Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area (Redirected from Blackfoot Reservoir Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

2

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

3

Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Magic Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.32833333,"lon":-114.3983333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

4

Development of reservoir simulator for hydraulically fractured gas wells in noncontinuous lenticular reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematical model is presented which forms the basis for a reservoir simulator that can be used to assist in the interpretation and prediction of the performance of hydraulically fractured gas wells completed in the western tight sands area. The model represents a first step in developing a reservoir simulator that can be used as an exploration tool and to analyze proposed gas well tests and future production trends in noncontinuous sand lense formations which are representative of the tight gas sands located in the Rocky Mountain gas provinces. The model developed consists of the necessary mathematical equations to simulate both reservoir and well performance under a variety of operating conditions. The equations developed are general in that they consider the following effects: (1) three-dimensional flow in the reservoir and one-dimensional flow in the fracture; (2) non-Darcy flow in the reservoir and fracture; (3) wellbore and fracture storage; (4) formation damage on the fracture face; (5) frictional pressure drop in the production string; (6) noncontinuous sand lenses; and (7) Klinkenberg effect. As a start toward the development of the final version of the desired reservoir simulator, a two-dimensional simulator was secured, placed on the computer, and debugged, and some test cases were run to ensure its validity. Using this simulator as a starting point, changes to reflect the effects of items 3 and 6 were made since it was believed these were the more important effects to consider at this stage of development. The development of an operational two-dimensional gas reservoir simulator was completed. Further work will be required to extend the simulator to three dimensions and incorporate all the changes reflected in items 1 to 6.

Evans, R.D.; Carroll, H.B. Jr.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

West Valley Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Reservoir Geothermal Area Valley Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: West Valley Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.19166667,"lon":-120.385,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

6

Geysers Hi-T Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geysers Hi-T Reservoir Geothermal Area Geysers Hi-T Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Geysers Hi-T Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.8,"lon":-122.8,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

7

Analysis of reservoir performance and forecasting for the eastern area of the C-2 Reservoir, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research developed a numerical simulation based on the latest reservoir description to evaluate the feasibility of new infill wells to maximize the recovery specifically in the eastern region of the reservoir operated by Petroleos de Venezuela...

Urdaneta Anez, Jackeline C

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Optimizing Development Strategies to Increase Reserves in Unconventional Gas Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spacing in highly uncertain and risky unconventional gas reservoirs. To achieve the research objectives, an integrated reservoir and decision modeling tool that fully incorporates uncertainty was developed. Monte Carlo simulation was used with a fast...

Turkarslan, Gulcan

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

9

Fuzzy optimal control of reservoir-assisted stormwater treatment areas for aquatic ecosystem restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Attachment of stormwater treatment areas (STAs) or constructed wetlands to stormwater retention reservoirs can achieve substantial reductions in pollutant loadings if properly operated and maintained. Besides water quality improvement, optimally operated reservoir-assisted \\{STAs\\} provide support for ecosystem remediation, flood control, and supplemental water supply. An adaptive, multiobjective real-time control model is developed for reservoir-assisted STA systems that incorporates fuzzy rule-based operating rules optimized using a genetic algorithm interacting with a simulation model of the system. The model is applied to the North Fork reservoir-assisted STA located in the watershed of the St. Lucie Estuary, Florida. Optimal daily feedback operational policies are developed for managing freshwater discharges to the Estuary for coastal ecosystem restoration, maximizing the natural treatment efficiency and of the STA, and providing supplemental water supply for irrigation. Testing and validation results from application of the fuzzy optimal control model confirm achievement of multiple targets and criteria for the North Fork project, while demonstrating potential for adaptive management of reservoir-assisted STA systems throughout the coastal regions of south Florida.

John W. Labadie; Yongshan Wan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Technology and Economics Affecting Unconventional Reservoir Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the introduction of new technologies that have boosted even more oil and gas production from the plays. Great examples are the use of horizontal and multilateral wells which has opened up additional areas for development, such as the Barnett Shale and the Bakken...

Flores Campero, Cecilia P.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

11

Simulation study to investigate development options for a super-heavy oil reservoir.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A reservoir simulation study was performed on a heavy oil reservoir with the main objective of evaluating possible development options beyond the existing cold production (more)

Diaz Franco, Jose Manuel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

The Role of Geochemistry and Stress on Fracture Development and Proppant Behavior in EGS Reservoirs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objective: Develop Improved Methods For Maintaining Permeable Fracture Volumes In EGS Reservoirs.

13

DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES FOR OPTIMIZED MEOR IN SHALLOW HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in western Missouri and southeastern Kansas, using an integrated approach including surface geochemical surveys, conventional MEOR treatments, horizontal fracturing in vertical wells, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and reservoir simulation to optimize the recovery process. The objective also includes transferring the knowledge gained from the project to other local landowners, to demonstrate how they may identify and develop their own heavy oil resources with minimal capital investment. Tasks completed in the first six-month period include soil sampling, geochemical analysis, construction of ERT arrays, collection of background ERT surveys, and analysis of core samples to develop a geomechanical model for designing the hydraulic fracturing treatment. Five wells were to be drilled in phase I. However, weather and funding delays resulted in drilling shifting to the second phase of the project. Work performed to date demonstrates that surface geochemical methods can be used to differentiate between productive and non-productive areas of the Warner Sand and that ERT can be used to successfully image through the Warner Sand.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2003-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

14

Evaluation of field development plans using 3-D reservoir modelling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three-dimensional reservoir modelling has become an accepted tool in reservoir description and is used for various purposes, such as reservoir performance prediction or integration and visualisation of data. In this case study, a small Northern North Sea turbiditic reservoir was to be developed with a line drive strategy utilising a series of horizontal producer and injector pairs, oriented north-south. This development plan was to be evaluated and the expected outcome of the wells was to be assessed and risked. Detailed analyses of core, well log and analogue data has led to the development of two geological {open_quotes}end member{close_quotes} scenarios. Both scenarios have been stochastically modelled using the Sequential Indicator Simulation method. The resulting equiprobable realisations have been subjected to detailed statistical well placement optimisation techniques. Based upon bivariate statistical evaluation of more than 1000 numerical well trajectories for each of the two scenarios, it was found that the wells inclinations and lengths had a great impact on the wells success, whereas the azimuth was found to have only a minor impact. After integration of the above results, the actual well paths were redesigned to meet external drilling constraints, resulting in substantial reductions in drilling time and costs.

Seifert, D.; Lewis, J.J.M. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Newbery, J.D.H. [Conoco, UK Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Fuzzy optimal control of reservoir-assisted stormwater treatment areas for aquatic ecosystem restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Attachment of stormwater treatment areas (STAs) or constructed wetlands to stormwater retention reservoirs can achieve substantial reductions in pollutant loadings if properly operated and maintained. Besides water quality improvement, optimally operated ... Keywords: Aquatic ecosystems, Constructed wetlands, Evolutionary algorithm, Fuzzy control, Real-time operations, Stormwater retention basins, Stormwater treatment areas

John W. Labadie; Yongshan Wan

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Application of fractal theory in refined reservoir description for EOR pilot area  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reliable reservoir description is essential to investigate scenarios for successful EOR pilot test. Reservoir characterization includes formation composition, permeability, porosity, reservoir fluids and other petrophysical parameters. In this study, various new tools have been applied to characterize Kilamayi conglomerate formation. This paper examines the merits of various statistical methods for recognizing rock property correlation in vertical columns and gives out methods to determine fractal dimension including R/S analysis and power spectral analysis. The paper also demonstrates that there is obvious fractal characteristics in conglomerate reservoirs of Kilamayi oil fields. Well log data in EOR pilot area are used to get distribution profile of parameters including permeability, porosity, water saturation and shale content.

Yue Li; Yonggang Duan; Yun Li; Yuan Lu

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing EGS Reservoir  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: Better understand and model fluid injection into a tight reservoir on the edges of a hydrothermal field. Use seismic data to constrain geomechanical/hydrologic/thermal model of reservoir.

18

Area balance and strain in coalbed methane reservoirs of the Black Warrior basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigation of coalbed methane reservoirs in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama has established a correspondence between productivity and structural position, but the reasons for this correspondence remain uncertain. In Cedar Cove field, for example, exceptionally productive wells are concentrated in a rollover anticline, whereas in Oak Grove field, exceptionally productive wells are aligned along a synclinal axis. This suggests that factors controlling gas production are a derivative of the structural geometry, and not the geometry by itself. Natural fractures and a low state of in-situ stress facilitate depressurization of coalbed reservoirs by dewatering, and hence, desorption and production of coalbed gas. Our hypothesis is that the abundance and openness of natural fractures in the Black Warrior basin are a direct expression of the layer-parallel strain dictated by map-scale structural geometry. Area balancing techniques can be used to quantify requisite strain, which is the homogeneous layer-parallel strain required for local area balance, and can also be used to constrain and verify structural cross sections. Application of area balancing techniques to extensional structures in the Black Warrior basin indicates that coalbed gas is produced from thin-skinned structures detached within the coal-bearing Pottsville Formation. Within reservoir intervals, requisite strain values are as high as 10 percent and increase downward toward the basal detachment. Mapping structure and production indicates that some productivity sweet spots correlate with enhanced bed curvature. Whereas requisite strain is the homogeneous strain calculated for discrete bed segments, curvature affects the distribution of strain within those segments. Recognizing this, our research is now focused on integrating area balancing techniques with curvature analysis to explain production patterns in coalbed methane reservoirs.

Pashin, J.C. [Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Groshong, R.H., Jr. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of CO2 Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Spraberry Trend Area, Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to assess the economic feasibility of CO2 flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in west Texas. This objective was accomplished through research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interactions in the reservoirs, (3) reservoir performance analysis, and (4) experimental investigations on CO2 gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This provides results of the final year of the six-year project for each of the four areas.

Knight, Bill; Schechter, David S.

2002-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

20

DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES FOR OPTIMIZED MEOR IN SHALLOW HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in western Missouri and southeastern Kansas, using an integrated approach including surface geochemical surveys, conventional MEOR treatments, horizontal fracturing in vertical wells, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and reservoir simulation to optimize the recovery process. The objective also includes transferring the knowledge gained from the project to other local landowners, to demonstrate how they may identify and develop their own heavy oil resources with little capital investment. The first year period was divided into two phases--Phase I and Phase II. Each phase was 6 months in duration. Tasks completed in first six month period included soil sampling, geochemical analysis, construction of ERT arrays, collection of background ERT surveys, and analysis of core samples to develop a geomechanical model for designing the hydraulic fracturing treatment. Five wells were to be drilled in phase I. However, weather and funding delays resulted in drilling shifting to the second phase of the project. During the second six month period, five vertical wells were drilled through the Bluejacket and Warner Sands. These wells were drilled with air and logged openhole. Drilling locations were selected after reviewing results of background ERT and geochemical surveys. Three ERT wells (2,3,4) were arranged in an equilateral triangle, spaced 70 feet apart and these wells were completed open hole. ERT arrays constructed during Phase I, were installed and background surveys were taken. Two wells (1,5) were drilled, cased, cemented and perforated. These wells were located north and south of the three ERT wells. Each well was stimulated with a linear guar gel and 20/40 mesh Brady sand. Tiltmeters were used with one fracture treatment to verify fracture morphology. Work performed during the first year of this research project demonstrates that surface geochemical methods can be used to differentiate between productive and non-productive areas of the Warner Sand and that ERT can be used to successfully image through the Warner Sand. ERT work also provided a background image for future MEOR treatments. Well logs from the five wells drilled were consistent with previous logs from historical coreholes, and the quality of the formation was found to be as expected. Hydraulic fracturing results demonstrated that fluid leakoff is inadequate for tip screenout (TSO) and that a horizontal fracture was generated. At this point it is not clear if the induced fracture remained in the Warner Sand, or propagated into another formation. MEOR treatments were originally expected to commence during Phase II. Due to weather delays, drilling and stimulation work was not completed until September, 2003. Microbial treatments therefore will commence in October, 2003. Phase III, the first 10 months of the second project year, will focus primarily on repeated cycles of MEOR treatments, ERT measurements and well pumping.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing EGS Reservoir...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

More Documents & Publications Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and Fluid Flow in EGS Reservoirs Detection and Characterization of Natural...

22

Hydraulic interwell connectivity in a carbonate reservoir: Johnson JL "AB" (Grayburg) study area, Ector County, West Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDRAULIC INTERWELL CONNECTIVITY IN A CARBONATE RESERVOIR: JOHNSON JL "AB" (GRAYBURG) STUDY AREA, ECTOR COUNTY, WEST TEXAS A Thesis by BERNARDO ALBERTO SILVA DE JESLtS Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering HYDRAULIC INTERWELL CONNECTIVITY IN A CARBONATE RESERVOIR: JOHNSON JL "AB" (GRAYBURG) STUDY AREA, ECTOR COUNTY, WEST TEXAS...

Silva de Jesu?s, Bernardo Alberto

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

Tenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The workshop contains presentations in the following areas: (1) reservoir engineering research; (2) field development; (3) vapor-dominated systems; (4) the Geysers thermal area; (5) well test analysis; (6) production engineering; (7) reservoir evaluation; (8) geochemistry and injection; (9) numerical simulation; and (10) reservoir physics. (ACR)

Not Available

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

24

The Influence of Fold and Fracture Development on Reservoir Behavior of the Lisburne Group of Northern Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Carboniferous Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The lisburne is detachment folded where it is exposed throughout the northeastern Brooks Range, but is relatively underformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study are to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of detachment folds and their truncation by thrust faults, (2) The influence of folding on fracture patterns, (3) The influence of deformation on fluid flow, and (4) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics.

Wallace, Wesley K.; Hanks, Catherine L.; Whalen, Michael T.; Jensen1, Jerry; Shackleton, J. Ryan; Jadamec, Margarete A.; McGee, Michelle M.; Karpov1, Alexandre V.

2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

25

Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding GRED II Notes Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition Projects Raft River (GRED II): Re-assessment and testing of previously abandoned production wells. The objective of the U.S. Geothermal effort is to re-access the available wellbores, assess their condition, perform extensive testing of the reservoir to determine its productive capacity, and perform a resource utilization assessment. At the time of this paper, all five wells had been

26

Characterization of dynamic change of Fan-delta reservoir properties in water-drive development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fan-delta reservoir in Huzhuangji oil field of east China, is a typical highly heterogeneous reservoir. The oil field has been developed by water-drive for 10 years, but the oil recovery is less than 12%, and water cut is over 90%, resulting from high heterogeneity and serious dynamic change of reservoir properties. This paper aims at the study of dynamic change of reservoir properties in water-drive development. Through quantitative imaging analysis and mercury injection analysis of cores from inspection wells, the dynamic change of reservoir pore structure in water-drive development was studied. The results show that the {open_quotes}large pore channels{close_quotes} develop in distributary channel sandstone and become larger in water-drive development, resulting in more serious pore heterogeneity. Through reservoir sensitivity experiments, the rock-fluid reaction in water-drive development is studied. The results show the permeability of some distal bar sandstone and deserted channel sandstone becomes lower due to swelling of I/S clay minerals in pore throats. OD the other hand, the permeability of distributary channel and mouth bar sandstone become larger because the authigenic Koalinites in pore throats are flushed away with the increase of flow rate of injection water. Well-logging analysis of flooded reservoirs are used to study the dynamic change of reservoir properties in various flow units. The distribution of remaining oil is closely related to the types and distribution of flow units.

Wu Shenghe; Xiong Qihua; Liu Yuhong [Univ. of Petroleum Changping, Beijing (China)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Reservoir Simulation Used to Plan Diatomite Developement in Mountainous Region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Santa Barbara County, Santa Maria Pacific (an exploration and production company) is expanding their cyclic steam project in a diatomite reservoir. The hilly or mountainous topography and cut and fill restrictions have interfered with the company...

Powell, Richard

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

28

Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area. Annual report, September 1, 1996--August 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in West Texas. This objective is being accomplished by conducting research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interaction in the reservoirs, (3) reservoir performance analysis, and (4) experimental investigations on CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This report provides results of the second year of the five-year project for each of the four areas. In the first area, the author has completed the reservoir characterization, which includes matrix description and detection (from core-log integration) and fracture characterization. This information is found in Section 1. In the second area, the author has completed extensive inhibition experiments that strongly indicate that the weakly water-wet behavior of the reservoir rock may be responsible for poor waterflood response observed in many Spraberry fields. In the third area, the author has made significant progress in analytical and numerical simulation of performance in Spraberry reservoirs as seen in Section 3. In the fourth area, the author has completed several suites of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry and Berea whole cores at reservoir conditions and reported in Section 4. The results of these experiments have been useful in developing a model for free-fall gravity drainage and have validated the premise that CO{sub 2} will recover oil from tight, unconfined Spraberry matrix. The final three years of this project involves implementation of the CO{sub 2} pilot. Up to twelve new wells are planned in the pilot area; water injection wells to contain the CO{sub 2}, three production wells to monitor performance of CO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2} injection wells including one horizontal injection well and logging observation wells to monitor CO{sub 2} flood fronts. Results of drilling these wells will be forthcoming.

Schechter, D.S.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

DEVELOPMENT PRACTICES FOR OPTIMIZED MEOR IN SHALLOW HEAVY OIL RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to demonstrate an economically viable and sustainable method of producing shallow heavy oil reserves in western Missouri and southeastern Kansas, using an integrated approach including surface geochemical surveys, conventional MEOR treatments, horizontal fracturing in vertical wells, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), and reservoir simulation to optimize the recovery process. The objective also includes transferring the knowledge gained from the project to other local landowners, to demonstrate how they may identify and develop their own heavy oil resources with minimal capital investment. In the twelve to eighteen-month project period, three wells were equipped with ERT arrays. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) background measurements were taken in the three ERT equipped wells. Pumping equipment was installed on the two fracture stimulated wells and pumping tests were conducted following the hydraulic fracture treatments. All wells were treated monthly with microbes, by adding a commercially available microbial mixture to wellbore fluids. ERT surveys were taken on a monthly basis, following microbial treatments. Worked performed to date demonstrates that resistivity changes are occurring in the subsurface, with resistivity increasing slightly. Pumping results for the hydraulically fractured wells were disappointing, with only a show of oil recovered and an increase in well shut-in pressure.

Shari Dunn-Norman

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Development of gas-bearing reservoirs in the Trenton Llimestone Formation of New York. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Energy Authority completed a study of the natural gas-bearing potential of New York State's Trenton Limestone Formation. The report includes an analysis of existing gas-well information and geological maps covering 33 counties in western and central New York State. The Trenton Limestone Formation is a limestone sequence with zones of shale interbeds that, when jointed and fractured, form reservoirs for natural gas. These reservoirs appear to be large and capable of sustained production, providing the production rates are carefully monitored to maintain reservoir pressure. Test wells have shown evidence of natural gas in all areas where the formation is present. The areas with the greatest reservoir potential trend from northeast to southwest beginning near the Adirondack foothills in Oneida County. When reservoir volumes are matched with a high success rate of discovery and minimum drilling costs, the northeastern part of central New York State appears to be the most likely region for both local use and commercial exploration. The Trenton formation in this area of the State generally contains gas at above-normal hydrostatic pressure. This indicates that the gas reservoirs are extensive and reach considerable depths. Due to the geophysical conditions of the reservoirs, however, it is important to carefully manage production and maintain pre-production pressure for optimum gas recovery.

Robinson, J.E.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Data Assimilation Tools for CO2 Reservoir Model Development A Review of Key Data Types, Analyses, and Selected Software  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has embarked on an initiative to develop world-class capabilities for performing experimental and computational analyses associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide. The ultimate goal of this initiative is to provide science-based solutions for helping to mitigate the adverse effects of greenhouse gas emissions. This Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative currently has two primary focus areasadvanced experimental methods and computational analysis. The experimental methods focus area involves the development of new experimental capabilities, supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL) housed at PNNL, for quantifying mineral reaction kinetics with CO2 under high temperature and pressure (supercritical) conditions. The computational analysis focus area involves numerical simulation of coupled, multi-scale processes associated with CO2 sequestration in geologic media, and the development of software to facilitate building and parameterizing conceptual and numerical models of subsurface reservoirs that represent geologic repositories for injected CO2. This report describes work in support of the computational analysis focus area. The computational analysis focus area currently consists of several collaborative research projects. These are all geared towards the development and application of conceptual and numerical models for geologic sequestration of CO2. The software being developed for this focus area is referred to as the Geologic Sequestration Software Suite or GS3. A wiki-based software framework is being developed to support GS3. This report summarizes work performed in FY09 on one of the LDRD projects in the computational analysis focus area. The title of this project is Data Assimilation Tools for CO2 Reservoir Model Development. Some key objectives of this project in FY09 were to assess the current state-of-the-art in reservoir model development, the data types and analyses that need to be performed in order to develop and parameterize credible and robust reservoir simulation models, and to review existing software that is applicable to these analyses. This report describes this effort and highlights areas in which additional software development, wiki application extensions, or related GS3 infrastructure development may be warranted.

Rockhold, Mark L.; Sullivan, E. C.; Murray, Christopher J.; Last, George V.; Black, Gary D.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

32

Optimization of coalbed-methane-reservoir exploration and development strategies through integration of simulation and economics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The unique properties and complex characteristics of coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs, and their consequent operating strategies, call for an integrated approach to be used to explore for and develop coal plays and prospects economically. An integrated approach involves the use of sophisticated reservoir, wellbore, and facilities modeling combined with economics and decision-making criteria. A new CBM prospecting tool (CPT) was generated by combining single-well (multilayered) reservoir simulators with a gridded reservoir model, Monte Carlo (MC) simulation, and economic modules. The multilayered reservoir model is divided into pods, representing relatively uniform reservoir properties, and a 'type well' is created for each pod. At every MC iteration, type-well forecasts are generated for the pods and are coupled with economic modules. A set of decision criteria contingent upon economic outcomes and reservoir characteristics is used to advance prospect exploration from the initial exploration well to the pilot and development stages. A novel approach has been used to determine the optimal well spacing should prospect development be contemplated. CPT model outcomes include a distribution of after-tax net present value (ATNPV), mean ATNPV (expected value), chance of economic success (Pe), distribution of type-well and pod gas and water production, reserves, peak gas volume, and capita. Example application of CPT to a hypothetical prospect is provided. An integrated approach also has been used to assist with production optimization of developed reservoirs. For example, an infill-well locating tool (ILT) has been constructed to provide a quick-look evaluation of infill locations in a developed reservoir. An application of ILT to a CBM reservoir is provided.

Clarkson, C.R.; McGovern, J.M.

2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and experience about completion and stimulation technologies used in TGS reservoirs. We developed the principal design and two modules of a computer program called Tight Gas Sand Advisor (TGS Advisor), which can be used to assist engineers in making decisions...

Bogatchev, Kirill Y.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPING A TIGHT GAS SAND ADVISOR FOR COMPLETION AND STIMULATION IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS WORLDWIDE A Thesis by KIRILL BOGATCHEV Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2007 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering DEVELOPING A TIGHT GAS SAND ADVISOR FOR COMPLETION AND STIMULATION IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS WORLDWIDE A Thesis by KIRILL...

Bogatchev, Kirill Y

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

35

An application of water recreation capacity standards to reservoir development planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN APPLICAIION OF NATER RECREATION CAPACITY STANDARDS TO RESERVOIR DEVELOPNENT PLAMIIN A Thesis by GRANT ARTHUR PETLRSEN Suhmitt;6 to the Graduate College of the Texas A&N University in partial . ulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MSTER OF SCIENCE Yuy 1968 Major Subject; Range Sci. ence (Recreation and Parks) AN APPLICATION OF WATER RECREATION CAPACITY STANDARDS TO RESERVOIR DEVELOPMENT PLANNING A Thesis by GRANT ARTHUR PETERSEN Approved as to style and content by: (Cha...

Petersen, Grant Arthur

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

36

Facies, depositional environments, and reservoir properties of the Shattuck sandstone, Mesa Queen Field and surrounding areas, southeastern New Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

iii FACIES, DEPOSITIONAL ENVIRONMENTS, AND RESERVOIR PROPERTIES OF THE SHATTUCK SANDSTONE, MESA QUEEN FIELD AND SURROUNDING AREAS, SOUTHEASTERN NEW MEXICO A Thesis by JARED BRANDON HAIGHT Submitted to the Office... PROPERTIES OF THE SHATTUCK SANDSTONE, MESA QUEEN FIELD AND SURROUNDING AREAS, SOUTHEASTERN NEW MEXICO A Thesis by JARED BRANDON HAIGHT Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

Haight, Jared

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area. Annual report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in West Texas. This objective is being accomplished by conducting research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interaction in the reservoirs, (3) analytical and numerical simulation of Spraberry reservoirs, and, (4) experimental investigations on CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This report provides results of the first year of the five-year project for each of the four areas.

Schechter, D.S.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing EGS Reservoir  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Also includes relevant well information * Developed sub-grid scale model of fracture permeability as a function of normal and shear displacements - Installed in the fully...

39

MODELING HANTAVIRUS RESERVOIR SPECIES DOMINANCE IN HIGH SEROPREVALENCE AREAS ON THE AZUERO PENINSULA OF PANAMA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PENINSULA OF PANAMA GERARDO SUZÁN, J. TOMASZ GIERMAKOWSKI,* ERIKA MARC?, HUMBERTO SUZÁN-AZPIRI, BLAS ARMI?N fragmentation commonly influences distribution of zoonotic disease reservoirs. In Panama, popu- lations geographical scales in southern Panama. The relative abundance of Zygodontomys brevicauda, the primary host

40

New developments in high resolution borehole seismology and their applications to reservoir development and management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single-well seismology, Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP`s) and Crosswell seismology are three new seismic techniques that we jointly refer to as borehole seismology. Borehole seismic techniques are of great interest because they can obtain much higher resolution images of oil and gas reservoirs than what is obtainable with currently used seismic techniques. The quality of oil and gas reservoir management decisions depend on the knowledge of both the large and the fine scale features in the reservoirs. Borehole seismology is capable of mapping reservoirs with an order of magnitude improvement in resolution compared with currently used technology. In borehole seismology we use a high frequency seismic source in an oil or gas well and record the signal in the same well, in other wells, or on the surface of the earth.

Paulsson, B.N.P. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Company, La Habra, CA (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The Influence of fold and fracture development on reservoir behavior of the Lisburne Group of northern Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Carboniferous Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The Lisburne is folded and thrust faulted where it is exposed throughout the Brooks Range, but is relatively undeformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study were to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of folds and their truncation by thrust faults. (2) The influence of folding on fracture patterns. (3) The influence of deformation on fluid flow. (4) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics. Symmetrical detachment folds characterize the Lisburne in the northeastern Brooks Range. In contrast, Lisburne in the main axis of the Brooks Range is deformed into imbricate thrust sheets with asymmetrical hangingwall anticlines and footwall synclines. The Continental Divide thrust front separates these different structural styles in the Lisburne and also marks the southern boundary of the northeastern Brooks Range. Field studies were conducted for this project during 1999 to 2001 in various locations in the northeastern Brooks Range and in the vicinity of Porcupine Lake, immediately south of the Continental Divide thrust front. Results are summarized below for the four main subject areas of the study.

