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1

United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastrucutre TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support  

SciTech Connect

The United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program at the Idaho National Laboratory manages and provides project management, technical, quality engineering, quality inspection and nuclear material support for the United States Department of Energy sponsored University Reactor Fuels Program. This program provides fresh, unirradiated nuclear fuel to Domestic University Research Reactor Facilities and is responsible for the return of the DOE-owned, irradiated nuclear fuel over the life of the program. This presentation will introduce the program management team, the universities supported by the program, the status of the program and focus on the return process of irradiated nuclear fuel for long term storage at DOE managed receipt facilities. It will include lessons learned from research reactor facilities that have successfully shipped spent fuel elements to DOE receipt facilities.

Douglas Morrell

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

High Density Fuel Development for Research Reactors  

SciTech Connect

An international effort to develop, qualify, and license high and very high density fuels has been underway for several years within the framework of multi-national RERTR programs. The current development status is the result of significant contributions from many laboratories, specifically CNEA in Argentina, AECL in Canada, CEA in France, TUM in Germany, KAERI in Korea, VNIIM, RDIPE, IPPE, NCCP and RIARR in Russia, INL, ANL and Y-12 in USA. These programs are mainly engaged with UMo dispersion fuels with densities from 6 to 8 gU/cm3 (high density fuel) and UMo monolithic fuel with density as high as 16 gU/cm3 (very high density fuel). This paper, mainly focused on the French & US programs, gives the status of high density UMo fuel development and perspectives on their qualification.

Daniel Wachs; Dennis Keiser; Mitchell Meyer; Douglas Burkes; Curtis Clark; Glenn Moore; Jan-Fong Jue; Totju Totev; Gerard Hofman; Tom Wiencek; Yeon So Kim; Jim Snelgrove

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR TECHNICAL NUCLEAR FORENSICS  

SciTech Connect

Technical nuclear forensics (TNF) refers to the collection, analysis and evaluation of pre- and post-detonation radiological or nuclear materials, devices, and/or debris. TNF is an integral component, complementing traditional forensics and investigative work, to help enable the attribution of discovered radiological or nuclear material. Research is needed to improve the capabilities of TNF. One research area of interest is determining the isotopic signatures of research reactors. Research reactors are a potential source of both radiological and nuclear material. Research reactors are often the least safeguarded type of reactor; they vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power, and burn-up. Many research reactors are fueled with highly-enriched uranium (HEU), up to {approx}93% {sup 235}U, which could potentially be used as weapons material. All of them have significant amounts of radiological material with which a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) could be built. Therefore, the ability to attribute if material originated from or was produced in a specific research reactor is an important tool in providing for the security of the United States. Currently there are approximately 237 operating research reactors worldwide, another 12 are in temporary shutdown and 224 research reactors are reported as shut down. Little is currently known about the isotopic signatures of spent research reactor fuel. An effort is underway at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to analyze spent research reactor fuel to determine these signatures. Computer models, using reactor physics codes, are being compared to the measured analytes in the spent fuel. This allows for improving the reactor physics codes in modeling research reactors for the purpose of nuclear forensics. Currently the Oak Ridge Research reactor (ORR) is being modeled and fuel samples are being analyzed for comparison. Samples of an ORR spent fuel assembly were taken by SRNL for analytical and radiochemical analysis. The fuel assembly was modeled using MONTEBURNS(MCNP5/ ORIGEN2.2) and MCNPX/CINDER90. The results from the models have been compared to each other and to the measured data.

Nichols, T.; Beals, D.; Sternat, M.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

4

Sodium fast reactor fuels and materials : research needs.  

SciTech Connect

An expert panel was assembled to identify gaps in fuels and materials research prior to licensing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) design. The expert panel considered both metal and oxide fuels, various cladding and duct materials, structural materials, fuel performance codes, fabrication capability and records, and transient behavior of fuel types. A methodology was developed to rate the relative importance of phenomena and properties both as to importance to a regulatory body and the maturity of the technology base. The technology base for fuels and cladding was divided into three regimes: information of high maturity under conservative operating conditions, information of low maturity under more aggressive operating conditions, and future design expectations where meager data exist.

Denman, Matthew R.; Porter, Douglas (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Art (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Lambert, John (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Hayes, Steven (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting. Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Idaho Falls, ID); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

FUEL ELEMENTS FOR THE ARGONNE ADVANCED RESEARCH REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

The core design and the fuel element concept for the high-flux Argonne Advanced Research Reactor are presented. The core is cooled and moderated by light water and utilizes beryllium as a reflector. The fuel element assembly is rhomboidal in cross section and consists of 27 plates fastened together at their edges by dovetailed locking keys, and at each end by end fittings. Each fuel plate is 40 mils thick and contains a uniform dispersion of highly enriched UO/ sub 2/ particles, up to a maximum of 37 wt%, in a matrix of sintered stainless steel powder. A 5 mil thick stainless steel cladding is metallurgically bonded to each side of the fueled matrix. (N.W.R.)

Adolph, N.R.; Silberstein, M.S.; Weinstein, A.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Development of Technical Nuclear Forensics for Spent Research Reactor Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pre-detonation technical nuclear forensics techniques for research reactor spent fuel were developed in a collaborative project with Savannah River National Lab ratory. An inverse analysis method was employed to reconstruct reactor parameters from a spent fuel sample using results from a radiochemical analysis. In the inverse analysis, a reactor physics code is used as a forward model. Verification and validation of different reactor physics codes was performed for usage in the inverse analysis. The verification and validation process consisted of two parts. The first is a variance analysis of Monte Carlo reactor physics burnup simulation results. The codes used in this work are MONTEBURNS and MCNPX/CINDER. Both utilize Monte Carlo transport calculations for reaction rate and flux results. Neither code has a variance analysis that will propagate through depletion steps, so a method to quantify and understand the variance propagation through these depletion calculations was developed. The second verification and validation process consisted of comparing reactor physics code output isotopic compositions to radiochemical analysis results. A sample from an Oak Ridge Research Reactor spent fuel assembly was acquired through a drilling process. This sample was then dissolved in nitric acid and diluted in three different quantities, creating three separate samples. A radiochemical analysis was completed and the results were compared to simulation outputs at different levels ofdetail. After establishing a forward model, an inverse analysis was developed to re-construct the burnup, initial uranium isotopic compositions, and cooling time of a research reactor spent fuel sample. A convergence acceleration technique was used that consisted of an analytical calculation to predict burnup, initial 235U, and 236U enrichments. The analytic calculation results may also be used stand alone or in a database search algorithm. In this work, a reactor physics code is used as a for- ward model with the analytic results as initial conditions in a numerical optimization algorithm. In the numerical analysis, the burnup and initial uranium isotopic com- positions are reconstructed until the iterative spent fuel characteristics converge with the measured data. Upon convergence of the sample’s burnup and initial uranium isotopic composition, the cooling time can be reconstructed. To reconstruct cooling time, the standard decay equation is inverted and solved for time. Two methods were developed. One method uses the converged burnup and initial uranium isotopic compositions along in a reactor depletion simulation. The second method uses an isotopic signature that does not decay out of its mass bin and has a simple production chain. An example would be 137Cs which decays into the stable 137Ba. Similar results are achieved with both methods, but extended shutdown time or time away from power results in over prediction of the cooling time. The over prediction of cooling time and comparison of different burnup reconstruction isotope results are indicator signatures of extended shutdown or time away from power. Due to dynamic operation in time and function, detailed power history reconstruction for research reactors is very challenging. Frequent variations in power, repeated variable shutdown time length, and experimentation history affect the spectrum an individual assembly is burned with such that full reactor parameter reconstruction is difficult. The results from this technical nuclear forensic analysis may be used with law enforcement, intelligence data, macroscopic and microscopic sample characteristics in a process called attribution to suggest or exclude possible sources of origin for a sample.

Sternat, Matthew 1982-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS OF FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR srENT NUCLEAR FUEL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR srENT NUCLEAR FUEL FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR srENT NUCLEAR FUEL TRANSPORTATION ALONG OTHER THAN~. PRESENTATIVE ROUTE FROM CONCORD NAVAL WEAPO~~ STATION TO IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LADORA TORY Introduction The Department of Energy is planning to transport foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel by rail from the Concord Naval Weapons Station (CNWS), Concord, California, to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The environmental analysis supporting the decision to transport, by rail or truck, foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel from CNWS to the INEEL is contained in +he Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliftration Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor

8

Effect of reduced enrichment on the fuel cycle for research reactors  

SciTech Connect

The new fuels developed by the RERTR Program and by other international programs for application in research reactors with reduced uranium enrichment (<20% EU) are discussed. It is shown that these fuels, combined with proper fuel-element design and fuel-management strategies, can provide at least the same core residence time as high-enrichment fuels in current use, and can frequently significantly extend it. The effect of enrichment reduction on other components of the research reactor fuel cycle, such as uranium and enrichment requirements, fuel fabrication, fuel shipment, and reprocessing are also briefly discussed with their economic implications. From a systematic comparison of HEU and LEU cores for the same reference research reactor, it is concluded that the new fuels have a potential for reducing the research reactor fuel cycle costs while reducing, at the same time, the uranium enrichment of the fuel.

Travelli, A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

High uranium density dispersion fuel for the reduced enrichment of research and test reactors program.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work describes the fabrication of a high uranium density fuel for the Reduced Enrichment of Research and Test Reactors Program. In an effort to… (more)

[No author

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research and Testing | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research June 01, 2013 Severe Accident Test Station ORNL is the focus point for Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel cladding research and testing. The purpose of this research is to furnish U.S. industry (EPRI, Areva, Westinghouse), and regulators (NRC) with much-needed data supporting safe and economical nuclear power generation and used fuel management. LWR fuel cladding work is tightly integrated with ORNL accident tolerant fuel development and used fuel disposition programs thereby providing a powerful capability that couples basic materials science research with the nuclear applications research and development. The ORNL LWR fuel cladding program consists of five complementary areas of research: Accident tolerant fuel and cladding material testing under design

11

Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Global Threat Reduction Initiative: Global Threat Reduction Initiative: U.S. Nuclear Remove Program Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel (FRR SNF) Acceptance 2007 DOE TEC Meeting Chuck Messick DOE/NNSA/SRS 2 Contents * Program Objective and Policy * Program implementation status * Shipment Information * Operational Logistics * Lessons Learned * Conclusion 3 U.S. Nuclear Remove Program Objective * To play a key role in the Global Threat Reduction Remove Program supporting permanent threat reduction by accepting program eligible material. * Works in conjunction with the Global Threat Reduction Convert Program to accept program eligible material as an incentive to core conversion providing a disposition path for HEU and LEU during the life of the Acceptance Program. 4 Reasons for the Policy

12

Analyses for conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

The 5 MW Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) is a heterogeneous, heavy water moderated and cooled reactor, fueled with highly-enriched uranium aluminum alloy fuel plates. The GTRR is required to convert to low enrichment (LEU) fuel in accordance with USNRC policy. Results of design and safety analyses performed by the RERTR Program at the Argonne National Laboratory for LEU conversion of the GTRR are summarized. Only those parameters which could change as a result of replacing the fuel are addressed. The performance of the reactor and all safety margins with LEU fuel are expected to be about the same as those with the current HEU fuel.

Matos, J.E.; Mo, S.C.; Woodruff, W.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Analyses for conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 5 MW Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) is a heterogeneous, heavy water moderated and cooled reactor, fueled with highly-enriched uranium aluminum alloy fuel plates. The GTRR is required to convert to low enrichment (LEU) fuel in accordance with USNRC policy. Results of design and safety analyses performed by the RERTR Program at the Argonne National Laboratory for LEU conversion of the GTRR are summarized. Only those parameters which could change as a result of replacing the fuel are addressed. The performance of the reactor and all safety margins with LEU fuel are expected to be about the same as those with the current HEU fuel.

Matos, J.E.; Mo, S.C.; Woodruff, W.L.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Nuclear nonproliferation: Concerns with US delays in accepting foregin research reactors` spent fuel  

SciTech Connect

One key US nonproliferation goal is to discourage use of highly enriched uranium fuel (HEU), which can be used to make nuclear bombs, in civilian nuclear programs worldwide. DOE`s Off-Site Fuels Policy for taking back spent HEU from foreign research reactors was allowed to expire due to environmental reasons. This report provides information on the effects of delays in renewing the Off-Site Fuels Policy on US nonproliferation goals and programs (specifically the reduced enrichment program), DOE`s efforts to renew the fuels policy, and the price to be charged to the operators of foreign reactors for DOE`s activities in taking back spent fuel.

1994-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

15

Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect

This document has been prepared to assist research reactor operators possessing spent fuel containing enriched uranium of United States origin to prepare part of the documentation necessary to ship this fuel to the United States. Data are included on the nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate, and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies. Isotopic masses of U, Np, Pu and Am that are present in spent research reactor fuel are estimated for MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assembly types. The isotopic masses of each fuel assembly type are given as functions of U-235 burnup in the spent fuel, and of initial U-235 enrichment and U-235 mass in the fuel assembly. Photon dose rates of spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are estimated for fuel assemblies with up to 80% U-235 burnup and specific power densities between 0.089 and 2.857 MW/kg[sup 235]U, and for fission product decay times of up to 20 years. Thermal decay heat loads are estimated for spent fuel based upon the fuel assembly irradiation history (average assembly power vs. elapsed time) and the spent fuel cooling time.

Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

Foreign research reactor irradiated nuclear fuel inventories containing HEU and LEU of United States origin  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of foreign research reactor inventories of aluminum-based and TRIGA irradiated nuclear fuel elements containing highly enriched and low enriched uranium of United States origin that are anticipated in January 1996, January 2001, and January 2006. These fuels from 104 research reactors in 41 countries are the same aluminum-based and TRIGA fuels that were eligible for receipt under the Department of Energy`s Offsite Fuels Policy that was in effect in 1988. All fuel inventory and reactor data that were available as of December 1, 1994, have been included in the estimates of approximately 14,300 irradiated fuel elements in January 1996, 18,800 in January 2001, and 22,700 in January 2006.

Matos, J.E.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Summary engineering description of underwater fuel storage facility for foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

This document is a summary description for an Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) for foreign research reactor (FRR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A FRR SNF environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared and will include both wet and dry storage facilities as storage alternatives. For the UFSF presented in this document, a specific site is not chosen. This facility can be sited at any one of the five locations under consideration in the EIS. These locations are the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. Generic facility environmental impacts and emissions are provided in this report. A baseline fuel element is defined in Section 2.2, and the results of a fission product analysis are presented. Requirements for a storage facility have been researched and are summarized in Section 3. Section 4 describes three facility options: (1) the Centralized-UFSF, which would store the entire fuel element quantity in a single facility at a single location, (2) the Regionalized Large-UFSF, which would store 75% of the fuel element quantity in some region of the country, and (3) the Regionalized Small-UFSF, which would store 25% of the fuel element quantity, with the possibility of a number of these facilities in various regions throughout the country. The operational philosophy is presented in Section 5, and Section 6 contains a description of the equipment. Section 7 defines the utilities required for the facility. Cost estimates are discussed in Section 8, and detailed cost estimates are included. Impacts to worker safety, public safety, and the environment are discussed in Section 9. Accidental releases are presented in Section 10. Standard Environmental Impact Forms are included in Section 11.

Dahlke, H.J.; Johnson, D.A.; Rawlins, J.K.; Searle, D.K.; Wachs, G.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Fresh and Spent Nuclear Fuel Repatriation from the IRT-2000 Research Reactor Facility, Sofia, Bulgaria  

SciTech Connect

The IRT 2000 research reactor, operated by the Bulgarian Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE), safely shipped all of their Russian-origin nuclear fuel from the Republic of Bulgaria to the Russian Federation beginning in 2003 and completing in 2008. These fresh and spent fuel shipments removed all highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Bulgaria. The fresh fuel was shipped by air in December 2003 using trucks and a commercial cargo aircraft. One combined spent fuel shipment of HEU and low enriched uranium (LEU) was completed in July 2008 using high capacity VPVR/M casks transported by truck, barge, and rail. The HEU shipments were assisted by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) and the LEU spent fuel shipment was funded by Bulgaria. This report describes the work, approvals, organizations, equipment, and agreements required to complete these shipments and concludes with several major lessons learned.

K. J. Allen; T. G. Apostolov; I. S. Dimitrov

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Analyses for conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

This document presents information concerning: analyses for conversion of the Georgia Tech Research Reactor from HEU to LEU; changes to technical specifications mandated by the conversion of the GTRR to low enrichment fuel; changes in the Safety Analysis Report mandated by the conversion of the GTRR to low enrichment fuel; and copies of all changed pages of the SAR and the technical specifications.

Matos, J.E.; Mo, S.C.; Woodruff, W.L.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Development of a Fissile Materials Irradiation Capability for Advanced Fuel Testing at the MIT Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A fissile materials irradiation capability has been developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITR) to support nuclear engineering studies in the area of advanced fuels. The focus of the expected research is to investigate the basic properties of advanced nuclear fuels using small aggregates of fissile material. As such, this program is intended to complement the ongoing fuel evaluation programs at test reactors. Candidates for study at the MITR include vibration-packed annular fuel for light water reactors and microparticle fuels for high-temperature gas reactors. Technical considerations that pertain to the design of the MITR facility are enumerated including those specified by 10 CFR 50 concerning the definition of a research reactor and those contained in a separate license amendment that was issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to MIT for these types of experiments. The former includes limits on the cross-sectional area of the experiment, the physical form of the irradiated material, and the removal of heat. The latter addresses experiment reactivity worth, thermal-hydraulic considerations, avoidance of fission product release, and experiment specific temperature scrams.

Hu Linwen; Bernard, John A.; Hejzlar, Pavel; Kohse, Gordon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research reactor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Development and transfer of fuel fabrication and utilization technology for research reactors  

SciTech Connect

Approximately 300 research reactors supplied with US-enriched uranium are currently in operation in about 40 countries, with a variety of types, sizes, experiment capabilities and applications. Despite the usefulness and popularity of research reactors, relatively few innovations in their core design have been made in the last fifteen years. The main reason can be better understood by reviewing briefly the history of research reactor fuel technology and enrichment levels. Stringent requirements on the enrichment of the uranium to be used in research reactors were considered and a program was launched to assist research reactors in continuing their operation with the new requirements and with minimum penalties. The goal of the new program, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, is to develop the technical means to utilize LEU instead of HEU in research reactors without significant penalties in experiment performance, operating costs, reactor modifications, and safety characteristics. This paper reviews briefly the RERTR Program activities with special emphasis on the technology transfer aspects of interest to this conference.

Travelli, A.; Domagala, R.F.; Matos, J.E.; Snelgrove, J.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel acceptance criteria, the mass of uranium and transuranic elements in spent research reactor fuel must be specified. These data are, however, not always known or readily determined. It is the purpose of this report to provide estimates of these data for some of the more common research reactor fuel assembly types. The specific types considered here are MTR, TRIGA and DIDO fuel assemblies. The degree of physical protection given to spent fuel assemblies is largely dependent upon the photon dose rate of the spent fuel material. These data also, are not always known or readily determined. Because of a self-protecting dose rate level of radiation (dose rate greater than 100 ren-x/h at I m in air), it is important to know the dose rate of spent fuel assemblies at all time. Estimates of the photon dose rate for spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are given in this report.

Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Fuel development activities of the US RERTR Program. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the development and irradiation testing of high-density fuels for use with low-enriched uranium in research and test reactors is reported. Swelling and blister-threshold temperature data obtained from the examination of miniature fuel plates containing UAl/sub x/, U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/, or U/sub 3/Si dispersed in an aluminum matrix are presented. Combined with the results of metallurgical examinations, these data show that these four fuel types will perform adequately to full burnup of the /sup 235/U contained in the low-enriched fuel. The exothermic reaction of the uranium-silicide fuels with aluminum has been found to occur at about the same temperature as the melting of the aluminum matrix and cladding and to be essentially quenched by the melting endotherm. A new series of miniature fuel plate irradiations is also discussed.

Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Wiencek, T.C.; Copeland, G.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

A disposition strategy for highly enriched, aluminum-based fuel from research and test reactors  

SciTech Connect

The strategy proposed in this paper offers the Department of Energy an approach for disposing of aluminum-based, highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent fuels from foreign and domestic research reactors. The proposal is technically, socially, and economically sound. If implemented, it would advance US non-proliferation goals while also disposing of the spent fuel`s waste by timely and proven methods using existing technologies and facilities at SRS without prolonged and controversial storage of the spent fuel. The fuel would be processed through 221-H. The radioactive fission products (waste) would be treated along with existing SRS high level waste by vitrifying it as borosilicate glass in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for disposal in the national geological repository. The HEU would be isotopically diluted, during processing, to low-enriched uranium (LEU) which can not be used to make weapons, thus eliminating proliferation concerns. The LEU can be sold to fabricators of either research reactor fuel or commercial power fuel. This proposed processing-LEU recycle approach has several important advantages over other alternatives, including: Lowest capital investment; lowest net total cost; quickest route to acceptable waste form and final geologic disposal; and likely lowest safety, health, and environmental impacts.

McKibben, J.M.; Gould, T.H.; McDonell, W.R.; Bickford, W.E.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Preliminary neutronics calculations for conversion of the Tehran research reactor core from HEU to LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

The 5-MW highly enriched uranium (HEU)-fueled Tehran Research Reactor is considered for conversion to high-density, low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. A preliminary neutronics calculation is performed as part of the conversion goal. In this study, two cores are considered: the HEU reference core and a proposed LEU core similar to the reference core, and a proposed LEU core similar to the reference core, using standardized U[sub 3]Si[sub 2] plates with the option of different [sup 235]U loadings. Various possibilities are investigated for the conversion of HEU to LEU fuel elements with 20% enriched [sup 235]U loadings of 207 to 297 g [sup 235]U/element. For the same equilibrium cycle length, the fuels are compared for flux, power distribution, burnup, and reactivity.

Nejat, S.M.R. (McMaster Univ., Hamilton, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Engineering Physics.)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

DOE/EIS-0218-SA-3: Supplement Analysis for the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program (November 2004)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE FOREIGN SUPPLEMENT ANALYSIS FOR THE FOREIGN RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL ACCEPTANCE PROGRAM NOVEMBER 2004 DOE/EIS-0218-SA-3 U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Washington, DC Final Supplement Analysis for the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program Final i TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1. Introduction.............................................................................................................................................. 1 2. Background .............................................................................................................................................. 1 3. The Proposed Action ...............................................................................................................................

28

DISPERSIONS OF URANIUM CARBIDES IN ALUMINUM PLATE-TYPE RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical feasibility of employing uranium carbide aluminun dispersions in aluminum-base research reactor fuel elements was investigated This study was motivated by the need to obtain higher uranium loadings in these fuel elements. Although toe MTR-type unit, containing a 13 18 wt% U-Al alloy is a proven reactor component, fabrication problems of considerable magnitude arise when attempts are made to increase the uranium investment in the alloy to more than 25 wt.%. Au approach to these fabrication difficulties is to select a compound with significantly higher density tban UAl/sub 4/ or UAl/sub 3/ compounds of the alloy system which when dispersed in aluminum powder, will reduce the volume occupied by the brittle, fissile phase. The uranium carbides, with densities ranging from 11.68 to 13.63 g/cm/sup 3/), appear to be suited for this application and were selected for development as a fuel material for aluminum-base dispersions. Studies were conducted at 580 to 620 deg C to determine the chemical compatibility of carbides with aluminum in sub-size cold- pressed comparts as well as in full-size fabricated fuel plates. Procedures were also developed to prepare uranium carbides, homogernously disperse the compounds in aluminum, roll clad the dispersions to form composite plates, and braze the plates into fuel assemblies. Corrosion tests of the fuel material were conducted in 20 and 60 deg C water to determine the integrity of the fuel material in the event of sin inadventent cladding failure. In addition, specimens were prepared to evaluate penformance under extensive irradiation Prior to studying the uranium carbide-aluminum system, methods for preparing the carbides were investigated. Are melting uranium and carnon was satisfactory for obtaining small quantities of various carbides. Later, reaction of graphite with UO/sub 2/ was successfully employed in the preparation of large quantities of UC/sub 2/, Studies of the chemical compatibility of cold-pressed compacts containing 50 wt% uranium carbide dispersed in aluminum revealed a marked trend toward stebifity as the carbon content of the uranium carbide increased from 446 to 9.20% C. Severe volume increases occurred in monocarbide dispersions with attendant formation of large quantities of the uranium-allumnim inter-metallic compounds. Dicarbide dispersions, on the other band, exhibited negligible reaction with aluminum after extended periods at 580 and 620 deg C. However, it was demonstrated that hydrogen can promote a reaction in UC/sub 2/-Al compacts. The hydrogen appears to reduce the UC/sub 2/ to UC which can subsequently react with aluminum producing the previously noted deleterious effects. A growth study at 605 deg C of composite fuel plates containing 59 wt.% UC/sub 2/ revealed insignificant changes within processing periods envisioned for fuel element processing. However, plate elongations as high as 2.5% were observed after 100 hr at this temperature. Severe blistering which occurred on fuel plates fabricated in the initial stages of the investigation was attributed to gaseous hydrocarbons, and the condition was ellminated by vacuum degasification of cold-pressed compacts. With the exception of the degasification requirement, procedures for manufacturing UC- bearing fuel elements were identical to those specified for the Geneva Conference Reactor fuel elements. Dispersions of uranium dicarbide corroded catastrophically in 20 and 60 deg C water, thus limiting the application of this material However, spocimens were prepared and insented in the MTR to evaluate the irradiation behavior of this fuel because of its potential application in onganic- cooled reactors. (auth)

Thurber, W.C.; Beaver, R.J.

1959-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

29

Accident Analysis for the NIST Research Reactor Before and After Fuel Conversion  

SciTech Connect

Postulated accidents have been analyzed for the 20 MW D2O-moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analysis has been carried out for the present core, which contains high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and for a proposed equilibrium core with low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations were performed with the MCNPX code to determine homogenized fuel compositions in the lower and upper halves of each fuel element and to determine the resulting neutronic properties of the core. The accident analysis employed a model of the primary loop with the RELAP5 code. The model includes the primary pumps, shutdown pumps outlet valves, heat exchanger, fuel elements, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow accident resulting from loss of electrical power with an assumption of failure of shutdown cooling pumps, (4) loss-of-flow accident resulting from a primary pump seizure, and (5) loss-of-flow accident resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve. In addition, natural circulation cooling at low power operation was analyzed. The analysis shows that the conversion will not lead to significant changes in the safety analysis and the calculated minimum critical heat flux ratio and maximum clad temperature assure that there is adequate margin to fuel failure.

Baek J.; Diamond D.; Cuadra, A.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.R.

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

Record of Decision for the Final EIS on Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5091 5091 Friday May 17, 1996 Part IV Department of Energy Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel; Notice 25092 Federal Register / Vol. 61, No. 97 / Friday, May 17, 1996 / Notices DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Record of Decision for the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed Nuclear Weapons Nonproliferation Policy Concerning Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Record of decision. SUMMARY: DOE, in consultation with the Department of State, has decided to implement a new foreign research reactor spent fuel acceptance policy as specified in the Preferred Alternative contained in the Final Environmental Impact Statement on a Proposed

31

Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Research Reactor BMRR The last of the Lab's reactors, the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR), was shut down in December 2000. The BMRR was a three megawatt...

32

NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL SYSTEMS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Homogeneous reactor fuel solutions are reported which provide automatic recombination of radiolytic gases and exhibit large thermal expansion characteristics, thereby providing stability at high temperatures and enabling reactor operation without the necessity of apparatus to recombine gases formed by the radiolytic dissociation of water in the fuel and without the necessity of liquid fuel handling outside the reactor vessel except for recovery processes. The fuels consist of phosphoric acid and water solutions of enriched uranium, wherein the uranium is in either the hexavalent or tetravalent state.

