Sample records for reservoir engineering stanford

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    KALMAN FILTER (ENKF) FOR HISTORY MATCHING PRESSURE DATA FROM GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS Omer Inanc TureyenPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University performance predictions of reservoir models for liquid dominated geothermal reservoirs. Specifically we

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University The Triassic sandstone reservoirs of the Paris Basin (France) have attractive geothermal potential for district heating. However, previous exploitations of these reservoirs have revealed re-injection problems

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University along a borehole at the site was consistent with results from FMI and PTS logging. INTRODUCTION

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University and maximum allowable gradients. Included in the tool is site selection for separators and pipeline gathering

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University extent of the Doughnut Hole, to image concurrent changes in the local velocity structure, and to describe

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30-February 1, 2006

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    Boyer, Edmond

    -well system and to create an enhanced permeability fractured rock reservoir by hydraulic stimulations. DuePROCEEDINGS, Thirty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30-February 1, 2006 SGP-TR-179 CREATION OF AN HDR RESERVOIR AT 5000 M DEPTH

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    a decrease of velocity of approximately 13% within the most fractured portion of the stimulated reservoirPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 IMAGING OF THE SOULTZ ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    short circuiting in fractured geothermal reservoirs. INTRODUCTION Hydraulic connectivity amongPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University were conducted in a fractured sandstone to establish the value of these tests for establishing inter

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University--heat source, thermal/hydraulic insulation, reservoir potential, and working fluid. These four factors. Combining these data with precision surface heat flow measurements allows the prediction of temperature

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    and extraction operations in a fractured geothermal reservoir. PORO-THERMOELASTIC DISPLACEMENT DISCONTINUITYPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 SIMULATION OF FLUID FLOW IN FRACTURED PORO

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Twenty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 24-26, 2000

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    sea water were injected into the fractured BO-4 reservoir. A chemical inhibitor was used to preventPROCEEDINGS, Twenty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University; it is rapidly mixed with the reservoir geothermal fluid. This can be explained by a relatively large

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    SYSTEMS: A CASE STUDY OF HEAT EXTRACTION AND THERMAL RECOVERY IN A MODEL EGS FRACTURED RESERVOIR DanielPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) a conduction-dominated, model EGS reservoir was evaluated

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    in fractured media is complex due to the fact that the access to the reservoirs is restricted to the boreholes development of deep geothermal energy (Petty et al., 2009). Especially in the case of fractured reservoirsPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    MEASUREMENT IN FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS Mohammed Alaskar1 , Morgan Ames1 , Chong Liu2 , Steve Connor2PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University as tracers to infer reservoir properties in-situ is addressed. INTRODUCTION There is currently no practical

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    be able to be maintained for more than 30 years with small decreases in reservoir pressure and temperaturePROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University RESERVOIR MODEL OF THE TAKIGAMI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, OITA, JAPAN Saeid Jalilinasrabady1 , Ryuichi Itoi1

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    for more than 30 years with small decreases in reservoir pressure and temperature in the production zonePROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR, OITA, JAPAN Saeid Jalilinasrabady1 , Ryuichi Itoi1 , Hiroki Gotoh2 , Toshiaki Tanaka1 1

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    a geothermal or EGS reservoir. Fracture surface area, however, is among the most crucial data requiredPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AND EGS RESERVOIRS Peter Rose1 , David Riasetto2 , Jacqueline Siy2 , Michael Bartl2 , Paul Reimus3

  18. -Reservoir Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

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    SGP-TR-91 - Reservoir Technology - Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research at Stanford Principal in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford, California #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ...PREFACE................................................................................ 20 3.4 Thermal Stress Effects on Thermal Conductivity .................................... 27 #12

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    % capacity factor over a typical project life of 30 years; and (b) innovations in field management have led1 PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 FIFTY YEARS OF POWER GENERATION

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Twenty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 28-30, 2002

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . INTRODUCTION During on a previous geothermal exploration phase done 30 years ago in the Lamentin areaPROCEEDINGS, Twenty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 28-30, 2002 SGP-TR-171 PRELIMINARY GEOLOGICAL RESULTS OF RECENT EXPLORATORY

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University been selected as an EGS demonstration site by the U. S. Department of Energy. This paper summarizes/University of Utah, U.S. Geothermal Inc. and Apex HiPoint Reservoir Engineering. The primary objective

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30 -February1, 2012

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    Boyer, Edmond

    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University was performed during one year on one site but injection pump failure and well damage lead to abandonment of the reservoir to the injected fluid paths. MODEL DESCRIPTION In this study we carried out numerical simulations

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    an abandoned oil or gas well could be used in which case no wells need to be drilled). The disadvantagePROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University reservoir volume, a downhole heat exchanger will rapidly deplete the heat near the wellbore and cannot

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30 -February 1, 2012

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    Boyer, Edmond

    derived from natural brines circulating within a deep fractured granite reservoir. Such scalingPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University as a self-cleaning of the fracture network during geothermal production. In parallel, many research works

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University RESERVOIR: THE STUDY CASE OF CALCITE IN THE SOULTZ-SOUS-FORÊTS ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM Ronan L. Hébert1 available data (petrography, mineralogy, fracture zones, flow pathways, etc...). The relationship between

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    study sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), The Future of Geothermal Energy (MIT, 2006 level geothermal systems model to enable the US Department of Energy's Geothermal Technologies ProgramPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University Geothermal wells producing acidic fluid have been abandoned because of high corrosion potential on casing, they have been abandoned or converted to injection wells in spite of their sufficient productivity

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    a possible means of measuring thermal drawdown in a geothermal system before significant cooling occursPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University cooling. Results indicate that while the sensitivity of the method as generally proposed is low, it may

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    and the resource has been cooled by the 30 years of reinjection. The thermal breakthrough (Tb) is expected to occur are next to 30 years old. They would need to be restored or shut down for scaling and/or corrosion problemsPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    for lifetimes between 30-100 years, with a 90% confidence interval of 98-1200 MWth. Lumped parameter modeling the past 20 years. INTRODUCTION The OBGA comprises the regions of low temperature geothermal activityPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and the resource has been cooled by the 30 years of reinjection. The thermal breakthrough (Tb) is expected to occurPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University AT THE SCALE OF THE GEOTHERMAL HEATING DOUBLET IN THE PARIS BASIN, FRANCE. M.Le Brun1* , V.Hamm1 , S.Lopez1 , P

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    transferred to Zorlu Energy Group for 30 years. After this transfer, the Group has started to work on bothPROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University OF KIZILDERE GEOTHERMAL FIELD IN TURKEY Füsun S. Tut Haklidir, Taylan Akin, Aygün Güney, Aye Alpagut Bükülmez

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Stanford Geothermal Program Department of Energy Resources Engineering, 367 Panama Street Stanford various strategies we have implemented or are implementing to improve the efficiency of the simulations

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    , Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 HYDRAULIC FRACTURING OF NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS reservoirs, especially hot fractured rock or enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) reservoirs, has usually relied-induced dilation, the conductivity of the natural fractures is enhanced and a higher-permeability reservoir

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    Department of Energy Resources Engineering, Stanford University 367 Panama Street, Stanford, CA 94305, USA e and geometry are key for the optimum energy extraction from geothermal resources. Existing fracture systems, enhanced geothermal systems do not require natural convective hydrothermal resources, but rather

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    1 , R.C.M. Malate1 and R. N. Horne2 1 Energy Development Corporation, Energy Center, Merritt Road, Fort Bonifacio, 1201 Taguig City, Philippines 2 Stanford Geothermal Program, Department of Energy Resources Engineering, 367 Panama St., Stanford, CA 94305-2220, USA villacorte.jd@energy.com.ph, malate@energy

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 911, 2009

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    , Stanford, California, February 9­11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 HOT DRY ROCK GEOTHERMAL ENERGY: IMPORTANT LESSONS FROM FENTON HILL Donald W. Brown Los Alamos National Laboratory P.O. Box 1663, MS-D443 Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 USA e-mail: dwb@lanl.gov ABSTRACT The concept of Hot Dry Rock (HDR) geothermal energy originated

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 DISTRIBUTION OF ARSENIC IN GEOTHERMAL WATERS.com ABSTRACT Distribution of Arsenic in geothermal waters in Sabalan area has been studied. In all samples on the distribution of As in the main hot springs and deep reservoir wells of Sabalan geothermal field

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    , Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 THERMAL ENERGY RECOVERY FROM ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL is quantifying Rg, the geothermal recovery factor, which is defined as the ratio of produced thermal energy to the thermal energy contained in the fractured volume comprising the reservoir. One approach to EGS resource

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    , are as follows: (a) reduce the operations and maintenance cost; (b) reduce the power plant cost; (c) choose, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 OPTIMIZATION OF THE ECONOMICS OF ELECTRIC POWER FROM) developed to date, numerical simulation of idealized EGS reservoirs, economic sensitivity analysis

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 REMOVAL OF WATER FOR CARBON DIOXIDE for carbon dioxide-based EGS operation. We examine the relationship between drying time and reservoir amount of carbon dioxide sequestered, and total amount of water produced. INTRODUCTION Carbon

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 11-13, 2013

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    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    -elastic deformation with damage evolution, and groundwater flow are solved using the Explicit Finite Difference Lagrangian Method for solid deformation and the Finite Element Method for fluid mass conservation. Rock, Stanford, California, February 11-13, 2013 SGP-TR-198 MODELING RESERVOIR STIMULATION INDUCED BY WELLBORE

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    TO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING: CHARACTERIZATION OF FRACTURED RESERVOIRS Tsuneo Ishido1 , Yuji Nishi2 the possibility of characterizing fractured reservoirs using a combination of pressure and self the so-called EKP-postprocessor (Ishido and Pritchett, 1996) to apply it to fractured reservoirs

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    of Energy Resources Engineering, 367 Panama St. Stanford University, CA 94305-2220, USA e-mail: mcclure the pressures, temperatures, and stresses. An efficient method for calculating thermal stresses along a fracture Future of Geothermal Energy" (Tester, 2007). An important observation from EGS projects has been

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    of Energy Resources Engineering 367 Panama Street Stanford, CA, 94305, USA e-mail: egillj opposed to time). The interwell connectivity is represented by a kernel function, which can be estimated via deconvolution. A nonparametric kernel estimation method is illustrated by deconvolving synthetic

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    .edu ABSTRACT Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are engineered reservoirs created to economically extract heat and retention of water, gas and hydrocarbons, sequestration of wastes, the formation of ore deposits that influence heat- and mass-transfer in evolving geological reservoirs. As suggested schematically in Figure 1

  7. Julian, B.R. and G.R. Foulger, Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-

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    Foulger, G. R.

    Julian, B.R. and G.R. Foulger, Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms, Thirty- Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9- 11, 2009. Monitoring Geothermal Processes with Microearthquake Mechanisms Bruce R. Julian, U. S

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    Energy Restoration Energy Heat Engine Energy in waste Figure 1: Geothermal heat engine converting raw involves four energy streams (Figure 1): 1) the heat extracted from the reservoir, 1 Sandia National, for the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04- 94AL85000. i.e. the earth, 2) the heat

  9. Reservoir technology - geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford. Fifth annual report, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

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    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.

    1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to carry out research on geothermal reservoir engineering techniques useful to the geothermal industry. A parallel objective is the training of geothermal engineers and scientists. The research is focused toward accelerated development of hydrothermal resources through the evaluation of fluid reserves, and the forecasting of field behavior with time. Injection technology is a research area receiving special attention. The program is divided into reservoir definition research, modeling of heat extraction from fractured reservoirs, application and testing of new and proven reservoir engineering technology, and technology transfer. (ACR)

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    2 1 Istanbul Technical University, Department of Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering, Maslak. In order to evaluate the ACE approach, we applied it to a subset of the Palinpinon data set and checked, prolonging the economic life of the reservoir. Presently, the developer relies on a variety of ways ranging

  11. Equation Chapter 1 Section 1PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    AND THERMAL TRANSPORT IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS Egill Juliusson and Roland N. Horne Stanford University 367 a simulation study of tracer and thermal transport in fractured geothermal reservoirs. The motivation that in vertically fractured reservoirs the tracer signal will not suffice to fully characterize the thermal

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    , Stanford University, Stanford, CA, spistone@stanford.edu 2 GeothermEx Inc., Richmond, CA ABSTRACT Carbon CO2 sequestration via subsurface fluid loss. In order to entertain this idea seriously in water, as can be observed in carbonated beverages. Furthermore, you can observe that the CO2 gas comes

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    . While geomechanics in conventional reservoir simulator is often governed by change in pore addresses the modelling of the geomechanical effects induced by reservoir production and reinjection, the optimum production rate and the reservoir performance, reservoir geomechanics tries to capture rock

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    , Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 DETERMINATION OF RESISTIVITY INDEX, CAPILLARY PRESSURE@stanford.edu ABSTRACT It is known that the three important parameters: resistivity, capillary pressure, and relative permeability from capillary pressure data. However the literature on the interrelationship between resistivity

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    of Enhanced Geothermal Sys- tems. As cold water is circulated through a reservoir, rock contract, creating

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    -mail: hector.carlos.pulido@pemex.com ABSTRACT Complex reservoir geometries can influence the results obtained

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    and around the wells? · How will injection affect to the temperature distribution in the reservoir. There is no overpressure in the reservoir. The pressure distribution is hydrostatic along the depth. Horizontal extension

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 3, 2011

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    change and permeability variations caused by rock failure is much interest in geothermal reservoir. Cold of numerical experiments have been carried out to study the impact of cold water injection on the reservoir

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    reservoir to obtain the probability distribution function for the stored energy ("heat in place distributions of the reservoir parameters. The data acquired during each phase of the reservoir development, and thickness are assumed based on uncertain estimates in order to calculate the probability distribution

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    The optimal design of production in fractured geothermal reservoirs requires knowledge of the resource Resistivity Tomography (ERT) to characterize fractures in geothermal reservoirs. ERT is a technique to their surroundings. Electrical current moving through the reservoir passes mainly through fluid-filled fractures

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    FOR TRACER TRANSPORT IN A FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Aniko Toth, Peter Szucs and Elemer Bobok University in a fractured limestone geothermal reservoir the flow was investigated by two different methods in order and thermodynamic performance of the fractured geothermal reservoir was modeled for this purpose. The flow pattern

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    , characterization of the reservoir is mainly accomplished by evaluation of drilling data and seismic surveys, characterization of a reservoir is difficult because direct and indirect survey data are lacking. Investigation sufficient reservoir property prognosis necessary based on quantitative data sets. Facies concepts have

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    a simplified reservoir model geometry to a combination of conservative and reactive tracer data (2) using a simplified reservoir model geometry to a combination of conservative and reactive tracer data (2) using geometry, our approach attempts to fit a simple reservoir description to observed tracer test data

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    the effectiveness of these small-scale power plants hybrid systems are to be designed or existing technologies, no geothermal power plant facility exists in Central- Eastern Europe. There are professional investors, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 GEOTHERMAL POWER PLANT CONCEPTS IN THE PANNONIAN BASIN

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    " drilling of a geothermal well with a stimulation treatment that involves cold water injection over time, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 THERMAL SINGLE-WELL INJECTION-WITHDRAWAL TRACER TESTS, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA K_Pruess@lbl.gov ABSTRACT Single-well

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    , Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 HOT ROCK GEOTHERMAL ENERGY PLAYS IN AUSTRALIA & Geothermal Group, PIRSA Level 6, 101 Grenfell St., Adelaide SA 5000, Australia 2 Onshore Energy & Minerals industries. Converting just 1% of Australia's estimated Hot Rock crustal energy to electricity, from

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 ARE GEOTHERMAL ENERGY RETURNS ON INVESTMENT as the investment energy for the next generation system. In the case of geothermal energy that means using on geothermal EROI of closing the loop is examined. The benefit of using geothermal energy, as compared

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    , Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 2010 PRESENT STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY IN TURKEY of geothermal energy in Turkey has focused mainly on district heating. The first of these systems came on line installed. Based on these recent projects it is clear that geothermal energy will contribute significantly

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    , Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 TURKEY'S GEOTHERMAL ENERGY POTENTIAL: UPDATED RESULTS E. The estimated recoverable thermal energy of the other 38 geothermal fields evaluated for direct utilization of identified apparent capacity, power generation potential and thermal energy potential are discussed. Also

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 A CONCEPTUAL MODEL FOR GEOTHERMAL ENERGY of the Caribbean islands have great potential for Geothermal Energy. These islands have been formed partially for geothermal energy. The only operating geothermal plant in the Caribbean is at Bouillante in Guadeloupe

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 GREAT EXPECTATIONS FOR GEOTHERMAL ENERGY.goldstein@sa.gov.au ABSTRACT Geothermal energy systems: have a modest environmental footprint; will not be impacted by climate for zero-emission, base-load direct use and power generation. Displacement of more emissive fossil energy

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    , Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 FUTURE OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY Subir K. Sanyal Geotherm This paper first describes the salient features of the various types of geothermal energy resources) geopressured systems, and (6) magma energy. Of these six types, only hydrothermal systems have been

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    out at expeditious development rates and there are about a million power plants of this type-energy power plant, that supplies consumers with heat within constrained by them parameters, standard, Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 DESIGNING THERMAL-PHYSICAL, POWER

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    for the simulation of steam flow in a geothermal power plant network". The fluid movement is governed. In the pipeline network of geothermal power plant the steam flows from high to low pressure and heat flows from, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 GeoSteamNet: 2. STEAM FLOW SIMULATION IN A PIPELINE

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES IN THE PACIFIC ISLANDS: THE POTENTIAL OF POWER GENERATION TO BENEFIT INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES Alex J. McCoy-West1,2 , Sarah Milicich1 their untapped geothermal resources) for cost effective power production and direct-use applications. As part

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    , Stanford, California, January 31 - February 2, 2011 SGP-TR-191 DIRECTIONAL WELLS AT THE PAILAS GEOTHERMAL Costa Rica. Since 2009, the Costa Rican Electricity Company (ICE) has drilled 7 deep directional boreholes (in addition to the 9 existing vertical boreholes). The purpose of directional drilling has been

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    , Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010 SGP-TR-188 STRENGTH RETROGRESSION IN CEMENTS UNDER HIGH-TEMPERATURE designs for high-temperature geothermal applications have typically included 35 to 40% additional be inadequate to provide a high-strength, low-permeability cement at temperatures typical for geothermal

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    , Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009 SGP-TR-187 FIELD EXPERIMENTS FOR STUDYING ON CO2 SEQUESTRATION to study CO2 sequestration in solid minerals by injecting CO2 dissolved water into a high temperature as carbonate minerals. INTRODUCTION For the global warming problems, it is considered to reduce CO2 emission

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    -northeast of Reno, Nevada. It has an estimated reservoir temperature of 175-205°C at 1- 2 km depth and supports understanding permeability anisotropy in the geothermal reservoir but also for estimating the fault reactivation studies, stress modeling, and 3D structural modeling may be valuable for geothermal development where cost

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Olkaria I (East) reservoir began producing steam for the 45 MWe Olkaria I power plant. During the twenty to this good performance, numerical simulation was done to establish how much more additional power could (Figure 3 & 4). Olkaria I reservoir serves the pioneer 45 MWe plant which was commissioned between 1981

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    /cm2 sec up to 10-7 g/cm2 sec. The thermal evolution was calculated for up to 30,000 years. The deep and the performance of reservoir was predicted for 30 years production. Depths of the reservoir are assumed from 0 province about 30 Km southwest of Semarang, Indonesia as shown in Figure 1, is still undeveloped geothermal

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    , "heat exchange area" is often used in a sense similar to residence times or their distribution; we within reservoir); RTD: residence time distribution; FSR: flow-storage repartition; SWIW: single

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    on fracture distribution is presented in this study. In this model, the reservoir is simulated using a system of blocks some of which contain fracture zones and fracture-free matrix zones. The fracture distribution

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Stanford University

    hydraulic fracture operations, since even automatic picks often require assessment and correction. To aid in the seismic characterization of reservoir fracture networks, we propose to complement conventional earthquake location techniques and subsequently relocated using advanced processing techniques

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    in the reservoir, (2) prevention of waste water contamination, and (3) enhancing heat recovery by heat mining to trace reinjected waste water by seismic monitoring. By observing microseismic activities it was hoped

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Stanford University

    to strong temperature gradients (Bundschuh and Suárez, 2010), as happens during the injection of cold fluids. This mechanism is of great importance in enhanced oil reservoirs and geothermal systems, when the injected cold

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    , there has been some interest in the use of carbon dioxide as a heat extraction fluid. CO2 offers a number and geological sequestration of CO2 within the reservoir · Possibility of direct use of produced CO2

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    or direct use applications after drilling and well testing. INTRODUCTION The Pueblo of Jemez is located, approximately one mile south of the main village of Jemez Pueblo. A 240-foot deep well was drilled in 1991 at the Indian Springs fault zone to test for the geothermal reservoir (Figure 2). The well is located right next

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    energy resources such as geopressured geothermal brine (GGB) reservoirs and hot saline aquifers (HSA) can be potential clean energy resources provided the heat extraction from the subsurface is done in an economic equation for the thermal energy transport is given as follows (Eq. 4). · · here, (4) w 1 (5) 1 1 (6) (7

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    SAND PROPPANTS UNDER GEOTHERMAL CONDITIONS Daniel Brinton, Kristie McLin, Joseph Moore Energy surfaces. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was employed to determine the composition energy produced worldwide. Central to the process of creating an EGS reservoir is hydraulic fracturing

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    generation by utilizing hot fluids co-produced from oil and gas field were studied using numerical simulation energy and power generation by utilizing hot fluids co-produced from oil and gas reservoirs (Li, et al TEMPERATURE DURING POWER GENERATION IN OIL FIELDS Bin Gong1 , Hongbin Liang2 , Shouliang Xin2 , and Kewen Li

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    -WATER INJECTION INTO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY COMBINED WITH CO2 STORAGE Hamidreza Salimi of the geothermal system. In this way, synergy is established between geothermal energy production and subsurface CO) with geothermal energy. A further reduction could be achieved by capturing the remaining emitted CO2

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    a preferably conservative behavior in the reservoir. Therefore, it must be stable under the physico-chemical defined temperature sensitive reaction kinetics (Robinson 1987) we investigate the structural elements the influences of structural characteristics on the reaction kinetics are studied on 42 phenol acetates in order

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    AND RECOVERABLE THERMAL ENERGY IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS BY VOLUMETRIC METHODS Hülya Sarak, Ö. nanç Türeyen) on to stored and recoverable thermal energy estimates calculated from volumetric methods. Effects distribution function, respectively) thermal energy "reserves" from individual wells (or fields) to get "proved

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    efficiently through the reservoir and to extract thermal energy at a higher rate. We present a modeling and transport calculations, consistent transfer of mass and energy between the continuum and the discrete and the resulting pressure and temperature evaluations are discussed. INTRODUCTION Geothermal Energy is one

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    plants, a pipe system is used to gather fluids from production wells and transport them to a power plant there are several geothermal power plants operational and there is potential for more. Because of the nature of the geothermal reservoirs involved, the steam supply systems for these power plants are normally designed for two

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    /stimulation is that sufficient rock volumes can be hydraulically fractured via both tensile and shear failure, and more importantly by reactivation of naturally existing fractures (by shearing), to create the reservoir. The advancement of EGS greatly depends on our understanding of the dynamics of the intimately coupled rock

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    is not an active volcanic region or plate boundary .Geothermal source might be from different source. The source of hot dry rock and geothermal reservoir and flow regimes have not be extensively explored. The Vijayan to geology of the study area with special emphasize on the dolerite dike which may have been the source

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Twenty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 28-30, 2002

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    Boyer, Edmond

    and with magmatic CO2 emanations (minimum CO2 partial pressure estimated to 1 bar). Relative to a diluted sea water laterally from NW to SE at relatively low depths. No major evidence of a high temperature geothermal, 1984 and 1985 showed no major shallow evidences of the occurrence of an high temperature reservoir

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    of the flowing fluid at the 9 newly drilled deep wells in Kizildere Geothermal Field. Figure 1 Location map as the dynamic properties of the fluid flowing both through the wellbore and the reservoir. It is known that Petroleum and Geothermal fluids have similar properties in terms of well testing. In this regard, almost

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    engineers and licensing officers · to determine the necessary flow rates for a desired heat (or cold) output

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Borozdina1 , Laura Foulquier1 , Maria Papachristou2 1 GPC IP, PARIS-NORD 2 ­ Immeuble Business Park ­ Bât. 4@geo.auth.gr ABSTRACT Three-dimensional modelling of geologic structures is routinely applied in petroleum and, at a lesser extent though, in geothermal engineering and has proven an efficient tool in investigating complex

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    tracers in the Raft River geothermal system. INTRODUCTION Geothermal energy will be one component by geothermal energy, like all energy sources, will depend on a combination of viable engineering and uncertainty will be critical to the design and operation of future geothermal energy sources. This paper

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    by the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) in 1995, 50 % of the well production time is spent on making the hole keeping up with the safety and HSE standards. One may say that the job of a drilling engineer is to safely

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    BY AIR LIFTING Per-Gunnar Alm Lund University, Engineering Geology, P.O. Box 118, S-22100 Lund, Sweden plant in Sweden. The plant has been in operation for 25 years. Four production wells are used and after. INTRODUCTION Back in 1984 the first geothermal heat plant in Sweden, and so far the only existing, was built

  6. Geothermal reservoir engineering research at Stanford University. Third annual report for the period October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported in the following areas: heat extraction from hydrothermal reservoirs; radon reservoir engineering; well test analysis and bench scale experiments; field applications; workshop, seminars, and technical information; reinjection technology; and seismic monitoring of vapor/liquid interfaces. (MHR)

  7. -Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

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    Stanford University

    For the Period October 1, 1985 through September 30, 1986 DE-ASO7-84ID12529 Stanford Geothermal Program was initiated in fiscal year 1981. The report covers the period from October 1, 1985 through September 30, 1986SGP-TR-107 - Injection Technology - Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research at Stanford Principal

  8. STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94305

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    Stanford University

    STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94305 SGP-TR-89 GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING RESEARCH...................................................................................................... 1 RESERVOIR DEFINITION and Tracer Concentration-Time Data Velocity and Gravity Effects in Relative Permeability for Layered

  9. Fifteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fifteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23--25, 1990. Major topics included: DOE's geothermal research and development program, well testing, field studies, geosciences, geysers, reinjection, tracers, geochemistry, and modeling.