Wesley K. Wallace; Catherine L. Hanks; Jerry Jensen: Michael T. Whalen; Paul Atkinson; Joseph Brinton; Thang Bui; Margarete Jadamec; Alexandre Karpov; John Lorenz; Michelle M. McGee; T.M. Parris; Ryan Shackleton

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Characterization and interwell connectivity evaluation of Green Rver reservoirs, Wells Draw study area, Uinta Basin, Utah  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and seal rocks of the Green River petroleum system. Datum is Mahoganey oil shale bed (1). 49 27 Fig. 11?Cross-section of thermal maturity of oil accumulations in the Green River petroleum system. 49 28 Fig. 12? Lake Uinta depositional... This petroleum system has produced more than 450 MMBO mainly from two formations, the Green River and Colton Formations. 7 The Green River Formation contains the source rock and most of the reservoir and seal rocks (Fig. 10). 49 Most of the kerogen-rich oil...

Abiazie, Joseph Uchechukwu

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

43

An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Humeros Geothermal Reservoir Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: An Updated Conceptual Model Of The Los Humeros Geothermal Reservoir (Mexico) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: An analysis of production and reservoir engineering data of 42 wells from the Los Humeros geothermal field (Mexico) allowed obtaining the pressure and temperature profiles for the unperturbed reservoir fluids and developing 1-D and 2-D models for the reservoir. Results showed the existence of at least two reservoirs in the system: a relatively shallow liquid-dominant reservoir located between 1025 and 1600 m above sea level (a.s.l.) the pressure profile of which corresponds to a 300-330°C boiling water column and a deeper low-liquid-saturation reservoir located between

44

WRAP process area development control work plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work plan defines the manner in which the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, Module I Process Area will be maintained under development control status. This status permits resolution of identified design discrepancies, control system changes, as-building of equipment, and perform modifications to increase process operability and maintainability as parallel efforts. This work plan maintains configuration control as these efforts are undertaken. This task will end with system testing and reissue of field verified design drawings.

Leist, K.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

45

Development Wells At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fenton Hill HDR site. References Z. V. Dash, H. D. Murphy, R. L. Aamodt, R. G. Aguilar, D. W. Brown, D. A. Counce, H. N. Fisher, C. O. Grigsby, H. Keppler, A. W. Laughlin, R. M. Potter, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo Jr, G. Zyvoloski (1983) Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Development_Wells_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Dash,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511310"

46

Chickamauga reservoir embayment study - 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this report are three-fold: (1) assess physical, chemical, and biological conditions in the major embayments of Chickamauga Reservoir; (2) compare water quality and biological conditions of embayments with main river locations; and (3) identify any water quality concerns in the study embayments that may warrant further investigation and/or management actions. Embayments are important areas of reservoirs to be considered when assessments are made to support water quality management plans. In general, embayments, because of their smaller size (water surface areas usually less than 1000 acres), shallower morphometry (average depth usually less than 10 feet), and longer detention times (frequently a month or more), exhibit more extreme responses to pollutant loadings and changes in land use than the main river region of the reservoir. Consequently, embayments are often at greater risk of water quality impairments (e.g. nutrient enrichment, filling and siltation, excessive growths of aquatic plants, algal blooms, low dissolved oxygen concentrations, bacteriological contamination, etc.). Much of the secondary beneficial use of reservoirs occurs in embayments (viz. marinas, recreation areas, parks and beaches, residential development, etc.). Typically embayments comprise less than 20 percent of the surface area of a reservoir, but they often receive 50 percent or more of the water-oriented recreational use of the reservoir. This intensive recreational use creates a potential for adverse use impacts if poor water quality and aquatic conditions exist in an embayment.

Meinert, D.L.; Butkus, S.R.; McDonough, T.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO2 gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area. Annual report, September 1, 1996--August 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the Spraberry CO{sub 2} pilot project is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of continuous CO{sub 2} injection in the naturally fractured reservoirs of the Spraberry Trend. In order to describe, understand, and model CO{sub 2} flooding in the naturally fractured Spraberry reservoirs, characterization of the fracture system is a must. Additional reservoir characterization was based on horizontal coring in the second year of the project. In addition to characterization of natural fractures, horizontal coring has confirmed a previously developed rock model for describing the Spraberry Trend shaly sands. A better method for identifying Spraberry pay zones has been verified. The authors have completed the reservoir characterization, which includes matrix description and detection (from core-log integration) and fracture characterization. This information is found in Section 1. The authors have completed extensive imbibition experiments that strongly indicate that the weakly water-wet behavior of the reservoir rock may be responsible for poor waterflood response observed in many Spraberry fields. The authors have also made significant progress in analytical and numerical simulation of performance in Spraberry reservoirs as seen in Section 3. They have completed several suites of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry and Berea whole cores at reservoir conditions and reported in Section 4. The results of these experiments have been useful in developing a model for free-fall gravity drainage and have validated the premise that CO{sub 2} will recover oil from tight, unconfined Spraberry matrix.

McDonald, P.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Evaluation of CO{sub 2} Gravity Drainage in the Naturally Fractured Spraberry Trend Area, Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in west Texas. This objective was accomplished through research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interactions in the reservoirs, (3) reservoir performance analysis, and (4) experimental investigations on CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. The four areas have been completed and reported in the previous annual reports. This report provides the results of the final year of the project including two SPE papers (SPE 71605 and SPE 71635) presented in the 2001 SPE Annual Meeting in New Orleans, two simulation works, analysis of logging observation wells (LOW) and progress of CO{sub 2} injection.

Knight, Bill; Schechter, David S.

2001-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

49

Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP)...

50

WETTABILITY AND PREDICTION OF OIL RECOVERY FROM RESERVOIRS DEVELOPED WITH MODERN DRILLING AND COMPLETION FLUIDS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are: (1) to improve understanding of the wettability alteration of mixed-wet rocks that results from contact with the components of synthetic oil-based drilling and completion fluids formulated to meet the needs of arctic drilling; (2) to investigate cleaning methods to reverse the wettability alteration of mixed-wet cores caused by contact with these SBM components; and (3) to develop new approaches to restoration of wetting that will permit the use of cores drilled with SBM formulations for valid studies of reservoir properties.

Jill S. Buckley; Norman R. Morrow

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Fractured reservoir discrete feature network technologies. Final report, March 7, 1996 to September 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes research conducted for the Fractured Reservoir Discrete Feature Network Technologies Project. The five areas studied are development of hierarchical fracture models; fractured reservoir compartmentalization, block size, and tributary volume analysis; development and demonstration of fractured reservoir discrete feature data analysis tools; development of tools for data integration and reservoir simulation through application of discrete feature network technologies for tertiary oil production; quantitative evaluation of the economic value of this analysis approach.

Dershowitz, William S.; Einstein, Herbert H.; LaPoint, Paul R.; Eiben, Thorsten; Wadleigh, Eugene; Ivanova, Violeta

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

A Study of the Economic Impact of Water Impoundment Through the Development of a Comparative-Projection Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using two established reservoir projects, an economic simulation model for reservoir development was constructed. The two comparative areas used for the model development are both reservoirs in central Texas and were constructed during approximately...

Pearson, J.E.

53

Development and distribution of Rival reservoirs in central Williston basin, western North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mississippian Rival (Nesson) beds in the central Williston basin, North Dakota, are a limestone to evaporite regressive sequence. Progradation of the depositional system produced several distinct shallowing-upward genetic units. Cyclicity in Rival beds was produced by periodic fluctuations in sea level. Rival oil reservoirs are porous and permeable packstones and grainstones. The dominant allochems in these reservoir rocks are peloids and skeletal and algal fragments. These sediments were deposited along carbonate shorelines and within algal banks that developed basinward of shorelines. The trapping mechanism along shorelines is a lithofacies change from limestone to anhydride. Algal banks are locally productive along paleostructural trends where bathymetric shallowing produced shoals dominated by the Codiacean alga Ortonella. Algal banks are flanked by impermeable carbonate mudstones and wackestones deposited in interbank and protected shelf environments. Two distinct Rival bank trends occur in the central basin: a northwest-southeast trend in McKenzie and Williams Counties, North Dakota, parallel with the Cedar Creek anticline, and a northeast-southwest trend along the Nesson anticline and the northeast flank of the basin, parallel with the Weldon-Brockton fault trend.

Hendricks, M.L.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Petrophysical Properties of Unconventional Low-Mobility Reservoirs (Shale Gas and Heavy Oil) by Using Newly Developed Adaptive Testing Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SPE 159172 Petrophysical Properties of Unconventional Low-Mobility Reservoirs (Shale Gas and Heavy Oil) by Using Newly Developed Adaptive Testing Approach Hamid Hadibeik, The University of Texas the dynamics of water- and oil- base mud-filtrate invasion that produce wellbore supercharging were developed

Torres-Verdín, Carlos

55

Model Development to Establish Integrated Operational Rule Curves for Hungry Horse and Libby Reservoirs - Montana, 1996 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hungry Horse and Libby dams have profoundly affected the aquatic ecosystems in two major tributaries of the Columbia River by altering habitat and water quality, and by imposing barriers to fish migration. In 1980, the U.S. Congress passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act, designed in part to balance hydropower development with other natural resources in the Columbia System. The Act formed the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) who developed a program to protect, mitigate and enhance fish and wildlife on the Columbia River and its tributaries. Pursuant to the Council`s Fish and Wildlife Program for the Columbia River System (1987), we constructed computer models to simulate the trophic dynamics of the reservoir biota as related to dam operation. Results were used to develop strategies to minimize impacts and enhance the reservoir and riverine fisheries, following program measures 903(a)(1-4) and 903(b)(1-5). Two FORTRAN simulation models were developed for Hungry Horse and Libby reservoirs located in northwestern Montana. The models were designed to generate accurate, short-term predictions specific to two reservoirs and are not directly applicable to other waters. The modeling strategy, however, is portable to other reservoir systems where sufficient data are available. Reservoir operation guidelines were developed to balance fisheries concerns in the headwaters with anadromous species recovery actions in the lower Columbia (Biological Rule Curves). These BRCs were then integrated with power production and flood control to reduce the economic impact of basin-wide fisheries recovery actions. These Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) were developed simultaneously in the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR), the Council`s phase IV amendment process and recovery actions associated with endangered Columbia Basin fish species.

Marotz, Brian; Althen, Craig; Gustafson, Daniel

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Development of general inflow performance relationships (IPR's) for slanted and horizontal wells producing heterogeneous solution-gas drive reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1968, the Vogel equation has been used extensively and successfully for analyzing the inflow performance relationship (IPR) of flowing vertical wells producing by solution-gas drive. Oil well productivity can be rapidly estimated by using the Vogel IPR curve and well outflow performance. With recent interests on horizontal well technology, several empirical IPRs for solution-gas drive horizontal and slanted wells have been developed under homogeneous reservoir conditions. This report presents the development of IPRs for horizontal and slanted wells by using a special vertical/horizontal/slanted well reservoir simulator under six different reservoir and well parameters: ratio of vertical to horizontal permeability, wellbore eccentricity, stratification, perforated length, formation thickness, and heterogeneous permeability. The pressure and gas saturation distributions around the wellbore are examined. The fundamental physical behavior of inflow performance for horizontal wells is described.

Cheng, A.M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Development of gas production type curves for horizontal wells in coalbed methane reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coalbed methane is an unconventional gas resource that consists of methane production from coal seams .The unique difference between CBM and conventional gas reservoirs is (more)

Nfonsam, Allen Ekahnzok.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Rehabilitating Aquatic Ecosystems in Developed Areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efforts to restore watershed and aquatic ecosystem processes in urban areas are constrained by...rehabilitation and enhancement are preferred over restoration when referring to improving environmental conditions ...

Kathleen G. Maas-Hebner

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Development and application of type curves for pressure transient analysis of horizontal wells in shale gas reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Even though significant progresses have been made in the past few years, there appears to be a lack of information regarding the characterisation of shale gas formations. A major purpose of this study is to demonstrate impacts of horizontal well geometries and gas flow parameters as well as shale gas reservoir system on horizontal well production behaviour and flow regime on pressure transient analysis (PTA). Extensive numerical simulations were conducted to model transient pressure behaviour of a horizontal well and apply the results to well test analysis in shale gas reservoirs. Based on the results from numerical simulations, a set of type curves have been developed in terms of dimensionless pseudopressure and time. Results from type curve matching for synthetic pressure data in shale gas reservoirs demonstrate that the conventional analysis approach may still be applicable for the quantitative analysis on the transient gas flow behaviour and determination of formation properties. [Received: June 21, 2013; Accepted: August 6, 2013

Sung Jun Lee; Tae Hong Kim; Kun Sang Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Development of Chemical Model to Predict the Interactions between Supercritical CO2and Fluid, and Rocks in EGS Reservoirs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This project will develop a chemical model, based on existing models and databases, that is capable of simulating chemical reactions between supercritical (SC) CO2 and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir rocks of various compositions in aqueous, non-aqueous and 2-phase environments.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Impact of Climate Change on Reservoir Flood Control in the Upstream Area of the Beijiang River Basin, South China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the potential impacts of global warming is likely to be experienced through changes in flood frequency and magnitude, which poses a potential threat to the downstream reservoir flood control system. In this paper, the downscaling results of ...

Chuanhao Wu; Guoru Huang; Haijun Yu; Zhijing Chen; Jingguang Ma

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

General inflow performance relationship for solution-gas reservoir wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two equations are developed to describe the inflow performance relationship (IPR) of wells producing from solution-gas drive reservoirs. These are general equations (extensions of the currently available IPR's) that apply to wells with any drainage-area shape at any state of completion flow efficiency and any stage of reservoir depletion. 7 refs.

Dias-Couto, L.E.; Golan, M.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID STRATIGRAPHY OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fluid model for the Coso geothermal reservoir is developed from Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) analyses. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry in well cuttings collected at 20 ft intervals is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow, fluid processes and reservoir seals. Boiling and condensate zones are distinguished. Models are created using cross-sections and fence diagrams. A thick condensate and boiling zone is indicated across the western portion

64

Fluid Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Fluid Stratigraphy and Permeable Zones of the Coso Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A fence-diagram for the Coso geothermal reservoir is developed from Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) analyses. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry in well cuttings collected at 20 ft intervals is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow, fluid processes and reservoir seals. Boiling and condensate zones are distinguished. Permeable zones are indicated by a large change in

65

DEVELOPMENT OF MORE-EFFICIENT GAS FLOODING APPLICABLE TO SHALLOW RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to widen the applicability of gas flooding to shallow oil reservoirs by reducing the pressure required for miscibility using gas enrichment and increasing sweep efficiency with foam. Task 1 examines the potential for improved oil recovery with enriched gases. Subtask 1.1 examines the effect of dispersion processes on oil recovery and the extent of enrichment needed in the presence of dispersion. Subtask 1.2 develops a fast, efficient method to predict the extent of enrichment needed for crude oils at a given pressure. Task 2 develops improved foam processes to increase sweep efficiency in gas flooding. Subtask 2.1 comprises mechanistic experimental studies of foams with N{sup 2} gas. Subtask 2.2 conducts experiments with CO{sup 2} foam. Subtask 2.3 develops and applies a simulator for foam processes in field application. Regarding Task 1, several results related to subtask 1.1 are given. In this period, most of our research centered on how to estimate the dispersivity at the field scale. Simulation studies (Solano et al. 2001) show that oil recovery for enriched gas drives depends on the amount of dispersion in reservoir media. But the true value of dispersion, expressed as dispersivity, at the field scale, is unknown. This research investigates three types of dispersion in permeable media to obtain realistic estimates of dispersive mixing at the field scale. The dispersivity from single-well tracer tests (SWTT), also known as echo dispersivity, is the dispersivity that is unaffected by fluid flow direction. Layering in permeable media tends to increase the observed dispersivity in well-to-well tracer tests, also known as transmission dispersivity, but leaves the echo dispersivity unaffected. A collection of SWTT data is analyzed to estimate echo dispersivity at the SWTT scale. The estimated echo dispersivities closely match a published trend with length scale in dispersivities obtained from groundwater tracer tests. This unexpected result--it was thought that transmission dispersivity should be greater than echo dispersivity--is analyzed with numerical simulation. A third type of dispersive mixing is local dispersivity, or the mixing observed at a point as tracer flows past it. Numerical simulation results show that the local dispersivity is always less than the transmission dispersivity and greater than the echo dispersivity limits. It is closer to one limit or the other depending on the amount and type of heterogeneity, the autocorrelation structure of the medium's permeability, and the lateral (vertical) permeability. The agreement between the SWTT echo dispersivities and the field trend suggests that the field data are measuring local dispersivities. All dispersivities appear to grow with length. Regarding Task 2, two results are described: (1) An experimental study of N{sup 2} foam finds the two steady-state foam-flow regimes at elevated temperature and with acid, adding evidence that the two regimes occur widely, if not universally, in foam in porous media. (2) A simulation finds that the optimal injection strategy for overcoming gravity override in homogeneous reservoirs is injection of large alternating slugs of surfactant and gas at fixed, maximum attainable injection rates. A simple model for the process explains why the this strategy works so well. Before conducting simulations of SAG displacements, however, it is important to analyze the given foam model using fractional-flow theory. Fractional-flow theory predicts that some foam processes will give foam collapse immediately behind the gas front. In simulations, numerical dispersion leads to a false impression of good sweep efficiency. In this case simply grid refinement may not warn of the inaccuracy of the simulation.

William R. Rossen; Russell T. Johns; Gary A. Pope

2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

66

Advanced reservoir characterization and evaluation of CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area. First annual technical progress report, September 1, 1995--August 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to assess the economic feasibility of CO{sub 2} flooding the naturally fractured Spraberry Trend Area in West Texas. This objective is being accomplished by conducting research in four areas: (1) extensive characterization of the reservoirs, (2) experimental studies of crude oil/brine/rock (COBR) interaction in the reservoirs, (3) analytical and numerical simulation of Spraberry reservoirs, and, (4) experimental investigations on CO{sub 2} gravity drainage in Spraberry whole cores. This report provides results of the first year of the five-year project for each of the four areas.

Schechter, D.S.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

67

THE INFLUENCE OF FOLD AND FRACTURE DEVELOPMENT ON RESERVOIR BEHAVIOR OF THE LISBURNE GROUP OF NORTHERN ALASKA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Carboniferous Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The Lisburne is detachment folded where it is exposed throughout the northeastern Brooks Range, but is relatively undeformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study are to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of detachment folds and their truncation by thrust faults. (2) The influence of folding on fracture patterns. (3) The influence of deformation on fluid flow. (4) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics. The Lisburne in the main axis of the Brooks Range is characteristically deformed into imbricate thrust sheets with asymmetrical hanging wall anticlines and footwall synclines. In contrast, the Lisburne in the northeastern Brooks Range is characterized by symmetrical detachment folds. The focus of our 2000 field studies was at the boundary between these structural styles in the vicinity of Porcupine Lake, in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The northern edge of thrust-truncated folds in Lisburne is marked by a local range front that likely represents an eastward continuation of the central Brooks Range front. This is bounded to the north by a gently dipping panel of Lisburne with local asymmetrical folds. The leading edge of the flat panel is thrust over Permian to Cretaceous rocks in a synclinal depression. These younger rocks overlie symmetrically detachment-folded Lisburne, as is extensively exposed to the north. Six partial sections were measured in the Lisburne of the flat panel and local range front. The Lisburne here is about 700 m thick and is interpreted to consist primarily of the Wachsmuth and Alapah Limestones, with only a thin veneer of Wahoo Limestone. The Wachsmuth (200 m) is gradational between the underlying Missippian Kayak Shale and the overlying Mississippian Alapah, and increases in resistance upward. The Alapah consists of a lower resistant member (100 m) of alternating limestone and chert, a middle recessive member (100 m), and an upper resistant member (260 m) that is similar to Wahoo in the northeastern Brooks Range. The Wahoo is recessive and is thin (30 m) due either to non-deposition or erosion beneath the sub-Permian unconformity. The Lisburne of the area records two major episodes of transgression and shallowing-upward on a carbonate ramp. Thicknesses and facies vary along depositional strike. Asymmetrical folds, mostly truncated by thrust faults, were studied in and south of the local range front. Fold geometry was documented by surveys of four thrust-truncated folds and two folds not visibly cut by thrusts. A portion of the local range front was mapped to document changes in fold geometry along strike in three dimensions. The folds typically display a long, non-folded gently to moderately dipping backlimbs and steep to overturned forelimbs, commonly including parasitic anticline-syncline pairs. Thrusts commonly cut through the anticlinal forelimb or the forward synclinal hinge. These folds probably originated as detachment folds based on their mechanical stratigraphy and the transition to detachment folds to the north. Their geometry indicates that they were asymmetrical prior to thrust truncation. This asymmetry may have favored accommodation of increasing shortening by thrust breakthrough rather than continued folding. Fracture patterns were documented in the gently dipping panel of Lisburne and the asymmetrical folds within it. Four sets of steeply dipping extension fractures were identified, with strikes to the (1) N, (2) E, (3) N to NW, and (4) NE. The relative timing of these fracture sets is complex and unclear. En echelon sets of fractures are common, and display normal or strike-slip sense. Mesoscopic and penetrative structures are locally well developed, and indicate bed-parallel shear within the flat panel and strain within folds. Three sets of normal faults are well developed in the area, and are unusual

Wesley K. Wallace; Catherine L. Hanks; Jerry Jensen; Michael T. Whalen

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

DEVELOPMENT OF MORE-EFFICIENT GAS FLOODING APPLICABLE TO SHALLOW RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to widen the applicability of gas flooding to shallow oil reservoirs by reducing the pressure required for miscibility using gas enrichment and increasing sweep efficiency with foam. Task 1 examines the potential for improved oil recovery with enriched gases. Subtask 1.1 examines the effect of dispersion processes on oil recovery and the extent of enrichment needed in the presence of dispersion. Subtask 1.2 develops a fast, efficient method to predict the extent of enrichment needed for crude oils at a given pressure. Task 2 develops improved foam processes to increase sweep efficiency in gas flooding. Subtask 2.1 comprises mechanistic experimental studies of foams with N{sub 2} gas. Subtask 2.2 conducts experiments with CO{sub 2} foam. Subtask 2.3 develops and applies a simulator for foam processes in field application. Regarding Task 1, several very important results were achieved this period for subtask 1.2. In particular, we successfully developed a robust Windows-based code to calculate MMP and MME for fluid characterizations that consist of any number of pseudocomponents. We also were successful in developing a new technique to quantify the displacement mechanism of a gas flood--that is, to determine the fraction of a displacement that is vaporizing or condensing. These new technologies will be very important to develop new correlations and to determine important parameters for the design of gas injection floods. Regarding Task 2, several results were achieved: (1) A detailed study of the accuracy of foam simulation validates the model with fits to analytical fractional-flow solutions. It shows that there is no way to represent surfactant-concentration effects on foam without some numerical artifacts. (2) New results on capillary crossflow with foam show that this is much less detrimental than earlier studies had argued. (3) It was shown that the extremely useful model of Stone for gravity segregation with foam is rigorously true as long as the standard assumptions of fractional-flow theory apply. Without this proof, it was always possible that this powerful model would break down in some important application.

William R. Rossen; Russell T. Johns; Gary A. Pope

2003-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

69

The Influence of Fold and Fracture Development on Reservoir Behavior of the Lisburne Group of Northern Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of detachment folds and their truncation by thrust faults, (2) The influence of folding and lithostratigraphy on fracture patterns, (3) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics, and (4) The influence of lithostratigraphy and deformation on fluid flow.

Wallace, W.K.; Hanks, C.L.; Whalen, M.T.; Jensen, J.; Atkinson, P.K.; Brinton, J.S.

2001-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

70

Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries Agency/Company /Organization: U.S. Agency for International Development Topics: Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, Finance Resource Type: Publications Website: pdf.usaid.gov/pdf_docs/PNADO826.pdf Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries Screenshot References: Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries[1] Summary "In order to determine how USAID assistance may help overcome barriers to financing these types of projects, this report addresses the following

71

Peer Reviewed: Experimenting with Hydroelectric Reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Peer Reviewed: Experimenting with Hydroelectric Reservoirs ... Researchers created reservoirs in Canada to explore the impacts of hydroelectric developments on greenhouse gas and methylmercury production. ...

R. A. Bodaly; Kenneth G. Beaty; Len H. Hendzel; Andrew R. Majewski; Michael J. Paterson; Kristofer R. Rolfhus; Alan F. Penn; Vincent L. St. Louis; Britt D. Hall; Cory J. D. Matthews; Katharine A. Cherewyk; Mariah Mailman; James P. Hurley; Sherry L. Schiff; Jason J. Venkiteswaran

2004-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

EA for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-00016-EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: EA for Well Field Development at Patua Geothermal Area - DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2011-00016-EA EA at Patua Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field, Patua Geothermal Project Phase II General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant Gradient Resources Geothermal Area Patua Geothermal Area Project Location Fernley, Nevada Project Phase Geothermal/Exploration, Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Drilling Techniques, Thermal Gradient Holes Time Frame (days) NEPA Process Time 327 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency none provided

73

Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1990: Physical and chemical characteristics of water and sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA`s) Reservoir Vital Signs Monitoring program, physical/chemical measurements of water and sediment were made in 1990 on twelve TVA reservoirs (the nine main steam Tennessee river reservoirs - Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary reservoirs - Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris). The objective of this monitoring program is to assess the health or integrity of these aquatic ecosystems. The physical/chemical water quality data collected in 1990 showed the water quality of these reservoirs to be very good. However, hypolimnetic anoxia during the summer months in Watts bars, Douglas, and Cherokee reservoir continues to be a concern. High concentrations of nutrients were measured in the transition zones of Cherokee and Douglas reservoirs, resulting in highly productive and eutrophic conditions in the transition zones of these reservoirs. Fecal coliform organisms were frequently detected in the forebay area of Guntersville reservoir, and higher than expected ammonia nitrogen concentrations were found at the transition zone of Wheeler reservoir. Elevated concentrations of mercury were found in Pickwick and Watts bar reservoir sediment, and high lead concentrations were found in a sediment sample collected from Guntersville reservoir. A TVA Reservoir Water Quality Index (RWQI) was developed and used to summarize water quality conditions on a scale from 0 (worst) to 100 (best).

Meinert, D.L.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1990: Physical and chemical characteristics of water and sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA's) Reservoir Vital Signs Monitoring program, physical/chemical measurements of water and sediment were made in 1990 on twelve TVA reservoirs (the nine main steam Tennessee river reservoirs - Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary reservoirs - Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris). The objective of this monitoring program is to assess the health or integrity of these aquatic ecosystems. The physical/chemical water quality data collected in 1990 showed the water quality of these reservoirs to be very good. However, hypolimnetic anoxia during the summer months in Watts bars, Douglas, and Cherokee reservoir continues to be a concern. High concentrations of nutrients were measured in the transition zones of Cherokee and Douglas reservoirs, resulting in highly productive and eutrophic conditions in the transition zones of these reservoirs. Fecal coliform organisms were frequently detected in the forebay area of Guntersville reservoir, and higher than expected ammonia nitrogen concentrations were found at the transition zone of Wheeler reservoir. Elevated concentrations of mercury were found in Pickwick and Watts bar reservoir sediment, and high lead concentrations were found in a sediment sample collected from Guntersville reservoir. A TVA Reservoir Water Quality Index (RWQI) was developed and used to summarize water quality conditions on a scale from 0 (worst) to 100 (best).

Meinert, D.L.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Development of a description method for the Yowlumne Unit "A" reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

composition that make up a typical sample in the Yowlumne reservoir. The dominant minerals in the Yowlumne are quartz, followed by potassium feldspar and other minerals. Potassium feldspar is a mineral that emits radiation which is detectable... with conventional wireline logging instruments, principally the Gamma Ray Log, which detects radiation emitted in the vicinity of the wellbore being logged. The Gamma Ray Log is used as a lithologic indicator for the presence of shales because they typically...