Thamer, B.J.; Bidwell, R.M.; Hammond, R.P.

1959-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Analysis of Accidents at the Pakistan Research Reactor-1 Using Proposed Mixed-Fuel (HEU and LEU) Core  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) was converted from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel in 1991. The reactor is running successfully, with an upgraded power level of 10 MW. To save money on the purchase of costly fresh LEU fuel elements, the use of less burnt HEU spent fuel elements along with the present LEU fuel elements is being considered. The proposal calls for the HEU fuel elements to be placed near the thermal column to gain the required excess reactivity. In the present study the safety analysis of a proposed mixed-fuel core has been carried out at a calculated steady-state power level of 9.8 MW. Standard computer codes and correlations were employed to compute various parameters. Initiating events in reactivity-induced accidents involve various modes of reactivity insertion, namely, start-up accident, accidental drop of a fuel element on the core, flooding of a beam tube with water, and removal of an in-pile experiment during reactor operation. For each of these transients, time histories of reactor power, energy released, temperature, and reactivity were determined.

Bokhari, Ishtiaq H. [Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (Pakistan)

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Greek research reactor performance characteristics after addition of beryllium reflector and LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

The GRR-1 is a 5-MW pool-type, light-water-moderated and-cooled reactor fueled with MTR-type fuel elements. Recently received Be reflector blocks will soon be added to the core to add additional reactivity until fresh LEU fuel arrives. REBUS-3 xy fuel cycle analyses, using burnup dependent cross sections, were performed to assist in fuel management decisions for the water- and Be-reflected HEU nonequilibrium cores. Cross sections generated by EPRI-CELL have been benchmarked to identical VIM Monte Carlo models. The size of the Be-reflected LEU core has been reduced to 30 elements compared to 35 for the HEU water-reflected core, and an equilibrium cycle calculation has been performed.

Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Papastergiou, C. (National Center for Scientific Research, Athens (Greece))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Greek research reactor performance characteristics after addition of beryllium reflector and LEU fuel  

SciTech Connect

The GRR-1 is a 5-MW pool-type, light-water-moderated and-cooled reactor fueled with MTR-type fuel elements. Recently received Be reflector blocks will soon be added to the core to add additional reactivity until fresh LEU fuel arrives. REBUS-3 xy fuel cycle analyses, using burnup dependent cross sections, were performed to assist in fuel management decisions for the water- and Be-reflected HEU nonequilibrium cores. Cross sections generated by EPRI-CELL have been benchmarked to identical VIM Monte Carlo models. The size of the Be-reflected LEU core has been reduced to 30 elements compared to 35 for the HEU water-reflected core, and an equilibrium cycle calculation has been performed.

Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Papastergiou, C. [National Center for Scientific Research, Athens (Greece)

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel slug for a reactor which acts as a safety device is described. The fuel slug is an aluminum tube with a foil lining the inside surface of the tube, the foil being fabricated of uranium in a lead matrix.

Horning, W.A.; Lanning, D.D.; Donahue, D.J.

1959-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel plate is designed for incorporation into control rods of the type utilized in high-flux test reactors. The fuel plate is designed so that the portion nearest the poison section of the control rod contains about one-half as much fissionable material as in the rest of the plate, thereby eliminating dangerous flux peaking in that portion. (AEC)

Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

1963-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

38

Research reactors - an overview  

SciTech Connect

A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

West, C.D.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Cermet fuel reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cermet fueled nuclear reactors are attractive candidates for high performance space power systems. The cermet fuel consists of tungsten-urania hexagonal fuel blocks characterized by high strength at elevated temperatures, a high thermal conductivity and resultant high thermal shock resistance. Key features of the cermet fueled reactor design are (1) the ability to achieve very high coolant exit temperatures, and (2) thermal shock resistance during rapid power changes, and (3) two barriers to fission product release - the cermet matrix and the fuel element cladding. Additionally, thre is a potential for achieving a long operating life because of (1) the neutronic insensitivity of the fast-spectrum core to the buildup of fission products and (2) the utilization of a high strength refractory metal matrix and structural materials. These materials also provide resistance against compression forces that potentially might compact and/or reconfigure the core. In addition, the neutronic properties of the refractory materials assure that the reactor remains substantially subcritical under conditions of water immersion. It is concluded that cermet fueled reactors can be utilized to meet the power requirements for a broad range of advanced space applications. 4 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Cowan, C.L.; Palmer, R.S.; Van Hoomissen, J.E.; Bhattacharyya, S.K.; Barner, J.O.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

FUEL ASSAY REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor having maximum sensitivity to perturbations is described comprising a core consisting of a horizontally disposed, rectangular, annular fuel zone containing enriched uranium dioxide dispersed in graphite, the concentration of uranium dioxide increasing from the outside to the inside of the fuel zone, an internal reflector of graphite containing an axial test opening disposed within the fuel zone, an external graphite reflector, means for changing the neutron spectrum in the test opening, and means for measuring perturbations in the neutron flux caused by the introduction of different fuel elements into the test opening. (AEC)

Spinrad, B.I.; Sandmeier, H.A.; Martens, F.H.

1962-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research reactor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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41

PROCEEDINGS OF THE AEC SYMPOSIUM FOR CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF IRRADIATED FUELS FROM POWER, TEST, AND RESEARCH REACTORS, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON, OCTOBER 20 AND 21, 1959  

SciTech Connect

A review is presented in this symposium of the technology currently available for processing spent fuels from research, test, and power reactors. Twenty-one papers are included. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each paper. (W.L.H.)

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor fuel element of the capillary tube type is described. The element consists of a thin walled tube, sealed at both ends, and having an interior coatlng of a fissionable material, such as uranium enriched in U-235. The tube wall is gas tight and is constructed of titanium, zirconium, or molybdenum.

Kesselring, K.A.; Seybolt, A.U.

1958-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL PUMP  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reactor fuel pump is described which offers long life, low susceptibility to radiation damage, and gaseous fission product removal. An inert-gas lubricated bearing supports a journal on one end of the drive shsft. The other end has an impeller and expansion chamber which effect pumping and gas- liquid separation. (T.R.H.)

Cobb, W.G.

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

AN EVALUATION OF THE URANIUM CONTAMINATION ON THE SURFACES OF ALCLAD URANIUM-ALUMINUM ALLOY RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL PLATES  

SciTech Connect

Reported radioactivity in the Low-Intensity Test Reactor (LITR) water coolant traceable to uranium contamination on the surfaces of the alclad uranium-- aluminum plate-tyne fuel element led to an investigation to determine the sources of uranium contamination on the fuel plate surfaces. Two possible contributors to surface contamination are external sources such as rolling-mill equipment, the most obvious, and diffusion of uranium from the uranium-aluminum alloy fuel into the aluminum cladding. This diffusion is likely because of the 600 deg C heat treatments used in the conventional fabrication process. Uranium determinations based on neutron activation analysis of machined layers from fuel plate surfaces showed that rolling-mill equipment, contaminated with highly enriched uranium, was responsible for transferring as much as 180 ppm U to plate surfaces. By careful practice where cleanliness is emphasized, surface contamination can be reduced to 0.6 ppm U/sup 235/. The residue remaining on the plate surface may be accounted for by diffusion of uranium from the fuel alloy into and through the cladding of the fuel plate. Data obtained from preliminary diffusion studies permitted a good estimate to be made of the diffusion coefficient of uranium into aluminum at 600 deg C: 2.5 x 10/sup -8/ cm//sec. To minimize diffusion while the plate-type aluminum-base research reactor fuel element is being processed, heat treatments at 600 deg C should be limited to 2.5 hr. The uranium contamination on the surfaces of the finished fuel plates should then be less than 0.6 ppm U / sup 235/ . This investigation also revealed that the solubility limit of uranium in aluminum at 600 deg C is approx 60 ppm. (auth)

Beaver, R.J.; Erwin, J.H.; Mateer, R.S.

1962-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

45

Effect of changes in DOE pricing policies for enrichment and reprocessing on research reactor fuel cycle costs  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cycle costs with HEU and LEU fuels for the IAEA generic 10 MW reactor are updated to reflect the change in DOE pricing policy for enrichment services as of October 1985 and the published charges for LEU reprocessing services as of February 1986. The net effects are essentially no change in HEU fuel cycle costs and a reduction of about 8 to 10% in the fuel cycle costs for LEU silicide fuel.

Matos, J.E.; Freese, K.E.

1986-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

46

Fossil fuel furnace reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fossil fuel furnace reactor is provided for simulating a continuous processing plant with a batch reactor. An internal reaction vessel contains a batch of shale oil, with the vessel having a relatively thin wall thickness for a heat transfer rate effective to simulate a process temperature history in the selected continuous processing plant. A heater jacket is disposed about the reactor vessel and defines a number of independent controllable temperature zones axially spaced along the reaction vessel. Each temperature zone can be energized to simulate a time-temperature history of process material through the continuous plant. A pressure vessel contains both the heater jacket and the reaction vessel at an operating pressure functionally selected to simulate the continuous processing plant. The process yield from the oil shale may be used as feedback information to software simulating operation of the continuous plant to provide operating parameters, i.e., temperature profiles, ambient atmosphere, operating pressure, material feed rates, etc., for simulation in the batch reactor.

Parkinson, William J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Water reactor fuel cladding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a nuclear reactor fuel element cladding tube. It comprises: an outer cylindrical layer of a first zirconium alloy selected from the group consisting of Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4; an inner cylindrical layer of a second zirconium alloy consisting essentially of about 0.19 to 0.6 wt.% tin, about 0.19 to less than 0.5 wt.% iron, about 100 to 700 ppm oxygen, less than 2000 ppm total impurities, and the remainder essentially zirconium; the inner layer characterized by aqueous corrosion resistance substantially the same as the first zirconium alloy; the inner layer characterized by improved resistance to PCI crack propagation under reactor operating conditions compared to the first zirconium alloy and substantially the same PCI crack propagation resistance compared to unalloyed zirconium; and the inner cylindrical layer is metallurgically bonded to the outer layer.

Foster, J.P.; McDonald, S.G.

1990-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

48

NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL-BREEDER FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel-breeder fuel element was developed for a nuclear reactor wherein discrete particles of fissionable material are dispersed in a matrix of fertile breeder material. The fuel element combines the advantages of a dispersion type and a breeder-type. (AEC)

Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

1962-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

49

Developing fuel management capabilities based on coupled Monte Carlo depletion in support of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR) conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pursuant to a 1986 NRC ruling, the MIT Reactor (MITR) is planning on converting from the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) for fuel. Prior studies have shown that the MITR will be able to ...

Romano, Paul K. (Paul Kollath)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The use of U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ dispersed in aluminum in plate-type fuel elements for research and test reactors  

SciTech Connect

A high-density fuel based on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ dispersed in aluminum has been developed and tested for use in converting plate-type research and test reactors from the use of highly enriched uranium to the use of low-enriched uranium. Results of preirradiation testing and the irradiation and postirradiation examination of miniature fuel plates and full-sized fuel elements are summarized. Swelling of the U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ fuel particles is a linear function of the fission density in the particle to well beyond the fission density achievable in low-enriched fuels. U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ particle swelling rate is approximately the same as that of the commonly used UAl/sub x/ fuel particle. The presence of minor amounts of U/sub 3/Si or uranium solid solution in the fuel result in greater, but still acceptable, fuel swelling. Blister threshold temperatures are at least as high as those of currently used fuels. An exothermic reaction occurs near the aluminum melting temperature, but the measured energy releases were low enough not to substantially worsen the consequences of an accident. U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-aluminum dispersion fuel with uranium densities up to at least 4.8 Mg/m/sup 3/ is a suitable LEU fuel for typical plate-type research and test reactors. 42 refs., 28 figs., 7 tabs.

Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Hofman, G.L.; Wiencek, T.C.; Copeland, G.L.; Hobbs, R.W.; Senn, R.L.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Advanced Nuclear Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This report describes technical modifications implemented by INVAP to improve the safety of the Research Reactors the company designs and builds.

Lolich, J.V.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

52

REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS TESTING CONTAINER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent shows a method for detecting leaks in jacketed fuel elements. The element is placed in a sealed tank within a nuclear reactor, and, while the reactor operates, the element is sparged with gas. The gas is then led outside the reactor and monitored for radioactive Xe or Kr. (AEC)

Whitham, G.K.; Smith, R.R.

1963-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

LEU fuel cycle analyses for the Belgian BR2 Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Equilibrium fuel cycle characteristics were calculated for reference HEU and two proposed LEU fuel cycles using an 11-group diffusion-theory neutron flux solution in hexagonal-Z geometry. The diffusion theory model was benchmarked with a detailed Monte Carlo core model. The two proposed LEU fuel designs increased the {sup 235}U loading 20% and the fuel meat volume 51%. The first LEU design used {sup 10}B as a burnable absorber. Either proposed LEU fuel element would provide equilibrium fuel cycle characteristics similar to those of the HEU fuel cycle. Irradiation rates of Co control followers and Ir disks in the center of the core were reduced 6 {plus minus} 1% in the LEU equilibrium core compared to reference HEU core. 11 refs., 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Deen, J.R.; Snelgrove, J.L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Fuel Reformation: Microchannel Reactor Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel processing is used to extract hydrogen from conventional vehicle fuel and allow fuel cell powered vehicles to use the existing petroleum fuel infrastructure. Kilowatt scale micro-channel steam reforming, water-gas shift and preferential oxida-tion reactors have been developed capable of achieving DOE required system performance metrics. Use of a microchannel design effectively supplies heat to the highly endothermic steam reforming reactor to maintain high conversions, controls the temperature profile for the exothermic water gas shift reactor, which optimizes the overall reaction conversion, and removes heat to prevent the unwanted hydrogen oxidation in the prefer-ential oxidation reactor. The reactors combined with micro-channel heat exchangers, when scaled to a full sized 50 kWe automotive system, will be less than 21 L in volume and 52 kg in weight.

Brooks, Kriston P.; Davis, James M.; Fischer, Christopher M.; King, David L.; Pederson, Larry R.; Rawlings, Gregg C.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.; TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Wegeng, Robert S.; Whyatt, Greg A.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Proliferation Resistant Nuclear Reactor Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global appetite for fission power is projected to grow dramatically this century, and for good reason. Despite considerable research to identify new sources of energy, fission remains the most plentiful and practical alternative to fossil fuels. The environmental challenges of fossil fuel have made the fission power option increasingly attractive, particularly as we are forced to rely on reserves in ecologically fragile or politically unstable corners of the globe. Caught between a globally eroding fossil fuel reserve as well as the uncertainty and considerable costs in the development of fusion power, most of the world will most likely come to rely on fission power for at least the remainder of the 21st century. Despite inevitable growth, fission power faces enduring challenges in sustainability and security. One of fission power's greatest hurdles to universal acceptance is the risk of potential misuse for nefarious purposes of fissionable byproducts in spent fuel, such as plutonium. With this issue in mind, we have discussed intrinsic concepts in this report that are motivated by the premise that the utility, desirability, and applicability of nuclear materials can be reduced. In a general sense, the intrinsic solutions aim to reduce or eliminate the quantity of existing weapons usable material; avoid production of new weapons-usable material through enrichment, breeding, extraction; or employ engineering solutions to make the fuel cycle less useful or more difficult for producing weapons-usable material. By their nature, these schemes require modifications to existing fuel cycles. As such, the concomitants of these modifications require engagement from the nuclear reactor and fuel-design community to fully assess their effects. Unfortunately, active pursuit of any scheme that could further complicate the spread of domestic nuclear power will probably be understandably unpopular. Nevertheless, the nonproliferation and counterterrorism issues are paramount, and we posit that the exploration, development, and implementation of intrinsic mechanisms such as discussed here are part of a balanced approach aimed at preventing the misuse of nuclear material for nuclear-energy applications.

Gray, L W; Moody, K J; Bradley, K S; Lorenzana, H E

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

56

M-1 N-Reactor fuel development. Excerpts from N-Reactor Department Research and Development Budget for FY-1967 and Revision of Budget for FY-1966  

SciTech Connect

The use of metallic uranium fuel elements on a large scale in a pressurized water cooled graphite moderated power reactor environment in N-Reactor not only represents an extrapolation from previous Hanford fuel technology but it represents the only production-scale application of this concept in this country or abroad. Provision of a supporting technology is and will continue to be a major activity at Hanford as only a limited amount of directly applicable R&D will be available from other sites. The major benefit to be achieved through an extensive and continuing fuel program is attainment of the full capabilities of the N-Reactor at much reduced fuel cycle costs. The current N-Reactor fuel design represents the best engineering judgment of what is required for adequate performance. While the design is intentionally conservative, some features may not fully provide the level of performance required to sustain efficient reactor operation. Results of production-scale irradiation experience and special test irradiations will provide direction to a continuing program to correct any excesses or deficiencies in the initial fuel design. Reduction of unwarranted conservatism in the design will lower fuel fabrication costs, and correction of deficiencies will lower irradiation costs through increased time operated efficiency. Costs of this program are summarized for 1965, 66, and 67. The paper describes the scope of the program, its relationship to other programs, and technical progress in FY-1965 which included improved performance of the fuel elements even with the large number of rapid shutdowns of the reactor.

1965-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

57

Research and development of americium-containing mixed oxide fuel for fast reactors  

SciTech Connect

The present status of the R and D program for americium-containing MOX fuel is reported. Successful achievements for development of fabrication technology with remote handling and evaluation of irradiation behavior together with evaluation of thermo-chemical properties based on the out-of-pile experiments are mentioned with emphasis on effects of Am addition on the MOX fuel properties. (authors)

Tanaka, Kosuke; Osaka, Masahiko; Sato, Isamu; Miwa, Shuhei; Koyama, Shin-ichi; Ishi, Yohei; Hirosawa, Takashi; Obayashi, Hiroshi; Yoshimochi, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Kenya [Japan Atomic Energy Agency: 4002 Narita-cho, O-arai-machi, Higashiibaraki-gun, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Successful Completion of the Largest Shipment of Russian Research Reactor High-Enriched Uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel from Czech Republic to Russian Federation  

SciTech Connect

On December 8, 2007, the largest shipment of high-enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel was successfully made from a Russian-designed nuclear research reactor in the Czech Republic to the Russian Federation. This accomplishment is the culmination of years of planning, negotiations, and hard work. The United States, Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency have been working together on the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Program in support of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative. In February 2003, RRRFR Program representatives met with the Nuclear Research Institute in Rež, Czech Republic, and discussed the return of their high-enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel to the Russian Federation for reprocessing. Nearly 5 years later, the shipment was made. This paper discusses the planning, preparations, coordination, and cooperation required to make this important international shipment.

Michael Tyacke; Dr. Igor Bolshinsky; Jeff Chamberlin

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Research and Medical Isotope Reactor Supply | Y-12 National Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Medical ... Research and Medical Isotope Reactor Supply Our goal is to fuel research and test reactors with low-enriched uranium. Y-12 tops the short list of the...

60

Foreign Research Reactor/Domestic Research Reactor Receipt Coordinator...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Research ReactorDomestic Research Reactor Receipt Coordinator, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research reactor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Decommssioning Of Research Reactor: Problemsand Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of the preparation for decommissioning the Research Reactor in Salaspils (Latvia) and the experience of decommissioning the Research Reactor in Sosny (Belarus) show that the problem of decommissioning research reactors is acute for countries that have no NPPs or their own nuclear industry. It also is associated with regulatory framework, planning and design, dismantling technologies, decontamination of radioactive equipment and materials, spent fuel and radioactive waste management, etc. 1. INTRODUCTION According to the IAEA research reactor database, there are about 300 research reactors worldwide [1]. At present over 30% of them have lifetimes of more than 35 years, 60% of more than 25 years. After the Chernobyl accident, significant efforts were made by many countries to modernize old research reactors aiming, first of all, at ensuring safe operation. However, a large number of aging research reactors will be facing shutdown in the near future. The problem of decommis...

Alexander Mikhalevich

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

MOLTEN FLUORIDE NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Molten-salt reactor fuel compositions consisting of mixtures of fluoride salts are reported. In its broadest form, the composition contains an alkali fluoride such as sodium fluoride, zirconium tetrafluoride, and a uranium fluoride, the latter being the tetrafluoride or trifluoride or a mixture of the two. An outstanding property of these fuel compositions is a high coeffieient of thermal expansion which provides a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity in reactors in which they are used.

Barton, C.J.; Grimes, W.R.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

FUSED REACTOR FUELS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a nuciear reactor fuel composition comprising (1) from about 0.01 to about 50 wt.% based on the total weight of said composition of at least one element selected from the class consisting of uranium, thorium, and plutonium, wherein said eiement is present in the form of at least one component selected from the class consisting of oxides, halides, and salts of oxygenated anions, with components comprising (2) at least one member selected from the class consisting of (a) sulfur, wherein the sulfur is in the form of at least one entity selected irom the class consisting of oxides of sulfur, metal sulfates, metal sulfites, metal halosulfonates, and acids of sulfur, (b) halogen, wherein said halogen is in the form of at least one compound selected from the class of metal halides, metal halosulfonates, and metal halophosphates, (c) phosphorus, wherein said phosphorus is in the form of at least one constituent selected from the class consisting of oxides of phosphorus, metal phosphates, metal phosphites, and metal halophosphates, (d) at least one oxide of a member selected from the class consisting of a metal and a metalloid wherein said oxide is free from an oxide of said element in (1); wherein the amount of at least one member selected from the class consisting of halogen and sulfur is at least about one at.% based on the amount of the sum of said sulfur, halogen, and phosphorus atom in said composition; and wherein the amount of said 2(a), 2(b) and 2(c) components in said composition which are free from said elements of uranium, thorium, arid plutonium, is at least about 60 wt.% based on the combined weight of the components of said composition which are free from said elements of uranium, thorium, and plutonium. (AEC)

Mayer, S.W.

1962-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

64

New Fuel Cycle and Fuel Management Options in Heavy Liquid Metal-Cooled Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management - Fuel Management of Reactors Other Than Light Water Reactors

Ehud Greenspan; Pavel Hejzlar; Hiroshi Sekimoto; Georgy Toshinsky; David Wade

65

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element particularly adapted for use in nuclear reactors of high power density is offered. It has fissionable fuel pellet segments mounted in a tubular housing and defining a central passage in the fuel element. A burnable poison element extends through the central passage, which is designed to contain more poison material at the median portion than at the end portions thereby providing a more uniform hurnup and longer reactivity life.

Bassett, C.H.

1961-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

66

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element is designed which is particularly adapted for reactors of high power density used to generate steam for the production of electricity. The fuel element consists of inner and outer concentric tubes forming an annular chamber within which is contained fissionable fuel pellet segments, wedge members interposed between the fuel segments, and a spring which, acting with wedge members, urges said fuel pellets radially into contact against the inner surface of the outer tube. The wedge members may be a fertile material convertible into fissionable fuel material by absorbing neutrons emitted from the fissionable fuel pellet segments. The costly grinding of cylindrical fuel pellets to close tolerances for snug engagement is reduced because the need to finish the exact size is eliminated. (AEC)

Bassett, C.H.

1961-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

67

FUEL CYCLE PROGRAM, A BOILING WATER REACTOR RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. First Summary Report for March 1959-July 1960  

SciTech Connect

The Fuel Cycle Development Program is a basic development program for boiling and other water technology. It covers the areas of oxide fuel fabrication. irradiation. and examination; the physics of water-moderated reactore; and boiling-water heat transfer and stability. Schedules for the fuel- cycle program were examined. and it was concluded that portions of the Task A program should be conducted during the period May to Dec. 1959 in order to keep costs of the work as low as possible and to allow initiation of the fuel-cycle program at the earliest possible date after the Vallecitos BWR was returned to service. The basis for the scheduling of the work is discussed. and a chronological summary describing the content of the work is given. Technical progress is outlined and details are summarized. Subsequent reports issued monthly and quarterly will summarize the progress of the prognam. (W.D.M.)

Cook, W.H.

1961-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

68

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor fuel element comprising high density ceramic fissionable material enclosed in a tubular cladding of corrosion-resistant material is described. The fissionable material is in the form of segments of a tube which have cooperating tapered interfaces which produce outward radial displacement when the segments are urged axially together. A resilient means is provided within the tubular housing to constantly urge the fuel segments axially. This design maintains the fuel material in tight contacting engagement against the inner surface of the outer cladding tube to eliminate any gap therebetween which may be caused by differential thermal expansion between the fuel material and the material of the tube.

Bassett, C.H.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Developing and Qualifying Parameters for Closure Welding Overpacks Containing Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

Fluor engineers developed a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) technique and parameters, demonstrated requisite weld quality, and successfully closure-welded packaged spent nuclear fuel (SNF) overpacks at the Hanford Site. This paper reviews weld development and qualification activities associated with the overpack closure-welding and provides a summary of the production campaign. The primary requirement of the closure weld is to provide leak-tight confinement of the packaged material against release to the environment during interim storage (40-year design term). Required weld quality, in this case, was established through up-front development and qualification, and then verification of parameter compliance during production welding. This approach was implemented to allow for a simpler overpack design and more efficient production operations than possible with approaches using routine post-weld testing and nondestructive examination (NDE). A series of welding trials were conducted to establish the desired welding technique and parameters. Qualification of the process included statistical evaluation and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section IX testing. In addition, pull testing with a weighted mockup, and thermal calculation/physical testing to identify the maximum temperature the packaged contents would be subject to during welding, was performed. Thirteen overpacks were successfully packaged and placed into interim storage. The closure-welding development activities (including pull testing and thermal analysis) provided the needed confidence that the packaged SNF overpacks could be safely handled and placed into interim storage, and remain leak-tight for the duration of the storage term. (author)

Cannell, G.R.; Goldmann, L.H.; McCormack, R.L. [Hanford Site, Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

DEVELOPING AND QUANTIFYING PARAMETERS FOR CLOSURE WELDING OVERPACKS CONTAINING RESEARCH REACTOR SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect

Fluor engineers developed a Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) technique and parameters, demonstrated requisite weld quality and successfully closure-welded packaged spent nuclear fuel (SNF) overpacks at the Hanford Site. This paper reviews weld development and qualification activities associated with the overpack closure-welding and provides a summary of the production campaign. The primary requirement of the closure weld is to provide leaktight confinement of the packaged material against release to the environment during interim storage (40-year design term). Required weld quality, in this case, was established through up-front development and qualification, and then verification of parameter compliance during production welding. This approach was implemented to allow for a simpler overpack design and more efficient production operations than possible with approaches using routine post-weld testing and nondestructive examination (NDE). . A series of welding trials were conducted to establish the desired welding technique and parameters. Qualification of the process included statistical evaluation and American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section IX testing. In addition, pull testing with a weighted mockup, and thermal calculation/physical testing to identify the maximum temperature the packaged contents would be subject to during welding, was performed. Thirteen overpacks were successfully packaged and placed into interim storage. The closure-welding development activities (including pull testing and thermal analysis) provided the needed confidence that the packaged SNF overpacks could be safely handled and placed into interim storage, and remain leaktight for the duration of the storage term.

CANNELL GR

2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

71

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element possessing good stability and heat conducting properties is described. The fuel element comprises an outer tube formed of material selected from the group consisting of stainhess steel, V, Ti. Mo. or Zr, a fuel tube concentrically fitting within the outer tube and containing an oxide of an isotope selected from the group consisting of U/sup 235/, U/sup 233/, and Pu/sup 239/, and a hollow, porous core concentrically fitting within the fuel tube and formed of an oxide of an element selected from the group consisting of Mg, Be, and Zr.

Shackleford, M.H.