  10. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

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    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 34105 Stanford Geothermal, California SGP-TR-72 A RESERVOIR ENGINEERING ANALYSIS OF A VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL FIELD BY John Forrest Dee June 1983 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department

  11. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

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    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94305 SGP-TR-35 SECOND ANNUAL #12;INTRODUCTION The research e f f o r t of t h e Stanford Geothermal Program is focused on geothermal reservoir engineering. The major o b j e c t i v e of t h e protiram is t o develop techniques f o

  12. Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  13. Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

    1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  14. HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, R.C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    upon the available reservoir data. If the latter data a r eThe use of measured data in reservoir engineering simulationdata on the condition of the well and the static reservoir

  15. Stanford Geothermal Program Tnterdisciplinary Research

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    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Tnterdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences Stanford University Stanford, California A LABORATORY MODEL OF STWLATED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS by A. Hunsbedt P. Kruger created by artificial stimulation of geothermal reservoirs has been con- structed. The model has been used

  16. Sixth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P. (eds.)

    1980-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    INTRODUCTION TO THE PROCEEDINGS OF THE SIXTH GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WORKSHOP, STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and Paul Kruger Co-Principal Investigators Ian G. Donaldson Program Manager Stanford Geothermal Program The Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering convened at Stanford University on December 16, 1980. As with previous Workshops the attendance was around 100 with a significant participation from countries other than the United States (18 attendees from 6 countries). In addition, there were a number of papers from foreign contributors not able to attend. Because of the success of all the earlier workshops there was only one format change, a new scheduling of Tuesday to Thursday rather than the earlier Wednesday through Friday. This change was in general considered for the better and will be retained for the Seventh Workshop. Papers were presented on two and a half of the three days, the panel session, this year on the numerical modeling intercomparison study sponsored by the Department of Energy, being held on the second afternoon. This panel discussion is described in a separate Stanford Geothermal Program Report (SGP-TR42). This year there was a shift in subject of the papers. There was a reduction in the number of papers offered on pressure transients and well testing and an introduction of several new subjects. After overviews by Bob Gray of the Department of Energy and Jack Howard of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, we had papers on field development, geopressured systems, production engineering, well testing, modeling, reservoir physics, reservoir chemistry, and risk analysis. A total of 51 papers were contributed and are printed in these Proceedings. It was, however, necessary to restrict the presentations and not all papers printed were presented. Although the content of the Workshop has changed over the years, the format to date has proved to be satisfactory. The objectives of the Workshop, the bringing together of researchers, engineers and managers involved in geothermal reservoir study and development and the provision of a forum for the prompt and open reporting of progress and for the exchange of ideas, continue to be met . Active discussion by the majority of the participants is apparent both in and outside the workshop arena. The Workshop Proceedings now contain some of the most highly cited geothermal literature. Unfortunately, the popularity of the Workshop for the presentation and exchange of ideas does have some less welcome side effects. The major one is the developing necessity for a limitation of the number of papers that are actually presented. We will continue to include all offered papers in the Summaries and Proceedings. As in the recent past, this sixth Workshop was supported by a grant from the Department of Energy. This grant is now made directly to Stanford as part of the support for the Stanford Geothermal Program (Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459). We are certain that all participants join us in our appreciation of this continuing support. Thanks are also due to all those individuals who helped in so many ways: The members of the program committee who had to work so hard to keep the program to a manageable size - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Paul G. Atkinson (Union Oil Company). Michael L. Sorey (U.S.G.S.), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program), and Roland N. Horne (Stanford Geothermal Program). The session chairmen who contributed so much to the organization and operation of the technical sessions - George Frye (Aminoil USA), Phillip H. Messer (Union Oil Company), Leland L. Mink (Department of Energy), Manuel Nathenson (U.S.G.S.), Gunnar Bodvarsson (Oregon State University), Mohindar S. Gulati (Union Oil Company), George F. Pinder (Princeton University), Paul A. Witherspoon (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory), Frank G. Miller (Stanford Geothermal Program) and Michael J. O'Sullivan (Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory). The many people who assisted behind the scenes, making sure that everything was prepared and organized - in particular we would like to t

  17. Seventeenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1992-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    PREFACE The Seventeenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 29-31, 1992. There were one hundred sixteen registered participants which equaled the attendance last year. Participants were from seven foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, France, Belgium, Mexico and New Zealand. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in the papers. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Raffaele Cataldi. Dr. Cataldi gave a talk on the highlights of his geothermal career. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Cataldi. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award at the banquet. Thirty-eight papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Dr. Roland Horne opened the meeting and the key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who discussed the DOE Geothermal R. & D. Program. The talk focused on aiding long-term, cost effective private resource development. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: geochemistry, hot dry rock, injection, geysers, modeling, and reservoir mechanics. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: Sabodh Garg., Jim Lovekin, Jim Combs, Ben Barker, Marcel Lippmann, Glenn Horton, Steve Enedy, and John Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Francois Groff who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook -vii

  18. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

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    Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORTI UNIVERSITY Stanford, California SGP-TR-85 ANALYSIS OF THE STANFORD GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR MODEL EXPERIMENTS was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459

  19. . Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

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    Stanford University

    . Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford, California SGP-TR- 80 DEPLETION MODELING OF LIQUID DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS BY Gudmund 01sen June 1984 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under

  20. Eighteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    PREFACE The Eighteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 26-28, 1993. There were one hundred and seventeen registered participants which was greater than the attendance last year. Participants were from eight foreign countries: Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, Guatemala, and Iceland. Performance of many geothermal fields outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Dean Gary Ernst opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy was awarded to Dr. Mock who also spoke at the banquet. Thirty-nine papers were presented at the Workshop with two papers submitted for publication only. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: field operations, The Geysers, geoscience, hot-dry-rock, injection, modeling, slim hole wells, geochemistry, well test and wellbore. Session chairmen were major contributors to the program and we thank: John Counsil, Kathleen Enedy, Harry Olson, Eduardo Iglesias, Marcelo Lippmann, Paul Atkinson, Jim Lovekin, Marshall Reed, Antonio Correa, and David Faulder. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to John Hornbrook who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

  1. Nineteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Horne, R.J.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1994-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    PREFACE The Nineteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 18-20, 1994. This workshop opened on a sad note because of the death of Prof. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. on November 19, 1993. Hank had been fighting leukemia for a long time and finally lost the battle. Many of the workshop participants were present for the celebration of his life on January 21 at Stanford's Memorial Church. Hank was one of the founders of the Stanford Geothermal Program and the Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Workshop. His energy, kindness, quick wit, and knowledge will long be missed at future workshops. Following the Preface we have included a copy of the Memorial Resolution passed by the Stanford University Senate. There were one hundred and four registered participants. Participants were from ten foreign countries: Costa Rica, England, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, Philippines and Turkey. Workshop papers described the performance of fourteen geothermal fields outside the United States. Roland N. Home opened the meeting and welcomed the visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was J.E. ''Ted'' Mock who gave a presentation about the future of geothermal development. The banquet speaker was Jesus Rivera and he spoke about Energy Sources of Central American Countries. Forty two papers were presented at the Workshop. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: sciences, injection, production, modeling, and adsorption. Session chairmen are an important part of the workshop and our thanks go to: John Counsil, Mark Walters, Dave Duchane, David Faulder, Gudmundur Bodvarsson, Jim Lovekin, Joel Renner, and Iraj Ershaghi. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate audiovisual equipment and to Xianfa Deng who coordinated the meeting arrangements for the Workshop. Roland N. Home Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

  2. Twentieth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    PREFACE The Twentieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, dedicated to the memory of Professor Hank Ramey, was held at Stanford University on January 24-26, 1995. There were ninety-five registered participants. Participants came from six foreign countries: Japan, Mexico, England, Italy, New Zealand and Iceland. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors to the campus. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Thirty-two papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into eleven sessions concerning: field development, modeling, well tesubore, injection, geoscience, geochemistry and field operations. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bob Fournier, Mark Walters, John Counsil, Marcelo Lippmann, Keshav Goyal, Joel Renner and Mike Shook. In addition to the technical sessions, a panel discussion was held on ''What have we learned in 20 years?'' Panel speakers included Patrick Muffler, George Frye, Alfred Truesdell and John Pritchett. The subject was further discussed by Subir Sanyal, who gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager

  3. Sixteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program) [Stanford Geothermal Program

    1991-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sixteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23-25, 1991. The Workshop Banquet Speaker was Dr. Mohinder Gulati of UNOCAL Geothermal. Dr. Gulati gave an inspiring talk on the impact of numerical simulation on development of geothermal energy both in The Geysers and the Philippines. Dr. Gulati was the first recipient of The Stanford Geothermal Program Reservoir Engineering Award for Excellence in Development of Geothermal Energy. Dr. Frank Miller presented the award. The registered attendance figure of one hundred fifteen participants was up slightly from last year. There were seven foreign countries represented: Iceland, Italy, Philippines, Kenya, the United Kingdom, Mexico, and Japan. As last year, papers on about a dozen geothermal fields outside the United States were presented. There were thirty-six papers presented at the Workshop, and two papers were submitted for publication only. Attendees were welcomed by Dr. Khalid Aziz, Chairman of the Petroleum Engineering Department at Stanford. Opening remarks were presented by Dr. Roland Horne, followed by a discussion of the California Energy Commission's Geothermal Activities by Barbara Crowley, Vice Chairman; and J.E. ''Ted'' Mock's presentation of the DOE Geothermal Program: New Emphasis on Industrial Participation. Technical papers were organized in twelve sessions concerning: hot dry rock, geochemistry, tracer injection, field performance, modeling, and chemistry/gas. As in previous workshops, session chairpersons made major contributions to the program. Special thanks are due to Joel Renner, Jeff Tester, Jim Combs, Kathy Enedy, Elwood Baldwin, Sabodh Garg, Marcel0 Lippman, John Counsil, and Eduardo Iglesias. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank Pat Ota, Angharad Jones, Rosalee Benelli, Jeanne Mankinen, Ted Sumida, and Terri A. Ramey who also produces the Proceedings Volumes for publication. We owe a great deal of thanks to our students who operate the audiovisual equipment and to Michael Riley who coordinated the meeting arrangements for a second year. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Roland N. Horne Frank G. Miller Paul Kruger William E. Brigham Jean W. Cook

  4. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reservoir engineering research program a t the University of Colorado is described. Physical characterization

  5. SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchett, J.W.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. , L. F. Rice "Reservoir Engineering Data: thermal Field,Summary of Reservoir Engineering Data: Wairakei GeothermalSUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL

  6. SUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEW ZEALAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pritchett, J.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    W. , L. F. Rice "Reservoir Engineering Data: thermal Field,Summary of Reservoir Engineering Data: Wairakei GeothermalSUMMARY OF RESERVOIR ENGINEERING DATA: WAIRAKEI GEOTHERMAL

  7. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    results w i t h other reservoir data. Ramey [1974] definesone-dimen- sional data on reservoir drainage which has beenC. R. , Goodwill D. Data t o Reservoir Engine H. Application

  8. Thirteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.; Cook, J.W. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    PREFACE The Thirteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 19-21, 1988. Although 1987 continued to be difficult for the domestic geothermal industry, world-wide activities continued to expand. Two invited presentations on mature geothermal systems were a keynote of the meeting. Malcolm Grant presented a detailed review of Wairakei, New Zealand and highlighted plans for new development. G. Neri summarized experience on flow rate decline and well test analysis in Larderello, Italy. Attendance continued to be high with 128 registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, New Zealand, Japan, Mexico and The Philippines. A discussion of future workshops produced a strong recommendation that the Stanford Workshop program continue for the future. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Four technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published. In addition to these forty five technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Gustavo Calderon from the Inter-American Development Bank. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants a description of the Bank???s operations in Costa Rica developing alternative energy resources, specifically Geothermal, to improve the country???s economic basis. His talk appears as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: J. Combs, G. T. Cole, J. Counsil, A. Drenick, H. Dykstra, K. Goyal, P. Muffler, K. Pruess, and S. K. Sanyal. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Marilyn King, Pat Oto, Terri Ramey, Bronwyn Jones, Yasmin Gulamani, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, especially Jeralyn Luetkehans. The Thirteenth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract No. DE-AS07-84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jean W. Cook

  9. Julian, B.R. and G.R. Foulger, Improved Methods for Mapping Permeability and Heat sources in Geothermal Areas using Microearthquake Data, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    Systems (EGS) experiments and other geothermal operations. With support from the Dept. of Energy, we in Geothermal Areas using Microearthquake Data, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering and Heat sources in Geothermal Areas using Microearthquake Data Bruce R. Julian§ U. S. Geological Survey

  10. Eleventh workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Counsil, J.R. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1986-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eleventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 21-23, 1986. The attendance was up compared to previous years, with 144 registered participants. Ten foreign countries were represented: Canada, England, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand and Turkey. There were 38 technical presentations at the Workshop which are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Six technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published and one presentation is not published. In addition to these 45 technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by J. E. Mock from the Department of Energy. The Workshop Banquet speaker was Jim Combs of Geothermal Resources International, Inc. We thank him for his presentation on GEO geothermal developments at The Geysers. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the Workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, E. Iglesias, A. Moench, S. Prestwich, and K. Pruess. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank J.W. Cook, J.R. Hartford, M.C. King, A.E. Osugi, P. Pettit, J. Arroyo, J. Thorne, and T.A. Ramey for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Eleventh Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Energy through Contract DE-AS03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1986 H.J. Ramey, Jr. P. Kruger R.N. Horne W.E. Brigham F.G. Miller J.R. Counsil

  11. HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, R.C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the Cerro P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Mexicali,e C e r r o P r i e t o Geothermal F i e l d , Baja C a l i1979 HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING R.

  12. Stanford University School of Engineering 171 Undergraduate Handbook 2005-2006 ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    , mathematics through differential equations, probability and statistics, and science including physicsStanford University School of Engineering 171 Undergraduate Handbook 2005-2006 ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING -- ABET ACCREDITATION CRITERIA APPLY -- The environmental engineering profession works to protect

  13. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 and by the Departnent by water cir- culated in a " hot dry rock" geothermal reservoir will induce tensile thermal stresses i n

  14. Twelfth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Rivera, J. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1987-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Preface The Twelfth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 20-22, 1987. The year ending December 1986 was very difficult for the domestic geothermal industry. Low oil prices caused a sharp drop in geothermal steam prices. We expected to see some effect upon attendance at the Twelfth Workshop. To our surprise, the attendance was up by thirteen from previous years, with one hundred and fifty-seven registered participants. Eight foreign countries were represented: England, France, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, and Turkey. Despite a worldwide surplus of oil, international geothermal interest and development is growing at a remarkable pace. There were forty-one technical presentations at the Workshop. All of these are published as papers in this Proceedings volume. Seven technical papers not presented at the Workshop are also published; they concern geothermal developments and research in Iceland, Italy, and New Zealand. In addition to these forty-eight technical presentations or papers, the introductory address was given by Henry J. Ramey, Jr. from the Stanford Geothermal Program. The Workshop Banquet speaker was John R. Berg from the Department of Energy. We thank him for sharing with the Workshop participants his thoughts on the expectations of this agency in the role of alternative energy resources, specifically geothermal, within the country???s energy framework. His talk is represented as a paper in the back of this volume. The chairmen of the technical sessions made an important contribution to the workshop. Other than Stanford faculty members they included: M. Gulati, K. Goyal, G.S. Bodvarsson, A.S. Batchelor, H. Dykstra, M.J. Reed, A. Truesdell, J.S. Gudmundsson, and J.R. Counsil. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Marilyn King, Amy Osugi, Terri Ramey, and Rosalee Benelli for their valued help with the meeting arrangements and preparing the Proceedings. We also owe great thanks to our students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment, specially Jim Lovekin. The Twelfth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal Technology Division of the U. S. Department of Energy through Contract Nos. DE-AS03-80SF11459 and DE-AS07- 84ID12529. We deeply appreciate this continued support. January 1987 Henry J. Ramey, Jr. Paul Kruger Roland N. Horne William E. Brigham Frank G. Miller Jesus Rivera

  15. NANOSENSORS AS RESERVOIR ENGINEERING TOOLS TO MAP IN-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    .................................................................................. 1 1.1.1. The Role of Geothermal Energy........................................................ IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS By Morgan Ames June 2011 Financial support was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy (under contract number DE-FG36-08GO18192). Stanford University Stanford

  16. Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

  17. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary was provided through the Stanford Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 heat sweep model for estimating energy recovery from fractured geothermal reservoirs based on early

  18. STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, J. H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the characteristics of a geothermal reservoir: Items 2, 6,new data important to geothermal reservoir engineering prac-forecast performance of the geothermal reservoir and bore

  19. STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANAGEMENT PROGRAM ("GREMP") -DECEMBER, 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, J. H.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary of reservoir engineering data: Wairakei Geothermaland new data important to geothermal reservoir engineeringdata and other information related to geothermal reservoir

  20. STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Paul Kruger and Henry J . Ramey, Jr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Mass Transfer i n Porous and Fractured Media . . . . . . . . . 61 Heat Transfer i n Fractun3d Rock . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Geothermal Reservoir Phy.Sica1 PIodels . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 RAD3N I N GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

  1. Finite temperature reservoir engineering and entanglement dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Fedortchenko; A. Keller; T. Coudreau; P. Milman

    2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose experimental methods to engineer reservoirs at arbitrary temperature which are feasible with current technology. Our results generalize to mixed states the possibility of quantum state engineering through controlled decoherence. Finite temperature engineered reservoirs can lead to the experimental observation of thermal entanglement --the appearance and increase of entanglement with temperature-- to the study of the dependence of finite time disentanglement and revival with temperature, quantum thermodynamical effects, among many other applications, enlarging the comprehension of temperature dependent entanglement properties.

  2. Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    PROCEEDINGS, Second workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering, Stanford, CA, USA, 1 Dec 1976, 111977 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org...