Clark, James Walter

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

76

The development of MRI for the determination of porosity distribution in reservoir core samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scale porosity distributions. The existence of similarities between the different scales may indicate that porosity follows a fractal geometry. A key feature of fractals is their resemblance at various scales. I If evidence could be found... that the porosity does indeed follow a fractal geometry, this knowledge could be used to improve reservoir estimation procedures. & 2 Foot by foot porosity data was obtained using a Helium porosimeter for a three hundred foot vertical section of whole core...

Shivers, Jon Blake

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

77

THE INFLUENCE OF FOLD AND FRACTURE DEVELOPMENT ON RESERVOIR BEHAVIOR OF THE LISBURNE GROUP OF NORTHERN ALASKA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Lisburne Group is a major carbonate reservoir unit in northern Alaska. The Lisburne is detachment folded where it is exposed throughout the northeastern Brooks Range, but is relatively undeformed in areas of current production in the subsurface of the North Slope. The objectives of this study are to develop a better understanding of four major aspects of the Lisburne: (1) The geometry and kinematics of detachment folds and their truncation by thrust faults. (2) The influence of folding and lithostratigraphy on fracture patterns. (3) Lithostratigraphy and its influence on folding, faulting, fracturing, and reservoir characteristics. (4) The influence of lithostratigraphy and deformation on fluid flow. The results of field work during the summer of 1999 offer some preliminary insights: The Lisburne Limestone displays a range of symmetrical detachment fold geometries throughout the northeastern Brooks Range. The variation in fold geometry suggests a generalized progression in fold geometry with increasing shortening: Straight-limbed, narrow-crested folds at low shortening, box folds at intermediate shortening, and folds with a large height-to-width ratio and thickened hinges at high shortening. This sequence is interpreted to represent a progressive change in the dominant shortening mechanism from flexural-slip at low shortening to bulk strain at higher shortening. Structural variations in bed thickness occur throughout this progression. Parasitic folding accommodates structural thickening at low shortening and is gradually succeeded by penetrative strain as shortening increases. The amount of structural thickening at low to intermediate shortening may be inversely related to the local amount of structural thickening of the Kayak Shale, the incompetent unit that underlies the Lisburne. The Lisburne Limestone displays a different structural style in the south, across the boundary between the northeastern Brooks Range and the main axis of the Brooks Range fold-and-thrust belt. The steep forelimbs of angular asymmetrical folds typically have been cut and displaced by thrust faults, resulting in superposition of a fault-bend fold geometry on the truncated folds. Remnant uncut folds within trains of thrust-truncated folds and the predominance of detachment folds to the north suggest that these folds originated as detachment folds. Fold asymmetry and a more uniformly competent Lisburne Limestone may have favored accommodation of a significant proportion of shortening by thrust faulting, in contrast with the dominance of fold shortening to the north. Two dominant sets of fractures are present in the least deformed Lisburne Limestone: Early extension fractures normal to the regional fold trend and late extension and shear fractures parallel to the regional fold trend. These two major fracture sets remain as deformation increases, but they are more variable in orientation, character, and relative age. Compared to fold limbs, the fold hinges display greater density and extent of fractures, more conjugate and shear fractures, and more evidence of penetrative strain. This suggests that hinges remained fixed during fold growth. Late extension fractures normal to the fold axis are common even where penetrative strain is greatest. Fracture density is greater in fine-grained carbonates than in coarse-grained carbonates over the entire spectrum of deformation.

Wesley K. Wallace; Catherine L. Hanks; Michael T. Whalen; Jerry Jensen; Paul K. Atkinson; Joseph S. Brinton

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Tectonic setting of the Coso geothermal reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso geothermal reservoir is being developed in Sierran-type crystalline bedrock of the Coso Mountains, a small desert mountain range just to the east of the Sierra Nevada and Rose Valley, which is the southern extension of the Owens Valley of eastern California Optimum development of this reservoir requires an understanding of the fracture hydrology of the Coso Mountains crystalline terrain and its hydrologic connection to regional groundwater and thermal sources. An interpreted, conceptually balanced regional cross section that extends from the Sierra

79

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This proposal takes direct aim at this shortcoming. P/GSI is developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This array will remove the acquisition barrier to record the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. By using 3C surface seismic or borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore facilitate 9C reservoir imaging. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This proposal takes direct aim at this shortcoming. P/GSI is developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This array will remove the acquisition barrier to record the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore facilitate 9C reservoir imaging. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Julian, B.R. and G.R. Foulger, Improved Methods for Mapping Permeability and Heat sources in Geothermal Areas using Microearthquake Data, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering, Stanford University,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systems (EGS) experiments and other geothermal operations. With support from the Dept. of Energy, we in Geothermal Areas using Microearthquake Data, Thirty-Fifth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering and Heat sources in Geothermal Areas using Microearthquake Data Bruce R. Julian§ U. S. Geological Survey

Foulger, G. R.

82

Tourism Development in Greek Insular and Coastal Areas: Sociocultural Changes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tourism Development in Greek Insular and Coastal Areas: Sociocultural Changes and Crucial Policy tourism and tourism development at local, regional and national level. The analysis focuses on the role communities regarding tourism and tourists. There is consideration of the new productive structures

Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

83

Facies architecture of the Bluejacket Sandstone in the Eufaula Lake area, Oklahoma: Implications for the reservoir characterization of the Bartlesville Sandstone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Outcrop studies of the Bluejacket Sandstone (Middle Pennsylvanian) provide significant insights to reservoir architecture of the subsurface equivalent Bartlesville Sandstone. Quarry walls and road cuts in the Lake Eufaula area offer excellent exposures for detailed facies architectural investigations using high-precision surveying, photo mosaics. Directional minipermeameter measurements are being conducted. Subsurface studies include conventional logs, borehole image log, and core data. Reservoir architectures are reconstructed in four hierarchical levels: multi-storey sandstone, i.e. discrete genetic intervals; individual discrete genetic interval; facies within a discrete genetic interval; and lateral accretion bar deposits. In both outcrop and subsurface, the Bluejacket (Bartlesville) Sandstone comprises two distinctive architectures: a lower braided fluvial and an upper meandering fluvial. Braided fluvial deposits are typically 30 to 80 ft thick, and are laterally persistent filling an incised valley wider than the largest producing fields. The lower contact is irregular with local relief of 50 ft. The braided-fluvial deposits consist of 100-400-ft wide, 5-15-ft thick channel-fill elements. Each channel-fill interval is limited laterally by an erosional contact or overbank deposits, and is separated vertically by discontinuous mudstones or highly concentrated mudstone interclast lag conglomerates. Low-angle parallel-stratified or trough cross-stratified medium- to coarse-grained sandstones volumetrically dominate. This section has a blocky well log profile. Meandering fluvial deposits are typically 100 to 150 ft thick and comprise multiple discrete genetic intervals.

Ye, Liangmiao; Yang, Kexian [Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Occurrence, fate and ecotoxicological assessment of pharmaceutically active compounds in wastewater and sludge from wastewater treatment plants in Chongqing, the Three Gorges Reservoir Area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The occurrence, removal and ecotoxicological assessment of 21 pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) including antibiotics, analgesics, antiepileptics, antilipidemics and antihypersensitives, were studied at four municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in Chongqing, the Three Gorges Reservoir Area. Individual treatment unit effluents, as well as primary and secondary sludge, were sampled and analyzed for the selected PhACs to evaluate their biodegradation, persistence and partitioning behaviors. PhACs were identified and quantified using high performance liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry after solid-phase extraction. All the 21 analyzed PhACs were detected in wastewater and the target PhACs except acetaminophen, ibuprofen and gemfibrozil, were also found in sludge. The concentrations of the antibiotics and SVT were comparable to or even higher than those reported in developed countries, while the case of other target PhACs was opposite. The elimination of PhACs except acetaminophen was incomplete and a wide range of elimination efficiencies during the treatment were observed, i.e. from negative removal to 99.5%. The removal of PhACs was insignificant in primary and disinfection processes, and was mainly achieved during the biological treatment. Based on the mass balance analysis, biodegradation is believed to be the primary removal mechanism, whereas only about 1.5% of the total mass load of the target PhACs was removed by sorption. Experimentally estimated distribution coefficients (<500L/kg, with a few exceptions) also indicate that biodegradation/transformation was responsible for the removal of the target PhACs. Ecotoxicological assessment indicated that the environment concentrations of single compounds (including sulfadiazine, sulfamethoxazole, ofloxacin, azithromycin and erythromycin-H2O) in effluent and sludge, as well as the mixture of the 21 detected PhACs in effluent, sludge and receiving water had a significant ecotoxicological risk to algae. Therefore, further control of PhACs in effluent and sludge is required before their discharge and application to prevent their introduction into the environment.

Qing Yan; Xu Gao; You-Peng Chen; Xu-Ya Peng; Yi-Xin Zhang; Xiu-Mei Gan; Cheng-Fang Zi; Jin-Song Guo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Wister Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wister Geothermal Area Wister Geothermal Area (Redirected from Wister Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Wister Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

86

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Teels Marsh Geothermal Area (Redirected from Teels Marsh Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

87

Truckhaven Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truckhaven Geothermal Area Truckhaven Geothermal Area (Redirected from Truckhaven Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Truckhaven Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

88

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area (Redirected from Mokapu Penninsula Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

89

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area (Redirected from Kilauea Summit Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (12) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

90

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area (Redirected from Flint Geothermal Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

91

Resource investigation of low- and moderate-temperature geothermal areas in San Bernardino, California. Part of the third year report, 1980-81, of the US Department of Energy-California State-Coupled Program for Reservoir Assessment and Confirmation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ninety-seven geothermal wells and springs were identified and plotted on a compiled geologic map of the 40-square-mile study area. These wells and springs were concentrated in three distinguishable resource areas: Arrowhead Hot Springs; South San Bernardino; and Harlem Hot Springs - in each of which detailed geophysical, geochemical, and geological surveys were conducted. The Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area lies just north of the City of San Bernardino in the San Bernardino Mountains astride a shear zone (offshoot of the San Andreas fault) in pre-Cambrian gneiss and schist. The Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area, on the east side of the City, and the south San Bernardino geothermal area, on the south side, have geothermal reservoirs in Quaternary alluvial material which overlies a moderately deep sedimentary basin bound on the southwest by the San Jacinto fault (a ground water barrier). Geothermometry calculations suggest that the Arrowhead Hot Springs geothermal area, with a maximum reservoir temperature of 142/sup 0/C, may have the highest maximum reservoir temperature of the three geothermal areas. The maximum temperature recorded by CDMG in the south San Bernardino geothermal area was 56/sup 0/C from an artesian well, while the maximum temperature recorded in the Harlem Hot Springs geothermal area was 49.5/sup 0/C at 174 meters (570 feet) in an abandoned water well. The geophysical and geological surveys delineated fault traces in association with all three of the designated geothermal areas.

Youngs, L.G.; Bezore, S.P.; Chapman, R.H.; Chase, G.W.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Geothermal resource area 6: Lander and Eureka Counties. Area development plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geothermal Resource Area 6 includes Lander and Eureka Counties. There are several different geothermal resources ranging in temperature from 70/sup 0/F to in excess of 400/sup 0/F within this two country area. Eleven of these resources are considered major and have been selected for evaluation in this Area Development Plan. The various potential uses of the energy found at each of the 11 resource sites were determined after evaluating the study area's physical characteristics, land ownership and land use patterns, existing population and projected growth rates, and transportation facilities. These were then compared with the site specific resource characteristics. The uses considered were divided into five main categories: electrical generation, space heating, recreation, industrial process heat, and agriculture. Within two of these categories certain subdivisions were considered separately. The findings about each of the 11 geothermal sites considered are summarized.

Pugsley, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Marine Policy Challenges in developing China's marine protected area system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the country hosts an exceptional marine biodiversity comprising about 20,300 recorded species, including 12Marine Policy Challenges in developing China's marine protected area system Wanfei Qiu a,* , Bin Department of Marine Environment Protection, State Oceanic Administration, No. 1 Fuxingmenwai Avenue, Beijing

Jones, Peter JS

94

The role of reservoir characterization in the reservoir management process (as reflected in the Department of Energy`s reservoir management demonstration program)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optimum reservoir recovery and profitability result from guidance of reservoir practices provided by an effective reservoir management plan. Success in developing the best, most appropriate reservoir management plan requires knowledge and consideration of (1) the reservoir system including rocks, and rock-fluid interactions (i.e., a characterization of the reservoir) as well as wellbores and associated equipment and surface facilities; (2) the technologies available to describe, analyze, and exploit the reservoir; and (3) the business environment under which the plan will be developed and implemented. Reservoir characterization is the essential to gain needed knowledge of the reservoir for reservoir management plan building. Reservoir characterization efforts can be appropriately scaled by considering the reservoir management context under which the plan is being built. Reservoir management plans de-optimize with time as technology and the business environment change or as new reservoir information indicates the reservoir characterization models on which the current plan is based are inadequate. BDM-Oklahoma and the Department of Energy have implemented a program of reservoir management demonstrations to encourage operators with limited resources and experience to learn, implement, and disperse sound reservoir management techniques through cooperative research and development projects whose objectives are to develop reservoir management plans. In each of the three projects currently underway, careful attention to reservoir management context assures a reservoir characterization approach that is sufficient, but not in excess of what is necessary, to devise and implement an effective reservoir management plan.

Fowler, M.L. [BDM-Petroleum Technologies, Bartlesville, OK (United States); Young, M.A.; Madden, M.P. [BDM-Oklahoma, Bartlesville, OK (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Reservoir characterization, performance monitoring of waterflooding and development opportunities in Germania Spraberry Unit.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

existing over a regional area have long been known to dominate all aspects of performance in the Spraberry Trend Area. Two stages of depletion have taken place over 46 years of production: Primary production under solution gas drive and secondary recovery...

Hernandez Hernandez, Erwin Enrique

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

96

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a new technique developed for the oil industry in order to map borehole fluids. This method is being studied for application to geothermal wells and is funded by the California Energy Commission. Fluid inclusion gas geochemistry is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow

97

Development of general inflow performance relationships (IPR`s) for slanted and horizontal wells producing heterogeneous solution-gas drive reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1968, the Vogel equation has been used extensively and successfully for analyzing the inflow performance relationship (IPR) of flowing vertical wells producing by solution-gas drive. Oil well productivity can be rapidly estimated by using the Vogel IPR curve and well outflow performance. With recent interests on horizontal well technology, several empirical IPRs for solution-gas drive horizontal and slanted wells have been developed under homogeneous reservoir conditions. This report presents the development of IPRs for horizontal and slanted wells by using a special vertical/horizontal/slanted well reservoir simulator under six different reservoir and well parameters: ratio of vertical to horizontal permeability, wellbore eccentricity, stratification, perforated length, formation thickness, and heterogeneous permeability. The pressure and gas saturation distributions around the wellbore are examined. The fundamental physical behavior of inflow performance for horizontal wells is described.

Cheng, A.M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

White Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

White Mountains Geothermal Area White Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: White Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Hampshire Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

99

Truckhaven Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truckhaven Geothermal Area Truckhaven Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Truckhaven Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

100

Honokowai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Honokowai Geothermal Area Honokowai Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Honokowai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Wister Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wister Geothermal Area Wister Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Wister Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

102

Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area (Redirected from Lualualei Valley Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

103

Environment of deposition and reservoir characteristics of Lower Pennsylvanian Morrowan sandstones, South Empire field area, Eddy County, New Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Amoco Empire South Deep 10 and the Midwest South Empire Deep 1 wells. ATOKA GR AMOCO EMPIRE SOUTH DEEP IO I-188-28E API POROSITY 'Ya MIDWEST SOUTH EMPIRE DEEP I 8-18S-29E API POROSITY 'Yo 0~15 ~20 IIIII R( GR UPPER MORROW 0 0 0 0 lO 0... oil and gas from multiple horizons. Active drilling for Morrowan prospects in the South Empire field area began in the early 1970's. Gas was discovered in late 1971 with the completion of Midwest (now Amoco) Oil Corporation's South Empire Deep 1...

Lambert, Rebecca Bailey

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

OPTIMIZATION OF INFILL DRILLING IN NATURALLY-FRACTURED TIGHT-GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major goal of industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) fossil energy program is to increase gas reserves in tight-gas reservoirs. Infill drilling and hydraulic fracture stimulation in these reservoirs are important reservoir management strategies to increase production and reserves. Phase II of this DOE/cooperative industry project focused on optimization of infill drilling and evaluation of hydraulic fracturing in naturally-fractured tight-gas reservoirs. The cooperative project involved multidisciplinary reservoir characterization and simulation studies to determine infill well potential in the Mesaverde and Dakota sandstone formations at selected areas in the San Juan Basin of northwestern New Mexico. This work used the methodology and approach developed in Phase I. Integrated reservoir description and hydraulic fracture treatment analyses were also conducted in the Pecos Slope Abo tight-gas reservoir in southeastern New Mexico and the Lewis Shale in the San Juan Basin. This study has demonstrated a methodology to (1) describe reservoir heterogeneities and natural fracture systems, (2) determine reservoir permeability and permeability anisotropy, (3) define the elliptical drainage area and recoverable gas for existing wells, (4) determine the optimal location and number of new in-fill wells to maximize economic recovery, (5) forecast the increase in total cumulative gas production from infill drilling, and (6) evaluate hydraulic fracture simulation treatments and their impact on well drainage area and infill well potential. Industry partners during the course of this five-year project included BP, Burlington Resources, ConocoPhillips, and Williams.

Lawrence W. Teufel; Her-Yuan Chen; Thomas W. Engler; Bruce Hart

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

106

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2005-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

108

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

110

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

113

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

116

Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P Paulsson

2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

117

Development of a 400 Level 3C Clamped Downhole Seismic Receiver Array for 3D Borehole Seismic Imaging of Gas Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently hampered by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. Massive 3D VSP{reg_sign} and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver arrays will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N. P. Paulsson

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

118

DEVELOPMENT OF A 400 LEVEL 3C CLAMPED DOWNHOLE SEISMIC RECEIVER ARRAY FOR 3D BOREHOLE SEISMIC IMAGING OF GAS RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Borehole seismology is the highest resolution geophysical imaging technique available today to the oil and gas industry for characterization and monitoring of oil and gas reservoirs. However, the industry's ability to economically do high resolution 3D imaging of deep and complex gas reservoirs using borehole seismology is currently frustrated by the lack of the acquisition technology necessary to record the large volumes of the high frequency, high signal-to-noise-ratio borehole seismic data needed to do 3D imaging. This project takes direct aim at this shortcoming by developing a 400 level 3C clamped downhole seismic receiver array, and accompanying software, for borehole seismic 3D imaging. This large borehole seismic array will remove the technical acquisition barrier for recording the necessary volumes of data to do high resolution 3D VSP or 3D cross well seismic imaging. 3D VSP and long range Cross-Well Seismology (CWS) are two of the borehole seismic techniques that will allow the Gas industry to take the next step in their quest for higher resolution images of the gas reservoirs for the purpose of improving the recovery of the natural gas resources. Today only a fraction of the original Oil or Gas in place is produced when reservoirs are considered depleted. This is primarily due to our lack of understanding of the detailed compartmentalization of the oil and gas reservoirs. The 400 level 3C borehole seismic receiver array will allow for the economic use of 3D borehole seismic imaging for reservoir characterization and monitoring by allowing the economic recording of the required large data volumes that have a sufficiently dense spatial sampling. By using 3C surface seismic or 3C borehole seismic sources the 400 level receiver array will furthermore allow 3D reservoir imaging using 9C data. The 9C borehole seismic data will provide P, SH and SV information for imaging of the complex deep gas reservoirs and allow quantitative prediction of the rock and the fluid types. The data quality and the data volumes from a 400 level 3C array will allow us to develop the data processing technology necessary for high resolution reservoir imaging.

Bjorn N.P. Paulsson

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

An Advanced Fracture Characterization and Well Path Navigation System for Effective Re-Development and Enhancement of Ultimate Recovery from the Complex Monterey Reservoir of South Ellwood Field, Offshore California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to over 10,000,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intended to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. In the first phase of the project, state of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic, interference tests and production logs were employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database were used in the construction of a new geologic model of the fracture network. An innovative fracture network reservoir simulator was developed to better understand and manage the aquifers role in pressure maintenance and water production. In the second phase of this project, simulation models were used to plan the redevelopment of the field using high angle wells. Correct placement of the wells is critical to intersect the best-developed fracture zones and to avoid producing large volumes of water from the water leg. Particula r attention was paid to those areas of the field that have not been adequately developed with the existing producers. In cooperation with the DOE and the PTTC, the new data and the new fracture simulation model were shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during Budget Periods I and II. Venoco elected to terminate the project after Budget Period II and not to proceed with the activities planned for Budget Period III.

Horner, Steve; Ershaghi, Iraj

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

120

Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Hydro-Thermo-Mechanical Numerical Model For Hdr Geothermal Reservoir Evaluation Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A two-dimensional numerical model of coupled fluid flow, heat transfer and rock mechanics in naturally fractured rock is developed. The model is applicable to assessments of hot dry rock (HDR) geothermal reservoir characterisation experiments, and to the study of hydraulic stimulations and the heat extraction potential of HDR reservoirs. Modelling assumptions are based on the characteristics of the experimental HDR reservoir in the Carnmenellis granite in Cornwall, S. W. England. In

122

Development of a Compositional Reservoir Simulator for Asphaltene Precipitation Based on a Thermodynamically Consistent Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

graduate school an extraordinary experience. Thank you. Finally, I gratefully acknowledge Qatar National Research Fund for supporting this re- search under grant NPRP 09-1050-2-405. iv NOMENCLATURE A Flow cross-sectional area cf Rock compressibility f... MOLAR VOLUME : : : : : : : : 98 x LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page 4.1 Molar composition (%) of oils and solvent used to validate the asphaltene precipitation model (Burke, 1990) : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 36 4.2 Amount of asphaltene...

Gonzalez Abad, Karin G

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

123

Development of Optimization Systems Analysis Technique for Texas Water Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

growth asa function of resource use is developed and an example presented using the area affected by the Blackburn Crossing Reservoir in East Central Texas....

Hann, R. W.

124

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program-based on advanced reservoir management methods- can significantly improve oil recovery. The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

Murphy, M.B.

1997-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

Mark B. Murphy

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

Mark B. Murphy

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

Fractured reservoir discrete feature network technologies. Annual report, March 7, 1996--February 28, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes progress on the project, {open_quotes}Fractured Reservoir Discrete Feature Network Technologies{close_quotes} during the period March 7, 1996 to February 28, 1997. The report presents summaries of technology development for the following research areas: (1) development of hierarchical fracture models, (2) fractured reservoir compartmentalization and tributary volume, (3) fractured reservoir data analysis, and (4) integration of fractured reservoir data and production technologies. In addition, the report provides information on project status, publications submitted, data collection activities, and technology transfer through the world wide web (WWW). Research on hierarchical fracture models included geological, mathematical, and computer code development. The project built a foundation of quantitative, geological and geometrical information about the regional geology of the Permian Basin, including detailed information on the lithology, stratigraphy, and fracturing of Permian rocks in the project study area (Tracts 17 and 49 in the Yates field). Based on the accumulated knowledge of regional and local geology, project team members started the interpretation of fracture genesis mechanisms and the conceptual modeling of the fracture system in the study area. Research on fractured reservoir compartmentalization included basic research, technology development, and application of compartmentalized reservoir analyses for the project study site. Procedures were developed to analyze compartmentalization, tributary drainage volume, and reservoir matrix block size. These algorithms were implemented as a Windows 95 compartmentalization code, FraCluster.

Dershowitz, W.S.; La Pointe, P.R.; Einstein, H.H.; Ivanova, V.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Development of photo-patterned composite structures in microchannels for oil reservoir research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Starting from unstructured glass microchannels, we develop a new method of micromodel fabrication. We build composite structures in a bottom-up manner with ultraviolet projection lithography where the composite structures ...

Lee, Hyundo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Advanced oil recovery technologies for improved recovery from slope basin clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1--March 31, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program--based on advanced reservoir management methods--can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the US oil and gas industry. Results obtained to date are summarized for the following: geostatistics and reservoir mapping; reservoir engineering; reservoir characterization/reservoir simulation; miscible recovery simulations; and technology transfer.

NONE

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Design and Materials The Design area is a rapidly growing research area aimed at furthering the development of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design and Materials Design The Design area is a rapidly growing research area aimed at furthering the development of competitive products and systems. Research in this department focuses on design theories, design methodologies

Calgary, University of

131

Shear-wave splitting and reservoir crack characterization: the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shear-wave splitting and reservoir crack characterization: the Coso Shear-wave splitting and reservoir crack characterization: the Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Shear-wave splitting and reservoir crack characterization: the Coso geothermal field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper aims to improve current understanding of the subsurface fracture system in the Coso geothermal field, located in east-central California. The Coso reservoir is in active economic development, so that knowledge of the subsurface fracture system is of vital importance for an accurate evaluation of its geothermal potential and day-to-day production. To detect the geometry and density of fracture systems we applied the shear-wave splitting technique to a large number of

132

A History of Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United States: Reservoir Engineering 1976-2006  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report summarizes significant research projects performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) over 30 years to overcome challenges in reservoir engineering and to make generation of electricity from geothermal resources more cost-competitive.

133

Simplified methods of modeling multilayer reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this study is to develop simplified methods to model multilayer reservoirs. We examined the method to model well responses of multilayer reservoirs with equivalent single layer solutions during transient flow period which Bennett...

Ryou, Sangsoo

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area (Redirected from Hualalai Northwest Rift Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

135

Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (Redirected from Under Steamboat Springs Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure

136

Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area (Redirected from Columbus Salt Marsh Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure

137

Reservoir monitoring: 1990 summary of vital signs and use impairment monitoring on Tennessee Valley Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) initiated a Reservoir Monitoring Program on 12 TVA reservoirs (the nine main stream Tennessee river reservoirs -- Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary storage reservoirs -- Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris) in autumn 1989. The objective of the Reservoir Monitoring Program is to provide basic information on the ``health`` or integrity of the aquatic ecosystem in each TVA reservoir (``Vital Signs``) and to provide screening level information for describing how well each reservoir meets the swimmable and fishable goals of the Clean Water Act (Use Impairments). This is the first time in the history of the agency that a commitment to a long-term, systematic sampling of major TVA reservoirs has been made. The basis of the Vital Signs Monitoring is examination of appropriate physical, chemical, and biological indicators in three areas of each reservoir. These three areas are the forebay immediately upstream of the dam; the transition zone (the mid-reservoir region where the water changes from free flowing to more quiescent, impounded water); and the inflow or headwater region of the reservoir. The Use Impairments monitoring provides screening level information on the suitability of selected areas within TVA reservoirs for water contact activities (swimmable) and suitability of fish from TVA reservoirs for human consumption (fishable).

Dycus, D.L.; Meinert, D.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Reservoir monitoring: 1990 summary of vital signs and use impairment monitoring on Tennessee Valley Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) initiated a Reservoir Monitoring Program on 12 TVA reservoirs (the nine main stream Tennessee river reservoirs -- Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and three major tributary storage reservoirs -- Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris) in autumn 1989. The objective of the Reservoir Monitoring Program is to provide basic information on the health'' or integrity of the aquatic ecosystem in each TVA reservoir ( Vital Signs'') and to provide screening level information for describing how well each reservoir meets the swimmable and fishable goals of the Clean Water Act (Use Impairments). This is the first time in the history of the agency that a commitment to a long-term, systematic sampling of major TVA reservoirs has been made. The basis of the Vital Signs Monitoring is examination of appropriate physical, chemical, and biological indicators in three areas of each reservoir. These three areas are the forebay immediately upstream of the dam; the transition zone (the mid-reservoir region where the water changes from free flowing to more quiescent, impounded water); and the inflow or headwater region of the reservoir. The Use Impairments monitoring provides screening level information on the suitability of selected areas within TVA reservoirs for water contact activities (swimmable) and suitability of fish from TVA reservoirs for human consumption (fishable).