1958-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

72

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel element comprising a plurality of nuclear fuel bearing strips is presented. The strips are folded along their longitudinal axes to an angle of about 60 deg and are secured at each end by ferrule to form an elongated assembly suitable for occupying a cylindrical coolant channel.

Gurinsky, D.H.; Powell, R.W.; Fox, M.

1959-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

73

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described whereby fuel tubes or pins are cut, loaded with fuel pellets and a heat transfer medium, sealed at each end with slotted fittings, and assembled into a rectangular tube bundle to form a fuel element. The tubes comprising the fuel element are laterally connected between their ends by clips and tabs to form a linear group of spaced parallel tubes, which receive their vertical support by resting on a grid. The advantages of this method are that it permits elimination of structural material (e.g., fuel-element cans) within the reactor core, and removal of at least one fuel pin from an element and replacement thereof so that a burnable poison may be utilized during the core lifetime. (AEC)

Dickson, J.J.

1963-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

74

ADMINISTRATION OF ORNL RESEARCH REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

Organization of the ORNL Operations division for administration of the Oak Ridge Research Reactor, the Low Intensity Testing Reactor, and the Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor is described. (J.R.D.)

Casto, W.R.

1962-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

75

Summary report on the HFED (High-Uranium-Loaded Fuel Element Development) miniplate irradiations for the RERTR (Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor) Program  

SciTech Connect

An experiment to evaluate the irradiation characteristics of various candidate low-enriched, high-uranium content fuels for research and test reactors was performed for the US Department of Energy Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program. The experiment included the irradiation of 244 miniature fuel plates (miniplates) in a core position in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The miniplates were aluminum-based, dispersion-type plates 114.3 mm long by 50.8 mm wide with overall plate thicknesses of 1.27 or 1.52 mm. Fuel core dimensions varied according to the overall plate thicknesses with a minimum clad thickness of 0.20 mm. Tested fuels included UAl/sub x/, UAl/sub 2/, U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, U/sub 3/SiAl, U/sub 3/Si, U/sub 3/Si/sub 1.5/, U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/, U/sub 3/SiCu, USi, U/sub 6/Fe, and U/sub 6/Mn/sub 1.3/ materials. Although most miniplates were made with low-enriched uranium (19.9%), some with medium-enriched uranium (40 to 45%), a few with high-enriched uranium (93%), and a few with depleted uranium (0.2 to 0.4%) were tested for comparison. These fuel materials were irradiated to burnups ranging from /approximately/27 to 98 at. % /sup 235/U depletion. Operation of the experiment, measurement of miniplate thickness as the irradiation progressed, ultimate shipment of the irradiated miniplates to various hot cells, and preliminary results are reported here. 18 refs., 12 figs., 7 tabs.

Senn, R.L.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

RERTR program activities related to the development and application of new LEU fuels. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor; low-enriched uranium  

SciTech Connect

The statue of the U.S. Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is reviewed. After a brief outline of RERTR Program objectives and goals, program accomplishments are discussed with emphasis on the development, demonstration and application of new LEU fuels. Most program activities have proceeded as planned, and a combination of two silicide fuels (U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al) holds excellent promise for achieving the long-term program goals. Current plans and schedules project the uranium density of qualified RERTR fuels for plate-type reactors to grow by approximately 1 g U/cm/sup 3/ each year, from the current 1.7 g U/cm/sup 3/ to the 7.0 g U/cm/sup 3/ which will be reached in late 1988. The technical needs of research and test reactors for HEU exports are also forecasted to undergo a gradual but dramatic decline in the coming years.

Travelli, A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Nuclear reactor composite fuel assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A core and composite fuel assembly for a liquid-cooled breeder nuclear reactor including a plurality of elongated coextending driver and breeder fuel elements arranged to form a generally polygonal bundle within a thin-walled duct. The breeder elements are larger in cross section than the driver elements, and each breeder element is laterally bounded by a number of the driver elements. Each driver element further includes structure for spacing the driver elements from adjacent fuel elements and, where adjacent, the thin-walled duct. A core made up of the fuel elements can advantageously include fissile fuel of only one enrichment, while varying the effective enrichment of any given assembly or core region, merely by varying the relative number and size of the driver and breeder elements.

Burgess, Donn M. (Richland, WA); Marr, Duane R. (West Richland, WA); Cappiello, Michael W. (Richland, WA); Omberg, Ronald P. (Richland, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

The LEU conversion status of U.S. Research Reactors.  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the conversion status of US research and test reactors and estimates uranium densities needed to convert reactors with power levels 21 MW from HEU ({ge} 20% U-235) to LEU (<20% U-235) fuels. Detailed conversion studies for each reactor need to be completed in order to establish the feasibility of using LEU fuels.

Matos, J. E.

1997-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

79

PLUTONIUM METALLIC FUELS FOR FAST REACTORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early interest in metallic plutonium fuels for fast reactors led to much research on plutonium alloy systems including binary solid solutions with the addition of aluminum, gallium, or zirconium and low-melting eutectic alloys with iron and nickel or cobalt. There was also interest in ternaries of these elements with plutonium and cerium. The solid solution and eutectic alloys have most unusual properties, including negative thermal expansion in some solid-solution alloys and the highest viscosity known for liquid metals in the Pu-Fe system. Although metallic fuels have many potential advantages over ceramic fuels, the early attempts were unsuccessful because these fuels suffered from high swelling rates during burn up and high smearing densities. The liquid metal fuels experienced excessive corrosion. Subsequent work on higher-melting U-PuZr metallic fuels was much more promising. In light of the recent rebirth of interest in fast reactors, we review some of the key properties of the early fuels and discuss the challenges presented by the ternary alloys.

STAN, MARIUS [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HECKER, SIEGFRIED S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

80

NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT ASSEMBLY  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of fabricating nuclear reactor fuel element assemblies having a plurality of longitudinally extending flat fuel elements in spaced parallel relation to each other to form channels is presented. One side of a flat side plate is held contiguous to the ends of the elements and a welding means is passed along the other side of the platertransverse to the direction of the longitudinal extension of the elements. The setting and speed of travel of the welding means is set to cause penetration of the side plate with welds at bridge the gap in each channel between adjacent fuel elements with a weld-through bubble of predetermined size. The fabrication of a high strength, dependable fuel element is provided, and the reduction of distortion and high production costs are facilitated by this method. (AEC)

Stengel, F.G.

1963-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research reactor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fundamental aspects of nuclear reactor fuel elements.Unlike permanent nuclear reactor core components, nuclearof the first nuclear reactors, commercial nuclear fuel still

Terrani, Kurt Amir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Fuel handling apparatus for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fuel handling apparatus for transporting fuel elements into and out of a nuclear reactor and transporting them within the reactor vessel extends through a penetration in the side of the reactor vessel. A lateral transport device carries the fuel elements laterally within the vessel and through the opening in the side of the vessel, and a reversible lifting device raises and lowers the fuel elements. In the preferred embodiment, the lifting device is supported by a pair of pivot arms.

Hawke, Basil C. (Solana Beach, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fast Reactor Fuel Type and Reactor Safety Performance R. Wigeland , Idaho National Laboratory J. Cahalan, Argonne National Laboratory The sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor is currently being evaluated for the efficient transmutation of the highly-hazardous, long-lived, transuranic elements that are present in spent nuclear fuel. One of the fundamental choices that will be made is the selection of the fuel type for the fast reactor, whether oxide, metal, carbide, nitride, etc. It is likely that a decision on the fuel type will need to be made before many of the related technologies and facilities can be selected, from fuel fabrication to spent fuel reprocessing. A decision on fuel type should consider all impacts on the fast reactor system, including safety. Past work has demonstrated that the choice of fuel type may have a significant impact on the severity of consequences arising from accidents, especially for severe accidents of low probability. In this paper, the response of sodium-cooled fast reactors is discussed for both oxide and metal fuel types, highlighting the similarities and differences in reactor response and accident consequences. Any fast reactor facility must be designed to be able to successfully prevent, mitigate, or accommodate all consequences of potential events, including accidents. This is typically accomplished by using multiple barriers to the release of radiation, including the cladding on the fuel, the intact primary cooling system, and most visibly the reactor containment building. More recently, this has also included the use of ‘inherent safety’ concepts to reduce or eliminate the potential for serious damage in some cases. Past experience with oxide and metal fuel has demonstrated that both fuel types are suitable for use as fuel in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. However, safety analyses for these two fuel types have also shown that there can be substantial differences in accident consequences due to the neutronic and thermophysical properties of the fuel and their compatibility with the reactor coolant, with corresponding differences in the challenges presented to the reactor developers. Accident phenomena are discussed for the sodium-cooled fast reactor based on the mechanistic progression of conditions from accident initiation to accident termination, whether a benign state is achieved or more severe consequences are expected. General principles connecting accident phenomena and fuel properties are developed from the oxide and metal fuel safety analyses, providing guidelines that can be used as part of the evaluation for selection of fuel type for the sodium-cooled fast reactor.

R. Wigeland; J. Cahalan

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Relicensing of the MIT Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITR) is owned and operated by MIT, a nonprofit university. The current reactor, MITR-II, is a 5-MW, light water-cooled and heavy water-moderated reactor that uses materials test reactor-type fuel. Documents supporting application to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for relicensing of MITR were submitted in July 1999. A power upgrade from 5 to 6 MW was also requested. The relicensed reactor (MITR-III) will be the third reactor operated by MIT. This paper describes MITR-I and MITR-II, and design options considered for MITR-III. Selected problems addressed during the relicensing studies are also described, namely core tank aging evaluation, neutronic analysis, thermal-hydraulic analysis, and step reactivity insertion analysis.

Lin-Wen Hu; John A. Bernard; Susan Tucker

2000-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

85

Westinghouse Advanced Reactors Division Plutonium Fuel Laboratories  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ADVANCED REACTORS DIVISION FUEL LABORATORIES CHESWICK, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Policy, Safety and Environment Office of Operational Safety Environmental...

86

Accident Tolerant Fuels for Light Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Accident Tolerant Fuels for Light Water Reactors. Author(s), Steven J. Zinkle, Kurt A. Terrani, Lance L. Snead. On-Site Speaker (Planned) ...

87

Rethinking the light water reactor fuel cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The once through nuclear fuel cycle adopted by the majority of countries with operating commercial power reactors imposes a number of concerns. The radioactive waste created in the once through nuclear fuel cycle has to ...

Shwageraus, Evgeni, 1973-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Analysis Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Overview Current Projects Software Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Bookmark and Share Reactor physics and fuel cycle analysis is a core competency of the Nuclear Engineering (NE) Division. The Division has played a major role in the design and analysis of advanced reactors, particularly liquid-metal-cooled reactors. NE researchers have concentrated on developing computer codes for

89

DECONTAMINATION OF NEUTRON-IRRADIATED REACTOR FUEL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pyrometallurgical method of decontaminating neutronirradiated reactor fuel is presented. In accordance with the invention, neutron-irradiated reactor fuel may be decontaminated by countercurrently contacting the fuel with a bed of alkali and alkaine fluorides under an inert gas atmosphere and inductively melting the fuel and tracking the resulting descending molten fuel with induction heating as it passes through the bed. By this method, a large, continually fresh surface of salt is exposed to the descending molten fuel which enhances the efficiency of the scrubbing operation.

Buyers, A.G.; Rosen, F.D.; Motta, E.E.

1959-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

90

Twenty-second water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Severe accident research, thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs, high-burnup fuel behavior  

SciTech Connect

This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Second Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 24-26, 1994. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Finland, France, Italy, Japan, Russia, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting.

Monteleone, S. [comp.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

SPECIFICATIONS AND PROCEDURES USED IN MANUFACTURING U$sub 3$O$sub 8$- ALUMINUM DISPERSION FUEL ELEMENTS FOR CORE I OF THE PUERTO RICO RESEARCH REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

A thin plate-type element containing a dispersion of 20% enriched U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ was developed and successfully used in the 5-Mw pool-type research reactor at the Puerto Rico Nuclear Center. The underlying criteria that guided the design are presented. The technological factors, such as compatibility, corrosion resistance, and irradiation behavior, which led to the selection of U/ sub 3/O/sub 8/ as the fissile compound and aluminum as the cladding and matrix material, are reviewed. The fabrication procedures developed and adopted for manufacturing the component are presented. The scheme involves incorporation of 55 wt% U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ into aluminum compacts by powder metallurgy techniques, preparation of composite fuel plates by roll cladding, assembly of fuel plates into an integral unit by either the roll-swaging or pinning techniques, and corrosion protection of the element by an anodizing treatment to increase service life. Quality control measures adopted to ensure dimensional tolerances are described. Mechanical joining proved to be an economical method for assembling the pool-type fuel elements within dimensional specifications. (auth)

Kucera, W.J.; Leitten, C.F. Jr.; Beaver, R.J.

1963-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

92

Simulated nuclear reactor fuel assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for electrically simulating a nuclear reactor fuel assembly. It includes a heater assembly having a top end and a bottom end and a plurality of concentric heater tubes having electrical circuitry connected to a power source, and radially spaced from each other. An outer target tube and an inner target tube is concentric with the heater tubes and with each other, and the outer target tube surrounds and is radially spaced from the heater tubes. The inner target tube is surrounded by and radially spaced from the heater tubes and outer target tube. The top of the assembly is generally open to allow for the electrical power connection to the heater tubes, and the bottom of the assembly includes means for completing the electrical circuitry in the heater tubes to provide electrical resistance heating to simulate the power profile in a nuclear reactor. The embedded conductor elements in each heater tube is split into two halves for a substantial portion of its length and provided with electrical isolation such that each half of the conductor is joined at one end and is not joined at the other end.

Berta, Victor T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Fuels research, Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuels research from NIPER is described. The following two topics are briefly discussed: Department of Analytical Methodology for Analysis of Heavy Crudes, and Thermochemistry and Thermophysical Properties of Organic Nitrogen-, and Diheteroatom-Containing Compounds. 17 refs., 11 figs., 11 tabs.

Not Available

1990-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

94

Radiological consequences of ship collisions that might occur in U.S. Ports during the shipment of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel to the United States in break-bulk freighters  

SciTech Connect

Accident source terms, source term probabilities, consequences, and risks are developed for ship collisions that might occur in U.S. ports during the shipment of spent fuel from foreign research reactors to the United States in break-bulk freighters.

Sprung, J.L.; Bespalko, S.J.; Massey, C.D.; Yoshimura, R. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, J.D. [GRAM Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reardon, P.C. [PCRT Technologies, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ebert, M.W.; Gallagher D.W. [Science Applications International Corp., Reston, VA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement The U.S. Department of Energy...

96

Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Apparatus and Method for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion." This technology is available for licensing and/or further collaborative research from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. Overview The removal of CO2 from power plants is challenging because existing methods to separate CO2 from the gas mixture requires a significant fraction of the power plant output. Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) is a novel technology that utilizes a metal oxide oxygen carrier to transport oxygen to the fuel thereby avoiding direct contact between fuel and air. The use of CLC has the advantages of reducing the energy penalty while

97

FUEL PROGRAMMING FOR SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

The effect of fuel programming, i.e., the scheme used for changing fuel in a core, on the reactivity and specific power of a sodium graphite reactor is discussed Fuel programs considered Include replacing fuel a core-load at a time or a radial zone at a time, replacing fuel to manutain the same average exposure of fuel elements throughout the core, and replacing and transferring fuel elements to maintain more highly exposed fuel in the center or at the periphery of the core. Flux and criticality calculations show the degree of power flattening and the concurrent decrease in effective multiplication which results from maintaining more exposed fuel toward the core center. Corverse effects are shown for the case of maintaining more exposed fuel near the core periphery. The excess reactivity which must be controlled in the various programs is considered. Illustrative schedules for implementing each of these programs in an SGR are presented. (auth)

Connolly, T.J.

1959-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT AND CORE SYSTEM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to neutronic reactors and in particular to an improved fuel element and a novel reactor core system for facilitating removal of contaminating fission products, as they are fermed, from association with the flssionable fuel, so as to mitigate the interferent effects of such fission products during reactor operation. The fuel elements are comprised of tubular members impervious to fluid and contatning on their interior surfaces a thin layer of fissionable material providing a central void. The core structure is comprised of a plurality of the tubular fuel elements arranged in parallel and a closed manifold connected to their ends. In the reactor the core structure is dispersed in a water moderator and coolant within a pressure vessel, and a means connected to said manifuld is provided for withdrawing and disposing of mobile fission product contamination from the interior of the feel tubes and manifold.

Moore, W.T.

1958-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Research and Development Funding to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development Funding on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development Funding on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development Funding on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development Funding on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development Funding on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research and Development Funding on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

100

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Sandia Pulsed Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments Sandia scientist John Ford places fuel rods in the Seven Percent Critical Experiment (7uPCX) at the Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility Critical Experiments (SPRF/CX) test reactor - a reactor stripped down to its simplest form. The Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments (SPRF/CX) provides a flexible, shielded location for performing critical experiments that employ different reactor core configurations and fuel types. The facility is also available for hands-on nuclear criticality safety training. Research and other activities The 7% series, an evaluation of various core characteristics for higher commercial-fuel enrichment, is currently under way at the SPRF/CX. Past critical experiments at the SPRF/CX have included the Burnup Credit

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research reactor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Fuel Cycle Research and Development Presentation Title  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SiC Research for SiC Research for Accident Tolerant Fuels Shannon Bragg-Sitton Idaho National Laboratory Advanced LWR Fuels Technical Lead Advanced Fuels Campaign Advanced LWR Fuels Pathway Lead Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program August 2013 Outline  Overview of DOE SiC research  Severe accident modeling: MELCOR analysis w/SiC  Recent characterization test results - Oxidation kinetics - Irradiation studies - Fuel-clad interactions - Elastic property measurement - Thermal properties - Failure model analysis - Quench testing  Technology development - ASTM standards development - SiC/SiC joining technology 2 SiC Gap Analysis and Feasibility Study  SiC Gap Analysis / Feasibility - Milestone report issued July 30, 2013 - Incorporates results of work funded

102

Strengthening the nuclear-reactor fuel cycle against proliferation  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducts several research programs that serve to reduce the risks of fissile-material diversion from the nuclear-reactor fuel cycle. The objectives are to provide economical and efficient neutron or power generation with the minimum of inherent risks, and to further minimize risks by utilizing sophisticated techniques to detect attempts at material diversion. This paper will discuss the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, the Isotope Correlation Technique (ICT), and Proliferation-Resistant Closed-Cycle Reactors. The first two are sponsored by the DOE Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation.

Travelli, A.; Snelgrove, J.; Persiani, P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Arms Control and Nonproliferation Program

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

EA-0912: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent 2: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel EA-0912: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to accept 409 spent fuel elements from eight foreign research reactors in seven European countries. The spent fuel would be shipped across the ocean in spent fuel transportation casks from the country of origin to one or more United States eastern seaboard ports. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 22, 1994 EA-0912: Finding of No Significant Impact Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel April 22, 1994 EA-0912: Final Environmental Assessment Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

104

Design and optimization of a high thermal flux research reactor via Kriging-based algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In response to increasing demands for the services of research reactors, a 5 MW LEU-fueled research reactor core is developed and optimized to provide high thermal flux within specified limits upon thermal hydraulic ...

Kempf, Stephanie Anne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Friction pressure drop measurements and flow distribution analysis for LEU conversion study of MIT Research Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Nuclear Research Reactor (MITR) is the only research reactor in the United States that utilizes plate-type fuel elements with longitudinal fins to augment heat transfer. Recent studies on the conversion to low-enriched ...

Wong, Susanna Yuen-Ting

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Fuel cycle problems in fusion reactors  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cycle problems of fusion reactors evolve around the breeding, recovery, containment, and recycling of tritium. These processes are described, and their implications and alternatives are discussed. Technically, fuel cycle problems are solvable; economically, their feasibility is not yet known. (auth)

Hickman, R.G.

1976-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

107

2012 Annual Report Research Reactor Infrastructure Program  

SciTech Connect

The content of this report is the 2012 Annual Report for the Research Reactor Infrastructure Program.

Douglas Morrell

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

A Study of Fast Reactor Fuel Transmutation in a Candidate Dispersion Fuel Design  

SciTech Connect

Dispersion fuels represent a significant departure from typical ceramic fuels to address swelling and radiation damage in high burnup fuel. Such fuels use a manufacturing process in which fuel particles are encapsulated within a non-fuel matrix. Dispersion fuels have been studied since 1997 as part of an international effort to develop and test very high density fuel types for the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program.[1] The Idaho National Laboratory is performing research in the development of an innovative dispersion fuel concept that will meet the challenges of transuranic (TRU) transmutation by providing an integral fission gas plenum within the fuel itself, to eliminate the swelling that accompanies the irradiation of TRU. In this process, a metal TRU vector produced in a separations process is atomized into solid microspheres. The dispersion fuel process overcoats the microspheres with a mixture of resin and hollow carbon microspheres to create a TRUC. The foam may then be heated and mixed with a metal power (e.g., Zr, Ti, or Si) and resin to form a matrix metal carbide, that may be compacted and extruded into fuel elements. In this paper, we perform reactor physics calculations for a core loaded with the conceptual fuel design. We will assume a “typical” TRU vector and a reference matrix density. We will employ a fuel and core design based on the Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) design.[2] Using the CSAS6 and TRITON modules of the SCALE system [3] for preliminary scoping studies, we will demonstrate the feasibility of reactor operations. This paper will describe the results of these analyses.

Mark DeHart; Hongbin Zhang; Eric Shaber; Matthew Jesse

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Expanding and optimizing fuel management and data analysis capabilities of MCODE-FM in support of MIT research reactor (MITR-II) LEU conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies are underway in support of the MIT research reactor (MITR-II) conversion from high enriched Uranium (HEU) to low enriched Uranium (LEU), as required by recent non-proliferation policy. With the same core configuration ...

Horelik, Nicholas E. (Nicholas Edward)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

FUEL CYCLE PROGRAM. A BOILING WATER REACTOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. Eleventh Quarterly Progress Report, January-March 1963  

SciTech Connect

Even though VBWR shutdowns were required for location and removal of five failed fuel assemblies (HPD Program), the increase in fuel exposure was good. Fuel exposures wili pass the values at which cold worked stainless steel cladding was failing under the HPD Program. Failure of the 0.005-inch cold worked stainless steel clad fuel rods in assembly 8L was traced to strain cycling fatigue. A study of tapered fuel rods indicates a potential advantage for us of a variable water/fuel ratio along the flow channel. Natural circulation tests in the hydraulic stability loop were conducted over a range of conditions from stable, to oscillatory with exponential decay, to self-sustaining oscillation of constant amplitude, to unstable oscillations with divergent amplitude. The response to impulses in power input shows the effect of the time delay for transporting steam voids up through the riser. The data permit calculation of oscillation frequency, damping coefficient, time lags, and show the magnitude and character of pressure and velocity changes. The data, which have an experimental scatter of plus or minus 10% maximum, show that burnout heat fiux: decreases with increasing flow up to 2 x 10/sup 8/ lb/hr-ft/sup 2/; has a maximum for hydraulic diameter between 0.25 and 0.5 inch; and decreases for pressure increases between 600 to 1400 psi. A correlating equation for the data is given. The data are compared to results of others. Tests of special geometries show that the burnout heat flux: decreases 22 to 50% when the heated rod is within 0.033 inch of the channel wall; is unchanged upstream of a plate-type spacer; decreases 35 to 50% when the rod surface is roughened by sandblasting; is increased 20 to 40% by use of a rough liner. The four-rod test section is operating satisfactorily and 17 critical heat fiux data points are obtained at 1000 psia and flows of 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 x 10/sup 6/ lb/hr-ft/sup 2/. In each case the critical heat flux occurred at the exit end and on the side of the rod facing the corner of the channel. The evaluation of film trippers (rough liner) on the unheated channel walls indicates considerable promise for increasing the burnout heat flux limit. The theory of operation is that the liquid film on the unheated wail is sheared off and dispersed, thus adding to the liquid film on the heated rod. Measurements with a heater rod bowed so that it is in contact with the channel wall show that the critical heat flux is decreased by a factor of two or more from values with normal clearance. Temperature measurements on the rod, when operating past the critical heat flux, were in the order of magnitude of 1000 deg F for heat fluxes of about 500,000--600,000 Btu/hr-ft/sup 2/. Chemical analyses for radial variations in isotopic composition within a fuel pellet are nearly completed and are compiled for interpretation. (N.W.R.)

Howard, C.L. comp.

1963-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Fuel assembly for nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new and improved fuel assembly is formed to minimize the amount of parasitic structural material wherein a plurality of hollow tubular members are juxtaposed to the fuel elements of the assembly. The tubular members may serve as guide tubes for control elements and are secured to a number of longitudinally spaced grid members along the fuel assembly. The grid members include means thereon engaging each of the fuel elements to laterally position the fuel elements in a predetermined array. Openings in the bottom of each hollow member serve as a shock absorber to cushion shock transmitted to the structure when the control elements are rapidly inserted in their corresponding tubular members.

Creagan, Robert J. (Pitcairn, PA); Frisch, Erling (Pittsburgh, PA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

LEU conversion status of US research reactors, September 1996  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the conversion status of research and test reactors in the United States from the use of fuels containing highly- enriched uranium (HEU, greater than or equal to 20%) to the use of fuels containing low-enriched uranium (LEU, < 20%). Estimates of the uranium densities required for conversion are made for reactors with power levels greater than or equal to 1 MW that are not currently involved in the LEU conversion process.

Matos, J.E.

1996-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

113

International Research Reactor Decommissioning Project  

SciTech Connect

Many research reactors have been or will be shut down and are candidates for decommissioning. Most of the respective countries neither have a decommissioning policy nor the required expertise and funds to effectively implement a decommissioning project. The IAEA established the Research Reactor Decommissioning Demonstration Project (R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P) to help answer this need. It was agreed to involve the Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) as model reactor to demonstrate 'hands-on' experience as it is just starting the decommissioning process. Other facilities may be included in the project as they fit into the scope of R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P and complement to the PRR-1 decommissioning activities. The key outcome of the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P will be the decommissioning of the PRR-1 reactor. On the way to this final goal the preparation of safety related documents (i.e., decommissioning plan, environmental impact assessment, safety analysis report, health and safety plan, cost estimate, etc.) and the licensing process as well as the actual dismantling activities could provide a model to other countries involved in the project. It is expected that the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P would initiate activities related to planning and funding of decommissioning activities in the participating countries if that has not yet been done.

Leopando, Leonardo [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Quezon City (Philippines); Warnecke, Ernst [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Current Projects for Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis > Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis > Current Projects Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics...

115

Plutonium Discharge Rates and Spent Nuclear Fuel Inventory Estimates for Nuclear Reactors Worldwide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a preliminary survey and analysis of the five primary types of commercial nuclear power reactors currently in use around the world. Plutonium mass discharge rates from the reactors’ spent fuel at reload are estimated based on a simple methodology that is able to use limited reactor burnup and operational characteristics collected from a variety of public domain sources. Selected commercial reactor operating and nuclear core characteristics are also given for each reactor type. In addition to the worldwide commercial reactors survey, a materials test reactor survey was conducted to identify reactors of this type with a significant core power rating. Over 100 material or research reactors with a core power rating >1 MW fall into this category. Fuel characteristics and spent fuel inventories for these material test reactors are also provided herein.