  3. Stanford MBA/MS Electrical Engineering Joint Degree Program Page 1 of 20 August 18, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Stanford MBA/MS Electrical Engineering Joint Degree Program Page 1 of 20 August 18, 2014 Becky at the end of this transcript. Stanford MBA/MS Electrical Engineering Joint Degree Webinar August 18, 2014 on the Masters in Electrical Engineering and MBA Joint Degree Program. We are going to be together here for 45

  4. Stanford Geothermal Program Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    s Stanford Geothermal Program Stanford University Stanford, California RADON MEASUEMENTS I N GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS ? d by * ** Alan K. Stoker and Paul Kruger SGP-TR-4 January 1975 :: raw at Lcs Alams S c i and water, o i l and n a t u r a l gas wells. with radon i n geothermal reservoirs. Its presence i n

  5. STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCXS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCXS Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and A. Louis C a p i l l a r i t y . . . . . . . . . . 28 RADON I N GEOTHEENAL RESERVOIRS . . . . . . . 33 HEAT AND MASS TRANSPORT I N FRACTURED ROCKS . . . . . . . . . . . . .35 Mathematical Models

  6. Ninth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Miller, F.G.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Gudmundsson, J.S. (Stanford Geothermal Program)

    1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The attendance at the Workshop was similar to last year's with 123 registered participants of which 22 represented 8 foreign countries. A record number of technical papers (about 60) were submitted for presentation at the Workshop. The Program Committee, therefore, decided to have several parallel sessions to accommodate most of the papers. This format proved unpopular and will not be repeated. Many of the participants felt that the Workshop lost some of its unique qualities by having parallel sessions. The Workshop has always been held near the middle of December during examination week at Stanford. This timing was reviewed in an open discussion at the Workshop. The Program Committee subsequently decided to move the Workshop to January. The Tenth Workshop will be held on January 22-24, 1985. The theme of the Workshop this year was ''field developments worldwide''. The Program Committee addressed this theme by encouraging participants to submit field development papers, and by inviting several international authorities to give presentations at the Workshop. Field developments in at least twelve countries were reported: China, El Salvador, France, Greece, Iceland, Italy, Japan, Kenya, Mexico, New Zealand, the Philippines, and the United States. There were 58 technical presentations at the Workshop, of which 4 were not made available for publication. Several authors submitted papers not presented at the Workshop. However, these are included in the 60 papers of these Proceedings. The introductory address was given by Ron Toms of the U.S. Department of Energy, and the banquet speaker was A1 Cooper of Chevron Resources Company. An important contribution was made to the Workshop by the chairmen of the technical sessions. Other than Stanford Geothermal Program faculty members, they included: Don White (Field Developments), Bill D'Olier (Hydrothermal Systems), Herman Dykstra (Well Testing), Karsten Pruess (Well Testing), John Counsil (Reservoir Chemistry), Malcolm Mossman (Reservoir Chemistry), Greg Raasch (Production), Manny Nathenson (Injection), Susan Petty (Injection), Subir Sanyal (Simulation), Marty Molloy (Petrothermal), and Allen Moench (Reservoir Physics). The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff and students. We would like to thank Jean Cook, Joanne Hartford, Terri Ramey, Amy Osugi, and Marilyn King for their valued help with the Workshop arrangements and the Proceedings. We also owe thanks to the program students who arranged and operated the audio-visual equipment. The Ninth Workshop was supported by the Geothermal and Hydropower Technologies Division of the U . S . Department of Energy through contract DE-AT03-80SF11459. We deeply appreciate this continued support. H. J. Ramey, Jr., R. N. Horne, P. Kruger, W. E. Brigham, F. G. Miller, J. S . Gudmundsson -vii

  7. Stanford Geothermal Program Interd is c i p l inary Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Interd is c i p l inary Research i n Engineering and Earth Sciences Stanford University Stanford, C a l i f o r n i a LABORATORY STUDIES OF STIMULATED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS.E geothermal energy from artificially stimu- lated systems by in-place flashing was studied experimentally

  8. Twenty-first workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1996-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    PREFACE The Twenty-First Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at the Holiday Inn, Palo Alto on January 22-24, 1996. There were one-hundred fifty-five registered participants. Participants came from twenty foreign countries: Argentina, Austria, Canada, Costa Rica, El Salvador, France, Iceland, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Nicaragua, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, Switzerland, Turkey and the UK. The performance of many geothermal reservoirs outside the United States was described in several of the papers. Professor Roland N. Horne opened the meeting and welcomed visitors. The key note speaker was Marshall Reed, who gave a brief overview of the Department of Energy's current plan. Sixty-six papers were presented in the technical sessions of the workshop. Technical papers were organized into twenty sessions concerning: reservoir assessment, modeling, geology/geochemistry, fracture modeling hot dry rock, geoscience, low enthalpy, injection, well testing, drilling, adsorption and stimulation. Session chairmen were major contributors to the workshop, and we thank: Ben Barker, Bobbie Bishop-Gollan, Tom Box, Jim Combs, John Counsil, Sabodh Garg, Malcolm Grant, Marcel0 Lippmann, Jim Lovekin, John Pritchett, Marshall Reed, Joel Renner, Subir Sanyal, Mike Shook, Alfred Truesdell and Ken Williamson. Jim Lovekin gave the post-dinner speech at the banquet and highlighted the exciting developments in the geothermal field which are taking place worldwide. The Workshop was organized by the Stanford Geothermal Program faculty, staff, and graduate students. We wish to thank our students who operated the audiovisual equipment. Shaun D. Fitzgerald Program Manager.

  9. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    o f Energy from Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs. Dal las:well behavior, fractured matrix reservoir behavior, wellEnergy from Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs." Society of ~

  10. STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING RESEARCH PROJECTS SUPPORTED BY USDOE/DIVISION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, J.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary of reservoir engineering data: from the authors.of new data important to geo- thermal reservoir engineeringdata and other information related to geothermal reservoir

  11. Reservoir Engineering for Unconventional Gas Reservoirs: What Do We Have to Consider?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarkson, Christopher R [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reservoir engineer involved in the development of unconventional gas reservoirs (UGRs) is required to integrate a vast amount of data from disparate sources, and to be familiar with the data collection and assessment. There has been a rapid evolution of technology used to characterize UGR reservoir and hydraulic fracture properties, and there currently are few standardized procedures to be used as guidance. Therefore, more than ever, the reservoir engineer is required to question data sources and have an intimate knowledge of evaluation procedures. We propose a workflow for the optimization of UGR field development to guide discussion of the reservoir engineer's role in the process. Critical issues related to reservoir sample and log analysis, rate-transient and production data analysis, hydraulic and reservoir modeling and economic analysis are raised. Further, we have provided illustrations of each step of the workflow using tight gas examples. Our intent is to provide some guidance for best practices. In addition to reviewing existing methods for reservoir characterization, we introduce new methods for measuring pore size distribution (small-angle neutron scattering), evaluating core-scale heterogeneity, log-core calibration, evaluating core/log data trends to assist with scale-up of core data, and modeling flow-back of reservoir fluids immediately after well stimulation. Our focus in this manuscript is on tight and shale gas reservoirs; reservoir characterization methods for coalbed methane reservoirs have recently been discussed.

  12. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PR0GRAh.I STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PR0GRAh.I STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD,CALIFORNIA 94305 SGP-TR-5 1 GEOTHERMAL Implications of Adsorption and Formation Fluid Composition on Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation . . 40 TASK 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 APPENDIX A: PARTICIPANTS I N THE STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM . . 59 APPENDIX B: VISITING

  13. A reservoir engineer characterization of the Austin Chalk trend 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Her-Yuan

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A RESERVOIR ENGINEER CHARACTERIZATION OF THE AUSTIN CHALK TREND A Thesis by HER-YUAN CHEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ALM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1985... Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A RESERVOIR ENGINEER CHARACTERIZATION OF THE AUSTIN CHALK TREND A Thesis by HER-YUAN CHEN Approved as to style and content by; Steven W. Poston (Chairman of Committee) hing H. Wu (Member) Robert R. Serg...

  14. Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    1 Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report July 1990 - June 1996 Stanford Geothermal Program. THE EFFECTS OF ADSORPTION ON VAPOR-DOMINATED GEOTHERMAL FIELDS.1 1.1 SUMMARY? ..............................................................................................2 1.4 ADSORPTION IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS ........................................................3

  15. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Geothermal Resource Assessment and Reservoir EngineeriWorkshop on Geothermal Resources Assessment and ReserooirWorkshop on Geothermal Resources Assessment an ervoi r Engi

  16. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    i s maintain reservoir pressu found t o be f a i r l yPrieto. , Correlation of pressu temperature trends w i t h

  17. Stanford University Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    and smart grids; and Educate future academic and industry leaders to master and apply these theories of disciplines that can contribute to advancing engineering, science and practice for the planning, design

  18. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

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    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94105 SGP-TR- 61 GEOTHERMAL APPENDIX A: PARTICIPANTS IN THE STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM '81/'82 . 60 APPENDIX B: PAPERS PRESENTED through September 30, 1982. The Stanford Geothermal Program conducts interdisciplinary research

  19. Integration of advanced geoscience and engineering techniques to quantify interwell heterogeneity in reservoir models. Final report, September 29, 1993--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, W.W.; Buckley, J.S.; Ouenes, A.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this three-year project was to provide a quantitative definition of reservoir heterogeneity. This objective was accomplished through the integration of geologic, geophysical, and engineering databases into a multi-disciplinary understanding of reservoir architecture and associated fluid-rock and fluid-fluid interactions. This interdisciplinary effort integrated geological and geophysical data with engineering and petrophysical results through reservoir simulation to quantify reservoir architecture and the dynamics of fluid-rock and fluid-fluid interactions. An improved reservoir description allows greater accuracy and confidence during simulation and modeling as steps toward gaining greater recovery efficiency from existing reservoirs. A field laboratory, the Sulimar Queen Unit, was available for the field research. Several members of the PRRC staff participated in the development of improved reservoir description by integration of the field and laboratory data as well as in the development of quantitative reservoir models to aid performance predictions. Subcontractors from Stanford University and the University of Texas at Austin (UT) collaborated in the research and participated in the design and interpretation of field tests. The three-year project was initiated in September 1993 and led to the development and application of various reservoir description methodologies. A new approach for visualizing production data graphically was developed and implemented on the Internet. Using production data and old gamma rays logs, a black oil reservoir model that honors both primary and secondary performance was developed. The old gamma ray logs were used after applying a resealing technique, which was crucial for the success of the project. In addition to the gamma ray logs, the development of the reservoir model benefitted from an inverse Drill Stem Test (DST) technique which provided initial estimates of the reservoir permeability at different wells.

  20. Engineering Atomic Quantum Reservoirs for Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Susanne Pielawa; Luiz Davidovich; David Vitali; Giovanna Morigi

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present protocols for creating entangled states of two modes of the electromagnetic field, by using a beam of atoms crossing microwave resonators. The atoms are driven by a transverse, classical field and pump correlated photons into (i) two modes of a cavity and (ii) the modes of two distant cavities. The protocols are based on a stochastic dynamics, characterized by random arrival times of the atoms and by random interaction times between atoms and cavity modes. The resulting effective model yields a master equation, whose steady state is an entangled state of the cavity modes. In this respect, the atoms act like a quantum reservoir, pulling the cavity modes into an entangled, Einstein-Podolski-Rosen (EPR) state, whose degree of entanglement is controlled by the intensity and the frequency of the transverse field. This scheme is robust against stochastic fluctuations in the atomic beam, and it does not require atomic detection nor velocity selection.

  1. Engineering Atomic Quantum Reservoirs for Photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pielawa, Susanne; Vitali, David; Morigi, Giovanna

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present protocols for creating entangled states of two modes of the electromagnetic field, by using a beam of atoms crossing microwave resonators. The atoms are driven by a transverse, classical field and pump correlated photons into (i) two modes of a cavity and (ii) the modes of two distant cavities. The protocols are based on a stochastic dynamics, characterized by random arrival times of the atoms and by random interaction times between atoms and cavity modes. The resulting effective model yields a master equation, whose steady state is an entangled state of the cavity modes. In this respect, the atoms act like a quantum reservoir, pulling the cavity modes into an entangled, Einstein-Podolski-Rosen (EPR) state, whose degree of entanglement is controlled by the intensity and the frequency of the transverse field. This scheme is robust against stochastic fluctuations in the atomic beam, and it does not require atomic detection nor velocity selection.

  2. GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING MANGEMENT PROGRAM PLAN (GREMP PLAN)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bloomster, C.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in data interpretation, and reservoir performance as relatedgeothermal reservoir, the acquisition of data on the v i s cfield data and for modeling reservoir performance. such

  3. Integrated Dynamic Optimization and Control in Reservoir Engineering using Locally Identified Linear Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van den Hof, Paul

    on dynamic real-time optimization (D- RTO) of waterflooding strategies in petroleum reservoirs haveIntegrated Dynamic Optimization and Control in Reservoir Engineering using Locally Identified, the used large-scale, nonlinear, physics-based reservoir models suffer from vast parametric uncertainty

  4. Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report

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    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Final Report July 1996 - June 1999 Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy under grant number DE-FG07-95ID13370 Stanford Geothermal Program Department of Petroleum ....................................................................................................................6 2. THE ROLE OF CAPILLARY FORCES IN THE NATURAL STATE OF FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    EXPLORATION DATA William Cumming Cumming Geoscience 4728 Shade Tree Lane Santa Rosa, CA, 95405, USA e. A common alternative approach to both targeting and assessment is to focus on a data anomaly or, in some conceptual models based on information from typical geothermal exploration data sets. A conceptual model

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    as the innovative method of geothermal development. This paper presents scenarios for heat harvesting from typical.35×1016 Mscf of natural gas. Despite these impressive figures, extraction of geothermal energy is mostly exploit only those sites that have anomalously high geothermal gradients and strong water drives ­ the so

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    air pollution and save conventional energy, geothermal energy as a heat source for district heating on some typical geothermal wells. 1.2 Cliamte Air temperature affects the indoor temperature through heat

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    oil per year (45.7 million barrels) and reduces air pollution by almost 1 The total installed capacity

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ), water consumption, and land use from geothermal electricity generation than from traditional fossil-fuel­based electricity generators. However, the environmental impacts from the construction of geothermal energy. INTRODUCTION It is generally recognized that electricity production from geothermal power plants releases fewer

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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    Australia and Western Australia, that have been established with complementary programs to achieve research for industry and government to access research services Geothermal energy development in Australia will be best and Resources SA, Petroleum and Geothermal Group GPO Box 1671 Adelaide, SA, 5000, Australia e-mail: alexandra

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence, The University of Queensland, Queensland 4072, Australia 2 Radiogenic, Australia 3 School of Earth Sciences, The University of Queensland, Queensland 4072, Australia e-mail: t travertine vein and breccia deposits in the CO2-rich Pamukkale and Kirsehir geothermal fields in western

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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    into a fracture using 2.D-ROCMAS finite element software which has a coupled flow- geomechanic capability. Mathias

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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    POWER Lyle A. Johnson, PE and Everett D. Walker Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center 907 N. Poplar Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has developed a program to test low temperature power generation Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) is located at the Teapot Dome oil field, also known as the Naval

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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    -ROCK-PROPPANT INTERACTIONS Kristie McLin, Daniel Brinton, and Joseph Moore Energy and Geoscience Institute, University of Utah 423 Wakara Way Suite 300 Salt Lake City, UT 84108 e-mail: kristie.mclin@utah.edu ABSTRACT Enhanced. This deformation allows for the increase of contact area between proppant grains or between proppant and the wall

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Island (French Lesser Antilles) with 6 to 8% of its consumption of electric energy. The consequent.,1988). The persistence of volcanic activity in the area for almost 1 Ma and the associated magmatic, immediately north of Bouillante city (Marsolle-Machette corridor, cf. Figure 1 and Bouchot et al., 2010

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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    city, capital of the province (Fig.1). The field has been proved to be one of the geothermal prospects in Indonesia (Hochstein and Sudarman, 2008). PT. Pertamina Geothermal Energy (PT.PGE) conducted reconnaissance not been developed yet. Thus, we have carried out geochemical survey in this area and tried to develop

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    Stanford University

    : Well MG-1 casing profile. 2008 2009 Date 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 Flow,kg/s massflow steamflow waterflow

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    of the techniques that are in the "tool bag" for creating and managing Enhanced Geothermal Systems. This project is funded by the Department of Energy, Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technology Development program. The DOE in geothermal systems. Peaks in FIS data are assumed to be related to location of fractures. The working

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    of an ORC (Organic Rankine Cycle) plant having a net power capacity of 1,5MWe. Surface equipments (turbine fluid geochemistry, the temperature field and the hydraulic properties of the deep crystalline basement). The geothermal wells were hydraulically and chemically stimulated between 2000 and 2007 in order to enhance

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    and control of crack branching during hydraulic fracturing is essential for both geothermal and petroleum models have serious difficulties in simulating crack growth, especially, when the path of fracture) model with cohesive interactions between material particles as an alternative approach to modeling

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    Tek, A Schlumberger Company, Salt Lake City, UT 84104 2 U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA 94025 3 Temple lightly permeable open fractures identified by a suite of acoustic and electrical image logs logging to predict fluid pressures required for initiation of shear dilation and permeability development

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    element (nodal point) of the 41x41 matrix are computed. The grid can be saved in a file for its reuse

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    the well. These systems offer substantial economic savings over surface heat exchangers where a single

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    by 6 wells in the central part of the field. Development drilling continued and two 55 MWe units (Units maintained by drilling make-up wells. In the end of 2007, a 60 MWe (unit IV) was added to complete a 200 MWe of steam production in 1999 showed the decline of steam flow rate notably occurred at some production wells

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    Provide Effective Well Construction: A Proven Technology Rafael Hernández, Halliburton; and Daniel Bour of geothermal wells that are effectively cemented and durable poses a significant operational challenge. Typically, lost circulation while drilling and cementing can make it seemingly impossible to place

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    ) and then transferred by hand to 60 cm x 150 cm strip sheets maintained on site during the drilling process of the well completion. To help speed up the process of the borehole log data sheet completion, all well drilling temperature, pump pressure and revolutions per minute) were taken down manually from daily borehole drilling

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    of the well. High- enthalpy wells are discharge tested after they have been allowed to heat up after drilling 2008 44 wells had been drilled in the Hellisheidi field with up to 3 large drill rigs being active there at once. This study focuses on the analysis of end-of-drilling discharge tests for two wells HE-06 and HE

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    Stanford University

    Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 e-mail: Tianfu_Xu@lbl.gov 2 Energy and Geoscience Institute a more balanced path through the formation and more evenly dissolve calcite in all available fractures

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    Stanford University

    rock to achieve penetration. The frictional energy generated by the higher WOB on dulled cutters heats). Once the bit balance and whirl issues appeared solved, bit manufacturers set about improving the bit

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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    and containing a lot of natural gas. It is very suitable for development and utilization, including geothermal energy (and natural gas) electricity generation, heating and cooling, bathing and swimming, tourism , Xuanpeng Liu1 1 China University of Geosciences (Beijing), 29 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District 2 Pi

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    characteristics with unique problems caused by high-volume, hot water flows. This paper is an overview of state, geothermal electric plants have been built on the edges of tectonic plates where high temperature geothermal blanketing effect resulting in #12;temperatures as high as 270°C. The high-heat producing granite formations

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    and a consequent move of injection outfield, e.g. at Cerro Prieto (Lippmann et al. (2004)) and Tiwi (Sugiaman et al

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    energy since March 1994. It has provided steam for Unit I (55 MW, installed in 1994), a wellhead unit (5 of Mexico (CFE) during 1996 and 1997. These two temporary units were disassembled in April 1998 and 1999 grid. Finally, Unit 5, a 19 MW binary plant which extracts additional energy from the separated

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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    GEOTHERMAL SIPHON Edited by Hal Gurgenci Queensland Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence School a small Workshop organised by the Queensland Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence in Brisbane on 25. The second day of the Workshop discussed the future research strategies for the Queensland Geothermal Energy

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    -mail: tpbel@yandex.ru ABSTRACT Today the problem of rational energy and thermal energy efficiency for marketable product obtaining is one of the directions. INTRODUCTION Today the problem of rational energy and thermal energy efficiency is of great interest. Traditional methods of energy production at the hydropower

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO, 80401-3305, United States e-mail: Chad.Augustine@nrel.gov Katherine R. Young National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO, 80401-3305, United States e-mail: Katherine.Young@nrel.gov Arlene Anderson U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    2 Innovation Center Iceland, Department of Materials, Biotechnology and Energy, Keldnaholt in a bulge in the wall of the casing and is detrimental to the geothermal energy production and the lifetime. This deformation of the casing can lead to reduced energy output and in worst cases render the well inoperative

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    the porosity and permeability of a hot dry rock resource are presented. INTRODUCTIONS Geothermal energy is an established form of alternative energy that is being harvested in many locations around the world. An almost limitless supply of energy is available from the core of the Earth, arising as hot spots near the surface

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    Company, Salt Lake City, UT 84104 3 ORMAT Nevada Inc., Reno NV 89511 4 Schlumberger, Data and Consulting mineral grains, drilling induced fractures, and natural fractures. This paper describes selected geologic was drilled and then logged and analyzed using a multi-disciplinary approach to help evaluate the geothermal

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    Istanbul Technical University, Mining Faculty, Petroleum and Natural Gas Eng. Dept. Maslak Campus, 34469 generation started in 1984. Three additional production wells were drilled two years later to supply needed generating approximately 10 MWe of energy from year 1984 to 2001. The power plant installed in the field used

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    recipients. The Australian Geothermal Energy Group (AGEG) has also seen significant changes and developments. Additionally the joint AGEG ­ Australian Geothermal Energy Association (AGEA) Geothermal Reporting Code Geothermal Energy Centre of Excellence at the University of Queensland, the Western Australian Geothermal

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    OF THE GEOTHERMAL PARAMETERS OF THE GROUND IN CYPRUS FOR THE EXPLOITATION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY AND THE IMPACT aware of the benefits of geothermal energy and in order to increase the share of energy from renewable sources consumed in heating and cooling in 2020, promotes the geothermal energy systems through a Scheme

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    The concept of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) has long been recognized by geothermal energy experts as being the necessary technology for substantially increasing the contribution of geothermal energy DOE sponsored study led by MIT entitled "The Future of Geothermal Energy", hereafter referred

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    are all directed at achieving the Australian Geothermal Energy Group's (AGEG) aspirational targets (the Australian Geothermal Energy Association, AGEA) and the AGEG is to see geothermal energy providing renewable energy sources by 2020. Recognising the tremendous potential of geothermal energy to provide

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    conditioning via sorption chillers and geothermal desalination. The technologies are not new in their basic

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    -17-8 are investigated. It is ascertained that sorption capacity of the investigated sorbents makes up 3,7­4,1 mg/g depending on the form, poorly depends from in an investigated range. At sorption from waters and sewage. Specificity of the industrial process of extraction of the chemical compounds from

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    dip of 60°. This 3-D geological model could be now used as a basis for many exploration investigations superimposed on previous hercynian structures. This structural network is the way for fluid circulations) on geological investigations in the framework of the EGS Soultz project (Dezayes et al., 2009), and also (2

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    AND LOW TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES Timothy Reinhardt1 , Lyle A. Johnson2 and Neil Popovich3 1 U the production of power from coproduced and low temperature geothermal resources. To this end, and through production technologies. These technologies produce electricity by leveraging existing oil and gas field

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    temperature and flows are suggested for spas and pools, space and district heating, greenhouse and aquaculture, provides the necessary energy to the project. Larger projects, such as district heating and industrial

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    water is then conducted to heat exchangers for production of 88°C water for district heating. During electricity and hot water for district heating with minimum impact on the environment while keeping

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    FOR PLANNING OF AN EGS STIMULATION IN THE DESERT PEAK GEOTHERMAL FIELD, NEVADA Stephen H. Hickman1 and Nicholas C. Davatzes2 1 U.S. Geological Survey 345 Middlefield Road, MS977 Menlo Park, CA 94025, USA e of silicified rhyolite tuffs and metamorphosed mudstones at ambient temperatures of ~180 to 195° C. Our previous

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    supercritical geothermal resources located at depths 4-5 km or deeper, where the temperature estimates could of the estimates was carried out using the temperature records not involved in the calibration. The results%. This result makes it possible to increase significantly the deepness of indirect temperature estimations

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    geothermal resource of Germany with an estimated utilizable energy of about 180'000 EJ in a depth of 3-7 km and south German Variscian crystalline basement is considered to be the largest geothermal resource require complex and costly processing. Often they are anyhow limited to the topmost part of the basement

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    reduced to probability distribution functions for predictive modeling and simulation in a stochastic on the reduced probabilistic distribution functions. Using nested Monte Carlo simulations, we investigated