Dycus, D.L.; Meinert, D.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin). Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. One the reservoir-characterization study of both field is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to: (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area; (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments; and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced recovery program (CO{sub 2} flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill well will be drilled and cored. Technical progress is summarized for: geophysical characterization; reservoir characterization; outcrop characterization; and producibility problem characterization.

Dutton, S.P.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

140

Procedures for Establishing and Evaluating Research Areas for Strategic Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the area into a self-sustaining field of excellence, the University needs to identify and promote those

Carleton University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Regional correlations and reservoir characterization studies of the Pennsylvanian system in the Anadarko Basin area of Western Oklahoma and the Panhandle of Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Correlations problems have long existed between the Pennsylvanian marine clastics of the northeastern half of the Anadarko Basin and Shelf and the Pennsylvanian terrigenous washes of the extreme southwestern portion of the Anadarko Basin. These correlation problems have created nomenclature problems resulting in thousands of feet of washes often referred to on completion reports and production records as {open_quotes}granite wash{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}Atoka Wash{close_quotes} when much greater accuracy and specificity is both needed and possible. Few detailed cross-sections are available. Regional and field scale cross-sections were constructed which have been correlated well by well and field by field using nearly every deep well drilled in the basin. This process has provided for a high degree of consistency. These cross-sections have greatly diminished the correlation and nomenclature problems within the Anadarko Basin. Certain markers proved to be regionally persistent from the marine clastics into the terrigenous washes making the subdivision of thousands of feet of washes possible. Those of greatest importance were the top of the Marmaton, the Cherokee Marker, the Pink {open_quotes}Limestone{close_quotes} Interval, the top of the Atoka and the top of the Morrow. Once these and other subdivisions were made, production was allocated on a much more definitive basis. Additionally, detailed reservoir characterization of the reservoirs was conducted to include geologic and engineering data. Finally, a {open_quotes}field-specific{close_quotes} reservoir type log was chosen. A series of regional cross-sections will be presented along with the results of reservoir characterization studies conducted on reservoirs within the fields located along the cross-sections. A type log for each reservoir will also be illustrated.

Hendrickson, W.J.; Smith, P.W.; Williams, C.M. [Dwights Energydata Inc., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Plutonium Focus Area research and development plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) committed to a research and development program to support the technology needs for converting and stabilizing its nuclear materials for safe storage. The R and D Plan addresses five of the six material categories from the 94-1 Implementation Plan: plutonium (Pu) solutions, plutonium metals and oxides, plutonium residues, highly enriched uranium, and special isotopes. R and D efforts related to spent nuclear fuel (SNF) stabilization were specifically excluded from this plan. This updated plan has narrowed the focus to more effectively target specific problem areas by incorporating results form trade studies. Specifically, the trade studies involved salt; ash; sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C); combustibles; and scrub alloy. The plan anticipates possible disposition paths for nuclear materials and identifies resulting research requirements. These requirements may change as disposition paths become more certain. Thus, this plan represents a snapshot of the current progress and will continue to be updated on a regular basis. The paper discusses progress in safeguards and security, plutonium stabilization, special isotopes stabilization, highly-enriched uranium stabilization--MSRE remediation project, storage technologies, engineered systems, core technology, and proposed DOE/Russian technology exchange projects.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geotechnical studies of geothermal reservoirs Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) Abstract: It is proposed to delineate the important factors in the geothermal environment that will affect drilling. The geologic environment of the particular areas of interest are described, including rock types, geologic structure, and other important parameters that help describe the reservoir and overlying cap rock. The geologic environment and reservoir characteristics of several geothermal areas were studied, and drill bits were obtained from most of the areas. The geothermal areas studied are: (1) Geysers, California, (2) Imperial Valley, California, (3) Roosevelt Hot

144

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery From Slope Basin Clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery. The plan included developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced methods. A key goal is to transfer advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere, and throughout the US oil and gas industry.

Mark B. Murphy

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

145

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery From Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery. The plan included developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced methods. A key goal is to transfer advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere, and throughout the US oil and gas industry.

Mark B. Murphy

1997-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

146

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

Murphy, Michael B.

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

147

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to demonstrate that a development program-based on advanced reservoir management methods-can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan included developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

Murphy, Mark B.

2002-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

148

Two-dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and wells. (SINDA-3G program) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Two-dimensional simulation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir and wells. (SINDA-3G program) Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Computer models describing both the transient reservoir pressure behavior and the time dependent temperature response of the wells at the Raft River, Idaho, Geothermal Resource were developed. A horizontal, two-dimensional, finite-difference model for calculating pressure effects was constructed to simulate reservoir performance. Vertical, two-dimensional, finite-difference, axisymmetric models for each of the three existing wells at Raft River were also constructed to describe the

149

Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (5) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

150

Development of a large-area transformer coupled plasma source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A large-area transformer coupled plasma (TCP) source has been designed and constructed. In our design, a plasma generation chamber and a radio-frequency (RF) antenna chamber have been separated with a dielectric material, and differentially pumped to accommodate large-area, relatively thin dielectric windows against mechanical pressures. With a large diameter (78 cm) chamber, a low frequency (4 MHz) RF source has been chosen. By calculating the plasma impedance from TCPRP codes based on a 2D heating theory [1], the diameter of a single-turn copper coil antenna was optimized to provide high-density plasmas in the large area. Also the impedance matching circuit of this large-area TCP source has been designed from the calculated plasma impedance.

H.J Kim; K.H Han; N.S Yoon; Y.S Hwang

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

A Motorway Service Area Development Over a Former Landfill Site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A number of new service areas are currently being constructed in the United Kingdom to improve rest facilities and reduce driver fatigue on the motorways. However, there is increasing pressure on greenfield sites...

P. A. Fisher; R. J. Webley

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Analysis of Field Development Strategies of CO2 EOR/Capture Projects Using a Reservoir Simulation Economic Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

($) Drilling cost for one well ($) Facilities cost for one pattern ($) Tubing cost for one well ($) Drilling depth (feet) EIA US Energy Information Administration EOR Enhanced Oil Recovery EOS Equation of State IEA International... in the reservoir ................................................................ 20 Figure 13: Scope of this chapter: definition of the economic model ............................... 21 Figure 14: Spot price of the oil on the WTI market from 1986 to 2013 (EIA...

Saint-Felix, Martin

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

153

Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging survivability issues. Our findings indicate that packaging represents the most significant technical challenge associated with application of sensors in the downhole environment for long periods (5+ years) of time. These issues are described in detail within the report. The impact of successful reservoir monitoring programs and coincident improved reservoir management is measured by the production of additional oil and gas volumes from existing reservoirs, revitalization of nearly depleted reservoirs, possible re-establishment of already abandoned reservoirs, and improved economics for all cases. Smart Well monitoring provides the means to understand how a reservoir process is developing and to provide active reservoir management. At the same time it also provides data for developing high-fidelity simulation models. This work has been a joint effort with Sandia National Laboratories and UT-Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and the Institute of Computational and Engineering Mathematics.

Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Gilbert, Bob (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Lake, Larry W. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Thomas, Sunil G. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Klie, Hector (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Banchs, Rafael (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Nunez, Emilio J. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Jablonowski, Chris (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Wind Energy Development as an Economic Development Strategy for Rural Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Why does wind development make sense for rural areas? In many rural areas, utility scale wind energy developments can be a great way to expand and grow the economy through direct investment and job creation, in addition to significant potential spinoff development activities. Because of renewable state standards and incentives, including the Federal Production Tax Credit (PTC) and the Ohio SB 232 (which levels the playing field for wind projects by setting a property tax ceiling), more wind companies view Ohio as a new and exciting market for investment. Siting requirements for wind are also prevalent in Ohio, including good transmission lines and available land and wind resources. Ohio also has a skilled workforce that can construct and provide maintenance on wind systems as well as manufacture component parts for the industry. Utility Wind Basics Utility scale wind developments are large wind farms that generate 5 megawatts per hour or greater. They are governed by the Ohio Power Siting Board (OPSB) under provisions found in House Bill 562, 2008

Nancy Bowen-ellzey

155

MAPPING OF RESERVOIR PROPERTIES AND FACIES THROUGH INTEGRATION OF STATIC AND DYNAMIC DATA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowledge of the distribution of permeability and porosity in a reservoir is necessary for the prediction of future oil production, estimation of the location of bypassed oil, and optimization of reservoir management. But while the volume of data that can potentially provide information on reservoir architecture and fluid distributions has increased enormously in the past decade, it is not yet possible to make use of all the available data in an integrated fashion. While it is relatively easy to generate plausible reservoir models that honor static data such as core, log, and seismic data, it is far more difficult to generate plausible reservoir models that honor dynamic data such as transient pressures, saturations, and flow rates. As a result, the uncertainty in reservoir properties is higher than it could be and reservoir management can not be optimized. The goal of this project is to develop computationally efficient automatic history matching techniques for generating geologically plausible reservoir models which honor both static and dynamic data. Solution of this problem is necessary for the quantification of uncertainty in future reservoir performance predictions and for the optimization of reservoir management. Facies (defined here as regions of relatively uniform petrophysical properties) are common features of all reservoirs. Because the flow properties of the various facies can vary greatly, knowledge of the location of facies boundaries is of utmost importance for the prediction of reservoir performance and for the optimization of reservoir management. When the boundaries between facies are fairly well known, but flow properties are poorly known, the average properties for all facies can be determined using traditional techniques. Traditional history matching honors dynamic data by adjusting petrophysical properties in large areas, but in the process of adjusting the reservoir model ignores the static data and often results in implausible reservoir models. In general, boundary locations, average permeability and porosity, relative permeability curves, and local flow properties may all need to be adjusted to achieve a plausible reservoir model that honors all data. In this project, we will characterize the distribution of geologic facies as an indicator random field, making use of the tools of geostatistics as well as the tools of inverse and probability theory for data integration.

Albert C. Reynolds; Dean S. Oliver; Fengjun Zhang; Yannong Dong; Jan Arild Skjervheim; Ning Liu

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Tracer Testing At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3) 3) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Tracer Testing Activity Date 1983 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To develop chemical tracing procedures for geothermal areas. Notes Two field experiments were conducted to develop chemical tracer procedures for use with injection-backflow testing, one on the fracture-permeability Raft River reservoir and the other on the matrix-permeability East Mesa reservoir. Results from tests conducted with incremental increases in the injection volume at both East Mesa and Raft River suggests that, for both reservoirs, permeability remained uniform with increasing distance from the well bore. Increased mixing during quiescent periods, between injection and

157

Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Coso: example of a complex geothermal reservoir. Final report, 1984-1985 Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso geothermal system has been widely studied and reported by scientists through the past several years, but there is still a considerable divergence of opinion regarding the structural setting, origin, and internal structure of this energy resource. Because of accelerating exploration and development drilling that is taking place, there is a need for a reservoir model that is consistent with the limited geologic facts available regarding the area. Author(s): Austin, C.F.; Durbin, W.F.

158

Development of Autonomous Magnetometer Rotorcraft For Wide Area Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large areas across the United States and internationally are potentially contaminated with unexploded ordinance (UXO), with some ranges encompassing tens to hundreds of thousands of acres. Technologies are needed which will allow for cost effective wide area scanning with (1) near 100% coverage and (2) near 100% detection of subsurface ordnance or features indicative of subsurface ordnance. The current approach to wide area assessment is a multi-level one, in which medium - altitude fixed wing optical imaging is used for an initial site assessment. This assessment is followed with low altitude manned helicopter based magnetometry. Subsequent to this wide area assessment targeted surface investigations are performed using either towed geophysical sensor arrays or man portable sensors. In order to be an effective tool for small UXO detection, the sensing altitude for magnetic site investigations needs to be on the order of 1 to 3 meters. These altitude requirements mean that manned helicopter surveys will generally only be feasible in large, open and relatively flat terrains. While such surveys are effective in mapping large areas relatively fast there are substantial mobilization/demobilization, staffing and equipment costs associated with these surveys, resulting in costs of approximately $100-$150/acre. In addition, due to the low altitude there are substantial risks to pilots and equipment. Surface towed arrays provide highresolution maps but have other limitations, e.g. in their ability to navigate rough terrain effectively. Thus there is a need for other systems, which can be used for effective data collection. An Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) magnetometer platform is an obvious alternative. The motivation behind such a system is that it reduces risk to operators, is lower in initial and Operational and Maintenance (O&M) costs (and can thus potentially be applied to smaller sites) and has the potential of being more effective in terms of detection and possibly characterization (through the use of dynamic acquisition, i.e. survey mission in-flight reprioritization).

Mark D. McKay; Matthew O. Anderson

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Prediction of future well performance, including reservoir depletion effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past, the reservoir material balance (voidage) effects occurring between the end of the measured (known) production history and future Inflow Performance Relationship (IPR) time levels have been commonly ignored in the computation of the future IPR behavior. Neglecting the reservoir voidage that occurs during the time interval between the end of the known production history and the future IPR time levels results in erroneous estimates of the future IPR behavior. A detailed description is given of the mathematically rigorous technique that has been used in the development of a multilayer well performance simulator that properly accounts for the reservoir voidage effects. Some of the more significant results are also presented of an extensive effort to develop an accurate and computationally efficient well performance simulation model. The reservoir can be considered to be multilayered, with mixed reservoir layer completion types and outer boundary shapes, drainage areas and boundary conditions. The well performance model can be used to simulate performance in three different operating modes: (1) constant wellhead rate, (2) constant bottomhole pressure, and (3) constant wellhead pressure. The transient performance of vertical, vertically fractured and horizontal wells can be simulated with this well performance model. The well performance model uses mathematically rigorous transient solutions and not simply the approximate solutions for each of the well types, as do most of the other commercially available well performance models.

Poe, B.D. Jr.; Elbel, J.L.; Spath, J.B.; Wiggins, M.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Development Wells At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Holt...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ben Holt, Richard G. Campbell (1984) Mammoth Geothermal Project Environmental Science Associates (1987) Mammoth Pacific Geothermal Development Projects: Units II and III...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Advanced oil recovery technologies for improved recovery from slope basin clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1996 (fourth quarter)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery. The demonstration plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing the performance of the control area with an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals to attain the objective are: (1) to demonstrate that a development drilling program and pressure maintenance program, based on advanced reservoir management methods, can significantly improve oil recovery compared with existing technology applications, and (2) to transfer the advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the US oil and gas industry. Results obtained to date are summarized on the following: geology, engineering, 3-D seismic, reservoir characterization and simulation, and technology transfer.

NONE

1996-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

Reservoir simulation improves implementation of Midway Sunset steamflood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal reservoir simulation was utilized to understand, make development recommendations, and project the performance of the Monarch C steamflood in a portion of Mobil`s South Midway Sunset field. The Monarch, a thick sequence of complex turbidite deposition, is characterized by extreme geological heterogeneity (lithofacies-controlled permeability and saturation variation, and mudstone barrier layers). Steamflood performance in the Monarch is related directly to the reservoir quality, and the path of steam flow is significantly influenced by the numerous laterally extensive mudstone barriers. The fine grain clay-bearing sediments were deposited on the anticline, distal from the source, whereas the coarser grain sediments, with little clay, were deposited on the more proximal syncline and steep dip areas. Consequently, steamflood performance improves relative to the crest since reservoir quality improves (including oil saturation), clay content decreases, and structure (dip) becomes more pronounced.

Ellison, T.K.; Clayton, C.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Application of thermal depletion model to geothermal reservoirs with fracture and pore permeability Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: If reinjection and production wells intersect connected fractures, it is expected that reinjected fluid would cool the production well much sooner than would be predicted from calculations of flow in a porous medium. A method for calculating how much sooner that cooling will occur was developed. Basic assumptions of the method are presented, and possible application to the Salton Sea Geothermal Field, the Raft River System, and to reinjection of supersaturated fluids is discussed.

164

Application of reservoir models to Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a part of the Cherokee Reservoir Project hydrodynamic-temperature models and water quality models hav

Kim, B.R.; Bruggink, D.J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Factors affecting water quality in Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose was to: (1) define reservoir problems related to water quality conditions; (2) identify the probable causes of these problems; and (3) recommend procedures for achieving needed reservoir water quality improvements. This report presents the project findings to date and suggests steps for upgrading the quality of Cherokee Reservoir. Section II presents background information on the characteristics of the basin, the reservoir, and the beneficial uses of the reservoir. Section III identifies the impacts of existing reservoir water quality on uses of the reservoir for water supply, fishery resources, recreation, and waste assimilation. Section IV presents an assessment of cause-effect relationships. The factors affecting water quality addressed in Section IV are: (1) reservoir thermal stratification and hydrodynamics; (2) dissolved oxygen depletion; (3) eutrophication; (4) toxic substances; and (5) reservoir fisheries. Section V presents a preliminary evaluation of alternatives for improving the quality of Cherokee Reservoir. Section VI presents preliminary conclusions and recommendations for developing and implementing a reservoir water quality management plan. 7 references, 22 figures, 21 tables.

Iwanski, M.L.; Higgins, J.M.; Kim, B.R.; Young, R.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Development of autonomous magnetometer rotorcraft for wide area assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large areas across the United States are potentially contaminated with UXO, with some ranges encompassing tens to hundreds of thousands of acres. Technologies are needed which will allow for cost effective wide area scanning with 1) near 100 % coverage and 2) near 100 % detection of subsurface ordnance or features indicative of subsurface ordnance. The current approach to wide area assessment is a multi-level one, in which medium - altitude fixed wing optical imaging is used for an initial site assessment. This assessment is followed with low altitude manned helicopter based magnetometry. Subsequent to this wide area assessment targeted surface investigations are performed using either towed geophysical sensor arrays or man portable sensors. In order to be an effective tool for small UXO detection, the sensing altitude for magnetic site investigations needs to be on the order of 1 3 meters. These altitude requirements mean that manned helicopter surveys will generally only be feasible in large, open and relatively flat terrains. While such surveys are effective in mapping large areas relatively fast there are substantial mobilization/demobilization, staffing and equipment costs associated with these surveys (resulting in costs of approximately $100-$150/acre). In addition, due to the low altitude there are substantial risks to pilots and equipment. Surface towed arrays provide high resolution maps but have other limitations, e.g. in their ability to navigate rough terrain effectively. There is thus a need for other systems which can be used for effective data collection. An UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) magnetometer platform is an obvious alternative. The motivation behind such a system is that it reduces risk to operators, is lower in initial and Operational and Maintenance (O&M) costs (and can thus potentially be applied to smaller sites) and has the potential of being more effective in terms of detection and possibly characterization (through the use of dynamic acquisition, i.e. survey mission inflight reprioritization). We describe and report on a one year effort with as primary goal to provide a recommendation to SERDP for a path forward in the implementation of one or more autonomous unmanned magnetometer rotorcraft platforms. This recommendation (which is provided in chapter 6) is based on the following three elements a) An assessment on the applicability of autonomous rotorcraft magnetometer systems to the current DoD site inventory, and an initial assessment of which type(s) of autonomous unmanned magnetometer rotorcraft platforms (in terms of performance characteristics such as payload, altitude, obstacle avoidance, production rate and flight time) would be most relevant to this inventory (chapter 3); b) An evaluation of the feasibility of assembling such platforms from commercial components (unmanned rotorcraft, control systems and sensors both magnetometer sensors and supporting sensors). This evaluation included several highly successful field tests (chapter 4 and 5); c) A recommendation of the path forward, which includes a detailed outline of the efforts required in the design, assembly and testing of different modular platforms (chapter 6)

Roelof Versteeg; Matt Anderson; Les Beard; Eric Corban; Darryl Curley; Jeff Gamey; Ross Johnson; Dwight Junkin; Mark McKay; Jared Salzmann; Mikhail Tchernychev; Suraj Unnikrishnan; Scott Vinson

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Molokai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Molokai Geothermal Area Molokai Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Molokai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

168

Maui Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maui Geothermal Area Maui Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Maui Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

169

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (14) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Oregon Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

170

Separation Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Separation Creek Geothermal Area Separation Creek Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Separation Creek Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Oregon Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

171

Kauai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kauai Geothermal Area Kauai Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kauai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

172

Kawaihae Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kawaihae Geothermal Area Kawaihae Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kawaihae Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

173

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Montana Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

174

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (22) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Texas Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

175

Lester Meadow Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lester Meadow Geothermal Area Lester Meadow Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lester Meadow Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

176

Mt Ranier Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt Ranier Geothermal Area Mt Ranier Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt Ranier Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

177

Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska's North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Improving Geologic and Engineering Models of Midcontinent Fracture and Karst-Modified Reservoirs Using New 3-D Seismic Attributes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our project goal was to develop innovative seismic-based workflows for the incremental recovery of oil from karst-modified reservoirs within the onshore continental United States. Specific project objectives were: (1) to calibrate new multi-trace seismic attributes (volumetric curvature, in particular) for improved imaging of karst-modified reservoirs, (2) to develop attribute-based, cost-effective workflows to better characterize karst-modified carbonate reservoirs and fracture systems, and (3) to improve accuracy and predictiveness of resulting geomodels and reservoir simulations. In order to develop our workflows and validate our techniques, we conducted integrated studies of five karst-modified reservoirs in west Texas, Colorado, and Kansas. Our studies show that 3-D seismic volumetric curvature attributes have the ability to re-veal previously unknown features or provide enhanced visibility of karst and fracture features compared with other seismic analysis methods. Using these attributes, we recognize collapse features, solution-enlarged fractures, and geomorphologies that appear to be related to mature, cockpit landscapes. In four of our reservoir studies, volumetric curvature attributes appear to delineate reservoir compartment boundaries that impact production. The presence of these compartment boundaries was corroborated by reservoir simulations in two of the study areas. Based on our study results, we conclude that volumetric curvature attributes are valuable tools for mapping compartment boundaries in fracture- and karst-modified reservoirs, and we propose a best practices workflow for incorporating these attributes into reservoir characterization. When properly calibrated with geological and production data, these attributes can be used to predict the locations and sizes of undrained reservoir compartments. Technology transfer of our project work has been accomplished through presentations at professional society meetings, peer-reviewed publications, Kansas Geological Survey Open-file reports, Master's theses, and postings on the project website: http://www.kgs.ku.edu/SEISKARST.

Susan Nissen; Saibal Bhattacharya; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Marysville Mt Geothermal Area (Redirected from Marysville Mt Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Montana Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

180

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Fort Bliss Geothermal Area (Redirected from Fort Bliss Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (22) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Texas Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

New River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New River Geothermal Area New River Geothermal Area (Redirected from New River Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: New River Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

182

Kawaihae Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kawaihae Geothermal Area Kawaihae Geothermal Area (Redirected from Kawaihae Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kawaihae Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

183

Maui Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maui Geothermal Area Maui Geothermal Area (Redirected from Maui Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Maui Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

184

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Glass Buttes Geothermal Area (Redirected from Glass Buttes Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (14) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Oregon Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

185

Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area (Redirected from Obsidian Cliff Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

186

Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area (Redirected from Jemez Pueblo Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

187

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area (Redirected from Socorro Mountain Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (10) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

188

Kauai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kauai Geothermal Area Kauai Geothermal Area (Redirected from Kauai Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kauai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

189

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area (Redirected from Jemez Mountain Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

190

EM-50 Tanks Focus Area retrieval process development and enhancements. FY97 technology development summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD and E) activities are part of the US Department of Energy (DOE) EM-50 Tanks Focus Area, Retrieval and Closure program. The purpose of RPD and E is to understand retrieval processes, including emerging and existing technologies, and to gather data on these processes, so that end users have requisite technical bases to make retrieval decisions. Technologies addressed during FY97 include enhancements to sluicing, the use of pulsed air to assist mixing, mixer pumps, innovative mixing techniques, confined sluicing retrieval end effectors, borehole mining, light weight scarification, and testing of Russian-developed retrieval equipment. Furthermore, the Retrieval Analysis Tool was initiated to link retrieval processes with tank waste farms and tank geometric to assist end users by providing a consolidation of data and technical information that can be easily assessed. The main technical accomplishments are summarized under the following headings: Oak Ridge site-gunite and associated tanks treatability study; pulsed air mixing; Oak Ridge site-Old Hydrofracture Facility; hydraulic testbed relocation; cooling coil cleaning end effector; light weight scarifier; innovative tank mixing; advanced design mixer pump; enhanced sluicing; Russian retrieval equipment testing; retrieval data analysis and correlation; simulant development; and retrieval analysis tool (RAT).

Rinker, M.W.; Bamberger, J.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Alberts, D.G. [Waterjet Technology, Inc., Kent, WA (United States)] [and others

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Full Reviews: Reservoir Characterization  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below are the project presentations and respective peer reviewer comments for Reservoir Characterization.

192

Predicting production performance of CBM reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prediction of gas production from the coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs is challenging due to the complex interaction of storage and transport mechanisms. The vast majority of the gas in CBM reservoirs is stored by adsorption in the coal matrix which practically has no permeability. The flow to production wells however takes place through the cleats or the natural fracture system which store relatively small amounts of gas. These unique coal characteristics have resulted in classification of CBM as an unconventional gas resource. Gas production from CBM reservoirs is governed by gas diffusion through coal matrix followed by gas desorption into the cleat system through which the gas flows to the wellbore generally under two-phase conditions. As a result, the production profile of the CBM reservoirs greatly differs from conventional gas reservoirs. This precludes the use of common techniques such as decline curves to forecast the recovery, future revenues, and well performance. Numerical reservoir models (simulators) that incorporate the unique flow and storage characteristics of CBM reservoirs are by far the best tools for predicting the gas production from the CBM reservoirs. It is however cumbersome, time consuming, and expensive to use a complex reservoir simulator for evaluating CBM prospects when the required reservoir parameters are not available. Therefore, there is a need for a quick yet reliable tool for predicting production performance of CBM reservoirs. This paper presents a set of production type curves that can be used for predicting gas and water the production from CBM prospects. The type curves are particularly useful for parametric studies when the key characteristics are not well established. A numerical reservoir model that incorporated the unique flow and storage characteristics of CBM reservoirs was employed to develop the type curves. The impact of various reservoir parameters on the type curves was investigated to confirm the uniqueness of the type curves. The application and limitation of the type curves have been also discussed.

K. Aminian; S. Ameri

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Simulate reservoir performance Notes Computer models describing both the transient reservoir pressure behavior and the time dependent temperature response of the wells were developed. A horizontal, two-dimensional, finite-difference model for calculating pressure effects was constructed to simulate reservoir performance. Vertical, two-dimensional, finite-difference, axisymmetric models for each

194

Tanks Focus Area retrieval process development and enhancements FY96 technology development summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements (RPD&E) activities are part of the Retrieval and Closure Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) EM-50 Tanks Focus Area. The purposes of RPD&E are to understand retrieval processes, including emerging and existing technologies, and to gather data on those processes, so that end users have the requisite technical basis to make retrieval decisions. Work has been initiated to support the need for multiple retrieval technologies across the DOE complex. Technologies addressed during FY96 focused on enhancements to sluicing, borehole mining, confined sluicing retrieval end effectors, the lightweight scarifier, and pulsed air mixing. Furthermore, a decision tool and database have been initiated to link retrieval processes with tank closure to assist end users in making retrieval decisions.

Rinker, M.W.; Bamberger, J.A.; Hatchell, B.K. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Advanced oil recovery technologies for improved recovery from slope basin clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM. Quarterly technical progress report (seventh quarter), April 1--June 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program -- based on advanced reservoir management methods -- can significantly improve oil recovery. The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the US oil and gas industry. Results obtained to date are summarized.