Brian K. Castle; Shauna A. Hoiland; Richard A. Rankin; James W. Sterbentz

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Fuel Cycle Research & Development | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Cycle Research & Fuel Cycle Research & Development Fuel Cycle Research & Development Fuel Cycle Research & Development The mission of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program is to conduct research and development to help develop sustainable fuel cycles, as described in the Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. Sustainable fuel cycle options are those that improve uranium resource utilization, maximize energy generation, minimize waste generation, improve safety, and limit proliferation risk. The FCRD program will develop a suite of options to enable future policymakers to make informed decisions about how best to manage used fuel from nuclear reactors. The overall goal is to demonstrate the technologies necessary to allow commercial deployment of solutions for the sustainable management of used

117

AN ANALYSIS OF POWER REACTOR FUEL REPROCESSING  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an analysis of the projected economies and processing capacity requirements for a power reactor fuel reprocessing industry based on the recovery of fertile and fissionable materials from presently proposed power reactors within tbe confines of the continental United 8tates for the next five to ten years. An analysis of the present general state of development of a technology required for such an Industry is given. A summary of results of power reactor reprocessing chemical and engineering development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory from July 1955 through December 1956 is given. (auth)

Culler, F.L. Jr.; Blanco, R.E.; Goeller, H.E.; Watson, C.D.

1957-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

118

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Advanced Combustion and Fuels...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Combustion and Fuels Projects NREL's advanced combustion and fuels projects bridge fundamental chemical kinetics and engine research to investigate how new vehicle fuels...

119

Thermal hydraulic limits analysis for the MIT Research Reactor low enrichment uranium core conversion using statistical propagation of parametric uncertainties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is evaluating the conversion from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. In addition to the fuel element re-design from 15 to 18 plates per element, a reactor ...

Chiang, Keng-Yen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Reactor sharing experience at the MIT research reactor  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides a number of examples of how educational institutions in the Boston area and elsewhere that do not possess nuclear reactors for training and research purposes have successfully enriched their programs through utilization of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) with assistance from the Reactor Sharing Program of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

Clark, L. Jr.; Fecych, W.; Young, H.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research reactor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels and Lubricants Fuels and Lubricants Research to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Fuel Effects on Combustion Lubricants Natural Gas Research Biofuels End-Use Research

122

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Advanced Ethanol Fuel Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Advanced Ethanol Fuel Blend Research Grants

123

Optimally moderated nuclear fission reactor and fuel source therefor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved nuclear fission reactor of the continuous fueling type involves determining an asymptotic equilibrium state for the nuclear fission reactor and providing the reactor with a moderator-to-fuel ratio that is optimally moderated for the asymptotic equilibrium state of the nuclear fission reactor; the fuel-to-moderator ratio allowing the nuclear fission reactor to be substantially continuously operated in an optimally moderated state.

Ougouag, Abderrafi M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Terry, William K. (Shelley, ID); Gougar, Hans D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

124

MODELING ASSUMPTIONS FOR THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR FRESH FUEL SHIPPING CONTAINER  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor Fresh Fuel Shipping Container (ATR FFSC) is currently licensed per 10 CFR 71 to transport a fresh fuel element for either the Advanced Test Reactor, the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), or the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR-II). During the licensing process, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) raised a number of issues relating to the criticality analysis, namely (1) lack of a tolerance study on the fuel and packaging, (2) moderation conditions during normal conditions of transport (NCT), (3) treatment of minor hydrogenous packaging materials, and (4) treatment of potential fuel damage under hypothetical accident conditions (HAC). These concerns were adequately addressed by modifying the criticality analysis. A tolerance study was added for both the packaging and fuel elements, full-moderation was included in the NCT models, minor hydrogenous packaging materials were included, and fuel element damage was considered for the MURR and MITR-II fuel types.

Rick J. Migliore

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Electrorefining {open_quotes}N{close_quotes} reactor fuel  

SciTech Connect

Principles of purifying of uranium metal by electrorefining are reviewed. Metal reactor fuel after irradiation is a form of impure uranium. Dissolution and deposition electrorefining processes were developed for spent metal fuel under the Integral Fast Reactor Program. Application of these processes to the conditioning of spent N-reactor fuel slugs is examined.

Gay, E.C.; Miller, W.E.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Natural Fueling of a Tokamak Fusion Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A natural fueling mechanism that helps to maintain the main core deuterium and tritium (DT) density profiles in a tokamak fusion reactor is discussed. In H-mode plasmas dominated by ion- temperature gradient (ITG) driven turbulence, cold DT ions near the edge will naturally pinch radially inward towards the core. This mechanism is due to the quasi-neutral heat flux dominated nature of ITG turbulence and still applies when trapped and passing kinetic electron effects are included. Fueling using shallow pellet injection or supersonic gas jets is augmented by an inward pinch of could DT fuel. The natural fueling mechanism is demonstrated using the three-dimensional toroidal electromagnetic gyrokinetic turbulence code GEM and is analyzed using quasilinear theory. Profiles similar to those used for conservative ITER transport modeling that have a completely flat density profile are examined and it is found that natural fueling actually reduces the linear growth rates and energy transport.

Wan, Weigang; Chen, Yang; Perkins, Francis W

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

NEUTRONIC REACTOR AND FUEL ELEMENT THEREFOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a reactor design of the type which employs solid fuel elements disposed in channels within the moderator through which channels and around the fuel elements is conveyed a coolant fiuid. The coolant channels are comprised of aluminum tubes extending through a solid moderator such as graphite and the fuel elements are comprised of an elongated solid body of natural uranium jacketed in an aluminum jacket with the ends thereof closed by aluminum caps of substantially greater thickness than the jacket was and in good thermal contact with the fuel material to facilitate the conduction of heat from the central portion of said ends to the coolant surrounding the fuel element to prevent overheating of said central portion.

Szilard, L.; Young, G.J.

1958-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Nuclear reactor core and fuel element therefor  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a nuclear reactor core. This core consists of vertical columns of disengageable fuel elements stacked one atop another. These columns are arranged in side-by-side relationship to form a substantially continuous horizontal array. Each of the fuel elements include a block of refractory material having relatively good thermal conductivity and neutron moderating characteristics. The block has a pair of parallel flat top and bottom end faces and sides which are substantially prependicular to the end faces. The sides of each block is aligned vertically within a vertical column, with the sides of vertically adjacent blocks. Each of the blocks contains fuel chambers, including outer rows containing only fuel chambers along the sides of the block have nuclear fuel material disposed in them. The blocks also contain vertical coolant holes which are located inside the fuel chambers in the outer rows and the fuel chambers which are not located in the outer rows with the fuel chambers and which extend axially completely through from end face to end face and form continuous vertical intracolumn coolant passageways in the reactor core. The blocks have vertical grooves extending along the sides of the blocks form interblock channels which align in groups to form continuous vertical intercolumn coolant passsageways in the reactor core. The blocks are in the form of a regular hexagonal prism with each side of the block having vertical gooves defining one half of one of the coolant interblock channels, six corner edges on the blocks have vertical groves defining one-third of an interblock channel, the vertical sides of the blocks defining planar vertical surfaces.

Fortescue, P.

1986-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

129

FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear fuel element comprising a large number og wafers of fissionable material and a protective jacket having compartments holding these wafers is described. The compartments of the jacket aid the removal of heat from the wafers, keep the wafers or fragments thereof from migrating in the jacket, and permit the escape of gaseous fission products.

Carney, K.G. Jr.

1959-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

130

PYROCHEMICAL DECONTAMINATION METHOD FOR REACTOR FUEL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pyro-chemical method is presented for decontaminating neutron irradiated uranium and separating plutonium therefrom by contact in the molten state with a metal chloride salt. Uranium trichloride and uranium tetrachloride either alone or in admixture with alkaline metal and alkaline eanth metal fluorides under specified temperature and specified phase ratio conditions extract substantially all of the uranium from the irradiated uranium fuel together with certain fission products. The phases are then separated leaving purified uranium metal. The uranium and plutonium in the salt phase can be reduced to forin a highly decontaminated uraniumplutonium alloy. The present method possesses advantages for economically decontaminating irradiated nuclear fuel elements since irradiated fuel may be proccessed immediately after withdrawal from the reactor and the uranium need not be dissolved and later reduced to the metallic form. Accordingly, the uranium may be economically refabricated and reinserted into the reactor.

Buyers, A.G.

1959-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

131

Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.  

SciTech Connect

Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

Ludewig, H. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R. (Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Clement, B. (IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Los Alamos, NM); Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Ohno, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Miyhara, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Farmer, M. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wade, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Grandy, C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d'%C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache, Cea, France); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Carbajo, Juan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI); Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Porter D. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Lambert, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Hayes, S. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Sackett, J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The international effort to develop new research reactor fuel materials and designs based on the use of low-enriched uranium, instead of highly-enriched uranium, has made much progress during the eight years since its inception. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialist in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the ninth of a series which began in 1978. All previous meetings of this series are listed on the facing page. The focus of this meeting was on the LEU fuel demonstration which was in progress at the Oak Ridge Research (ORR) reactor, not far from where the meeting was held. The visit to the ORR, where a silicide LEU fuel with 4.8 g A/cm/sup 3/ was by then in routine use, illustrated how far work has progressed.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Fusion reactors for synthetic fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Some of the types of processes now being considered for synthetic fuels production from fusion energy, together with an example of each type are listed. The process efficiency is defined as the chemical energy in the generated hydrogen (at the higher heating value (HHV)) divided by the total fusion energy release, including alpha particles and secondary neutron reactions in the blanket. Except where specifically noted, both high and low temperature blanket heats are counted as part of total fusion energy release.

Powell, J.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Welding austenitic steel clads for fast reactor fuel pins  

SciTech Connect

ABS>From symposium on fuel and elements for fast reactors; Brussels. Belgium (2 Jul 1973). Developmental programs aimed at fabrication of stainless steelclad PuO/sub 2/ fuel pins are described. Information and data are included on welding fast reactor fuel cans, methods of reducing the incidence of weld cracking, effects of weld stresses, and fuel plug design. (JRD)

Papeleux, P.; Flipot, A.J.; Lafontaine, I.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Advanced LWR Fuel Testing Capabilities in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new test capability for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is being developed that will allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials under prototypic light-water reactor (LWR) operating conditions in less time than it takes in other research reactors. This paper will describe the HFIR testing capabilities, the new advanced fuel/cladding testing facilities, and the initial cooperative irradiation experiments currently planned to start in late 2008.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Spellman, Donald J [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Research and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Research and Development Funding to someone by E-mail Research and Development Funding to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Research and Development Funding on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Research and Development Funding on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Research and Development Funding on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Research and Development Funding on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Research and Development Funding on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Vehicle Research and Development Funding on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

137

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Research, Development, and Promotion to someone by E-mail Research, Development, and Promotion to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and Promotion on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and Promotion on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and Promotion on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and Promotion on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and Promotion on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Research, Development, and Promotion on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

138

Fuel Rod Cooling in Natural Uranium Reactors  

SciTech Connect

An analysis is presented of the transfer of heat from a cylindrical fuel rod surrounded by a fast flowing coolant in an annular duct, with maximum power output limited by fuel rod temperatures, coolant pressure drop and pumping power requirements. A method is also presented for comparing and evaluating various liquid and gaseous coolants within these limitations. The report also shows and discusses some calculated results obtained for the systems considred in the study of natural U reactors for the production of Pu and useful power (NAA-SR-137).

Trilling, C.A.

1952-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

139

FUEL ELEMENT FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel element structure particularly useful in high temperature nuclear reactors is presented. Basically, the structure comprises two coaxial graphite sleeves integrally joined together by radial fins. Due to the high structural strength of graphite at high temperatures and the rigidity of this structure, nuclear fuel encased within the inner sleeve in contiguous relation therewith is supported and prevented from expanding radially at high temperatures. Thus, the necessity of relying on the usual cladding materials with relatively low temperature limitations for structural strength is removed. (AEC)

Davidson, J.K.

1963-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

140

Evaluation of the thermal-hydraulic operating limits of the HEU-LEU transition cores for the MIT Research Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is in the process of conducting a design study to convert from High Enrichment Uranium (HEU) fuel to Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) fuel. The currently selected LEU fuel design contains 18 ...

Wang, Yunzhi (Yunzhi Diana)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research reactor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Fuel handling system for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pool type nuclear fission reactor has a core, with a plurality of core elements and a redan which confines coolant as a hot pool at a first end of the core separated from a cold pool at a second end of the core by the redan. A fuel handling system for use with such reactors comprises a core element storage basket located outside of the redan in the cold pool. An access passage is formed in the redan with a gate for opening and closing the passage to maintain the temperature differential between the hot pool and the cold pool. A mechanism is provided for opening and closing the gate. A lifting arm is also provided for manipulating the fuel core elements through the access passage between the storage basket and the core when the redan gate is open.

Saiveau, James G. (Hickory Hills, IL); Kann, William J. (Park Ridge, IL); Burelbach, James P. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

NUCLEAR REACTOR AND THERMIONIC FUEL ELEMENT THEREFOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The patent relates to the direct conversion of fission heat to electricity by use of thermionic plasma diodes having fissionable material cathodes, said diodes arranged to form a critical mass in a nuclear reactor. The patent describes a fuel element comprising a plurality of diodes each having a fissionable material cathode, an anode around said cathode, and an ionizable gas therebetween. Provision is made for flowing the gas and current serially through the diodes. (AEC)

Rasor, N.S.; Hirsch, R.L.

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

BNL | Our History: Reactors as Research Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

> See also: Accelerators > See also: Accelerators Brookhaven History: Using Reactors as Research Tools BGRR Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) was the Laboratory's first big machine and the first peace-time reactor built in the United States following World War II. The reactor's primary mission was to produce neutrons for scientific experimentation and to refine reactor technology. At the time, the BGRR could accommodate more simultaneous experiments than any other reactor. Scientists and engineers from every corner of the U.S. came to use the reactor, which was not only a source of neutrons for experiments, but also an excellent training facility. Researchers used the BGRR's neutrons as tools for studying atomic nuclei and the structure of solids, and to investigate many physical, chemical and

144

Research Reactors Division | Neutron Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is responsible for operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Operating at 85 MW, HFIR is the highest flux reactor-based source of neutrons for research in the United States,...

145

HEAT-TRANSFER EXPERIMENTS ON A PROPOSED FUEL ASSEMBLY FOR THE EXPERIMENTAL GAS COOLED REACTOR. SECTION II FO FUEL-ASSEMBLY HEAT-TRANSFER AND CHANNEL PRESSURE-DROP EXPERIMENT FOR THE EGCR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

Heat-transfer data are presented for the Experimental Gas Cooled Reactor Title I seven-rod fuel-assembly design. The effect on heat transfer of (1) the radial location of the outer six rods of the seven-fuel-rod cluster and of (2) the addition of helical-finned spacers at the midpoint of each of the seven fuel rods is discussed. The heattransfer data were obtained to verify preliminary general assumptions pertaining to the heat-transfer characteristics of the seven- rod fuel-assembly design and to obtain local heat-transfer correlations. The heat-transfer tests were performed at near-atmospheric pressure using air as the coolant medium. Plots and equations of heattransfer correlations over a Reynolds Number range from 12,000 to 80,000 are included. The test set-up and test procedure are also described. (auth)

Beaudoin, C.L.; Higgins, R.M.

1960-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

146

Implementation of vented fuel assemblies in the supercritical CO?-cooled fast reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis has been undertaken to investigate the utilization of fuel assembly venting in the reference design of the gas-cooled fast reactor under study as part of the larger research effort at MIT under Gen-IV NERI Project ...

McKee, Stephanie A

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

History of Research Reactors at Brookhaven  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History of Research Reactors at Brookhaven History of Research Reactors at Brookhaven Brookhaven National Laboratory has three nuclear reactors on its site that were used for scientific research. The reactors are all shut down, and the Laboratory is addressing environmental issues associated with their operations. photo of BGRR Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor - Beginning operations in 1950, the graphite reactor was used for research in medicine, biology, chemistry, physics and nuclear engineering. One of the most significant achievements at this facility was the development of technetium-99m, a radiopharmaceutical widely used to image almost any organ in the body. The graphite reactor was shut down in 1969. Parts of it have been decommissioned, with the remainder to be addressed by 2011. More history

148

Conversion and standardization of US university reactor fuels using LEU, status 1989  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, the US Department of Energy initiated a program to change the fuel used in most of the US university research reactors using HEU (93%) to LEU({lt}20{percent}) in order to minimize the risk of theft or diversion of this weapons-useable material. An important consideration in the LEU conversion planning process has been the desire to standardize the fuels that are used and to enhance the performance and utilization of the reactors. This paper describes the current status of this conversion process and the plans and schedules to complete an orderly transition from HEU to LEU fuel in most of these reactors. To date, three university reactors have been converted to LEU fuel, completed safety documentation for three reactors is being evaluated by the USNRC, and work on the safety documentation for six reactors is in progress. 13 refs., 9 tabs.

Brown, K.R.; Matos, J.E. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA); Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Research on Very High Temperature Gas Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Very high temperature gas reactors are helium-cooled, graphite-moderated advanced reactors that show potential for generating low-cost electricity via gas turbines or cogeneration with process-heat applications. This investigation addresses the development status of advanced coatings for nuclear-fuel particles and high-temperature structural materials and evaluates whether these developments are likely to lead to economically competitive applications of the very high temperature gas reactor concept.

1991-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

150

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Facilities Scientists, engineers, and analysts develop hydrogen and fuel cell technologies at NREL's extensive research facilities in Golden, Colorado. Fuel Cell...

151

Post Irradiation Evaluation of BWR Fuel From Hope Creek Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Occasionally, in some BWRs, fuel pellet washout from a single degraded fuel rod has resulted in high offgas levels that were sufficient to impede the reactor operation. In addition, certain sound fuel rods have exhibited high eddy-current liftoff values during routine poolside measurements. Investigators pursued these two recent BWR fuel issues by performing detailed hotcell examinations on selected fuel rods from the Hope Creek reactor. The results provided insights into the mechanisms involved and poss...

1997-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

152

APS Research Fuels Engineering Interest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5th, 2003 5th, 2003 APS Research Fuels Engineering Interest Award-winning research on the characteristics of fuel sprays from injectors is one of the featured articles in the May 2003 issue of Mechanical Engineering and on the Web site of that magazine. The studies, carried out at APS's X-ray Operation and Research beamline 1-BM and the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, revealed startling new information about fuel sprays, including the presence of a shockwave as the spray leaves the injector nozzle. Entitled "Penetrating Vision," the article in Mechanical Engineering, by associate editor John DeGaspari, notes that "an investigative technique using x-rays is causing engine designers to sit up and take notice." In the article, Scott Parrish, General Motors R&D senior research engineer, notes

153

Evaluation of Alternate Materials for Coated Particle Fuels for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor. Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Candidate ceramic materials were studied to determine their suitability as Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor particle fuel coatings. The ceramics examined in this work were: TiC, TiN, ZrC, ZrN, AlN, and SiC. The studies focused on (i) chemical reactivity of the ceramics with fission products palladium and rhodium, (ii) the thermomechanical stresses that develop in the fuel coatings from a variety of causes during burnup, and (iii) the radiation resiliency of the materials. The chemical reactivity of TiC, TiN, ZrC, and ZrN with Pd and Rh were all found to be much lower than that of SiC. A number of important chemical behaviors were observed at the ceramic-metal interfaces, including the formation of specific intermetallic phases and a variation in reaction rates for the different ceramics investigated. Based on the data collected in this work, the nitride ceramics (TiN and ZrN) exhibit chemical behavior that is characterized by lower reaction rates with Pd and Rh than the carbides TiC and ZrC. The thermomechanical stresses in spherical fuel particle ceramic coatings were modeled using finite element analysis, and included contributions from differential thermal expansion, fission gas pressure, fuel kernel swelling, and thermal creep. In general the tangential stresses in the coatings during full reactor operation are tensile, with ZrC showing the lowest values among TiC, ZrC, and SiC (TiN and ZrN were excluded from the comprehensive calculations due to a lack of available materials data). The work has highlighted the fact that thermal creep plays a critical role in the development of the stress state of the coatings by relaxing many of the stresses at high temperatures. To perform ion irradiations of sample materials, an irradiation beamline and high-temperature sample irradiation stage was constructed at the University of Wisconsin’s 1.7MV Tandem Accelerator Facility. This facility is now capable of irradiating of materials to high dose while controlling sample temperature up to 800ºC.

Paul A. Demkowicz; Karen Wright; Jian Gan; David Petti; Todd Allen; Jake Blanchard

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Why Was the BGRR Decommissioned? Why Was the BGRR Decommissioned? BGRR The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was decommissioned to ensure the complex is in a safe and stable condition and to reduce sources of groundwater contamination. The BGRR contained over 8,000 Curies of radioactive contaminants from past operations consisting of primarily nuclear activation products such as hydrogen-3 (tritium) and carbon-14 and fission products cesium-137 and strontium-90. The nature and extent of contamination varied by location depending on historic uses of the systems and components and releases, however, the majority of the contamination (over 99 percent) was bound within the graphite pile and biological shield. Radioactive contamination was identified in the fuel handling system deep

155

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor | Environmental Restoration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor(BGRR) BGRR Overview BGRR Complex Description Decommissioning Decision BGRR Complex Cleanup Actions BGRR Documents BGRR Science &...

156

FOREIGN RESEARCH AND POWER REACTOR PRELIMINARY LIST  

SciTech Connect

Foreign research and power reactors are tabulated. Nuclear power buildup goals are given for each nation on which information is available. (J.H.D.)

Ullmann, J.W.

1959-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

157

Cleanup at the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphite Research Reactor placeholder Remotely operated robot known as a BROKK manipulator In April 2005, the Department of Energy (DOE), the Lab, and the regulatory agencies...

158

University Research Reactor Task Force to the Nuclear Energy Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

University Research Reactor Task Force to the Nuclear Energy University Research Reactor Task Force to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee University Research Reactor Task Force to the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee In mid-February, 2001 The University Research Reactor (URR) Task Force (TF), a sub-group of the Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC), was asked to: * Analyze information collected by DOE, the NERAC "Blue Ribbon Panel," universities, and other sources pertaining to university reactors including their research and training capabilities, costs to operate, and operating data, and * Provide DOE with clear, near-term recommendations as to actions that should be taken by the Federal Government and a long-term strategy to assure the continued operation of vital university reactor facilities in

159

Spent nuclear fuel discharges from U.S. reactors 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spent Nuclear Fuel Discharges from US Reactors 1994 provides current statistical data on fuel assemblies irradiated at commercial nuclear reactors operating in the US. This year`s report provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities at these reactors. Detailed statistics on the data are presented in four chapters that highlight 1994 spent fuel discharges, storage capacities and inventories, canister and nonfuel component data, and assembly characteristics. Five appendices, a glossary, and bibliography are also included. 10 figs., 34 tabs.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Reactor core design and modeling of the MIT research reactor for conversion to LEU  

SciTech Connect

Feasibility design studies for conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR) to LEU are described. Because the reactor fuel has a rhombic cross section, a special input processor was created in order to model the reactor in great detail with the REBUS-PC diffusion theory code, in 3D (triangular-z) geometry. Comparisons are made of fuel assembly power distributions and control blade worth vs. axial position, between REBUS-PC results and Monte Carlo predictions from the MCNP code. Results for the original HEU core at zero burnup are also compared with measurement. These two analysis methods showed remarkable agreement. Ongoing fuel cycle studies are summarized. A status report will be given as to results thus far that affect key design decisions. Future work plans and schedules to achieve completion of the conversion are presented. (author)

Newton, Thomas H. Jr. [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 138 Albany St., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Olson, Arne P.; Stillman, John A. [RERTR Program, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research reactor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New World  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New World Record For Irradiation Performance Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Program's TRISO Particle Fuel Sets A New World Record For Irradiation Performance November 16, 2009 - 1:12pm Addthis As part of the Office of Nuclear Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program, the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program has achieved a new international record for irradiation testing of next-generation particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). The AGR Fuel Development Program was initiated by the Department of Energy in 2002 to develop the advanced fabrication and characterization technologies, and provide irradiation and safety performance data required to license TRISO particle fuel for the NGNP and future HTGRs. The AGR

162

Updated Uranium Fuel Cycle Environmental Impacts for Advanced Reactor Designs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to update the environmental impacts from the uranium fuel cycle for select advanced (GEN III+) reactor designs.

Nitschke, R.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

163

Fuel assembly transfer basket for pool type nuclear reactor vessels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel assembly transfer basket for a pool type, liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a side access loading and unloading port for receiving and relinquishing fuel assemblies during transfer.

Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Ramsour, Nicholas L. (San Jose, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Preparations for the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modifications to the Hot Fuel Examination Facility-South (HFEF/S) have been in progress since mid-1988 to ready the facility for demonstration of the unique Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) pyroprocess fuel cycle. This paper updates the last report on this subject to the American Nuclear Society and describes the progress made in the modifications to the facility and in fabrication of the new process equipment. The IFR is a breeder reactor, which is central to the capability of any reactor concept to contribute to mitigation of environmental impacts of fossil fuel combustion. As a fast breeder, fuel of course must be recycled in order to have any chance of an economical fuel cycle. The pyroprocess fuel cycle, relying on a metal alloy reactor fuel rather than oxide, has the potential to be economical even at small-scale deployment. Establishing this quantitatively is one important goal of the IFR fuel cycle demonstration.

Lineberry, M.J.; Phipps, R.D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Optimization of hydride fueled pressurized water reactor cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis contributes to the Hydride Fuels Project, a collaborative effort between UC Berkeley and MIT aimed at investigating the potential benefits of hydride fuel use in light water reactors (LWRs). This pursuit involves ...

Shuffler, Carter Alexander

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Nuclear reactor fuel rod attachment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reusable system for removably attaching a nuclear reactor fuel rod (12) to a support member (14). A locking cap (22) is secured to the fuel rod (12) and a locking strip (24) is fastened to the support member (14). The locking cap (22) has two opposing fingers (24a and 24b) shaped to form a socket having a body portion (26). The locking strip has an extension (36) shaped to rigidly attach to the socket's body portion (26). The locking cap's fingers are resiliently deflectable. For attachment, the locking cap (22) is longitudinally pushed onto the locking strip (24) causing the extension (36) to temporarily deflect open the fingers (24a and 24b) to engage the socket's body portion (26). For removal, the process is reversed.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Advanced sodium fast reactor accident source terms : research needs.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An expert opinion elicitation has been used to evaluate phenomena that could affect releases of radionuclides during accidents at sodium-cooled fast reactors. The intent was to identify research needed to develop a mechanistic model of radionuclide release for licensing and risk assessment purposes. Experts from the USA, France, the European Union, and Japan identified phenomena that could affect the release of radionuclides under hypothesized accident conditions. They qualitatively evaluated the importance of these phenomena and the need for additional experimental research. The experts identified seven phenomena that are of high importance and have a high need for additional experimental research: High temperature release of radionuclides from fuel during an energetic eventEnergetic interactions between molten reactor fuel and sodium coolant and associated transfer of radionuclides from the fuel to the coolantEntrainment of fuel and sodium bond material during the depressurization of a fuel rod with breached claddingRates of radionuclide leaching from fuel by liquid sodiumSurface enrichment of sodium pools by dissolved and suspended radionuclidesThermal decomposition of sodium iodide in the containment atmosphereReactions of iodine species in the containment to form volatile organic iodides. Other issues of high importance were identified that might merit further research as development of the mechanistic model of radionuclide release progressed.

Powers, Dana Auburn; Clement, Bernard [IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France; Denning, Richard [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH] Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Ohno, Shuji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan] Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan; Zeyen, Roland [Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Advanced sodium fast reactor accident source terms : research needs.  