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    for the measurement of distributed temperature and pressure in geothermal wells. Our effort in the first year has been Fiber Bragg grating pressure and temperature sensors distributed along the length of the fiber distributed temperature measurement system (DTS). A single mode step index fiber will be used for Brillouin

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    ) the corresponding thermal conductivity distribution for the corresponding stratigraphic unit. Employing the Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) "d" statistic we compared the distributions of thermal conductivities. Minimizing conductivities were drawn from the same distribution. Finally, an inverse problem incorporating all of the above

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    small clusters of very low magnitude events (Mw max -1.0) have been located. The spatial distribution and pressure distribution during stimulation treatment has been numerically modeled. The possible mechanisms on their temporal and spatial distribution. INTRODUCTION Seismic events triggered by fluid injection has been

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    of these wavelengths in the total distribution of stress directions is fractally distributed and (3) in a manner, the distribution and geometry of rock masses with different mechanical properties, and fault (earthquake) slip

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Madrid, Spain; vrath@fis.ucm.es ABSTRACT Information on the distribution of permeability at depth distribution: A fully physical, gradient-based Bayesian inversion, a massive Monte Carlo (MC) approach the technical and economic risk of geothermal projects (Manzella, 2010). Information on the distribution

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    stress orientations and magnitudes, the distribution, orientation and hydrologic properties of natural characteristics including the distribution of fracture permeability versus depth, variations in lithologic

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    distribution which can be stochastically generated or upscaled from the statistics of an actual fracture distribution. During the hydraulic stimulation process, LDEC tracks the propagation of fractures and other distributions. O

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    (Genter et al., 2009) in the framework of the EGS project. The temperature distribution in this area about the temperature distribution comes from the temperature well logs, so, its values in the domains

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    reduced to probability distribution functions for predictive modeling and simulation in a stochastic on the reduced probabilistic distribution functions. Using nested Monte Carlo simulations, we investigated the impact of parameter uncertainties of the distribution functions of fracture network on the flow using

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    /density, and fluid saturation or pore pressure. Comparison of the distribution of Vp/Vs ratios with a temperature and high temperature. However, there is a better correlation between the distribution of production

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    , and also to understand why natural earthquakes are distributed in source-type space the way they are a line connecting the +Dipole and ­Dipole loci. This feature is reminiscent of the distribution of source the +Crack and ­Crack loci. The observed distributions, however, involve systematically smaller volume

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    if the structure did not change, simply because of variation in the seismic ray distribution caused by the natural variation in earthquake locations. This problem can be severe when changes in the seismicity distribution distribution can produce artifacts that mimic changes in the seismic wave speeds at the time of a swarm. Even

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    and the resulting probability distributions of permeability, net-to-gross ratio and temperature are combined of the planned geothermal wells. A second Monte Carlo simulation provides the probability distributions: the probability distributions of the feasible thermal capacity and the feasible flow rate, which are calculated

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    , , 2 , ,L w x y t x y t q x y t t - - = (2) Combining Eqs. (1) and (2) leads to: ( ) ( ) ( ) 3 . , ,0 and Zhou, 2009): ( ) ( ) ( )3 12 , ,0, q , , , , p x y t x y t w x y t µ = - (1) Similarly

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    GEOTHERMAL MANIFESTATION, DOMUYO VN., NEUQUÉN, ARGENTINA G. Mas1, 2 , L. Bengochea1, 2 , L. C. Mas3 & N is located in the northern of the Neuquen Province, 36°63'S and 70º42'W, in the Mines and Chos Malal

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fouth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    supersaturated relative to a solubility of amorphous silica Ce (Marshall W.L., 1980). In accordance with experimental data (Marshall W.L., 1980) Ce value (mole/kg) for pure water depends on an absolute temperature

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Keyan Zheng1 Fang He2 1 Geothermal Council of China Energy Society 20 Da Hui Si Road, Haidian District Beijing, 100081, China e-mail: kyzheng@punlic3.bta.net.cn 2 GHP Council of China Renewable Energy Society of Renewable Energy of PRC" had clearly explained that geothermal energy belongs to renewable energy

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401, USA ABSTRACT In order for enhanced of the amount of energy generated from enhanced geothermal systems (EGS), which allows for the exploitation distinguishes EGS from most other energy sources is the difficulty and expense associated with characterizing

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    of Energy (MOE) and Renewable Energy Organization of Iran (SUNA). In this study, an attempt was made with some mitigation plans and monitoring program is accepted. INTRODUCTION Geothermal energy is generally accepted as being an environmentally benign energy source, particularly when compared to fossil fuel energy

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Park, CA 94025 2. Department of Energy Geothermal Technologies Program Washington, DC e-mail: colin of energy resources, including geothermal energy. Stakeholders at all levels of government, within in the 1970s during a time of rapid development and new interest in geothermal energy. That many

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    'S 2009 RISK ANALYSIS Katherine R. Young National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO, 80401-3305, United States e-mail: Katherine.Young@nrel.gov Chad Augustine National Renewable Energy Anderson U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Geothermal

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    ;Electrical submersible pumps In ESP systems, an electric motor and a multistage centrifugal pump run, induction electric motors are manufactured in a variety of horsepower ratings, operating voltages operating ranges of currently available thermoplastic wire insulations, and thus limit the operating

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    FORMATION IMAGING TECHNOLOGY: CORRELATION TO PERMEABILITY K. McLean1 and D. McNamara2 1 Contact Energy of the permeability. Only fractures with optimal orientation within the local stress field are considered for the reinjection strategy at Wairakei as well as understanding the nature of the connection between Wairakei

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 11-13, 2013

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    Foulger, G. R.

    Uddenberg1 , Mike Swyer1 , Bruce Julian2 , and Gillian Foulger2,3 1 AltaRock Energy, Inc.,7900 E. Green Lake to the American public that EGS can play a significant role in reducing foreign energy dependence, and provide thermally-degradable zonal isolation materials (TZIM) and associated technologies, Test single-well tracers

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    are situated in the Marbel Corridor and are supplying steam to a 52MWe power plant. The second stage production and 10 wells for brine injection. Power generation in MGPF was developed in two stages. The firstGP) which started its commercial operation in June 1999. The steam supplied to this plant comes from

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    The Ogiri geothermal power plant located in the West Kirishima area was opened in early 1996. Nittetsu Kagoshima Geothermal Co. (NKGC) supplies the geothermal steam to the power plant with installed capacity wells were completed when the power plant started its operation (Japan Geothermal Energy Association

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    Carlo Simulation results, these eleven fields have 453 MWe of power generation potential and 13 876 MWt and encouraging the installation of power generating plant are underway. New geothermal legislation calls of geothermal resources and geothermal power production potential. As a first step, the geothermal inventory

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    vary substantially from case to case (volumetric heat capacity, power plant or project life, method together with Monte Carlo simulations is often used to provide estimates of the probable depends on both the reference temperature and the power cycle (flash, binary). A proper understanding

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    that are associated with the Northern German Basin, a geothermal power plant will need to incorporate an Enhanced to reduce the probability of downtime in such geothermal power systems in order to achieve higher plant geothermal power plants in Germany. There are three potential regions for geothermal energy production

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    of pressure and quality, q . The results are shown in Figure 1. The smallest value of sound speed calculated large, rapid changes in the depth of vaporization. This can give rise to incompressible slugs of liquid steam forms. INTRODUCTION Wet steam (or any liquid in equilibrium with its own vapour) has an equation

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Seventh Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 30 -February 1, 2012

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    Foulger, G. R.

    on injecting fluid into rock formations. "Fracking" to increase permeability in gas shale formations has in particular become widespread in recent years. There are now several case histories of fracking causing

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    between fracture growth and deformation of existing fracture networks with fluid flow makes meso-scale DEM

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    internationally significant Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) developments. Recognizing EGS is (at least relatively straightforward regulatory system, which could be considered a benchmark for other jurisdictions to the public) a new technology with uncertain risks, PIRSA has taken account of international developments

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    geochemical and geophysical surveys as well as drilling temperature gradient holes (Sudarman et al, 1986 at Wayang Windu including 17 active production wells, two active reinjection wells and five slim holes and boundary conditions were defined based on available data from the drilled area. The distribution

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    and include uncertainties. Dealing with uncertainty analysis is a common tool e.g. for safety assessment of nuclear waste repositories (Rautman and Treadway, 1991). For HDR geothermal systems, aspects

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    by an assessment of geothermal potential for electric generation on Hammam Faraun hot spring. Keywords: geothermal of the geothermal potential for the electric generation of the Hammam Faraun hot spring. GEOLOGICAL & GEOCHEMICAL is characterized by superficial thermal manifestations including a cluster of hot springs with varied temperatures

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    believe that this technology might be a cost-effective and higher sampling rate alternative/supplement-mail: frank.horowitz@csiro.au ABSTRACT A technology based upon analyses of InSAR surveys of incremental displacement- field measurements. First, in (e.g.) an undrained fracture, they can cause direct inflation

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    of single producer was simulated. The calculations were made in a short exploitation time 0.1 year. The STAR. In the current research Soultz HDR project (Ledru, 2007) and commercial Cooper Basin HFR project (Vörös, 2007

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Second Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 22-24, 2007

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    Foulger, G. R.

    at geothermal areas provide information, particularly about seismic volume changes, that conventional "fault processes, however, is non-unique; different processes can produce identical seismic wave fields, and thus. Seismicity is monitored by a high-quality permanent network of 16 three-component digital borehole

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    was conducted in 2008. The choice of candidate wells for stimulation was based on low production stimulation. Through this process, we can obtain quantitative evaluation of the treatment. However stimulation. In this study we applied real-time acid treatment performance analysis tools, which have proved

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Warren Scott2 and Einar Gunnlaugsson1 1 Reykjavík Energy, Baejarhalsi 1, 110 Reykjavík , Iceland e reaches nearby towns and cities, annoying the inhabitants. Reykjavík Energy is preparing injection tons hydrogen sulfide into atmosphere. The hydrogen sulfide is released on top of the cooling towers

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    for managing CO2 greenhouse gas emission from geothermal power plant and also provide additional value MW of electricity and 150 MW of thermal water, emits approximately 181 g CO2/kWh (power production has been conducted and shown the feasibility to reduce the CO2 gas emission by utilizing the concept

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    biology. Neural nets can be applied to a wide variety of problems, such as storing or recalling data reduction, function approximation and time series prediction. A neural net consists of a large number is characterized by an activation function to its net input (sum of its weighted input signals) which determines

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Strasbourg 5, rue René Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg Cedex, France e-mail: cuenot@soultz.net ABSTRACT After 20

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    needs from a geothermal resource found on its property. Finally, the "waste" fluid from the heating AND PROJECTS PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE John W. Lund and Tonya "Toni" Boyd Geo-Heat Center, Oregon Institute of the geothermal hot water that could be used for heating the buildings. Three wells between 1200 and 1800 feet

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    thermal energy resources, or by waste heat. In addition, direct thermal use of geothermal energy also has supplied by high grade fossil fuels. For example, most of the energy we need for water and space heating%) and commercial (21%) sectors. Also quite importantly, almost 80% of 33.5 EJ is used to provide heat below 150°C

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    .aniko@uni-miskolc.hu ABSTRACT The floor of the entrance tunnel to an underground waste deposit system in Hungary is exposed, a floor deicing system was installed. This consists of a heating grid system placed in the floor of the tunnel entrance section. Initially, a fuel oil system was utilized to heat the incoming air. More

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    OF THE CASCADE HEAT PUMP PLANT Redko ndriy Donbass National Academy of Construction and Architecture Short of numerical studies of thermodynamic effectiveness of the cascade thermal scheme of the heat pump plant in the temperature range 20°- 105° (68° - 221°F). The possibility of using heat pump plants in heating systems

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    @itu.edu.tr ABSTRACT The heat content of a hydrothermal aquifer can be utilized by producing the aquifer's hot fluid whereas the waste cooled water is reinjected into the aquifer and such a scheme is called the doublet attention in the last five decades. Geothermal heating and cooling are possible in zones having a normal

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    of the Area can be seen in Fig. 1. The power plant produces electricity and hot water for space heating using the low pressure boiler is used for space heating in the Reykjavík Area. The brine cannot be used directly for space heating, due to its chemistry. It is therefore used to heat up cold fresh groundwater in heat

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    that this structure corresponds to a mode I (opening) crack. Perturbations to the seismicity rate and source areas, they flow into hot rock at depth inducing cracking and activating critically stressed pre to achieve this goal, it is necessary to mature existing microearthquake analysis techniques and software

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    or less heterogeneous systems (2-D projections), using heat (cold-water slugs) and solutes as tracers

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    : Injectivty n with cold wa er. did the Kawera ing injectivity s also filtered teel filter at th An environ e is in co In the absence uld increase ro njecting, as sh her under stimu as cold water ste water is ho

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    and no flow path deviation can be noted during the 30 days of cold water (55 o C) injection into the 140 o C

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    disturbs the initial thermodynamic equilibrium between the Dogger aquifer phases. This creates a cold

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    or man- made origin, injecting cold water into one well, and recovering hot water from the others of the fracture surface is expected to approach that of the injected cold water after several months of operation patterns of secondary thermal fractures (after Tester et al., 1989). In the process of the cold water

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    to the relatively high abundance and reactivity of the main geothermal gases (CO2, H2S, H2 and to a lesser extent. This high-temperature field is part of the Hengill volcanic system, and is host to the largest geothermal for the concentrations of the major reactive gases (CO2, H2S, H2 and CH4). Aquifer chemical compositions were calculated

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    77 to 120 bar, temperatures from 20 to 77°C, and a range of CO2 injection rates. Temperature data EXTRACTION FROM POROUS MEDIA BY MEANS OF CO2 Mario Magliocco1,2 , Timothy J. Kneafsey2 , Karsten Pruess2 The use of CO2 as a heat transfer fluid has been proposed as an alternative to water in enhanced

  13. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    -of-the-art electrolyte models, to gain insight into CO2-induced fluid-rock interactions for temperatures in the range 10 GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS WITH CO2 AS HEAT TRANSFER FLUID John Apps and Karsten Pruess Earth Sciences Division to as an Enhanced Geothermal System with CO2 (EGSCO2). The concept has yet to be tested in the field

  14. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    Agreement (CRADA) to demonstrate small scale power generation from an oil field waste stream. The project

  15. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    and reliability in drilling operations by utilizing a specially designed positive displacement motor (PDM a harmful environment to directional drilling equipment. High amounts of lost circulation material (LCM reliability, unlimited concentration of LCM, reduced survey time which minimizes non-productive time (NPT

  16. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    -mail: hector.carlos.pulido@pemex.com ABSTRACT An alternative method, named to as direct synthesis, is proposed

  17. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    physics. Nowadays geothermal resources are used to get heat supply, produce electric power, and extract

  18. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    - physical properties of a borehole heat exchanger (BHE) drilled into soft or hard rock (fig. 1). With a TRT loop type PE-HD heat exchanger pipes where a heating carrier fluid is pumped in a circuit with a constant rate. The heater of the TRT device is heating the fluid with constant power. The input and output

  19. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    that in deep and super deep wells the temperature of the drilling fluid (at a given depth) depends on the current vertical depth, on drilling technology (flow rate, well design, fluid properties, penetration rate of the thermal equilibrium when the temperature of drilling fluid (at a given depth) is a linear function of time

  20. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    is an important parameter in geothermal drilling since it affects drilling fluid, operations and equipment THE INLET AND OUTLET MUD TEMPERATURES WHILE DRILLING GEOTHERMAL FORMATIONS Sema Tekin1 and Serhat Akin2 1-Omerbeyli field were estimated by using mud inlet and outlet temperatures obtained during drilling. GTEMP wellbore

  1. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    ] Basics of Geological Carbon Sequestration and Well Integrity (Adapted from Carbon Sequestration Research and Mechanical coupling affecting the design of a geothermal or a geological carbon sequestration system or supercritical carbon dioxide in the subsurface for storage or heat extraction involves understanding

  2. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    in water has implications for long term carbon sequestration and water-rock interactions (Liu et al. 2003 be superior to water in its ability to mine heat from hot fractured rock. Carbon dioxide also offers modeling. 1. Introduction With increasing concerns about carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere

  3. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    /or water resources (EGS systems), and (2) effective and safe sequestration of carbon dioxide in deep to geothermal heat mining using carbon dioxide instead of water. While manometric, volumetric, and gravimetric-tubes. Sorption and desorption of carbon dioxide on the same solid was measured at 35 °C at pressures to 120 bar

  4. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    -mail: Tianfu_Xu@lbl.gov 2 School of Environmental Studies, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074, China

  5. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    , knock-out drums, piping and well pads. This paper describes the work flow and practices applied options for surface production facility design for Awi 9 conversion and criteria to select the best design infill drilling. Injection management remains the most important issue at Salak. Re-injection of brine

  6. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    Callahan1 , Will Osborn1 , Stephen Hickman2 and Nicholas Davatzes3 1 AltaRock Energy, 7900 E. Green Lake by AltaRock Energy (ARE) with participants from Newberry Geothermal, Davenport Power, Temple University

  7. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    which has potential for a geothermal sitting at the eastern flanks INTRODUCTION The geothermal energy), which is green geothermal area and as a lesson learned to apply in the similar area in order

  8. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    to solve a giant demand on food and energy. Existing resources of oil and gas are limited in Indonesia and the existing infrastructure to reach the customers of the energy is not sufficient as access to many areas in Indonesia is limited. Therefore, de-central, location adapted provision with energy is crucial. One third

  9. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    . MOL, Enex ehf. of Iceland and Vulcan Kft. (its owner is Green Rock Energy Ltd. of Australia EXPLORATION IN HUNGARY Attila Kujbus CEGE Central-European Geothermal Energy Production Plc. Infopark D of this fact, there are hardly any geothermal energy facilities in Hungary, and those few are operated

  10. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Sixth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 31 -February 2, 2011

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    INVESTIGATION PROGRAM K. Brockbank1 , C. Bromley2 and T. Glynn-Morris1 1 Contact Energy Wairakei Power Station.brockbank@contactenergy.co.nz ABSTRACT In 2008 Contact Energy undertook a comprehensive research program investigating subsidence by the green band. All wells are shown by green dots with the 13 boreholes drilled for the subsidence program

  11. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fourth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 9-11, 2009

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    Lake City, UT 84104 2 Energy and Geoscience Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84108 3 field, most of the productive wells are located in Section 21. Wells circled in green represent

  12. PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, February 1-3, 2010

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    USE Lance Brothers and Benjamin Iverson, Halliburton; and Daniel Bour, AltaRock Energy Inc to Portland cement is the use of a calcium hydroxide Ca(OH)2 silica SiO2 cement. Calcium hydroxide mixed

  13. Top-Down Intelligent Reservoir Models, Integrating Reservoir Engineering with AI&DM Extended Abstract, 2009 AAPG Annual Conventions, Denver Colorado

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    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    1 Top-Down Intelligent Reservoir Models, Integrating Reservoir Engineering with AI&DM Extended Abstract, 2009 AAPG Annual Conventions, Denver Colorado TOP-DOWN INTELLIGENT RESERVOIR MODELING (TDIRM and the history matched model is used to strategize field development in order to improve recovery. Top

  14. Howard A. Zebker Professor of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering

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    Zebker, Howard

    Howard A. Zebker Professor of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, Departments of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering (joint appt.), Stanford University, Stanford, CA. 1995-2006 Associate Professor, Departments of Geophysics and Electrical Engineering (joint appt.), Stanford University

  15. Engineering studies of g-1, g-2, and g-3 reservoirs, Meren field, Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thakur, G.C.; Haulenbeek, R.B.; Jain, A.; Koza, W.P.; Kurak, S.D.; Poston, S.W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A description is given of an engineering study of two large reservoirs in the G sands of Meren field, offshore Nigeria. The purpose of this study was to investigate various operating schemes for optimizing oil recovery from each of these gravity-segragated reservoirs. Geologic evaluation, material-balance calculations, and three-phase, two-dimensional (2D) (areal and cross-sectional) reservoir simulation models were used. 7 refs.

  16. Nanosensors as Reservoir Engineering Tools to Map Insitu Temperature Distributions in Geothermal Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan Ames

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of using nanosensors to measure temperature distribution and predict thermal breakthrough in geothermal reservoirs is addressed in this report. Four candidate sensors were identified: melting tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles, silica nanoparticles with covalently-attached dye, hollow silica nanoparticles with encapsulated dye and impermeable melting shells, and dye-polymer composite time-temperature indicators. Four main challenges associated with the successful implementation of temperature nanosensors were identified: nanoparticle mobility in porous and fractured media, the collection and detection of nanoparticles at the production well, engineering temperature sensing mechanisms that are both detectable and irreversible, and inferring the spatial geolocation of temperature measurements in order to map temperature distribution. Initial experiments were carried out to investigate each of these challenges. It was demonstrated in a slim-tube injection experiment that it is possible to transport silica nanoparticles over large distances through porous media. The feasibility of magnetic collection of nanoparticles from produced fluid was evaluated experimentally, and it was estimated that 3% of the injected nanoparticles were recovered in a prototype magnetic collection device. An analysis technique was tailored to nanosensors with a dye-release mechanism to estimate temperature measurement geolocation by analyzing the return curve of the released dye. This technique was used in a hypothetical example problem, and good estimates of geolocation were achieved. Tin-bismuth alloy nanoparticles were synthesized using a sonochemical method, and a bench heating experiment was performed using these nanoparticles. Particle growth due to melting was observed, indicating that tin-bismuth nanoparticles have potential as temperature nanosensors

  17. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM STANFORD UNIVERSITY STANFORD, CALIFORNIA 94305 SGP-TR-42 PROCEEDINGS SPECIAL PANEL ON GEOTHERMAL MODEL INTERCOMPARISON STUDY held in conjunction with The Code Comparison Contracts issued by Department of Energy Division of Geothermal Energy San Francisco Operations Office

  18. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in Engineering and Earth Sciences STANFORD UNIVERSITY Stanford, California SGP-TR-81 TRACER TEST ANALYSIS OF THE KLAMATH FALLS GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE Geothermal Program under Department of Energy Contract No. DE-AT03-80SF11459 and by the Department

  19. SGP-TR-32 STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SGP- TR- 32 STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM PROGRESS REPORT NO. 7 t o U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Recent Radon Transient Experiments Energy Recovery from Fracture-Stimulated Geothermal Reservoirs 1 2 l e c t i o n of Summary presentations prepared by t h e Stanford Geothermal Program s t a f f

  20. Engineering a thermal squeezed reservoir by system energy modulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ephraim Shahmoon; Gershon Kurizki

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that a thermal reservoir can effectively act as a squeezed reservoir on atoms that are subject to energy-level modulation. For sufficiently fast and strong modulation, for which the rotating-wave-approximation is broken, the resulting squeezing persists at long times. These effects are analyzed by a master equation that is valid beyond the rotating wave approximation. As an example we consider a two-level-atom in a cavity with Lorentzian linewidth, subject to sinusoidal energy modulation. A possible realization of these effects is discussed for Rydberg atoms.