NONE

1997-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

196

Development of a dual-porosity model for vapor-dominated fractured geothermal reservoirs using a semi-analytical fracture/matrix interaction term  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new type of dual-porosity model is being developed to simulate two-phase flow processes in fractured geothermal reservoirs. At this time it is assumed that the liquid phase in the matrix blocks remains immobile. By utilizing the effective compressibility of a two-phase water/steam mixture in a porous rock, flow within the matrix blocks can be modeled by a single diffusion equation. This equation in turn is replaced by a non-linear ordinary differential equation that utilizes the mean pressure and mean saturation in the matrix blocks to calculate the rate of fluid flow between the matrix blocks and fractures. This equation has been incorporated into the numerical simulator TOUGH to serve as a source/sink term for computational gridblocks that represent the fracture system. The new method has been compared with solutions obtained using fully-discretized matrix blocks, on a problem involving a three-dimensional vapor-dominated reservoir containing an injection and a production well, and has been found to be quite accurate.

Zimmerman, R.W.; Hadgu, T.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

AREA  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AREA AREA FAQ # Question Response 316 vs DCAA FAQ 1 An inquiry from CH about an SBIR recipient asking if a DCAA audit is sufficient to comply with the regulation or if they need to add this to their audit they have performed yearly by a public accounting firm. 316 audits are essentially A-133 audits for for-profit entities. They DO NOT replace DCAA or other audits requested by DOE to look at indirect rates or incurred costs or closeouts. DCAA would never agree to perform A-133 or our 316 audits. They don't do A-133 audits for DOD awardees. The purpose of the audits are different, look at different things and in the few instances of overlap, from different perspectives. 316

198

Thermo-Poroelastic Modeling of Reservoir Stimulation and Microseismicity Using Finite Element Method with Damage Mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stress and permeability variations around a wellbore and in the reservoir are of much interest in petroleum and geothermal reservoir development. Water injection causes significant changes in pore pressure, temperature, and stress in hot reservoirs...

Lee, Sang Hoon

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

199

Development of A Bayesian Geostatistical Data Assimilation Method and Application to the Hanford 300 Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Development of A Bayesian Geostatistical Data Assimilation Method and Application to the Hanford to the Hanford 300 Area Copyright Fall 2010 by Haruko Murakami #12;1 Abstract Development of A Bayesian Geostatistical Data Assimilation Method and Application to the Hanford 300 Area by Haruko Murakami Doctor

Rubin, Yoram

200

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (12) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Florida Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Mountains Geothermal Area Florida Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Florida Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

202

Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

203

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

204

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (10) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

205

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

206

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

207

Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

208

New River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New River Geothermal Area New River Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: New River Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

209

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

210

Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

211

Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

212

Desert Queen Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Queen Geothermal Area Desert Queen Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Desert Queen Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

213

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. Summary of Technical Progress

Scott Hara

1997-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

214

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

1998-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

215

Increasing Heavy Oil Reservers in the Wilmington Oil field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) 11-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, Scott [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)

1997-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

216

Reducing temperature uncertainties by stochastic geothermal reservoir modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......economically successful geothermal reservoirs. To this...An increased use of geothermal energy requires reliable estimates...exploration and development of geothermal reservoirs. Suitable...risk of failure and cost may be reduced and estimated......

C. Vogt; D. Mottaghy; A. Wolf; V. Rath; R. Pechnig; C. Clauser

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Techniques of High Performance Reservoir Simulation for Unconventional Challenges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

48 offshore Alaska 2010 5 high performance computing, execution of compositional simulation in parallel seems to be the apparently feasible way to tackle its computational demand. Although running reservoir simulation in parallel sounds extremely... attractive, developing an efficient parallel reservoir simulator is far more challenging than developing the underlying serial reservoir simulator. For decades there have remained many open problems associated with high performance computing and reservoir...

Wang, Yuhe

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

218

Natural resources development in Mexico: biological diversity conservation and protected areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT IN MEXICO' BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY CONSERVATION AND PROTECTED AREAS A PROFESSIONAL PAPER by JOHN MARTIN GOEBEL Submitted to the College of Agriculture of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the Degree of MASTER OF AGRICULTURE August, 1989 Major Subject: Natural Resources Development Recreation and Parks NATURAL RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT IN MEXICO: BIOLOGICAL DIVERSITY CONSERVATION AND PROTECTED AREAS A PROFESSIONAL PAPER...

Goebel, John Martin

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

219

Using Thermally-Degrading, Partitioning, and Nonreactive Tracers to Determine Temperature Distribution and Fracture/Heat Transfer Surface Area in Geothermal Reservoirs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Project Summary. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and surface area available for heat transfer in EGS.

220

Water quality management plan for Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The management plan provides an assessment of Cherokee Reservoir's current water quality, identifies those factors which affect reservoir water quality, and develops recommendations aimed at restoring or maintaining water quality at levels sufficient to support diverse beneficial uses. 20 references, 8 figures, 15 tables. (ACR)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Geothermometry At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Akutan Fumaroles Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The chemistry of the hot springs strongly suggests the existence of a neutral chloride reservoir with economically developable temperature. The fluid geothermometry tells a consistent story, with cation geothermometry detecting a >210degrees C reservoir temperature, probably near the fumarole, and silica geothermometry and presence of sinter suggesting that 160 to 180degrees C exists close to hot spring B. References

222

Extracting maximum petrophysical and geological information from a limited reservoir database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The characterization of old fields lacking sufficient core and log data is a challenging task. This paper describes a methodology that uses new and conventional tools to build a reliable reservoir model for the Sulimar Queen field. At the fine scale, permeability measured on a fine grid with a minipermeameter was used in conjunction with the petrographic data collected on multiple thin sections. The use of regression analysis and a newly developed fuzzy logic algorithm led to the identification of key petrographic elements which control permeability. At the log scale, old gamma ray logs were first rescaled/calibrated throughout the entire field for consistency and reliability using only four modem logs. Using data from one cored well and the rescaled gamma ray logs, correlations between core porosity, permeability, total water content and gamma ray were developed to complete the small scale characterization. At the reservoir scale, outcrop data and the rescaled gamma logs were used to define the reservoir structure over an area of ten square miles where only 36 wells were available. Given the structure, the rescaled gamma ray logs were used to build the reservoir volume by identifying the flow units and their continuity. Finally, history-matching results constrained to the primary production were used to estimate the dynamic reservoir properties such as relative permeabilities to complete the characterization. The obtained reservoir model was tested by forecasting the waterflood performance and which was in good agreement with the actual performance.

Ali, M.; Chawathe, A.; Ouenes, A. [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Application of advanced reservoir characterization, simulation, and production optimization strategies to maximize recovery in slope and basin clastic reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin). Quarterly report, July 1 - September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to demonstrate that detailed reservoir characterization of slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico is a cost effective way to recover a higher percentage of the original oil in place through strategic placement of infill wells and geologically based field development. Project objectives are divided into two major phases. The objectives of the reservoir characterization phase of the project are to provide a detailed understanding of the architecture and heterogeneity of two fields, the Ford Geraldine unit and Ford West field, which produce from the Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon Formations, respectively, of the Delaware Mountain Group and to compare Bell Canyon and Cherry Canyon reservoirs. Reservoir characterization will utilize 3-D seismic data, high-resolution sequence stratigraphy, subsurface field studies, outcrop characterization, and other techniques. Once the reservoir- characterization study of both fields is completed, a pilot area of approximately 1 mi{sup 2} in one of the fields will be chosen for reservoir simulation. The objectives of the implementation phase of the project are to (1) apply the knowledge gained from reservoir characterization and simulation studies to increase recovery from the pilot area, (2) demonstrate that economically significant unrecovered oil remains in geologically resolvable untapped compartments, and (3) test the accuracy of reservoir characterization and flow simulation as predictive tools in resource preservation of mature fields. A geologically designed, enhanced-recovery program (CO{sup 2} flood, waterflood, or polymer flood) and well-completion program will be developed, and one to three infill wells will be drilled and cored. Accomplishments for this past quarter are discussed.

Dutton, S.P.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

BERNAL et al Local development in peri-urban and rural areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BERNAL et al Local development in peri-urban and rural areas based on co-management for small water, and propose predefined variables to analyze some Colombian small communities located in rural areas in order management; Colombia INTRODUCTION The sector of water and sewage services in Colombia have experimented

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

225

Assessment of Rooftop Area in Austin Energy's Service Territory Suitable for PV Development  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

As part of the Solar America Cities program, Austin Energy proposed to perform an assessment of the rooftop area available for PV development within its service area. Austin Energy contracted with Clean Energy Associates (CEA) to perform the analysis. This report summarizes the project objectives, data sources and methodological approach employed, and results.

226

Developing and Evaluating Routing Protocols for Rural Areas That Communicates Via Data Mules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Developing and Evaluating Routing Protocols for Rural Areas That Communicates Via Data Mules connectivity to isolated village networks via multiple data mules. These multiple mules communicate in order traces for multiple data mules for rural-like areas the existing protocols ad hoc on-demand distance

Blake, Edwin

227

Reservoir characterization of the Mississippian Ratcliffe, Richland County, Montana, Williston Basin. Topical report, September 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This topical report is a compilation of characterizations by different disciplines of the Mississippian Ratcliffe in portions of Richland County, MT. Goals of the report are to increase understanding of the reservoir rocks, oil-in-place, heterogeneity and methods for improved recovery. The report covers investigations of geology, petrography, reservoir engineering and seismic. The Ratcliffe is a low permeability oil reservoir which appears to be developed across much of the study area and occurs across much of the Williston Basin. The reservoir has not been a primary drilling target in the study area because average reserves have been insufficient to payout the cost of drilling and completion despite the application of hydraulic fracture stimulation. Oil trapping does not appear to be structurally controlled. For the Ratcliffe to be a viable drilling objective, methods need to be developed for (1) targeting better reservoir development and (2) better completions. A geological model is presented for targeting areas with greater potential for commercial reserves in the Ratcliffe. This model can be best utilized with the aid of 3D seismic. A 3D seismic survey was acquired and is used to demonstrate a methodology for targeting the Ratcliffe. Other data obtained during the project include oriented core, special formation-imaging log, pressure transient measurements and oil PVT. Although re-entry horizontal drilling was unsuccessfully tested, this completion technology should improve the economic viability of the Ratcliffe. Reservoir simulation of horizontal completions with productivity of three times that of a vertical well suggested two or three horizontal wells in a 258-ha (640-acre) area could recover sufficient reserves for profitable drilling.

Sippel, M.; Luff, K.D.; Hendricks, M.L.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program-based on advanced reservoir management methods-can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry. This is the twenty-eighth quarterly progress report on the project. Results obtained to date are summarized.

Mark B. Murphy

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

229

Advanced oil recovery technologies for improved recovery from slope basin clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery. The demonstration plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing the performance of the control area with an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals to attain the objective are: (1) to demonstrate that a development drilling program and pressure maintenance program, based on advanced reservoir management methods, can significantly improve oil recovery compared with existing technology applications, and (2) to transfer the advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere in the U.S. oil and gas industry.

Murphy, M.B.

1996-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

230

Status of Cherokee Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the first in a series of reports prepared by Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) for those interested in the conditions of TVA reservoirs. This overviews of Cherokee Reservoir summarizes reservoir and watershed characteristics, reservoir uses and use impairments, water quality and aquatic biological conditions, and activities of reservoir management agencies. This information was extracted from the most current reports, publications, and data available, and interviews with water resource professionals in various Federal, state, and local agencies and in public and private water supply and wastewater treatment facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Not Available

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re- injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the fourth quarter of Budget Period II.

Steve Horner

2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

232

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the eleventh quarter of Budget Period I.

Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

2003-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the tenth quarter of Budget Period I.

Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the twelfth quarter of Budget Period I.

Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the fifth quarter of Budget Period II.

Steve Horner

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

An Advanced Fracture Characterization and Well Path Navigation System for Effective Re-Development and Enhancement of Ultimate Recovery from the Complex Monterey Reservoir of South Ellwood Field, Offshore California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the ninth quarter of Budget Period II.

Steve Horner

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

237

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the seventh quarter of Budget Period II.

Steve Horner

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the final quarter of Budget Period I.

Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the third quarter of Budget Period II.

Steve Horner

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

240

AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during the second quarter of Budget Period II.

Steve Horner

2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Development Drilling Activity Date 2005 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis AMP Resources, LLC drilled one of the first operating wells, Industrial Production Well PW-2, in the spring of 2005 under geothermal project area permit #568. Notes The well was completed to a depth of 143.6 m and a peak temperature of 145°C, as indicated by static temperature surveys. Wellhead temperatures at PW-2 were 140°C at a flow rate of 157.7 liters per minute, and no

242

Integrated, multidisciplinary reservoir characterization, modeling and engineering leading to enhanced oil recovery from the Midway-Sunset field, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pru Fee property is developed in a heavy oil, Class III (slope and basin clastic sand), reservoir of the Midway-Sunset field, San Joaquin Basin, California. Wells on the property were shut-in with an estimated 85% of the original oil remaining in place because the reservoir failed to respond to conventional cyclic steaming. Producibility problems are attributed to the close proximity of the property to the margin of the field. Specific problems include complex reservoir geometry, thinning pay, bottom water, and dipping beds. These problems are likely common at the margins of the Midway-Sunset and other Class III reservoirs. This project forms the first step in returning the property to production and explores strategies that might be applied elsewhere. Reservoir characterization, modeling, and engineering methods are integrated to design, simulate, and implement a pilot steam flood. A new drillhole provides good quality, core through the pay zone and a full suite of geophysical logs. Correlations between geological and petrophysical data are used to extrapolate reservoir conditions from older logs and yield a 3-dimensional petrophysical model. Numerical results illustrate how each producibility problem might influence production and provide a framework for designing the pilot steam flood. This first phase illustrates how a multidisciplinary team can use established technologies in developing the detailed petrophysical, geological, and numerical models needed to enhance oil recovery from marginal areas of Class III reservoirs.

Schamel, S.; Forster, C.; Deo, M. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)) (and others)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Integrated, multidisciplinary reservoir characterization, modeling and engineering leading to enhanced oil recovery from the Midway-Sunset field, California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pru Fee property is developed in a heavy oil, Class III (slope and basin clastic sand), reservoir of the Midway-Sunset field, San Joaquin Basin, California. Wells on the property were shut-in with an estimated 85% of the original oil remaining in place because the reservoir failed to respond to conventional cyclic steaming. Producibility problems are attributed to the close proximity of the property to the margin of the field. Specific problems include complex reservoir geometry, thinning pay, bottom water, and dipping beds. These problems are likely common at the margins of the Midway-Sunset and other Class III reservoirs. This project forms the first step in returning the property to production and explores strategies that might be applied elsewhere. Reservoir characterization, modeling, and engineering methods are integrated to design, simulate, and implement a pilot steam flood. A new drillhole provides good quality, core through the pay zone and a full suite of geophysical logs. Correlations between geological and petrophysical data are used to extrapolate reservoir conditions from older logs and yield a 3-dimensional petrophysical model. Numerical results illustrate how each producibility problem might influence production and provide a framework for designing the pilot steam flood. This first phase illustrates how a multidisciplinary team can use established technologies in developing the detailed petrophysical, geological, and numerical models needed to enhance oil recovery from marginal areas of Class III reservoirs.

Schamel, S.; Forster, C.; Deo, M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

244

Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska`s North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During this quarter, work began on the regional structural and geologic analysis of the greater Green River basin (GGRB) in southwestern Wyoming, northwestern Colorado and northeastern Utah. The ultimate objective of the regional analysis is to apply the techniques developed and demonstrated during earlier phases of the project to sweet-spot delineation in a relatively new and underexplored play: tight gas from continuous-type Upper Cretaceous reservoirs of the GGRB. The primary goal of this work is to partition and high-grade the greater Green River basin for exploration efforts in the Cretaceous tight gas play. The work plan for the quarter of January 1, 1998--March 31, 1998 consisted of three tasks: (1) Acquire necessary data and develop base map of study area; (2) Process data for analysis; and (3) Initiate structural study. The first task and second tasks were completed during this reporting period. The third task was initiated and work continues.

NONE

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

246

Hydrothermal Reservoirs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrothermal Reservoirs Hydrothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Hydrothermal Reservoirs Dictionary.png Hydrothermal Reservoir: Hydrothermal Reservoirs are underground zones of porous rock containing hot water and steam, and can be naturally occurring or human-made. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Natural, shallow hydrothermal reservoirs naturally occurring hot water reservoirs, typically found at depths of less than 5 km below the Earth's surface where there is heat, water and a permeable material (permeability in rock formations results from fractures, joints, pores, etc.). Often, hydrothermal reservoirs have an overlying layer that bounds the reservoir and also serves as a thermal insulator, allowing greater heat retention. If hydrothermal reservoirs

247

Development Wells At Fallon Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Fallon Naval Air Station Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Fallon Naval Air Station Area Exploration Technique Development Wells Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes As was mentioned previously, the Navy signed a development contract with Ormat in 2005 to produce power from a potential resource on the SE corner of the main side portion of NAS Fallon. Additionally the GPO began additional exploration activities on the Bombing Range 16 in collaboration with the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy. The introduction of $9.1M of Recovery Act funds in early 2009 led to a broadening as well as an

248

Understanding the reservoir important to successful stimulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In anisotropic Bakken shale reservoirs, fracture treatments serve to extend the well bore radius past a disturbed zone and vertically connect discrete intervals. Natural fractures in the near-well bore area strongly control the well deliverability rate. The Bakken is one of the few shale formations in the world with commercial oil production. This article covers the Bakken reservoir properties that influence production and stimulation treatments. The concluding part will discuss the design and effectiveness of the treatments.

Cramer, D.D. (BJ Services Co., Denver, CO (US))

1991-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

249

Sizing of a hot dry rock reservoir from a hydraulic fracturing experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hot dry rock (HDR) reservoirs do not lend themselves to the standard methods of reservoir sizing developed in the petroleum industry such as the buildup/drawdown test. In a HDR reservoir the reservoir is created by the injection of fluid. This process of hydraulic fracturing of the reservoir rock usually involves injection of a large volume (5 million gallons) at high rates (40BPM). A methodology is presented for sizing the HDR reservoir created during the hydraulic fracturing process. The reservoir created during a recent fracturing experiment is sized using the techniques presented. This reservoir is then investigated for commercial potential by simulation of long term power production. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Zyvoloski, G.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Mt St Helens Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

251

Fifteenth workshop on geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fifteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 23--25, 1990. Major topics included: DOE's geothermal research and development program, well testing, field studies, geosciences, geysers, reinjection, tracers, geochemistry, and modeling.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Study of induced seismicity for reservoir characterization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main goal of the thesis is to characterize the attributes of conventional and unconventional reservoirs through passive seismicity. The dissertation is comprised of the development and applications of three new methods, ...

Li, Junlun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Reservoir fracture characterizations from seismic scattered waves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The measurements of fracture parameters, such as fracture orientation, fracture density and fracture compliance, in a reservoir is very important for field development and exploration. Traditional seismic methods for ...

Fang, Xinding

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Study on fine geological modelling of the fluvial sandstone reservoir in Daqing oilfield  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These paper aims at developing a method for fine reservoir description in maturing oilfields by using close spaced well logging data. The main productive reservoirs in Daqing oilfield is a set of large fluvial-deltaic deposits in the Songliao Lake Basin, characterized by multi-layers and serious heterogeneities. Various fluvial channel sandstone reservoirs cover a fairly important proportion of reserves. After a long period of water flooding, most of them have turned into high water cut layers, but there are considerable residual reserves within them, which are difficult to find and tap. Making fine reservoir description and developing sound a geological model is essential for tapping residual oil and enhancing oil recovery. The principal reason for relative lower precision of predicting model developed by using geostatistics is incomplete recognition of complex distribution of fluvial reservoirs and their internal architecture`s. Tasking advantage of limited outcrop data from other regions (suppose no outcrop data available in oilfield) can only provide the knowledge of subtle changing of reservoir parameters and internal architecture. For the specific geometry distribution and internal architecture of subsurface reservoirs (such as in produced regions) can be gained only from continuous infilling logging well data available from studied areas. For developing a geological model, we think the first important thing is to characterize sandbodies geometries and their general architecture`s, which are the framework of models, and then the slight changing of interwell parameters and internal architecture`s, which are the contents and cells of the model. An excellent model should possess both of them, but the geometry is the key to model, because it controls the contents and cells distribution within a model.

Zhoa Han-Qing [Daqing Research Institute, Helongjiang (China)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Numerical Investigation of Fractured Reservoir Response to Injection/Extraction Using a Fully Coupled Displacement Discontinuity Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In geothermal reservoirs and unconventional gas reservoirs with very low matrix permeability, fractures are the main routes of fluid flow and heat transport, so the fracture permeability change is important. In fact, reservoir development under...

Lee, Byungtark

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

256

Mt St Helens Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Mt St Helens Geothermal Area (Redirected from Mt St Helens Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt St Helens Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

257

Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area (Redirected from Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

258

Lahaina-Kaanapali Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lahaina-Kaanapali Geothermal Area Lahaina-Kaanapali Geothermal Area (Redirected from Lahaina-Kaanapali Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lahaina-Kaanapali Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (5) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

259

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area (Redirected from Lassen Volcanic National Park Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (11) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

260

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area (Redirected from Upper Hot Creek Ranch Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area (Redirected from Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

262

Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area (Redirected from Gabbs Alkali Flat Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

263

Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area (Redirected from Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Alaska Exploration Region: Alaska Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

264

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area (Redirected from San Juan Volcanic Field Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

265

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area (Redirected from Winnemucca Dry Lake Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

266

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area (Redirected from Walker Lake Valley Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

267

Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area (Redirected from Nevada Test And Training Range Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (5) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

268

Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Redirected from Fenton Hill Hdr Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (26) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

269

Engineering Research and Development and Technology thrust area report FY92  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is to develop the technical staff and the technology needed to support current and future LLNL programs. To accomplish this mission, the Engineering Research, Development, and Technology Program has two important goals: (1) to identify key technologies and (2) to conduct high-quality work to enhance our capabilities in these key technologies. To help focus our efforts, we identify technology thrust areas and select technical leaders for each area. The thrust areas are integrated engineering activities and, rather than being based on individual disciplines, they are staffed by personnel from Electronics Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and other LLNL organizations, as appropriate. The thrust area leaders are expected to establish strong links to LLNL program leaders and to industry; to use outside and inside experts to review the quality and direction of the work; to use university contacts to supplement and complement their efforts; and to be certain that we are not duplicating the work of others. This annual report, organized by thrust area, describes activities conducted within the Program for the fiscal year 1992. Its intent is to provide timely summaries of objectives, theories, methods, and results. The nine thrust areas for this fiscal year are: Computational Electronics and Electromagnetics; Computational Mechanics; Diagnostics and Microelectronics; Emerging Technologies; Fabrication Technology; Materials Science and Engineering; Microwave and Pulsed Power; Nondestructive Evaluation; and Remote Sensing and Imaging, and Signal Engineering.

Langland, R.T.; Minichino, C. [eds.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Conceptual Model At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conceptual Model At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Conceptual Model At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Conceptual Model Activity Date 1990 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To develop an understanding of the fracture hydrology of the Coso Mountains crystalline terrain and its hydrologic connection to regional groundwater and thermal source Notes An interpreted, conceptually balanced regional cross section that extends from the Sierra Nevada through the geothermal reservoir to the Panamint Mountains is presented. The cross section is constrained by new reflection and refraction seismic data, gravity and magnetic modeling, drilling data from the geothermal reservoir, and published regional geologic mapping. The

271

Increasing heavy oil reservers in the Wilmington oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies, technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) 11-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, S. [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)], Casteel, J. [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States)

1997-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

272

Characterization of facies and permeability patterns in carbonate reservoirs based on outcrop analogs. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of this research is to develop methods for better describing the three-dimensional geometry of carbonate reservoir flow units as related to conventional or enhanced recovery of oil. San Andres and Grayburg reservoirs were selected for study because of the 13 Bbbl of remaining mobile oil and 17 Bbbl of residual oil in these reservoirs. The key data base is provided by detailed characterization of geologic facies and rock permeability in reservior-scale outcrops of the Permian San Andres Formation in the Guadalupe Mountains of New Mexico. Emphasis is placed on developing an outcrop analog for San Andres strata that can be used as (1) a guide to interpreting the regional and local geologic framework of the subsurface reservoirs (2) a data source illustrating the scales and patterns of variability of rock-fabric facies and petrophysical properties, particularly in lateral dimension, and on scales that cannot be studied during subsurface reservoir characterization. The research approach taken to achieve these objectives utilizes the integration of geologic description, geostatistical techniques, and reservoir flow simulation experiments. Results from this research show that the spatial distribution of facies relative to the waterflood direction can significantly affect how the reservoir produces. Bypassing of unswept oil occurs due to cross flow of injected water from high permeability zones into lower permeability zones were high permeability zones terminate. An area of unswept oil develops because of the slower advance of the water-injection front in the lower permeability zones. When the injection pattern is reversed, the cross-flow effect changes due to the different arrangements of rock-fabric flow units relative to the flow of injected water, and the sweep efficiency is significantly different. Flow across low-permeability mudstones occurs showing that these layers do not necessarily represent flow barriers.

Kerans, C.; Lucia, F.J.; Senger, R.K.; Fogg, G.E.; Nance, H.S.; Hovorka, S.D.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Summary of Hot-Dry-Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing 1978-1980...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

fracturing, but also by heat extraction and thermal contraction effects. Reservoir heat- transfer area grew from 8000 to 50 000 m2 and reservoir fracture volume grew from 11...

274

Property:SanyalTempReservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SanyalTempReservoir SanyalTempReservoir Jump to: navigation, search Property Name SanyalTempReservoir Property Type Page Description see Sanyal_Temperature_Classification Allows Values Extremely Low Temperature;Very Low Temperature;Low Temperature;Moderate Temperature;High Temperature;Ultra High Temperature;Steam Field Pages using the property "SanyalTempReservoir" Showing 16 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + Very Low Temperature + B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area + Moderate Temperature + Blue Mountain Geothermal Area + High Temperature + C Chena Geothermal Area + Very Low Temperature + D Desert Peak Geothermal Area + Moderate Temperature + K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area + High Temperature + L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area + High Temperature +

275

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through March 1999, project work has been completed related to data preparation, basic reservoir engineering, developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model, and a rock-log model, well drilling and completions, and surface facilities. Work is continuing on the stochastic geologic model, developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Fault Block IIA Tar (Tar II-A) Zone, and operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction. Thermal-related formation compaction is a concern of the project team due to observed surface subsidence in the local area above the steamflood project. Last quarter on January 12, the steamflood project lost its inexpensive steam source from the Harbor Cogeneration Plant as a result of the recent deregulation of electrical power rates in California. An operational plan was developed and implemented to mitigate the effects of the two situations. Seven water injection wells were placed in service in November and December 1998 on the flanks of the Phase 1 steamflood area to pressure up the reservoir to fill up the existing steam chest. Intensive reservoir engineering and geomechanics studies are continuing to determine the best ways to shut down the steamflood operations in Fault Block II while minimizing any future surface subsidence. The new 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulator model is being used to provide sensitivity cases to optimize production, steam injection, future flank cold water injection and reservoir temperature and pressure. According to the model, reservoir fill up of the steam chest at the current injection rate of 28,000 BPD and gross and net oil production rates of 7,700 BPD and 750 BOPD (injection to production ratio of 4) will occur in October 1999. At that time, the reservoir should act more like a waterflood and production and cold water injection can be operated at lower net injection rates to be determined. Modeling runs developed this quarter found that varying individual well injection rates to meet added production and local pressure problems by sub-zone could reduce steam chest fill-up by up to one month.

