring some 80 meters in diameter, in which counter-rotating beams of electrons and positrons were circulated at

238

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC) 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC) The ongoing and projected Environmental...

239

Stanford University Researchers Represented in the E-print Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PatBrownLabHomePagePapers.html Brubaker, Ben - Department of Mathematics, Stanford University http:math.stanford.edubrubaker Brunet, Anne - Department...

240

Stimulation and reservoir engineering of geothermal resources. Second annual report, July 1, 1978-September 30, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Individual projects are grouped under four main areas of study: energy extraction, bench-scale flow experiments, radon tracer techniques, and well test analysis. The energy extraction experiments concern the efficiency with which the in-place heat and fluids can be produced in the most economical manner. The bench-scale flow experiments cover the results of three models used to examine the properties of flow through porous media at elevated temperature and pressures. Random tracer techniques describe accelerated efforts to field test several geothermal reservoirs by both transient and transect test procedures. The well test analysis section describes several new developments: analysis of earth-tide effects, pressure transient analysis of multilayered systems, interference testing with storage and skin effects, determination of steam-water relative permeability from wellhead data, well test analysis for wells produced at constant pressure, the parallelepiped model, slug test DST analysis, and pressure transient behavior in naturally fractured reservoirs. (MHR)

Kruger, P.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir engineering stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

July 4, 1997 The Stanford InfoBus and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 4, 1997 1 of 30 The Stanford InfoBus and Its Service Layers Augmenting the Internet Project Computer Science Department Stanford University, CA 94305 The Stanford InfoBus is a prototype service layers pro­ vided by the Stanford InfoBus: protocols for managing items and collections (DLIOP

Gravano, Luis

242

Coal bed methane reservoir simulation studies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study is to perform simulation studies for a specific coal bed methane reservoir. First, the theory and reservoir engineering aspects of (more)

Karimi, Kaveh

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation » Innovation » Commercialization » National Science & Innovation » Innovation » Commercialization » National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition » Stanford Nitrogen Group National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Stanford Nitrogen Group Stanford University The Stanford Nitrogen Group developed a new wastewater treatment process for the removal and recovery of energy from waste nitrogen (i.e. ammonia). This process improves the efficiency and lowers the cost of nitrogen treatment. The process is termed the Coupled Aerobic-anoxic Nitrous Decomposition Operation (CANDO) and consists of 2 principal steps: biological conversion of ammonia to N2O gas, and combustion of a fuel (i.e. biogas) with N2O to recover energy. It's the first wastewater treatment process to recover energy from nitrogen.

244

SSRL Site Map | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map Global Menu DOE Stanford SLAC SSRL LCLS AD PPA SUNCAT PULSE SIMES Main menu Home About SSRL What is SSRL? Director's Office Organization Advisory Panels History SSRL News...

245

Reservoir engineering of a mechanical resonator: generating a macroscopic superposition state and monitoring its decoherence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A deterministic scheme for generating a macroscopic superposition state of a nanomechanical resonator is proposed. The nonclassical state is generated through a suitably engineered dissipative dynamics exploiting the optomechanical quadratic interaction with a bichromatically driven optical cavity mode. The resulting driven dissipative dynamics can be employed for monitoring and testing the decoherence processes affecting the nanomechanical resonator under controlled conditions.

Muhammad Asjad; David Vitali

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

DOE Solar Decathlon: Stanford University  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

into one centralized "engine" with modular additions to extend the control system to each living space. A modular framework supports future additions. Structural insulated panels...

247

SSRL- Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

esteemed member of the international scientific community as a teacher and researcher in electrical engineering, applied physics and materials science. Bill spent the past 40...

248

Present Status and Future Prospects of Geothermal Development in Italy with an Appendix on Reservoir Engineering  

SciTech Connect

This paper consists of two parts and an appendix. In the first part a review is made of the geothermal activity in Italy from 1975 to 1982, including electrical and non-electrical applications. Remarks then follow on the trends that occurred and the operational criteria that were applied in the same period, which can be considered a transitional period of geothermal development in Italy. Information on recent trends and development objectives up to 1990 are given in the second part of the paper, together with a summary on program activities in the various geothermal areas of Italy. The appendix specifically reviews the main reseroir engineering activities carried out in the past years and the problems likely to be faced in the coming years in developing Itallian fields.

Cataldi, R.; Calamai, A.; Neri, G.; Manetti, G.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

Reservoir engineering report for the magma-SDG and E geothermal experimental site near the Salton Sea, California  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description of the Salton Sea geothermal reservoir is given and includes approximate fault locations, geology (lithology), temperatures, and estimates of the extent of the reservoir. The reservoir's temperatures and chemical composition are also reviewed. The flow characteristics are discussed after analyses of drillstem tests and extended well tests. The field production, reserves and depletion are estimated, and the effects of fractures on flow and depletion are discussed. The reservoir is believed to be separated into an ''upper'' and ''lower'' portion by a relatively thick and continuous shale layer. The upper reservoir is highly porous, with high permeability and productivity. The lower reservoir is at least twice as large as the upper but has much lower storativity and permeability in the rock matrix. The lower reservoir may be highly fractured, and its temperatures and dissolved solids are greater than those of the upper reservoir. The proven reserves of heat in the upper reservoir are about /sup 1///sub 4/ GW.yr (in the fluid) and /sup 1///sub 3/ GW.yr (in the rock). In the lower reservoir the proven reserves of heat are 5/sup 3///sub 4/ GW.yr (in the fluid) and 17 GW.yr (in the rock). Unproven reserves greatly exceed these numbers. Injection tests following well completion imply that hydraulic fracturing has taken place in two of the SDG and E wells and at least one other well nearby.

Schroeder, R.C.

1976-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

250

Stanford, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stanford, California: Energy Resources Stanford, California: Energy Resources (Redirected from Stanford, CA) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 37.424106°, -122.1660756° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.424106,"lon":-122.1660756,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

251

Improving Geologic and Engineering Models of Midcontinent Fracture and Karst-Modified Reservoirs Using New 3-D Seismic Attributes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our project goal was to develop innovative seismic-based workflows for the incremental recovery of oil from karst-modified reservoirs within the onshore continental United States. Specific project objectives were: (1) to calibrate new multi-trace seismic attributes (volumetric curvature, in particular) for improved imaging of karst-modified reservoirs, (2) to develop attribute-based, cost-effective workflows to better characterize karst-modified carbonate reservoirs and fracture systems, and (3) to improve accuracy and predictiveness of resulting geomodels and reservoir simulations. In order to develop our workflows and validate our techniques, we conducted integrated studies of five karst-modified reservoirs in west Texas, Colorado, and Kansas. Our studies show that 3-D seismic volumetric curvature attributes have the ability to re-veal previously unknown features or provide enhanced visibility of karst and fracture features compared with other seismic analysis methods. Using these attributes, we recognize collapse features, solution-enlarged fractures, and geomorphologies that appear to be related to mature, cockpit landscapes. In four of our reservoir studies, volumetric curvature attributes appear to delineate reservoir compartment boundaries that impact production. The presence of these compartment boundaries was corroborated by reservoir simulations in two of the study areas. Based on our study results, we conclude that volumetric curvature attributes are valuable tools for mapping compartment boundaries in fracture- and karst-modified reservoirs, and we propose a best practices workflow for incorporating these attributes into reservoir characterization. When properly calibrated with geological and production data, these attributes can be used to predict the locations and sizes of undrained reservoir compartments. Technology transfer of our project work has been accomplished through presentations at professional society meetings, peer-reviewed publications, Kansas Geological Survey Open-file reports, Master's theses, and postings on the project website: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/SEISKARST.

Susan Nissen; Saibal Bhattacharya; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

COMPUTER SYSTEMS LABORATORY STANFORD ELECTRONICS LABORATORIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Data 2.1 Performance and Utilization Data 2.2 Failure Data 5 5 6 3. Preliminary Analysis 3.1 Load Profiles 3.2 Failure Profiles 7 3.3 Analysis and Discussion of Preliminary Results Some ReliabilityCOMPUTER SYSTEMS LABORATORY I I STANFORD ELECTRONICS LABORATORIES DEPARTMENT OF ElECTRiCAl

Stanford University

253

Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico--waterflood performance analysis for the South Cowden Grayburg Reservoir, Ector County, Texas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A reservoir engineering study was conducted of waterflood performance in the South Cowden field, an Upper Permian Grayburg reservoir on the Central Basin Platform in West Texas. The study was undertaken to understand the historically poor waterflood performance, evaluate three techniques for incorporating petrophysical measurements and geological interpretation into heterogeneous reservoir models, and identify issues in heterogeneity modeling and fluid-flow scaleup that require further research. The approach included analysis of relative permeability data, analysis of injection and production data, heterogeneity modeling, and waterflood simulation. The poor South Cowden waterflood recovery is due, in part, to completion of wells in only the top half of the formation. Recompletion of wells through the entire formation is estimated to improve recovery in ten years by 6 percent of the original oil in place in some areas of the field. A direct three-dimensional stochastic approach to heterogeneity modeling produced the best fit to waterflood performance and injectivity, but a more conventional model based on smooth mapping of layer-averaged properties was almost as good. The results reaffirm the importance of large-scale heterogeneities in waterflood modeling but demonstrate only a slight advantage for stochastic modeling at this scale. All the flow simulations required a reduction to the measured whole-core k{sub v}/k{sub h} to explain waterflood behavior, suggesting the presence of barriers to vertical flow not explicitly accounted for in any of the heterogeneity models. They also required modifications to the measured steady-state relative permeabilities, suggesting the importance of small-scale heterogeneities and scaleup. Vertical flow barriers, small-scale heterogeneity modeling, and relative permeability scaleup require additional research for waterflood performance prediction in reservoirs like South Cowden.

Jennings, J.W. Jr.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

User Facility Access Policy | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Access Policy Facility Access Policy 1. Summary The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science national user facility that provides synchrotron radiation to researchers in many fields of science and technology, including biology, catalysis, chemistry, energy, engineering, forensics, geoscience, materials science, medicine, molecular environmental science, and physics. With a pioneering start in 1974, the facility was upgraded to a state-of-the-art third generation lightsource in 2004, providing major improvements in emittance, ring current and new or upgraded beam lines. SSRL's research programs include both the x-ray and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum. SSRL is primarily supported by the DOE Offices of Basic Energy Sciences

255

Geysers reservoir studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

LBL is conducting several research projects related to issues of interest to The Geysers operators, including those that deal with understanding the nature of vapor-dominated systems, measuring or inferring reservoir processes and parameters, and studying the effects of liquid injection. All of these topics are directly or indirectly relevant to the development of reservoir strategies aimed at stabilizing or increasing production rates of non-corrosive steam, low in non-condensable gases. Only reservoir engineering studies will be described here, since microearthquake and geochemical projects carried out by LBL or its contractors are discussed in accompanying papers. Three reservoir engineering studies will be described in some detail, that is: (a) Modeling studies of heat transfer and phase distribution in two-phase geothermal reservoirs; (b) Numerical modeling studies of Geysers injection experiments; and (c) Development of a dual-porosity model to calculate mass flow between rock matrix blocks and neighboring fractures.

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Lippmann, M.J.; Pruess, K.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Stanford University Solar Decathlon 2011 Construction Drawings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONSULTANTS CONSULTANTS NONE: PROJECT IS PUBLIC DOMAIN 01 10/11/2012 80% DOE/NREL DD SUBMISSION 02 11/20/2012 80% DOE/NREL RE-SUBMISSION 03 02/14/2013 100% DOE/NREL CD SUBMISSION 04 04/05/2013 100% DOE/NREL CD RE-SUBMISSION 05 08/22/2013 100% AS-BUILT SUBMISSION 8/22/2013 12:23:07 PM G-001 COVER PAGE 104 DEREK OUYANG ANRAN LI STANFORD UNIVERSITY Y2E2 BUILDING RM 254 273 VIA ORTEGA STANFORD, CA 94305 STANFORDSD@GMAIL.COM SOLARDECATHLON.STANFORD.EDU 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 A B C D E 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 A B C D E SHEET TITLE LOT NUMBER: DRAWN BY: CHECKED BY: COPYRIGHT: CLIENT U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SOLAR DECATHLON 2013 WWW.SOLARDECATHLON.GOV TEAM NAME: ADDRESS: CONTACT: CONSULTANTS NONE: PROJECT IS PUBLIC DOMAIN 01 10/11/2012 80% DOE/NREL DD SUBMISSION 02 11/20/2012 80% DOE/NREL RE-SUBMISSION

257

Stanford v. Roche, Microsoft and other Supreme Court Cases |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

other Supreme Court Cases Stanford v. Roche, Microsoft and other Supreme Court Cases LBNLDOE meeting0.pdf recentcaselaw lally drysdale.pdf More Documents & Publications...

258

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - SLAC, Stanford Team Focuses...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SLAC, Stanford Team Focuses on High-Energy Electrons to Treat Cancer By Diane Rezendes Khirallah February 9, 2012 Accelerator physicists at SLAC and cancer specialists from...

259

SSRL in SLAC Today | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in SLAC Today Subscribe to SSRL in SLAC Today feed URL: https:news.slac.stanford.edutagsprograms-facilitieslightsourcesstanford-synchrotron-radiation-lightsource-ssrl...

260

Norwich University, Stanford University and Kentucky/Indiana...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy, (202) 779-3295 Jason.Lutterman@ee.doe.gov Norwich University, Stanford University and Team KentuckyIndiana Take the Affordability Contest and University of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir engineering stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Possible Magmatic Input to the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Basin. Authors Philip E. Wannamaker, William M. Doerner and Derrick P. Hasterok Published Journal 31st Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford,...

262

MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF THE BEHAVIOR OF GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS UNDER EXPLOITATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and momentum transfer i n a geothermal reservoir, Summaries2nd Work- shop Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, StanfordSchroeder, W e l l tests, Geothermal Resource and Reservoir

Bodvarsson, G.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Stanford - Woods Institute for the Environment | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stanford - Woods Institute for the Environment Stanford - Woods Institute for the Environment Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Stanford- Woods Institute for the Environment Name Stanford- Woods Institute for the Environment Address 473 Via Ortega Place Stanford, California Zip 94305 Region Bay Area Coordinates 37.427774°, -122.175672° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.427774,"lon":-122.175672,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

264

Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Name Stanford- Global Climate and Energy Project Address 473 Via Ortega Place Stanford, California Zip 94305 Region Bay Area Coordinates 37.427774°, -122.175672° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.427774,"lon":-122.175672,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

265

Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico - petrophysical characterization of the South Cowden Grayburg Reservoir, Ector County, Texas. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Reservoir performance of the South Cowden Grayburg field suggests that only 21 percent of the original oil in place has been recovered. The purpose of this study is to construct a realistic reservoir model to be used to predict the location of the remaining mobile oil. Construction of reservoir models for fluid-flow simulation of carbonate reservoirs is difficult because they typically have complicated and unpredictable permeability patterns. Much of the difficulty results from the degree to which diagenetic overprinting masks depositional textures and patterns. For example, the task of constructing a reservoir model of a limestone reservoir that has undergone only cementation and compaction is easier than constructing a model of a karsted reservoir that has undergone cavern formation and collapse as well as cementation and compaction. The Permian-age carbonate-ramp reservoirs in the Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico, are typically anhydritic dolomitized limestone. Because the dolomitization occurred soon after deposition, depositional fabrics and patterns are often retained, and a reservoir model can be constructed using depositional concepts. Recent studies of the San Andres outcrop in the Guadalupe Mountains and the Seminole San Andres reservoir in the Permian Basin illustrate how depositional fabrics and patterns can be used to construct a reservoir model when depositional features are retained.

Lucia, F.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Proprietary Research | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proprietary Research Proprietary Research Proprietary Research is defined as that for which users request confidentiality of proposal, data and results for a certain period of time. This research follows the guidelines for implementation by the Stanford University Faculty Senate and is executed through a Proprietary User Agreement. Proprietary Research is subject to the Department of Energy's full-cost recovery requirement for facility charges for the use of user facilities and advance payment of those charges. The facility charges are established as a dollar rate for each shift of beam time. Experimenters interested in conducting Proprietary Research should contact the User Research Administration Manager well in advance of the anticipated need for beam time as the legal and financial procedures involved may take

267

Geoscience/Engineering Characterization of the Interwell Environment in Carbonate Reservoirs Based on Outcrop Analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to investigate styles of reservoir heterogeneity found in low permeability pelleted wackestone/packstone facies and mixed carbonate/clastic facies found in Permian Basin reservoirs by studying similar facies found in Permian Basin reservoirs by studying similar facies exposed in the Guadalupe Mountains. Specific objectives for the outcrop study include construction of a stratigraphic framework, petrophysical quantification of the framework, and testing the outcrop reservoir model for effects of reservoir heterogeneity on production performance. Specific objectives for the subsurface study parallel objectives for the outcrop study.

Lucia, F.J.; Kerans, C.

1997-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

268

Director's Office | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Member of Technical Staff, Hewlett-Packard Co., 1978-1982. Professor (Research), Electrical Engineering, Photon Science, 1982-present. Assistant Director, SSRL, 1982-2005....

269

Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only to conventional consolidated reservoirs (with constant formation compressibility) but also to unconsolidated reservoirs (with variable formation compressibility) by including geomechanics, permeability deterioration and compartmentalization to estimate the OGIP and performance characteristics of each compartment in such reservoirs given production data. A geomechanics model was developed using available correlation in the industry to estimate variable pore volume compressibility, reservoir compaction and permeability reduction. The geomechanics calculations were combined with gas material balance equation and pseudo-steady state equation and the model was used to predict well performance. Simulated production data from a conventional gas Simulator was used for consolidated reservoir cases while synthetic data (generated by the model using known parameters) was used for unconsolidated reservoir cases. In both cases, the Compartmentalized Depletion Model was used to analyze data, and estimate the OGIP and Jg of each compartment in a compartmentalized gas reservoir and predict the subsequent reservoir performance. The analysis was done by history-matching gas rate with the model using an optimization technique. The model gave satisfactory results with both consolidated and unconsolidated reservoirs for single and multiple reservoir layers. It was demonstrated that for unconsolidated reservoirs, reduction in permeability and reservoir compaction could be very significant especially for unconsolidated gas reservoirs with large pay thickness and large depletion pressure.