SciTech Connect

An expert opinion elicitation has been used to evaluate phenomena that could affect releases of radionuclides during accidents at sodium-cooled fast reactors. The intent was to identify research needed to develop a mechanistic model of radionuclide release for licensing and risk assessment purposes. Experts from the USA, France, the European Union, and Japan identified phenomena that could affect the release of radionuclides under hypothesized accident conditions. They qualitatively evaluated the importance of these phenomena and the need for additional experimental research. The experts identified seven phenomena that are of high importance and have a high need for additional experimental research: High temperature release of radionuclides from fuel during an energetic eventEnergetic interactions between molten reactor fuel and sodium coolant and associated transfer of radionuclides from the fuel to the coolantEntrainment of fuel and sodium bond material during the depressurization of a fuel rod with breached claddingRates of radionuclide leaching from fuel by liquid sodiumSurface enrichment of sodium pools by dissolved and suspended radionuclidesThermal decomposition of sodium iodide in the containment atmosphereReactions of iodine species in the containment to form volatile organic iodides. Other issues of high importance were identified that might merit further research as development of the mechanistic model of radionuclide release progressed.

Powers, Dana Auburn; Clement, Bernard [IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France; Denning, Richard [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH] Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Ohno, Shuji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan] Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan; Zeyen, Roland [Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France] Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects NREL's hydrogen and fuel cell research projects focus on developing, integrating, and demonstrating advanced hydrogen production, hydrogen storage, and fuel cell...

170

Evaluation of the thermal-hydraulic operating limits of the HEU-LEU transition cores for the MIT Research Reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is in the process of conducting a design study to convert from High Enrichment Uranium (HEU) fuel to Low Enrichment… (more)

Wang, Yunzhi (Yunzhi Diana)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report October - December 1980  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from October 1 through December 31, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NOE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Edler, S K

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Fuel Reliability Program: Post-Irradiation Examination and Performance Assessment of ATRIUM-10 BWR Fuel from Browns Ferry-3 Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ATRIUM-10 design (10x10 lattice) fuel was irradiated for one 24-month period during Cycle 12 to 25 MWd/kgU rod-average exposure at Tennessee Valley Authority's Browns Ferry Unit 3 reactor. The project goal was to characterize the behavior of modern boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel at low exposures to assess early-life performance in a well-documented reactor environment. This report includes results from hot cell post-irradiation examinations. In a future Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report, ...

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

173

California Fuel Cell Partnership Alternative Fuels Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and maintenance are both important. Propane and CNG are NOT "cleaner burning". RSD is a very good tool but ... Measured grams pollutant per kg of fuel from RSD -quantifiable uncertainty Fuel sales from tax department inventories · Only need one week of work and fuel sales to get fuel based emissions inventories · RSD

175

Fuel performance comparison between Savannah River reactors and the US commercial nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a review of fuel/target performance of the Savannah River Reactors which was made to compare their in-core performance with that of the commercial nuclear reactors in the US.

Paik, I.K.; Ellison, P.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Fuel Cell Applied Research Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since November 12, 2003, Northern Alberta Institute of Technology has been operating a 200 kW phosphoric acid fuel cell to provide electrical and thermal energy to its campus. The project was made possible by funding from the U.S. Department of Energy as well as by a partnership with the provincial Alberta Energy Research Institute; a private-public partnership, Climate Change Central; the federal Ministry of Western Economic Development; and local natural gas supplier, ATCO Gas. Operation of the fuel cell has contributed to reducing NAIT's carbon dioxide emissions through its efficient use of natural gas.

Lee Richardson

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

177

Fuel Cell Applied Research Project  

SciTech Connect

Since November 12, 2003, Northern Alberta Institute of Technology has been operating a 200 kW phosphoric acid fuel cell to provide electrical and thermal energy to its campus. The project was made possible by funding from the U.S. Department of Energy as well as by a partnership with the provincial Alberta Energy Research Institute; a private-public partnership, Climate Change Central; the federal Ministry of Western Economic Development; and local natural gas supplier, ATCO Gas. Operation of the fuel cell has contributed to reducing NAIT's carbon dioxide emissions through its efficient use of natural gas.

Lee Richardson

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

CHEMICAL ASPECTS OF PELLET-CLADDING INTERACTION IN LIGHT WATER REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANS/ENS Topical Meeting on Reactor Safety Aspects of FuelINTERACTION IN LiaiT-WATER-REACTOR FUEL ELEMENTS by D. R.PCI) in light water reactor fuel elements, the chemical

Olander, D.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the Budapest research reactor.  

SciTech Connect

A neutronic feasibility study for conversion of the Budapest Research Reactor (BRR) from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with the KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute in Hungary. Comparisons were made of the reactor performance with the current HEU (36%) fuel and with a proposed LEU (19.75%) fuel. Cycle lengths, thermal neutron fluxes, and rod worths were calculated in equilibrium-type cores for each type of fuel. Relative to the HEU fuel, the LEU fuel has up to a 50% longer fuel cycle length, but a 7-10% smaller thermal neutron flux in the experiment locations. The rod worths are smaller with the LEU fuel, but are still large enough to easily satisfy the BRR shutdown margin criteria. Irradiation testing of four VVR-M2 LEU fuel assemblies that are nearly the same as the proposed BRR LEU fuel assemblies is currently in progress at the Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute.

Pond, R. B.

1998-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

180

PROCESSING OF MOLTEN SALT POWER REACTOR FUEL  

SciTech Connect

ABS> Fuel reprocessing methods are being investigated for molten salt nuclear reactors which use LiF--BeF/sub 2/ salt as a solvent for UF/sub 4/ and ThF/sub 4/. A liquid HF dissolution procedure coupled with fluorination has been developed for recovery of the uranium and LiF- BeF/sub 2/ solvent salt which is highly enriched in Li/sup 7/. The recovered salt is decontaminated in the process from the major reactor poisons; namely, rare earths and neptunium. A brief investigation of alternate methods, including oxide precipitation, partial freezing, and metal reduction, indicated that such methods may give some separation of the solvent salt from reactor poisons, but they do not appear to be sufficiently quantitative for a simple processing operation. Solubilities of LiF and BeF/sub 2/ in aqueous 70t0 100% HF are presented. The BeF/sub 2/ solubility is appreciably increased in the presence of water and large amounts of LiF. Salt solubilities of 150 g/liter are attainable. Tracer experiments indicate that rare earth solubilities, relative to LiF-- BeF/sub 2/ solvent salt solubility, increase from about 10/sup -4/ mole% in 98% HF to 0.003 mole% in 80% HF. Fluorination of uranium from LiF--BeF/sub 2/ salt was demonstrated. This appears feasible also for the recovery of the relatively small ccncentration of uranium produced in the LiF- BeF/sub 2/ThF/sub 4/ blanket. A proposed chemical flowsheet is presented on the basis of this exploratory work as applied to the semicontinuous processing of a 600 Mw power reactor. (auth)

Campbell, D.O.; Cathers, G.I.

1959-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research reactor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Neutronic safety parameters and transient analyses for potential LEU conversion of the Budapest Research Reactor.  

SciTech Connect

An initial safety study for potential LEU conversion of the Budapest Research Reactor was completed. The study compares safety parameters and example transients for reactor cores with HEU and LEU fuels. Reactivity coefficients, kinetic parameters and control rod worths were calculated for cores with HEU(36%) UAl alloy fuel and UO{sub 2}-Al dispersion fuel, and with LEU (19.75%)UO{sub 2}-Al dispersion fuel that has a uranium density of about 2.5 g/cm{sup 3}. A preliminary fuel conversion plan was developed for transition cores that would convert the BRR from HEU to LEU fuel after the process is begun.

Pond, R. B.; Hanan, N. A.; Matos, J. E.; Maraczy, C.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

182

Alcohol fuel research in Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turkey, like most of the developing countries of the world, has vast agricultural potential, yet the country is highly dependent on oil imports, which satisfy 90% of its crude oil demand. Since Turkey had an economy based on agriculture, the usage of national resources in the energy field is extremely important. In the first years of the Turkish Republic, in 1931, the usage of national resources as an alternative to conventional fuels became a subject of increasing interest. Since then a lot of research has been conducted, but only a limited amount of application has been realized. Alcohol has always occupied an important place among the alternative fuel studies. The subject has been the scope of some research institute projects and university and government development planning studies. In Turkey, one of the most important studies in this area has been undertaken by the authors` research group in their university. This study is a general review of alcohol usage as an alternative automotive fuel in Turkey. This review includes a short history of the subject, the approach of the government, the research results, possible developments on the subject in the near future, and finally, it concludes with proposals.

Karaosmanoglu, F.; Isigiguer-Erguedenler, A.; Aksoy, H.A. [Istanbul Technical Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Experience with non-fuel-bearing components in LWR (light-water reactor) fuel systems  

SciTech Connect

Many non-fuel-bearing components are so closely associated with the spent fuel assemblies that their integrity and behavior must be taken into consideration with the fuel assemblies, when handling spent fuel of planning waste management activities. Presented herein is some of the experience that has been gained over the past two decades from non-fuel-bearing components in light-water reactors (LWRs), both pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) and boiling-water reactors (BWRs). Among the most important of these components are the control rod systems, the absorber and burnable poison rods, and the fuel assembly channels. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Bailey, W.J.; Berting, F.M.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor Project: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOE’s Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core design and fuel cycle; reactor safety and thermal hydraulics; and fuel performance.

Petti, David Andrew; Dolan, Thomas James; Miller, Gregory Kent; Moore, Richard Leroy; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Oh, Chang H; Gougar, Hans D

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for Advanced Test Reactor LEU Fuel Conversion  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located in the ATR Complex of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), was constructed in the 1960s for the purpose of irradiating reactor fuels and materials. Other irradiation services, such as radioisotope production, are also performed at ATR. The ATR is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) matrix (UAlx) in an aluminum sandwich plate cladding. The National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) strategic mission includes efforts to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material at civilian sites around the world. Converting research reactors from using HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU) was originally started in 1978 as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. Within this strategic mission, GTRI has three goals that provide a comprehensive approach to achieving this mission: The first goal, the driver for the modification that is the subject of this determination, is to convert research reactors from using HEU to LEU. Thus the mission of the ATR LEU Fuel Conversion Project is to convert the ATR and Advanced Test Reactor Critical facility (ATRC) (two of the six U.S. High-Performance Research Reactors [HPRR]) to LEU fuel by 2017. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project pre-conceptual design identified several issues that lead to the conclusion that the project is a major modification.

Boyd D. Christensen; Michael A. Lehto; Noel R. Duckwitz

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Fuel cycle design and analysis of SABR: subrcritical advanced burner reactor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Various fuel cycles for a sodium-cooled, subcritical, fast reactor with a fusion neutron source for the transmutation of light water reactor spent fuel have been… (more)

Sommer, Christopher

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Metal-fueled HWR (heavy water reactors) severe accident issues: Differences and similarities to commercial LWRs (light water reactors)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Differences and similarities in severe accident progression and phenomena between commercial Light Water Reactors (LWR) and metal-fueled isotopic production Heavy Water Reactors (HWR) are described. It is very important to distinguish between accident progression in the two systems because each reactor type behaves in a unique manner to a fuel melting accident. Some of the lessons learned as a result of the extensive commercial severe accident research are not applicable to metal-fueled heavy water reactors. A direct application of severe accident phenomena developed from oxide-fueled LWRs to metal-fueled HWRs may lead to large errors or substantial uncertainties. In general, the application of severe accident LWR concepts to HWRs should be done with the intent to define the relevant issues, define differences, and determine areas of overlap. This paper describes the relevant differences between LWR and metal-fueled HWR severe accident phenomena. Also included in the paper is a description of the phenomena that govern the source term in HWRs, the areas where research is needed to resolve major uncertainties, and areas in which LWR technology can be directly applied with few modifications.

Ellison, P.G.; Hyder, M.L.; Monson, P.R. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA)); Coryell, E.W. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

FUEL ELEMENT FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lattice type fissionable fuel structure for a nuclear reactor is described. The fissionable material is formed into a plurality of rod-llke bodies with each encased in a fluid-tight jacket. A plurality of spaced longitudinal fins are mounted on the exterior and extend radially from each jacket, with a portion of the fins extending radially beyond the remainder of the fins. A collar of short length for each body is mounted on the extended fins for spacing the bodies, and adjacent bodies abut each other through these collars. Should distortion of the bodies take place, coilapse of the outer fins is limited by the shorter flns, thereby insuring some coolant flow at all times. (AEC)

Duffy, J.G. Jr.

1961-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

FUEL ELEMENT FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lattice-type fissionable fuel structure for a nuclear reactor is offered. The fissionable material is formed into a plurality of rod-like bodies each encased in a fluid-tight jacket. A plurality of spaced longitudinal fins are mounted on the exterior of and extend radially from each jacket, and a portion of the fins extends radially beyond the remainder of the fins. A collar of short lengih for each body is mounted on the extended fins for spacing the bodies, and adjacent bodies abut each other through these collars. Should distortion of the bodies take place, collapse of the outer fins is limited by the shorter fins thereby insuring some coolant flow therethrough at all times.

Duffy, J.G. Jr.

1961-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium: Plans and schedules  

SciTech Connect

The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. To minimize this risk, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued its final rule on ''Limiting the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium in Domestically Licensed Research and Test Reactors,'' in February 1986. This paper describes the plans and schedules developed by the US Department of Energy to coordinate an orderly transition from HEU to LEU fuel in most of these reactors. An important element in the planning process has been the desire to standardize the LEU fuels used in US university reactors and to enhance the performance and utilization of a number of these reactors. The program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years.

Young, H.H.; Brown, K.R.; Matos, J.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Novel Reactor Design for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping Combustion Opportunity Research is active on the patent pending technology, titled "Apparatus and Method for Solid Fuel Chemical Looping...

192

Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor - Rev. 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was developed by Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to demonstrate the potential of a water-cooled, thorium oxide fuel cycle breeder reactor. The LWBR core operated from 1977-82 without major incident. The fuel and fuel components suffered minimal damage during operation, and the reactor testing was deemed successful. Extensive destructive and nondestructive postirradiation examinations confirmed that the fuel was in good condition with minimal amounts of cladding deformities and fuel pellet cracks. Fuel was placed in wet storage upon arrival at the Expended Core Facility, then dried and sent to the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center for underground dry storage. It is likely that the fuel remains in good condition at its current underground dry storage location at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Reports show no indication of damage to the core associated with shipping, loading, or storage.

Olson, Gail Lynn; Mc Cardell, Richard Keith; Illum, Douglas Brent

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Preparation of high temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel element  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method for the preparation of high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel elements wherein uncarbonized fuel rods are inserted in appropriate channels of an HTGR fuel element block and the entire block is inserted in an autoclave for in situ carbonization under high pressure. The method is particularly applicable to remote handling techniques.

Bradley, Ronnie A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sease, John D. (Knoxville, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Preliminary Advanced Test Reactor LEU Fuel Conversion Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density, high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. The ATR has large irradiation test volumes located in high flux areas. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth with a maximum unperturbed thermal neutron flux rating of 1.0 x 1015 n/cm2–s. As a result, the ATR is a representative candidate for assessing the necessary modifications and evaluating the subsequent operating effects associated with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel conversion. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was developed for the fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. Using the current HEU 235U enrichment of 93.0 % as a baseline, an analysis can be performed to determine the LEU uranium density and 235U enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield an equivalent Keff between the HEU core and a LEU core versus effective full power days (EFPD). The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model will be used to optimize the 235U loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in Keff between the HEU and LEU core can be minimized for operation at 150 EFPD with a total core power of 115 MW. The Monte-Carlo with ORIGEN-2 (MCWO) method was used to calculate Keff versus EFPDs. The MCWO-calculated results for the LEU case demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the LEU core conversion designer should be able to optimize the 235U content of each fuel plate, so that the Keff and relative radial fission heat flux profile are similar to the reference ATR HEU case. However, to demonstrate that the LEU core fuel cycle performance can meet the Upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report (UFSAR) safety requirements, a further study will be required in order to investigate the detailed radial, axial, and azimuthal heat flux profile variations versus EFPDs.

G. S. Chang; R. G. Ambrosek

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Research Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Research Biofuels Research Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Research Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Research Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Research Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Research Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Research Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Research Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuels Research Grants The Connecticut Department of Economic and Community Development administers a fuel diversification grant program to provide funding to

196

Independent Verification of Research Reactor Operation (Analysis of the Georgian IRT-M Reactor by the Isotope Ratio Method)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Nonproliferation and International Security (NA-24) develops technologies to aid in implementing international nuclear safeguards. The Isotope Ratio Method (IRM) was successfully developed in 2005 – 2007 by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Republic of Georgia’s Andronikashvili Institute of Physics as a generic technology to verify the declared operation of water-moderated research reactors, independent of spent fuel inventory. IRM estimates the energy produced over the operating lifetime of a fission reactor by measuring the ratios of the isotopes of trace impurity elements in non-fuel reactor components.The Isotope Ratio Method is a technique for estimating the energy produced over the operating lifetime of a fission reactor by measuring the ratios of the isotopes of impurity elements in non-fuel reactor components.

Cliff, John B.; Frank, Douglas P.; Gerlach, David C.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Little, Winston W.; Reid, Bruce D.; Tsiklauri, Georgi V.; Abramidze, Sh; Rostomashvili, Z.; Kiknadze, G.; Dzhavakhishvily, O.; Nabakhtiani, G.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

197

High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

PROTEUS - Simulation Toolset for Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation Toolset for Simulation Toolset for Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis PROTEUS Faster and more accurate neutronics calculations enable optimum reactor design... Argonne National Laboratory's powerful reactor physics toolset, PROTEUS, empowers users to create optimal reactor designs quickly, reliably and accurately. ...Reducing costs for designers of fast spectrum reactors. PROTEUS' long history of validation provides confidence in predictive simulations Argonne's simulation tools have more than 30 years of validation history against numerous experiments and measurements. The tools within PROTEUS work together, using the same interface files for easier integration of calculations. Multi-group Fast Reactor Cross Section Processing: MC 2 -3 No other fast spectrum multigroup generation tool

199

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Photoelectrochemical Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Standards and Methods Development to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Photoelectrochemical Research Standards and Methods Development on Facebook...

200

Spent fuel utilization in a compact traveling wave reactor  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, several innovative designs of nuclear reactors are proposed. One of them is Traveling Wave Reactor (TWR). The unique characteristic of a TWR is the capability of breeding its own fuel in the reactor. The reactor is fueled by mostly depleted, natural uranium or spent nuclear fuel and a small amount of enriched uranium to initiate the fission process. Later on in the core, the reactor gradually converts the non-fissile material into the fissile in a process like a traveling wave. In this work, a TWR with spent nuclear fuel blanket was studied. Several parameters such as reactivity coefficients, delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron generation lifetime, and fission power, were analyzed. The discharge burnup composition was also analyzed. The calculation is performed by a continuous energy Monte Carlo code McCARD.

Hartanto, Donny; Kim, Yonghee [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology 373-1 Kusong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research reactor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Eastern Europe Research Reactor Initiative nuclear education and training courses - Current activities and future challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Eastern Europe Research Reactor Initiative was established in January 2008 to enhance cooperation between the Research Reactors in Eastern Europe. It covers three areas of research reactor utilisation: irradiation of materials and fuel, radioisotope production, neutron beam experiments, education and training. In the field of education and training an EERRI training course was developed. The training programme has been elaborated with the purpose to assist IAEA Member States, which consider building a research reactor (RR) as a first step to develop nuclear competence and infrastructure in the Country. The major strength of the reactor is utilisation of three different research reactors and a lot of practical exercises. Due to high level of adaptability, the course can be tailored to specific needs of institutions with limited or no access to research reactors. (authors)

Snoj, L. [Josef Stefan Inst., Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sklenka, L.; Rataj, J. [Dept. of Nuclear Reactor, Czech Technical Univ. in Prague, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Boeck, H. [Vienna Univ. of Technology/Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Reactor operations Brookhaven medical research reactor, Brookhaven high flux beam reactor informal monthly report  

SciTech Connect

This document is the April 1995 summary report on reactor operations at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor and the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Ongoing experiments/irradiations in each are listed, and other significant operations functions are also noted. The HFBR surveillance testing schedule is also listed.

Hauptman, H.M.; Petro, J.N.; Jacobi, O. [and others

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Basic Research for the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Basic Research for the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Basic Research for the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Basic Research for the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative More Documents & Publications...

204

RERTR 2009 (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Global Threat Reduction in cooperation with the China Atomic Energy Authority and International Atomic Energy Agency hosted the 'RERTR 2009 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors.' The meeting was organized by Argonne National Laboratory, China Institute of Atomic Energy and Idaho National Laboratory and was held in Beijing, China from November 1-5, 2009. This was the 31st annual meeting in a series on the same general subject regarding the conversion of reactors within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program develops technology necessary to enable the conversion of civilian facilities using high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels and targets.

Totev, T.; Stevens, J.; Kim, Y. S.; Hofman, G.; Matos, J.; Hanan, N.; Garner, P.; Dionne, B.; Olson, A.; Feldman, E.; Dunn, F.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Atomic Research Center; Inst. of Nuclear Physics; LLNL; INL; Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Comisi?n Nacional de Energ?a At?mica; Nuclear Reactor Lab.; Inst. of Atomic Energy-Poland; AECL-Canada; Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Japan Atomic Energy Agency; Nuclear Power Inst. of China; Kyoto Univ. Research Reactor Inst.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

A neutronics feasibility study for the LEU conversion of Poland's Maria research reactor.  

SciTech Connect

The MARIA reactor is a high-flux multipurpose research reactor which is water-cooled and moderated with both beryllium and water. Standard HEU (80% {sup 235}U)fuel assemblies consist of six concentric fuel tubes of a U-Al alloy clad in aluminum. Although the inventory of HEU (80%) fuel is nearly exhausted, a supply of highly-loaded 36%-enriched fuel assemblies is available at the reactor site. Neutronic equilibrium studies have been made to determine the relative performance of fuels with enrichments of 80%, 36% and 19.7%. These studies indicate that LEU (19.7%) densities of about 2.5 gU/cm{sup 3} and 3.8 gU/cm{sup 3} are required to match the performance of the MARIA reactor with 80%-enriched and with 36%-enriched fuels, respectively.

Bretscher, M. M.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

206

Hot Fuel Examination Facility's neutron radiography reactor  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory-West is located near Idaho Falls, Idaho, and is operated by the University of Chicago for the United States Department of Energy in support of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program, LMFBR. The Hot Fuel Examination Facility, HFEF, is one of several facilities located at the Argonne Site. HFEF comprises a large hot cell where both nondestructive and destructive examination of highly-irradiated reactor fuels are conducted in support of the LMFBR program. One of the nondestructive examination techniques utilized at HFEF is neutron radiography, which is provided by the NRAD reactor facility (a TRIGA type reactor) below the HFEF hot cell.

Pruett, D.P.; Richards, W.J.; Heidel, C.C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Fuel rod retention device for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is described for supporting a nuclear fuel rod in a fuel rod assembly which allows the rod to be removed without disturbing other rods in the assembly. A fuel rod cap connects the rod to a bolt which is supported in the assembly end fitting by means of a locking assembly. The device is designed so that the bolt is held securely during normal reactor operation yet may be easily disengaged and the fuel rod removed when desired.

Hylton, Charles L. (Madison Heights, VA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Research Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels Research Biofuels Research Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Research Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Research Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Research Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Research Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Research Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels Research Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuels Research Grants The Colorado Office of Economic Development administers the Bioscience Discovery Evaluation Grant Program (Program), which provides grants to

209

DISMANTLING OF THE REACTOR BLOCK OF THE FRJ-1 RESEARCH REACTOR (MERLIN)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the past procedure in dismantling the reactor block of the FRJ-1 research reactor (MERLIN). Furthermore, it gives an outlook on future activities up to the final removal of the reactor block. MERLIN is an abbreviation for Medium Energy Research Light Water Moderated Industrial Nuclear Reactor. The FRJ-1 (MERLIN) was shut down in 1985 and the fuel elements removed from the facility. After dismantling the coolant loops and removing the reactor tank internals with subsequent draining of the reactor tank water, the first activities for dismantling the reactor block were carried out in summer 2001. The relevant license was granted in late July 2001 by the licensing authority specifying 8 incidental provisions. After dismantling the reactor extension (gates of the thermal columns and steel platforms surrounding the reactor block), a heavy-load platform including a casing around the reactor block was constructed. Two ventilation systems with a volume flow of 10,000 and 2 ,000 m3/h will, moreover, serve to avoid a spread of contamination. The reactor block will be dismantled in three phases divided according to upper, central and bottom sections. Dismantling the upper section started in August 2002. This section as well as the bottom section can probably be completely measured for clearance. For this reason, the activities have so far been carried out manually using mechanical and thermal techniques. The central section will probably have to be largely disposed of as radioactive waste. This is the region of the former reactor core in which the experimental devices are also integrated. Most of this work will probably have to be carried out by remote handling. More than 80 % of the dismantled materials of the reactor block can probably be measured for clearance. For this purpose, a clearance measurement device was taken into operation in the FRJ-1. On this occasion, the limits of clearance measurement have become evident. For concrete, which constitutes the largest portion of the dismantled materials by volume, an additional conditioning step has become necessary to fulfill the clearance criteria, whereas waste packages with steel components largely have to be reconditioned once more at a later stage. Material measured for clearance will be disposed of conventionally (recycling, landfill) after inspection by the official expert and clearance by the regulatory authority. Dismantled parts that cannot be measured for clearance will be transferred to the Decontamination Department of the Research Centre. From the present perspective, the dismantling of the reactor block will be completed within the first six months of 2003.

Stahn, B.; Matela, K.; Zehbe, C.; Poeppinghaus, J.; Cremer, J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

210

Conversion and standardization of university reactor fuels using low-enrichment uranium - options and costs  

SciTech Connect

The highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel used in twenty United States university reactors can be viewed as contributing to the risk of theft or diversion of weapons-useable material. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has issued a policy statement expressing its concern and has published a proposed rule on limiting the use of HEU in NRC-licensed non-power reactors. The fuel options, functional impacts, licensing, and scheduling of conversion and standardization of these reactor fuels to use of low-enrichment uranium (LEU) have been assessed. The university reactors span a wide range in form and function, from medium-power intense neutron sources where HEU fuel may be required, to low-power training and research facilities where HEU fuel is unnecessary. Conversion provides an opportunity to standardize university reactor fuels and improve reactor utilization in some cases. The entire program is estimated to cost about $10 million and to last about five years. Planning for conversion and standardization is facilitated by the US Department of Energy. 20 refs., 1 tab.

Harris, D.R.; Matos, J.E.; Young, H.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

EXTENDING SODIUM FAST REACTOR DRIVER FUEL USE TO HIGHER TEMPERATURES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculations of potential sodium-cooled fast reactor fuel temperatures were performed to estimate the effects of increasing the outlet temperature of a given fast reactor design by increasing pin power, decreasing assembly flow, or increasing inlet temperature. Based upon experience in the U.S., both metal and mixed oxide (MOX) fuel types are discussed in terms of potential performance effects created by the increased operating temperatures. Assembly outlet temperatures of 600, 650 and 700 °C were used as goal temperatures. Fuel/cladding chemical interaction (FCCI) and fuel melting, as well as challenges to the mechanical integrity of the cladding material, were identified as the limiting phenomena. For example, starting with a recent 1000 MWth fast reactor design, raising the outlet temperature to 650 °C through pin power increase increased the MOX centerline temperature to more than 3300 °C and the metal fuel peak cladding temperature to more than 700 °C. These exceeded limitations to fuel performance; fuel melting was limiting for MOX and FCCI for metal fuel. Both could be alleviated by design ‘fixes’, such as using a barrier inside the cladding to minimize FCCI in the metal fuel, or using annular fuel in the case of MOX. Both would also require an advanced cladding material with improved stress rupture properties. While some of these are costly, the benefits of having a high-temperature reactor which can support hydrogen production, or other missions requiring high process heat may make the extra costs justified.