Scott Hara

2000-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

276

Geological and petrophysical characterization of the ferron sandstone for 3-D simulation of a fluvial-deltaic reservoir. Quarterly report, January 1 - March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop a comprehensive, interdisciplinary, and quantitative characterization of a fluvial- deltaic reservoir which will allow realistic inter-well and reservoir-scale modeling to be constructed for improved oil-field development in similar reservoirs world-wide. The geological and petrophysical properties of the Cretaceous Ferron Sandstone in east-central Utah will be quantitatively determined. Both new and existing data will be integrated into a three-dimensional representation of spatial variations in porosity, storativity, and tensorial rock permeability at a scale appropriate for inter-well to regional-scale reservoir simulation. Results could improve reservoir management through proper infill and extension drilling strategies, reduction of economic risks, increased recovery from existing oil fields, and more reliable reserve calculations. Technical progress this quarter is divided into case-study evaluation, geostatistics, and technology transfer activities. The work focused on one parasequence set, referred to as the Kf-1, in the Willow Springs Wash and Ivie Creek case-study areas. In the Ivie Creek case-study area the Kf-1 represents a river-dominated delta deposit which changes from proximal to distal from east to west. In the Willow Springs Wash case-study area the Kf-1 contains parasequences which represent river-dominated and wave-modified environments of deposition. Interpretations of lithofacies, bounding surfaces, and other geologic information are being used to determine reservoir architecture. Graphical interpretations of important flow boundaries in the case-study areas, identified on photomosaics, are being used to construct cross sections, paleogeographic, maps, and reservoir models. Geostatistical analyses are being incorporated with the geological characterization to develop a three-dimensional model of the reservoirs for fluid-flow simulation.

Allison, M.L.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Core Analysis For The Development And Constraint Of Physical Models Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

For The Development And Constraint Of Physical Models Of For The Development And Constraint Of Physical Models Of Geothermal Reservoirs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Core Analysis For The Development And Constraint Of Physical Models Of Geothermal Reservoirs Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Effective reservoir exploration, characterization, and engineering require a fundamental understanding of the geophysical properties of reservoir rocks and fracture systems. Even in the best of circumstances, spatial variability in porosity, fracture density, salinity, saturation, tectonic stress, fluid pressures, and lithology can all potentially produce and/or contribute to geophysical anomalies. As a result, serious uniqueness problems frequently occur when interpreting

278

Advanced oil recovery technologies for improved recovery from slope basin clastic reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1996 (fifth quarter)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program--based on advanced reservoir management methods--can significantly improve oil recovery. The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques while comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program, can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the US oil and gas industry. Results so far are described on geology, engineering, 3-D seismic, reservoir characterization and simulation, and technology transfer.

NONE

1997-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1983) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1983) Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1983) Exploration Activity Details Location East Mesa Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Tracer Testing Activity Date 1983 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Two field experiments were conducted to develop chemical tracer procedures for use with injection-backflow testing, one on the fracture-permeability Raft River reservoir and the other on the matrix-permeability East Mesa reservoir. Results from tests conducted with incremental increases in the injection volume at both East Mesa and Raft River suggests that, for both reservoirs, permeability remained uniform with increasing distance from the

280

Geothermal Reservoir Technology Research Program: Abstracts of selected research projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research projects are described in the following areas: geothermal exploration, mapping reservoir properties and reservoir monitoring, and well testing, simulation, and predicting reservoir performance. The objectives, technical approach, and project status of each project are presented. The background, research results, and future plans for each project are discussed. The names, addresses, and telephone and telefax numbers are given for the DOE program manager and the principal investigators. (MHR)

Reed, M.J. (ed.)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Simulation of Radon Transport in Geothermal Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulation of radon transport is a useful adjunct in the study of radon as an in situ tracer of hydrodynamic and thermodynamic numerical model has been developed to assist in the interpretation of field experiments. The model simulates transient response of radon concentration in wellhead geofluid as a function of prevailing reservoir conditions. The radon simulation model has been used to simulate radon concentration response during production drawdown and two flowrate transient tests in vapor-dominated systems. Comparison of model simulation with experimental data from field tests provides insight in the analysis of reservoir phenomena such as propagation of boiling fronts, and estimates of reservoir properties of porosity and permeability thickness.

Semprini, Lewis; Kruger, Paul

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Planning and neo-endogenous model for sustainable development in Spanish rural areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Changes in rural areas in recent decades have resulted in a new approach to local rural development called 'neo-endogenous'. This paper describes the main characteristics of this new development model, which is based on three pillars, harnessing endogenous potential, developing social capital (endogenous units, local/global actors and neo-endogenous units) and promoting local participative democracy. Then the balance of top??down bottom??up approaches and their relationship to improve strategic planning for rural areas are analysed. Finally, co-construction of a local sustainable development plan by means of a knowledge-model based on the experience of the University of Almeria Rural Engineering Research Group is proposed.

Alfredo Tolon-Becerra; Xavier Lastra-Bravo; Emilio Galdeano-Gomez

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

INCREASING WATERFLOOD RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH IMPROVED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project increased recoverable waterflood reserves in slope and basin reservoirs through improved reservoir characterization and reservoir management. The particular application of this project is in portions of Fault Blocks IV and V of the Wilmington Oil Field, in Long Beach, California, but the approach is widely applicable in slope and basin reservoirs. Transferring technology so that it can be applied in other sections of the Wilmington Field and by operators in other slope and basin reservoirs is a primary component of the project. This project used advanced reservoir characterization tools, including the pulsed acoustic cased-hole logging tool, geologic three-dimensional (3-D) modeling software, and commercially available reservoir management software to identify sands with remaining high oil saturation following waterflood. Production from the identified high oil saturated sands was stimulated by recompleting existing production and injection wells in these sands using conventional means as well as a short radius redrill candidate. Although these reservoirs have been waterflooded over 40 years, researchers have found areas of remaining oil saturation. Areas such as the top sand in the Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the western fault slivers of Upper Terminal Zone Fault Block V, the bottom sands of the Tar Zone Fault Block V, and the eastern edge of Fault Block IV in both the Upper Terminal and Lower Terminal Zones all show significant remaining oil saturation. Each area of interest was uncovered emphasizing a different type of reservoir characterization technique or practice. This was not the original strategy but was necessitated by the different levels of progress in each of the project activities.

Scott Walker; Chris Phillips; Roy Koerner; Don Clarke; Dan Moos; Kwasi Tagbor

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

284

FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY: NEW METHOD FOR GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIR...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RESERVOIR ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS Abstract Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a new technique developed for the oil industry in order to map borehole fluids....

285

ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow in the wellbore); and (3) accurate approaches to account for the effects of reservoir heterogeneity and for the optimization of nonconventional well deployment. An overview of our progress in each of these main areas is as follows. A general purpose object-oriented research simulator (GPRS) was developed under this project. The GPRS code is managed using modern software management techniques and has been deployed to many companies and research institutions. The simulator includes general black-oil and compositional modeling modules. The formulation is general in that it allows for the selection of a wide variety of primary and secondary variables and accommodates varying degrees of solution implicitness. Specifically, we developed and implemented an IMPSAT procedure (implicit in pressure and saturation, explicit in all other variables) for compositional modeling as well as an adaptive implicit procedure. Both of these capabilities allow for efficiency gains through selective implicitness. The code treats cell connections through a general connection list, which allows it to accommodate both structured and unstructured grids. The GPRS code was written to be easily extendable so new modeling techniques can be readily incorporated. Along these lines, we developed a new dual porosity module compatible with the GPRS framework, as well as a new discrete fracture model applicable for fractured or faulted reservoirs. Both of these methods display substantial advantages over previous implementations. Further, we assessed the performance of different preconditioners in an attempt to improve the efficiency of the linear solver. As a result of this investigation, substantial improvements in solver performance were achieved.

Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

2004-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

286

Business Continuity Project Project Summary: Develop Business Continuity Plans for all critical functional areas of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Business Continuity Project Project Summary: Develop Business Continuity Plans for all critical functional areas of the corporation. Project Requirements: Individual and Corporate plans that allow organization- · Integrate stand-by generator into plans- · Improve evacuation procedures- · Integrate other

287

Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Zim's Hot Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Idaho Batholith GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

288

Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Geothermal Area | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Geothermal Area Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

289

Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (26) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

290

Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

291

Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Alaska Exploration Region: Alaska Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

292

Zuni Mountains Nm Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zuni Mountains Nm Geothermal Area Zuni Mountains Nm Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Zuni Mountains Nm Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

293

Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Under Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

294

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Winnemucca Dry Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

295

Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Geothermal Area Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mauna Loa Southwest Rift Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

296

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Juan Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

297

Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

298

Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Hualalai Northwest Rift Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

299

Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Twenty-Nine Palms Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

300

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lassen Volcanic National Park Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (11) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Upper Hot Creek Ranch Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

302

Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Dead Horse Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

303

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Walker Lake Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

304

San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: San Francisco Volcanic Field Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Arizona Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

305

Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Columbus Salt Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

306

Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Seven Mile Hole Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (4) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Wyoming Exploration Region: Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

307

Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Gabbs Alkali Flat Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

308

Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Development through High-Resolution 3C3D Seismic and Horizontal Drilling: Eva South Marrow Sand Unit, Texas County, Oklahoma  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Eva South Morrow Sand Unit is located in western Texas County, Oklahoma. The field produces from an upper Morrow sandstone, termed the Eva sandstone, deposited in a transgressive valley-fill sequence. The field is defined as a combination structural stratigraphic trap; the reservoir lies in a convex up -dip bend in the valley and is truncated on the west side by the Teepee Creek fault. Although the field has been a successful waterflood since 1993, reservoir heterogeneity and compartmentalization has impeded overall sweep efficiency. A 4.25 square mile high-resolution, three component three-dimensional (3C3D) seismic survey was acquired in order to improve reservoir characterization and pinpoint the optimal location of a new horizontal producing well, the ESU 13-H.

Wheeler,David M.; Miller, William A.; Wilson, Travis C.

2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

309

5 - Reservoir Engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter presents the basic fundamentals that are useful to practical petroleum engineers by including basic principles, definitions, and data related to the reservoir engineering. It introduces the topics at a level that can be understood by engineers and geologists who are not expert in the field of reservoir engineering. Various correlations are provided in the chapter to understand the functioning of reservoir engineering, and newer techniques for improving recovery are also discussed. Reservoir engineering covers a broad range of subjects including the occurrence of fluids in a gas or oil-bearing reservoir, movement of those or injected fluids, and evaluation of the factors governing the recovery of oil or gas. The objectives of a reservoir engineer are to maximize producing rates and to recover oil and gas from reservoirs in the most economical manner possible. The advent of programmable calculators and personal computers has changed the approach that the reservoir engineers use to solve problems. In the chapter, many of the charts and graphs that have been historically used are presented for completeness and for illustrative purposes. In addition, separate sections of the chapter are devoted to the use of equations in some of the more common programs suitable for programmable calculators and personal computers.

F. David Martin; Robert M. Colpitts

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The hope is that successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs, including: (1) Development of three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic reservoir simulation models--thermal or otherwise--to aid in reservoir management of the steamflood and post-steamflood phases and subsequent development work. (2) Development of computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid reservoir surveillance and operations. (3) Perform detailed studies of the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (4) Testing and proposed application of a novel alkaline-steam well completion technique for the containment of the unconsolidated formation sands and control of fluid entry and injection profiles. (5) Installation of a 2100 ft, 14 inch insulated, steam line beneath a harbor channel to supply steam to an island location. (6) Testing and proposed application of thermal recovery technologies to increase oil production and reserves: (a) Performing pilot tests of cyclic steam injection and production on new horizontal wells. (b) Performing pilot tests of hot water-alternating-steam (WAS) drive in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Perform a pilot steamflood with the four horizontal injectors and producers using a pseudo steam-assisted gravity-drainage (SAGD) process. (8) Advanced reservoir management, through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring and evaluation.

Unknown

2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

311

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico was a cost-shared field demonstration project in the U.S. Department of Energy Class III Program. A major goal of the Class III Program was to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques were used at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP) project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The objective of the project was to demonstrate that a development program, which was based on advanced reservoir management methods, could significantly improve oil recovery at the NDP. Initial goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to other oil and gas producers. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geological, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description was used as a risk reduction tool to identify 'sweet spots' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir. An Advanced Log Analysis technique developed from the NDP project has proven useful in defining additional productive zones and refining completion techniques. This program proved to be especially helpful in locating and evaluating potential recompletion intervals, which has resulted in low development costs with only small incremental increases in lifting costs. To develop additional reserves at lower costs, zones behind pipe in existing wells were evaluated using techniques developed for the Brushy Canyon interval. These techniques were used to complete uphole zones in thirteen of the NDP wells. A total of 14 recompletions were done: four during 1999, four during 2000, two during 2001, and four during 2002-2003. These workovers added reserves of 332,304 barrels of oil (BO) and 640,363 MCFG (thousand cubic feet of gas) at an overall weighted average development cost of $1.87 per BOE (barrel of oil equivalent). A pressure maintenance pilot project in a developed area of the field was not conducted because the pilot area was pressure depleted, and the reservoir in that area was found to be compartmentalized and discontinuous. Economic analyses and simulation studies indicated that immiscible injection of lean hydrocarbon gas for pressure maintenance was not warranted at the NDP and would need to be considered for implementation in similar fields very soon after production has started. Simulation studies suggested that the injection of miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) could recover significant quantities of oil at the NDP, but a source of low-cost CO{sub 2} was not available in the area. Results from the project indicated that further development will be under playa lakes and potash areas that were beyond the regions covered by well control and are not accessible with vertical wells. These areas, covered by 3-D seismic surveys that were obtained as part of the project, were accessed with combinations of deviated/horizontal wells. Three directional/horizontal wells have been drilled and completed to develop reserves under surface-restricted areas and potash mines. The third

Mark B. Murphy

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

312

Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Evaluating the Raft River and Boise, Idaho, resources by pump and injection tests require information on the geology, geochemistry, surficial and borehole geophysics, and well construction and development methods. Nonideal test conditions and a complex hydrogeologic system prevent the use of idealized mathematical models for data evaluation in a one-phase fluid system. An empirical approach is successfully used since it was observed that all valid pump and injection well pressure data for constant discharge

313

Quantification of Libby Reservoir Levels Needed to Maintain or Enhance Reservoir Fisheries, 1983-1987 Methods and Data Summary.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin. The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power, flood control, and navigation and other benefits. Research began in May 1983 to determine how operations of Libby dam impact the reservoir fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these impacts. This study is unique in that it was designed to accomplish its goal through detailed information gathering on every trophic level in the reservoir system and integration of this information into a quantitative computer model. The specific study objectives are to: quantify available reservoir habitat, determine abundance, growth and distribution of fish within the reservoir and potential recruitment of salmonids from Libby Reservoir tributaries within the United States, determine abundance and availability of food organisms for fish in the reservoir, quantify fish use of available food items, develop relationships between reservoir drawdown and reservoir habitat for fish and fish food organisms, and estimate impacts of reservoir operation on the reservoir fishery. 115 refs., 22 figs., 51 tabs.

Chisholm, Ian

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Integrated Seismic Studies At The Rye Patch Geothermal Reservoir, Nevada Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A 3-D surface seismic reflection survey, covering an area of over 3 square miles, was conducted at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to explore the structural features that may control geothermal production in the area. In addition to the surface sources and receivers, a high-temperature three-component seismometer was deployed in a borehole at a depth of 3900 ft within the basement below the reservoir, which recorded the waves generated by all surface sources. A total of 1959 first-arrival travel times were determined out of 2134 possible traces. Two-dimensional

315

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Lithology and alteration mineralogy of reservoir rocks at Coso Geothermal Area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Coso is one of several high-temperature geothermal systems associated with recent volcanic activity in the Basin and Range province. Chemical and fluid inclusion data demonstrate that production is from a narrow, asymmetric plume of thermal water that originates from a deep reservoir to the south and then flows laterally to the north. Geologic controls on the geometry of the upwelling plume were investigated using petrographic and analytical analyses of reservoir rock and vein material.

316

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through September 2000, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on improving core analysis techniques, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post steamflood projects. Work was discontinued on the stochastic geologic model and developing a 3-D stochastic thermal reservoir simulation model of the Tar II-A Zone so the project team could use the 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model to provide alternatives for the Tar II-A post steamflood operations and shale compaction studies. The project team spent the fourth quarter 2000 performing well work and reservoir surveillance on the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and the Tar V horizontal well steamflood pilot. Expanding thermal recovery operations to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, including the Tar V horizontal well pilot steamflood project, is a critical part of the City of Long Beach and Tidelands Oil Production Company's development strategy for the field. The current steamflood operations in the Tar V pilot are economical, but recent performance is below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that are being evaluated.

Scott Hara

2001-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

317

Geothermometry At Blackfoot Reservoir Area (Hutsinpiller & Parry...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Amy Hutsinpiller, W. T. Parry (1985) Geochemistry And Geothermometry Of Spring Water From The Blackfoot...

318

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir, reservoir, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; GEOPHYSICAL SURVEYS; RAFT RIVER VALLEY; GEOTHERMAL EXPLORATION; BOREHOLES; EVALUATION; HOT-WATER SYSTEMS; IDAHO; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; WELL LOGGING; CAVITIES; EXPLORATION; GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS; HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEMS; NORTH AMERICA; PACIFIC NORTHWEST REGION; USA Author(s): Applegate, J.K.; Donaldson, P.R.; Hinkley, D.L.; Wallace, T.L. Published: Geophysics, 2/1/1977 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Geophysical Method At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Raft River Geothermal Area

319

Reservoir Simulation for Improving Water Flooding Performance in Low-Permeability Reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We studied the YSL oil field in Daqing, China with reservoir permeability 10-3 ?m2 that has been developed by water flooding. From the results of a preliminary estimate ... we have used as the basis for numerical...

Huiying Zhong; Hongjun Yin

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Supporting technology for enhanced recovery, Annex V: evaluate application of recently developed techniques in the areas of drilling, coring, and telemetry. Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE fossil-energy report V-1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Agreement between the United States and Venezuela was designed to further energy research and development in six areas. This report focuses on Annex V - Drilling, Coring, and Telemetry as supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery projects in the United States and Venezuela. Annex V consists of 18 tasks to perform these three projects. This report completes the work for Annex V. Energy research and development in the area of Enhanced Oil Recovery has as its goal the more efficient and complete production of the third crop of oil. Methods and techniques must be developed to assist in the implementation of EOR projects. Technology development that reduces costs and provides better reservoir information often has a direct impact on the economic viability of EOR projects and Annex V addresses these areas. Each of the three areas covered by Annex V are separate entities and are presented in this report as different sections. Each has its own Abstract. The drilling and coring tests were highly successful but only a limited amount of work was necessary in the Telemetry area because a field test was not feasible.

Williams, C.R.; Lichaa, P.; Van Domselaar, H.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

322

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2003-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

323

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2003-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

324

Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Borehole geophysics evaluation of the Raft River geothermal reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Borehole geophysics techniques were used in evaluating the Raft River geothermal reservoir to establish a viable model for the system. The assumed model for the hot water (145/sup 0/C) reservoir was a zone of higher conductivity, increased porosity, decreased density, and lower sonic velocity. It was believed that the long term contact with the hot water would cause alteration producing these effects. With this model in mind, cross-plots of the above parameters were made to attempt to delineate the reservoir. It appears that the most meaningful data include smoothed and

325

Heat deliverability of homogeneous geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the last two decades, the petroleum industry has been successfully using simple inflow performance relationships (IPR's) to predict oil deliverability. In contrast, the geothermal industry lacked a simple and reliable method to estimate geothermal wells' heat deliverability. To address this gap in the standard geothermal-reservoir-assessment arsenal, we developed generalized dimensionless geothermal inflow performance relationships (GIPR's). These ''reference curves'' may be regarded as an approximate general solution of the equations describing the practically important case of radial 2-phase inflow. Based on this approximate solution, we outline a straightforward approach to estimate the reservoir contribution to geothermal wells heat and mass deliverability for 2-phase reservoirs. This approach is far less costly and in most cases as reliable as numerically modeling the reservoir, which is the alternative for 2-phase inflow.

Iglesias, Eduardo R.; Moya, Sara L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington Oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Quarterly report, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., California using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The technologies include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, S.

1996-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

327

Improved characterization of reservoir behavior by integration of reservoir performances data and rock type distributions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated geological/petrophysical and reservoir engineering study was performed for a large, mature waterflood project (>250 wells, {approximately}80% water cut) at the North Robertson (Clear Fork) Unit, Gaines County, Texas. The primary goal of the study was to develop an integrated reservoir description for {open_quotes}targeted{close_quotes} (economic) 10-acre (4-hectare) infill drilling and future recovery operations in a low permeability, carbonate (dolomite) reservoir. Integration of the results from geological/petrophysical studies and reservoir performance analyses provide a rapid and effective method for developing a comprehensive reservoir description. This reservoir description can be used for reservoir flow simulation, performance prediction, infill targeting, waterflood management, and for optimizing well developments (patterns, completions, and stimulations). The following analyses were performed as part of this study: (1) Geological/petrophysical analyses: (core and well log data) - {open_quotes}Rock typing{close_quotes} based on qualitative and quantitative visualization of pore-scale features. Reservoir layering based on {open_quotes}rock typing {close_quotes} and hydraulic flow units. Development of a {open_quotes}core-log{close_quotes} model to estimate permeability using porosity and other properties derived from well logs. The core-log model is based on {open_quotes}rock types.{close_quotes} (2) Engineering analyses: (production and injection history, well tests) Material balance decline type curve analyses to estimate total reservoir volume, formation flow characteristics (flow capacity, skin factor, and fracture half-length), and indications of well/boundary interference. Estimated ultimate recovery analyses to yield movable oil (or injectable water) volumes, as well as indications of well and boundary interference.

Davies, D.K.; Vessell, R.K. [David K. Davies & Associates, Kingwood, TX (United States); Doublet, L.E. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

MULTIDISCIPLINARY IMAGING OF ROCK PROPERTIES IN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS FOR FLOW-UNIT TARGETING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the US contain large quantities of remaining oil and gas that constitute a huge target for improved diagnosis and imaging of reservoir properties. The resource target is especially large in carbonate reservoirs, where conventional data and methodologies are normally insufficient to resolve critical scales of reservoir heterogeneity. The objectives of the research described in this report were to develop and test such methodologies for improved imaging, measurement, modeling, and prediction of reservoir properties in carbonate hydrocarbon reservoirs. The focus of the study is the Permian-age Fullerton Clear Fork reservoir of the Permian Basin of West Texas. This reservoir is an especially appropriate choice considering (a) the Permian Basin is the largest oil-bearing basin in the US, and (b) as a play, Clear Fork reservoirs have exhibited the lowest recovery efficiencies of all carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin.

Stephen C. Ruppel

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Fractured gas reservoirs in the Devonian shale of the Illinois and Appalachian basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Devonian and Lower Mississippian black shale sequence of Kentucky includes the New Albany Shale of Illinois basin and the Ohio Shale of the Appalachian basin. Fractured reservoirs in the Ohio Shale contain a major gas resource, but have not been so prolific in the New Albany Shale. The authors propose two models of fractured shale reservoirs in both the Illinois and the Appalachian basins, to be tested with gas production data. (1) Where reactivated basement faults have propagated to the surface, the lack of an effective seal has prevented the development of overpressure. The resulting fracture system is entirely tectonic is origin, and served mainly as a conduit for gas migration from the basin to the surface. Gas accumulations in such reservoirs typically are small and underpressured. (2) Where basement faults have been reactivated but have not reached the surface, a seal on the fractured reservoir is preserved. In areas where thermal maturity has been adequate, overpressuring due to gas generation resulted in a major extension of the fracture system, as well as enhanced gas compression and adsorption. Such gas accumulations are relatively large. Original overpressuring has been largely lost, due both to natural depletion and to uncontrolled production. The relative thermal immaturity of the Illinois basin accounts for the scarcity of the second type of fractured reservoir and the small magnitude of the New Albany Shale gas resource.

Hamilton-Smith, T.; Walker, D.; Nuttall, B. (Kentucky Geological Survey, Lexington (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below are the project presentations and respective peer review results for Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture Characterization.

331

Chemistry, Reservoir, and Integrated Models  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Below are the project presentations and respective peer review results for Chemistry, Reservoir and Integrated Models.

332

Reservoir Protection (Oklahoma)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Oklahoma Water Resource Board has the authority to make rules for the control of sanitation on all property located within any reservoir or drainage basin. The Board works with the Department...

333

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Fourteenth workshop geothermal reservoir engineering: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fourteenth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering was held at Stanford University on January 24--26, 1989. Major areas of discussion include: (1) well testing; (2) various field results; (3) geoscience; (4) geochemistry; (5) reinjection; (6) hot dry rock; and (7) numerical modelling. For these workshop proceedings, individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Kruger, P.; Horne, R.N.; Miller, F.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Cook, J.W.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Session: Reservoir Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five papers: ''Reservoir Technology'' by Joel L. Renner; ''LBL Research on the Geysers: Conceptual Models, Simulation and Monitoring Studies'' by Gudmundur S. Bodvarsson; ''Geothermal Geophysical Research in Electrical Methods at UURI'' by Philip E. Wannamaker; ''Optimizing Reinjection Strategy at Palinpinon, Philippines Based on Chloride Data'' by Roland N. Horne; ''TETRAD Reservoir Simulation'' by G. Michael Shook

Renner, Joel L.; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Wannamaker, Philip E.; Horne, Roland N.; Shook, G. Michael

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

PUBLISHED ONLINE: 31 JULY 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1211 Carbon emission from hydroelectric reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTERS PUBLISHED ONLINE: 31 JULY 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1211 Carbon emission from hydroelectric * Hydroelectric reservoirs cover an area of 3.4 ? 105 km2 and comprise about 20% of all reservoirs. In addition dioxide and methane from hydroelectric reservoirs, on the basis of data from 85 globally distributed

337

Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Phase I Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy reservoirs at the Fenton Hill field site grew continuously during Run Segments 2 through 5 (January 1978 to December 1980). Reservoir growth was caused not only by pressurization and hydraulic fracturing, but also by heat-extraction and thermal-contraction effects. Reservoir heat-transfer area grew from 8000 to 50,000 m2 and reservoir fracture volume grew from 11 to 266 m3. Despite this reservoir growth, the water loss rate increased only 30%, under similar pressure environments. For comparable temperature and pressure

338

Property:AvgReservoirDepth | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AvgReservoirDepth AvgReservoirDepth Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AvgReservoirDepth Property Type Quantity Description Average depth to reservoir Use this type to express a quantity of length. The default unit is the meter (m). Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: Meters - 1 m, meter, meters Meter, Meters, METER, METERS Kilometers - 0.001 km, kilometer, kilometers, Kilometer, Kilometers, KILOMETERS, KILOMETERS Miles - 0.000621371 mi, mile, miles, Mile, Miles, MILE, MILES Feet - 3.28084 ft, foot, feet, Foot, Feet, FOOT, FEET Yards - 1.09361 yd, yard, yards, Yard, Yards, YARD, YARDS Pages using the property "AvgReservoirDepth" Showing 24 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + 213 m0.213 km 0.132 mi 698.819 ft 232.939 yd + B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area + 850 m0.85 km

339

Oxygenation cost estimates for Cherokee, Douglas, and Norris reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The capital and annual costs associated with reoxygenation of the turbine releases at Cherokee, Douglas and Norris Reservoirs using the small bubble injection technique developed for Ft. Patrick Henry Dam were computed. The weekly average dissolved oxygen (DO) deficits were computed for each reservoir for an average year (based on 16 years of records). The total annual cost of an oxygen supply and injection system for each reservoir is presented. 5 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

Fain, T.G.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

The Role of Acidizing in Proppant Fracturing in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the most widely considered alternatives for application in carbonate reservoirs. Especially in areas that have high closure stress, the non-smoothly etched surface created by acid fracturing may not remain open upon closing, resulting in decrease...