Yusuf, Nurudeen

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Brought to You by Stanford Office of Sustainability, 340 Bonair Siding, Stanford. Visit us at http://sustainable.stanford.edu Sustainability on the Farm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air. energy recovery Y2E2 uses the conditioned air exiting the building to pre-cool or pre ducts on the roof, essentially taking the edge off the outside air before it is conditioned. onsite as emissions from university population commute and air travel. stanford energy and climate plan (2008 -2009

Nur, Amos

271

Geoscience/Engineering Characterization of the Interwell Environment in Carbonate Reservoirs Based on Outcrop Analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate styles of reservoir heterogeneity found in low permeability pelleted wackestone/packstone facies and mixed carbonate/clastic facies found in Permian Basin reservoirs by studying similar facies exposed in the Guadalupe Mountains. Specific objectives for the outcrop study include construction of a stratigraphic framework, petrophysical quantification of the framework, and testing the outcrop reservoir model for effects of reservoir heterogeneity on production performance. Specific objectives for the subsurface study parallel objectives for the outcrop study.

Lucia, F.J.; Kerans, C.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Play Analysis and Digital Portfolio of Major Oil Reservoirs in the Permian Basin: Application and Transfer of Advanced Geological and Engineering Technologies for Incremental Production Opportunities  

SciTech Connect

A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest onshore petroleum-producing basin in the United States. Approximately 1,300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000. Of these significant-sized reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. There are 32 geologic plays that have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs, and each of the 1,300 major reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. The final reservoir shapefile for each play contains the geographic location of each reservoir. Associated reservoir information within the linked data tables includes RRC reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are smaller than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production of >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl [5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]). Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

273

Stanford- Precourt Energy Efficiency Center | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Precourt Energy Efficiency Center Precourt Energy Efficiency Center Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Stanford- Precourt Energy Efficiency Center Name Stanford- Precourt Energy Efficiency Center Address 473 Via Ortega Place Stanford, California Zip 94305 Region Bay Area Coordinates 37.427774°, -122.175672° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.427774,"lon":-122.175672,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

274

Phase and amplitude detection system for the Stanford Linear Accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer controlled phase and amplitude detection system to measure and stabilize the rf power sources in the Stanford Linear Accelerator is described. This system measures the instantaneous phase and amplitude of a 1 microsecond 2856 MHz rf pulse and will be used for phase feedback control and for amplitude and phase jitter detection. This paper discusses the measurement system performance requirements for the operation of the Stanford Linear Collider, and the design and implementation of the phase and amplitude detection system. The fundamental software algorithms used in the measurement are described, as is the performance of the prototype phase and amplitude detector system.

Fox, J.D.; Schwarz, H.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES  

SciTech Connect

The Permian Basin of west Texas and southeast New Mexico has produced >30 Bbbl (4.77 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000, most of it from 1,339 reservoirs having individual cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}). These significant-sized reservoirs are the focus of this report. Thirty-two Permian Basin oil plays were defined, and each of the 1,339 significant-sized reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Associated reservoir information within linked data tables includes Railroad Commission of Texas reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are <1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. This report contains a summary description of each play, including key reservoir characteristics and successful reservoir-management practices that have been used in the play. The CD accompanying the report contains a pdf version of the report, the GIS project, pdf maps of all plays, and digital data files. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 from these significant-sized reservoirs was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl 5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]).

Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES  

SciTech Connect

A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest petroleum-producing basin in the US. Approximately 1300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl of oil through 2000. Of these major reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. On a preliminary basis, 32 geologic plays have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs and assignment of each of the 1300 major reservoirs to a play has begun. The reservoirs are being mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonardian Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; William Raatz; Cari Breton; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans; Mark H. Holtz

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Engineering Engineering1354608000000EngineeringSome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access./No/Questions? 667-5809library@lanl.gov Engineering Some of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. Key Resources Reference Standards Data Sources Organizations Journals Key Resources Engineering Village Includes Engineering Index (Ei) and Compendex Knovel Handbooks, databases, and eBooks integrated with analytical and search tools IEEE Xplore Full text access to technical literature, standards, and conference proceedings in engineering and technology SPIE Digital Library Full-text papers from SPIE journals and proceedings published since 1998; subject coverage includes optics, photonics, electronic imaging, visual information processing, biomedical optics, lasers, and

278

Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrodynamics Bioscience, Biosecurity, Health Chemical Science Earth, Space Sciences Energy Engineering High Energy Density Plasmas, Fluids Information Science, Computing,...

279

Session 4: Geothermal Reservoir Definition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study of geothermal reservoir behavior is presently in a state of change brought about by the discovery that reservoir heterogeneity--fractures in particular--is responsible for large scale effects during production. On the other hand, some parts of a reservoir, or some portions of its behavior. may be unaffected by fractures and behave, instead, as if the reservoir were a homogeneous porous medium. Drilling has for many years been guided by geologists prospecting for fractures (which have been recognized as the source of production), but until recently reservoir engineers have not studied the behavior of fractured systems under production. In the last three years research efforts, funded by the Department of Energy and others, have made significant progress in the study of fractures. The investigations into simulation of fracture flow, tracer analysis of fractured systems, and well test analysis of double porosity reservoirs are all advancing. However, presently we are at something of a conceptual impasse in defining a reservoir as fractured or porous. It seems likely that future directions will not continue to attempt to distinguish two separate reservoir types, but will focus instead on defining behavior types. That is, certain aspects of reservoir behavior may be considered to be generally of the porous medium type (for example, field wide decline), while others may be more frequently fracture type (for example, breakthrough of reinjected water). In short, our overall view of geothermal reservoir definition is becoming a little more complex, thereby better accommodating the complexities of the reservoirs themselves. Recent research results already enable us to understand some previously contradictory results, and recognition of the difficulties is encouraging for future progress in the correct direction.

Horne, Roland N.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

SPLASH: Stanford parallel applications for shared-memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the Stanford Parallel Applications for Shared-Memory (SPLASH), a set of parallel applications for use in the design and evaluation of shared-memory multiprocessing systems. Our goal is to provide a suite of realistic applications that will ...

Jaswinder Pal Singh; Wolf-Dietrich Weber; Anoop Gupta

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir engineering stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Global Climate & Energy ProjectGlobal & Energy Project STANFORD UNIVERSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from plants and animals to energy, and to determine the best conditions for doing so (see below). #12, and processes may have an enormous impact on the world's future energy consumption and environment. In orderGlobal Climate & Energy ProjectGlobal & Energy Project STANFORD UNIVERSITY Global Energy Climate

Nur, Amos

282

Introduction 3 About The Stanford Department of Public Safety 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Vaden Health Center for smoking cessation information and programs. Holiday Fire Safety Information://www.stanford.edu/group/svab/, (650) 7253190 The Health Library at the Vaden Health Center is a comprehensive resource center sexual assault. The library is located on the 2nd floor of Vaden at the Health Promotion Services

Ford, James

283

Stanford Green Dorm Project --Photovoltaic Mini-Report --  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and promotional purposes. Technology Overview Photovoltaic (PV) cells are semiconductor devices that convert light and the overall installation of modules is called an array. Diagram of photovoltaic cell. (httpStanford Green Dorm Project -- Photovoltaic Mini-Report -- Paul Kreiner ­ May 7, 2004 Purpose PVs

Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu

284

-Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the injection well to^ production wells along high conductivity fractures. A powerful method for investigat- ing fields typically choose a configuration for injection wells after a number of development wells have of cooler injected fluids at producing wells. The goal of the current #12;- 10 - work is to provide

Stanford University

285

Stanford Geothermal Program quarterly technical report, January--March 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the following: investigation of adsorption/desorption during reinjection at the Geysers, drawdown and buildup pressure analysis in multiwell reservoirs, adsorption of water vapor on reservoir rocks, and estimation of desorption parameters from experimental data. (MHR)

Not Available

1992-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

286

Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging survivability issues. Our findings indicate that packaging represents the most significant technical challenge associated with application of sensors in the downhole environment for long periods (5+ years) of time. These issues are described in detail within the report. The impact of successful reservoir monitoring programs and coincident improved reservoir management is measured by the production of additional oil and gas volumes from existing reservoirs, revitalization of nearly depleted reservoirs, possible re-establishment of already abandoned reservoirs, and improved economics for all cases. Smart Well monitoring provides the means to understand how a reservoir process is developing and to provide active reservoir management. At the same time it also provides data for developing high-fidelity simulation models. This work has been a joint effort with Sandia National Laboratories and UT-Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and the Institute of Computational and Engineering Mathematics.

Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Gilbert, Bob (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Lake, Larry W. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Thomas, Sunil G. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Klie, Hector (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Banchs, Rafael (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Nunez, Emilio J. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Jablonowski, Chris (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Experimental Equipment | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equipment Equipment SSRL plans the distribution of its limited equipment on the basis of the information supplied on the Beam Time Request Form and the User Support Requirements Form. Please make sure to state all of your needs. Standard X-Ray Station Equipment Standard equipment to be found on an x-ray station includes: (1 ea.) Small and large ionization chambers (1) Exit slits (1) X-Y sample positioner (3) Keithly 427 current-to-voltage amplifier TEK 2215 60 MHZ 2 channel scope Voltage-to-frequency converter (3 channels) (1) Fluke high voltage power supply (1) Kinetic Systems hex scaler (1) Kinetic Systems up-down presettable counter (1) Ortec real-time clock (2) Joerger stepping motor controller DSP Micro VAX or Kinetic Systems G.I./CAMAC crate controller (1) Standard Engineering Corporation CAMAC power supply

288

Subscriber access provided by STANFORD UNIV GREEN LIBR Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Figure 1a) was grown by hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) on an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated of Chemistry, Stanford UniVersity, Stanford, California 94305, and National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617, Stanford University. | Department of Chemistry, Stanford University. National Renewable Energy Laboratory

Cui, Yi

289

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992  

SciTech Connect

SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M. [eds.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

Reservoir and injection technology and Heat Extraction Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the Stanford Geothermal Program in the fiscal year 1989, the task areas include predictive modeling of reservoir behavior and tracer test interpretation and testing. Major emphasis is in reservoir technology, reinjection technology, and heat extraction. Predictive modeling of reservoir behavior consists of a multi-pronged approach to well test analysis under a variety of conditions. The efforts have been directed to designing and analyzing well tests in (1) naturally fractured reservoirs; (2) fractured wells; (3) complex reservoir geometries; and, (4) gas reservoirs including inertial and other effects. The analytical solutions for naturally fractured reservoirs are determined using fracture size distribution. In the study of fractured wells, an elliptical coordinate system is used to obtain semi-analytical solutions to finite conductivity fractures. Effort has also been directed to the modeling and creation of a user friendly computer program for steam/gas reservoirs including wellbore storage, skin and non-Darcy flow effects. This work has a complementary effort on modeling high flow rate wells including inertial effects in the wellbore and fractures. In addition, work on gravity drainage systems is being continued.

Horne, R.N.; Ramey, H.H. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Kruger, P.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Engineering Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Home Technologies Core Competencies Showcase Careers Partnerships About Advanced Manufacturing Developing high-performance materials, devices, components, and assemblies enabled by innovative design tools and novel manufacturing techniques Learn more Applied Electromagnetics Supporting the development of electromagnetic systems that are pervasive and paramount to the greater National Security community. Learn more Data Sciences Enabling better decisions through the development and application of state-of-the-art techniques in machine learning, statistics, and decision sciences Learn more Precision Engineering Embracing determinism to guide rigorous design, construction, and metrology of mechatronic systems, instruments, and manufactured components

292

EOR (enhanced oil recovery): the reservoir and its contents  

SciTech Connect

Factors in commitment to enhanced oil recovery of any type are discussed with relation to reservoir characteristics. Core analysis, well logging, reservoir engineering studies, well transient testing, and chemical tracer testing are recommended in order to ascertain the dimensions and conditions of the potentially hydrocarbon bearing reservoir. The calculated risk that is necessary even after conducting the recommended practices is emphasized.

Frederick, R.O.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and acquisition of reservoir property measurements  

SciTech Connect

In October, a contract was awarded for the Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and Acquisition of Reservoir Property measurements from wells in the Michigan, Illinois, and Appalachian Basins. Geologic and engineering data collected through this project will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms and conditions controlling shale gas production. This report summarizes the results obtained from the various testing procedures used at each wellsite and the activities conducted at the Reservoir Testing Facility.

Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and acquisition of reservoir property measurements. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In October, a contract was awarded for the Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and Acquisition of Reservoir Property measurements from wells in the Michigan, Illinois, and Appalachian Basins. Geologic and engineering data collected through this project will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms and conditions controlling shale gas production. This report summarizes the results obtained from the various testing procedures used at each wellsite and the activities conducted at the Reservoir Testing Facility.

Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy Department |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy Department A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy Department January 3, 2012 - 2:28pm Addthis Stanford Physics Professor Pat Burchat and student Ho Jeong Kim in the BaBar main control room at the SLAC National Lab. | Photo courtesy of the SLAC National Accelerator Lab. Stanford Physics Professor Pat Burchat and student Ho Jeong Kim in the BaBar main control room at the SLAC National Lab. | Photo courtesy of the SLAC National Accelerator Lab. Kate Bannan Communications and Outreach Specialist For over 100 years, Stanford University has advanced knowledge and transformed lives through innovative academic programs, research and outreach. The school is recognized internationally as a top research

296

A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy Department |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy Department A "Cardinal" Partnership: Stanford University & the Energy Department January 3, 2012 - 2:28pm Addthis Stanford Physics Professor Pat Burchat and student Ho Jeong Kim in the BaBar main control room at the SLAC National Lab. | Photo courtesy of the SLAC National Accelerator Lab. Stanford Physics Professor Pat Burchat and student Ho Jeong Kim in the BaBar main control room at the SLAC National Lab. | Photo courtesy of the SLAC National Accelerator Lab. Kate Bannan Communications and Outreach Specialist For over 100 years, Stanford University has advanced knowledge and transformed lives through innovative academic programs, research and outreach. The school is recognized internationally as a top research

297

Engineering methods for predicting productivity and longevity of hot-dry-rock geothermal reservoir in the presence of thermal cracks. Technical completion report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Additional heat extraction from geothermal energy reservioirs depends on the feasibility to extend the main, hydraulic fracture through secondary thermal cracks of the adjacent hot rock. When the main, hydraulic fracture is cooled sufficiently, these secondary thermal cracks are produced normal to the main fracture surface. As such, both the heat transfer surface area and heat energy available to the fluid circulating through the main, hydraulic fracture system increase. Methods for predicting the productivity and longevity of a geothermal reservoir were developed. A question is whether a significant long-term enhancement of the heat extraction process is achieved due to these secondary thermal cracks. In short, the objectives of this investigation are to study how the main, hydraulic fracture can be extended through these secondary thermal cracks of the rock, and to develop methods for predicting the productivity and longevity of a geothermal reservoir.

Hsu, Y.C.; Lu, Y.M.; Ju, F.D.; Dhingra, K.C.; Lu, Y.M.; Ju, F.D.; Dhingra, K.C.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators  

SciTech Connect

This report is a transcript of a practice lecture given in preparation for a review lecture on the operation of thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators. The author begins by a brief review of the thermodynamic principles underlying the operation of thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators. Remember from thermodynamics class that there are two kinds of heat engines, the heat engine or the prime mover which produces work from heat, and the refrigerator or heat pump that uses work to pump heat. The device operates between two thermal reservoirs at temperatures T{sub hot} and T{sub cold}. In the heat engine, heat flows into the device from the reservoir at T{sub hot}, produces work, and delivers waste heat into the reservoir at T{sub cold}. In the refrigerator, work flows into the device, lifting heat Q{sub cold} from reservoir at T{sub cold} and rejecting waste heat into the reservoir at T{sub hot}.

Swift, G.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

299

An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Humeros Geothermal Reservoir Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: An analysis of production and reservoir engineering data of 42 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field (Mexico) allowed obtaining the pressure and temperature profiles for the unperturbed reservoir fluids and developing 1-D and 2-D models for the reservoir. Results showed the existence of at least two reservoirs in the system: a relatively shallow liquid-dominant reservoir located between 1025 and 1600 m above sea level (a.s.l.) the pressure profile of which corresponds to a 300-330°C boiling water column and a deeper low-liquid-saturation reservoir located between

300

2011 Annual Planning Summary for Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Site Office (SLAC SO) (See also Science).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir engineering stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Stanford geothermal program. Final report, July 1990--June 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the following: (1) improving models of vapor-dominated geothermal fields: the effects of adsorption; (2) adsorption characteristics of rocks from vapor-dominated geothermal reservoir at the Geysers, CA; (3) optimizing reinjection strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines based on chloride data; (4) optimization of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs; and (5) steam-water relative permeability.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Long ion chamber systems for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Panofsky Long Ion Chamber (PLIC) is essentially a gas-filled coaxial cable, and has been used to protect the Stanford Linear Accelerator from damage caused by its electron beam, and as a sensitive diagnostic tool. This old technology has been updated and has found renewed use in the SLC. PLIC systems have been installed as beam steering aids in most parts of the SLC and are a part of the system that protects the SLC from damage by errant beams in several places. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Rolfe, J.; Gearhart, R.; Jacobsen, R.; Jenkins, T.; McComick, D.; Nelson, R.; Reagan, D.; Ross, M.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Comprehensive Analysis of Enhanced CBM Production via CO2 Injection Using a Surrogate Reservoir Model Jalal Jalali, Shahab D. Mohaghegh, Dept. of Petroleum & Natural Gas Engineering, West Virginia University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Response Surface Model using Experimental Design technique or using Reduced Models. Once trained, SRMs canComprehensive Analysis of Enhanced CBM Production via CO2 Injection Using a Surrogate Reservoir Reservoir simulation is the industry standard for reservoir management. Complex reservoir models usually

Mohaghegh, Shahab

304

DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker Safety and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker Safety and Health Violations DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker Safety and Health Violations April 3, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued Preliminary Notices of Violation (PNOVs) to three contractors - Stanford University, Pacific Underground Construction, Inc., and Western Allied Mechanical, Inc. - for violations in September 2007 of the Department's worker safety and health regulations. Stanford University is the managing and operating contractor for DOE's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC), located in Menlo Park, California. At the time the violations occurred, Pacific Underground Construction was performing work at SLAC under subcontract to

305

Geothermal Reservoir Dynamics - TOUGHREACT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has been active for several years and has focused on developing, enhancing and applying mathematical modeling capabilities for fractured geothermal systems. The emphasis of our work has recently shifted towards enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) and hot dry rock (HDR), and FY05 is the first year that the DOE-AOP actually lists this project under Enhanced Geothermal Systems. Our overall purpose is to develop new engineering tools and a better understanding of the coupling between fluid flow, heat transfer, chemical reactions, and rock-mechanical deformation, to demonstrate new EGS technology through field applications, and to make technical information and computer programs available for field applications. The objectives of this project are to: (1) Improve fundamental understanding and engineering methods for geothermal systems, primarily focusing on EGS and HDR systems and on critical issues in geothermal systems that are difficult to produce. (2) Improve techniques for characterizing reservoir conditions and processes through new modeling and monitoring techniques based on ''active'' tracers and coupled processes. (3) Improve techniques for targeting injection towards specific engineering objectives, including maintaining and controlling injectivity, controlling non-condensable and corrosive gases, avoiding scale formation, and optimizing energy recovery. Seek opportunities for field testing and applying new technologies, and work with industrial partners and other research organizations.