  1. Sustainable Stanford Protecting Stanford's assets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogyo, Matthew

    ... Benefits Labs Protect your samples ­ During energy and equipment failure ­ Reduce risk of valuable sample Study #12;Protect Stanford's Assets & Save Energy Stanford `s Energy Retrofit Program has since 1993 biological samples · The -80C freezers alone require more energy than the entire Gilbert Building (5 Million

  2. Petrofacies analysis - the petrophysical tool for geologic/engineering reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watney, W.L.; Guy, W.J.; Gerlach, P.M. [Kansas Geological Survey, Lawrence, KS (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petrofacies analysis is defined as the characterization and classification of pore types and fluid saturations as revealed by petrophysical measures of a reservoir. The word {open_quotes}petrofacies{close_quotes} makes an explicit link between petroleum engineers concerns with pore characteristics as arbiters of production performance, and the facies paradigm of geologists as a methodology for genetic understanding and prediction. In petrofacies analysis, the porosity and resistivity axes of the classical Pickett plot are used to map water saturation, bulk volume water, and estimated permeability, as well as capillary pressure information, where it is available. When data points are connected in order of depth within a reservoir, the characteristic patterns reflect reservoir rock character and its interplay with the hydrocarbon column. A third variable can be presented at each point on the crossplot by assigning a color scale that is based on other well logs, often gamma ray or photoelectric effect, or other derived variables. Contrasts between reservoir pore types and fluid saturations will be reflected in changing patterns on the crossplot and can help discriminate and characterize reservoir heterogeneity. Many hundreds of analyses of well logs facilitated by spreadsheet and object-oriented programming have provided the means to distinguish patterns typical of certain complex pore types for sandstones and carbonate reservoirs, occurrences of irreducible water saturation, and presence of transition zones. The result has been an improved means to evaluate potential production such as bypassed pay behind pipe and in old exploration holes, or to assess zonation and continuity of the reservoir. Petrofacies analysis is applied in this example to distinguishing flow units including discrimination of pore type as assessment of reservoir conformance and continuity. The analysis is facilitated through the use of color cross sections and cluster analysis.

  3. A reservoir engineering and economic evaluation of waterflood infill drilling in the Johnson J.L. "AB" unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yadavalli, Sameer Kumar

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A RESERVOIR ENGINEERING AND ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF WATERFLOOD INFILL DRILLING IN THE JOHNSON J. L. "AB" UNIT A Thesis by SAMEER KUMAR YADA VALLI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A RESERVOIR ENGINEERING AND ECONOMIC EVALUATION OF WATERFLOOD INFILL DRILLING IN THE JOHNSON J. L. "AB" UNIT A Thesis by SAMEER KUMAR YADAVALLI Approved...

  4. ANALYSIS OF PRODUCTION DECLINE IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zais, E.J.; Bodvarsson, G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Garg, 1978, Reservoir Engineering Data: Wai.akei Geothermalof the reservoir engineer because production data are alwaysGeothermal Reservoirs IV. DATA PROCESSING • • • . • Data

  5. Stabilizing Open Quantum Systems by Markovian Reservoir Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. G. Schirmer; Xiaoting Wang

    2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We study open quantum systems whose evolution is governed by a master equation of Kossakowski-Gorini-Sudarshan-Lindblad type and give a characterization of the convex set of steady states of such systems based on the generalized Bloch representation. It is shown that an isolated steady state of the Bloch equation cannot be a center, i.e., that the existence of a unique steady state implies attractivity and global asymptotic stability. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of a unique steady state are derived and applied to different physical models including two- and four-level atoms, (truncated) harmonic oscillators, composite and decomposable systems. It is shown how these criteria could be exploited in principle for quantum reservoir engineeing via coherent control and direct feedback to stabilize the system to a desired steady state. We also discuss the question of limit points of the dynamics. Despite the non-existence of isolated centers, open quantum systems can have nontrivial invariant sets. These invariant sets are center manifolds that arise when the Bloch superoperator has purely imaginary eigenvalues and are closely related to decoherence-free subspaces.

  6. Two-mode squeezed states in cavity optomechanics via engineering of a single reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Woolley; A. A. Clerk

    2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We study theoretically a three-mode optomechanical system where two mechanical oscillators are independently coupled to a single cavity mode. By optimized two-tone or four-tone driving of the cavity one can prepare the mechanical oscillators in an entangled two-mode squeezed state, even if they start in a thermal state. The highly-pure, symmetric steady-state achieved allows the optimal fidelity of standard continuous-variable teleportation protocols to be achieved. In contrast to other reservoir engineering approaches to generating mechanical entanglement, only a single reservoir is required to prepare the highly-pure entangled steady-state, greatly simplifying experimental implementation. The entanglement may be verified via a bound on the Duan inequality obtained from the cavity output spectrum. A similar technique may be used for the preparation of a highly-pure two-mode squeezed state of two cavity modes, coupled to a common mechanical oscillator.

  7. GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONS WITH SHAFT79

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    that well blocks must geothermal reservoir s·tudies, paperof Califomia. LBL-10066 GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR SIMULATIONSbe presented at the Fifth Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

  8. Stanford University Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University Hearing Conservation Program April 2006 #12;Stanford University HEARING CONSERVATION PROGRAM CONTENTS PAGE 1.0 INTRODUCTION.2 Environmental Health and Safety (EH&S)..............................................4 3.3 Employees

  9. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2002-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 2 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of rockfluid interactions, (2) petrophysical and engineering characterization, (3) data integration, (4) 3-D geologic modeling, (5) 3-D reservoir simulation and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 2. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions is near completion. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been essentially completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The model represents an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic model served as the framework for the simulations. A technology workshop on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields was conducted to transfer the results of the project to the petroleum industry.

  10. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2001-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 1 of the project has been reservoir description and characterization. This effort has included four tasks: (1) geoscientific reservoir characterization, (2) the study of rock-fluid interactions, (3) petrophysical and engineering characterization and (4) data integration. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 1. Overall, the project work is on schedule. Geoscientific reservoir characterization is essentially completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been initiated. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization is progressing. Data on reservoir production rate and pressure history at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been tabulated, and porosity data from core analysis has been correlated with porosity as observed from well log response. Data integration is on schedule, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database for reservoir characterization, modeling and simulation for the reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs for each of these fields.

  11. Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska's North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

  12. A reservoir engineering characterization of the north study area of the C2/VLE-305 reservoir, Lamar Field, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padron Cabral, Ricardo Javier

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reservoir charactefimtion is the key to successful oil field development programs. The recovery efficiency of any reservoir is influenced by its heterogeneities, particularly the distributions of porosity and permeability. ...

  13. Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Research. Fourth annual report, October 1, 1983-September 30, 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Brigham, W.E.; Miller, F.G.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reservoir definition research consisted of well test analysis and bench-scale experiments. Well testing included both single-well pressure drawdown and buildup testing, and multiple-well interference testing. The development of new well testing methods continued to receive major emphasis during the year. Work included a project on multiphase compressibility, including the thermal content of the rock. Several projects on double-porosity systems were completed, and work was done on relative-permeability. Heat extraction from rock will determine the long-term response of geothermal reservoirs to development. The work in this task area involved a combination of physical and mathematical modeling of heat extraction from fractured geothermal reservoirs. International cooperative research dealt with adsorption of water on reservoir cores, the planning of tracer surveys, and an injection and tracer test in the Los Azufres fields. 32 refs.

  14. STATUS OF GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING RESEARCH PROJECTS SUPPORTED BY USDOE/DIVISION OF GEOTHERMAL ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, J.H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the authors. Wairakei geothermal field: Lawrence BerkeleyR. C. , Evaluation of potential geothermal well-head and17, "S"r78" for use in geothermal reservoir 25 p. (LBL-

  15. EFFECTS OF WATER INJECTION INTO FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SGP-TR-57 SGP-TR-57 EFFECTS OF WATER INJECTION INTO FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS: A SUMMARY INTO FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS A SUMMARY OP EXPERImCE WORtDWIDE Roland N. Horne Stanford University ABSTRACT Reinjection of water i n t o fractured geothermal reservoirs holds potential both f o r

  16. Sustainable Stanford Greening Infrastructure & Choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Communication and Publication Sustainable Stanford website Year In Review Annual Report Cardinal Green

  17. Dry Gas Zone, Elk Hills field, Kern County, California: General reservoir study: Engineering text and exhibits: (Final report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dry Gas Zone in the Elk Hills field is comprised of fourteen separate productive horizons deposited in the MYA Group of the San Joaquin Formation of Pliocene Age. Eighty-six separate Reservoir Units have been identified within the interval over an area roughly ten miles long and four miles wide. One basal Tulare sand, the Tulare B, was also included in the geologic study. Five earlier studies have been made of the Dry Gas Zone; each is referenced in the Appendix of this report. Most of these studies were geologic in nature, and none provided in-depth reservoir analyses. This report is made up of ten (10) separate volumes which include: engineering text and exhibits (white dot); engineering data (black dot); geologic text and tables (green dot); structure and isochore maps (light blue dot); structural cross sections (dark blue dot); stratigraphic cross sections (brown dot); geologic data sheets -book 1 (yellow dot); geologic data sheets - book 2 (orange dot); geologic data sheets - book 3 (red dot); and geologic data sheets - book 4 (pink or coral dot). Basic production, injection, pressure, and other assorted technical data were provided by the US Department of Energy engineering staff at Elk Hills. These data were accepted as furnished with no attempt being made at independent verification.

  18. Dept. of Mechanical Engineering 1500 Engineering Dr.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    Dept. of Mechanical Engineering 1500 Engineering Dr. University of Wisconsin ­ Madison Madison, WI. of Mechanical Engineering 2008 ­ Present Director of Engine Research Center 2003 ­ 2007 Associate Professor ­ 1995 Research Assistant Stanford University, Stanford, CA 1984 ­ 1989 Research Engineer Flow Research

  19. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Alabama in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company are undertaking an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling that utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary objective of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. The principal research effort for Year 3 of the project has been reservoir characterization, 3-D modeling, testing of the geologic-engineering model, and technology transfer. This effort has included six tasks: (1) the study of seismic attributes, (2) petrophysical characterization, (3) data integration, (4) the building of the geologic-engineering model, (5) the testing of the geologic-engineering model and (6) technology transfer. This work was scheduled for completion in Year 3. Progress on the project is as follows: geoscientific reservoir characterization is completed. The architecture, porosity types and heterogeneity of the reef and shoal reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been characterized using geological and geophysical data. The study of rock-fluid interactions has been completed. Observations regarding the diagenetic processes influencing pore system development and heterogeneity in these reef and shoal reservoirs have been made. Petrophysical and engineering property characterization has been completed. Porosity and permeability data at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been analyzed, and well performance analysis has been conducted. Data integration is up to date, in that, the geological, geophysical, petrophysical and engineering data collected to date for Appleton and Vocation Fields have been compiled into a fieldwide digital database. 3-D geologic modeling of the structures and reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The models represent an integration of geological, petrophysical and seismic data. 3-D reservoir simulation of the reservoirs at Appleton and Vocation Fields has been completed. The 3-D geologic models served as the framework for the simulations. The geologic-engineering models of the Appleton and Vocation Field reservoirs have been developed. These models are being tested. The geophysical interpretation for the paleotopographic feature being tested has been made, and the study of the data resulting from drilling of a well on this paleohigh is in progress. Numerous presentations on reservoir characterization and modeling at Appleton and Vocation Fields have been made at professional meetings and conferences and a short course on microbial reservoir characterization and modeling based on these fields has been prepared.

  20. Applying Semantic Web Techniques to Reservoir Engineering: Challenges and Experiences from Event Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasanna, Viktor K.

    (Integrated Asset Management [1] [2]) integrates information and application of various tasks in reservoir presented in this paper is an initial step towards a vision of integrated field event management, that uses, Event Ontology, Integrated Asset Management, Oilfield Industry, Rule Based Reasoning. I. INTRODUCTION

  1. Model-Based Control and Optimization of Large Scale Physical Systems -Challenges in Reservoir Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van den Hof, Paul

    needs to increase efficiency in oil recovery from subsurface reservoirs new technology is devel- oped challenge to rationalize the decision processes. With newly developed technology for drilling wells and in for Systems and Control, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft, The Netherlands E-mail: p

  2. Integration of advanced geoscience and engineering techniques to quantify interwell heterogeneity in reservoir models. Annual report, September 29, 1994--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, F.D.; Buckley, J.S.; Weiss, W.W.; Ouenes, A.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this project is to conduct a variety of laboratory and field tests and utilize all the geological, geophysical, and engineering information to develop a mathematical model of the reservoir by the use of global optimization methods. This interdisciplinary effort will integrate advanced geoscience and reservoir engineering concepts to quantify interwell reservoir heterogeneity and the dynamics of fluid-rock and fluid-fluid interactions. The reservoir characterization includes geological methods (outcrop and reservoir rock studies), geophysical methods (interwell acoustic techniques), and other reservoir/hydrologic methodologies including analyses of pressure transient data, core studies, and tracer tests. The field testing is being conducted at the Sulimar Queen Unit with related laboratory testing at the PRRC on samples from the Sulimar site and Queen sandstone outcrops. The aim is to (1) characterize and quantify lithologic heterogeneity, (2) mathematically quantify changes in the heterogeneity at various scales, (3) integrate the wide variety of data into a model that is jointly constrained by the interdisciplinary interpretive effort, and (4) help optimize petroleum recovery efficiencies.

  3. Geothermal Technologies Program Overview Presentation at Stanford...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Overview Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop Geothermal Technologies Program Overview Presentation at Stanford Geothermal Workshop General overview of Geothermal...

  4. Naturally fractured reservoirs contain a significant amount of the world oil reserves. A number of these reservoirs contain several

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arbogast, Todd

    Summary Naturally fractured reservoirs contain a significant amount of the world oil reserves simulation of naturally fractured reservoirs is one of the most important, challenging, and computationally intensive problems in reservoir engineering. Parallel reservoir simulators developed for naturally fractured

  5. INTEGRATED GEOLOGIC-ENGINEERING MODEL FOR REEF AND CARBONATE SHOAL RESERVOIRS ASSOCIATED WITH PALEOHIGHS: UPPER JURASSIC SMACKOVER FORMATION, NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ernest A. Mancini

    2004-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Alabama, in cooperation with Texas A&M University, McGill University, Longleaf Energy Group, Strago Petroleum Corporation, and Paramount Petroleum Company, has undertaken an integrated, interdisciplinary geoscientific and engineering research project. The project is designed to characterize and model reservoir architecture, pore systems and rock-fluid interactions at the pore to field scale in Upper Jurassic Smackover reef and carbonate shoal reservoirs associated with varying degrees of relief on pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs in the northeastern Gulf of Mexico. The project effort includes the prediction of fluid flow in carbonate reservoirs through reservoir simulation modeling which utilizes geologic reservoir characterization and modeling and the prediction of carbonate reservoir architecture, heterogeneity and quality through seismic imaging. The primary goal of the project is to increase the profitability, producibility and efficiency of recovery of oil from existing and undiscovered Upper Jurassic fields characterized by reef and carbonate shoals associated with pre-Mesozoic basement paleohighs. Geoscientific reservoir property, geophysical seismic attribute, petrophysical property, and engineering property characterization has shown that reef (thrombolite) and shoal reservoir lithofacies developed on the flanks of high-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Vocation Field example) and on the crest and flanks of low-relief crystalline basement paleohighs (Appleton Field example). The reef thrombolite lithofacies have higher reservoir quality than the shoal lithofacies due to overall higher permeabilities and greater interconnectivity. Thrombolite dolostone flow units, which are dominated by dolomite intercrystalline and vuggy pores, are characterized by a pore system comprised of a higher percentage of large-sized pores and larger pore throats. Rock-fluid interactions (diagenesis) studies have shown that although the primary control on reservoir architecture and geographic distribution of Smackover reservoirs is the fabric and texture of the depositional lithofacies, diagenesis (chiefly dolomitization) is a significant factor that preserves and enhances reservoir quality. The evaporative pumping mechanism is favored to explain the dolomitization of the thrombolite doloboundstone and dolostone reservoir flow units at Appleton and Vocation Fields. Geologic modeling, reservoir simulation, and the testing and applying the resulting integrated geologic-engineering models have shown that little oil remains to be recovered at Appleton Field and a significant amount of oil remains to be recovered at Vocation Field through a strategic infill drilling program. The drive mechanisms for primary production in Appleton and Vocation Fields remain effective; therefore, the initiation of a pressure maintenance program or enhanced recovery project is not required at this time. The integrated geologic-engineering model developed for a low-relief paleohigh (Appleton Field) was tested for three scenarios involving the variables of present-day structural elevation and the presence/absence of potential reef thrombolite lithofacies. In each case, the predictions based upon the model were correct. From this modeling, the characteristics of the ideal prospect in the basement ridge play include a low-relief paleohigh associated with dendroidal/chaotic thrombolite doloboundstone and dolostone that has sufficient present-day structural relief so that these carbonates rest above the oil-water contact. Such a prospect was identified from the modeling, and it is located northwest of well Permit No. 3854B (Appleton Field) and south of well No. Permit No.11030B (Northwest Appleton Field).

  6. Reservoir Engineering Optimization Strategies for Subsurface CO{sub 2} Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mclntire, Blayde; McPherson, Brian

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to outline a methodology for calculating the optimum number of injection wells for geologic CCS. The methodology is intended primarily for reservoir pressure management, and factors in cost as well. Efficiency may come in many forms depending on project goals; therefore, various results are presented simultaneously. The developed methodology is illustrated via application in a case study of the Rocky Mountain Carbon Capture and Storage (RMCCS) project, including a CCS candidate site near Craig, Colorado, USA. The forecasting method provided reasonable estimates of cost and injection volume when compared to simulated results.

  7. Pore-scale mechanisms of gas flow in tight sand reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silin, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fundamentals of fractured reservoir engineering, Elsevierof naturally fractured reservoirs, SPEJ (1963), 106. J. D.37]. In a fractured conventional reservoir, the accumulating

  8. TopTop--Down Intelligent ReservoirDown Intelligent Reservoir Modeling (TDIRM)Modeling (TDIRM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Reservoir ModelingModeling · In top-down modeling we start from production data and try to deduce a pictureTopTop--Down Intelligent ReservoirDown Intelligent Reservoir Modeling (TDIRM)Modeling (TDIRM) A NEW APPROACH IN RESERVOIR MODELING BY INTEGRATING CLASSIC RESERVOIR ENGINEERING WITH ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

  9. Championed by Residential and Dining Enterprises Stanford Dining and Stanford Hospitality & Auxiliaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straight, Aaron

    Championed by Residential and Dining Enterprises Stanford Dining and Stanford Hospitality Administration 3 Stanford Dining and Stanford Hospitality & Auxiliaries 4 From Residential & Dining Enterprises 5 Sustainability Report 3 #12;From Residential & Dining Enterprises "Residential & Dining Enterprises supports

  10. A theoretical study on the performances of thermoelectric heat engine and refrigerator with two-dimensional electron reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Xiaoguang, E-mail: 276718626@qq.com; Long, Kailin; Wang, Jun; Qiu, Teng, E-mail: tqiu@seu.edu.cn [Department of Physics, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); He, Jizhou [Department of Physics, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Liu, Nian [Department of Physical and Electronics, Anhui Science and Technology University, Bengbu 233100 (China)

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical thermoelectric nanophysics models of low-dimensional electronic heat engine and refrigerator devices, comprising two-dimensional hot and cold reservoirs and an interconnecting filtered electron transport mechanism have been established. The models were used to numerically simulate and evaluate the thermoelectric performance and energy conversion efficiencies of these low-dimensional devices, based on three different types of electron transport momentum-dependent filters, referred to herein as k{sub x}, k{sub y}, and k{sub r} filters. Assuming the Fermi-Dirac distribution of electrons, expressions for key thermoelectric performance parameters were derived for the resonant transport processes, in which the transmission of electrons has been approximated as a Lorentzian resonance function. Optimizations were carried out and the corresponding optimized design parameters have been determined, including but not limited to the universal theoretical upper bound of the efficiency at maximum power for heat engines, and the maximum coefficient of performance for refrigerators. From the results, it was determined that k{sub r} filter delivers the best thermoelectric performance, followed by the k{sub x} filter, and then the k{sub y} filter. For refrigerators with any one of three filters, an optimum range for the full width at half maximum of the transport resonance was found to be <2k{sub B}T.

  11. Dry gas zone, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: General reservoir study: Engineering data, effective August 1, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This reservoir study of the dry gas zone of Elk Hills Field is a data compilation with information relating to well: completion; production; pressure; and back pressure. (JF)

  12. Stanford Geothermal Workshop - Geothermal Technologies Office...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    by Geothermal Technologies Director Doug Hollett at the Stanford Geothermal Workshop on February 11-13, 2013. stanford2013hollett.pdf More Documents & Publications Geothermal...

  13. About the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource | Stanford...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The material will likely enable broader use of fuel cells that produce emissions-free energy, which could eventually replace gasoline engines and the batteries found in small...

  14. Geoscience/engineering characterization of the interwell environment in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs, Permian Basin, West Texas and New Mexico--waterflood performance analysis for the South Cowden Grayburg Reservoir, Ector County, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, J.W. Jr.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reservoir engineering study was conducted of waterflood performance in the South Cowden field, an Upper Permian Grayburg reservoir on the Central Basin Platform in West Texas. The study was undertaken to understand the historically poor waterflood performance, evaluate three techniques for incorporating petrophysical measurements and geological interpretation into heterogeneous reservoir models, and identify issues in heterogeneity modeling and fluid-flow scaleup that require further research. The approach included analysis of relative permeability data, analysis of injection and production data, heterogeneity modeling, and waterflood simulation. The poor South Cowden waterflood recovery is due, in part, to completion of wells in only the top half of the formation. Recompletion of wells through the entire formation is estimated to improve recovery in ten years by 6 percent of the original oil in place in some areas of the field. A direct three-dimensional stochastic approach to heterogeneity modeling produced the best fit to waterflood performance and injectivity, but a more conventional model based on smooth mapping of layer-averaged properties was almost as good. The results reaffirm the importance of large-scale heterogeneities in waterflood modeling but demonstrate only a slight advantage for stochastic modeling at this scale. All the flow simulations required a reduction to the measured whole-core k{sub v}/k{sub h} to explain waterflood behavior, suggesting the presence of barriers to vertical flow not explicitly accounted for in any of the heterogeneity models. They also required modifications to the measured steady-state relative permeabilities, suggesting the importance of small-scale heterogeneities and scaleup. Vertical flow barriers, small-scale heterogeneity modeling, and relative permeability scaleup require additional research for waterflood performance prediction in reservoirs like South Cowden.

  15. Present Status and Future Prospects of Geothermal Development in Italy with an Appendix on Reservoir Engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cataldi, R.; Calamai, A.; Neri, G.; Manetti, G.

    1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper consists of two parts and an appendix. In the first part a review is made of the geothermal activity in Italy from 1975 to 1982, including electrical and non-electrical applications. Remarks then follow on the trends that occurred and the operational criteria that were applied in the same period, which can be considered a transitional period of geothermal development in Italy. Information on recent trends and development objectives up to 1990 are given in the second part of the paper, together with a summary on program activities in the various geothermal areas of Italy. The appendix specifically reviews the main reseroir engineering activities carried out in the past years and the problems likely to be faced in the coming years in developing Itallian fields.