Douglas L. Porter

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high outlet temperatures and high thermal-energy conversion efficiency of modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) enable an efficient and cost effective integration of the reactor system with non-electricity generation applications, such as process heat and/or hydrogen production, for the many petrochemical and other industrial processes that require temperatures between 300°C and 900°C. The Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the HTGR concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project as a transformative application of nuclear energy that will demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity, process heat, and hydrogen production, thereby reducing greenhouse-gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The objective of the DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program is to qualify tristructural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particle fuel for use in HTGRs. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, post-irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission-product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete, fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process and key fuel properties, the irradiation and accident safety performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. An overview of the program and recent progress is presented.

David Petti

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Modular Pebble Bed Reactor Project, University Research Consortium Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is developing a fundamental conceptual design for a gas-cooled, modular, pebble bed reactor. Key technology areas associated with this design are being investigated which intend to address issues concerning fuel performance, safety, core neutronics and proliferation resistance, economics and waste disposal. Research has been initiated in the following areas: · Improved fuel particle performance · Reactor physics · Economics · Proliferation resistance · Power conversion system modeling · Safety analysis · Regulatory and licensing strategy Recent accomplishments include: · Developed four conceptual models for fuel particle failures that are currently being evaluated by a series of ABAQUS analyses. Analytical fits to the results are being performed over a range of important parameters using statistical/factorial tools. The fits will be used in a Monte Carlo fuel performance code, which is under development. · A fracture mechanics approach has been used to develop a failure probability model for the fuel particle, which has resulted in significant improvement over earlier models. · Investigation of fuel particle physio-chemical behavior has been initiated which includes the development of a fission gas release model, particle temperature distributions, internal particle pressure, migration of fission products, and chemical attack of fuel particle layers. · A balance of plant, steady-state thermal hydraulics model has been developed to represent all major components of a MPBR. Component models are being refined to accurately reflect transient performance. · A comparison between air and helium for use in the energy-conversion cycle of the MPBR has been completed and formed the basis of a master’s degree thesis. · Safety issues associated with air ingress are being evaluated. · Post shutdown, reactor heat removal characteristics are being evaluated by the Heating-7 code. · PEBBED, a fast deterministic neutronic code package suitable for numerous repetitive calculations has been developed. Use of the code has focused on scoping studies for MPBR design features and proliferation issues. Publication of an archival journal article covering this work is being prepared. · Detailed gas reactor physics calculations have also been performed with the MCNP and VSOP codes. Furthermore, studies on the proliferation resistance of the MPBR fuel cycle has been initiated using these code · Issues identified during the MPBR research has resulted in a NERI proposal dealing with turbo-machinery design being approved for funding beginning in FY01. Two other NERI proposals, dealing with the development of a burnup “meter” and modularization techniques, were also funded in which the MIT team will be a participant. · A South African MPBR fuel testing proposal is pending ($7.0M over nine years).

Petti, David Andrew

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Fuel Cell Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with a focus on improving the performance and durability and reducing the cost of fuel cell components and systems. Research efforts involve: Developing advanced catalysts,...

215

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

high conductivity) for this application include tin oxide, indium tin oxide, and zinc oxide. Contact: Bryan Pivovar 303-275-3809 Printable Version Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Research...

216

Space reactor fuel element testing in upgraded TREAT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The testing of candidate fuel elements at prototypic operating conditions with respect to temperature, power density, hydrogen coolant flow rate, etc., a crucial component in the development and qualification of nuclear rocket engines based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR), NERVA-derivative, and other concepts. Such testing may be performed at existing reactors, or at new facilities. A scoping study has been performed to assess the feasibility of testing PBR based fuel elements at the TREAT reactor. initial results suggest that full-scale PBR, elements could be tested at an average energy deposition of {approximately}60--80 MW-s/L in the current TREAT reactor. If the TREAT reactor was upgraded to include fuel elements with a higher temperature limit, average energy deposition of {approximately}100 MW/L may be achievable.

Todosow, M.; Bezler, P.; Ludewig, H.; Kato, W.Y.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Space reactor fuel element testing in upgraded TREAT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The testing of candidate fuel elements at prototypic operating conditions with respect to temperature, power density, hydrogen coolant flow rate, etc., a crucial component in the development and qualification of nuclear rocket engines based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR), NERVA-derivative, and other concepts. Such testing may be performed at existing reactors, or at new facilities. A scoping study has been performed to assess the feasibility of testing PBR based fuel elements at the TREAT reactor. initial results suggest that full-scale PBR, elements could be tested at an average energy deposition of {approximately}60--80 MW-s/L in the current TREAT reactor. If the TREAT reactor was upgraded to include fuel elements with a higher temperature limit, average energy deposition of {approximately}100 MW/L may be achievable.

Todosow, M.; Bezler, P.; Ludewig, H.; Kato, W.Y.

1993-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

218

Reactor physics assessment of thick silicon carbide clad PWR fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High temperature tolerance, chemical stability and low neutron affinity make silicon carbide (SiC) a potential fuel cladding material that may improve the economics and safety of light water reactors (LWRs). "Thick" SiC ...

Bloore, David A. (David Allan)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Innovative fuel designs for high power density pressurized water reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the ways to lower the cost of nuclear energy is to increase the power density of the reactor core. Features of fuel design that enhance the potential for high power density are derived based on characteristics of ...

Feng, Dandong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has established the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program to address the following overall goals: Provide a baseline fuel qualification data set in support of the licensing and operation of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Gas-reactor fuel performance demonstration and qualification comprise the longest duration research and development (R&D) task for the NGNP feasibility. The baseline fuel form is to be demonstrated and qualified for a peak fuel centerline temperature of 1250°C. Support near-term deployment of an NGNP by reducing market entry risks posed by technical uncertainties associated with fuel production and qualification. Utilize international collaboration mechanisms to extend the value of DOE resources. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, postirradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process, key fuel properties, the irradiation performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. Fuel performance modeling and analysis of the fission product behavior in the primary circuit are important aspects of this work. The performance models are considered essential for several reasons, including guidance for the plant designer in establishing the core design and operating limits, and demonstration to the licensing authority that the applicant has a thorough understanding of the in-service behavior of the fuel system. The fission product behavior task will also provide primary source term data needed for licensing. An overview of the program and recent progress will be presented.

David Petti; Hans Gougar; Gary Bell

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research reactor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

AECL/U.S. INERI - Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Power Reactors Fuel Requirements and Down-Select Report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the first milestone of the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) U.S./Euratom Joint Proposal 1.8 entitled “Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Light-Water Reactors.” The milestone represents the assessment and preliminary study of a variety of fuels that hold promise as transmutation and minor actinide burning fuel compositions for light-water reactors. The most promising fuels of interest to the participants on this INERI program have been selected for further study. These fuel compositions are discussed in this report.

William Carmack; Randy Fielding; Pavel Medvedev; Mitch Meyer

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fuels and Lubricants Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels and Lubricants Research Fuels and Lubricants Research As transportation accounts for two-thirds of the nearly $1 billion the U.S. spends daily on foreign oil, it is vital to increase our use of alternative fuels. Increasing the fuels available to drivers reduces price volatility, supports domestic industries, and increases environmental sustainability. The DOE's Alternative Fuels Data Center provides basic information on alternative fuels, including Biodiesel, Ethanol, Natural Gas, Propane, and Hydrogen. The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports research to improve how vehicles use these many of these fuels in the future, as well as activities to increase their availability today. It also researches how new petroleum-based fuels affect advanced combustion systems and how lubricants can improve the efficiency of vehicles currently on the road.

223

Yttrium and rare earth stabilized fast reactor metal fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

To increase the operating temperature of a reactor, the melting point and mechanical properties of the fuel must be increased. For an actinide-rich fuel, yttrium, lanthanum and/or rare earth elements can be added, as stabilizers, to uranium and plutonium and/or a mixture of other actinides to raise the melting point of the fuel and improve its mechanical properties. Since only about 1% of the actinide fuel may be yttrium, lanthanum, or a rare earth element, the neutron penalty is low, the reactor core size can be reduced, the fuel can be burned efficiently, reprocessing requirements are reduced, and the nuclear waste disposal volumes reduced. A further advantage occurs when yttrium, lanthanum, and/or other rare earth elements are exposed to radiation in a reactor, they produce only short half life radioisotopes, which reduce nuclear waste disposal problems through much shorter assured-isolation requirements.

Guon, Jerold (Woodland Hills, CA); Grantham, LeRoy F. (Calabasas, CA); Specht, Eugene R. (Simi Valley, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Spent nuclear fuel discharges from US reactors 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Nuclear Fuel Data Survey, Form RW-859. This form is used to collect data on fuel assemblies irradiated at commercial nuclear reactors operating in the United States, and the current inventories and storage capacities of those reactors. These data are important to the design and operation of the equipment and facilities that DOE will use for the future acceptance, transportation, and disposal of spent fuels. The data collected and presented identifies trends in burnup, enrichment, and spent nuclear fuel discharged form commercial light-water reactor as of December 31, 1993. The document covers not only spent nuclear fuel discharges; but also site capacities and inventories; canisters and nonfuel components; and assembly type characteristics.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

VENTED FUEL ELEMENT FOR GAS-COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hollow, porous-walled fuel element filled with fissionable fuel and provided with an outlet port through its wall is described. In operation in a gas-cooled reactor, the element is connected, through its outlet port, to the vacuum side of a pump that causes a portion of the coolant gas flowing over the exterior surface of the element to be drawn through the porous walls thereof and out through the outlet port. This continuous purging gas flow sweeps away gaseous fission products as they are released by the fissioning fuel. (AEC) A fuel element for a nuclear reactor incorporating a body of metal of melting point lower than the temperature of operation of the reactor and a nuclear fuel in finely divided form dispersed in the body of metal as a settled slurry is presented. (AEC)

Furgerson, W.T.

1963-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

226

Advanced Fuel/Cladding Testing Capabilities in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability to test advanced fuels and cladding materials under reactor operating conditions in the United States is limited. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and the newly expanded post-irradiation examination (PIE) capability at the ORNL Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory provide unique support for this type of advanced fuel/cladding development effort. The wide breadth of ORNL's fuels and materials research divisions provides all the necessary fuel development capabilities in one location. At ORNL, facilities are available from test fuel fabrication, to irradiation in HFIR under either thermal or fast reactor conditions, to a complete suite of PIEs, and to final product disposal. There are very few locations in the world where this full range of capabilities exists. New testing capabilities at HFIR have been developed that allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials under prototypic operating conditions (i.e., for both fast-spectrum conditions and light-water-reactor conditions). This paper will describe the HFIR testing capabilities, the new advanced fuel/cladding testing facilities, and the initial cooperative irradiation experiment that begins this year.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Spellman, Donald J [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects Projects NREL's vehicles and fuels projects focus on developing, evaluating, and demonstrating innovative technologies that reduce the nation's dependence on imported petroleum and improve air quality. We work in partnership with vehicle manufacturers, equipment suppliers, fuel providers, and others to develop and commercialize vehicle and fuel technologies that meet our nation's energy and environmental goals. Advanced Combustion and Fuels Biofuels Electric Vehicle Grid Integration Energy Storage Fleet Test and Evaluation Power Electronics ReFUEL Laboratory Secure Transportation Data Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction Vehicle Systems Analysis Printable Version Vehicles & Fuels Research Home Projects Advanced Combustion & Fuels Biofuels Electric Vehicle Grid Integration

228

Gel-sphere-pac reactor fuel fabrication and its application to a variety of fuels  

SciTech Connect

The gel-sphere-pac fuel fabrication option was evaluated for its possible application to commercial scale fuel fabrication for 19 fuel element designs that use oxide fuel in metal clad rods. The dry gel spheres are prepared at the reprocessing plant and are then calcined, sintered, inspected, and loaded into fuel rods and packed by low-energy vibration. A fuel smear density of 83 to 88% theoretical can be obtained. All fuel fabrication process steps were defined and evaluated from fuel receiving to finished fuel element shipping. The evaluation also covers the feasibility of the process, the current status of technology, estimates of the required time and cost to develop the technology to commercial status, and the safety and licensability of commercial scale plants. The primary evaluation was for a Light-Water Reactor fuel element containing (U,Pu)O/sub 2/ fuel. The other 18 fuel element types - 3 for Light-Water Reactors, 1 for a Heavy-Water Reactor, 1 for a Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor, 7 for Liquid-Metal-Cooled Fast Breeder Reactors, and 3 pairs for Light-Water Prebreeder and Breeder Reactors - were compared with the Light-Water Reactor. The gel-sphere-pac option was found applicable to 17 of the 19 element types; the characteristics of a commercial scale plant were defined for these for making cost estimates for such plants. The evaluation clearly shows the gel-sphere-pac process to be a viable fuel fabrication option. Estimates indicate a significant potential fabrication cost advantage for the gel-sphere-pac process if a remotely operated and remotely maintained fuel fabrication plant is required.

Olsen, A.R.; Judkins, R.R. (comps.)

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Assessment of innovative fuel designs for high performance light water reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To increase the power density and maximum allowable fuel burnup in light water reactors, new fuel rod designs are investigated. Such fuel is desirable for improving the economic performance light water reactors loaded with ...

Carpenter, David Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Documents Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Documents Feasibility Study (PDF) Proposed Remedial Action Plan (PDF) Record of Decision (PDF) RD/RA Work Plan for the BGRR Pile (PDF) RD/RA Work Plan for the Bioshield (PDF) RD/RA Work Plan for the BGRR Cap (PDF) Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Explanation of Significant Differences (PDF) (4/12) NYSDEC Approval Letter for BGRR ESD (PDF) (5/12) USEPA Approval Letter for BGRR ESD (PDF) (6/12) DOE BGRR ESD Transmittal Letter (PDF) (7/12) Remedial Design Implementation Report (PDF) (12/11) Completion Reports Removal of the Above-Ground Ducts and Preparation of the Instrument House (708) for Removal (PDF) - April 2002 Below-Ground Duct Outlet Air Coolers, Filters and Primary Liner Removal (PDF) - April 2005 Canal and Deep Soil Pockets Excavation and Removal (PDF) - August

231

NEUTRON REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT UTILIZING ZIRCONIUM-BASE ALLOYS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to clad fuel elements for use in neutronic reactors and is drawn to such a fuel element which consists of a core of fissionable material, comprised of an alloy of zirconium and U/sup 235/ enriched uranium, encased in a jacket of a binary zirconium-tin alloy in which the tin content ranges between 1 and 15% by weight.

Saller, H.A.; Keeler, J.R.; Szumachowski, E.R.

1957-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

232

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - ReFUEL Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Search More Search Options Site Map NREL's Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory is a state-of-the-art research and testing facility for advanced fuels and vehicles. Research and development focuses on overcoming barriers to the increased use of renewable diesel and other nonpetroleum-based fuels, such as biodiesel and synthetic diesel derived from biomass, and improving vehicle efficiency. Using biofuels and improving vehicle efficiency reduces our dependence on imported petroleum and enhances our national energy security. The ReFUEL Laboratory houses the following specialized equipment: Heavy-duty chassis dynamometer with a simulation capability of 8,000 to 80,000 lbs for vehicle performance and emissions research Heavy-duty (up to 600 hp) and light-duty (up to 75 hp) engine

233

License extension for the MIT research reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On February 8, 1995, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) amended the operating license for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) research reactor (MITR) by extending its expiration date from May 7, 1996, to August 8, 1999. This increase of 2.25 yr in the duration of the license was for the purpose of recapturing construction time. Extensions of this type have routinely been granted to power plants. The significance of the present action is that it is the first such extension ever granted to a research reactor. This paper describes the basis for the amendment request and the supporting safety analysis.

Bernard, J.A. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

234

Nuclear reactor vessel fuel thermal insulating barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The reactor vessel of a nuclear reactor installation which is suspended from the cold leg nozzles in a reactor cavity is provided with a lower thermal insulating barrier spaced from the reactor vessel that has a hemispherical lower section that increases in volume from the center line of the reactor to the outer extent of the diameter of the thermal insulating barrier and smoothly transitions up the side walls of the vessel. The space between the thermal insulating harrier and the reactor vessel forms a chamber which can be flooded with cooling water through passive valving to directly cool the reactor vessel in the event of a severe accident. The passive inlet valve for the cooling water includes a buoyant door that is normally maintained sealed under its own weight and floats open when the cavity is Hooded. Passively opening steam vents are also provided.

Keegan, C. Patrick; Scobel, James H.; Wright, Richard F.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

235

Safer nuclear reactors could result from Los Alamos research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Calendar Video Newsroom News Releases News Releases - 2010 March Safer nuclear reactors could result from research Safer nuclear reactors could result from Los...

236

The triple axis spectrometer at the new research reactor OPAL ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The triple axis spectrometer at the new research reactor OPAL in Australia. ... The TAS will be based on a thermal beam at the reactor face. ...

237

MCNP-model for the OAEP Thai Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

An MCNP input was prepared for the Thai Research Reactor, making extensive use of the MCNP geometry`s lattice feature that allows a flexible and easy rearrangement of the core components and the adjustment of the control elements. The geometry was checked for overdefined or undefined zones by two-dimensional plots of cuts through the core configuration with the MCNP geometry plotting capabilities, and by a three-dimensional view of the core configuration with the SABRINA code. Cross sections were defined for a hypothetical core of 67 standard fuel elements and 38 low-enriched uranium fuel elements--all filled with fresh fuel. Three test calculations were performed with the MCNP4B-code to obtain the multiplication factor for the cases with control elements fully inserted, fully withdrawn, and at a working position.

Gallmeier, F.X.; Tang, J.S.; Primm, R.T. III

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Basic and Applied Science Research Reactors - Reactors designed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th...

239

Software: Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis > Analysis > Software Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Overview Current Projects Software Nuclear Plant Dynamics and Safety Nuclear Data Program Advanced Reactor Development Nuclear Waste Form and Repository Performance Modeling Nuclear Energy Systems Design and Development Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Software Bookmark and Share An extensive powerful suite of computer codes developed and validated by the NE Division and its predecessor divisions at Argonne supports the development of fast reactors; many of these codes are also applicable to other reactor types. A brief description of these codes follows. Contact

240

Technology gap analysis on sodium-cooled reactor fuel handling system supporting advanced burner reactor development.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand in an environmentally sustainable manner, to address nuclear waste management issues without making separated plutonium, and to address nonproliferation concerns. The advanced burner reactor (ABR) is a fast reactor concept which supports the GNEP fuel cycle system. Since the integral fast reactor (IFR) and advanced liquid-metal reactor (ALMR) projects were terminated in 1994, there has been no major development on sodium-cooled fast reactors in the United States. Therefore, in support of the GNEP fast reactor program, the history of sodium-cooled reactor development was reviewed to support the initiation of this technology within the United States and to gain an understanding of the technology gaps that may still remain for sodium fast reactor technology. The fuel-handling system is a key element of any fast reactor design. The major functions of this system are to receive, test, store, and then load fresh fuel into the core; unload from the core; then clean, test, store, and ship spent fuel. Major requirements are that the system must be reliable and relatively easy to maintain. In addition, the system should be designed so that it does not adversely impact plant economics from the viewpoints of capital investment or plant operations. In this gap analysis, information on fuel-handling operating experiences in the following reactor plants was carefully reviewed: EBR-I, SRE, HNPF, Fermi, SEFOR, FFTF, CRBR, EBR-II, DFR, PFR, Rapsodie, Phenix, Superphenix, KNK, SNR-300, Joyo, and Monju. The results of this evaluation indicate that a standardized fuel-handling system for a commercial fast reactor is yet to be established. However, in the past sodium-cooled reactor plants, most major fuel-handling components-such as the rotatable plug, in-vessel fuel-handling machine, ex-vessel fuel transportation cask, ex-vessel sodium-cooled storage, and cleaning stations-have accumulated satisfactory construction and operation experiences. In addition, two special issues for future development are described in this report: large capacity interim storage and transuranic-bearing fuel handling.

Chikazawa, Y.; Farmer, M.; Grandy, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research reactor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development Program Presentation to Office of Environmental Management Tank Waste Corporate Board James C. Bresee, ScD, JD Advisory Board Member Office of Nuclear Energy July 29, 2009 July 29, 2009 Fuel Cycle Research and Development DM 195665 2 Outline Fuel Cycle R&D Mission Changes from the Former Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative The Science-Based Approach Key Collaborators Budget History Program Elements Summary July 29, 2009 Fuel Cycle Research and Development DM 195665 3 Fuel Cycle R&D Mission The mission of Fuel Cycle Research and Development is to develop options to current fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while reducing proliferation risks by conducting

242

New Tool for Proliferation Resistance Evaluation Applied to Uranium and Thorium Fueled Fast Reactor Fuel Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The comparison of nuclear facilities based on their barriers to nuclear material proliferation has remained a difficult endeavor, often requiring expert elicitation for each system under consideration. However, objectively comparing systems using a set of computable metrics to derive a single number representing a system is not, in essence, a nuclear nonproliferation specific problem and significant research has been performed for business models. For instance, Multi-Attribute Utility Analysis (MAUA) methods have been used previously to provide an objective insight of the barriers to proliferation. In this paper, the Proliferation Resistance Analysis and Evaluation Tool for Observed Risk (PRAETOR), a multi-tiered analysis tool based on the multiplicative MAUA method, is presented. It folds sixty three mostly independent metrics over three levels of detail to give an ultimate metric for nonproliferation performance comparison. In order to reduce analysts' bias, the weighting between the various metrics was obtained by surveying a total of thirty three nonproliferation specialists and nonspecialists from fields such as particle physics, international policy, and industrial engineering. The PRAETOR was used to evaluate the Fast Breeder Reactor Fuel Cycle (FBRFC). The results obtained using these weights are compared against a uniform weight approach. Results are presented for five nuclear material diversion scenarios: four examples include a diversion attempt on various components of a PUREX fast reactor cycle and one scenario involves theft from a PUREX facility in a LWR cycle. The FBRFC was evaluated with uranium-plutonium fuel and a second time using thorium-uranium fuel. These diversion scenarios were tested with both uniform and expert weights, with and without safeguards in place. The numerical results corroborate nonproliferation truths and provide insight regarding fast reactor facilities' proliferation resistance in relation to known standards.

Metcalf, Richard R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicles and Fuels Research News Vehicles and Fuels Research News The following news stories highlight vehicles and fuels research at NREL. December 23, 2013 NREL and Thought Leaders Gather at Electric Vehicle Battery Management Summit NREL researchers will gather with U.S. Department of Energy program directors and technology managers, and other thought leaders to exchange strategies for maximizing the performance, safety, and lifespan of electric-drive vehicle batteries. November 7, 2013 NREL Developed Mobile App for Alternative Fueling Station Locations Released iPhone users now have access to a free application that locates fueling stations offering alternative fuels, including electricity, natural gas, biodiesel, e85 Ethanol, propane and hydrogen. The Energy Department's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed the new mobile

244

The Stirred Tank Reactor Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The design and operation of a differential Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is described. The fuel cell design is based on coupled Stirred Tank Reactors (STR); the gas phase in each reactor compartment was well mixed. The characteristic times for reactant flow, gas phase diffusion and reaction were chosen so that the gas compositions at both the anode and cathode are uniform. The STR PEM fuel cell is one-dimensional; the only spatial gradients are transverse to the membrane. The STR PEM fuel cell was employed to examine fuel cell start- up, and its dynamic responses to changes in load, temperature and reactant flow rates. Multiple time scales in systems response are found to correspond to water absorption by the membrane, water transport through the membrane and stress-related mechanical changes of the membrane.

Benziger, J; Karnas, E; Moxley, J; Teuscher, C; Kevrekidis, Yu G; Benziger, Jay

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Run - Beyond - Cladding - Breach (RBCB) test results for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metallic fuels program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1984 Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) began an aggressive program of research and development based on the concept of a closed system for fast-reactor power generation and on-site fuel reprocessing, exclusively designed around the use of metallic fuel. This is the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Although the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) has used metallic fuel since its creation 25 yeas ago, in 1985 ANL began a study of the characteristics and behavior of an advanced-design metallic fuel based on uranium-zirconium (U-Zr) and uranium-plutonium-zirconium (U-Pu-Zr) alloys. During the past five years several areas were addressed concerning the performance of this fuel system. In all instances of testing the metallic fuel has demonstrated its ability to perform reliably to high burnups under varying design conditions. This paper will present one area of testing which concerns the fuel system's performance under breach conditions. It is the purpose of this paper to document the observed post-breach behavior of this advanced-design metallic fuel. 2 figs., 1 tab.

Batte, G.L. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Hoffman, G.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Performance and fuel cycle cost study of the R2 reactor with HEU and LEU fuels  

SciTech Connect

A systematic study of the experiment performance and fuel cycle costs of the 50 MW R2 reactor operated by Studsvik Energiteknik AB has been performed using the current R2 HEU fuel, a variety of LEU fuel element designs, and two core-box/reflector configurations. The results include the relative performance of both in-core and ex-core experiments, control rod worths, and relative annual fuel cycle costs.

Pond, R.B.; Freese, K.E.; Matos, J.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

D. E. Shropshire

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Reactor physics behavior of transuranic-bearing TRISO-particle fuel in a pressurized water reactor  

SciTech Connect

Calculations have been performed to assess the neutronic behavior of pins of Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in otherwise-conventional Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel pins. The FCM fuel contains transuranic (TRU) - only oxide fuel in tri-isotropic (TRISO) particles with the TRU loading coming from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Use of the TRISO particle fuel would provide an additional barrier to fission product release in the event of cladding failure. Depletion calculations were performed to evaluate reactivity-limited burnup of the TRU-only FCM fuel. These calculations showed that due to relatively little space available for fuel, the achievable burnup with these pins alone is quite small. Various reactivity parameters were also evaluated at each burnup step including moderator temperature coefficient (MTC), Doppler, and soluble boron worth. These were compared to reference UO{sub 2} and MOX unit cells. The TRU-only FCM fuel exhibits degraded MTC and Doppler coefficients relative to UO{sub 2} and MOX. Also, the reactivity effects of coolant voiding suggest that the behavior of this fuel would be similar to a MOX fuel of very high plutonium fraction, which are known to have positive void reactivity. In general, loading of TRU-only FCM fuel into an assembly without significant quantities of uranium presents challenges to the reactor design. However, if such FCM fuel pins are included in a heterogeneous assembly alongside LEU fuel pins, the overall reactivity behavior would be dominated by the uranium pins while attractive TRU destruction performance levels in the TRU-only FCM fuel pins is retained. From this work, it is concluded that use of heterogeneous assemblies such as these appears feasible from a preliminary reactor physics standpoint. (authors)

Pope, M. A.; Sen, R. S.; Ougouag, A. M.; Youinou, G. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); Boer, B. [Idaho National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3840 (United States); SCK-CEN, Boertang 200, BE-2400 Mol (Belgium)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Reactor Physics Behavior of Transuranic-Bearing TRISO-Particle Fuel in a Pressurized Water Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Calculations have been performed to assess the neutronic behavior of pins of Fully-Ceramic Micro-encapsulated (FCM) fuel in otherwise-conventional Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel pins. The FCM fuel contains transuranic (TRU)-only oxide fuel in tri-isotropic (TRISO) particles with the TRU loading coming from the spent fuel of a conventional LWR after 5 years of cooling. Use of the TRISO particle fuel would provide an additional barrier to fission product release in the event of cladding failure. Depletion calculations were performed to evaluate reactivity-limited burnup of the TRU-only FCM fuel. These calculations showed that due to relatively little space available for fuel, the achievable burnup with these pins alone is quite small. Various reactivity parameters were also evaluated at each burnup step including moderator temperature coefficient (MTC), Doppler, and soluble boron worth. These were compared to reference UO{sub 2} and MOX unit cells. The TRU-only FCM fuel exhibits degraded MTC and Doppler coefficients relative to UO{sub 2} and MOX. Also, the reactivity effects of coolant voiding suggest that the behavior of this fuel would be similar to a MOX fuel of very high plutonium fraction, which are known to have positive void reactivity. In general, loading of TRU-only FCM fuel into an assembly without significant quantities of uranium presents challenges to the reactor design. However, if such FCM fuel pins are included in a heterogeneous assembly alongside LEU fuel pins, the overall reactivity behavior would be dominated by the uranium pins while attractive TRU destruction performance levels in the TRU-only FCM fuel pins is. From this work, it is concluded that use of heterogeneous assemblies such as these appears feasible from a preliminary reactor physics standpoint.