Pruess, Karsten; Xu, Tianfu; Shan, Chao; Zhang, Yingqi; Wu,Yu-Shu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Rutqvist, Jonny; Zhang,Guoxiang; Kennedy, Mack

2005-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

306

A structurally complex and dynamic reservoir description for reservoir simulation, Kuparuk River Field, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

The Kupanuk River Field is a structurally complex giant oil field adjacent to the Prudhoe Bay Field on Alaska`s North Slope. Oil is reservoired within two Early Cretaceous shallow marine sandstone formations, separated stratigraphically by an erosionally truncated marine silt/shale. Subjected to several phases of tectonism, this highly compartmentalized reservoir has been developed on regular 160 acre direct line drive patterns. An integrated team of geoscientists and engineers from BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc. and ARCO Alaska Inc. is presently quantifying the benefits of infill drilling at Kuparuk, and identifying the best locations for well placement. The two primary reservoir characteristics believed to impact the effectiveness of infill drilling are large-scale reservoir heterogeneity, and reservoir comparmentation due to faulting. Multiple thin pay zones within the two reservoir intervals are isolated laterally by faults with magnitudes greater than pay zone thickness. A process and tools designed to construct and maintain a structurally complex reservoir description, shared by the geoscientists and reservoir engineers, are described. Cross-discipline integration is aided by the use of Tech*Logic`s IREX 3-D reservoir modeling and visualization application. The unique architecture of the IREX model allows for representation of very complex structural geometries, and facilitates iteration between reservoir description and simulation, along the seismic to simulation continuum. Modifications to the reservoir description are guided by well-level history matching within the constraints of all available geoscience information. The techniques described will be of particular interest to those working on reservoir description and simulation of structurally complex fields.

Walsh, T.P. [Alaska Petrotechnical Services Inc., Anchorage, AK (United States); Leander, M.H.; Wilcox, T.C. [BP Exploration (Alaska) Inc., Anchorage, AK (United States)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Engineered Nanoparticles as Improved Oil Recovery and Flow ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Advanced Materials and Reservoir Engineering for Extreme Oil & Gas...

308

Radioactive Materials at SSRL | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioactive Materials at SSRL Radioactive Materials at SSRL Contact Information SSRL Safety Officer (650) 926-3861 SSRL Radiation Protection Group (650) 926-4299 SSRLRadMat@SLAC.STANFORD.EDU Throughout the course of an SSRL Experimental Run, there are requests from users to transport and use small amounts of radioactive material in their experiments, either as stand alone samples or in a matrix of other materials. There is no minimum quantity for declaring the use of radioactive samples at SSRL. The purpose of this procedure is to enable Users, SSRL and SLAC staff to know what radiological controls will be implemented for these materials, based on the isotope, its toxicity risk and radiological controls. Radioactive materials at SSRL are classified into 4 classification Groups based on the radiotoxicity tables, see below.

309

degree option is offered only in chemical engineering. In addition, the Ph.D. degree in the School of Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reservoir Engineering II (4) GEOL 535 Petroleum and Subsurface Geology (4) C&PE 618 Waterflooding (3

Peterson, Blake R.

310

New Asphaltene Nanoscience and Its Impact on Reservoir Characterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Asphaltene Nanoscience and Its Impact on Asphaltene Nanoscience and Its Impact on Reservoir Characterization Oliver C. Mullins Schlumberger-Doll Research, 1 Hampshire St., Cambridge, MA 02139, USA Crude oils consist of gases, liquids and solids, the asphaltenes. The gas and liquid constituents of crude oil are chemically well understood and their theoretical frame work can be satisfactorily treated by cubic equations of state. In contrast, the asphaltene have been grossly misunderstood precluding any theoretical treatment of asphaltene gradients in reservoirs. In recent years, asphaltene science has undergone a renaissance with many of the advances being subsumed in the "Yen-Mullins model" (named by Professor Zare at Stanford U.) which consists of asphaltene molecules, nanoaggregates and clusters of

311

Status of Norris Reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Norris Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses, conditions that impair reservoir uses, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most up-to-date publications and data available, and from interviews with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies, and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 14 refs., 3 figs.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Information Science, Systems & Technology -Undergraduate (College of Engineering ONLY)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Information Science undergraduate students from the Class of 2011 in the College of Engineering. Historical Responded: 10 Response Rate: 100% 2011 Graduate and Professional Schools Cornell University MENG Civil Analyst Baltimore MD Factset Research Systems, Inc. Software Engineer Stanford CT General Electric

Lipson, Michal

313

3D Magnetotelluic characterization of the Coso Geothermal Field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

130, 475-496. the Coso Geothermal Field, Proc.28 th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanfords ratio and porosity at Coso geothermal area, California: J.

Newman, Gregory A.; Hoversten, G. Michael; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Gasperikova, Erika

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear 4: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. For more information, contact: Mr. Dave Osugi DOE SLAC Site Office 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS8A Menlo Park, CA 94025 Electronic mail: dave.osugi@sso.science.doe.gov Documents Available for Download March 7, 2012 EA-1904: Finding of No Significant Impact Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, CA

315

EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

04: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear 04: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California EA-1904: Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, California Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed construction of the Linac Coherent Light Source at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. For more information, contact: Mr. Dave Osugi DOE SLAC Site Office 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS8A Menlo Park, CA 94025 Electronic mail: dave.osugi@sso.science.doe.gov Documents Available for Download March 7, 2012 EA-1904: Finding of No Significant Impact Linac Coherent Light Source II at Stanford Linear Accelerator Laboratory, San Mateo, CA

316

California Stanford University of University Institute of University California of Southern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Stanford University of University Institute of University California of Southern Technology California ____________________________________________________________ February 15, 2011 Dear Representative, As Congress considers funding options for the remainder of fiscal year (FY) 2011, California

Narayanan, Shrikanth S.

317

Stanford Universitys U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STANFORD POINTS APPROACH EQUALS EXCEEDS ECLIPSES 0-60% 61-80% 81-90% 91-100% A. LIVABILITY 1 Is the operation of the house's lighting, entertainment, and other controls intuitive?...

318

Geothermal reservoir simulation to enhance confidence in predictions for nuclear waste disposal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Challenging Water Dominated Geothermal System: the CerroSixteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering,Simulation, Uenotai Geothermal Field, Akita Prefecture,

Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Pruess, Karsten; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Engineering and economic feasibility of utilizing geothermal heat from the Heber reservoir for industrial processing purposes at Valley Nitrogen Producers Inc. , El Centro agricultural chemical plant. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineering and economic feasibility of utilizing geothermal heat from the Heber KGRA for industrial processing purposes at the Valley Nitrogen Producers, Inc. El Centro, California agricultural chemical plant was investigated. The analysis proceeds through the preliminary economics to determine the restraints imposed by geothermal modification size on internal rates of return, and through the energy utilization evaluation to determine the best method for substituting geothermal energy for existing fossil fuel energy. Finally, several geothermal utilization schemes were analyzed for detailed cost-benefit evaluation. An economically viable plan for implementing geothermal energy in the VNP Plant was identified and the final conclusions and recommendations were made based on these detailed cost-benefit analyses. Costs associated with geothermal energy production and implementation were formulated utilizing a modified Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories' ''GEOCOST'' program.

Sherwood, P.B.; Newman, K.L.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Optimizing reservoir management through fracture modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fracture flow will become increasingly important to optimal reservoir management as exploration of geothermal reservoirs continues and as injection of spent fluid increases. The Department of Energy conducts research focused on locating and characterizing fractures, modeling the effects of fractures on movement of fluid, solutes, and heat throughout a reservoir, and determining the effects of injection on long-term reservoir production characteristics in order to increase the ability to predict with greater certainty the long-term performance of geothermal reservoirs. Improvements in interpreting and modeling geophysical techniques such as gravity, self potential, and aeromagnetics are yielding new information for the delineation of active major conduits for fluid flow. Vertical seismic profiling and cross-borehole electromagnetic techniques also show promise for delineating fracture zones. DOE funds several efforts for simulating geothermal reservoirs. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has adopted a continuum treatment for reservoirs with a fracture component. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory has developed simulation techniques which utilize discrete fractures and interchange of fluid between permeable matrix and fractures. Results of these research projects will be presented to industry through publications and appropriate public meetings. 9 refs.

Renner, J.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir engineering stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Status of Wheeler Reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is one in a series of status reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Wheeler Reservoir summarizes reservoir purposes and operation, reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, and water quality and aquatic biological conditions. The information presented here is from the most recent reports, publications, and original data available. If no recent data were available, historical data were summarized. If data were completely lacking, environmental professionals with special knowledge of the resource were interviewed. 12 refs., 2 figs.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Status of Cherokee Reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first in a series of reports prepared by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overviews of Cherokee Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports, publications, and data available, and interviews with water resource professionals in various Federal, state, and local agencies and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

William E. and Diane M. Spicer Young Investigator Award | Stanford...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

esteemed member of the international scientific community as a teacher and researcher in electrical engineering, applied physics and materials science. Bill spent the past 40...

324

Hydrothermal Reservoirs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Reservoirs Hydrothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Hydrothermal Reservoirs Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Reservoir: Hydrothermal Reservoirs are underground zones of porous rock containing hot water and steam, and can be naturally occurring or human-made. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Natural, shallow hydrothermal reservoirs naturally occurring hot water reservoirs, typically found at depths of less than 5 km below the Earth's surface where there is heat, water and a permeable material (permeability in rock formations results from fractures, joints, pores, etc.). Often, hydrothermal reservoirs have an overlying layer that bounds the reservoir and also serves as a thermal insulator, allowing greater heat retention. If hydrothermal reservoirs

325

Woods Institute for the Environment 429 Arguello Way, Encina Modular C Stanford, CA 94305 http://environment.stanford.edu/ideas/biofuels.html  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· http://environment.stanford.edu/ideas/biofuels.html The Impacts of Large Scale Use of Biofuels on Food, Agriculture, and Trade One of the targets of the United Nation's Millennium Development Goals is to cut that target has been slow. If food availability or the ability to purchase food further declines, there could

Nur, Amos

326

Woods Institute for the Environment 429 Arguello Way, Encina Modular C Stanford, CA 94305 http://environment.stanford.edu/ideas/biofuels.html  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· http://environment.stanford.edu/ideas/biofuels.html The Environmental, Resource, and Trade Implications of Biofuels This sheet summarizes some of the primary insights that arose from the Workshop on the Environmental, Resource and Trade Implications of Biofuels, which included 40 leading representatives

Nur, Amos

327

Woods Institute for the Environment 429 Arguello Way, Encina Modular C Stanford, CA 94305 http://environment.stanford.edu/ideas/biofuels.html  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· http://environment.stanford.edu/ideas/biofuels.html The Impacts of Large-Scale Biofuel Use on Climate models (LCAs) of biofuels attempt to capture all of the GHG emissions associated with a fuel from sources facility; the conversion of the feedstock to a finished biofuel; the distribution of the finished biofuel

Nur, Amos

328

Woods Institute for the Environment 429 Arguello Way, Encina Modular C Stanford, CA 94305 http://environment.stanford.edu/ideas/biofuels.html  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· http://environment.stanford.edu/ideas/biofuels.html The Impacts of Large-Scale Biofuel Use on Water in the Gulf of Mexico. 1. Over the next five years, large-scale use of biofuels could further degrade water quality. In the short term, the impact of biofuels on water quality is simply the impact of intensified

Nur, Amos

329

Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling. Annual report, June 13, 1994--June 12, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This project has used a multi-disciplinary approach employing geology, geophysics, and engineering to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and management activities to design and implement an optimized infill drilling program at the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit in Gaines County, Texas. The activities during the first Budget Period have consisted of developing an integrated reservoir description from geological, engineering, and geostatistical studies, and using this description for reservoir flow simulation. Specific reservoir management activities are being identified and tested. The geologically targeted infill drilling program will be implemented using the results of this work. A significant contribution of this project is to demonstrate the use of cost-effective reservoir characterization and management tools that will be helpful to both independent and major operators for the optimal development of heterogeneous, low permeability shallow-shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. The techniques that are outlined for the formulation of an integrated reservoir description apply to all oil and gas reservoirs, but are specifically tailored for use in the heterogeneous, low permeability carbonate reservoirs of West Texas.

Pande, P.K.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Geothermal reservoir technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A status report on Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Reservoir Technology projects under DOE's Hydrothermal Research Subprogram is presented. During FY 1985 significant accomplishments were made in developing and evaluating methods for (1) describing geothermal systems and processes; (2) predicting reservoir changes; (3) mapping faults and fractures; and (4) field data analysis. In addition, LBL assisted DOE in establishing the research needs of the geothermal industry in the area of Reservoir Technology. 15 refs., 5 figs.

Lippmann, M.J.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Geothermal Reservoir Dynamics - TOUGHREACT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Swelling in a Fractured Geothermal Reservoir, presented atTHC) Modeling Based on Geothermal Field Data, Geothermics,and Silica Scaling in Geothermal Production-Injection Wells

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Use of XML and Java for collaborative petroleum reservoir modeling on the Internet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through INternet Informatics) is a public-domain, web-based freeware that is made up of an integrated suite of 14 Java-based software tools to accomplish on-line, real-time geologic and engineering reservoir modeling. ... Keywords: GEMINI, Java, Petroleum web-based software, Reservoir modeling, Web start, XML

John Victorine; W. Lynn Watney; Saibal Bhattacharya

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

NREL: News - NREL and Stanford Team up on Peel-and-Stick Solar Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

313 313 NREL and Stanford Team up on Peel-and-Stick Solar Cells Devices could charge battery-powered products in the future January 10, 2013 It may be possible soon to charge cell phones, change the tint on windows, or power small toys with peel-and-stick versions of solar cells, thanks to a partnership between Stanford University and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). A scientific paper, "Peel and Stick: Fabricating Thin Film Solar Cells on Universal Substrates," appears in the online version of Scientific Reports, a subsidiary of the British scientific journal Nature. Peel-and-stick, or water-assisted transfer printing (WTP), technologies were developed by the Stanford group and have been used before for nanowire

334

EA-1107: Construction and Operation of a Office Building at the Stanford  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Construction and Operation of a Office Building at the 7: Construction and Operation of a Office Building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Berkeley, California EA-1107: Construction and Operation of a Office Building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Berkeley, California SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed project to modify existing Building 51B at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to install and conduct experiments on a new Induction Linear Accelerator System. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 8, 1995 EA-1107: Finding of No Significant Impact Construction and Operation of a Office Building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center September 8, 1995 EA-1107: Final Environmental Assessment

335

http://www.slac.stanford.edu/~quarkpt/slaconly/lcc0121.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 August 2003 Sensitivity to Interaction Region Solenoid Horizontal Motion Peter Tenenbaum and Tor Raubenheimer Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Stanford University Stanford, CA Abstract: Horizontal motion of a linear collider's Interaction Region solenoid magnet will cause vertical motion of the beam at the collision point. An expression relating the two effects is derived, and a tolerance on the solenoid's position is estimated. Sensitivity to Interaction Region Solenoid Horizontal Motion P. Tenenbaum, T.O. Raubenheimer LCC-Note-0121 August 13, 2003 Abstract Horizontal motion of a linear collider's Interatction Region solenoid magnet will cause vertical motion of the beam at the collision point. An expression relating the two effects is derived, and a tolerance

336

Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Order R2-2005-0022, May 18, 2005  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CALIFORNIA REGIONAL WATER QUALITY CONTROL BOARD CALIFORNIA REGIONAL WATER QUALITY CONTROL BOARD SAN FRANCISCO BAY REGION ORDER No. R2-2005-0022 RESCISSION of: ORDER No. 85-88, WASTE DISCHARGE REQUIREMENTS and ADOPTION of: SITE CLEANUP REQUIREMENTS for: STANFORD UNIVERSITY and the UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY for the property located at the: STANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER 2575 SAND HILL ROAD MENLO PARK, SAN MATEO COUNTY FINDINGS: The California Regional Water Quality Control Board, San Francisco Bay Region (Water Board) finds that: 1. Purpose of Order This Order establishes Site Cleanup Requirements for the investigation and remediation of impacted soil and groundwater resulting from historical spills and leaks that have occurred during the course of operations of the Stanford Linear

337

ARPA-E & Stanford University Explore the Hows and Whys of Energy Use |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

& Stanford University Explore the Hows and Whys of Energy & Stanford University Explore the Hows and Whys of Energy Use ARPA-E & Stanford University Explore the Hows and Whys of Energy Use May 25, 2011 - 3:45pm Addthis Members of Girl Scout Troop #61373 from Santa Clara, CA create an instructional video for home energy use. | Photo courtesy of Troop Leader Sylvia Kennedy Members of Girl Scout Troop #61373 from Santa Clara, CA create an instructional video for home energy use. | Photo courtesy of Troop Leader Sylvia Kennedy Kristina Pflanz Writer & Contractor, Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy What does this project do? Researchers are seeking a breakthrough on the human behavioral side of energy use. They have made a long-term goal of reducing average residential energy use by over 20 percent.