Densirimongkol, Jurairat

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

An Integrated Study Method For Exploration Of Gas Hydrate Reservoirs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

approach for exploration of gas hydrate reservoirs in marine areas. Authors C. Y. Sun, B. H. Niu, P. F. Wen, Y. Y. Huang, H. Y. Wang, X. W. Huang and J. Li Published Journal...

342

Photovoltaic applications in rural areas of developing countries: a survey of evidence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Deficient energy supplies compound the economic problems facing many developing countries. Fuel wood and charcoal are scarce and/or increasingly expensive due to the rising demand for forestry resources and insufficient afforestation. The supply of oil products is also deficient as a result of the balance of payments deficits experienced by most developing countries in recent years. Photovoltaic (PV) technology is a viable alternative for providing electricity for rural areas. There are three groups of PV application. The first consists of technologies that are viable even under present conditions. The second group of applications are those that are low powered, but for which other existing technologies are more cost effective at current prices and development levels. To the third group belong the high-power applications. Since PV technology can be shown to be reliable and cost-effective for some applications, it should be considered as an alternative to rural electrification.

Yvette Stevens

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Modification of reservoir chemical and physical factors in steamfloods to increase heavy oil recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal methods, and particularly steam injection, are currently recognized as the most promising for the efficient recovery of heavy oil. Despite significant progress, however, important technical issues remain open. Specifically, still inadequate is our knowledge of the complex interaction between porous media and the various fluids of thermal recovery (steam, water, heavy oil, gases, and chemicals). While, the interplay of heat transfer and fluid flow with pore- and macro-scale heterogeneity is largely unexplored. The objectives of this contract are to continue previous work and to carry out new fundamental studies in the following areas of interest to thermal recovery: displacement and flow properties of fluids involving phase change (condensation-evaporation) in porous media; flow properties of mobility control fluids (such as foam); and the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on thermal recovery. The specific projects are motivated by and address the need to improve heavy oil recovery from typical reservoirs as well as less conventional fractured reservoirs producing from vertical or horizontal wells. During this past quarter, work continued on: the development of relative permeabilities during steam displacement; the optimization of recovery processes in heterogeneous reservoirs by using optical control methods; and in the area of chemical additives, work continued on the behavior of non-Newtonian fluid flow and on foam displacements in porous media.

Yortsos, Y.C.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class 1 oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Yearly technical progress report, January 1--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oklahoma Geological Survey and the University of Oklahoma are engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program includes the systematic and comprehensive collection, evaluation, and distribution of information on all of Oklahoma`s FDD oil reservoirs and the recovery technologies that can be applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. To date, the lead geologists have defined the initial geographic extents of Oklahoma`s FDD plays, and compiled known information about those plays. Nine plays have been defined, all of them Pennsylvanian in age and most from the Cherokee Group. A bibliographic database has been developed to record the literature sources and their related plays. Trend maps are being developed to identify the FDD portions of the relevant reservoirs, through accessing current production databases and through compiling the literature results. A reservoir database system also has been developed, to record specific reservoir data elements that are identified through the literature, and through public and private data sources. The project team is working with the Oklahoma Nomenclature Committee of the Mid-Continent Oil and Gas Association to update oil field boundary definitions in the project area. Also, team members are working with several private companies to develop demonstration reservoirs for the reservoir characterization and simulation activities. All of the information gathered through these efforts will be transferred to the Oklahoma petroleum industry through a series of publications and workshops. Additionally, plans are being developed, and hardware and software resources are being acquired, in preparation for the opening of a publicly-accessible computer users laboratory, one component of the technology transfer program.

Mankin, C.J. [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States)] [Oklahoma Geological Survey, Norman, OK (United States); Banken, M.K. [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)] [Oklahoma Univ., Norman, OK (United States)

1995-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

345

Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs of Kansas - Near-Term, Class II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of this project was development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent.

Carr, Timothy R.; Green, Don W.; Willhite, G. Paul

2001-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

346

High-Resolution Characterization of Reservoir Heterogeneity and Connectivity in Clastic Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study developed new concepts and interpretative methods for mapping reservoir heterogeneity and connectivity of a fault controlled Wilcox clastic reservoir in Texas, USA. The application of high-resolution seismic enhancement in this study...

Hull, Thomas Frederick

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

347

Impact of Reservoir Evaporation and Evaporation Suppression on Water Supply Capabilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reservoir storage is essential for developing dependable water supplies and is a major component of the river system water budget. The storage contents of reservoirs fluctuate greatly with variations in water use and climatic conditions that range...

Ayala, Rolando A

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work plan for October 1, 1997 to September 30, 1998 consisted of investigation of a number of topical areas. These topical areas were reported in four quarterly status reports, which were submitted to DOE earlier. These topical areas are reviewed in this volume. The topical areas covered during the year were: (1) Development of preliminary tests of a production method for determining areas of natural fracturing. Advanced Resources has demonstrated that such a relationship exists in the southern Piceance basin tight gas play. Natural fracture clusters are genetically related to stress concentrations (also called stress perturbations) associated with local deformation such a faulting. The mechanical explanation of this phenomenon is that deformation generally initiates at regions where the local stress field is elevated beyond the regional. (2) Regional structural and geologic analysis of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). Application of techniques developed and demonstrated during earlier phases of the project for sweet-spot delineation were demonstrated in a relatively new and underexplored play: tight gas from continuous-typeUpper Cretaceous reservoirs of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB). The effort included data acquisition/processing, base map generation, geophysical and remote sensing analysis and the integration of these data and analyses. (3) Examination of the Table Rock field area in the northern Washakie Basin of the Greater Green River Basin. This effort was performed in support of Union Pacific Resources- and DOE-planned horizontal drilling efforts. The effort comprised acquisition of necessary seismic data and depth-conversion, mapping of major fault geometry, and analysis of displacement vectors, and the development of the natural fracture prediction. (4) Greater Green River Basin Partitioning. Building on fundamental fracture characterization work and prior work performed under this contract, namely structural analysis using satellite and potential field data, the GGRB was divided into partitions that will be used to analyze the resource potential of the Frontier and Mesaverde Upper Cretaceous tight gas play. A total of 20 partitions were developed, which will be instrumental for examining the Upper Cretaceous play potential. (5) Partition Analysis. Resource assessment associated with individual partitions was initiated starting with the Vermilion Sub-basin and the Green River Deep (which include the Stratos well) partitions (see Chapter 5). (6) Technology Transfer. Tech transfer was achieved by documenting our research and presenting it at various conferences.

NONE

1998-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

5 - Reservoir Engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter presents the basic fundamentals useful to practical petroleum engineers. Topics are introduced at a level that can be understood by engineers and geologists who are not expert in this field. Various correlations are provided in the chapter where useful. Newer techniques for improving recovery are also discussed in the chapter. Reservoir engineering covers a broad range of subjects including the occurrence of fluids in a gas or oil-beating reservoir, movement of those fluids or injected fluids, and evaluation of the factors governing the recovery of oil or gas. The objectives of a reservoir engineer are to maximize production rates and to ultimately recover oil and gas from reservoirs in the most economical manner possible. The chapter includes many of the charts and graphs that have been historically used. While illustrating enhanced oil recovery methods, estimation of waterflood residual oil saturation, fluid movements, material balance with volumetric analysis, the chapter also discusses pressure transient testing, recovery of hydrocarbons, and decline curve analysis. Decline curve analysis estimates primary oil recovery for an individual reservoir. The conventional analysis of production decline curves for oil or gas production consists of plotting the log of flow rate versus time on semilog paper. In case of a decline in the rate of production, the data are extrapolated into the future to provide an estimate of expected production and reserves.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Saving an Underground Reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significant part of the region?s agricultural economy. Though the area has few rivers and lakes, underneath it lies a supply of water that has provided groundwater for developing this economy. This underground water, the Ogallala Aquifer, is a finite.... ?We have already seen isolat- ed areas that have no irrigation water remaining and the economy has been crushed.? The region produces about 4 percent of the nation?s corn, 25 percent of the hard red winter wheat, 23 per- cent of the grain sorghum...

Wythe, Kathy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Optoelectronic Reservoir Computing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reservoir computing is a recently introduced, highly efficient bio-inspired approach for processing time dependent data. The basic scheme of reservoir computing consists of a non linear recurrent dynamical system coupled to a single input layer and a single output layer. Within these constraints many implementations are possible. Here we report an opto-electronic implementation of reservoir computing based on a recently proposed architecture consisting of a single non linear node and a delay line. Our implementation is sufficiently fast for real time information processing. We illustrate its performance on tasks of practical importance such as nonlinear channel equalization and speech recognition, and obtain results comparable to state of the art digital implementations.

Yvan Paquot; Franois Duport; Anteo Smerieri; Joni Dambre; Benjamin Schrauwen; Marc Haelterman; Serge Massar

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

352

Application of integrated reservoir management and reservoir characterization to optimize infill drilling. Annual report, June 13, 1994--June 12, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has used a multi-disciplinary approach employing geology, geophysics, and engineering to conduct advanced reservoir characterization and management activities to design and implement an optimized infill drilling program at the North Robertson (Clearfork) Unit in Gaines County, Texas. The activities during the first Budget Period have consisted of developing an integrated reservoir description from geological, engineering, and geostatistical studies, and using this description for reservoir flow simulation. Specific reservoir management activities are being identified and tested. The geologically targeted infill drilling program will be implemented using the results of this work. A significant contribution of this project is to demonstrate the use of cost-effective reservoir characterization and management tools that will be helpful to both independent and major operators for the optimal development of heterogeneous, low permeability shallow-shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs. The techniques that are outlined for the formulation of an integrated reservoir description apply to all oil and gas reservoirs, but are specifically tailored for use in the heterogeneous, low permeability carbonate reservoirs of West Texas.

Pande, P.K.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Altering Reservoir Wettability to Improve Production from Single Wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured and typically produce less than 10% original oil in place during primary recovery. Spontaneous imbibition has proven an important mechanism for oil recovery from fractured reservoirs, which are usually weak waterflood candidates. In some situations, chemical stimulation can promote imbibition of water to alter the reservoir wettability toward water-wetness such that oil is produced at an economic rate from the rock matrix into fractures. In this project, cores and fluids from five reservoirs were used in laboratory tests: the San Andres formation (Fuhrman Masho and Eagle Creek fields) in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico; and the Interlake, Stony Mountain, and Red River formations from the Cedar Creek Anticline in Montana and South Dakota. Solutions of nonionic, anionic, and amphoteric surfactants with formation water were used to promote waterwetness. Some Fuhrman Masho cores soaked in surfactant solution had improved oil recovery up to 38%. Most Eagle Creek cores did not respond to any of the tested surfactants. Some Cedar Creek anticline cores had good response to two anionic surfactants (CD 128 and A246L). The results indicate that cores with higher permeability responded better to the surfactants. The increased recovery is mainly ascribed to increased water-wetness. It is suspected that rock mineralogy is also an important factor. The laboratory work generated three field tests of the surfactant soak process in the West Fuhrman Masho San Andres Unit. The flawlessly designed tests included mechanical well clean out, installation of new pumps, and daily well tests before and after the treatments. Treatments were designed using artificial intelligence (AI) correlations developed from 23 previous surfactant soak treatments. The treatments were conducted during the last quarter of 2006. One of the wells produced a marginal volume of incremental oil through October. It is interesting to note that the field tests were conducted in an area of the field that has not met production expectations. The dataset on the 23 Phosphoria well surfactant soaks was updated. An analysis of the oil decline curves indicted that 4.5 lb of chemical produced a barrel of incremental oil. The AI analysis supports the adage 'good wells are the best candidates.' The generally better performance of surfactant in the high permeability core laboratory tests supports this observation. AI correlations were developed to predict the response to water-frac stimulations in a tight San Andres reservoir. The correlations maybe useful in the design of Cedar Creek Anticline surfactant soak treatments planned for next year. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance scans of dolomite cores to measure porosity and saturation during the high temperature laboratory work were acquired. The scans could not be correlated with physical measurement using either conventional or AI methods.

W. W. Weiss

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

354

Developments in West Coast area in 1979. [Tabular data and maps  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New-field discoveries in California were down in 1979 from the previous year. The total exploratory footage drilled was slightly lower, but the total number of successful exploratory wells was up 19% from 1978. One new oil field and 5 new gas field discoveries were reported in California. None of these discoveries appear to be of major size. During 1979, hydrocarbons were discovered in commercial quantities for the first time in Oregon - the Mist Gas field, in the northwestern corner of the state, in Columbia County. A pipeline was constructed for initial production in late 1979. This discovery has spurred drilling and leasing activity. Mobil drilled a second deep exploratory well in Oregon, to 10,412 ft, which was subsequently abandoned. Only 1 shallow oil and gas exploratory well was drilled in Washington State this year. As yet it has not been completed. Development drilling in California, although down from 1978, continued at an active pace and is related largely to steam-flood projects. Production of oil outstripped additions to reserves by 285.8 million bbl in 1979. Geothermal activity increased in California's Imperial Valley and Geysers area. Southern California Edison Co. has begun construction of a 10-Mw generating plant near Brawley in the Imperial Valley. Two other geothermal projects in the Imperial Valley sponsored by Southern California Edison include the development of a 50-Mw unit near Heber and a prospective 10-Mw plant south of the Salton Sea. Westmoreland Geothermal Associates also have plans to develop a plant in the valley. In the Geysers area, Sacramento Municipal Utility District plans to construct a 55-Mw plant. The Geysers capacity is expected to increase to 1238 Mw by the end of 1982.

Blaisdell, R.C.; Dignes, T.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Physical model of a fractured reservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

model of a fractured reservoir model of a fractured reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Physical model of a fractured reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The objectives of the physical modeling effort are to: (1) evaluate injection-backflow testing for fractured reservoirs under conditions of known reservoir parameters (porosity, fracture width, etc.); (2) study the mechanisms controlling solute transport in fracture systems; and (3) provide data for validation of numerical models that explicitly simulate solute migration in fracture systems. The fracture network is 0.57-m wide, 1.7-m long, and consists of two sets of fractures at right angles to one another with a fracture spacing of 10.2 cm. A series of

356

Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave splitting Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Microearthquakes recorded by a downhole, three-component seismic network deployed around the Coso, California, geothermal reservoir since 1992 display distinctive shear-wave splitting and clear polarization directions. From the polarizations the authors estimated three predominant subsurface fracture directions, and from the time delays of the split waves they determined tomographically the 3-D fracture density distribution in the reservoir. Author(s): Lou, M.; Rial, J.A. Published: Geophysics, 3/1/1997

357

Development of A Bayesian Geostatistical Data Assimilation Method and Application to the Hanford 300 Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4.3.1 Hanford 300Area IFRC Site . . . . . . . . . . . .aquifer characterization at the Hanford 300 area 3.14.4 Data Assimilation at the Hanford IFRC

Murakami, Haruko

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Mixed Waste Focus Area alternative oxidation technologies development and demonstration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) is currently supporting the development and demonstration of several alternative oxidation technology (AOT) processes for treatment of combustible mixed low-level wastes. The impetus for this support derives from regulatory and political hurdles frequently encountered by traditional thermal techniques, primarily incinerators. AOTs have been defined as technologies that destroy organic material without using open-flame reactions. Whether thermal or nonthermal, the processes have the potential advantages of relatively low-volume gaseous emissions, generation of few or no dioxin/furan compounds, and operation at low enough temperatures that metals (except mercury) and most radionuclides are not volatilized. Technology development and demonstration are needed to confirm and realize the potential of AOTs and to compare them on an equal basis with their fully demonstrated thermal counterparts. AOTs include both thermal and nonthermal processes that oxidize organic wastes but operate under significantly different physical and chemical conditions than incinerators. Nonthermal processes currently being studied include Delphi DETOX and acid digestion at the Savannah River Site, and direct chemical oxidation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. All three technologies are at advanced stages of development or are entering the demonstration phase. Nonflame thermal processes include catalytic chemical oxidation, which is being developed and deployed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and team reforming, a commercial process being supported by Department of Energy. Related technologies include two low-flow, secondary oxidation processes (Phoenix and Thermatrix units) that have been tested at MSE, Inc., in Butte, Montana. Although testing is complete on some AOT technologies, most require additional support to complete some or all of the identified development objectives. Brief descriptions, status, and planned paths forward for each of the technologies are presented.

Borduin, L.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Fewell, T.; Gombert, D.; Priebe, S. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Reservoir geochemistry: A link between reservoir geology and engineering?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geochemistry provides a natural, but poorly exploited, link between reservoir geology and engineering. The authors summarize some current applications of geochemistry to reservoir description and stress that, because of their strong interactions with mineral surfaces and water, nitrogen and oxygen compounds in petroleum may exert an important influence on the pressure/volume/temperature (PVT) properties of petroleum, viscosity and wettability. The distribution of these compounds in reservoirs is heterogeneous on a submeter scale and is partly controlled by variations in reservoir quality. The implied variations in petroleum properties and wettability may account for some of the errors in reservoir simulations.

Larter, S.R.; Aplin, A.C.; Chen, M.; Taylor, P.N. [Univ. of Newcastle (Australia); Corbett, P.W.M.; Ementon, N. [Heriot-Watt Univ., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Renewable energy and sustainable developments in Egypt: photovoltaic water pumping in remote areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper considers the economics of using photovoltaic (PV) technology for developing remote areas. East Owienat in Upper Egypt is the chosen region: there, the feasibility of using PV systems for the pumping of ground water in comparison with using diesel units, taking into consideration the different parameters affecting the costs and the present value of both systems, is considered. The study proved that PV-battery systems can be used efficiently for water pumping at East Owienat: the cost of the water unit pumped by PV systems is much less than that pumped using diesel systems, and the water cost is more sensitive to PV cells prices than their life-time periods.

Elham Mahmoud; Hoseen el Nather

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Integral cesium reservoir: Design and transient operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electrically heated thermionic converter has been designed built and successfully tested in air (Homer et.al., 1995). One of the unique features of this converter was an integral cesium reservoir thermally coupled to the emitter. The reservoir consisted of fifteen cesiated graphite pins located in pockets situated in the emitter lead with thermal coupling to the emitter, collector and the emitter terminal; there were no auxiliary electric heaters on the reservoir. Test results are described for conditions in which the input thermal power to the converter was ramped up and down between 50% and 100% of full power in times as short as 50 sec, with data acquisition occurring every 12 sec. During the ramps the emitter and collector temperature profiles. the reservoir temperature and the electric output into a fixed load resistor are reported. The converter responded promptly to the power ramps without excessive overshoot and with no tendency to develop instabilities. This is the rust demonstration of the performance of a cesium-graphite integral reservoir in a fast transient

Smith, J.N. Jr.; Horner, M.H.; Begg, L.L. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Wrobleski, W.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., West Mifflin, PA (United States). Bettis Atomic Power Lab.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Property:MeanReservoirTemp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MeanReservoirTemp MeanReservoirTemp Jump to: navigation, search Property Name MeanReservoirTemp Property Type Temperature Description Mean estimated reservoir temperature at location based on the USGS 2008 Geothermal Resource Assessment if the United States Pages using the property "MeanReservoirTemp" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area + 363.15 K90 °C 194 °F 653.67 °R + Adak Geothermal Area + 428.15 K155 °C 311 °F 770.67 °R + Akun Strait Geothermal Area + 353.15 K80 °C 176 °F 635.67 °R + Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area + 523.15 K250 °C 482 °F 941.67 °R + Alvord Hot Springs Geothermal Area + 408.15 K135 °C 275 °F 734.67 °R + Amedee Geothermal Area + 388.15 K115 °C 239 °F 698.67 °R + Arrowhead Hot Springs Geothermal Area + 388.15 K115 °C

363

New method for evaluating composite reservoir systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple new technique has been developed for evaluating interference test data in radially symmetric composite reservoirs. The technique is based on the realization that systematic variations in the apparent storage coefficient (calculated from semi-log analysis of the late-time data are indicative of a two-mobility (k/..mu..) reservoir. By analyzing variations in the apparent storage coefficient, both the mobility and size of the inner region can be calculated. The technique is particularly useful for evaluating heterogeneous geothermal systems where the intersection of several faults, or hydrothermal alteration has created a high permeability region in the center of the geothermal field. The technique is applied to an extensive interference test in the geothermal reservoir at Klamath Falls, Oregon. 7 refs., 7 figs.

Benson, S.M.; Lai, C.H.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Semi-analytical solutions for multilayer reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, we develop, validate, and present five new approximate solutions for the case of a multilayer reservoir system - these solutions are: [ Solution p[wDj(tD)] Description 1 a[j] Constant p[wDj(tD)] Case 2 a[j tD] Linear p[wDj(tD)] Zero...

Lolon, Elyezer Pabibak

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

365

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCXS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STIMULATION AND RESERVOIR ENGINEERING OF GEOTHERMAL RESOURCXS Henry J. Ramey, Jr., and A. Louis. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Stanford Geothermal Project Reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Papers Presented a t the Second United Nations Symposium on t h e Development and Use of Geothermal Resources, May 19-29, 1975, San

Stanford University

366

Integrated Reflection Seismic Monitoring and Reservoir Modeling for Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US DOE/NETL CCS MVA program funded a project with Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc. (now SIGMA) to model the proof of concept of using sparse seismic data in the monitoring of CO{sub 2} injected into saline aquifers. The goal of the project was to develop and demonstrate an active source reflection seismic imaging strategy based on deployment of spatially sparse surface seismic arrays. The primary objective was to test the feasibility of sparse seismic array systems to monitor the CO{sub 2} plume migration injected into deep saline aquifers. The USDOE/RMOTC Teapot Dome (Wyoming) 3D seismic and reservoir data targeting the Crow Mountain formation was used as a realistic proxy to evaluate the feasibility of the proposed methodology. Though the RMOTC field has been well studied, the Crow Mountain as a saline aquifer has not been studied previously as a CO{sub 2} sequestration (storage) candidate reservoir. A full reprocessing of the seismic data from field tapes that included prestack time migration (PSTM) followed by prestack depth migration (PSDM) was performed. A baseline reservoir model was generated from the new imaging results that characterized the faults and horizon surfaces of the Crow Mountain reservoir. The 3D interpretation was integrated with the petrophysical data from available wells and incorporated into a geocellular model. The reservoir structure used in the geocellular model was developed using advanced inversion technologies including Fusion's ThinMAN{trademark} broadband spectral inversion. Seal failure risk was assessed using Fusion's proprietary GEOPRESS{trademark} pore pressure and fracture pressure prediction technology. CO{sub 2} injection was simulated into the Crow Mountain with a commercial reservoir simulator. Approximately 1.2MM tons of CO{sub 2} was simulated to be injected into the Crow Mountain reservoir over 30 years and subsequently let 'soak' in the reservoir for 970 years. The relatively small plume developed from this injection was observed migrating due to gravity to the apexes of the double anticline in the Crow Mountain reservoir of the Teapot dome. Four models were generated from the reservoir simulation task of the project which included three saturation models representing snapshots at different times during and after simulated CO{sub 2} injection and a fully saturated CO{sub 2} fluid substitution model. The saturation models were used along with a Gassmann fluid substitution model for CO{sub 2} to perform fluid volumetric substitution in the Crow Mountain formation. The fluid substitution resulted in a velocity and density model for the 3D volume at each saturation condition that was used to generate a synthetic seismic survey. FPTI's (Fusion Petroleum Technologies Inc.) proprietary SeisModelPRO{trademark} full acoustic wave equation software was used to simulate acquisition of a 3D seismic survey on the four models over a subset of the field area. The simulated acquisition area included the injection wells and the majority of the simulated plume area.

John Rogers

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

CALCULATION AND USE OF STEAM/WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

c c c i i c I CALCULATION AND USE OF STEAM/WATER RELATIVE PERMEABILITIES IN GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS to calculate the steam/water relative permeabilities in geothermal reservoirs was developed and applied curves as a basis for analysis of future well tests for geothermal reservoirs. c ii #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS

Stanford University

368

Reservoir vital signs monitoring, 1991: Physical and chemical characteristics of water and sediment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the second year of TVA's Reservoir Vital signs Monitoring program, physical/chemical measurements of water and sediment were made on fourteen TVA reservoirs (the nine mainstem Tennessee river reservoirs - Kentucky through Fort Loudoun and five tributary reservoirs - Cherokee, Douglas, Norris, Melton Hill and Tellico). In addition in 1991, limited water quality monitoring was initiated on ten tributary storage impoundments. The objective of the Vital Signs monitoring program is to assess the health or integrity of these aquatic ecosystems. Physical/chemical data collected in 1991 showed the water quality of the majority of TVA's reservoirs to be very good, but pointed out areas for improvement and further investigation.

Meinert, D.L.; Fehring, J.P.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Scenario Prediction of Energy Demand and Development Status of Renewable Energy in Dunstan Area of Chongming Island  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on the data of GDP and population during the period 20032008, the energy demand in 2020 for industrial and residential energy in Dunstan area of Chongming Island was ... research material, the development ...

Xuezhong Fan; Liquan Zhang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geothermal reservoir temperatures estimated from the oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested as a geothermometer in three areas of the western United States. Limited analyses of spring and borehole fluids and existing experimental rate studies suggest that dissolved sulfate and water are probably in isotopic equilibrium in all reservoirs of significant size with temperatures above

371

Exploration model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot Springs KGRA,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot Springs KGRA, model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot Springs KGRA, Inyo Co. , California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Exploration model for possible geothermal reservoir, Coso Hot Springs KGRA, Inyo Co. , California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that a steam-filled fracture geothermal reservoir exists at Coso Hot Springs KGRA, as proposed by Combs and Jarzabek (1977). Gravity data collected by the USGS (Isherwood and Plouff, 1978) was plotted and compared with the geology of the area, which is well known. An east-west trending Bouguer gravity profile was constructed through the center of the heat flow anomaly described by Combs (1976). The best fit model for the observed gravity at

372

Application of Integrated Reservoir Management and Reservoir Characterization to Optimize Infill Drillings. Annual technical progress report, June 13, 1996 to June 12, 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infill drilling of wells on a uniform spacing, without regard to reservoir performance and characterization, does not optimize reservoir development because it fails to account for the complex nature of reservoir heterogeneities present in many low permeability reservoirs, and carbonate reservoirs in particular. New and emerging technologies, such as geostatistical modeling, rigorous decline curve analysis, reservoir rock typing, and special core analysis can be used to develop a 3-D simulation model for prediction of infill locations. Other technologies, such as inter-well injection tracers and magnetic flow conditioners, can also aid in the efficient evaluation and operation of both injection and producing wells. The purpose of this project was to demonstrate useful and cost effective methods of exploitation of the shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs of the Permian Basin located in West Texas.