Michael A. Pope; R. Sonat Sen; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Gilles Youinou; Brian Boer

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Electrometallurgical treatment of degraded N-reactor fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

N-Reactor fuel constitutes almost 80% of the entire mass of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) spent fuel inventory. The current plan for disposition of this fuel calls for interim dry storage, followed by direct repository disposal. However, this approach may not be viable for the entire inventory of N-Reactor fuel. The physical condition and chemical composition of much of the fuel have changed during the period that it has been in storage. The cladding of many of the fuel elements has been breached, allowing the metallic uranium fuel to react with water in the storage pools producing uranium oxides (U{sub x}O{sub y}) and uranium hydride (UH{sub 3}). Even if the breached fuel is placed in dry storage, it may continue to undergo significant changes caused by the reaction of exposed uranium with any remaining water in the container. Uranium oxides, uranium hydride, and hydrogen gas are expected to form as a result of this reaction. The presence of potentially explosive hydrogen and uranium hydride, which under certain conditions is pyrophoric, raises technical concerns that will need to be addressed. The electrometallurgical treatment process developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has potential for conditioning degraded N-Reactor fuel for long-term storage or disposal. The first step in evaluating the applicability of this process is the preparation of degraded fuel that is similar to the actual degraded N-Reactor fuel. Subsequently, the simulated degraded fuel can be introduced into an electrorefiner to examine the effect of corrosion products on the electrorefining process. Some of the technical issues to be resolved include the viability of direct electrorefining without a head-end reduction step, the effect of adherent corrosion products on the electrorefining kinetics, and the recovery and treatment of loose corrosion products that pull away from the degraded fuel. This paper presents results from an experimental study of the preparation, characterization, and subsequent electrometallurgical treatment of samples of simulated degraded N-Reactor fuel.

Gourishankar, K. V.; Karell, E. J.; Everhart, R. E.; Indacochea, E.

2000-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

251

System for fuel rod removal from a reactor module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robotic system for remote underwater withdrawal of the fuel rods from fuel modules of a light water breeder reactor includes a collet/grapple assembly for gripping and removing fuel rods in each module, which is positioned by use of a winch and a radial support means attached to a vertical support tube which is mounted over the fuel module. A programmable logic controller in conjunction with a microcomputer, provides control for the accurate positioning and pulling force of the rod grapple assembly. Closed circuit television cameras are provided which aid in operator interface with the robotic system.

Matchett, Richard L. (Bethel Park, PA); Roof, David R. (North Huntingdon, PA); Kikta, Thomas J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Wilczynski, Rosemarie (McKees Rocks, PA); Nilsen, Roy J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Bacvinskas, William S. (Bethel Park, PA); Fodor, George (Pittsburgh, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

System for fuel rod removal from a reactor module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robotic system for remote underwater withdrawal of the fuel rods from fuel modules of a light water breeder reactor includes a collet/grapple assembly for gripping and removing fuel rods in each module, which is positioned by use of a winch and a radial support means attached to a vertical support tube which is mounted over the fuel module. A programmable logic controller in conjunction with a microcomputer, provides control for the accurate positioning and pulling force of the rod grapple assembly. Closed circuit television cameras are provided which aid in operator interface with the robotic system. 7 figs.

Matchett, R.L.; Fodor, G.; Kikta, T.J.; Bacvinsicas, W.S.; Roof, D.R.; Nilsen, R.J.; Wilczynski, R.

1988-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

253

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Research Council Reviews...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Research Council Reviews FreedomCAR and Fuel Partnership Research Program to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: National Research Council Reviews...

254

Fuel pins with both target and fuel pellets in an isotope-production reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for producing tritium in a fast breeder reactor cooled with liquid metal. Lithium target pellets are placed in close contact with fissile fuel pellets in order to increase the tritium production rate.

Cawley, W.E.; Omberg, R.P.

1982-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

255

Reactor Physics Assessment of the Inclusion of Unseparated Neptunium in MOX Reactor Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reducing the number of actinide separation streams in a spent fuel recovery process would reduce the cost and complexity of the process, and lower the quantity and numbers of solvents needed. It is more difficult and costly to separate Np and recombine it with Am-Cm prior to co-conversion than to simply co-strip it with the U-Pu-Np. Inclusion of the Np in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for light water reactor (LWR) applications should not seriously affect the operating behavior of the reactor, nor should it pose insurmountable fuel design issues. In this work, the U, Pu, and Np from typical discharged and cooled PWR spent nuclear fuel are assumed to be used together in the preparation of MOX fuel for use in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). The reactor grade Pu isotopic vector is used in the model and the relative mass ratio of the Pu and Np content (Np/Pu mass is 0.061) from the cooled spent fuel is maintained but the overall Pu-Np MOX wt% is adjusted with respect to the U content (assumed to be at 0.25 wt% 235U enrichment) to offset reactivity and cycle length effects. The SCALE 5.1 scientific package (especially modules TRITON, NEWT, ORIGEN-S, ORIGEN-ARP) was used for the calculations presented in this paper. A typical Westinghouse 17x17 fuel assembly design was modeled at nominal PWR operating conditions. It was seen that U-Pu-Np MOX fuel with NpO2 and PuO2 representing 11.5wt% of the total MOX fuel would be similar to standard MOX fuel in which PuO2 is 9wt% of the fuel. The reactivity, isotopic composition, and neutron and ? sources, and the decay heat details for the discharged MOX fuel are presented and discussed in this paper.

Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

CHEMICAL PROBLEMS OF NON-AQUEOUS FLUID-FUEL REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

The three main chemical problems of non-aqueous fluidfuel reactors are selection of a fuel system which meets nuclear and thermal requirements, control of corrosion of structural materials, and development of an efficient and economical separation process. The problems of the fastneutron reactor with a core of fused NaCl, PbCl/sub 2/, UCl/sub 4/ mixture and a blanket of fused UCl/ sub 4/ are discussed, except for the separation process. Brief treatment is given the Bi- U - Pu fuel system for thermal reactors, including tentative flowsheets for the separation process. A detailed discussion of the experiments of Bareis at Brookhaven and related experiments on the distribution of various metals between liquid Bi and fused-salt solutions is given, the experimental results correlated, and application made to reactor problems. A general discussion is given of nonaqueous high-temperature separation processes (L.M.T.)

Scatchard, G.; Clark, H.M.; Golden, S.; Boltax, A.; Schuhmann, R. Jr.

1952-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

257

STORED ENERGY: GROWTH AND ANNEALING STATUS OF GRAPHITE MODERATOR IN THE BNL RESEARCH REACTOR. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The present sthtus, past annealing procedures and experiences, future annealing procedures, annealing sehedule, revised annealing procedure (1958), procedure for combating a graphite fire in fuel channel, high-temperature stored energy, and graphite burning experiments are reportcd for the BNL Research Reactor. The following subjccts are discussed in the appendixes: control of radiation damage in a graphitc reactor; annealing of graphite moderator structure in the BNL; annealing operation in BNL graphite reactor; effect of pile radiation on mechanical and other properties of graphite; neutron sensing instrumentation; instrumentation for sensing fuel failures; thermocouple pattern for enriched fuel loading; environmental hazard from a molten fuel element; retention of volatile flssion products on filters; retention of volatile fission products on water tube coolers; retention of volatile fission products in molten fuel plates; and release of the lowtemperature stored energy in the BEPO Pile. (W.L.H.)

1959-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Technologies in the Media Spotlight Vehicle Technologies in the Media Spotlight August 19, 2013 Automakers have made steady progress reducing the cost and increasing the performance of fuel cell propulsion systems, and most major vehicle manufacturers are geared to launch fuel cell electric vehicles in the U.S. market between 2015 and 2020. A recent Denver Post article highlights the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's contribution to the progress that automakers have made in getting their fuel cell electric vehicles ready for production. "When I started working on fuel cells in the '90s, people said it was a good field because a solution would always be five years away," said Brian Pivovar, who leads NREL's fuel cell research. "Not anymore." The article references a variety of NREL's hydrogen and fuel cell

259

Reactor-specific spent fuel discharge projections, 1984 to 2020  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original spent fuel utility data base (SFDB) has been adjusted to produce agreement with the EIA nuclear energy generation forecast. The procedure developed allows the detail of the utility data base to remain intact, while the overall nuclear generation is changed to match any uniform nuclear generation forecast. This procedure adjusts the weight of the reactor discharges as reported on the SFDB and makes a minimal (less than 10%) change in the original discharge exposures in order to preserve discharges of an integral number of fuel assemblies. The procedure used in developing the reactor-specific spent fuel discharge projections, as well as the resulting data bases themselves, are described in detail in this report. Discussions of the procedure cover the following topics: a description of the data base; data base adjustment procedures; addition of generic power reactors; and accuracy of the data base adjustments. Reactor-specific discharge and storage requirements are presented. Annual and cumulative discharge projections are provided. Annual and cumulative requirements for additional storage are shown for the maximum at-reactor (AR) storage assumption, and for the maximum AR with transshipment assumption. These compare directly to the storage requirements from the utility-supplied data, as reported in the Spent Fuel Storage Requirements Report. The results presented in this report include: the disaggregated spent fuel discharge projections; and disaggregated projections of requirements for additional spent fuel storage capacity prior to 1998. Descriptions of the methodology and the results are included in this report. Details supporting the discussions in the main body of the report, including descriptions of the capacity and fuel discharge projections, are included. 3 refs., 6 figs., 12 tabs.

Heeb, C.M.; Libby, R.A.; Holter, G.M.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Remote Inspection Devices for Spent Reactor Enriched Uranium Fuel Elements  

SciTech Connect

A remote video inspection was developed and deployed in Argentina for the detailed inspection of highly radioactive spent reactor fuel (SNF) as a prerequisite to its shipment to the Savannah River Site (SRS) in the United States for long-term storage and disposition. The fuel is highly enriched uranium (HEU) spent assemblies dating from 1967 to 1989 and aluminum clad uranium-aluminum alloy of a typical material test reactor design. The specialized video system was designed for low cost, high portability, easy setup, and ease of usage, while accommodating the differing electrical systems (i.e. 110/60 Hz, 220/50 Hz) between the United States and Argentina.

Heckendorn, F.M.

2001-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

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261

Spent nuclear fuel discharges from US reactors 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report provides current statistical data on every fuel assembly irradiated in commercial nuclear reactors operating in the United States. It also provides data on the current inventories and storage capacities of those reactors to a wide audience, including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the nuclear and electric industries and the general public. It uses data from the mandatory, ``Nuclear Fuel Data`` survey, Form RW-859 for 1992 and historical data collected by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) on previous Form RW-859 surveys. The report was prepared by the EIA under a Memorandum of Understanding with the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management.

Not Available

1994-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

262

Leu conversion status of U.S. research reactors: September 1996  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the Department of Energy, the RERTR Program has summarized the conversion status of research and test reactors in the United States and has made estimates of the uranium densities that would be needed to convert the reactors with power levels greater than or equal to 1 MW from Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) (greater than or equal to 20% U-235) to Lightly Enriched Uranium (LEU) (less than 20% U-235) fuels. Detailed conversion studies for each of the reactors need to be completed in order to establish the feasibility of using LEU fuels.

Matos, J.E.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor: Reactor core and associated structures successfully removed; waste shipped offsite for disposal Brookhaven Lab Completes Decommissioning of Graphite Research Reactor: Reactor core and associated structures successfully removed; waste shipped offsite for disposal September 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor’s bioshield, which contains the 700-ton reactor core, is shown prior to decommissioning. The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor's bioshield, which contains the 700-ton reactor core, is shown prior to decommissioning. Pictured here is the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, where major decommissioning milestones were recently reached after the remaining radioactive materials from the facility’s bioshield were shipped to a licensed offsite disposal facility.

264

Retrievable fuel pin end member for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bottom end member (17b) on a retrievable fuel pin (13b) secures the pin (13b) within a nuclear reactor (12) by engaging on a transverse attachment rail (18) with a spring clip type of action. Removal and reinstallation if facilitated as only axial movement of the fuel pin (13b) is required for either operation. A pair of resilient axially extending blades (31) are spaced apart to define a slot (24) having a seat region (34) which receives the rail (18) and having a land region (37), closer to the tips (39) of the blades (31) which is normally of less width than the rail (18). Thus an axially directed force sufficient to wedge the resilient blades (31) apart is required to emplace or release the fuel pin (13b) such force being greater than the axial forces on the fuel pins (13b) which occur during operation of the reactor (12).

Rosa, Jerry M. (Los Gatos, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

PLUTONIUM FUEL PROCESSING AND FABRICATION FOR FAST CERAMIC REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

>A study was made of the processes available for fabrication of plutonium-containing fuel from a fast ceramic reacter, and for chemical reprocessing of irradiated fuel. Radiations from recycled plutonium are evaluated. Adaptation of conventional glove-box handling procedures to the fabrication of recycle plutonium appears practical. It is concluded that acceptable costs are obtainable using moderate extensions of conventional glove- box fabrication methods and wet processing techniques, provided a significant volume of production is available. The minimum economic scale for the preferred chemical reprocessing method, anion exchange, is about 500 Mw(e) of reactor capacity. The minimum scale of economic operation for the fuel refabrication facility corresponds to three 500 Mw(e) reactors, if only steady-state refueling provides the fabrication load. The minimum volume required falls to one 500 Mw(e) reactor, if the continued growth of capacity provides fabrication volume equal to that for refueling. The chemical reprocessing costs obtained range from 0.27 mills/kwh for 1500 Mw(e) of reactor capacity, to 0.10 mills/kwh for 3000 Mw(e) of capacity. The estimated fuel fabrication cost is l/kg of uranium and plutonium in the core region (excluding axial and radial blankets) or .06/ g of plutonium content, When axial blankets, fabricated in the same rods, are included; the combined average is 34/kg of uranium and plutonium. Radial blanket fabrication cost is /kg of uranium. The overall average of all fuel and blankets is /kg of uranium and plutonium. The fabrication cost is 0.29 mills/kwh for a production rate corresponding to 3000 Mw(e) of capacity (or 1500 Mw(e) of capacity plus growth equivalent to one additional reactor core per year). For one 525 Mw(e) reactor, (plus equivalent growth volume) the fabrication cost becomes 0.42 mills/ kwh. (All fuel throughputs are based on fuel life of 100,000 MWD/T.) Using the estimates developed, the total fuel cycle cost for a typical fast reactor design using PuO/sub 2/UO/sub 2/ fuel is estimated to be about 0.9 mills/kwh. (auth)

Zebroski, E.L.; Alter, H.W.; Collins, G.D.

1962-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility Ames, Iowa  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,, *' ; . Final Radiological Condition of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility Ames, Iowa _, . AGENCY: Office of Operational Safety, Department of Energy ' ACTION: Notice of Availability of Archival Information Package SUMMARY: The'Office of Operational Safety of the Department O i Energy (DOE) has reviewed documentation relating to the decontamination and decommissioning operations conducted at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa and has prepared an archival informati0.n package to permanently document the results of the action and the site conditions and use restriction placed on the . site at the tim e of release. This review is based on post-decontamination survey data and other pertinent documentation referenced in and included in the archival package. The material and

267

Fresh-Core Reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor with Uranium(20)-Erbium-Zirconium-Hydride Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA® (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The initial critical configuration developed during the fuel loading process, which contains only 56 fuel elements, has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The 60-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has also been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (~±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

John D. Bess; Thomas L. Maddock; Margaret A. Marshall; Leland M. Montierth

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Fresh-Core Reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor with Uranium(20)-Erbium-Zirconium-Hydride Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA® (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The 60-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The initial critical configuration developed during the fuel loading process, which contains only 56 fuel elements, has not been evaluated as it is very similar to the evaluated core configuration. The benchmark eigenvalue is 1.0012 ± 0.0029. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (~±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

John D. Bess; Thomas L. Maddock; Margaret A. Marshall; Leland M. Montierth

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Proliferation resistant fuel for pebble bed modular reactors  

SciTech Connect

We show that it is possible to denature the Plutonium produced in Pebble Bed Modular Reactors (PBMR) by doping the nuclear fuel with either 3050 ppm of {sup 237}Np or 2100 ppm of Am vector. A correct choice of these isotopes concentration yields denatured Plutonium with isotopic ratio {sup 238}Pu/Pu {>=} 6%, for the entire fuel burnup cycle. The penalty for introducing these isotopes into the nuclear fuel is a subsequent shortening of the fuel burnup cycle, with respect to a non-doped reference fuel, by 41.2 Full Power Days (FPDs) and 19.9 FPDs, respectively, which correspond to 4070 MWd/ton and 1965 MWd/ton reduction in fuel discharge burnup. (authors)

Ronen, Y.; Aboudy, M.; Regev, D.; Gilad, E. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Means for supporting fuel elements in a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A grid structure for a nuclear reactor fuel assembly comprising a plurality of connecting members forming at least one longitudinally extending opening peripheral and inner fuel element openings through each of which openings at least one nuclear fuel element extends, said connecting members forming wall means surrounding said each peripheral and inner fuel element opening, a pair of rigid projections longitudinally spaced from one another extending from a portion of said wall means into said each peripheral and inner opening for rigidly engaging said each fuel element, respectively, yet permit individual longitudinal slippage thereof, and resilient means formed integrally on and from said wall means and positioned in said each peripheral and inner opening in opposed relationship with said projections and located to engage said fuel element to bias the latter into engagement with said rigid projections, respectively

Andrews, Harry N. (Murrysville, PA); Keller, Herbert W. (Monroeville, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Technological Transfer from Research Nuclear Reactors to New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this paper is the analysis of the technological transfer role in the nuclear field, with particular emphasis on nuclear reactors domain. The presentation is sustained by historical arguments. In this frame, it is very important to start with the achievements of the first nuclear systems, for instant those with natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as moderator, following in time through the history until the New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors.Starting with 1940, the accelerated development of the industry has implied the increase of the global demand for energy. In this respect, the nuclear energy could play an important role, being essentially an unlimited source of energy. However, the nuclear option faces the challenges of increasingly demanding safety requirements, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. Worldwide, a significant amount of experience has been accumulated during development, licensing, construction, and operation of nuclear power reactors. The experience gained is a strong basis for further improvements. Actually, the nuclear programs of many countries are addressing the development of advanced reactors, which are intended to have better economics, higher reliability, improved safety, and proliferation-resistant characteristics in order to overcome the current concerns about nuclear power. Advanced reactors, now under development, may help to meet the demand for energy power of both developed and developing countries as well as for district heating, desalination and for process heat.The paper gives historical examples that illustrate the steps pursued from first research nuclear reactors to present advanced power reactors. Emphasis was laid upon the fact that the progress is due to the great discoveries of the nuclear scientists using the technological transfer.

Radulescu, Laura ['Horia Hulubei' National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering, PO BOX MG-6, Bucharest 077125 (Romania); Pavelescu, Margarit [Academy of Romanian Scientists, Bucharest (Romania)

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

272

Sterile Neutrino Search Using China Advanced Research Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the feasibility of a sterile neutrino search at the China Advanced Research Reactor by measuring $\\bar {\

Guo, Gang; Ji, Xiangdong; Liu, Jianglai; Xi, Zhaoxu; Zhang, Huanqiao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

FUEL ELEMENTS FOR THERMAL-FISSION NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fuel elements for thermal-fission nuclear reactors are described. The fuel element is comprised of a core of alumina, a film of a metal of the class consisting of copper, silver, and nickel on the outer face of the core, and a coating of an oxide of a metal isotope of the class consisting of Un/sup 235/, U/ sup 233/, and Pu/sup 239/ on the metal f ilm.

Flint, O.

1961-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

274

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Biofuels Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biofuels Projects Biofuels Projects NREL biofuels projects help overcome technical barriers and expand markets for renewable, biodegradable vehicle fuels. These new liquid fuels include higher-level ethanol blends, butanol, biodiesel, renewable diesel, and other biomass-derived fuels. NREL's biofuels research and development helps improve engine efficiency, reduce polluting emissions, and improve U.S. energy security by reducing petroleum dependency. Biofuels for Diesel Engines NREL's diesel biofuels research and development focuses on developing fuel quality standards and demonstrating compatibility with engines and emission control systems. Highly efficient heavy-duty diesel truck engines are the primary power source for global transportation of freight. Light-duty diesel-fueled passenger vehicles have much higher fuel economy than

275

Transforming criticality control methods for EBR-II fuel handling during reactor decommissioning  

SciTech Connect

A review of the Department of Energy (DOE) request to decommission the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) was conducted in order to develop a scope of work and analysis method for performing the safety review of the facility. Evaluation of the current national standards, DOE orders, EBR-II nuclear safeguards and criticality control practices showed that a decommissioning policy for maintaining criticality safety during a long term fuel transfer process did not exist. The purpose of this research was to provide a technical basis for transforming the reactor from an instrumentation and measurement controlled system to a system that provides both physical constraint and administrative controls to prevent criticality accidents. Essentially, this was done by modifying the reactor core configuration, reactor operations procedures and system instrumentation to meet the safety practices of ANS-8.1-1983. Subcritical limits were determined by applying established liquid metal reactor methods for both the experimental and computational validations.

Eberle, C.S.; Dean, E.M.; Angelo, P.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

Fuel leak detection apparatus for gas cooled nuclear reactors  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus is disclosed for detecting nuclear fuel leaks within nuclear power system reactors, such as high temperature gas cooled reactors. The apparatus includes a probe assembly that is inserted into the high temperature reactor coolant gaseous stream. The probe has an aperture adapted to communicate gaseous fluid between its inside and outside surfaces and also contains an inner tube for sampling gaseous fluid present near the aperture. A high pressure supply of noncontaminated gas is provided to selectively balance the pressure of the stream being sampled to prevent gas from entering the probe through the aperture. The apparatus includes valves that are operable to cause various directional flows and pressures, which valves are located outside of the reactor walls to permit maintenance work and the like to be performed without shutting down the reactor.

Burnette, Richard D. (San Diego, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Reactor operations: Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Informal report, June 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part one of this report gives the operating history of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor for the month of June. Also included are the BMRR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of BMRR irradiations for the month. Part two gives the operating histories of the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor and the Cold Neutron Facility at HFBR for June. Also included are the HFBR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of HFBR irradiations for the month.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Reactor operations: Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor. Informal report, July 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part one of this report gives the operating history for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor for the month of July. Also included are the BMRR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of BMRR irradiations for the month. Part two gives the operating histories for the Brookhaven High Flux Beam Reactor and the Cold Neutron Source Facility for the month of July. Also included are the HFBR technical safety surveillance requirements record and the summary of HFBR irradiations for the month.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Fuel Fabrication Capability Research and Development Plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to provide a comprehensive review of the mission of the Fuel Fabrication Capability (FFC) within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Convert Program, along with research and development (R&D) needs that have been identified as necessary to ensuring mission success. The design and fabrication of successful nuclear fuels must be closely linked endeavors.

Senor, David J.; Burkes, Douglas

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

280

Fuel damage during off-normal transients in metal-fueled fast reactors  

SciTech Connect

Fuel damage during off-normal transients is a key issue in the safety of fast reactors because the fuel pin cladding provides the primary barrier to the release of radioactive materials. Part of the Safety Task of the Integral Fast Reactor Program is to provide assessments of the damage and margins to failure for metallic fuels over the wide range of transients that must be considered in safety analyses. This paper reviews the current status of the analytical and experimental programs that are providing the bases for these assessments. 13 refs., 2 figs.

Kramer, J.M.; Bauer, T.H.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research reactor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Method of locating a leaking fuel element in a fast breeder power reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Leaking fuel elements in a fast reactor are identified by measuring the ratio of .sup.134 Xe to .sup.133 Xe in the reactor cover gas following detection of a fuel element leak, this ratio being indicative of the power and burnup of the failed fuel element. This procedure can be used to identify leaking fuel elements in a power breeder reactor while continuing operation of the reactor since the ratio measured is that of the gases stored in the plenum of the failed fuel element. Thus, use of a cleanup system for the cover gas makes it possible to identify sequentially a multiplicity of leaking fuel elements without shutting the reactor down.

Honekamp, John R. (Downers Grove, IL); Fryer, Richard M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Introduction of Thorium-Based Fuels in High Conversion Pressurized Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regular Technical Paper / Special Issue on the Symposium on Radiation Effects in Ceramic Oxide and Novel LWR Fuels / Fission Reactors

V. Vallet; B. Gastaldi; J. Politello; A. Santamarina; L. Van Den Durpel

283

Chicago Pile reactors create enduring research legacy - Argonne's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chicago Pile reactors create enduring research Chicago Pile reactors create enduring research legacy About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

284

Method of controlling crystallite size in nuclear-reactor fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved spherules for making enhanced forms of nuclear-reactor fuels are prepared by internal gelation procedures within a sol-gel operation and are accomplished by first boiling the concentrated HMTA-urea feed solution before engaging in the spherule-forming operation thereby effectively controlling crystallite size in the product spherules.

Lloyd, Milton H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Collins, Jack L. (Knoxville, TN); Shell, Sam E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

METHOD OF FORMING A FUEL ELEMENT FOR A NUCLEAR REACTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for preparing a fuel element for a nuclear reactor. The method includes the steps of sandblasting a body of uranium dioxide to roughen the surface thereof, depositing a thin layer of carbon thereon by thermal decomposition of methane, and cladding the uranium dioxide body with zirconium by gas pressure bonding. (AEC)

Layer, E.H. Jr.; Peet, C.S.

1962-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

286

Nuclear breeder reactor fuel element with silicon carbide getter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved cesium getter 28 is provided in a breeder reactor fuel element or pin in the form of an extended surface area, low density element formed in one embodiment as a helically wound foil 30 located with silicon carbide, and located at the upper end of the fertile material upper blanket 20.

Christiansen, David W. (Kennewick, WA); Karnesky, Richard A. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

On0Line Fuel Failure Monitor for Fuel Testing and Monitoring of Gas Cooled Very High Temperature Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IVery High Temperature Reactors (VHTR) utilize the TRISO microsphere as the fundamental fuel unit in the core. The TRISO microsphere (~ 1- mm diameter) is composed of a UO2 kernel surrounded by a porous pyrolytic graphite buffer, an inner pyrolytic graphite layer, a silicon carbide (SiC) coating, and an outer pyrolytic graphite layer. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel is expected to range from 4% – 10% (higher enrichments are also being considered). The layer/coating system that surrounds the UO2 kernel acts as the containment and main barrier against the environmental release of radioactivity. To understand better the behavior of this fuel under in-core conditions (e.g., high temperature, intense fast neutron flux, etc.), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a fuel testing program that will take place at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During this project North Carolina State University (NCSU) researchers will collaborate with INL staff for establishing an optimized system for fuel monitoring for the ATR tests. In addition, it is expected that the developed system and methods will be of general use for fuel failure monitoring in gas cooled VHTRs.

Ayman I. Hawari; Mohamed A. Bourham

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

288

Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Waste Corporate Board James C. Bresee, ScD, JD Advisory Board Member Office of Nuclear Energy July 29, 2009 July 29, 2009 Fuel Cycle Research and Development DM 195665 2 Outline...