338

Biofuels6a.doc Woods Institute for the Environment 429 Arguello Way, Encina Modular C Stanford, CA 94305  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels6a.doc Woods Institute for the Environment · 429 Arguello Way, Encina Modular C · Stanford, CA 94305 · http://environment.stanford.edu/ideas/biofuels.html The Impacts of Large-Scale Biofuel Use practices can significantly influence the environmental effects of biofuels. The choices farmers make

Nur, Amos

339

Hot dry rock geothermal reservoir engineering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two wells, GT-2 and EE-1, were originally drilled to a depth of 9600 ft (2.93 km) and 10,000 ft (3.05 km), respectively, and, after some difficulties, including redrilling of the bottom portion of GT-2, a good fracture connection was made between EE-1 and GT-2B, as the modified GT-2 was called. The circulation system was studied extensively for the purpose of establishing a number of fracture properties. Techniques were developed to determine orientation, geometry, heat exchange area, volume, flow impedance and impedance distribution. A much larger fracture system was then created from a depth of 9620 ft (2.93 km) in EE-1. The techniques used and results obtained in the study of the new and old fracture systems are discussed. (MHR)

Aamodt, R.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Annotated research bibliography for geothermal reservoir engineering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This bibliography is divided into the following subject areas: formation evaluation, modeling, exploitation strategies, and interpretation of production trends. A subject/author index is included. (MHR)

Sudol, G.A.; Harrison, R.F.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir engineering stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Proceedings fourth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Forty-three papers are included. Five papers were abstracted previously. Separate abstracts were prepared for thirty-eight. (MHR)

Kruger, P.; Ramey, H.J. Jr. (eds.)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Reservoir and injection technology and Heat Extraction Project. Fifth annual report, January 1, 1989--December 31, 1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the Stanford Geothermal Program in the fiscal year 1989, the task areas include predictive modeling of reservoir behavior and tracer test interpretation and testing. Major emphasis is in reservoir technology, reinjection technology, and heat extraction. Predictive modeling of reservoir behavior consists of a multi-pronged approach to well test analysis under a variety of conditions. The efforts have been directed to designing and analyzing well tests in (1) naturally fractured reservoirs; (2) fractured wells; (3) complex reservoir geometries; and, (4) gas reservoirs including inertial and other effects. The analytical solutions for naturally fractured reservoirs are determined using fracture size distribution. In the study of fractured wells, an elliptical coordinate system is used to obtain semi-analytical solutions to finite conductivity fractures. Effort has also been directed to the modeling and creation of a user friendly computer program for steam/gas reservoirs including wellbore storage, skin and non-Darcy flow effects. This work has a complementary effort on modeling high flow rate wells including inertial effects in the wellbore and fractures. In addition, work on gravity drainage systems is being continued.

Horne, R.N.; Ramey, H.H. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Kruger, P.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Reservoir characterization of Pennsylvanian sandstone reservoirs. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes the progress during the three years of a project on Reservoir Characterization of Pennsylvanian Sandstone Reservoirs. The report is divided into three sections: (i) reservoir description; (ii) scale-up procedures; (iii) outcrop investigation. The first section describes the methods by which a reservoir can be described in three dimensions. The next step in reservoir description is to scale up reservoir properties for flow simulation. The second section addresses the issue of scale-up of reservoir properties once the spatial descriptions of properties are created. The last section describes the investigation of an outcrop.

Kelkar, M.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

(Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) annual environmental monitoring report, January--December 1989  

SciTech Connect

This progress report discusses environmental monitoring activities at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center for 1989. Topics include climate, site geology, site water usage, land use, demography, unusual events or releases, radioactive and nonradioactive releases, compliance summary, environmental nonradiological program information, environmental radiological program information, groundwater protection monitoring ad quality assurance. 5 figs., 7 tabs. (KJD)

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

California Stanford University of University of Institute of University California Southern  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California Stanford University of University of Institute of University California Southern Technology California March 13, 2012 The Honorable Dianne Feinstein 331 Hart Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510-0504 Dear Senator Feinstein: On behalf of California's research universities, we write

Southern California, University of

346

Visualization of oil reservoirs over a large range of scales as a catalyst for multi-disciplinary integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss a system which provides a single, unified model of oil and gas reservoirs that is used across a range of disciplines from geologists to reservoir engineers. It has to store, manipulate and display reservoir phenomena which are observed over ...

Stephen Tyson; Brennan Williams

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Reservoir Protection (Oklahoma)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Oklahoma Water Resource Board has the authority to make rules for the control of sanitation on all property located within any reservoir or drainage basin. The Board works with the Department...

348

Geology and Reservoir Simulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Service: 1-800-553-7681 Geology and Reservoir Simulation Background Natural gas from shale is becoming ever more recognized as an abundant and economically viable fuel in the...

349

Session: Reservoir Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. The successful development of HPAI technology has tremendous potential for increasing the flow of oil from deep carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin, a target resource that can be conservatively estimated at more than 1.5 billion barrels. Successful implementation in the field chosen for demonstration, for example, could result in the recovery of more than 34 million barrels of oil that will not otherwise be produced. Geological and petrophysical analysis of available data at Barnhart field reveals the following important observations: (1) the Barnhart Ellenburger reservoir is similar to most other Ellenburger reservoirs in terms of depositional facies, diagenesis, and petrophysical attributes; (2) the reservoir is characterized by low to moderate matrix porosity much like most other Ellenburger reservoirs in the Permian Basin; (3) karst processes (cave formation, infill, and collapse) have substantially altered stratigraphic architecture and reservoir properties; (4) porosity and permeability increase with depth and may be associated with the degree of karst-related diagenesis; (5) tectonic fractures overprint the reservoir, improving overall connectivity; (6) oil-saturation profiles show that the oil-water contact (OWC) is as much as 125 ft lower than previous estimations; (7) production history and trends suggest that this reservoir is very similar to other solution-gas-drive reservoirs in the Permian Basin; and (8) reservoir simulation study showed that the Barnhart reservoir is a good candidate for HPAI and that application of horizontal-well technology can improve ultimate resource recovery from the reservoir.

Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plant that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data are being gathered during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The results of the demonstration are being closely monitored to provide a basis for improving the design of the HPAI field deployment plan. The results of the reservoir characterization field demonstration and monitoring program will be documented and widely disseminated to facilitate adoption of this technology by oil operators in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the US.

Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olsen; Deanna Combs; Dhiraj Dembla; Leonel Gomez

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

The U.S. Department of Energy's Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geothermal reservoir engineering is an important aspect f the Department of Energys Geothermal Technology Division, geothermal research and development program. Reservoir engineering-related research, a component of all geosciences activities, is of particular importance in the context of Hydrothermal Reservoir Research. Three closely related research activities (Brine Injection, Reservoir Definition, and Caldera Reservoir Investigations) are now combined under the more general heading of Reservoir Technology. Scientific investigations, as part of the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program, also contribute greatly to the understanding of the behavior of high-temperature hydrothermal convection systems. With the creation of the Geothermal Technology Organization, where geothermal research will be cost-shard with industry, it is anticipated that a number of research topics will be brought to the point where the geothermal industry can rapidly put new technology into use. 2 tabs., 2 figs.

Mock, John E.; Blackett, Robert E.

1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

353

Real natural gas reservoir data Vs. natural gas reservoir models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gas reservoir per se model is an exceedingly simple model of a natural gas reservoir designed to develop the physical relationship between ultimate recovery and rate(s) of withdrawal for production regulation policy assessment. To be responsive, ...

Ellis A. Monash; John Lohrenz

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

NEPA CX Determination SS-SC-12-03 for the Stanford Research Computer Facility (SRCF)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 for the Stanford Research Computer Facility (SRCF) 3 for the Stanford Research Computer Facility (SRCF) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination A. SSO NEPA Control #: SS-SC-12-03 AN12038 B. Brief Description of Proposed Action: The project scope includes the construction of a new computer facility (21,500 square feet) capable of providing 3 MW of data center potential. The new two-story facility will provide infrastructure for a multitude of server racks. There are three fenced service yards outside the building, one for chillers, one for new electrical substation equipment, and one for emergency generators. The ground floor will be utilized for electrical and receiving area; the second floor will have a server room, mechanical room, conference

355

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987  

SciTech Connect

During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K. [eds.

1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

A STUDY ON GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGlNEERING APPROACH COMBINED WITH GEOLOGICAL INFORMATIONS  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the combined approaches of reservoir geology and engineering to a geothermal field where geological characteristics are highly complex and heterogeneous.Especially,the concrete approaches are discussed for the case of geothermal reservoir performance studies with a developed numerical model, by showing example cases accompanied with reinjection of produced disposal hot water into underground in an object geothermal reservoir. This combined approach will be a great help in solving complicated problems encountered during the development of a geothermal field.

Hirakawa, S.; Yamaguchi, S.; Yoshinobu, F.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

357

Core Analysis for the Development and Constraint of Physical Models of Geothermal Reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effective reservoir exploration, characterization, and engineering require a fundamental understanding of the geophysical properties of reservoir rocks and fracture systems. Even in the best of circumstances, spatial variability in porosity, fracture density, salinity, saturation, tectonic stress, fluid pressures, and lithology can all potentially produce and/or contribute to geophysical anomalies. As a result, serious uniqueness problems frequently occur when interpreting assumptions based on a knowledge base founded in validated rock physics models of reservoir material.

Greg N. Boitnott

2003-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

358

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986  

SciTech Connect

1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

Cantwell, K. [ed.

1987-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

Reinjection into geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reinjection of geothermal wastewater is practiced as a means of disposal and for reservoir pressure support. Various aspects of reinjection are discussed, both in terms of theoretical studies as well as specific field examples. The discussion focuses on the major effects of reinjection, including pressure maintenance and chemical and thermal effects. (ACR)

Bodvarsson, G.S.; Stefansson, V.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Advances in the TOUGH2 family of general-purpose reservoir simulators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

TOUGH2 is a general-purpose fluid and heat flow simulators, with applications in geothermal reservoir engineering, nuclear waste disposal, and environmental contamination problems. This report summarizes recent developments which enhance the usability of the code, and provide a more accurate and comprehensive description of reservoir processes.

Pruess, K.; Finsterle, S.; Moridis, G.; Oldenburg, C.; Antunez, E.; Wu, Y.S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir engineering stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Functional networks as a new data mining predictive paradigm to predict permeability in a carbonate reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Permeability prediction has been a challenge to reservoir engineers due to the lack of tools that measure it directly. The most reliable data of permeability obtained from laboratory measurements on cores do not provide a continuous profile along the ... Keywords: Carbonate reservoir, Data mining, Feedforward neural networks, Functional networks, Fuzzy logic, Minimum description length, Permeability, Porosity, Statistical regression

Emad A. El-Sebakhy; Ognian Asparouhov; Abdul-Azeez Abdulraheem; Abdul-Aziz Al-Majed; Donghui Wu; Kris Latinski; Iputu Raharja

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Automatic hydraulic fracturing design for low permeability reservoirs using artificial intelligence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydraulic fracturing technique is one of the major developments in petroleum engineering in the last two decades. Today, nearly all the wells completed in low permeability gas reservoirs require a hydraulic fracturing treatment in order to produce ...

Andrei Sergiu Popa / Shahab Mohaghegh

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Reservoir Characterization of Upper Devonian Gordon Sandstone, Jacksonburg, Stringtown Oil Field, Northwestern West Virginia  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to establish relationships among permeability, geophysical and other data by integrating geologic, geophysical and engineering data into an interdisciplinary quantification of reservoir heterogeneity as it relates to production.

Ameri, S.; Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Bilgesu, H.I.; Hohn, M.E.; McDowell, R.R.; Patchen, D.L.

2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

364

A better understanding of a Uinta Basin channelized analog reservoir through geostatistics and reservoir simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Green River Formation is located in the Uinta basin of northeastern Utah. It contains several reservoirs that can be classified as lacustrine such as the Altamont-Bluebell and Red Wash. Lacustrine reservoirs are abundant in other provinces in the world such as China, Southeast Asia, Brazil, West Africa, and the Caspian Sea. Even though they can contain important accumulations of hydrocarbons, our understanding of the primary controls on fluid flow within these systems is still not clear. This ambiguity leads in some cases to inefficient recovery of hydrocarbons in such reservoirs. This study is aimed at clarifying the effects of heterogeneities in channelized reservoirs on fluid flow. It uses a multidisciplinary approach combining geologic knowledge with reservoir engineering. It involves the geologic modeling and fluid flow simulation of a channelized outcrop of the Green River formation. The study of this outcrop provides insights for modeling, understanding, and possibly predicting the behavior of channelized oil and gas reservoirs. Results show that the number of channels in the model can have a significant effect on performance. The rock properties in these channels and the channel paths are also important factors that determine the recovery efficiency. Other findings include the effect on performance of vertical anisotropy in a channelized reservoir. We discovered that an isotropic reservoir performs better than an anisotropic one and that the well perforation interval is extremely important when comparing the performance of several anisotropic cases. Finally, we investigated the effects of the recovery strategy on performance in a channelized setting. We found that waterflooding yields better results than any of the other recovery techniques analyzed. Sensitivity runs with different waterflood patterns indicated that a staggered line drive results in the best performance in the analog channelized reservoir we modeled, as it allows for the best recovery factor in the least amount of time. The results of this work can be used qualitatively to predict performance in a channelized setting but their use is limited quantitatively because of the issue of scale, i.e. the outcrop width is much less than typical interwell scale.

Robbana, Enis

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Microsoft PowerPoint - kkeditWebinarNETLCO2_022311_Stanford 1...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Poisson's Ratio versus Water Saturation for a Gas CO 2 and water saturated Troll unconsolidated sand reservoir. Discussion - Task 3 Impedance and Poisson's Ratio versus...

366

Status of Blue Ridge Reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is one in a series of reports prepared by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overview of Blue Ridge Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports and data available, as well as interview with water resource professionals in various federal, state, and local agencies. Blue Ridge Reservoir is a single-purpose hydropower generating project. When consistent with this primary objective, the reservoir is also operated to benefit secondary objectives including water quality, recreation, fish and aquatic habitat, development of shoreline, aesthetic quality, and other public and private uses that support overall regional economic growth and development. 8 refs., 1 fig.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Interdisciplinary study of reservoir compartments. [Quarterly report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This DOE research project was established to document the integrated team approach for solving reservoir engineering problems. A field study integrating the disciplines of geology, geophysics, and petroleum engineering will be the mechanism for documenting the integrated approach. This is an area of keen interest to the oil and gas industry. The goal will be to provide tools and approaches that can be used to detect reservoir compartments, reach a better reserve estimate, and improve profits early in the life of a field. Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: reservoir selection and data gathering; outcrop/core/log analysis/ and correlations, internal architecture description; seismic analysis; and permeability experimental work.

Van Kirk, C.W.; Thompson, R.S.

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

368

Using multi-layer models to forecast gas flow rates in tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The petroleum industry commonly uses single-layer models to characterize and forecast long-term production in tight gas reservoir systems. However, most tight gas reservoirs are layered systems where the permeability and porosity of each layer can vary significantly, often over several orders of magnitude. In addition, the drainage areas of each of the layers can be substantially different. Due to the complexity of such reservoirs, the analysis of pressure and production history using single-layer analyses techniques provide incorrect estimates of permeability, fracture conductivity, drainage area, and fracture half-length. These erroneous values of reservoir properties also provide the reservoir engineer with misleading values of forecasted gas recovery. The main objectives of this research project are: (1) to demonstrate the typical errors that can occur in reservoir properties when single-layer modeling methods are used to history match production data from typical layered tight gas reservoirs, and (2) to use the single-layer match to demonstrate the error that can occur when forecasting long-term gas production for such complex gas reservoirs. A finite-difference reservoir simulator was used to simulate gas production from various layered tight gas reservoirs. These synthetic production data were analyzed using single-layer models to determine reservoir properties. The estimated reservoir properties obtained from the history matches were then used to forecast ten years of cumulative gas production and to find the accuracy of gas reserves estimated for tight gas reservoirs when a single-layer model is used for the analysis. Based on the results obtained in this work, I conclude that the accuracy in reservoir properties and future gas flow rates in layered tight gas reservoirs when analyzed using a single-layer model is a function of the degree of variability in permeability within the layers and the availability of production data to be analyzed. In cases where there is an idea that the reservoir presents a large variability in â??â??kâ?, using a multi-layer model to analyze the production data will provide the reservoir engineer with more accurate estimates of long-term production recovery and reservoir properties.

Jerez Vera, Sergio Armando

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Geothermal reservoir management  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The optimal management of a hot water geothermal reservoir was considered. The physical system investigated includes a three-dimensional aquifer from which hot water is pumped and circulated through a heat exchanger. Heat removed from the geothermal fluid is transferred to a building complex or other facility for space heating. After passing through the heat exchanger, the (now cooled) geothermal fluid is reinjected into the aquifer. This cools the reservoir at a rate predicted by an expression relating pumping rate, time, and production hole temperature. The economic model proposed in the study maximizes discounted value of energy transferred across the heat exchanger minus the discounted cost of wells, equipment, and pumping energy. The real value of energy is assumed to increase at r percent per year. A major decision variable is the production or pumping rate (which is constant over the project life). Other decision variables in this optimization are production timing, reinjection temperature, and the economic life of the reservoir at the selected pumping rate. Results show that waiting time to production and production life increases as r increases and decreases as the discount rate increases. Production rate decreases as r increases and increases as the discount rate increases. The optimal injection temperature is very close to the temperature of the steam produced on the other side of the heat exchanger, and is virtually independent of r and the discount rate. Sensitivity of the decision variables to geohydrological parameters was also investigated. Initial aquifer temperature and permeability have a major influence on these variables, although aquifer porosity is of less importance. A penalty was considered for production delay after the lease is granted.

Scherer, C.R.; Golabi, K.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Advanced reservoir simulation using soft computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reservoir simulation is a challenging problem for the oil and gas industry. A correctly calibrated reservoir simulator provides an effective tool for reservoir evaluation that can be used to obtain essential reservoir information. A long-standing problem ... Keywords: fuzzy control, history matching, parallel processing, reservoir simulation

G. Janoski; F.-S. Li; M. Pietrzyk; A. H. Sung; S.-H. Chang; R. B. Grigg

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Reservoir Modeling for Production Management  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For both petroleum and geothermal resources, many of the reservoirs are fracture dominated--rather than matrix-permeability controlled. For such reservoirs, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent permeability of the interconnected system of natural joints (i.e., pre-existing fractures) is critical to the efficient exploitation of the resource through proper pressure management. Our experience and that reported by others indicates that a reduction in the reservoir pressure sometimes leads to an overall reduction in production rate due to the ''pinching off'' of the joint network, rather than the anticipated increase in production rate. This effect occurs not just in the vicinity of the wellbore, where proppants are sometimes employed, but throughout much of the reservoir region. This follows from the fact that under certain circumstances, the decline in fracture permeability (or conductivity) with decreasing reservoir pressure exceeds the far-field reservoir ''drainage'' flow rate increase due to the increased pressure gradient. Further, a knowledge of the pressure-dependent joint permeability could aid in designing more appropriate secondary recovery strategies in petroleum reservoirs or reinjection procedures for geothermal reservoirs.