  16. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiraling Laser Pulses CouldStanford Nitrogen Group

  17. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiraling Laser Pulses CouldStanford Nitrogen

  18. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiraling Laser Pulses CouldStanford

  19. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiraling Laser Pulses CouldStanfordAdvance notification

  20. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiraling Laser Pulses CouldStanfordAdvance

  1. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiraling Laser Pulses CouldStanfordAdvanceSSRL Gas

  2. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiraling Laser Pulses CouldStanfordAdvanceSSRL

  3. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiraling Laser Pulses CouldStanfordAdvanceSSRLAccess to

  4. Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Nurudeen

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only...

  5. Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Nurudeen

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only...

  6. Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska`s North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

  7. STANFORD REDWOOD CITY INFUSION THERAPY CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bejerano, Gill

    STANFORD REDWOOD CITY INFUSION THERAPY CENTER Stanford Redwood City Infusion Therapy Center 450 that the new Stanford Redwood City Infusion Therapy Center opened on January 6, 2014. This new state previously received infusion treatments in the Infusion Treatment Area (ITA) at the Stanford Cancer Center

  8. Portable GPS Baseband Logging Morgan Quigley, Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Andrew Y.

    Portable GPS Baseband Logging Morgan Quigley, Stanford University Pieter Abbeel, Stanford Dennis Akos, University of Colorado Andrew Y. Ng, Stanford University BIOGRAPHY Morgan Quigley and Pieter

  9. Optimal Hydropower Reservoir Operation with Environmental Requirements MARCELO ALBERTO OLIVARES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    Optimal Hydropower Reservoir Operation with Environmental Requirements By MARCELO ALBERTO OLIVARES Engineering Optimal Hydropower Reservoir Operation with Environmental Requirements Abstract Engineering solutions to the environmental impacts of hydropower operations on downstream aquatic ecosystem are studied

  10. Reservoir analysis study: Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Elk Hills Field, Kern County, California: Phase 3 report, Recommended additional reservoir engineering analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The basis for completion of the Phase III tasks above were the reports of Phases I and II and the associated backup material. The Phase II report was reviewed to identify the major uncertainties in all of the reserve assignments. In addition to the Proved, Probable and Possible reserves of Phase II, ''potential reserves'' or those associated with a greater degree of risk than the Possible reserves included in the Phase II report, were also identified based on the work performed by Bergeson through the Phase II reporting date. Thirty-three specific studies were identified to address the major Phase II reserve uncertainties or these potential reserves. These studies are listed in Table 1 and are grouped by the Elk Hills pool designation. The basis and need for each study are elaborated in the discussion which follows. Where possible, the need for the study was quantified by associating the study with a particular reserve estimate which would be clarified by the analysis. This reserve value was either the Probable or Possible reserves which were being studied, the potential reserves that were identified, or simply the uncertainty inherent in the proved reserves as identified in the study purpose. The costs associated with performing the study are also shown in Table 1 and were estimated based on Bergeson's knowledge of the Elk Hills reservoirs and data base following Phases I and II, as well as the company's experience in performing similar studies in other fields. The cost estimates are considered reasonable for general budgeting purposes, but may require refinement prior to actual initiation of these studies. This is particularly true for studies involving field testing to obtain additional log, core or test information as the cost of such items is not considered in this report. 51 figs., 46 tabs.

  11. Applying reservoir characterization technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lake, L.W.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    While reservoir characterization is an old discipline, only within the last 10 years have engineers and scientists been able to make quantitative descriptions, due mostly to improvements in high-resolution computational power, sophisticated graphics, and geostatistics. This paper summarizes what has been learned during the past decade by using these technologies.

  12. Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Petroleum Engineering Minor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    electives in Petroleum Reservoir Engineering and Petroleum Production Engineering Chemical and Petroleum Engineering Petroleum Engineering Minor Students their skills by taking a minor in petroleum engineering. Energy is the largest

  13. https://spectrum.stanford.edu/education-mentoring Contact us at Stanford-edplan-initiative@lists.stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonnenburg, Justin L.

    https://spectrum.stanford.edu/education-mentoring Contact us at Stanford-edplan-initiative@lists.stanford.edu IRB Update Wednesday, June 26, 2013 12:00PM ­ 1:00PM Li Ka Shing Center, Rm. 130 291 Campus Drive updates and FYIs to the research community on IRB-related topics. The workshop will provide guidance

  14. Tayo Oguntebi tayo@stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olukotun, Kunle

    groups and industry labs (ppl.stanford.edu). Research within PPL began with novel FPGA- based hardware

  15. Copyright 2004, Society of Petroleum Engineers Inc. This paper was prepared for presentation at the 2005 SPE Reservoir Simulation Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sambridge, Malcolm

    Copyright 2004, Society of Petroleum Engineers Inc. This paper was prepared for presentation not been reviewed by the Society of Petroleum Engineers and are subject to correction by the author(s). The material, as presented, does not necessarily reflect any position of the Society of Petroleum Engineers

  16. Copyright 1999, Society of Petroleum Engineers Inc. This paper was prepared for presentation at the 1999 SPE Reservoir Simulation Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peszynska, Malgorzata

    Copyright 1999, Society of Petroleum Engineers Inc. This paper was prepared for presentation by the Society of Petroleum Engineers and are subject to correction by the author(s). The material, as presented, does not necessarily reflect any position of the Society of Petroleum Engineers, its officers

  17. Stephen R. Barley School of Engineering 787 Mayfield Avenue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    of Engineering, Stanford University 2004-10 Co-Director. General Motors/Stanford University CollaborativeVITA Stephen R. Barley School of Engineering 787 Mayfield Avenue Management Science and Engineering Professor. The Richard Weiland Professor of Management Science and Engineering, School of Engineering

  18. Integrated Hydraulic Fracture Placement and Design Optimization in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Xiaodan

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Unconventional reservoir such as tight and shale gas reservoirs has the potential of becoming the main source of cleaner energy in the 21th century. Production from these reservoirs is mainly accomplished through engineered hydraulic fracturing...

  19. Integrated Hydraulic Fracture Placement and Design Optimization in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Xiaodan

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Unconventional reservoir such as tight and shale gas reservoirs has the potential of becoming the main source of cleaner energy in the 21th century. Production from these reservoirs is mainly accomplished through engineered hydraulic fracturing...

  20. Fracture-Flow-Enhanced Solute Diffusion into Fractured Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Ye, Ming; Sudicky, E.A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs, Society of Petroleumresources from fractured reservoirs (e.g. , Warren and Root,Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 28-30, 2008 SGP-TR-185 FRACTURE-FLOW-ENHANCED SOLUTE DIFFUSION INTO FRACTURED

  1. Portable GPS Baseband Logging Morgan Quigley, Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Portable GPS Baseband Logging Morgan Quigley, Stanford University Pieter Abbeel, Stanford Dennis Akos, University of Colorado Andrew Y. Ng, Stanfod University BIOGRAPHY Morgan Quigley and Pieter

  2. Stanford University June 2012 Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research on the web:http://siepr.stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    's compensating policies for small schools One example of such a policy failure comes from the government of India of learning and Compensating Policies for Small Schools: Addressing Schooling Inequalities in Rural India1Stanford University · June 2012 Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research on the web

  3. Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Gilbert, Bob (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Lake, Larry W. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Thomas, Sunil G. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Klie, Hector (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Banchs, Rafael (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Nunez, Emilio J. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Jablonowski, Chris (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX)

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging survivability issues. Our findings indicate that packaging represents the most significant technical challenge associated with application of sensors in the downhole environment for long periods (5+ years) of time. These issues are described in detail within the report. The impact of successful reservoir monitoring programs and coincident improved reservoir management is measured by the production of additional oil and gas volumes from existing reservoirs, revitalization of nearly depleted reservoirs, possible re-establishment of already abandoned reservoirs, and improved economics for all cases. Smart Well monitoring provides the means to understand how a reservoir process is developing and to provide active reservoir management. At the same time it also provides data for developing high-fidelity simulation models. This work has been a joint effort with Sandia National Laboratories and UT-Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and the Institute of Computational and Engineering Mathematics.

  4. Stanford University Committee on Health and Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Energy Management 4. Report on Stanford Environment, Health and Safety (EH&S) programs ­ Larry Gibbs ­Professor of Pathology ·Nancy Olson ­Community Member, Palo Alto ·Jeffrey Wine ­Professor of Psychology, Associate Director of Sustainability and Energy Management 4. Report on Stanford Environment, Health

  5. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) at Stanford, California, conducted February 29 through March 4, 1988. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with the SLAC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation and is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations at the SLAC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team is developing a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing certain of the environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by a DOE National Laboratory or a support contractor. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Interim Report for the SLAC facility. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the SLAC Survey. 95 refs., 25 figs., 25 tabs.

  6. Development of Reservoir Characterization Techniques and Production Models for Exploiting Naturally Fractured Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiggins, Michael L.; Brown, Raymon L.; Civan, Faruk; Hughes, Richard G.

    2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This research was directed toward developing a systematic reservoir characterization methodology which can be used by the petroleum industry to implement infill drilling programs and/or enhanced oil recovery projects in naturally fractured reservoir systems in an environmentally safe and cost effective manner. It was anticipated that the results of this research program will provide geoscientists and engineers with a systematic procedure for properly characterizing a fractured reservoir system and a reservoir/horizontal wellbore simulator model which can be used to select well locations and an effective EOR process to optimize the recovery of the oil and gas reserves from such complex reservoir systems.

  7. Berkeley-Stanford Summer School

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find MoreLawrence Berkeley NationalBerkeley-Stanford

  8. Play Analysis and Digital Portfolio of Major Oil Reservoirs in the Permian Basin: Application and Transfer of Advanced Geological and Engineering Technologies for Incremental Production Opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest onshore petroleum-producing basin in the United States. Approximately 1,300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000. Of these significant-sized reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. There are 32 geologic plays that have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs, and each of the 1,300 major reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. The final reservoir shapefile for each play contains the geographic location of each reservoir. Associated reservoir information within the linked data tables includes RRC reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are smaller than 1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production of >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl [5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]). Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

  9. Copyright 2001, Society of Petroleum Engineers Inc. This paper was prepared for presentation at the SPE Reservoir Simulation Symposium held in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmroth, Erik

    at the SPE Reservoir Simulation Symposium held in Houston, Texas, 11­14 February 2001. This paper resolution for reservoir simulation on single-processor machine. This paper reports on our work, multiphase fluids in three-dimensional porous and fractured media. We have implemented the TOUGH2 package

  10. PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; Caroline L. Breton; William D. Raatz; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans

    2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Permian Basin of west Texas and southeast New Mexico has produced >30 Bbbl (4.77 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}) of oil through 2000, most of it from 1,339 reservoirs having individual cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}). These significant-sized reservoirs are the focus of this report. Thirty-two Permian Basin oil plays were defined, and each of the 1,339 significant-sized reservoirs was assigned to a play. The reservoirs were mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Associated reservoir information within linked data tables includes Railroad Commission of Texas reservoir number and district (Texas only), official field and reservoir name, year reservoir was discovered, depth to top of the reservoir, production in 2000, and cumulative production through 2000. Some tables also list subplays. Play boundaries were drawn for each play; the boundaries include areas where fields in that play occur but are <1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) of cumulative production. This report contains a summary description of each play, including key reservoir characteristics and successful reservoir-management practices that have been used in the play. The CD accompanying the report contains a pdf version of the report, the GIS project, pdf maps of all plays, and digital data files. Oil production from the reservoirs in the Permian Basin having cumulative production >1 MMbbl (1.59 x 10{sup 5} m{sup 3}) was 301.4 MMbbl (4.79 x 10{sup 7} m{sup 3}) in 2000. Cumulative Permian Basin production through 2000 from these significant-sized reservoirs was 28.9 Bbbl (4.59 x 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}). The top four plays in cumulative production are the Northwest Shelf San Andres Platform Carbonate play (3.97 Bbbl [6.31 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), the Leonard Restricted Platform Carbonate play (3.30 Bbbl 5.25 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}), the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play (2.70 Bbbl [4.29 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]), and the San Andres Platform Carbonate play (2.15 Bbbl [3.42 x 10{sup 8} m{sup 3}]).

  11. Stanford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    ... Name, Vol. V, No. N, Month 20YY, Pages 1–0? ... A great deal of research has been done on the topic of position estimation in ad-hoc networks ([Ganesan et ...

  12. Stanford Geothermal Program Interdisciplinary Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    PROCEDURE ........................................................................................ 11 DATA.................... ............................... ................... .......10 7. Reservoir Design ......................................................................14 Measured Data ................................................................................ 14

  13. PLAY ANALYSIS AND DIGITAL PORTFOLIO OF MAJOR OIL RESERVOIRS IN THE PERMIAN BASIN: APPLICATION AND TRANSFER OF ADVANCED GEOLOGICAL AND ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGIES FOR INCREMENTAL PRODUCTION OPPORTUNITIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley P. Dutton; Eugene M. Kim; Ronald F. Broadhead; William Raatz; Cari Breton; Stephen C. Ruppel; Charles Kerans; Mark H. Holtz

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A play portfolio is being constructed for the Permian Basin in west Texas and southeast New Mexico, the largest petroleum-producing basin in the US. Approximately 1300 reservoirs in the Permian Basin have been identified as having cumulative production greater than 1 MMbbl of oil through 2000. Of these major reservoirs, approximately 1,000 are in Texas and 300 in New Mexico. On a preliminary basis, 32 geologic plays have been defined for Permian Basin oil reservoirs and assignment of each of the 1300 major reservoirs to a play has begun. The reservoirs are being mapped and compiled in a Geographic Information System (GIS) by play. Detailed studies of three reservoirs are in progress: Kelly-Snyder (SACROC unit) in the Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian Horseshoe Atoll Carbonate play, Fullerton in the Leonardian Restricted Platform Carbonate play, and Barnhart (Ellenburger) in the Ellenburger Selectively Dolomitized Ramp Carbonate play. For each of these detailed reservoir studies, technologies for further, economically viable exploitation are being investigated.

  14. Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and acquisition of reservoir property measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October, a contract was awarded for the Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and Acquisition of Reservoir Property measurements from wells in the Michigan, Illinois, and Appalachian Basins. Geologic and engineering data collected through this project will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms and conditions controlling shale gas production. This report summarizes the results obtained from the various testing procedures used at each wellsite and the activities conducted at the Reservoir Testing Facility.

  15. Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and acquisition of reservoir property measurements. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In October, a contract was awarded for the Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and Acquisition of Reservoir Property measurements from wells in the Michigan, Illinois, and Appalachian Basins. Geologic and engineering data collected through this project will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms and conditions controlling shale gas production. This report summarizes the results obtained from the various testing procedures used at each wellsite and the activities conducted at the Reservoir Testing Facility.

  16. HYDROPOWER RESERVOIR FOR FLOOD CONTROL: A CASE STUDY ON RINGLET RESERVOIR, CAMERON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    HYDROPOWER RESERVOIR FOR FLOOD CONTROL: A CASE STUDY ON RINGLET RESERVOIR, CAMERON HIGHLANDS, Malaysia 4 Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Colorado State University, USA ABSTRACT: Hydropower as possible for daily hydropower generation as well as to prevent any spillage at dam. However

  17. Stanford University School of Medicine Privacy Office medprivacy@stanford.edu | 650.725.1828

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    devices used for Stanford business, including personally-owned devices. This applies to all members questions. Personal mobile devices. If you use your personal mobile device for work purposes (including, visit http://med.stanford.edu/datasecurity. Back-up and encrypt devices. The School of Medicine Data

  18. Proceedings of the 9th International Scientific and Technical Conference "New Methods and Technologies in Petroleum Geology, Drilling and Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    and Technologies in Petroleum Geology, Drilling and Reservoir Engineering," Volume II, 311-317, AGH, Krakow, Poland

  19. -Injection Technology -Geothermal Reservoir Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Investigator: Roland N. Home September 1985 First Annual Report Department of Energy Contract Number, and the forecasting of field behavior with time. Injection I I Tec hnology is a research area receiving special on geothermal energy. The Program publishes technical reports on all of its research projects. Research findings

  20. HIGH TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder, R.C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reviewed with data from Cerro Prieto as the primary example.using data from Cerro Prieto as an' example. Downhole toolsare reviewed. Data from Cerro Prieto are used as an example

  1. Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has used a multi-disciplinary approach employing geology, geophysics, and engineering to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and management activities to design and implement an optimized infill drilling program at the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit in Gaines County, Texas. The activities during the first Budget Period consisted of developing an integrated reservoir description from geological, engineering, and geostatistical studies, and using this description for reservoir flow simulation. Specific reservoir management activities were identified and tested. The geologically targeted infill drilling program currently being implemented is a result of this work. A significant contribution of this project is to demonstrate the use of cost-effective reservoir characterization and management tools that will be helpful to both independent and major operators for the optimal development of heterogeneous, low permeability shallow-shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. The techniques that are outlined for the formulation of an integrated reservoir description apply to all oil and gas reservoirs, but are specifically tailored for use in the heterogeneous, low permeability carbonate reservoirs of West Texas.

  2. IOP PUBLISHING MODELLING AND SIMULATION IN MATERIALS SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING Modelling Simul. Mater. Sci. Eng. 17 (2009) 075008 (14pp) doi:10.1088/0965-0393/17/7/075008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Wei

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA 3 University of California as well as covalent semiconductors. MEAM potentials for many binary alloys have also been developed [7

  3. Stanford Anesthesia 50th Year Celebration Registration Category

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    Stanford Anesthesia 50th Year Celebration Registration Category Please select a registration Department of Anesthesia will not assume any responsibility for any injuries or other negative occurrences indicate your affiliation with Stanford Anesthesia Anesthesia Resident Anesthesia Fellow Anesthesia Faculty

  4. Original articles The Stanford Digital Library metadata architecturec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravano, Luis

    Original articles The Stanford Digital Library metadata architecturec Michelle Baldonado, Chen / Accepted: 14 January 1997 Abstract. The overall goal of the Stanford Digital Library project is to provide an infrastructure that aords interoperability among heterogeneous, autono- mous digital library services

  5. December 2001 Trevor Hastie, Stanford Statistics 1 Support Vector Machines,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hastie, Trevor

    December 2001 Trevor Hastie, Stanford Statistics 1 Support Vector Machines, Kernel Logistic in Optimization and Computational Algorithms (NTOC2001) December 9-13, 2001, Kyodai-Kaikan, Kyoto, Japan http://www-stat.stanford.edu/hastie/Papers/ivmtalk.pdf #12;December 2001 Trevor Hastie, Stanford Statistics 2 Outline · Optimal separating hyperplanes

  6. Accepted, subject to re-review, Journal of Hydraulic Engineering, ASCE, version of January 2006 Role of Ponded Turbidity Currents in Reservoir Trap Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary

    , because some of this sediment may pass out of the reservoir without settling out. Here a model of trap. The dam causes a sustained turbidity current to reflect and form a muddy pond bounded upstream by a hydraulic jump. If the interface of this muddy pond rises above any vent or overflow point at the dam

  7. Tenth U.S. National Conference on Earthquake Engineering Frontiers of Earthquake Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Jack W.

    AND IMPACT ON STRUCTURAL COLLAPSE RISK Reagan Chandramohan1 , Jack W. Baker2 and Gregory G. Deierlein3 ABSTRACT Calculation of structural collapse risk using non-linear response history analysis requires and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 2 Associate Professor, Dept. of Civil

  8. Stanford University November 2012 Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research on the web:http://siepr.stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zalta, Edward N.

    , most notably China, have large shale gas reserves. Current landed prices for liquefied natural gas (LNG:http://siepr.stanford.edu SIEPRpolicy brief Energy industry observers have called the development of unconventional natural gas the shale for a controlled release of the natural gas trapped inside are the two major breakthroughs

  9. Stanford University September 2011 Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research on the web:http://siepr.stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Fei-Fei

    other major sectors of the U.S. economy? Many of the core ideas advocated by health care reformers:http://siepr.stanford.edu SIEPRpolicy brief Will information technology transform the health care sector the way it has transformed are premised on patients, physicians, and health care organizations having access to complete electronic

  10. Stanford University June 2011 Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research on the web:http://siepr.stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Fei-Fei

    , purification, and metals production industry; a domestic rare earth metals alloying industry; and a domestic:http://siepr.stanford.edu SIEPRpolicy brief China produces 97 percent of all rare earth elements (REEs) consumed in the world today,1 is now paying attention, recently introducing the Rare Earth Supply-Chain Technology and Resource

  11. Chris Kenney kenney@slac.stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    Chris Kenney kenney@slac.stanford.edu LDAC LCLS Detector Review Dec. 2, 2010 LDAC 1 LCLS has to develop, manufacture, and operate advanced detectors optimized for the needs of the LCLS. The LDAC meets, SLAC/LCLS Liaison The last LDAC meeting was held at SLAC in December 2010. The LDAC provides

  12. Stanford Center for Position, Navigation & Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straight, Aaron

    contributing exciting, novel new technologies, and together can play a leading role in this technology to rejuvenate the GLONASS system · Japan is also active with QZSS. #12;6 Outline A. Navigation & time technology;2 Stanford Center for Position Navigation and Time · The implementation of GPS in 1973 began this technology

  13. Stanford Center for Position, Navigation and Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straight, Aaron

    --ACES: Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space Bryant Walker Smith--Legal Aspects of Vehicle Automation Michael O Collision Avoidance System (ACAS X)" 15 9:30am 30 Beiker, Sven Stanford CARS "Automated vehicles are coming "Legal aspects of Vehicle Automation" 17 11:00am 30 Shaw, Stuart Lockheed Martin "GPS III Signal

  14. Stanford UniverSity Postdoctoral Scholars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Stanford UniverSity Postdoctoral Scholars Health Care Reform and Your Health Insurance Options Effective January 1, 2014, the Affordable Care Act -- also known as "health care reform" -- will require the impact of health care reform and to feel confident about your personal coverage decisions

  15. STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM FIRST ANNUAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    STANFORD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM FIRST ANNUAL REPORT t o U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY LAWRENCE BERKELEY PRESENTATIONS & PUBLICATIONS APPENDIX A: STANDARD GEOTHERMAL PROGRAM WEEKLY SEMINAR ii 1 4 23 35 49 58 60 63 65 Geothermal Program has maintained momentum built up under the previous National Science Foundation support

  16. Black Shales Adina Paytan, Stanford University, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paytan, Adina

    Tales of Black Shales Adina Paytan, Stanford University, USA Several times during the middle of the Cretaceous period, between 125 and 80 million years ago, organic-carbon-rich black shales were deposited over large areas of the ocean floor. These black shales provide valuable information about past climates

  17. STANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER DIRECTOR'S OFFICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    of these offices not listed here. PART 1: RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM MANAGEMENT RECORDS R&D Program Management records document the basis for research and development program management decisions, direction, policiesSTANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER DIRECTOR'S OFFICE RECORDS CONTROL SCHEDULE SCOPE: This schedule

  18. STANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER RECORDS CONTROL SCHEDULE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    to project justification, staffing, initiation, or execution; project management plans, records managementSTANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER PEP-II RECORDS CONTROL SCHEDULE SCOPE: This schedule covers records of the PEP-II project, regardless of format (paper, electronic, magnetic, photographic, etc

  19. The wind of freedom . . . Stanford's motto,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, Vaughan

    · Oxford, United Kingdom · Paris, France · Santiago, Chile 80 residential housing facilities An estimatedThe wind of freedom . . . 2 0 1 4 #12;Stanford's motto, "Die Luft der Freiheit weht" --which translates as "the wind of freedom blows"-- appears on the University's seal and has been a touchstone

  20. Robert L. Byer Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a strong domestic program requires supporting a world-class cadre of scientists, engineers and students Holdren Director, Office of Science and Technology Policy New Executive Office Building 725 17th Street, NW Washington DC 20502 The Honorable Dr. Holdren, I am writing as president of the American Physical

  1. Civil Engineering Environmental Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Jim

    ) : Southampton University #12;5 Canada Wharf Station, London Underground · An underground chamber in clay- building · Communication #12;12 THE CONSTRCUTIONARIUM First Year Student Field Class The students design. Renovation of old canals and tunnels Design of new storage reservoirs #12;17 Civil Engineering

  2. Yinyu Ye is currently the K.T. Li Chair Professor of Engineering at Department of Management Science and Engineering and Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, Yinyu

    Science and Engineering and Institute of Computational and Mathematical Engineering, Stanford University Sciences, the inaugural 2006 Farkas Prize on Optimization, the 2009 IBM Faculty Award, etc.. He has of government and industry funded research projects. He has been the Director of the Stanford Management Science

  3. Some practical aspects of reservoir management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, M.L.; Young, M.A.; Cole, E.L.; Madden, M.P. [BDM-Oklahoma, Bartlesville, OK (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The practical essence of reservoir management is the optimal application of available resources-people, equipment, technology, and money to maximize profitability and recovery. Success must include knowledge and consideration of (1) the reservoir system, (2) the technologies available, and (3) the reservoir management business environment. Two Reservoir Management Demonstration projects (one in a small, newly-discovered field and one in a large, mature water-flood) implemented by the Department of Energy through BDM-Oklahoma illustrate the diversity of situations suited for reservoir management efforts. Project teams made up of experienced engineers, geoscientists, and other professionals arrived at an overall reservoir management strategy for each field. in 1993, Belden & Blake Corporation discovered a regionally significant oil reservoir (East Randolph Field) in the Cambrian Rose Run formation in Portage County, Ohio. Project objectives are to improve field operational economics and optimize oil recovery. The team focused on characterizing the reservoir geology and analyzing primary production and reservoir data to develop simulation models. Historical performance was simulated and predictions were made to assess infill drilling, water flooding, and gas repressurization. The Citronelle Field, discovered in 1955 in Mobile County, Alabama, has produced 160 million barrels from fluvial sandstones of the Cretaceous Rodessa formation. Project objectives are to address improving recovery through waterflood optimization and problems related to drilling, recompletions, production operations, and regulatory and environmental issues. Initial efforts focused on defining specific problems and on defining a geographic area within the field where solutions might best be pursued. Geologic and reservoir models were used to evaluate past performance and to investigate improved recovery operations.