Nevans, Jerry W.; Blasingame, Tom; Doublet, Louis; Kelkar, Mohan; Freeman, George; Callard, Jeff; Moore, David; Davies, David; Vessell, Richard; Pregger, Brian; Dixon, Bill

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

373

Modification of reservoir chemical and physical factors in steamfloods to increase heavy oil recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal methods, and particularly steam injection, are currently recognized as the most promising for the efficient recovery of heavy oil. Despite significant progress, however, important technical issues remain open. Specifically, still inadequate is our knowledge of the complex interaction between porous media and the various fluids of thermal recovery (steam, water, heavy oil, gases, and chemicals). While, the interplay of heat transfer and fluid flow with pore- and macro-scale heterogeneity is largely unexplored. The objectives of this contract are to continue previous work and to carry out new fundamental studies in the following areas of interest to thermal recovery: displacement and flow properties of fluids involving phase change (condensation-evaporation) in porous media; flow properties of mobility control fluids (such as foam); and the effect of reservoir heterogeneity on thermal recovery. The specific projects are motivated by and address the need to improve heavy oil recovery from typical reservoirs as well as less conventional fractured reservoirs producing from vertical or horizontal wells. During this quarter work continued on: development of relative permeabilities during steam injection; optimization of recovery processes in heterogeneous reservoirs by using optimal control methods; and behavior of non-Newtonian fluid flow and on foam displacements in porous media.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

374

Study on detailed geological modelling for fluvial sandstone reservoir in Daqing oil field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Guided by the sedimentation theory and knowledge of modern and ancient fluvial deposition and utilizing the abundant information of sedimentary series, microfacies type and petrophysical parameters from well logging curves of close spaced thousands of wells located in a large area. A new method for establishing detailed sedimentation and permeability distribution models for fluvial reservoirs have been developed successfully. This study aimed at the geometry and internal architecture of sandbodies, in accordance to their hierarchical levels of heterogeneity and building up sedimentation and permeability distribution models of fluvial reservoirs, describing the reservoir heterogeneity on the light of the river sedimentary rules. The results and methods obtained in outcrop and modem sedimentation studies have successfully supported the study. Taking advantage of this method, the major producing layers (PI{sub 1-2}), which have been considered as heterogeneous and thick fluvial reservoirs extending widely in lateral are researched in detail. These layers are subdivided into single sedimentary units vertically and the microfacies are identified horizontally. Furthermore, a complex system is recognized according to their hierarchical levels from large to small, meander belt, single channel sandbody, meander scroll, point bar, and lateral accretion bodies of point bar. The achieved results improved the description of areal distribution of point bar sandbodies, provide an accurate and detailed framework model for establishing high resolution predicting model. By using geostatistic technique, it also plays an important role in searching for enriched zone of residual oil distribution.

Zhao Hanqing; Fu Zhiguo; Lu Xiaoguang [Institute of Petroleum Exploration and Development, Daqing (China)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The Ahuachapan geothermal field, El Salvador: Reservoir analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Earth Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is conducting a reservoir evaluation study of the Ahuachapan geothermal field in El Salvador. This work is being performed in cooperation with the Comision Ejecutiva Hidroelectrica del Rio Lempa (CEL) and the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This report describes the work done during the first year of the study (FY 1988--89), and includes the (1) development of geological and conceptual models of the field, (2) evaluation of the initial thermodynamic and chemical conditions and their changes during exploitation, (3) evaluation of interference test data and the observed reservoir pressure decline, and (4) the development of a natural state model for the field. The geological model of the field indicates that there are seven (7) major and five (5) minor faults that control the fluid movement in the Ahuachapan area. Some of the faults act as a barrier to flow as indicated by large temperature declines towards the north and west. Other faults act as preferential pathways to flow. The Ahuachapan Andesites provide good horizontal permeability to flow and provide most of the fluids to the wells. The underlying Older Agglomerates also contribute to well production, but considerably less than the Andesites. 84 refs.

Aunzo, Z.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Laky, C.; Lippmann, M.J.; Steingrimsson, B.; Truesdell, A.H.; Witherspoon, P.A. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Icelandic National Energy Authority, Reykjavik (Iceland); Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA); Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

100-N Area Decision Unit Target Analyte List Development for Soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the process used to identify source area target analytes in support of the 100-N Area remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) addendum to the Integrated 100 Area Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study Work Plan (DOE/RL-2008-46, Rev. 0).

Ovink, R.

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

377

Reviving Abandoned Reservoirs with High-Pressure Air Injection: Application in a Fractured and Karsted Dolomite Reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite declining production rates, existing reservoirs in the United States contain vast volumes of remaining oil that is not being effectively recovered. This oil resource constitutes a huge target for the development and application of modern, cost-effective technologies for producing oil. Chief among the barriers to the recovery of this oil are the high costs of designing and implementing conventional advanced recovery technologies in these mature, in many cases pressure-depleted, reservoirs. An additional, increasingly significant barrier is the lack of vital technical expertise necessary for the application of these technologies. This lack of expertise is especially notable among the small operators and independents that operate many of these mature, yet oil-rich, reservoirs. We addressed these barriers to more effective oil recovery by developing, testing, applying, and documenting an innovative technology that can be used by even the smallest operator to significantly increase the flow of oil from mature U.S. reservoirs. The Bureau of Economic Geology and Goldrus Producing Company assembled a multidisciplinary team of geoscientists and engineers to evaluate the applicability of high-pressure air injection (HPAI) in revitalizing a nearly abandoned carbonate reservoir in the Permian Basin of West Texas. The Permian Basin, the largest oil-bearing basin in North America, contains more than 70 billion barrels of remaining oil in place and is an ideal venue to validate this technology. We have demonstrated the potential of HPAI for oil-recovery improvement in preliminary laboratory tests and a reservoir pilot project. To more completely test the technology, this project emphasized detailed characterization of reservoir properties, which were integrated to access the effectiveness and economics of HPAI. The characterization phase of the project utilized geoscientists and petroleum engineers from the Bureau of Economic Geology and the Department of Petroleum Engineering (both at The University of Texas at Austin) to define the controls on fluid flow in the reservoir as a basis for developing a reservoir model. The successful development of HPAI technology has tremendous potential for increasing the flow of oil from deep carbonate reservoirs in the Permian Basin, a target resource that can be conservatively estimated at more than 1.5 billion barrels. Successful implementation in the field chosen for demonstration, for example, could result in the recovery of more than 34 million barrels of oil that will not otherwise be produced. Geological and petrophysical analysis of available data at Barnhart field reveals the following important observations: (1) the Barnhart Ellenburger reservoir is similar to most other Ellenburger reservoirs in terms of depositional facies, diagenesis, and petrophysical attributes; (2) the reservoir is characterized by low to moderate matrix porosity much like most other Ellenburger reservoirs in the Permian Basin; (3) karst processes (cave formation, infill, and collapse) have substantially altered stratigraphic architecture and reservoir properties; (4) porosity and permeability increase with depth and may be associated with the degree of karst-related diagenesis; (5) tectonic fractures overprint the reservoir, improving overall connectivity; (6) oil-saturation profiles show that the oil-water contact (OWC) is as much as 125 ft lower than previous estimations; (7) production history and trends suggest that this reservoir is very similar to other solution-gas-drive reservoirs in the Permian Basin; and (8) reservoir simulation study showed that the Barnhart reservoir is a good candidate for HPAI and that application of horizontal-well technology can improve ultimate resource recovery from the reservoir.

Robert Loucks; Stephen C. Ruppel; Dembla Dhiraj; Julia Gale; Jon Holder; Jeff Kane; Jon Olson; John A. Jackson; Katherine G. Jackson

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

378

Influences of salt structures on reservoir rocks in block L-2, Dutch continental shelf  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the subsurface of the Netherlands Continental Shelf, thick layers of Zechstein salt have developed into salt domes and ridges that pierce through the overlying formations. To measure the range of lateral influence of the salt in these structures on the sandstone reservoir rocks of the Mesozoic sequence, a cementation model was developed. The target area, Block L-2, was chosen for the presence of salt domes, wells, and reservoir rocks. The L-2 case study has been performed on two Triassic sandstone intervals. The lower, Volpriehausen, sandstone showed halite cementation in one well, located within several 100 m from a salt dome. Four other wells, located more than 1.5 km from a salt structure, did not show any signs of halite cementation. Therefore, the lateral influence of salt domes on the surrounding reservoir rock is, in this case, limited to less than 1.5 km at 3-4 km depth. A slightly shallower Triassic sandstone (Detfurth) shows more frequent halite cementation. This cementation can be attributed to early seepage from overlying Rot salt brines.Triassic Rot salt is present above depletion areas of the Zechstein salt structures, and in such a way the seepage can be seen as an indirect influence of the salt structures.

Dronkert, H. (Delft Univ. of Technology, Delft (Netherlands)); Remmelts, G. (Geological Survey of the Netherlands, Haarlem (Netherlands))

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Facies Analysis and Reservoir Characterization of Subtidal, Intertidal, and Supratidal Zones of the Mudstone-rich Entrada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the San Rafael Swell. Porosity and permeability of the facies in this area indicate excellent reservoir potential in three of eight facies that were studied. Porosities of these potential reservoirs ranged from 11-22%, with permeabilities ranging from 44-430md. These high quality reservoir facies are surrounded

Seamons, Kent E.

380

Characterization of oil and gas reservoir heterogeneity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research described In this report addresses the internal architecture of two specific reservoir types: restricted-platform carbonates and fluvial-deltaic sandstones. Together, these two reservoir types contain more than two-thirds of the unrecovered mobile oil remaining ill Texas. The approach followed in this study was to develop a strong understanding of the styles of heterogeneity of these reservoir types based on a detailed outcrop description and a translation of these findings into optimized recovery strategies in select subsurface analogs. Research targeted Grayburg Formation restricted-platform carbonate outcrops along the Algerita Escarpment and In Stone Canyon In southeastern New Mexico and Ferron deltaic sandstones in central Utah as analogs for the North Foster (Grayburg) and Lake Creek (Wilcox) units, respectively. In both settings, sequence-stratigraphic style profoundly influenced between-well architectural fabric and permeability structure. It is concluded that reservoirs of different depositional origins can therefore be categorized Into a heterogeneity matrix'' based on varying intensity of vertical and lateral heterogeneity. The utility of the matrix is that it allows prediction of the nature and location of remaining mobile oil. Highly stratified reservoirs such as the Grayburg, for example, will contain a large proportion of vertically bypassed oil; thus, an appropriate recovery strategy will be waterflood optimization and profile modification. Laterally heterogeneous reservoirs such as deltaic distributary systems would benefit from targeted infill drilling (possibly with horizontal wells) and improved areal sweep efficiency. Potential for advanced recovery of remaining mobile oil through heterogeneity-based advanced secondary recovery strategies In Texas is projected to be an Incremental 16 Bbbl. In the Lower 48 States this target may be as much as 45 Bbbl at low to moderate oil prices over the near- to mid-term.

Tyler, N.; Barton, M.D.; Bebout, D.G.; Fisher, R.S.; Grigsby, J.D.; Guevara, E.; Holtz, M.; Kerans, C.; Nance, H.S.; Levey, R.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Conceptual Model At Raft River Geothermal Area (1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Conceptual Model Activity Date 1981 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Use geoscience data to develop a conceptual model of the reservoir. Notes The geoscience data gathered in the drilling and testing of seven geothermal wells suggest that the thermal reservoir is: (a) produced from fractures found at the contact metamorphic zone, apparently the base of detached normal faulting from the Bridge and Horse Well Fault zones of the Jim Sage Mountains; (b) anisotropic, with the major axis of hydraulic

382

Three-dimensional Modeling of Fracture Clusters in Geothermal Reservoirs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objective: to develop a 3-D numerical model for simulating mode I; II; and III (tensile; shear; and tearing propagation of multiple fractures using the virtual multi-dimensional internal bond (VMIB); to predict geothermal reservoir stimulation.

383

Putting integrated reservoir characterization into practice - in house training  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for even more efficient reservoir characterization and management has forced a change in the way Mobil Oil provides technical support to its production operations. We`ve learned that to be successful, a good understanding of the reservoir is essential. This includes an understanding of the technical and business significance of reservoir heterogeneities at different stages of field development. A multi-disciplinary understanding of the business of integrated reservoir characterization is essential and to facilitate this understanding, Mobil has developed a highly successful {open_quotes}Reservoir Characterization Field Seminar{close_quotes}. Through specific team based case studies that incorporate outcrop examples and data the program provides participants the opportunity to explore historic and alternative approaches to reservoir description, characterization and management. We explore appropriate levels and timing of data gathering, technology applications, risk assessment and management practices at different stages of field development. The case studies presented throughout the course are a unique element of the program which combine real life and hypothetical problem sets that explore how different technical disciplines interact, the approaches to a problem solving they use, the assumptions and uncertainties contained in their contributions and the impact those conclusions may have on other disciplines involved in the overall reservoir management process. The team building aspect of the course was an added bonus.

Wright, F.M. Jr.; Best, D.A.; Clarke, R.T. [Mobile Exploration and Producing Technical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. Through December 2001, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the First Quarter 2002, the project team developed an accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project and began implementing the associated well work in March. The Tar V pilot steamflood project will be converted to post-steamflood cold water injection in April 2002. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Most of the 2001 well work resulted in maintaining oil and gross fluid production and water injection rates. Reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are at 88% and 91% hydrostatic levels, respectively. Well work during the first quarter and plans for 2002 are described in the Reservoir Management section. The steamflood operation in the Tar V pilot project is mature and profitable. Recent production performance has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations that have been addressed during this quarter. As the fluid production temperatures were beginning to exceed 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and will be converted to cold water injection next quarter.

Scott Hara

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

Class III Mid-Term Project, "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involved improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective has been to transfer technology that can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The first budget period addressed several producibility problems in the Tar II-A and Tar V thermal recovery operations that are common in SBC reservoirs. A few of the advanced technologies developed include a three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic geologic model, a 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model to aid in reservoir management and subsequent post-steamflood development work, and a detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rocks and fluids. State of the art operational work included drilling and performing a pilot steam injection and production project via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors), implementing a hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steamflood area to improve thermal efficiency, installing a 2400-foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location, testing a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems, and starting on an advanced reservoir management system through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. The second budget period phase (BP2) continued to implement state-of-the-art operational work to optimize thermal recovery processes, improve well drilling and completion practices, and evaluate the geomechanical characteristics of the producing formations. The objectives were to further improve reservoir characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, test the proficiency of the three-dimensional geologic and thermal reservoir simulation models, identify the high permeability thief zones to reduce water breakthrough and cycling, and analyze the nonuniform distribution of the remaining oil in place. This work resulted in the redevelopment of the Tar II-A and Tar V post-steamflood projects by drilling several new wells and converting idle wells to improve injection sweep efficiency and more effectively drain the remaining oil reserves. Reservoir management work included reducing water cuts, maintaining or increasing oil production, and evaluating and minimizing further thermal-related formation compaction. The BP2 project utilized all the tools and knowledge gained throughout the DOE project to maximize recovery of the oil in place.

Scott Hara

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research carried out in the Department of Petroleum Engineering at Stanford University from September 1997 - September 1998 under the second year of a three-year grant from the Department of Energy on the "Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs." The research effort is an integrated study of the factors affecting gas injection, from the pore scale to the field scale, and involves theoretical analysis, laboratory experiments, and numerical simulation. The original proposal described research in four areas: (1) Pore scale modeling of three phase flow in porous media; (2) Laboratory experiments and analysis of factors influencing gas injection performance at the core scale with an emphasis on the fundamentals of three phase flow; (3) Benchmark simulations of gas injection at the field scale; and (4) Development of streamline-based reservoir simulator. Each state of the research is planned to provide input and insight into the next stage, such that at the end we should have an integrated understanding of the key factors affecting field scale displacements.

Blunt, Martin J.; Orr, Franklin M.

1999-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

387

GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE AND RESERVOIR INVESTIGATIONS OF U.S. BUREAU OF RECLAMATION LEASEHOLDS AT EAST MESA, IMPERIAL VALLEY, CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of geothermal resources in the Imperial Valley ofO N GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE INVESTIGATIONS IMPERIAL VALLEY. C Ageothermal reservoir underlying the East Mesa area, Imperial Valley,

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Aquatic Studies at the Proposed George Parkhouse I Reservoir Site on the South Sulphur River in Northeast Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In 1997, the Texas Water Development Board identified George Parkhouse I on the South Sulphur River in northeast Texas as a potential reservoir site. This aquatic survey of a future reservoir site is designed to provide information about stream fish...

Gelwick, Frances P.; Burgess, Christine C.

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

Prediction of Gas Injection Performance for Heterogeneous Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes research into gas injection processes in four main areas: laboratory experiments to measure three-phase relative permeability; network modeling to predict three-phase relative permeability; benchmark simulations of gas injection and water flooding at the field scale; and the development of fast streamline techniques to study field-scale ow. The aim of the work is to achieve a comprehensive description of gas injection processes from the pore to the core to the reservoir scale. To this end, measurements of three-phase relative pemeability have been made and compared with predictions from pore scale modeling. At the field scale, streamline-based simulation has been extended to compositional displacements, providing a rapid method to predict oil recovery from gas injection.

Franklin M. Orr, Jr.; Martin J. Blunt

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

Underground natural gas storage reservoir management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to research technologies and methodologies that will reduce the costs associated with the operation and maintenance of underground natural gas storage. This effort will include a survey of public information to determine the amount of natural gas lost from underground storage fields, determine the causes of this lost gas, and develop strategies and remedial designs to reduce or stop the gas loss from selected fields. Phase I includes a detailed survey of US natural gas storage reservoirs to determine the actual amount of natural gas annually lost from underground storage fields. These reservoirs will be ranked, the resultant will include the amount of gas and revenue annually lost. The results will be analyzed in conjunction with the type (geologic) of storage reservoirs to determine the significance and impact of the gas loss. A report of the work accomplished will be prepared. The report will include: (1) a summary list by geologic type of US gas storage reservoirs and their annual underground gas storage losses in ft{sup 3}; (2) a rank by geologic classifications as to the amount of gas lost and the resultant lost revenue; and (3) show the level of significance and impact of the losses by geologic type. Concurrently, the amount of storage activity has increased in conjunction with the net increase of natural gas imports as shown on Figure No. 3. Storage is playing an ever increasing importance in supplying the domestic energy requirements.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

EIS-0404: Los Vaqueros Reservoir Expansion Project, California | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

404: Los Vaqueros Reservoir Expansion Project, California 404: Los Vaqueros Reservoir Expansion Project, California EIS-0404: Los Vaqueros Reservoir Expansion Project, California Summary This EIS/Environmental Impact Report was prepared by the Department of the Interior (Bureau of Reclamation, Mid-Pacific Region) and the Contra Costa Water District to evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to enlarge the existing Los Vaqueros Reservoir in Contra Costa County, California. DOE's Western Area Power Administration (Western) was a cooperating agency because it has jurisdiction over transmission facilities that were expected to be relocated under the proposed action. Based on project changes, however, Western has no action and therefore will not adopt the EIS or issue a ROD. Public Comment Opportunities No public comment opportunities available at this time.

392

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization-  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Use Of Electrical Surveys For Geothermal Reservoir Characterization- Beowawe Geothermal Field Details Activities (4) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The STAR geothermal reservoir simulator was used to model the natural state of the Beowawe geothermal field, and to compute the subsurface distributions of temperature and salinity which were in turn employed to calculate pore-fluid resistivity. Archie's law, which relates formation resistivity to porosity and pore-fluid resistivity, was adopted to infer formation resistivity distribution. Subsequently, DC, MT and SP postprocessors were used to compute the expected response corresponding to

393

Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Update on the Raft River Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Since the last conference, a fourth well has been drilled to an intermediate depth and tested as a production well, with plans to use this well in the long term for injection of fluids into the strata above the production strata. The third, triple legged well has been fully pump tested, and the recovery of the second well from an injection well back to production status has revealed very interesting data on the reservoir conditions around that well. Both interference testing and geochemistry analysis shows that the third well is producing from a different aquifer

394

A frequency monitoring system development for wide-area power grid protection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There have been recent research activities on GPS-based FNET to prevent wide-area blackouts by monitoring frequency deviation. This paper introduces a system for monitoring regional frequencies in power grid deve...

Yoon Sang Kim; Junho Ko; Dong-Kwang Shin; Chul-Hwan Kim; Chul-Won Park

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Recreation land policies of Texas river authorities operating reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for future water in Texas by the Texas Department of Water Resources: Present use of lakes and reservoirs for water- oriented recreation demonstrates the need to include recreation as one of the many purposes of water 13 development projects... by the reservoir owner. 26 3. Another factor is that most reservoir owners do not let the1r land stand idle. Uses are found which either increase the benefits of the project' to the owner or public, or at least balance the costs of holding the land pending...

Ruesink, Lou Ellen

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

A petrophysics and reservoir performance-based reservoir characterization of Womack Hill (Upper Smackover) Field (Alabama)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as well as to optimize the operating practices in the field. We used a non-parametric regression algorithm (ACE) to develop correlations between the core and well log data. These correlations allow us to estimate reservoir permeability at the "flow unit...

Avila Urbaneja, Juan Carlos

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

397

DOE-Funded Research at Stanford Sees Results in Reservoir Characteriza...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Geothermal Systems (EGS). This research will help developers learn more about the fracture systems in geothermal reservoirs, so that they may better predict the results of...

398

Production optimization of a tight sandstone gas reservoir with well completions: A numerical simulation study.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Tight gas sands have significant gas reserves, which requires cost-effective well completion technology and reservoir development plans for viable commercial exploitation. In this study, a (more)

Defeu, Cyrille W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Understanding motivations of potential partners to develop a public outdoor recreation center in an urban area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Participation in traditional outdoor activities has declined in recent decades, causing concern for agencies involved in managing areas where citizens can pursue these activities. With limited resources to address this complex challenge, collaboration among several stakeholders seems to provide a winwin solution. An outdoor center that offers activities such as fishing, hunting, trapping and canoeing is one collaborative option. The purpose of this study is to better understand the motivations of organizations to collaborate in the development and operation of an outdoor center in the U.S. state of Michigan. Expectancy theory and social exchange theory provided a unique approach to understanding potential partners? expectations regarding positive outcomes and costs of collaboration. Through semi-structured interviews with potential partners, researchers found that a prevalent expected benefit of collaboration is the presence of a venue near diverse, urban populations at which to conduct outdoor programming. In addition, patterns emerged in the anticipated benefits from (and contributions to) the partnership based on the types of organizations interviewed. Insights into organizations? motivations to collaborate, based on these two theoretical frameworks, will aid recreation providers in creating appropriate selection criteria for partners and strategies for engaging them in collaborative projects to enhance outdoor recreation participation. Management implications When planning a new recreation center, it is important to identify potential collaborating organizations, and to integrate and coordinate the expectations of those organizations as early as possible. In order to balance the varying interests, it is helpful for managers: To categorize potential collaborators based on the nature of their relationship with the initiating organization (e.g., participant-focused, activity-focused, education-focused, manufacturers/retailers), as these classifications are typically characterized by different motivations and expectations; To understand individual preferences and agendas of each of the respective future partners; To emphasize the increasing efficiencies associated with cooperation; To increase their awareness of both benefits and costs anticipated by the potential partners; and To consider the various types of potential contributions, beyond financial support, that partners can provide. These may include: equipment, experts, participants and volunteers.

Christine Carmichael; Dan McCole

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Quarterly report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current project is a systematic research effort aimed at quantifying relationships between process mechanisms that can lead to improved recovery from gas injection processes performed in heterogeneous Class 1 and Class 2 reservoirs. It will provide a rational basis for the design of displacement processes that take advantage of crossflow due to capillary, gravity and viscous forces to offset partially the adverse effects of heterogeneity. In effect, the high permeability zones are used to deliver fluid by crossflow to zones that would otherwise be flooded only very slowly. Thus, the research effort is divided into five areas: Development of miscibility in multicomponent systems; Design estimates for nearly miscible displacements; Design of miscible floods for fractured reservoirs; Compositional flow visualization experiments; and Simulation of near-miscible flow in heterogeneous systems. The status of the research effort in each area is reviewed briefly in the following section.

Orr, F.M. Jr.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "reservoir development area" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

IMPROVED MISCIBLE NITROGEN FLOOD PERFORMANCE UTILIZING ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND HORIZONTAL LATERALS IN A CLASS I RESERVOIR - EAST BINGER (MARCHAND) UNIT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work associated with Budget Period 1 of the East Binger (Marchand) Unit project is nearing completion. A major aspect of this project is accurate modeling of the performance of horizontal wells. Well EBU 37-3H, the first horizontal well drilled in the unit, was drilled in the second quarter of 2001. After much difficulty establishing economic production from the well, the well was hydraulically fractured in November 2001. Post-treatment production has been very encouraging and is significantly better than a vertical well drilled in a similar setting. International Reservoir Technologies, Inc. has completed the final history match of the pilot area reservoir simulation model, including tuning to the performance of the horizontal well. The model's predicted reservoir pressure gradient between injection and production wells accurately matches observed data from the field, a significant improvement from prior model predictions. The model's predicted gas injection profiles now also more accurately match field data. Work has begun toward evaluating the optimum development scenario with the pilot model. Initially, four scenarios will be evaluated--two involving all horizontal infill wells, one involving all vertical infill wells, and one involving a combination of vertical and horizontal infill wells. The model cases for these scenarios have been defined, and construction of them is underway.

Joe Sinner

2002-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

402

Department of Earth Sciences www.rhul.ac.uk/earthsciences Page 1 of 2 Developing reservoir presence probability mapping using stratigraphic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

research, specialist service provider, exploration, and production geosciences areas within the oil and gas code to run and post- process multiple model scenarios to produce conditional frequency maps., 2008,Stratigraphic modelling of turbidite prospects to reduce exploration risk, Petroleum Geoscience, v

Sheldon, Nathan D.

403

Launois, L., Veslot, J., Irz, P., and Argillier, C. (2010) Selecting fish-based metrics responding to human pressures in French natural lakes and reservoirs:towards the development of a fish-based index (FBI) for French lakes, Ecology of Freshwater Fish 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Launois, L., Veslot, J., Irz, P., and Argillier, C. (2010) Selecting fish-based metrics responding to human pressures in French natural lakes and reservoirs:towards the development of a fish-based index (FBI) for French lakes, Ecology of Freshwater Fish 2010. _ 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/ S. Accepted

Boyer, Edmond

404

Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced reservoir characterization techniques are being used at the Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The reservoir characterization, geologic modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir.

Murphy, M.B.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Advanced reservoir characterization for improved oil recovery in a New Mexico Delaware basin project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County, New Mexico is a field demonstration site in the Department of Energy Class III program. The basic problem at the Nash Draw Pool is the low recovery typically observed in similar Delaware fields. By comparing a control area using standard infill drilling techniques to a pilot area developed using advanced reservoir characterization methods, the goal of the project is to demonstrate that advanced technology can significantly improve oil recovery. During the first year of the project, four new producing wells were drilled, serving as data acquisition wells. Vertical seismic profiles and a 3-D seismic survey were acquired to assist in interwell correlations and facies prediction. Limited surface access at the Nash Draw Pool, caused by proximity of underground potash mining and surface playa lakes, limits development with conventional drilling. Combinations of vertical and horizontal wells combined with selective completions are being evaluated to optimize production performance. Based on the production response of similar Delaware fields, pressure maintenance is a likely requirement at the Nash Draw Pool. A detailed reservoir model of pilot area was developed, and enhanced recovery options, including waterflooding, lean gas, and carbon dioxide injection, are being evaluated.

Martin, F.D.; Kendall, R.P.; Whitney, E.M. [Dave Martin and Associates, Inc., Socorro, NM (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Analysis of stress sensitivity and its influence on oil productionfrom tight reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a study of the relationship betweenpermeability and effective stress in tight petroleum reser