Brown, Donald W.

1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

372

Reservoir management using streamline simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geostatistical techniques can generate fine-scale description of reservoir properties that honor a variety of available data. The differences among multiple geostatistical realizations indicate the presence of uncertainty due to the lack of information and sparsity of data. Quantifying this uncertainty in terms of reservoir performance forecast poses a major reservoir management challenge. One solution to this problem is flow simulation of a large number of these plausible reservoir descriptions. However, this approach is not feasible in practice because of the computational costs associated with multiple detailed flow simulations. Other major reservoir management challenges include the determination of the swept and unswept areas at a particular time of interest in the life of a reservoir. Until now, sweep efficiency correlations have generally been limited to homogeneous 2-D cases. Calculating volumetric sweep efficiency in a 3-D heterogeneous reservoir is difficult due to the inherent complexity of multiple layers and arbitrary well configurations. Identifying the swept and unswept areas is primarily important for making a decision on the infill locations. Most of the mature reservoirs all over the world are under waterflood. Managing a waterflood requires an understanding of how injection wells displace oil to producing wells. By quantifying the fluid movements, the displacement process can be actively managed. Areas that are not being swept can be developed, and inefficiencies, such as water cycling, can be removed. Conventional simulation provides general answers to almost all of these problems, however time constraint prohibits using a detailed model to capture complexities for each well. Three dimensional streamline simulation can meet most of these reservoir management challenges. Moreover use of fast streamline-based simulation technique offers significant potential in terms of computational efficiency. Its high performance simulation speed makes it well suited for describing flow characteristics for high resolution reservoir models and can be used on a routine basis to make effective and efficient reservoir management decisions. In this research, we extend the capability of streamline simulation as an efficient tool for reservoir management purposes. We show its application in terms of swept volume calculations, ranking of stochastic reservoir models, pattern rate allocation and reservoir performance forecasting under uncertainty.

Choudhary, Manoj Kumar

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Tertiary carbonate reservoirs in Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon production from Tertiary carbonate reservoirs accounted for ca. 10% of daily Indonesian production at the beginning of 1978. Environmentally, the reservoirs appear as parts of reef complexes and high-energy carbonate deposits within basinal areas situated mainly in the back arc of the archipelago. Good porosities of the reservoirs are represented by vugular/moldic and intergranular porosity types. The reservoirs are capable of producing prolific amounts of hydrocarbons: production tests in Salawati-Irian Jaya reaches maximum values of 32,000 bpd, and in Arun-North Sumatra tests recorded 200 MMCF gas/day. Significant hydrocarbon accumulations are related to good reservoir rocks in carbonates deposited as patch reefs, pinnacle reefs, and platform complexes. Exploration efforts expand continuously within carbonate formations which are extensive horizontally as well as vertically in the Tertiary stratigraphic column.

Nayoan, G.A.S.; Arpandi; Siregar, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Water resources review: Ocoee reservoirs, 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) is preparing a series of reports to make technical information on individual TVA reservoirs readily accessible. These reports provide a summary of reservoir purpose and operation; physical characteristics of the reservoir and watershed; water quality conditions; aquatic biological conditions; and designated, actual and potential uses of the reservoir and impairments of those use. This reservoir status report addressed the three Ocoee Reservoirs in Polk County, Tennessee.

Cox, J.P.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Selection of fracture fluid for stimulating tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Essentially all producing wells drilled in tight gas sands and shales are stimulated using hydraulic fracture treatments. The development of optimal fracturing procedures, therefore, has a large impact on the long-term economic viability of the wells. The industry has been working on stimulation technology for more than 50 years, yet practices that are currently used may not always be optimum. Using information from the petroleum engineering literature, numerical and analytical simulators, surveys from fracturing experts, and statistical analysis of production data, this research provides guidelines for selection of the appropriate stimulation treatment fluid in most gas shale and tight gas reservoirs. This study takes into account various parameters such as the type of formation, the presence of natural fractures, reservoir properties, economics, and the experience of experts we have surveyed. This work provides a guide to operators concerning the selection of an appropriate type of fracture fluid for a specific set of conditions for a tight gas reservoir.

Malpani, Rajgopal Vijaykumar

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

NETL: Discrete Fracture Reservoir Simulation Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discrete Fracture Reservoir Simulation FRACGENNFFLOW Shale Gas Flow Simulation Shale Gas Flow Simulation FRACGENNFFLOW, a fractured reservoir modeling software developed by the...

377

Data requirements and acquisition for reservoir characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report outlines the types of data, data sources and measurement tools required for effective reservoir characterization, the data required for specific enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes, and a discussion on the determination of the optimum data density for reservoir characterization and reservoir modeling. The two basic sources of data for reservoir characterization are data from the specific reservoir and data from analog reservoirs, outcrops, and modern environments. Reservoir data can be divided into three broad categories: (1) rock properties (the container) and (2) fluid properties (the contents) and (3)interaction between reservoir rock and fluid. Both static and dynamic measurements are required.

Jackson, S.; Chang, Ming Ming; Tham, Min

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Greenhouse gas cycling in experimental boreal reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Hydroelectric reservoirs account for 59% of the installed electricity generating capacity in Canada and 26% in Ontario. Reservoirs also provide irrigation capacity, drinking water, and (more)

Venkiteswaran, Jason James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

ANALYSIS OF PRODUCTION DECLINE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum Reservoirs. Geothermal Reservoirs IV. DATA1970, Superheating of Geothermal Steam, Proc. of the U.N.the Development & Utilization of Geothermal Resources, Pisa.

Zais, E.J.; Bodvarsson, G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal system deep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approach using two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rock interactions in enhanced geothermal systems (EGS).31 th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, 301998). Computer modeling for geothermal systems: predicting

Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Subscriber access provided by STANFORD UNIV GREEN LIBR Nano Letters is published by the American Chemical Society. 1155 Sixteenth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) was grown by hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD) on an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate 94305, and National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 1617 Cole BouleVard., Golden, Colorado 80401 Received, Stanford University. National Renewable Energy Laboratory. NANO LETTERS 2009 Vol. 9, No. 1 279-282 10

Fan, Shanhui

382

SSRL and LCLS are national user facilities operated by Stanford University for the US Department of Energy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SSRL Users' Organization Meeting Friday, August 12, 2011 The SSRL Users Organization Executive requested that the Klein award description on the SSRL website be clarified to distinguish the Spicer Young description will be modified accordingly: The Melvin P. Klein Scientific Development Award: https://www-conf.slac.stanford.edu/ssrl

Wechsler, Risa H.

383

Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs. Quarterly status report, January 1--March 31, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On February 18, 1992, Louisiana State University with two technical subcontractors, BDM, Inc. and ICF, Inc., began a research program to estimate the potential oil and gas reserve additions that could result from the application of advanced secondary and enhanced oil recovery technologies and the exploitation of undeveloped and attic oil zones in the Gulf of Mexico oil fields that are related to piercement salt domes. This project is a one year continuation of this research and will continue work in reservoir description, extraction processes, and technology transfer. Detailed data will be collected for two previously studies reservoirs: a South Marsh Island reservoir operated by Taylor Energy and one additional Gulf of Mexico reservoir operated by Mobil. Additional reservoirs identified during the project will also be studied if possible. Data collected will include reprocessed 2-D seismic data, newly acquired 3-D data, fluid data, fluid samples, pressure data, well test data, well logs, and core data/samples. The new data will be used to refine reservoir and geologic characterization of these reservoirs. Further laboratory investigation will provide additional simulation input data in the form of PVT properties, relative permeabilities, capillary pressure, and water compatibility. Geological investigations will be conducted to refine the models of mud-rich submarine fan architectures used by seismic analysts and reservoir engineers. Research on advanced reservoir simulation will also be conducted. This report describes a review of fine-grained submarine fans and turbidite systems.

Kimbrell, W.C.; Bassiouni, Z.A.; Bourgoyne, A.T.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

384

TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY Reservoir Geophysics Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

includes applications to clastic reservoirs, heavy oil reservoirs, gas/oil shale, gas hydrates. Basic

385

Microsoft PowerPoint - 04CifernoStanford - Capture Project Summary.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Program US Perspective on CO 2 Capture and Separation Jared P. Ciferno - National Energy Technology Laboratory Global Climate and Energy Project April 27, 2004 Stanford University GCEP - JPC - 4/27/04 Presentation Outline * Carbon Sequestration Program * Pre-Combustion CO 2 Technologies * Post-Combustion CO 2 Technologies * Oxy-Fuel Technologies * Modeling and Assessment Tools * On-Site NETL R & D GCEP - JPC - 4/27/04 * One of DOE's 17 national labs * Government owned/operated * Sites in Pennsylvania, West Virginia, Oklahoma, Alaska * More than 1,100 federal and support contractor employees * FY 03 budget of $750 million National Energy Technology Laboratory GCEP - JPC - 4/27/04 Carbon Sequestration Program Structure Infrastructure 7 Regional Partnerships * Engage regional, state, local

386

In situ X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials | Stanford  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials X-ray Characterization of Energy Storage Materials Tuesday, July 9, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Johanna Nelson, Stanford Postdoctoral Scholar, SSRL MSD Hard X-ray Department A key factor in the global move towards clean, renewable energy is the electrification of the automobile. Current battery technology limits EV (electric vehicles) to a short travel range, slow recharge, and costly price tag. Li-ion batteries promise the high specific capacity required for EVs to travel 300+ miles on a single charge with a number of possible earth abundant anode and cathode materials; however, set backs such as capacity fading hinder the full capability of these rechargeable batteries. In order to accurately characterize the dynamic electrochemical processes at the

387

Interdisciplinary study of reservoir compartments. Annual technical report  

SciTech Connect

This DOE research project was established to document the integrated team approach for solving reservoir engineering problems. The goal will be to provide tools and approaches that can be used to detect reservoir compartments, reach a better reserve estimate, and improve profits early in the life of a field. Field selection consumed nearly the first four months of the project. The choice was the Hambert Field area which is the field area being studied. During the remainder of the year, a significant portion of the data was gathered and entered into a data base. Cores have been described, log analysis performed on over 100 wells, and regional mapping and correlation of sedimentary packages completed. Compressional (P) and shear (S) wave velocity data was measured on 8 core plugs at various conditions and lithologies. The analysis of the 3D seismic data has been started and supports the interpretation that the structural component will be a significant factor for reservoir compartmentalization in this reservoir. The experimental permeability work completed includes the pressure decay profile permeability measurements on the cores. Relationships of porosity and permeability with net confining stress were developed. Core relative permeability measurements were also completed during the year. Additional experimental measurements completed include Young`s Modulus, Shear Modulus, Poisson`s ratio, and the bulk compressibility as a function of the effective stress. Preliminary engineering analysis of the pressure build-up data from two wells supports the conclusion that sealing faults may act as barriers to flow.

Van Kirk, C.W.

1994-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

388

HDR reservoir flow impedance and potentials for impedance reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The data from flow tests which employed two different production zones in a well at Fenton Hill indicates the flow impedance of a wellbore zone damaged by rapid depressurization was altered, possibly by pressure spallation, which appears to have mechanically propped the joint apertures of outlet flow paths intersecting the altered wellbore. The rapid depressurization and subsequent flow test data derived from the damaged well has led to the hypothesis that pressure spallation and the resultant mechanical propping of outlet flow paths reduced the outlet flow impedance of the damaged wellbore. Furthermore, transient pressure data shows the largest pressure drop between the injection and production wellheads occurs near the production wellbore, so lowering the outlet impedance by increasing the apertures of outlet flow paths will have the greatest effect on reducing the overall reservoir impedance. Fenton Hill data also reveals that increasing the overall reservoir pressure dilates the apertures of flow paths, which likewise serves to reduce the reservoir impedance. Data suggests that either pressure dilating the wellbore connected joints with high production wellhead pressure, or mechanically propping open the outlet flow paths will increase the near-wellbore permeability. Finally, a new method for calculating and comparing near-wellbore outlet impedances has been developed. Further modeling, experimentation, and engineered reservoir modifications, such as pressure dilation and mechanical propping, hold considerable potential for significantly improving the productivity of HDR reservoirs.

DuTeau, R.; Brown, D.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

HDR reservoir flow impedance and potentials for impedance reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The data from flow tests which employed two different production zones in a well at Fenton Hill indicates the flow impedance of a wellbore zone damaged by rapid depressurization was altered, possibly by pressure spallation, which appears to have mechanically propped the joint apertures of outlet flow paths intersecting the altered wellbore. The rapid depressurization and subsequent flow test data derived from the damaged well has led to the hypothesis that pressure spallation and the resultant mechanical propping of outlet flow paths reduced the outlet flow impedance of the damaged wellbore. Furthermore, transient pressure data shows the largest pressure drop between the injection and production wellheads occurs near the production wellbore, so lowering the outlet impedance by increasing the apertures of outlet flow paths will have the greatest effect on reducing the overall reservoir impedance. Fenton Hill data also reveals that increasing the overall reservoir pressure dilates the apertures of flow paths, which likewise serves to reduce the reservoir impedance. Data suggests that either pressure dilating the wellbore connected joints with high production wellhead pressure, or mechanically propping open the outlet flow paths will increase the near-wellbore permeability. Finally, a new method for calculating and comparing near-wellbore outlet impedances has been developed. Further modeling, experimentation, and engineered reservoir modifications, such as pressure dilation and mechanical propping, hold considerable potential for significantly improving the productivity of HDR reservoirs.

DuTeau, R.; Brown, D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Integrated Reservoir Characterization: Offshore Louisiana, Grand Isle Blocks 32 & 33  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis integrated geology, geophysics, and petroleum engineering data to build a detailed reservoir characterization models for three gas pay sands in the Grand Isle 33 & 43 fields, offshore Louisiana. The reservoirs are Late Miocene in age and include the upper (PM), middle (QH), and lower (RD) sands. The reservoir models address the stratigraphy of the upper (PM) sand and help delineate the lower (RD) reservoir. In addition, this research addresses the partially depleted QH-2 reservoir compartment. The detailed models were constructed by integrating seismic, well log, and production data. These detailed models can help locate recoverable oil and gas that has been left behind. The upper PM model further delineated that the PM sand has several areas that are shaled-out effectively creating a flow barrier within reservoir compartments. Due to the barrier in the PM-1 reservoir compartment, an area of potentially recoverable hydrocarbons remains. In Grand Isle 33, the middle QH sand was partially depleted in the QH-2 reservoir compartment by a series of development wells. Bottom hole pressure data from wells in Grand Isle 32 & 33 reveal that the two QH fault compartments are in communication across a leaking fault. Production wells in the QH-1 compartment produced reserves from the QH-2 compartment. The lower RD sand model helped further delineate the reservoir in the RD-2 compartment and show that this compartment has been depleted. The RD model also shows the possible presence of remaining recoverable hydrocarbons in the RD-1 compartment. It is estimated that about 6.7 billion cubic feet of gas might remain within this reservoir waiting to be recovered. A seismic amplitude anomaly response from the QH and RD sands is interpreted to be a lithologic indicator rather than the presence of hydrocarbons. Amplitude response from the PM level appears to be below the resolution of the seismic data. A synthetic seismogram model was generated to represent the PM and surrounding sands. This model shows that by increasing the frequency of the seismic data from 20 Hz to a dominant frequency of 30 Hz that the PM and surrounding sands could be seismically resolvable. Also the PM-1 compartment has possible recoverable hydrocarbons of 1.5 billion cubic feet of gas remaining.

Casey, Michael Chase

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period January - March 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the "Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist". The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with cased-hole logging tools. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to translate measurements through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius lateral recompletions as well as other recompletion techniques such as the sand consolidation through steam injection.

Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

1998-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

392

Increasing Waterflood Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this quarterly report are to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period October - December 1997 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the "Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist". The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology. The identification of the sands with high remaining oil saturation will be accomplished by developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model and by using a state of the art reservoir management computer software. The wells identified by the geologic and reservoir engineering work as having the best potential will be logged with cased-hole logging tools. The application of the logging tools will be optimized in the lab by developing a rock-log model. This rock-log model will allow us to translate measurements through casing into effective porosity and hydrocarbon saturation. The wells that are shown to have the best oil production potential will be recompleted. The recompletions will be optimized by evaluating short radius lateral recompletions as well as other recompletion techniques such as the sand consolidation through steam injection.

Chris Phillips; Dan Moos; Don Clarke; John Nguyen; Kwasi Tagbor; Roy Koerner; Scott Walker

1998-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

393

A reservoir management strategy for multilayered reservoirs in eastern Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A reservoir management strategy has been developed for a field located in eastern Venezuela. The field contains deep, high pressure, multilayer reservoirs. A thorough formation evaluation was accomplished using the log data, core data, PVT data, geologic data, well completion data and the production data. A reservoir simulation model was built to forecast reservoir performance for a variety of exploitation and well completion strategies. Reserve forecasts have been made using the reservoir model. The methodology applied in this research consists of eight tasks: 1) build a data base with existing data, 2) analyze the log and core data, 3) analyze the pressure and production data, 4) analyze the PVT data, 5) analyze the hydraulic fracture treatments, 6) build the reservoir model, 7) determine the possible reservoir management strategies, and 8) perform economic evaluations for the management strategies. While much of the data for the field studied was supplied by PDVSA, we did not receive all of the data we requested. For example, no pressure buildup data were available. When necessary, we used correlations to determine values for reservoir data that we were not supplied. In this research four formations were studied and characterized, determining porosity and permeability values. Also, fracture treatments were analyzed and a reservoir model was developed. Runs for black oil and volatile oil were performed. The results show that the upper zones are the most prospective areas, but fracture treatments must be performed to reduce the damage on the sand face. Lower formations (Cretaceous) have a lower permeability value, but high OOIP that justify performing fracture treatments and completing this zone. Economics were developed to support this conclusion. Optimum well spacing was calculated showing that 960 acres is the optimum well spacing, but also that 640 acres can be maintained for all the reservoirs and dual completions can be performed, first hydraulic fracturing and completing the Cretaceous formation, and then, completing any upper zone. Reservoir simulation results show that up to 31% of OOIP may be incrementally recovered by hydraulic fracturing the Cretaceous formation and 10 or less from the upper zones.