  4. Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonate Studies Executive Summary for 2014 Outcrop and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate Reservoirs for Improved Recovery of Remaining/Al 0.00 0.02 0.04 Eagle Ford Fm #12;#12; Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory Research Plans

  5. Thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, G.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a transcript of a practice lecture given in preparation for a review lecture on the operation of thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators. The author begins by a brief review of the thermodynamic principles underlying the operation of thermoacoustic engines and refrigerators. Remember from thermodynamics class that there are two kinds of heat engines, the heat engine or the prime mover which produces work from heat, and the refrigerator or heat pump that uses work to pump heat. The device operates between two thermal reservoirs at temperatures T{sub hot} and T{sub cold}. In the heat engine, heat flows into the device from the reservoir at T{sub hot}, produces work, and delivers waste heat into the reservoir at T{sub cold}. In the refrigerator, work flows into the device, lifting heat Q{sub cold} from reservoir at T{sub cold} and rejecting waste heat into the reservoir at T{sub hot}.

  6. Research on improved and enhanced oil recovery in Illinois through reservoir characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Illinois Department of Energy and Natural Resources through a Memorandum of Understanding with the US Department of Energy has commenced a research program in Improved and Enhanced Oil Recovery from Illinois Reservoirs Through Reservoir Characterization.'' The program will include studies on mineralogy, petrography of reservoir rock, database management, engineering assessment, seismic studies and acoustic logs, and mapping. 8 figs. (CBS)

  7. Learning for Control from Multiple Demonstrations Adam Coates acoates@cs.stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Andrew Y.

    pabbeel@cs.stanford.edu Andrew Y. Ng ang@cs.stanford.edu Stanford University CS Department, 353 Serra Mall include the first autonomous tic-tocs, loops and hurricane, vastly superior performance on previously

  8. Learning for Control from Multiple Demonstrations Adam Coates acoates@cs.stanford.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Andrew Y.

    pabbeel@cs.stanford.edu Andrew Y. Ng ang@cs.stanford.edu Stanford University CS Department, 353 Serra Mall include the first autonomous tic­tocs, loops and hurricane, vastly superior performance on previously

  9. Electronic Phase Control with an Electric Field | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electronic Phase Control with an Electric Field Wednesday, April 29, 2015 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Speaker: Hongtao Yuan, Stanford University Program...

  10. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Syncrotron Light Source (NSLS-II) Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL) Neutron Scattering Facilities Nanoscale Science Research Centers (NSRCs) Projects...

  11. Tackling Big Challenges Using Tiny Crystals | Stanford Synchrotron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conference Room 108A Speaker: Matteo Cargnello, Stanford Univeristy Program Description Fossil fuels are not endless and their extensive use is causing irreversible climate...

  12. DOE Cites Stanford University and Two Subcontractors for Worker...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Violation (PNOVs) to three contractors - Stanford University, Pacific Underground Construction, Inc., and Western Allied Mechanical, Inc. - for violations in September 2007 of...

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION TECHNIQUES AND PRODUCTION MODELS FOR EXPLOITING NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Wiggins; Raymon L. Brown; Faruk Civan; Richard G. Hughes

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    For many years, geoscientists and engineers have undertaken research to characterize naturally fractured reservoirs. Geoscientists have focused on understanding the process of fracturing and the subsequent measurement and description of fracture characteristics. Engineers have concentrated on the fluid flow behavior in the fracture-porous media system and the development of models to predict the hydrocarbon production from these complex systems. This research attempts to integrate these two complementary views to develop a quantitative reservoir characterization methodology and flow performance model for naturally fractured reservoirs. The research has focused on estimating naturally fractured reservoir properties from seismic data, predicting fracture characteristics from well logs, and developing a naturally fractured reservoir simulator. It is important to develop techniques that can be applied to estimate the important parameters in predicting the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs. This project proposes a method to relate seismic properties to the elastic compliance and permeability of the reservoir based upon a sugar cube model. In addition, methods are presented to use conventional well logs to estimate localized fracture information for reservoir characterization purposes. The ability to estimate fracture information from conventional well logs is very important in older wells where data are often limited. Finally, a desktop naturally fractured reservoir simulator has been developed for the purpose of predicting the performance of these complex reservoirs. The simulator incorporates vertical and horizontal wellbore models, methods to handle matrix to fracture fluid transfer, and fracture permeability tensors. This research project has developed methods to characterize and study the performance of naturally fractured reservoirs that integrate geoscience and engineering data. This is an important step in developing exploitation strategies for optimizing the recovery from naturally fractured reservoir systems. The next logical extension of this work is to apply the proposed methods to an actual field case study to provide information for verification and modification of the techniques and simulator. This report provides the details of the proposed techniques and summarizes the activities undertaken during the course of this project. Technology transfer activities were highlighted by a two-day technical conference held in Oklahoma City in June 2002. This conference attracted over 90 participants and included the presentation of seventeen technical papers from researchers throughout the United States.

  14. Improved characterization of reservoir behavior by integration of reservoir performances data and rock type distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davies, D.K.; Vessell, R.K. [David K. Davies & Associates, Kingwood, TX (United States); Doublet, L.E. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated geological/petrophysical and reservoir engineering study was performed for a large, mature waterflood project (>250 wells, {approximately}80% water cut) at the North Robertson (Clear Fork) Unit, Gaines County, Texas. The primary goal of the study was to develop an integrated reservoir description for {open_quotes}targeted{close_quotes} (economic) 10-acre (4-hectare) infill drilling and future recovery operations in a low permeability, carbonate (dolomite) reservoir. Integration of the results from geological/petrophysical studies and reservoir performance analyses provide a rapid and effective method for developing a comprehensive reservoir description. This reservoir description can be used for reservoir flow simulation, performance prediction, infill targeting, waterflood management, and for optimizing well developments (patterns, completions, and stimulations). The following analyses were performed as part of this study: (1) Geological/petrophysical analyses: (core and well log data) - {open_quotes}Rock typing{close_quotes} based on qualitative and quantitative visualization of pore-scale features. Reservoir layering based on {open_quotes}rock typing {close_quotes} and hydraulic flow units. Development of a {open_quotes}core-log{close_quotes} model to estimate permeability using porosity and other properties derived from well logs. The core-log model is based on {open_quotes}rock types.{close_quotes} (2) Engineering analyses: (production and injection history, well tests) Material balance decline type curve analyses to estimate total reservoir volume, formation flow characteristics (flow capacity, skin factor, and fracture half-length), and indications of well/boundary interference. Estimated ultimate recovery analyses to yield movable oil (or injectable water) volumes, as well as indications of well and boundary interference.

  15. Atlas of Northern Gulf of Mexico Gas and Oil Reservoirs: Procedures and examples of resource distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seni, S.J.; Finley, R.J.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the program is to produce a reservoir atlas series of the Gulf of Mexico that (1) classifies and groups offshore oil and gas reservoirs into a series of geologically defined reservoir plays, (2) compiles comprehensive reservoir play information that includes descriptive and quantitative summaries of play characteristics, cumulative production, reserves, original oil and gas in place, and various other engineering and geologic data, (3) provides detailed summaries of representative type reservoirs for each play, and (4) organizes computerized tables of reservoir engineering data into a geographic information system (GIS). The primary product of the program will be an oil and gas atlas series of the offshore Northern Gulf of Mexico and a computerized geographical information system of geologic and engineering data linked to reservoir location.

  16. Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling. Annual report, June 13, 1994--June 12, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pande, P.K.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has used a multi-disciplinary approach employing geology, geophysics, and engineering to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and management activities to design and implement an optimized infill drilling program at the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit in Gaines County, Texas. The activities during the first Budget Period have consisted of developing an integrated reservoir description from geological, engineering, and geostatistical studies, and using this description for reservoir flow simulation. Specific reservoir management activities are being identified and tested. The geologically targeted infill drilling program will be implemented using the results of this work. A significant contribution of this project is to demonstrate the use of cost-effective reservoir characterization and management tools that will be helpful to both independent and major operators for the optimal development of heterogeneous, low permeability shallow-shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. The techniques that are outlined for the formulation of an integrated reservoir description apply to all oil and gas reservoirs, but are specifically tailored for use in the heterogeneous, low permeability carbonate reservoirs of West Texas.

  17. Constant Asphaltene Molecular and Nanoaggregate Mass in a Gravitationally Segregated Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94350, United States Saudi Aramco

  18. Reservoir CharacterizationReservoir Characterization Research LaboratoryResearch Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Reservoir CharacterizationReservoir Characterization Research LaboratoryResearch Laboratory at Austin Austin, Texas 78713Austin, Texas 78713--89248924 #12;Reservoir Characterization Research Laboratory for Carbonate Studies Research Plans for 2012 Outcrop and Subsurface Characterization of Carbonate

  19. Reservoir management using streamline simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choudhary, Manoj Kumar

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of information and sparsity of data. Quantifying this uncertainty in terms of reservoir performance forecast poses a major reservoir management challenge. One solution to this problem is flow simulation of a large number of these plausible reservoir descriptions...

  20. Workshop: Synchrotron Applications in Chemical Catalysis | Stanford

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to &83Stanford

  1. Stanford, California: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk,SoutheastSt. Francis(Redirected from Stanford, CA) Jump to:

  2. Stanford Nitrogen Group | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiraling Laser Pulses CouldStanford Nitrogen Group

  3. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource: SPEAR3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarshipSpiraling Laser Pulses CouldStanfordAdvanceSSRLAccess

  4. THE STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LIGHTSOURCE STRATEGIC PLAN:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solid ...SuccessSurprisingSynchrotronsPlasmaSTANFORD SYNCHROTRON

  5. Computer Science & Engineering Box 352350 Seattle, WA 98195-2350

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    Seattle, WA Permit #62Jeff Heer will join us from Stanford University, where he is a faculty member, a Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, the IJCAI Computers and Thought Award

  6. ENGINEERING

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ENGINEERING the Future of ENERGY Regional University Alliance National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Research and Development The Future of Energy The time to redraw...

  7. Texas A&M University at Qatar Petroleum Engineering Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    available for Petrophysics/Formation Evaluation, Production Engineering, Reservoir Engineering The Petroleum and formation evaluation, production engineering, or reservoir fluids for the petroleum engineering program; (21 Texas A&M University at Qatar Petroleum Engineering Program Education City, Doha, Qatar Positions

  8. Horizontal well applications in complex carbonate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahman, M.; Al-Awami, H.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past four years, Saudi Aramco has drilled over eighty horizontal wells, onshore and offshore. It has successfully applied this technology to develop new reservoirs as well as enhance recovery from its mature fields. This paper presents the reservoir engineering aspects of `horizontal` and `high angle` wells drilled in a major offshore field in Saudi Arabia. It shows how horizontal wells have (a) increased the recovery of bypassed oil, (b) improved well productivity in tight reservoirs, (c) increased production from thin oil zones underlain by water, and (d) improved peripheral injection. The paper discusses the actual performance of the horizontal wells and compares them with offset conventional wells. It presents the results of logging and testing of these wells, and highlights actual field data on (a) relationship between productivity gain and horizontal length, (b) pressure loss along the horizontal wellbore, and (c) effect of heterogeneity on coning an inflow performance.

  9. Reservoir Protection (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oklahoma Water Resource Board has the authority to make rules for the control of sanitation on all property located within any reservoir or drainage basin. The Board works with the Department...

  10. Reservoir Operation in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.

    management of the surface water resources of the various river basins of the state. The operation of these essential water control facilities is examined in this report. Reservoir operation is viewed here from the perspective of deciding how much water...

  11. Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. The successful development of HPAI technology has tremendous potential for increasing the flow of oil from deep carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin, a target resource that can be conservatively estimated at more than 1.5 billion barrels. Successful implementation in the field chosen for demonstration, for example, could result in the recovery of more than 34 million barrels of oil that will not otherwise be produced. Geological and petrophysical analysis of available data at Barnhart field reveals the following important observations: (1) the Barnhart Ellenburger reservoir is similar to most other Ellenburger reservoirs in terms of depositional facies, diagenesis, and petrophysical attributes; (2) the reservoir is characterized by low to moderate matrix porosity much like most other Ellenburger reservoirs in the Permian Basin; (3) karst processes (cave formation, infill, and collapse) have substantially altered stratigraphic architecture and reservoir properties; (4) porosity and permeability increase with depth and may be associated with the degree of karst-related diagenesis; (5) tectonic fractures overprint the reservoir, improving overall connectivity; (6) oil-saturation profiles show that the oil-water contact (OWC) is as much as 125 ft lower than previous estimations; (7) production history and trends suggest that this reservoir is very similar to other solution-gas-drive reservoirs in the Permian Basin; and (8) reservoir simulation study showed that the Barnhart reservoir is a good candidate for HPAI and that application of horizontal-well technology can improve ultimate resource recovery from the reservoir.

  12. Mechanical engineering Department Seminar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanical engineering Department Seminar Wynter J. Duncanson Department of Aerospace and Ocean Engineering Virginia Tech Smart' Bubbles for Acoustic Contrast in Oil Reservoirs 11:00 AM Friday, 19 April engineering from Boston University. Her doctoral research was devoted to designing surface architectures

  13. Recovery of oil from fractured reservoirs by gas displacement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unneberg, Arild

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RECOVERY OF OIL FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY GAS DISPLACEMENT A Thesis by ARILD UNNE BE RG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AlkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974... Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering RECOVERY OF OIL FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY GAS DISPLACEMENT A Thesis by ARILD UNNEBERG Approved as, to style and content by: . ( y (Chairman of Cornrnittee) (Head of Depar nt) / (Membe r) (Member) M b...

  14. Recovery of oil from fractured reservoirs by gas displacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unneberg, Arild

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RECOVERY OF OIL FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY GAS DISPLACEMENT A Thesis by ARILD UNNE BE RG Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AlkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974... Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering RECOVERY OF OIL FROM FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY GAS DISPLACEMENT A Thesis by ARILD UNNEBERG Approved as, to style and content by: . ( y (Chairman of Cornrnittee) (Head of Depar nt) / (Membe r) (Member) M b...

  15. Analyzing aquifers associated with gas reservoirs using aquifer influence functions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Targac, Gary Wayne

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ANALYZING AQUIFERS ASSOCIATED WITH GAS RESERVOIRS USING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE TARGAC Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE V z May 1988 z V z z I- Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ANALYZING AQUIFERS ASSOCIATED WITH GAS RESERVOIRS USING AQUIFER INFLUENCE FUNCTIONS A Thesis by GARY WAYNE TARGAC Approved as to style and content by: (Chair of Committ R...

  16. Reservoir analysis model for battlefield operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Garrett James

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'age. Tbe concrete gravity dam had eighteen spillway gates thirty-tvo feet in height along the top of the stxucture (Figure 7). The United Nations Copyright (1952) by the Society of Amexican Nilitaxy Engineers. Reprinted by permission from the January... of expert systems for Military Hydrology applications, specifically the reservoir drawdown problem. Finally, a next generation notional concept for the RANBO concept is presented incorporating a wide range of military requirements (dam-break analysis...

  17. Microsoft Word - EDUconnectStanford11-10

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Project at Stanford and LANL ; more info Steven Chu 1997 Physics Professor of Physics and Applied Physics 1987 - 2008; Professor Emeritus Ph.D. Thesis at LBL under AEC contract;...

  18. ZERO WASTE STANFORD WASTE REDUCTION, RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING GUIDELINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerdes, J. Christian

    ZERO WASTE STANFORD WASTE REDUCTION, RECYCLING AND COMPOSTING GUIDELINES PLASTICS, METALS & GLASS pleaseemptyandflatten COMPOSTABLES kitchenandyardwasteonly LANDFILL ONLY ifallelsefails All Plastic Containers Metal Material All Food Paper Plates & Napkins *including pizza & donut boxes Compostable & Biodegradable

  19. Predicting Stimulation Response Relationships For Engineered...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    For Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs Project objectives: Using existing LLNL computer programs, develop realistic models of EGS stimulation-response scenarios involving...

  20. Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Enga, B.E.

    1981-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to Stirling engines and to improved methods of operation whereby catalytic oxidation of a major proportion of the fuel takes place in the external combustor. An external combustion unit of a Stirling engine comprises a catalytic combustor having a thermally stable and oxidation resistant monolith made from and/or carrying a catalytic material and including a multiplicity of flow paths for catalytic combustion of combustible gases and injected fuel. The use of a catalytic combustor in accordance with this invention enables a Stirling or other engine fitted therewith to be used in areas such as mines and underwater installations where conventional flame combustion is impracticable or is controlled by stringent regulations.

  1. Office Address: Dept. of Petroleum Engineering Colorado School of Mines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    , CO2 flooding and sequestration, and heat transfer in EOR/IOR processes · Fractured reservoir@lbl.gov http://www-esd.lbl.gov/ESD_staff/wu/index.html EDUCATION Ph.D. Reservoir Engineering, University of California at Berkeley M.S. Reservoir Engineering/Hydrogeology, University of California at Berkeley M

  2. 3D Magnetotelluic characterization of the Coso Geothermal Field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Gregory A.; Hoversten, G. Michael; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Gasperikova, Erika

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    130, 475-496. the Coso Geothermal Field, Proc.28 th Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanfords ratio and porosity at Coso geothermal area, California: J.

  3. DOE-Funded Research at Stanford Sees Results in Reservoir Characteriza...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    by hydraulic, chemical or electrostatic effects. To investigate these issues, a nanofluid was created by suspending SiO2 nanoparticles in a liquid solution, and then...

  4. DOE-Funded Research at Stanford Sees Results in Reservoir Characterization

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No Significant Impact for Biomass CogenerationFlex Bulletin The|

  5. A reservoir management strategy for multilayered reservoirs in eastern Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinel Diaz, Arnaldo Leopoldo

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reservoir management strategy has been developed for a field located in eastern Venezuela. The field contains deep, high pressure, multilayer reservoirs. A thorough formation evaluation was accomplished using the log data, core data, PVT data...

  6. Evolution of analyzing reservoir simulation data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, R.E.; Huang, A.Y.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical Reservoir Simulation is routinely used by the petroleum producing companies world-wide as an engineering tool to efficiently manage their hydrocarbon reservoirs. The task of building models with a large number of grid-blocks is not easy, and to analyze the voluminous results produced by such models is even more difficult. This paper discusses the historical evolution of techniques used to analyze reservoir simulation data over the past decade. It outlines how the advancement of workstation technology and the introduction of X-Window System opened up an entirely new way of utilizing mainframe computing power and workstation graphical display capabilities, simultaneously. The paper also discusses Saudi Aramco`s experience in the development of sophisticated reservoir simulation post-processing packages. The need for direct communication between the programmer and end-users to facilitate a user-friendly package is emphasized. A practical example illustrating the benefit of these post-processing packages in the construction and history matching of a large model with approximately 52,000 cells is presented. Savings in manpower and computer resources using current technology are estimated.

  7. Evolution of analyzing reservoir simulation data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, R.E.; Huang, A.Y.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petroleum-producing companies world-wide routinely use numerical reservoir simulation as an engineering tool to manage their hydrocarbon reservoirs efficiently. The task of building models with a large number of gridblocks is not easy, and analyzing the voluminous results produced by such models is even more difficult. This paper discusses the historical evolution of techniques used to analyze reservoir simulation data over the past decade. It outlines how the advancement of workstation technology and the introduction of an X-Window system opened up an entirely new way of using mainframe computing power and workstation graphical display capabilities simultaneously. The paper also discusses Saudi Aramco`s experience in the development of sophisticated reservoir simulation postprocessing packages. The authors emphasize the need for direct communication between the programmer and end users to facilitate a user-friendly package. They present a practical example illustrating the benefit of these postprocessing packages in the construction and history matching of a large model with approximately 52,000 cells. They estimate savings in manpower and computer resources using current technology.