Espinel Diaz, Arnaldo Leopoldo

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Interdisciplinary study of reservoir compartments and heterogeneity. Annual report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

A case study approach using Terry Sandstone production from the Aristocrat-Hambert Field, Weld County, Colorado is being used to document the process of integration. One specific project goal is to demonstrate how a multidisciplinary approach can be used to detect reservoir compartmentalization. Teamwork is the norm for the petroleum industry. Teams of geologists, geophysicists, and petroleum engineers work together to improve profits through a better understanding of reservoir size, compartmentalization, and orientation as well as reservoir flow characteristics. In this manner, integration of data narrows the uncertainty in reserve estimates and enhances reservoir management decisions. The process of integration has proven to be an iterative process. Integration has helped identify reservoir compartmentalization and reduce the uncertainty in the reserve estimates. The goal during the final phase of the project will be to quantify the value of integration and provide a template for making decisions.

Kirk, C. Van

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Alternate Methods in Reservoir Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As time progresses, more and more oil fields and reservoirs are reaching maturity; consequently, secondary and tertiary methods of oil recovery have become increasingly important in the petroleum industry. This significance has added to the industry's ...

Guadalupe I. Janoski; Andrew H. Sung

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Fracture characterization of multilayered reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fracture treatment optimization techniques have been developed using Long-Spaced-Digital-Sonic (LSDS) log, pumpin-flowback, mini-frac, and downhole treating pressure data. These analysis techniques have been successfully applied in massive hydraulic fracturing (MHF) of ''tight gas'' wells. Massive hydraulic fracture stimulations have been used to make many tight gas reservoirs commercially attractive. However, studies have shown that short highly conductive fractures are optimum for the successful stimulation of wells in moderate permeability reservoirs. As a result, the ability to design and place optimal fractures in these reservoirs is critical. This paper illustrates the application of fracture analysis techniques to a moderate permeability multi-layered reservoir. These techniques were used to identify large zonal variations in rock properties and pore pressure which result from the complex geology. The inclusion of geologic factors in fracture treatment design allowed the placement of short highly conductive fractures which were used to improve injectivity and vertical sweep, and therefore, ultimate recovery.

Britt, L.K.; Larsen, M.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Measurement requirements and methods for geothermal reservoir system parameters: an appraisal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the key needs in the advancement of geothermal energy is the availability of adequate measurements to aid the reservoir and production engineer in the development and operation of geothermal reservoirs, wells and the overall process plant. This report documents the geothermal parameters and their measurement requirements and provides an appraisal of measurement methods and instruments capable of meeting the requirements together with recommendations on identified deficiencies.

Lamers, M.D.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Chickamauga reservoir embayment study - 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are three-fold: (1) assess physical, chemical, and biological conditions in the major embayments of Chickamauga Reservoir; (2) compare water quality and biological conditions of embayments with main river locations; and (3) identify any water quality concerns in the study embayments that may warrant further investigation and/or management actions. Embayments are important areas of reservoirs to be considered when assessments are made to support water quality management plans. In general, embayments, because of their smaller size (water surface areas usually less than 1000 acres), shallower morphometry (average depth usually less than 10 feet), and longer detention times (frequently a month or more), exhibit more extreme responses to pollutant loadings and changes in land use than the main river region of the reservoir. Consequently, embayments are often at greater risk of water quality impairments (e.g. nutrient enrichment, filling and siltation, excessive growths of aquatic plants, algal blooms, low dissolved oxygen concentrations, bacteriological contamination, etc.). Much of the secondary beneficial use of reservoirs occurs in embayments (viz. marinas, recreation areas, parks and beaches, residential development, etc.). Typically embayments comprise less than 20 percent of the surface area of a reservoir, but they often receive 50 percent or more of the water-oriented recreational use of the reservoir. This intensive recreational use creates a potential for adverse use impacts if poor water quality and aquatic conditions exist in an embayment.

Meinert, D.L.; Butkus, S.R.; McDonough, T.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plan that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data are being gathered during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The results of the demonstration will being closely monitored to provide a basis for improving the design of the HPAI field deployment plan. The results of the reservoir characterization field demonstration and monitoring program will be documented and widely disseminated to facilitate adoption of this technology by oil operators in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the U.S.

Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olsen; Deanna Combs; Dhiraj Dembla; Leonel Gomez

2003-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

400

Engines - Spark Ignition Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spark Ignition Engines Spark Ignition Engines Thomas Wallner and omni engine Thomas Wallner and the omnivorous engine Background Today the United States import more than 60% of its crude oil and petroleum products. Transportation accounts for a major portion of these imports. Research in this field is focused on reducing the dependency on foreign oil by increasing the engine efficiency on the one hand and blending gasoline with renewable domestic fuels, such as ethanol, on the other. Argonne's Research The main focus of research is on evaluation of advanced combustion concepts and effects of fuel properties on engine efficiency, performance and emissions. The platforms used are a single-cylinder research engine as well as an automotive-size four-cylinder engine with direct fuel injection.

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401

Rock Physics Based Determination of Reservoir Microstructure for Reservoir Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the most important, but often ignored, factors affecting the transport and the seismic properties of hydrocarbon reservoir is pore shape. Transport properties depend on the dimensions, geometry, and distribution of pores and cracks. Knowledge of pore shape distribution is needed to explain the often-encountered complex interrelationship between seismic parameters (e.g. seismic velocity) and the independent physical properties (e.g. porosity) of hydrocarbon reservoirs. However, our knowledge of reservoir pore shape distribution is very limited. This dissertation employs a pore structure parameter via a rock physics model to characterize mean reservoir pore shape. The parameter was used to develop a new physical concept of critical clay content in the context of pore compressibility as a function of pore aspect ratio for a better understanding of seismic velocity as a function of porosity. This study makes use of well log dataset from offshore Norway and from North Viking Graben in the North Sea. In the studied North Sea reservoir, porosity and measured horizontal permeability was found to increase with increasing pore aspect ratio (PAR). PAR is relatively constant at 0.23 for volumes of clay (V_cl) less than 32% with a significant decrease to 0.04 for V_cl above 32%. The point of inflexion at 32% in the PAR V_cl plane is defined as the critical clay volume. Much of the scatters in the compressional velocity-porosity cross-plots are observed where V_cl is above this critical value. For clay content higher than the critical value, Hertz-Mindlin (HM) contact theory over-predicts compressional velocity (V_p) by about 69%. This was reduced to 4% when PAR distribution was accounted for in the original HM formulation. The pore structure parameter was also used to study a fractured carbonate reservoir in the Sichuan basin, China. Using the parameter, the reservoir interval can be distinguished from those with no fracture. The former has a pore structure parameter value that is ? 3.8 whereas it was < 3.8 for the latter. This finding was consistent with the result of fracture analysis, which was based on FMI image. The results from this dissertation will find application in reservoir characterization as the industry target more complex, deeper, and unconventional reservoirs.

Adesokan, Hamid 1976-

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plan that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data were to be generated during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The demonstration phase has been delayed by Goldrus because of funding problems. Since the first of the year, Goldrus has been active in searching for partners to help finance the project. To this end it has commissioned several small consulting studies to technically support its effort to secure a partner. After financial support is obtained, the demonstration phase of the project will proceed. Since just after the beginning of the year, BEG has curtailed project activities and spending of DOE funds except for the continued support of one engineering student. This student has now completed his work and has written a thesis describing his research (titled ''Stimulating enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in west Texas light oil reservoir''). We plan to recommence our work on the project as soon as the operator obtains necessary funding to carry out the demonstration phase of the project. In order to complete all activities specified in the proposal, it will be necessary to request an extension of the project from the originally defined completion date. We are confident that Goldrus will obtain the necessary funding to continue and that we can complete the project if an extension is granted. We strongly believe that the results of this study will provide the impetus for a new approach to enhanced oil recovery in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the United States.

Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olson; Deanna Combs; Dhiraj Dembla

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Cari L. Johnson $ Department of Geological and Environmental Sciences, Building 320, Stanford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

source rocks are the Jurassic ?re and Spekk Formations, the latter being the time the reservoirs are also in direct contact with mature, organic-rich source rocks. The minimum horizontal stress., 1995. Petroleum geochemistry of the Haltenbanken, Norwegian continental shelf. In: Cubitt, J

Johnson, Cari

404

An integrated approach to characterize reservoir connectivity to improve waterflood infill drilling recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Infill drilling can significantly improve reservoir interwell connectivity in heterogeneous reservoirs, thereby enhances the waterflood recovery. This study defines and investigates the Hydraulic Interwell Connectivity (HIC) concept to characterize and estimate the reservoir connectivity, quantitatively. This approach is an integrated study of reservoir characterization, geostatistics, production performance and reservoir engineering. In this study HIC is quantitatively defined as the ratio of observed fluid flow rate to a maximum possible (ideal) flow rate between any combination of any two wells in the producing unit. The spatial distribution of HIC can be determined for different layers or total net pay of the reservoir. Geostatistics is used to evaluate the horizontal and vertical variation of HIC in the reservoir. The spatial variation of HIC can be used to describe the degree of communication between injectors and producers. This spatial distribution of HIC can also serve as a guide for selecting infill well locations. A West Texas producing unit, JL Johnson "AB", with average reservoir permeability of 0.90 md, is used as an example to illustrate the application of this approach. The waterflood infill drilling recovery is improved by incorporating the HIC in simulation study. It is a practical approach which facilitates and eases the implementation of targeted infill drilling. This approach makes targeted infill drilling more economical over pattern infill drilling by eliminating the drilling of poor injectors and producers. It is found to be a useful concept and procedure to design, implement and optimize infill drilling programs.

Malik, Zaheer Ahmad

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Infill drilling if wells on a uniform spacing without regard to reservoir performance and characterization foes not optimize reservoir development because it fails to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, and carbonate reservoirs in particular. New and emerging technologies, such as geostatistical modeling, rigorous decline curve analysis, reservoir rock typing, and special core analysis can be used to develop a 3-D simulation model for prediction of infill locations.

None

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drilling  

SciTech Connect

Initial drilling of wells on a uniform spacing, without regard to reservoir performance and characterization, must become a process of the past. Such efforts do not optimize reservoir development as they fail to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, and carbonate reservoirs in particular. These reservoirs are typically characterized by: o Large, discontinuous pay intervals o Vertical and lateral changes in reservoir properties o Low reservoir energy o High residual oil saturation o Low recovery efficiency

P. K. Pande

1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

407

A STOCHASTIC METHOD FOR MODELING FLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS C. Anderson andFLUID DISPLACEMENT IN PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS C. Anderson andachieve optimal recovery of petroleum from a reservoir, it

Anderson, C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

A nano heat engine beyond the Carnot limit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat engines extract work by running cyclically between two heat reservoirs. When the two reservoirs are thermal and at different temperatures, the maximum efficiency of the engine is given by the Carnot limit. Here we consider a quantum Otto cycle for a time-dependent harmonic oscillator coupled to an engineered squeezed thermal reservoir. We show that the efficiency at maximum power increases with the degree of squeezing, exponentially approaching unity for large squeezing parameters $r$. Furthermore, we propose an experimental scheme to implement such a system by using a single trapped ion in a linear Paul trap with special geometry and coupled to engineered reservoirs. Our analytical investigations are supported with Monte Carlo simulations that demonstrate the feasibility of our proposal. For realistic trap parameters, an increase of up to a factor of four is reached, largely exceeding the classical limit.

Johannes Ronagel; Obinna Abah; Ferdinand Schmidt-Kaler; Kilian Singer; Eric Lutz

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

409

Top-Off Injection and Higher Currents at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is a 234 m circumference storage ring for 3 GeV electrons with its synchrotron radiation serving currently 13 beamlines with about 27 experimental stations. It operated for long time with 100 mA peak current provided by usually three injections per day. In July 2009, the maximum beam current was raised to 200 mA. Over the period from June 2009 to March 2010, Top-Off operation started at every beamline. Top-Off, i.e., the injection of electrons into the storage ring with injection stoppers open, is necessary for SSRL to reach its design current of 500 mA. In the future, the maximal power of the injection current will also soon be raised from currently 1.5 W to 5 W. The Radiation Protection Department at SLAC worked with SSRL on the specifications for the safety systems for operation with Top-Off injection and higher beam currents.

Bauer, Johannes

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

410

Experiences from First Top-Off Injection at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) is moving toward Top-Off injection mode, SLAC's Radiation Protection Department is working with SSRL on minimizing the radiological hazards of this mode. One such hazard is radiation that is created inside the accelerator concrete enclosure by injected beam. Since during Top-Off injection the stoppers that would otherwise isolate the storage ring from the experimental area stay open, the stoppers no longer prevent such radiation from reaching the experimental area. The level of this stray radiation was measured in April 2008 during the first Top-Off injection tests. They revealed radiation dose rates of up to 18 microSv/h (1.8 millirem/h) outside the experimental hutches, significantly higher than our goal of 1 microSv/h (0.1 millirem/h). Non-optimal injection increased the measured dose rates by a factor two. Further tests in 2008 indicated that subsequent improvements by SSRL to the injection system have reduced the dose rates to acceptable levels. This presentation describes the studies performed before the Top-Off tests, the tests themselves and their major results (both under initial conditions and after improvements were implemented), and presents the controls being implemented for full and routine Top-Off injection.

Bauer, J.M.; Liu, J.C.; Prinz, A.; Rokni, S.H.; /SLAC

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

411

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area (Redirected from Blackfoot Reservoir Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

412

Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Modeling of Geothermal Reservoirs: Fundamental Processes, Computer Simulation and Field Applications Abstract This article attempts to critically evaluate the present state of the art of geothermal reservoir simulation. Methodological aspects of geothermal reservoir modeling are briefly reviewed, with special emphasis on flow in fractured media. We then examine some applications of numerical simulation to studies of reservoir dynamics, well test design and analysis, and modeling of specific fields. Tangible impacts of reservoir simulation

413

Reservoir technology research at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research being carried out at LBL as part of DOE/GTD's Reservoir Technology Program includes field, theoretical and modeling activities. The purpose is to develop, improve and validate methods and instrumentation to: (1) determine geothermal reservoir parameters, (2) detect and characterize reservoir fractures and boundaries, and (3) identify and evaluate the importance of reservoir processes. The ultimate objective of this work is to advance the state-of-the-art for characterizing geothermal reservoirs and evaluating their productive capacity and longevity under commercial exploitation. LBL's FY1986 accomplishments, FY1987 progress to date, and possible future activities under DOE's Reservoir Technology Program are discussed.

Lippmann, M.J.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is proposed to delineate the important factors in the geothermal environment that will affect drilling. The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. The geologic environment and reservoir characteristics of several geothermal areas were studied, and drill bits were obtained from most of the areas. The geothermal areas studied are: (1) Geysers, California, (2) Imperial Valley, California, (3) Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah, (4) Bacca Ranch, Valle Grande, New Mexico, (5) Jemez Caldera, New Mexico, (6) Raft River, Idaho, and (7) Marysville, Montona. (MHR)

Pratt, H.R.; Simonson, E.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy | Stanford  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy Monday, May 14, 2012 - 3:30pm SSRL Conference Room 137-322 Drew Pomerantz, Schlumberger Unconventional hydrocarbon resources such as gas shale and oil-bearing shale have emerged recently as economically viable sources of energy, dramatically altering America's energy landscape. Despite their importance, the basic chemistry and physics of shales are not understood as well as conventional reservoirs. In particular, shales are unique in that they contain kerogen, a complex organic solid that controls factors such as the amount of hydrocarbon that can be produced from the reservoir and the rate at which the hydrocarbon is produced. The industry's current understanding of the chemical composition of kerogen is limited, preventing detailed

416

Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy | Stanford  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy Characterization of Gas Shales by X-ray Raman Spectroscopy Thursday, February 23, 2012 - 10:30am SSRL Third Floor Conference Room 137-322 Drew Pomerantz, Schlumberger Unconventional hydrocarbon resources such as gas shale and oil-bearing shale have emerged recently as economically viable sources of energy, dramatically altering America's energy landscape. Despite their importance, the basic chemistry and physics of shales are not understood as well as conventional reservoirs. In particular, shales are unique in that they contain kerogen, a complex organic solid that controls factors such as the amount of hydrocarbon that can be produced from the reservoir and the rate at which the hydrocarbon is produced. The industry's current understanding of the chemical composition of kerogen is limited, preventing detailed

417

Use of a hydraulic interwell connectivity concept for sandstone reservoir characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proper reservoir characterization is the key to successful implementation of improved oil recovery programs. The recovery efficiency of any reservoir is mainly controlled by its heterogeneity. Interwell connectivity is considered as a direct measure of reservoir heterogeneity. This study uses a hydraulic interwell connectivity concept to characterize sandstone reservoirs. It defines and investigates the Interwell Flow Capacity Index (IFCI) to quantitatively characterize the reservoir connectivity. This approach is an integrated study of reservoir characterization, geostatistics, production performance and reservoir engineering. In this study IFCI is quantitatively defined as the ratio of observed fluid flow rates in any two adjacent wells in a producing unit. Geostatistics and fluid dynamics are used to evaluate the reservoir connectivity. The spatial variation of IFCI can be used to describe the degree of communication between injectors and producers, to evaluate the reservoir rock quality and to describe the production-injection performance. The spatial distribution of IFCI can also serve as a guide to modify water injection patterns, select infill well locations, define workovers and other operational strategies for waterflooding. A Colombian (South America) sandstone producing unit, La Cira Field "C Zone", is used to illustrate the application of IFCI concept. This zone has been subdivided into 16 genetic units. The CIC genetic unit (average reservoir permeability of 31 md and sand thickness of 6 feet) is used as an example to illustrate the application of this approach. The geological model is improved by incorporating the IFCI, which helps to define the flow units. IFCI model is a practical approach to evaluate the injection and production performance of existing waterflood patterns. The IFCI approach should be useful for interpreting the variability of oil recovery and improving the implementation of optimized waterflood process and targeted infill drilling.

Canas, Jesus Alberto

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Fast Track Reservoir Modeling of Shale Formations in the Appalachian Basin. Application to Lower Huron Shale in Eastern Kentucky  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a fast track reservoir modeling and analysis of the Lower Huron Shale in Eastern Kentucky is presented. Unlike conventional reservoir simulation and modeling which is a bottom up approach (geo-cellular model to history matching) this new approach starts by attempting to build a reservoir realization from well production history (Top to Bottom), augmented by core, well-log, well-test and seismic data in order to increase accuracy. This approach requires creation of a large spatial-temporal database that is efficiently handled with state of the art Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining techniques (AI & DM), and therefore it represents an elegant integration of reservoir engineering techniques with Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining. Advantages of this new technique are a) ease of development, b) limited data requirement (as compared to reservoir simulation), and c) speed of analysis. All of the 77 wells used in this study are completed in the Lower Huron Shale and are a part of the Big Sandy Gas field in Eastern Kentucky. Most of the wells have production profiles for more than twenty years. Porosity and thickness data was acquired from the available well logs, while permeability, natural fracture network properties, and fracture aperture data was acquired through a single well history matching process that uses the FRACGEN/NFFLOW simulator package. This technology, known as Top-Down Intelligent Reservoir Modeling, starts with performing conventional reservoir engineering analysis on individual wells such as decline curve analysis and volumetric reserves estimation. Statistical techniques along with information generated from the reservoir engineering analysis contribute to an extensive spatio-temporal database of reservoir behavior. The database is used to develop a cohesive model of the field using fuzzy pattern recognition or similar techniques. The reservoir model is calibrated (history matched) with production history from the most recently drilled wells. The calibrated model is then further used for field development strategies to improve and enhance gas recovery.

Grujic, Ognjen; Mohaghegh, Shahab; Bromhal, Grant

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

REVIVING ABANDONED RESERVOIRS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE AIR INJECTION: APPLICATION IN A FRACTURED AND KARSTED DOLOMITE RESERVOIR  

SciTech Connect

The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and Goldrus Producing Company have assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The characterization phase of the project is utilizing geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. This model will be used to define a field deployment plan that Goldrus, a small independent oil company, will implement by drilling both vertical and horizontal wells during the demonstration phase of the project. Additional reservoir data were to be generated during the demonstration phase to improve the accuracy of the reservoir model. The demonstration phase has been delayed by Goldrus because of funding problems. Since the first of the year, Goldrus has been active in searching for partners to help finance the project. After financial support is obtained, the demonstration phase of the project will proceed. Since just after the beginning of the year, BEG has curtailed project activities and spending of DOE funds except for the continued support of one engineering student. This student has now completed his work and his thesis was reported on in the last semi-annual report. We plan to recommence our work on the project as soon as the operator obtains necessary funding to carry out the demonstration phase of the project. In order to complete all activities specified in the proposal, we requested and received an extension of the project to September 30, 2005. We are confident that Goldrus will obtain the necessary funding to continue and that we can complete the project by the end of the extension data. We strongly believe that the results of this study will provide the impetus for a new approach to enhanced oil recovery in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the United States.

Robert Loucks; Steve Ruppel; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jon Olson

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow in the wellbore); and (3) accurate approaches to account for the effects of reservoir heterogeneity and for the optimization of nonconventional well deployment. An overview of our progress in each of these main areas is as follows. A general purpose object-oriented research simulator (GPRS) was developed under this project. The GPRS code is managed using modern software management techniques and has been deployed to many companies and research institutions. The simulator includes general black-oil and compositional modeling modules. The formulation is general in that it allows for the selection of a wide variety of primary and secondary variables and accommodates varying degrees of solution implicitness. Specifically, we developed and implemented an IMPSAT procedure (implicit in pressure and saturation, explicit in all other variables) for compositional modeling as well as an adaptive implicit procedure. Both of these capabilities allow for efficiency gains through selective implicitness. The code treats cell connections through a general connection list, which allows it to accommodate both structured and unstructured grids. The GPRS code was written to be easily extendable so new modeling techniques can be readily incorporated. Along these lines, we developed a new dual porosity module compatible with the GPRS framework, as well as a new discrete fracture model applicable for fractured or faulted reservoirs. Both of these methods display substantial advantages over previous implementations. Further, we assessed the performance of different preconditioners in an attempt to improve the efficiency of the linear solver. As a result of this investigation, substantial improvements in solver performance were achieved.

Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

2004-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir engineering stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Reservoir compaction loads on casings and liners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure drawdown due to production from a reservoir causes compaction of the reservoir formation which induces axial and radial loads on the wellbore. Reservoir compaction loads increase during the production life of a well, and are greater for deviated wells. Presented here are casing and liner loads at initial and final pressure drawdowns for a particular reservoir and at well deviation angles of 0 to 45 degrees.

Wooley, G.R.; Prachner, W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Optimization Online - Managing Hydroelectric Reservoirs over an ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jul 7, 2013 ... Managing Hydroelectric Reservoirs over an Extended Planning Horizon using a Benders Decomposition Algorithm Exploiting a Memory Loss...

423

Prevention of Reservoir Interior Discoloration  

SciTech Connect

Contamination is anathema in reservoir production. Some of the contamination is a result of welding and some appears after welding but existed before. Oxygen was documented to be a major contributor to discoloration in welding. This study demonstrates that it can be controlled and that some of the informal cleaning processes contribute to contamination.

Arnold, K.F.

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

424

Exploration, Drilling and Development Operations in the Bottle Rock Area of the Geysers Steam Field, With New Geologic Insights and Models Defining Reservoir Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MCR Geothermal Corporation pioneered successful exploratiory drilling the Bottle Rock area of the Geysers Steam Field in 1976. The wellfield is characterized by a deep reservoir with varied flowrates, temperatures, pressures, and stem chemistries being quite acceptable. More detailed reservoir engineering tests will follow as production commences.

Hebein, Jeffrey J.

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

A Roadmap for Engineering Piezoelectricity in Graphene  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Roadmap for Roadmap for Engineering Piezoelectricity in Graphene A Roadmap for Engineering Piezoelectricity in Graphene Doping this 'Miracle Material' May Lead to New Array of Nanoscale Devices, Simulations Reveal February 23, 2012 | Tags: Carver, Chemistry, Franklin, Materials Science Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 This illustration shows lithium atoms (red) dopped on graphene (black hexagons) and generating electricity. Graphic courtesy of Mitchell Ong, Stanford University. Some scientists refer to graphene as the "miracle material" of the 21st century. Composed of a single sheet of carbon atoms, this material is tougher than diamond, more conductive than copper, and has potential applications in a variety of technologies. Now with the help of supercomputers at the Department of Energy's

426

Nutrient transport model in CHAHNIMEH manmade reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Model for predicting nutrient transport to CHAHNIMEH reservoir is developed in this paper. Nitrogen and phosphorous have been simulated as the important parameters in evaluating water quality in the reservoir. Solar radiation and wind flow are considered ... Keywords: CHAHNIMEH, modeling, nutrient, reservoir, transport, water movement

Seyyed Ahmad Mirbagheri; Seyyed Arman Hashemi Monfared

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Eutrophication modelling of reservoirs in Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two reservoirs in Taiwan were modeled to simulate the hydrodynamics and water quality in the water column. The modelling effort was supported with data collected in the field for a 2-year period for both reservoirs. Spatial and temporal distributions ... Keywords: CE-QUAL-W2, Reservoir Eutrophication Modelling, Water quality

Jan-Tai Kuo; Wu-Seng Lung; Chou-Ping Yang; Wen-Cheng Liu; Ming-Der Yang; Tai-Shan Tang

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

1995 verification flow testing of the HDR reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent flow testing of the Fenton Hill HDR reservoir has demonstrated that engineered geothermal systems can be shut-in for extended periods of d= with apparently no adverse effects. However, when this particular reservoir at Venton Hill was shut-in for 2 years in a pressurized condition, natural convection within the open-jointed reservoir region appears to have leveled out the preexisting temperature gradient so that the gradient has now approached a condition more typical of liquid-dominated hydrothermal reservoirs which air invariably almost isothermal due to natural convection. As a result of the sudden flow impedance reduction that led to an almost 50% increase in Production flow new the end of the Second Phase of the LTFR in May 1993, we were uncertain as to the state of the reservoir after being shut-in for 2 years. The flow performance observed during the current testing was found to be intermediate between that at-the end of the Second Phase of the LTFT and that following, the subsequent sudden flow increase, implying that whatever caused the sudden reduction in impedance in the first place is probably somehow associated with the cooldown of the reservoir near the injection interval, since temperature recovery at the surfaces of the surrounding open joints is the most obvious phenomenon expected to occur over time within the reservoir.

Brown, D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Application of magnetic method to assess the extent of high temperature geothermal reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The extent of thermally altered rocks in high temperature geothermal reservoirs hosted by young volcanic rocks can be assessed from magnetic surveys. Magnetic anomalies associated with many geothermal field in New Zealand and Indonesia can be interpreted in terms of thick (up to 1 km) demagnetized reservoir rocks. Demagnetization of these rocks has been confirmed by core studies and is caused by hydrothermal alteration produced from fluid/rock interactions. Models of the demagnetized Wairakei (NZ) and Kamojang (Indonesia) reservoirs are presented which include the productive areas. Magnetic surveys give fast and economical investigations of high temperature prospects if measurements are made from the air. The magnetic interpretation models can provide important constraints for reservoir models. Magnetic ground surveys can also be used to assess the extent of concealed near surface alteration which can be used in site selection of engineering structures.

Soengkono, S.; Hochstein, M.P.

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

430

Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management, Class III  

SciTech Connect

This project was intended to increase recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs, transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project.

Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott; Phillips, Chris; Nguyen, John; Moos, Dan; Tagbor, Kwasi

2001-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

431

Process and apparatus for reducing the loss of hydrogen from Stirling engines  

SciTech Connect

A Stirling engine assembly is described which defines a working gas volume therein, the Stirling engine assembly comprising: a working gas reservoir for storing a working gas at a pressure greater than pressure of the working gas in the working volume of the Stirling engine; a trap cell operatively connected between an outlet of the reservoir and the Stirling engine working volume. The trap cell includes an enclosure having porous windows at either end thereof and a sorbent with an affinity for water vapor therein, such that water vapor adsorbed on the sorbent diffuses into the hydrogen passing from the reservoir into the working engine; a compressor means for drawing working gas from the Stirling engine working volume, through the trap cell and pumping the working gas into the hydrogen reservoir. The sorbent in the trap cell at the reduced pressure caused by the compressor adsorbs water vapor from the working gas such that substantially dry working gas is pumped by the compressor into the reservoir. The working gas is doped with water vapor by the tank cell as it passes into the Stirling engine and is dried by the trap cell as it is removed from the working engine for storage in the reservoir to prevent condensation of water vapor in the reservoir.

Alger, D.L.

1987-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

432

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

433

4. International reservoir characterization technical conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume contains the Proceedings of the Fourth International Reservoir Characterization Technical Conference held March 2-4, 1997 in Houston, Texas. The theme for the conference was Advances in Reservoir Characterization for Effective Reservoir Management. On March 2, 1997, the DOE Class Workshop kicked off with tutorials by Dr. Steve Begg (BP Exploration) and Dr. Ganesh Thakur (Chevron). Tutorial presentations are not included in these Proceedings but may be available from the authors. The conference consisted of the following topics: data acquisition; reservoir modeling; scaling reservoir properties; and managing uncertainty. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology database.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

An integrated study of the reservoir performance in the Area Central Norte (ACN) region of the Tordillo Field (Argentina)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Tordillo Field is located within the San Jorge Basin of southern Argentina. The field is located within a small, dominantly extension basin, and is operated by Tecpetrol S.A., a domestic private oil company. The field produces from the El TreboL Comodoro Rivadavia, and Mina El Carmen Formations and is estimated to contain approximately 1,800 MMSTB of in-place oil. The Area Central Norte (ACN) region is a designated portion of the TordiHo Field in which a pilot waterflood was initiated in September 1993. There are immediate plans for expanding the pilot waterflood, and therefore, it is imperative that we evaluate the reservoir properties, as well as the reservoir production potential in order to design the most effective field development plan. Our integrated study of reservoir performance in the ACN pilot area, combining the geological, engineering, and reservoir performance data, is utilized to characterize the reservoir and to develop an appropriate reservoir management plan. This study win be used to determine the feasibility of expanding secondary recovery efforts throughout the Tordiflo Field by developing a reservoir description that includes the reservoir structure, rock and fluid properties, and the performance potential of the reservoir. The main focus of this work is to evaluate primary and secondary well performance in a highly stratified sequence of oil producing sands. In this study, we use rigorous methods to analyze and interpret production rate, injection rate, and pressure data from oil and water injection wells using decline type curves and estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) analysis. These methods are shown to yield excellent results for a variety of field conditions, without regard to the structure of the reservoir (shape and size), or the reservoir drive mechanism(s). Results of these analyses include the following: eservo rties: 0 Fonnation permeability, k Skin factor, s, for near-well damage or stimulation In-pplace fluid volumes: Original oil-in-place, N Reservoir drainage area, A Movable oil at current conditions, Np,,,,,, We examined the available core and modem well log data to develop an understanding for the petrophysical (k and 0) properties of the reservoir. These results will help us determine if reservoir performance is directly influenced by the geologic structure and flow characteristics of the reservoir. By combing the geological, petrophysical, and reservoir performance data in this manner, we are able to develop an integrated reservoir description for future developments as well as production optimization.

Tuvio, Raul

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

t o be exploited f electrical power. D r i l l i n g began a69 megawatts of electrical power and, as a by-product, tohas been producing electrical power since the mid-1960's a t

Pritchett, J.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Advanced Materials and Reservoir Engineering for Extreme Oil ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanostructured and advanced materials potentially offer new possibilities in drilling, exploration and production. In this symposium both academia and industry...

437

SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grange, L. I. (Compiler), Geothermal Steam for Power i n N eGeology of the Tauhara Geothermal Field, Lake Taupo,"DSIR Geological Survey Geothermal Report No. 4, 1966.

Pritchett, J.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Proceedings of fifth workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Forty-four papers are included. Two papers were abstracted for EDB previously. Separate abstracts were prepared for forty-two. (MHR)

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P. (eds.)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Low-to-moderate-temperature hydrothermal reservoir engineering handbook. [Appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This volume contains the following appendices: units and conversions, glossary of terms, instrumentation, fabrication of instruments, VARFLOW program user's guide, and reference bibliography.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

NANOSENSORS AS RESERVOIR ENGINEERING TOOLS TO MAP IN-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and garnished. List everything you want to serve, including garnishes, mints, nuts, beverages, and an extra be carved in the kitchen and arranged on a platter with a suitable garnish. In arranging a meat platter in chilled bowl. Garnish top with julienne spiced beets and sliced hard-cooked eggs. 1 unbaked pastry shell 1

Stanford University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir engineering stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

PROCEEDINGS SEVENTEENTH WOR.KSHOP GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

improvement was applied. The resulting cost-supply curves for hydrothermal1 electricity were then used in the primary NES economics model, FOSSIL2, which competes most...

442

GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

r s u r f a c e energy conversion systems. P N P b . O p t iwell system, energy conversion system, disposal system),of wells, an energy conversion system, a disposal system, an

Bloomster, C.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Recent reservoir engineering developments at Brady Hot Springs, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Brady's Hot Springs is a hydrothermal area located approximately 28Km northeast of Fernley, Nevada. Surface manifestations of geothermal activity occur along a north-northeast trend fault zone (herein referred to as the Brady Thermal Fault) at the eastern margin of Hot Springs Flat, a small basin. Since September, 1959, Magma Power Company, its subsidiaries, and Union Oil Company (as Earth Energy Company) have drilled numerous wells in the area. In 1977 Magma's 160 acre lease in Section 12 was assigned to Geothermal Food Processors (GFP) for the purpose of providing heat from the wells on this acreage for the dehydration of food. GFP made application to the Geothermal Loan Guarantee Program (GLGP) for assistance in financing the effort, and consequently the GLGP office turned to the USGS for a resource evaluation. The USGS in turn recommended that a pumped flow test was necessary to truly determine the ability of the acreage's wells to provide the requisite water flow rate, temperature, and composition for the plant's operating lifetime of at least 15 years. Consequently, Thermal Power Company was contacted and procured to design, arrange, conduct, and evaluate a pumped flow program to satisfy these questions.

Rudisill, J.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis. (NOTE: See 1976 Sandia Albuquerque workshop onCalifornia, April 13-15, 1977. b Sandia Lab Report (SAND 75-n g Development Program a t Sandia L a b o r a t o r i e s ,

Bloomster, C.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bfxley, P. F. ,-"Land Subsidence i n the Wairakei Geothermalformation effects (i .e. , subsidence) are of interest, theof the ground surface (subsidence) and to net mass changes

Pritchett, J.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bfxley, P. F. ,-"Land Subsidence i n the Wairakei Geothermalformation effects (i .e. , subsidence) are of interest, theof the ground surface (subsidence) and to net mass changes

Pritchett, J.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Proceedings of the seventh workshop on geothermal-reservoir engineering  

SciTech Connect

Thirty-three papers are included. Two were abstracted for EDB previously. Separate abstracts were prepared for thirty-one.

Kruger, P.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Donaldson, I.G.; Gudmundsson, J.S. (eds.)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Hawaii Geothermal Project; HGP-A Reservoir Engineering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hawaii Geothermal Project well HGP-A has undergone a two-year testing program which included cold water pumpdown tests, flashing flows with measurements of temperature and pressure profiles, and noise surveys. These tests and the data obtained are discussed in detail.

Yuen, P.C.; Chen, B.H.; Kihara, D.H.; Seki, A.S.; Takahashi, P.K.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

ERDA--DGE/LBL geothermal reservoir engineering management program  

SciTech Connect

The management program is outlined and the objectives are discussed. The development procedure and implementation of the plan are described. (MHR)

Howard, J.H.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 Mission of Division of Geothermal Energy . . . . .Coordination with Other Geothermal Programs . . . . . . 6the Behavior of Geothermal Systems . . . . . . . . . 1 6

Bloomster, C.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grange, L. I. (Compiler), Geothermal Steam for Power i n N eGeology of the Tauhara Geothermal Field, Lake Taupo,"DSIR Geological Survey Geothermal Report No. 4, 1966.

Pritchett, J.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Proceedings of the eighth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Forty-seven papers are included. Nine were abstracted for EDB previously. Separate abstracts were prepared for thirty-eight. (MHR)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Time-resolved Spectroscopy of Laser-heated Copper Foils | Stanford...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectroscopy of Laser-heated Copper Foils Tuesday, July 16, 2013 - 11:00am SLAC, Conference Room 137-322 Presented by Kelly Cone, PhD Engineering, Dept. of Applied Science,...