  8. Geochemical analysis of reservoir continuity and connectivity, Arab-D and Hanifa Reservoirs, Abqaiq Field, Saudia Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahdi, A.A.; Grover, G. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia); Hwang, R. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic geochemistry and its integration with geologic and reservoir engineering data is becoming increasingly utilized to assist geologists and petroleum engineers in solving production related problems. In Abqaiq Field of eastern Saudi Arabia, gas chromatographic analysis (FSCOT) of produced oils from the Arab-D and Hanifa reservoirs was used to evaluate vertical and lateral continuity within and between these reservoirs. Bulk and molecular properties of produced Arab-D oils do not vary significantly over the 70 km length and 10 km width of the reservoir. Hanifa oils, however, do reflect two compositionally distinct populations that are hot in lateral communication, compatible with the occurrence of a large oil pool in the southern part of the field, and a separate, and smaller northern accumulation. The Arab-D and underlying Hanifa oil pools are separated by over 450 feet of impermeable carbonates of the Jubaila Formation, yet the Southern Hanifa pool and the Arab-D have been in pressure communication since onset of Hanifa production in 1954. Recent borehole imaging and core data from horizontal Hanifa wells confirmed the long suspected occurrence of fractures responsible for fluid transmissibility within the porous (up to 35%) but tight (<10md matrix K) Hanifa reservoir, and between the Hanifa and Arab-D. The nearly identical hydrocarbon composition of oils from the Arab-D and southern Hanifa pool provided the final confirmation of fluid communication between the two reservoirs, and extension of a Hanifa fracture-fault network via the Jubaila Formation. This work lead to acquisition of 3-D seismic to image and map the fracture-fault system. The molecular fingerprinting approach demonstrated that produced oils can be used to evaluate vertical and lateral reservoir continuity, and at Abqaiq Field confirmed, in part, the need to produce the Hanifa reservoir via horizontal wells to arrest the reservoir communication that occurs with existing vertical wells.

  9. Dual-porosity reservoir modeling of the fractured Hanifa reservoir, Abqaiq Field, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthy, S.T. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractures play a significant role in the transmissibility of the Hanifa reservoir at Abqaiq Field. The Hanifa is a Type 2 fractured reservoir characterized by a finely-crystalline carbonate matrix which contains most of the reservoir storage porosity, and a stylolitic fracture system which provides essential permeability. Comparisons of over 5000 fractures identified from core and borehole image data with open-hole log data showed that porosity is negatively correlated with fracture density and mechanical rock strength. From these relationships, it was possible to utilize additional wells where porosity log data was available to calculate fracture densities. These wells were used to generate matrix porosity and permeability as well as fracture density attributes in a 12-sequence, 29-layer geocellular model. The effect of structural curvature on fracture intensity in the reservoir was estimated by mapping the derivative of structural dip. Incorporation of structural curvature explained variations in well test behavior not predicted by initial estimates of fracture density from porosity alone. Resultant fracture permeabilities compared favorably with well-test derived productivity indices. Three-dimensional visualization of model attributes showed that a monotonous and low (<10 md) distribution of matrix-related permeability contrasts sharply with highly variable and relatively high (>50 md) permeabilities of the fracture system. Reliability of the geocellular model to predict fracture densities and associated permeabilities has been confirmed by subsequent drilling of high cost horizontal wells, and is being used in reservoir engineering and development drilling planning efforts.

  10. Dual-porosity reservoir modeling of the fractured Hanifa reservoir, Abqaiq Field, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthy, S.T. (Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractures play a significant role in the transmissibility of the Hanifa reservoir at Abqaiq Field. The Hanifa is a Type 2 fractured reservoir characterized by a finely-crystalline carbonate matrix which contains most of the reservoir storage porosity, and a stylolitic fracture system which provides essential permeability. Comparisons of over 5000 fractures identified from core and borehole image data with open-hole log data showed that porosity is negatively correlated with fracture density and mechanical rock strength. From these relationships, it was possible to utilize additional wells where porosity log data was available to calculate fracture densities. These wells were used to generate matrix porosity and permeability as well as fracture density attributes in a 12-sequence, 29-layer geocellular model. The effect of structural curvature on fracture intensity in the reservoir was estimated by mapping the derivative of structural dip. Incorporation of structural curvature explained variations in well test behavior not predicted by initial estimates of fracture density from porosity alone. Resultant fracture permeabilities compared favorably with well-test derived productivity indices. Three-dimensional visualization of model attributes showed that a monotonous and low (<10 md) distribution of matrix-related permeability contrasts sharply with highly variable and relatively high (>50 md) permeabilities of the fracture system. Reliability of the geocellular model to predict fracture densities and associated permeabilities has been confirmed by subsequent drilling of high cost horizontal wells, and is being used in reservoir engineering and development drilling planning efforts.

  11. The development of a correlation for determining oil density in high temperature reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witte, Thurman William

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT OF A CORRELATION FOR DETERMINING OIL DENSITY IN HIGH TEMPERATURE RESERVOIRS A Thesis by Thurman William Witte Jr. Approved as to style and content by... change during the depletion of the reservoir. With the current state of techno logy in the petroleum industry reservoirs are being discovered at very great depths with tempera- tures frequently in excess of 200 'F. In many instances the fluids being...

  12. Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeeches Energy Speeches RSS June 25,Engineering

  13. Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8, 2000Consumption SurveyEnergyphysicist Dave JohnsonEngineering

  14. CHEMICAL TRACER RETENTION IN POROUS MEDIA Submitted to the Department of Petroleum Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    * CHEMICAL TRACER RETENTION IN POROUS MEDIA A Report Submitted to the Department of Petroleum Engineering of Stanford University in Fulfillment of the Requirement for the Degree of Master of Science

  15. ORBIS: The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World Version 1.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    ORBIS: The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World Version 1.0 May, 2012 Walter and provides a unique resource for our understanding of premodern history. #12;ORBIS: The Stanford Geospatial....................................................................................................................................22 Geospatial technology

  16. Shirvani 1 P23 Fault-Tolerance Projects at Stanford CRC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Edward J.

    . INTRODUCTION Electronic systems used in military, avionics and aerospace require high reliability systems are designed for high reliability using certified components. Many of these certified components. McCluskey Center for Reliable Computing, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 * Computer

  17. Hispanic Poverty and Inequality Grant Competition Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Fei-Fei

    Hispanic Poverty and Inequality Grant Competition Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality Request for Proposals The Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality (CPI), a National Poverty Research Center funded by the Office

  18. Reinjection into geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Stefansson, V.

    1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reinjection of geothermal wastewater is practiced as a means of disposal and for reservoir pressure support. Various aspects of reinjection are discussed, both in terms of theoretical studies as well as specific field examples. The discussion focuses on the major effects of reinjection, including pressure maintenance and chemical and thermal effects. (ACR)

  19. Three dimensional geologic modeling of a fractured reservoir, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthy, S.T.; Grover, G.A. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A geological assessment of a large carbonate reservoir in Saudi Arabia shows that it is a Type 2 fractured reservoir in which fractures provide the essential permeability. Intercrystalline microporosity, found within the basinally deposited mudstones and wackestones, is the dominant porosity type. Near-vertical, east-west-oriented extension fractures are preferentially localized in low-to-moderate porosities associated with stylolites. Porosity/fracture density relationships, combined with the results of structural curvature mapping, yielded a 3-dimensional model of fracture density. Fracture permeability and fracture porosity distributions were generated by integrating fracture density modeling results with average fracture aperture information derived from well test data. Dramatic differences exist between matrix- and fracture-related porosity, permeability models that help explain observed production behavior within the field. These models are being used by reservoir and simulation engineers for daily reservoir management, history matching, and long-term development drilling planning.

  20. G-2 and G-3 reservoirs, Delta South field, Nigeria - 2. Simulation of water injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thakur, G.C.; Stanat, P.L.; Aruna, M.; Ajayi, S.A.; Poston, S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A description is given of a two-dimensional, three-phase, black-oil simulation of the G-2 and G-3 reservoirs in the Delta South field offshore Nigeria. The purpose of these studies was to investigate, from an engineering standpoint, various operating schemes for optimizing the oil recovery from each of these highly gravity-segregated reservoirs. 4 refs.

  1. Post Doctoral Research Fellowship Simulating the greenhouse gas emission from boreal region reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of greenhouse gases from northern boreal reservoirs as part of a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research modified the DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC) model to simulate the exchange of CO2 between boreal by the creation of reservoirs for the production of hydro-electricity. We have recently developed a water column

  2. Application of artifical intelligence to reservoir characterization: An interdisciplinary approach. Annual report, October 1993--October 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelkar, B.G.; Gamble, R.F.; Kerr, D.R.; Thompson, L.G.; Shenoi, S.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This basis of this research is to apply novel techniques from Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems in capturing, integrating and articulating key knowledge from geology, geostatistics, and petroleum engineering to develop accurate descriptions of petroleum reservoirs. The ultimate goal is to design and implement a single powerful expert system for use by small producers and independents to efficiently exploit reservoirs.

  3. Evaluation of Devonian shale gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vanorsdale, C.R.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The evaluation of predominantly shale reservoirs presents a problem for engineers traditionally educated either to correct for or to ignore such lithologic zones. Currently accepted evaluation techniques and their applicability are discussed to determine the best way to forecast remaining recoverable gas reserves from the Devonian shales of the Appalachian basin. This study indicates that rate/time decline-curve analysis is the most reliable technique and presents typical decline curves based on production data gathered from 508 shale wells in a three-state study area. The resultant type curves illustrate a dual- (or multiple-) porosity mechanism that violates standard decline-curve analysis guidelines. The results, however, are typical not only for the Devonian shales but for all naturally fractured, multilayered, or similar shale reservoirs.

  4. Copyright 2006, Society of Petroleum Engineers This paper was prepared for presentation at the 2006 SPE/DOE Symposium on Improved Oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arbogast, Todd

    -972-952-9435. Abstract Naturally fractured reservoirs contain a significant amount of the world oil reserves. A number fractured reservoirs is one of the most important, challenging, and computationally intensive problems in reservoir engineering. Parallel reservoir simulators developed for naturally fractured reservoirs can

  5. Engine breather oil recovery system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speer, S.R.; Norton, J.G.; Wilson, J.D.

    1990-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an engine breather oil recovery system, for use with reciprocating engines having an oil breather and an oil reservoir recovery system. It comprises:an engine breather outlet from the engine; a vapor and oil separator device in fluid flow connection with the engine breather outlet; a motive flow suction means in fluid flow connection between the separator device and the engine, so as to provide a substantially continuous pressure drop between the separator device and the engine oil reservoir; an engine fluid system in parallel with the separator device; and an engine driven pump in fluid flow connection with such other engine fluid system, wherein the motive force for the motive flow suction means is provided by the fluid from the engine pump.

  6. THE DEVELOPMENT OF LOW TEMPERATURE TECHNOLOGY AT STANFORD AND ITS RELEVANCE TO HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    % and to indicate their relevance to several applications in high energy physics. 11. TECHNOLOGICAL INNOVATIONS 1I I I I I - . THE DEVELOPMENT OF LOW TEMPERATURE TECHNOLOGY AT STANFORD AND ITS RELEVANCE TO HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS" H. Alan Schwettmant Stanford University Stanford, California Department of Physics

  7. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F i r s t Geopressured Geothermal Energy Conference. Austin,Experiment t o Extract Geothermal Energy From Hot Dry Rock."I 2nd Geopressured Geothermal Energy Conference. University

  8. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal Potential o f Cerro Prieto, 2nd U.N. Symposium onEast Mesa, California; Cerro Prieto, e Mexico; Matsukawa,i n E l Tatio, Chile, and Cerro Prieto, Mexico, are used t o

  9. ANNOTATED RESEARCH BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudo!, G.A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F i r s t Geopressured Geothermal Energy Conference. Austin,I 2nd Geopressured Geothermal Energy Conference. UniversityExperiment t o Extract Geothermal Energy From Hot Dry Rock."

  10. Alan Farquharson, SVP Reservoir Engineering Economics! Upstream

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline prices4 OilU.S. Offshore U.S. StateAlabamaJune

  11. PROCEEDINGS SECOND WORKSHOP GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Foundenhancer activity than histone30518 PREPRINT Synthesis,

  12. PROCEEDINGS SIXTEENTH WORKSHOP GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Foundenhancer activity than histone30518 PREPRINT

  13. PROCEEDINGS THIRD WORKSHOP GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ENGINEERING

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Foundenhancer activity than histone30518 PREPRINTTHIRD WORKSHOP

  14. Reservoir Characterization of Upper Devonian Gordon Sandstone, Jacksonburg, Stringtown Oil Field, Northwestern West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ameri, S.; Aminian, K.; Avary, K.L.; Bilgesu, H.I.; Hohn, M.E.; McDowell, R.R.; Patchen, D.L.

    2002-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work was to establish relationships among permeability, geophysical and other data by integrating geologic, geophysical and engineering data into an interdisciplinary quantification of reservoir heterogeneity as it relates to production.

  15. Engineering Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    T A C T i N f O r M A T i O N #12;4 engineering is the profession in which a knowledge of advancedEngineering Engineering Technology & A T P E N N S T A T E 2 0 1 0 ­ 2 0 1 1 #12;2 Join us at penn state! Since 1896, Penn State has been a leader in engineering and engineering technology education

  16. The privilege to use lasers (non-ionizing radiation) at Stanford University requires each individual user to follow and adhere to the guidelines recommended in the American National Standard Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Mark A.

    Preface The privilege to use lasers (non-ionizing radiation) at Stanford, and the institution. This manual provides an orientation on lasers (non-ionizing radiation.2.2 Engineering Controls 5.2.3 Administrative and Procedural Controls 6.0 PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT

  17. Interdisciplinary study of reservoir compartments. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Kirk, C.W.

    1994-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE research project was established to document the integrated team approach for solving reservoir engineering problems. A field study integrating the disciplines of geology, geophysics, and petroleum engineering will be the mechanism for documenting the integrated approach. This is an area of keen interest to the oil and gas industry. The goal will be to provide tools and approaches that can be used to detect reservoir compartments, reach a better reserve estimate, and improve profits early in the life of a field.

  18. Reservoir Outflow (RESOUT) Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purvis, Stuart Travis

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rating tables for a comprehensive range of outlet structure types and configurations, simulating a dam breach, routing a hydrograph through the reservoir, and performing drawdown analyses. The thesis describes the basic equations and computational... of Rating Curves Rating Curves for Uncontrolled Ogee Spillways Rating Curves for Uncontrolled Broad-crested Spillways Rating Curves for Spillway Gates Rating Curves for Drop Inlet Spillways Rating Curves for Outlet Works Breach Simulation Storage...

  19. Texas Tech University | Whitacre College of Engineering | Box 43103 | Lubbock, Texas 79409-3103 | 806.742.3451 | www.coe.ttu.edu Preparing for a Degree in Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    engineering; artificial lift and system analysis; reservoir engineering, hyrdraulic fracking, fluidless fracking, surface operations and facilities design energetics, biomechanics, superhard materials

  20. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M. [eds.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

  1. 150-MW S-band klystron program at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprehn, D.; Caryotakis, G.; Phillips, R.M.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two S-Band klystrons operating at 150 MW have been designed, fabricated and tested at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) during the past two years for use in an experimental accelerator at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) in Hamburg, Germany. Both klystrons operate at the design power, 60 Hz repetition rate, 3 {micro}s pulsewidth, with an efficiency {gt} 40%, and agreement between the experimental results and simulations is excellent. The 535 kV, 700 A electron gun was tested by constructing a solenoidal focused beam stick which identified a source of oscillation, subsequently engineered out of the klystron guns. Design of the beam stick and the two klystrons is discussed, along with observation and suppression of spurious oscillations. Differences in design and the resulting performance of the Klystrons is emphasized.

  2. Computer Replacement Guidelines Environmental Health and Safety, Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Computer Replacement Guidelines Environmental Health and Safety, Stanford University 17 November 2005 This document describes the guidelines for replacing laptop and desktop computers at Environmental Health and Safety. PC laptop and desktop computers will be replaced a) on an ongoing basis where

  3. Stanford University December 2011, page 1 Office of Postdoctoral Affairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    administrators who would like to enter aid that would offset the amount owed by a postdoc for covering children Stanford ePay. Aid may be entered directly in GFS, as described below. This will apply a credit to Item Type it accordingly. Under Item Type Setup, enter your PTA information, and navigate to the main

  4. STANFORD HISTORICAL SOCIETY FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE April 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straight, Aaron

    the old road's condition, which went from knee-deep dust in summer to nearly impassible adobe mud after winter rains," Cottle writes. Stanford's base map has changed repeatedly since construction, construction, and traffic flow. Since the first edition, Lane A, a service road off Campus Drive, has had its

  5. Bylaws of the Stanford University School of Medicine Faculty Senate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straight, Aaron

    , and subject to the provisions of the Articles of Organization of the Academic Council of Stanford University and the academic leadership of the School. Article I. Responsibilities and Functions of the Faculty Senate Section 1. Academic Programs (1) For the degree of Doctor of Medicine (MD), the Senate shall collaborate

  6. Change of Dissertation Adviser or Reading Committee Member Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, James

    Change of Dissertation Adviser or Reading Committee Member Stanford University Please address approval for a change of dissertation adviser, the addition or deletion of a doctoral dissertation reading of the dissertation. Policy: The reading committee must conform to University regulations at the time of degree

  7. Overall Project Goals The Global Ecology Research Center at Stanford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -energy cooling. The Night Sky radiant system demon- strates the same principles of radiant heat loss to deep space that researchers are investigating while a Cool Tower serves as an iconic focal point that drawsOverall Project Goals The Global Ecology Research Center at Stanford University is an extremely low

  8. STANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER Winter 1999, Vol. 29, No. 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    STANFORD LINEAR ACCELERATOR CENTER Winter 1999, Vol. 29, No. 3 #12;The Beam Line is published GEORGE TRILLING, KARL VAN BIBBER HERMAN WINICK Illustrations TERRY ANDERSON Distribution CRYSTAL TILGHMAN A PERIODICAL OF PARTICLE PHYSICS WINTER 1999 VOL. 29, NUMBER 3 Printed on recycled paper FEATURES 2 GOLDEN

  9. Interdisciplinary study of reservoir compartments. [Quarterly report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Kirk, C.W.; Thompson, R.S.

    1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE research project was established to document the integrated team approach for solving reservoir engineering problems. A field study integrating the disciplines of geology, geophysics, and petroleum engineering will be the mechanism for documenting the integrated approach. This is an area of keen interest to the oil and gas industry. The goal will be to provide tools and approaches that can be used to detect reservoir compartments, reach a better reserve estimate, and improve profits early in the life of a field. Progress reports are presented for the following tasks: reservoir selection and data gathering; outcrop/core/log analysis/ and correlations, internal architecture description; seismic analysis; and permeability experimental work.

  10. Fluid Circulation and Heat Extraction from Engineered Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A large amount of fluid circulation and heat extraction (i.e., thermal power production) research and testing has been conducted on engineered geothermal reservoirs in the...

  11. Interdisciplinary study of reservoir compartments. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Kirk, C.W.

    1995-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE research project was established to document the integrated team approach for solving reservoir engineering problems. A field study integrating the disciplines of geology, geophysics, and petroleum engineering will be the mechanism for documenting the integrated approach. This is an area of keen interest to the oil and gas industry. The goal will be to provide tools and approaches that can be used to detect reservoir compartments, reach a better reserve estimate, and improve profits early in the life of a field. Brief summaries are provided for the following six tasks: reservoir selection and data gathering; outcrop/core/log analysis/and correlations; internal architecture description; seismic analysis; detailed reservoir engineering evaluation; and permeability experimental work. Where appropriate reports by the research professors and the research assistants are included in the appendix.

  12. Upscaling verticle permeability within a fluvio-aeolian reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, S.D.; Corbett, P.W.M.; Jensen, J.L. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vertical permeability (k{sub v}) is a crucial factor in many reservoir engineering issues. To date there has been little work undertaken to understand the wide variation of k{sub v} values measured at different scales in the reservoir. This paper presents the results of a study in which we have modelled the results of a downhole well tester using a statistical model and high resolution permeability data. The work has demonstrates and quantifies a wide variation in k{sub v} at smaller, near wellbore scales and has implications for k{sub v} modelling at larger scales.

  13. DepartMent of ciVil & enVironMental enGineerinG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straight, Aaron

    Mission Goals & Vision March 2006 > DepartMent of ciVil & enVironMental enGineerinG stanforD Uni of Sustainability 5 engineering for sustainability 6 embracing sustainable engineering 7 Sustainable Built strengths and priorities 19 * pacific rim environmental research center 20 * center for ocean solutions 21

  14. ICED'09/148 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN, ICED'09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    derived from the diversity of disciplines that contribute to design, including engineering, economics with the usual engineering requirements. This article describes the basic ideas in constructing the designICED'09/148 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN, ICED'09 24 - 27 AUGUST 2009, STANFORD

  15. Fluid Flow Simulation in Fractured Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Sudipta

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to analyze fluid flow in fractured reservoirs. In most petroleum reservoirs, particularly carbonate reservoirs and some tight sands, natural fractures play a critical role in controlling fluid ...

  16. Reservoir permeability from seismic attribute analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goloshubin, G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the reservoir permeability based on seismic and log data.seismic reservoir response based on well and 3D seismic datadata analysis we suggest seismic imaging of the reservoir

  17. A simulation-based reservoir management program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voskanian, M.M. [California State Lands Commission, Sacramento, CA (United States); Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Coombs, S. [Pacific Operators Offshore, Inc., Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Paul, R.G. [Minerals Management Service, Reston, VA (United States). Headquarters Office; Ershaghi, I. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are more than 5,200 independent oil and gas producers operating in the US today (based on current IPAA membership figures). These companies are playing an increasingly important role in production of hydrocarbons in California and elsewhere in the US. Pacific Operators Offshore, Inc., in a historic collaboration with its government royalty owners, the California State Lands Commission and the Minerals Management Service of the US Department of Interior, is attempting to redevelop the Carpinteria Offshore Field after two-and-a-half decades of production and partial abandonment by a previous operator. This paper will describe a project which focuses on the distribution of advanced reservoir management technologies (geological, petrophysical, and engineering) to independent producers like Pacific Operators Offshore, Inc. The evolving information highway, specifically the World Wide Web (WWW), serves as the distribution medium. The project to be described in this paper is an example of the implementation of a reservoir management tool which is supported by distributed databases, incorporates a shared computing environment, and integrates stochastic, geological, and engineering modeling.

  18. Stanford geothermal program. Final report, July 1990--June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following: (1) improving models of vapor-dominated geothermal fields: the effects of adsorption; (2) adsorption characteristics of rocks from vapor-dominated geothermal reservoir at the Geysers, CA; (3) optimizing reinjection strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines based on chloride data; (4) optimization of water injection into vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs; and (5) steam-water relative permeability.

  19. Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Characterization of geothermal reservoir...

  20. Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Thermal Engineering: Theory and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossain, M. Enamul

    Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Thermal Engineering: Theory and Applications of kinetic energy and internal energy , Internal energy, Geothermal temperature gradient, Gravitational that can be estimated from reservoir properties Permeability of the reservoir system, Thermal conductivity