454

Engineering Institute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Institute Engineering Institute Engineering Institute Engineering dynamics that include flight, vibration isolation for precision manufacturing, earthquake engineering, blast loading, signal processing, and experimental model analysis. Contact Leader, LANL Charles Farrar Email Leader, UCSD Michael Todd Email LANL Program Administrator Jutta Kayser (505) 663-5649 Email Collaboration for conducting mission-driven, multidisciplinary engineering research and recruiting, revitalization, and retention of current & future staff The Engineering Institute is a collaboration between LANL and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) Jacobs School of Engineering, whose mission is to develop a comprehensive approach for conducting mission-driven, multidisciplinary engineering research

455

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid inventory of the reservoir. 4 figs.

Brown, D.W.

1997-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

456

Lead, Uranium, and Nickel Compound Data from the XAFS Library at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) library at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory is intended to be a reference library of XAFS spectra for various lead, uranium, and nickel compounds. Compounds are organized by central atom and all spectra are transmission data. Molecular Environmental Science (MES) research at SSRL focuses on the fundamental interfacial, molecular- and nano-scale processes that control contaminant and nutrient cycling in the biosphere with the goal of elucidating global elemental cycles and anthropogenic influences on the environment. Key areas of investigation include the: (a) Structural chemistry of water and dissolved solutes, (b) Structural chemistry and reactivity of complex natural environmental materials with respect to heavy metals and metalloids (biominerals, Fe- and Mn-oxides, biofilms, and organic materials), (c) Reactions at environmental interfaces, including sorption, precipitation and dissolution processes that affect the bioavailability of heavy metals and other contaminants, and (d) Microbial transformations of metals and anions. SSRL-based MES research utilizes synchrotron-based x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS), x-ray standing wave (XSW) spectroscopy, and photoemission spectroscopy (PES) because of their unique capabilities to probe structure/composition relationships in complex, non-crystalline, and dilute materials. [copied from http://www-ssrl.slac.stanford.edu/mes/index.html

457

Application of artificial intelligence to reservoir characterization: An interdisciplinary approach. [Quarterly report], January 1--March 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This basis search is to apply novel techniques from Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Expert Systems in capturing, integrating and articulating key knowledge from geology, geostatistics, and petroleum engineering to develop accurate descriptions of petroleum reservoirs. The ultimate goal is to design and implement a single powerful expert system for use by small producers and independents to efficiently exploit reservoirs. The overall project plan to design the system to create integrated reservoir description begins by initially developing an AI-based methodology for producing large-scale reservoir descriptions generated interactively from geology and well test data. Parallel to this task is a second task that develops an AI-based methodology that uses facies-biased information to generate small-scale descriptions of reservoir properties such as permeability and porosity. The third task involves consolidation and integration of the large-scale and small-scale methodologies to produce reservoir descriptions honoring all the available data. The final task will be technology transfer. With this plan, we have carefully allocated and sequenced the activities involved in each of the tasks to promote concurrent progress towards the research objectives. The results of the integration are not merely limited to obtaining better characterizations of individual reservoirs. They have the potential to significantly impact and advance the discipline of reservoir characterization itself.

Kelkar, B.G.; Kerr, D.R.; Thompson, L.G.; Shenoi, S.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Improved oil recovery in fluvial dominated reservoirs of Kansas--near-term. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep efficiency and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of injection wells due to solids in the injection water. In many instances the lack of reservoir management results from (1) poor data collection and organization, (2) little or no integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, (3) the presence of multiple operators within the field, and (4) not identifying optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by North American Resources Company. This field was in the latter stage of primary production at the beginning of this project and is currently being waterflooded as a result of this project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these type of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis. Results of these two field projects are discussed.

Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.; Walton, A.; Schoeling, L.; Reynolds, R.; Michnick, M.; Watney, L.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Improved Oil Recovery In Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near Term  

SciTech Connect

Common oil field problems exist in fluvial dominated deltaic reservoirs in Kansas. The problems are poor waterflood sweep efficiency and lack of reservoir management. The poor waterflood sweep efficiency is due to (1) reservoir heterogeneity, (2) channeling of injected water through high permeability zones or fractures, and (3) clogging of injection wells due to solids in the injection water. In many instances the lack of reservoir management results from (1) poor data collection and organization, (2) little or no integrated analysis of existing data by geological and engineering personnel, (3) the presence of multiple operators within the field, and (4) not identifying optimum recovery techniques. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. This field was in the latter stage of primary production at the beginning of this project and is currently being waterflooded as a result of this project. The Nelson Lease (an existing waterflood) is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. The objective is to increase recovery efficiency and economics in these types of reservoirs. The technologies being applied to increase waterflood sweep efficiency are (1) in situ permeability modification treatments, (2) infill drilling, (3) pattern changes, and (4) air flotation to improve water quality. The technologies being applied to improve reservoir management are (1) database development, (2) reservoir simulation, (3) transient testing, (4) database management, and (5) integrated geological and engineering analysis.

Green, Don W.; McCune, D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite, G. Paul

1999-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

460

Measurement of Lake Roosevelt Biota in Relation to Reservoir Operations; 1992 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research project is to collect data to model resident fish requirements for Lake Roosevelt as part of the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Bureau of Reclamation (BoR), and U.S. Army Corps of Engineer`s (ACE) System Operation Review. The System Operation Review (SOR) is a tri-agency team functioning to review the use and partitioning of Columbia Basin waters. User groups of the Columbia have been defined as power, irrigation, flood control, anadromous fish, resident fish, wildlife, recreation, water quality, navigation, and cultural resources. Once completed the model will predict biological responses to different reservoir operation strategies. The model being developed for resident fish is based on Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife, and Parks model for resident fish requirements within Hungry Horse and Libby Reservoirs. While the Montana model predicts fish growth based on the impacts of reservoir operation and flow conditions on primary and secondary production levels, the Lake Roosevelt model will also factor in the affects of water retention time on zooplankton production levels and fish entrainment. Major components of the Lake Roosevelt model include: (1) quantification of impacts to zooplankton, benthic invertebrates, and fish caused by reservoir drawdowns and low water retention times; (2) quantification of number, distribution, and use of fish food organisms in the reservoir by season; (3) determination of seasonal growth of fish species as related to reservoir operations, prey abundance and utilization; and (4) quantification of entrainment levels of fish as related to reservoir operations and water retention times. This report contains the results of the resident fish system operation review program for Lake Roosevelt from January through December 1992.

Griffith, Janelle R.; McDowell, Amy C.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir engineering stanford" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the demand for energy worldwide increases, the oil and gas industry will need to increase recovery from unconventional gas reservoirs (UGR). UGRs include Tight Gas Sand (TGS), coalbed methane and gas shales. To economically produce UGRs, one must have adequate product price and one must use the most current technology. TGS reservoirs require stimulation as a part of the completion, so improvement of completion practices is very important. We did a thorough literature review to extract knowledge and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions while completing and stimulating TGS reservoirs. The modules include Perforation Selection and Proppant Selection. Based on input well/reservoir parameters these subroutines provide unambiguous recommendations concerning which perforation strategy(s) and what proppant(s) are applicable for a given well. The most crucial parameters from completion best-practices analyses and consultations with experts are built into TGS Advisor's logic, which mimics human expert's decision-making process. TGS Advisor's recommended procedures for successful completions will facilitate TGS development and improve economical performance of TGS reservoirs.

Bogatchev, Kirill Y

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the demand for energy worldwide increases, the oil and gas industry will need to increase recovery from unconventional gas reservoirs (UGR). UGRs include Tight Gas Sand (TGS), coalbed methane and gas shales. To economically produce UGRs, one must have adequate product price and one must use the most current technology. TGS reservoirs require stimulation as a part of the completion, so improvement of completion practices is very important. We did a thorough literature review to extract knowledge and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions while completing and stimulating TGS reservoirs. The modules include Perforation Selection and Proppant Selection. Based on input well/reservoir parameters these subroutines provide unambiguous recommendations concerning which perforation strategy(s) and what proppant(s) are applicable for a given well. The most crucial parameters from completion best-practices analyses and consultations with experts are built into TGS Advisors logic, which mimics human experts decision-making process. TGS Advisors recommended procedures for successful completions will facilitate TGS development and improve economical performance of TGS reservoirs.

Bogatchev, Kirill Y.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Imaging of reservoirs and fracture systems using microearthquakes induced by hydraulic injections  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Predicting the future performance of a geothermal reservoir and planning a strategy for increasing productivity from the reservoir require an intimate knowledge of the fracture system through which geothermal fluids permeate. Microearthquakes often accompany hydraulic fracturing as well as normal production activities in geothermal fields. The waveforms from the se microearthquakes provide valuable information that can be used to infer the three-dimensional structure of the fracture system in the reservoir. The locations of the microearthquakes can be used to infer the presence of large fractures along which shear slip has occurred. Tomographic imaging using arrival times of the seismic waves, provides a three-dimensional image of the P and S wave velocity structure of the reservoir. These velocities yield information about the presence of microfractures in the rock. Waveform stacking methods can be used to both corroborate seismic velocities and image seismic scatters in the reservoir. The most prominent seismic scatters are likely to be fluid-filled fractures. Thus, seismic data provide information about a fractures over a large scale range which can be of use in reservoir engineering. 32 refs., 4 figs.

Fehler, M.; House, L.; Phillips, W.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Block, L.; Cheng, C.H. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA). Earth Resources Lab.)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

wyang98@stanford.edu; phone 1 650 723-6213; fax 1 650 725-9755; http://eil.stanford.edu/WiMMS/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, a new wireless sensing unit for operation within an automated Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system is proposed, designed and validated. The design of the wireless sensing unit emphasizes minimization of its power consumption characteristics to ensure it is suited for long-term field deployment in civil structures. The wireless modem integrated with the unit has a long communication range that permits wireless sensors to be spaced over 100m apart. A multi-channel high-resolution analog-to-digital converter is included within each sensing unit to provide flexibility for high-fidelity data collection. A key feature of the wireless sensing unit design is the inclusion of a sophisticated computing core that is capable of locally executing engineering algorithms in real-time. As part of the embedded software, a novel communication protocol is written that can accomplish low-latency communications for accurate time synchronization between spatially distributed wireless sensors. To illustrate the capabilities of the wireless monitoring platform, including the execution of extensive computational tasks, a prototype system is fabricated and tested in the laboratory and field. As part of validating the system performance in the field, the vertical acceleration response of the Geumdang Bridge under traffic loading is measured by 14 wireless sensing unit prototypes.

Design Of Low-Power; Wang Yang; Jerome P. Lynch; B Kincho H. Law

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

A virtual company concept for reservoir management  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes how reservoir management problems were pursued with a virtual company concept via the Internet and World Wide Web. The focus of the paper is on the implementation of virtual asset management teams that were assembled with small independent oil companies. The paper highlights the mechanics of how the virtual team transferred data and interpretations, evaluated geological models of complex reservoirs, and used results of simulation studies to analyze various reservoir management strategies.

Martin, F.D. [Dave Martin and Associates, Inc. (United States); Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

466

Are software engineers true engineers?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software engineering is an often used term to describe the activities, methods, and tools of large scale software development. There is an ongoing discussion whether Software Engineering can be considered as an engineering discipline. In ...

Claus Lewerentz; Heinrich Rust

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Slimholes for geothermal reservoir evaluation - An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The topics covered in this session include: slimhole testing and data acquisition, theoretical and numerical models for slimholes, and an overview of the analysis of slimhole data acquired by the Japanese. The fundamental issues discussed are concerned with assessing the efficacy of slimhole testing for the evaluation of geothermal reservoirs. the term reservoir evaluation is here taken to mean the assessment of the potential of the geothermal reservoir for the profitable production of electrical power. As an introduction to the subsequent presentations and discussions, a brief summary of the more important aspects of the use of slimholes in reservoir evaluation is given.

Hickox, C.E.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Mapping Diffuse Seismicity for Geothermal Reservoir Management with Matched Field Processing Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation,...

469

Nonisothermal injection tests in fractured reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The paper extends the analysis of nonisothermal pressure transient data to fractured reservoirs. Two cases are considered: reservoirs with predominantly horzontal fractures and reservoirs with predominantly vertical fractures. Effects of conductive heat transfer between the fractures and the rock matrix are modeled, and the resulting pressure transients evaluated. Thermal conduction tends to retard the movement of the thermal front in the fractures, which significantly affects the pressure transient data. The purpose of the numerical simulation studies is to provide methods for analyzing nonisothermal injection/falloff data for fractured reservoirs.

Cox, B.L.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Injecting Carbon Dioxide into Unconventional Storage Reservoirs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will also be investigated with a targeted CO 2 injection test into a depleted shale gas well. Different reservoir models will be used before, during, and after injection...

471

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect

Research continued on methods to detect naturally fractured tight gas reservoirs. This report discusses 3D-3C seismic acquisition and 3D P-wave alternate processing.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

472

Safety of Dams and Reservoirs Act (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act regulates dams and associated reservoirs to protect health and public safety and minimize adverse consequences associated with potential dam failure. The act describes the responsibilities...

473

Storage capacity in hot dry rock reservoirs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting thermal energy, in a cyclic manner, from geologic strata which may be termed hot dry rock. A reservoir comprised of hot fractured rock is established and water or other liquid is passed through the reservoir. The water is heated by the hot rock, recovered from the reservoir, cooled by extraction of heat by means of heat exchange apparatus on the surface, and then re-injected into the reservoir to be heated again. Water is added to the reservoir by means of an injection well and recovered from the reservoir by means of a production well. Water is continuously provided to the reservoir and continuously withdrawn from the reservoir at two different flow rates, a base rate and a peak rate. Increasing water flow from the base rate to the peak rate is accomplished by rapidly decreasing backpressure at the outlet of the production well in order to meet periodic needs for amounts of thermal energy greater than a baseload amount, such as to generate additional electric power to meet peak demands. The rate of flow of water provided to the hot dry rock reservoir is maintained at a value effective to prevent depletion of the liquid

Brown, Donald W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Increasing CO2 Storage in Oil Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increasing CO Increasing CO 2 Storage in Oil Recovery Kristian Jessen (krisj@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-723-6348) Linda C. Sam-Olibale (chizoba@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-725-0831) Anthony R. Kovscek (kovscek@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-723-1218) Franklin M. Orr, Jr. (fmorr@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-723-2750) Department of Petroleum Engineering, Stanford University 65 Green Earth Sciences Building 367 Panama Street Stanford, CA 94305-2220 Introduction Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) injection has been used as a commercial process for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) since the 1970's. Because the cost of oil recovered is closely linked to the purchase cost of the CO 2 injected, considerable reservoir engineering design effort has gone into reducing the total amount of CO 2 required to recover each barrel of oil. If,

475

Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. Te Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2.

Green, D.W.; McCune, D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite G.P.

1999-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

476

Improved Oil Recovery in Fluvial Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to address waterflood problems of the type found in Morrow sandstone reservoirs in southwestern Kansas and in Cherokee Group reservoirs in southeastern Kansas. Two demonstration sites operated by different independent oil operators are involved in this project. The Stewart Field is located in Finney County, Kansas and is operated by PetroSantander, Inc. Te Nelson Lease is located in Allen County, Kansas, in the N.E. Savonburg Field and is operated by James E. Russell Petroleum, Inc. General topics to be addressed are (1) reservoir management and performance evaluation, (2) waterflood optimization, and (3) the demonstration of recovery processes involving off-the-shelf technologies which can be used to enhance waterflood recovery, increase reserves, and reduce the abandonment rate of these reservoir types. In the Stewart Project, the reservoir management portion of the project conducted during Budget Period 1 involved performance evaluation. This included (1) reservoir characterization and the development of a reservoir database, (2) volumetric analysis to evaluate production performance, (3) reservoir modeling, (4) laboratory work, (5) identification of operational problems, (6) identification of unrecovered mobile oil and estimation of recovery factors, and (7) Identification of the most efficient and economical recovery process. To accomplish these objectives the initial budget period was subdivided into three major tasks. The tasks were (1) geological and engineering analysis, (2) laboratory testing, and (3) unitization. Due to the presence of different operators within the field, it was necessary to unitize the field in order to demonstrate a field-wide improved recovery process. This work was completed and the project moved into Budget Period 2.

Green, Don W.; McCune, A.D.; Michnick, M.; Reynolds, R.; Walton, A.; Watney, L.; Willhite, G. Paul

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

477

Shockwave Engine: Wave Disk Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: MSU is developing a new engine for use in hybrid automobiles that could significantly reduce fuel waste and improve engine efficiency. In a traditional internal combustion engine, air and fuel are ignited, creating high-temperature and high-pressure gases which expand rapidly. This expansion of gases forces the engines pistons to pump and powers the car. MSUs engine has no pistons. It uses the combustion of air and fuel to build up pressure within the engine, generating a shockwave that blasts hot gas exhaust into the blades of the engines rotors causing them to turn, which generates electricity. MSUs redesigned engine would be the size of a cooking pot and contain fewer moving partsreducing the weight of the engine by 30%. It would also enable a vehicle that could use 60% of its fuel for propulsion.

None

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

478

Increasing Waterflooding Reservoirs in the Wilmington Oil Field through Improved Reservoir Characterization and Reservoir Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this quarterly report was to summarize the work conducted under each task during the reporting period April - June 1998 and to report all technical data and findings as specified in the ''Federal Assistance Reporting Checklist''. The main objective of this project is the transfer of technologies, methodologies, and findings developed and applied in this project to other operators of Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs. This project will study methods to identify sands with high remaining oil saturation and to recomplete existing wells using advanced completion technology.

Koerner, Roy; Clarke, Don; Walker, Scott

1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

479

Contract NO. DE-FG22-93BC14862 Department of Petroleum Engineering  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Productivity and Injectivity of Horizontal Wells Productivity and Injectivity of Horizontal Wells Contract NO. DE-FG22-93BC14862 Department of Petroleum Engineering Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305 Contract Date: March 10, 1993 Anticipated Completion: March 10, 1998 Principal Investigator: Co- Inves t igat ors: Research Associate: Administrative Assistant: Technical Project Manager (DOE): F. John Fayers Khalid Aziz Thomas A. Hewett Sepehr Arbabi Marilyn Smith Thomas B. Reid _ - ; . ? --.i # 4 . - - - - 9 \ r c . 1 _ > -- r n * : - * c-2 : , / Quarterly Report /, -3 . * - -A," c f 2 1-3 .-- :+: Reporting Period: Ja