289

Electrolysis cell for reprocessing plutonium reactor fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolytic cell for refining a mixture of metals including spent fuel containing U and Pu contaminated with other metals is claimed. The cell includes a metallic pot containing a metallic pool as one anode at a lower level, a fused salt as the electrolyte at an intermediate level and a cathode and an anode basket in spaced-apart positions in the electrolyte with the cathode and anode being retractable to positions above the electrolyte during which spent fuel may be added to the anode basket. The anode basket is extendable into the lower pool to dissolve at least some metallic contaminants; the anode basket contains the spent fuel acting as a second anode when in the electrolyte.

Miller, W.E.; Steindler, M.J.; Burris, L.

1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

290

Electrolysis cell for reprocessing plutonium reactor fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolytic cell for refining a mixture of metals including spent fuel containing U and Pu contaminated with other metals, the cell including a metallic pot containing a metallic pool as one anode at a lower level, a fused salt as the electrolyte at an intermediate level and a cathode and an anode basket in spaced-apart positions in the electrolyte with the cathode and anode being retractable to positions above the electrolyte during which spent fuel may be added to the anode basket and the anode basket being extendable into the lower pool to dissolve at least some metallic contaminants, the anode basket containing the spent fuel acting as a second anode when in the electrolyte.

Miller, William E. (Naperville, IL); Steindler, Martin J. (Park Forest, IL); Burris, Leslie (Naperville, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Research Reactor Preparations for the Air Shipment of Highly Enriched Uranium from Romania  

SciTech Connect

In June 2009 two air shipments transported both unirradiated (fresh) and irradiated (spent) Russian-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) nuclear fuel from two research reactors in Romania to the Russian Federation for conversion to low enriched uranium. The Institute for Nuclear Research at Pitesti (SCN Pitesti) shipped 30.1 kg of HEU fresh fuel pellets to Dimitrovgrad, Russia and the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (IFIN-HH) shipped 23.7 kilograms of HEU spent fuel assemblies from the VVR S research reactor at Magurele, Romania, to Chelyabinsk, Russia. Both HEU shipments were coordinated by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), were managed in Romania by the National Commission for Nuclear Activities Control (CNCAN), and were conducted in cooperation with the Russian Federation State Corporation Rosatom and the International Atomic Energy Agency. Both shipments were transported by truck to and from respective commercial airports in Romania and the Russian Federation and stored at secure nuclear facilities in Russia until the material is converted into low enriched uranium. These shipments resulted in Romania becoming the 3rd country under the RRRFR program and the 14th country under the GTRI program to remove all HEU. This paper describes the research reactor preparations and license approvals that were necessary to safely and securely complete these air shipments of nuclear fuel.

K. J. Allen; I. Bolshinsky; L. L. Biro; M. E. Budu; N. V. Zamfir; M. Dragusin; C. Paunoiu; M. Ciocanescu

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Thermal hydraulics analysis of the MIT research reactor in support of a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MIT research reactor (MITR) is converting from the existing high enrichment uranium (HEU) core to a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core using a high-density monolithic UMo fuel. The design of an optimum LEU core for the ...

Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Configuration adjustment potential of the Very High Temperature Reactor prismatic cores with advanced actinide fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minor actinides represent the long-term radiotoxicity of nuclear wastes. As one of their potential incineration options, partitioning and transmutation in fission reactors are seriously considered worldwide. If implemented, these technologies could also be a source of nuclear fuel materials required for sustainability of nuclear energy. The objective of this research was to evaluate performance characteristics of Very High Temperature Reactors (VHTRs) and their variations due to configuration adjustments targeting achievability of spectral variations. The development of realistic whole-core 3D VHTR models and their benchmarking against experimental data was an inherent part of the research effort. Although the performance analysis was primarily focused on prismatic core configurations, 3D pebble-bed core models were also created and analyzed. The whole-core 3D models representing the prismatic block and pebble-bed cores were created for use with the SCALE 5.0 code system. Each of the models required the Dancoff correction factor to be externally calculated. The code system DANCOFF-MCThe whole-core/system 3D models with multi-heterogeneity treatments were validated by the benchmark problems. Obtained results are in agreement with the available High Temperature Test Reactor data. Preliminary analyses of actinide-fueled VHTR configurations have indicated promising performance characteristics. Utilization of minor actinides as a fuel component would facilitate development of new fuel cycles and support sustainability of a fuel source for nuclear energy assuring future operation of Generation IV nuclear energy systems. was utilized to perform the Dancoff factor calculations.

Ames, David E, II

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL helps industry partners develop the next generation of energy efficient, high performance vehicles and fuels. NREL's transportation research spans from the materials to the systems level. NREL conducts research on the full range of vehicle types, from light-duty passenger cars to heavy-duty freight trucks. NREL's credible transportation research is grounded in real-world data. NREL's integrated approach links automotive technology advances to the full spectrum of renewable energy solutions. NREL researchers examine infrastructure, market conditions and driver behavior, as well as fuels and vehicles. NREL helps put fuel-efficient, low-emission cars and trucks on the road through research and innovation in electric vehicle, biofuel, and conventional automotive technologies. Researchers collaborate with industry

295

Nuclide Composition Benchmark Data Set for Verifying Burnup Codes on Spent Light Water Reactor Fuels  

SciTech Connect

To establish a nuclide composition benchmark data set for the verification of burnup codes, destructive analyses of light water reactor spent-fuel samples, which were cut out from several heights of spent-fuel rods, were carried out at the analytical laboratory at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The 16 samples from three kinds of pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rods and the 18 samples from two boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel rods were examined. Their initial {sup 235}U enrichments and burnups were from 2.6 to 4.1% and from 4 to 50 GWd/t, respectively. One PWR fuel rod and one BWR fuel rod contained gadolinia as a burnable poison. The measurements for more than 40 nuclides of uranium, transuranium, and fission product elements were performed by destructive analysis using mass spectrometry, and alpha-ray and gamma-ray spectrometry. Burnup for each sample was determined by the {sup 148}Nd method. The analytical methods and the results as well as the related irradiation condition data are compiled as a complete benchmark data set.

Nakahara, Yoshinori; Suyama, Kenya; Inagawa, Jun; Nagaishi, Ryuji; Kurosawa, Setsumi; Kohno, Nobuaki; Onuki, Mamoru; Mochizuki, Hiroki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan)

2002-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee Report of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Subcommittee of the...

297

Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Renewable Fuels &039;Plus&039; Research and Development Fund (Ontario, Canada) Alternative Renewable Fuels 'Plus' Research and Development Fund (Ontario, Canada)...

298

FAST FUEL TEST REACTOR-FFTR CONCEPTUAL DESIGN STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The Fast Fuel Test Reactor (FFTR) is a nuclear facility for the purpose of irradiating samples of fuels and structural components for use in fast reactors. The core consisis of a plate type element in a square configuration. Beryllium metal between the fuel elements is used to obtain a neutron energy spectrum in the hard intermediate region. Cooling of the core and test specimens is accomplished by means of liquid sodium. The design concept was carried through in sufficient degree in the following areas of preliminary concern: number and size of irradiation facilities, sample power requirements, plant layout to evaluate site requirements, plant and nuclear design parameters to evaluate essential equipment requirements. plant-capital-cost estimate, annual- operating-cost estimate, and estimate of construction time schedule. (W.D.M.)

Brubaker, R.; Hummel, H.H.; McArthy, A.; Smaardyk, A.; Kittel, J.H.

1960-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Other Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Other Research Facilities Other Research Facilities In addition to the laboratories dedicated to hydrogen and fuel cell research, other facilities at NREL provide space for scientists developing hydrogen and fuel cell technologies along with other renewable energy technologies. Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility NREL's Distributed Energy Resources (DER) Test Facility is a working laboratory to test and improve interconnections among renewable energy generation technologies, energy storage systems, and electrical conversion equipment. Research being conducted includes improving the system efficiency of hydrogen production by electrolysis using wind or other renewable energy. This research highlights a promising option for encouraging higher penetrations of renewable energy generation as well as

300

Use of Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis in the Design of Reactor Physics and Criticality Benchmark Experiments for Advanced Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Advances in Nuclear Fuel Management - Increased Enrichment/High Burnup and Light Water Reactor Fuel Cycle Optimization

B. T. Rearden; W. J. Anderson; G. A. Harms

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research reactor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Optimization of Boiling Water Reactor Fuel Crud Characteristics for Reducing Radiation Fields: Evaluation of BWR Fuel Crud Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel crud formation and its properties are the combined result of many factors, including corrosion product input, zinc addition rates, reactor coolant chemistry, and fuel and core design. Crud deposition may impact fuel performance as well as radiation field generation. Many projects have evaluated changes in fuel crud properties resulting from changing reactor coolant chemistry. However, the desired crud properties for both good fuel performance and mitigation of radiation field source term are ...

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

302

Using low-enriched uranium in research reactors: The RERTR program  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the RERTR program is to minimize and eventually eliminate use of highway enriched uranium (HEU) in research and test reactors. The program has been very successful, and has developed low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel materials and designs which can be used effectively in approximately 90 percent of the research and test reactors which used HEU when the program began. This progress would not have been possible without active international cooperation among fuel developers, commercial vendors, and reactor operators. The new tasks which the RERTR program is undertaking at this time include development of new and better fuels that will allow use of LEU fuels in all research and test reactors; cooperation with Russian laboratories, which will make it possible to minimize and eventually eliminate use of HEU in research reactors throughout the world, irrespective of its origin; and development of an LEU-based process for the production of {sup 99}Mo. Continuation and intensification of international cooperation are essential to the achievement of the ultimate goals of the RERTR program.

Travelli, A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Overview of the fast reactors fuels program. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

Each nation involved in LMFBR development has its unique energy strategies which consider energy growth projections, uranium resources, capital costs, and plant operational requirements. Common to all of these strategies is a history of fast reactor experience which dates back to the days of the Manhatten Project and includes the CLEMENTINE Reactor, which generated a few watts, LAMPRE, EBR-I, EBR-II, FERMI, SEFOR, FFTF, BR-1, -2, -5, -10, BOR-60, BN-350, BN-600, JOYO, RAPSODIE, Phenix, KNK-II, DFR, and PFR. Fast reactors under design or construction include PEC, CRBR, SuperPhenix, SNR-300, MONJU, and Madras (India). The parallel fuels and materials evolution has fully supported this reactor development. It has involved cermets, molten plutonium alloy, plutonium oxide, uranium metal or alloy, uranium oxide, and mixed uranium-plutonium oxides and carbides.

Evans, E.A.; Cox, C.M.; Hayward, B.R.; Rice, L.H.; Yoshikawa, H.H.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, January-June 1986: Reactor Safety Research Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the technology base supporting licensing decisions.

Not Available

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

PNNL: Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To achieve higher power levels, researchers now are turning their attention to advanced fuel designs. PNNL is developing a new metal fuel for light water reactors intended...

306

A Parametric Study of the DUPIC Fuel Cycle to Reflect Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel Management Strategy  

SciTech Connect

For both pressurized water reactor (PWR) and Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) tandem analysis, the Direct Use of spent PWR fuel In CANDU reactor (DUPIC) fuel cycle in a CANDU 6 reactor is studied using the DRAGON/DONJON chain of codes with the ENDF/B-V and ENDF/B-VI libraries. The reference feed material is a 17 x 17 French standard 900-MW(electric) PWR fuel. The PWR spent-fuel composition is obtained from two-dimensional DRAGON assembly transport and depletion calculations. After a number of years of cooling, this defines the initial fuel nuclide field in the CANDU unit cell calculations in DRAGON, where it is further depleted with the same neutron group structure. The resulting macroscopic cross sections are condensed and tabulated to be used in a full-core model of a CANDU 6 reactor to find an optimized channel fueling rate distribution on a time-average basis. Assuming equilibrium refueling conditions and a particular refueling sequence, instantaneous full-core diffusion calculations are finally performed with the DONJON code, from which both the channel power peaking factors and local parameter effects are estimated. A generic study of the DUPIC fuel cycle is carried out using the linear reactivity model for initial enrichments ranging from 3.2 to 4.5 wt% in a PWR. Because of the uneven power histories of the spent PWR assemblies, the spent PWR fuel composition is expected to differ from one assembly to the next. Uneven mixing of the powder during DUPIC fuel fabrication may lead to uncertainties in the composition of the fuel bundle and larger peaking factors in CANDU. A mixing method for reducing composition uncertainties is discussed.

Rozon, Daniel; Shen Wei [Institut de Genie Nucleaire (Canada)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

PEBBLE-BED NUCLEAR REACTOR SYSTEM PHYSICS AND FUEL UTILIZATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Generation IV Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PMBR) design may be used for electricity production, co-generation applications (industrial heat, hydrogen production, desalination, etc.), and could potentially eliminate some high level nuclear wastes. Because of these advantages, as well as the ability to build cost-effective small-to-medium sized reactors, this design is currently being considered for construction in many countries, from Japan, where test reactors are being analyzed, to China. The use of TRISO-coated micro-particles as a fuel in these reactors leads to multi-heterogeneity physics features that must be properly treated and accounted for. Inherent interrelationships of neutron interactions, temperature effects, and structural effects, further challenge computational evaluations of High Temperature Reactors (HTRs). The developed models and computational techniques have to be validated in code-to-code and, most importantly, code-to-experiment benchmark studies. This report quantifies the relative accuracy of various multi-heterogeneity treatments in whole-core 3D models for parametric studies of Generation IV Pebble Bed Modular Reactors as well as provide preliminary results of the PBMR performance analysis. Data is gathered from two different models, one based upon a benchmark for the African PBMR-400 design, and another based on the PROTEUS criticality experiment, since the African design is a more realistic power reactor, but the PROTEUS experiment model can be used for calculations that cannot be performed on the more complex model. Early data was used to refine final models, and the resulting final models were used to conduct parametric studies on composition and geometry optimization based on pebble bed reactor physics in order to improve fuel utilization.

Kelly, Ryan 1989-

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Electrolytic recovery of reactor metal fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new electrolytic process and apparatus are provided using sodium, cerium or a similar metal in alloy or within a sodium beta or beta[double prime]-alumina sodium ion conductor to electrolytically displace each of the spent fuel metals except for cesium and strontium on a selective basis from the electrolyte to an inert metal cathode. Each of the metals can be deposited separately. An electrolytic transfer of spent fuel into the electrolyte includes a sodium or cerium salt in the electrolyte with sodium or cerium alloy being deposited on the cathode during the transfer of the metals from the spent fuel. The cathode with the deposit of sodium or cerium alloy is then shunted to an anode and the reverse transfer is carried out on a selective basis with each metal being deposited separately at the cathode. The result is that the sodium or cerium needed for the process is regenerated in the first step and no additional source of these reactants is required. 2 figs.

Miller, W.E.; Tomczuk, Z.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

309

Research Reactors Division | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactors Division (RRD) is responsible for operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Operating at 85 MW, HFIR is the highest flux reactor-based source of neutrons for...

310

Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - III: Spent DUPIC Fuel Disposal Cost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposal costs of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and DUPIC fuels have been estimated based on available literature data and the engineering design of a spent CANDU fuel disposal facility by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The cost estimation was carried out by the normalization concept of total electricity generation. Therefore, the future electricity generation scale was analyzed to evaluate the appropriate capacity of the high-level waste disposal facility in Korea, which is a key parameter of the disposal cost estimation. Based on the total electricity generation scale, it is concluded that the disposal unit costs for spent CANDU natural uranium, CANDU-DUPIC, and PWR fuels are 192.3, 388.5, and 696.5 $/kg heavy element, respectively.

Ko, Won Il; Choi, Hangbok; Roh, Gyuhong; Yang, Myung Seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

The ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor and New Advanced Fuel Testing Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy s High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), was originally designed (in the 1960s) primarily as a part of the overall program to produce transuranic isotopes for use in the heavy-element research program of the United States. Today, the reactor is a highly versatile machine, producing medical and transuranic isotopes and performing materials test experimental irradiations and neutron-scattering experiments. The ability to test advanced fuels and cladding materials in a thermal neutron spectrum in the United States is limited, and a fast-spectrum irradiation facility does not currently exist in this country. The HFIR has a distinct advantage for consideration as a fuel/cladding irradiation facility because of the extremely high neutron fluxes that this reactor provides over the full thermal- to fast-neutron energy range. New test capabilities have been developed that will allow testing of advanced nuclear fuels and cladding materials in the HFIR under prototypic light-water reactor (LWR) and fast-reactor (FR) operating conditions.

Ott, Larry J [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Effect of Fuel Fraction on Small Modified CANDLE Burn-up Based Gas Cooled Fast Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual design study of Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Modified CANDLE Burn-up has been performed. The objective of this research is to get optimal design parameters of such type reactors. The parameters of nuclear design including the critical condition, conversion ratio, and burn-up level were compared. These parameters are calculated by variation in the fuel fraction 47.5% up to 70%. Two dimensional full core multi groups diffusion calculations was performed by CITATION code. Group constant preparations are performed by using SRAC code system with JENDL-3.2 nuclear data library. In this design the reactor cores with cylindrical cell two dimensional R-Z core models are subdivided into several parts with the same volume in the axial directions. The placement of fuel in core arranged so that the result of plutonium from natural uranium can be utilized optimally for 10 years reactor operation. Modified CANDLE burn-up was established successfully in a core radial width 1.4 m. Total thermal power output for reference core is 550 MW. Study on the effect of fuel to coolant ratio shows that effective multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) is in almost linear relations with the change of the fuel volume to coolant ratio.

Ariani, Menik [Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia); Physics Department, Sriwijaya University, Kampus Indralaya, Ogan Ilir, Sumatera Selatan (Indonesia); Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Asiah, Nur [Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia); Shafii, M. Ali [Departmen of Physics Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40134 (Indonesia); Physics Department, Andalas University, Kampus Limau Manis, Padang, Sumatera Barat (Indonesia); Khairurrijal

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

313

Behavior of actinides in the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle  

SciTech Connect

The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) under development by Argonne National Laboratory uses metallic fuels instead of ceramics. This allows electrorefining of spent fuels and presents opportunities for recycling minor actinide elements. Four minor actinides ({sup 237}Np, {sup 240}Pu, {sup 241}Am, and {sup 243}Am) determine the waste storage requirements of spent fuel from all types of fission reactors. These nuclides behave the same as uranium and other plutonium isotopes in electrorefining, so they can be recycled back to the reactor without elaborate chemical processing. An experiment has been designed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the high-energy neutron spectra of the IFR in consuming these four nuclides and plutonium. Eighteen sets of seven actinide and five light metal targets have been selected for ten day exposure in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 which serves as a prototype of the IFR. Post-irradiation analyses of the exposed targets by gamma, alpha, and mass spectroscopy are used to determine nuclear reaction-rates and neutron spectra. These experimental data increase the authors` confidence in their ability to predict reaction rates in candidate IFR designs using a variety of neutron transport and diffusion programs.

Courtney, J.C. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States). Nuclear Science Center; Lineberry, M.J. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Technology Development Div.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Use of silicide fuel in the Ford Nuclear Reactor - to lengthen fuel element lifetimes  

SciTech Connect

Based on economic considerations, it has been proposed to increase the lifetime of LEU fuel elements in the Ford Nuclear Reactor by raising the {sup 235}U plate loading from 9.3 grams in aluminide (UAl{sub x}) fuel to 12.5 grams in silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) fuel. For a representative core configuration, preliminary neutronic depletion and steady state thermal hydraulic calculations have been performed to investigate core characteristics during the transition from an all-aluminide to an all-silicide core. This paper discusses motivations for this fuel element upgrade, results from the calculations, and conclusions.

Bretscher, M.M.; Snelgrove, J.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Burn, R.R.; Lee, J.C. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Phoenix Memorial Lab.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

Feasibility of breeding in hard spectrum boiling water reactors with oxide and nitride fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study assesses the neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and fuel performance aspects of using nitride fuel in place of oxides in Pu-based high conversion light water reactor designs. Using the higher density nitride fuel ...

Feng, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

The Phenomenology of Nuclear Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

most widely used nuclear fuel is in the form of Uranium Oxide. It is used in hundreds of nuclear power reactors, naval reactors and research reactors. This ceramic fuel form has...

317

Pressurized Water Reactor Chemically Enhanced Ultrasonic Fuel Cleaning: Feasibility Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrosion product deposition on fuel is undesirable because it may lead to crud induced power shift (CIPS), contribute to crud induced localized corrosion (CILC), and lead to larger corrosion product releases during shutdown. Ultrasonic fuel cleaning (UFC) has provided utilities with a method to remove corrosion products from the fuel after shutdown; however, visual inspections of cleaned assemblies indicate that activity removal is not 100% efficient. Researchers have proposed several methods to improve...

2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

318

Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation, storage, and delivery of hydrogen as an energy carrier. Hydrogen Production & Delivery Research and Electricity Energy Delivery (i.e., the "Super Grid" concept) · · · · · · · · · · · Development of Efficient Research Center has just begun operation of a UTC phosphoric acid fuel cell to provide heating, cooling

319

A FUEL REPROCESSING PLANT FOR FAST CERAMIC REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

A study was made of the adaptation of the HAPO anion exchange process to the reprocessing of Fast Ceramic Reactor (FCR) fuel using the Idaho Small Plant Concept. It is shown that the anion exchange flowsheet meets the reprocessing objectives of the FCR case and can be adequately accommodated in the Small Plant Concept. Capacities of up to 1550 Md(e) are feasible in the Small Plant and unit reprocessing costs range from 0.14 to 0.28 mills/kwh depending on the number of reactors to be processed. (auth)

Alter, H.W.

1962-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Research and Research and Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogen Research and Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Hydrogen Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives Hydrogen Research and Development

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research reactor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Publications Publications NREL researchers document their findings in technical reports, conference papers, journal articles, and fact sheets. Visit the following online resources to find publications about alternative and advanced transportation technologies and systems. NREL Publications Database This database features a wide variety of publications produced by NREL from 1977 to the present. Search the database or find publications according to these popular key words: Advanced vehicles and systems | Alternative fuels | Batteries | Electric vehicles | Energy storage | Fuel cell vehicles | Hybrid electric vehicles | Plug-in electric vehicles | Vehicle analysis | Vehicle modeling | Vehicle emissions Selected Publications Read selected publications related to our vehicles and fuels projects:

322

Two U.S. University Research Reactors to be Converted From Highly Enriched  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. University Research Reactors to be Converted From Highly U.S. University Research Reactors to be Converted From Highly Enriched Uranium to Low-Enriched Uranium Two U.S. University Research Reactors to be Converted From Highly Enriched Uranium to Low-Enriched Uranium April 11, 2005 - 11:34am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - As part of the Bush administration's aggressive effort to reduce the amount of weapons-grade nuclear material worldwide, Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman announced today that the Department of Energy (DOE) has begun to convert research reactors from using highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium fuel (LEU) at the University of Florida and Texas A&M University. This effort, by DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology, are the latest steps

323

Fuel subassembly leak test chamber for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A container with a valve at one end is inserted into a nuclear reactor coolant pool. Once in the pool, the valve is opened by a mechanical linkage. An individual fuel subassembly is lifted into the container by a gripper; the valve is then closed providing an isolated chamber for the subassembly. A vacuum is drawn on the chamber to encourage gaseous fission product leakage through any defects in the cladding of the fuel rods comprising the subassembly; this leakage may be detected by instrumentation, and the need for replacement of the assembly ascertained.

Divona, Charles J. (Santa Ana, CA)

1978-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

324

Light water reactor mixed-oxide fuel irradiation experiment  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition is sponsoring and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is leading an irradiation experiment to test mixed uranium-plutonium oxide (MOX) fuel made from weapons-grade (WG) plutonium. In this multiyear program, sealed capsules containing MOX fuel pellets fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are being irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The planned experiments will investigate the utilization of dry-processed plutonium, the effects of WG plutonium isotopics on MOX performance, and any material interactions of gallium with Zircaloy cladding.

Hodge, S.A.; Cowell, B.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Chang, G.S.; Ryskamp, J.M. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

FABRICATION OF TUBE TYPE FUEL ELEMENT FOR NUCLEAR REACTORS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of fabricating a nuclear reactor fuel element is given. It consists essentially of fixing two tubes in concentric relationship with respect to one another to provide an annulus therebetween, filling the annulus with a fissionablematerial-containing powder, compacting the powder material within the annulus and closing the ends thereof. The powder material is further compacted by swaging the inner surface of the inner tube to increase its diameter while maintaining the original size of the outer tube. This process results in reduced fabrication costs of powdered fissionable material type fuel elements and a substantial reduction in the peak core temperatures while materially enhancing the heat removal characteristics.

Loeb, E.; Nicklas, J.H.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Global estimation of potential unreported plutonium in thermal research reactors  

SciTech Connect

As of November, 1993, 303 research reactors (research, test, training, prototype, and electricity producing) were operational worldwide; 155 of these were in non-nuclear weapon states. Of these 155 research reactors, 80 are thermal reactors that have a power rating of 1 MW(th) or greater and could be utilized to produce plutonium. A previously published study on the unreported plutonium production of six research reactors indicates that a minimum reactor power of 40 MW (th) is required to make a significant quantity (SQ), 8 kg, of fissile plutonium per year by unreported irradiations. As part of the Global Nuclear Material Control Model effort, we determined an upper bound on the maximum possible quantity of plutonium that could be produced by the 80 thermal research reactors in the non-nuclear weapon states (NNWS). We estimate that in one year a maximum of roughly one quarter of a metric ton (250 kg) of plutonium could be produced in these 80 NNWS thermal research reactors based on their reported power output. We have calculated the quantity of plutonium and the number of years that would be required to produce an SQ of plutonium in the 80 thermal research reactors and aggregated by NNWS. A safeguards approach for multiple thermal research reactors that can produce less than 1 SQ per year should be conducted in association with further developing a safeguards and design information reverification approach for states that have multiple research reactors.

Dreicer, J.S.; Rutherford, D.A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Safeguards Guidance for Prismatic Fueled High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR)  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

5) 5) August 2012 Guidance for High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs) with Prismatic Fuel INL/CON-12-26130 Revision 0 Safeguards-by-Design: Guidance for High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs) With Prismatic Fuel Philip Casey Durst (INL Consultant) August 2012 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. References herein to any specific commercial product,

328

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electricity Research Electricity Research and Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Electricity Research and Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Electricity Basics Production & Distribution Research & Development Related Links Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Laws & Incentives

329

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biomass Research and Biomass Research and Development Initiative to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biomass Research and Development Initiative on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biomass Research and Development Initiative

330

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biobased Biobased Transportation Research Funding to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobased Transportation Research Funding on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biobased Transportation Research Funding The Surface Transportation Research, Development, and Deployment (STRDD)

331

Detachable connection for a nuclear reactor fuel assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A locking connection for releasably attaching a handling socket to the duct tube of a fuel assembly for a nuclear reactor. The connection comprises a load pad housing mechanically attached to the duct tube and a handling socket threadably secured within the housing. A retaining ring is interposed between the housing and the handling socket and is formed with a projection and depression engagable within a cavity and groove of the housing and handling socket, respectively, to form a detachable interlocked connection assembly.

Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.

1983-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

332

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Services » Site & Facility Restoration » Deactivation & Decommissioning (D&D) » D&D Workshops » Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) was the first reactor built in the U.S. for peacetime atomic research following World War II. Construction began in 1947 and the reactor started operating in August 1950. In the next 18 years, an estimated 25,000 scientific experiments were carried out at the BGRR using neutrons produced in the facility's 700-ton graphite core, made up of more than 60,000 individual graphite blocks. The BGRR was placed on standby in 1968 and then permanently shut down as the next-generation reactor, the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), was

333

Establishing a Cost Basis for Converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from High Enriched to Low Enriched Uranium Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the auspices of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program, the National Nuclear Security Administration /Department of Energy (NNSA/DOE) has, as a goal, to convert research reactors worldwide from weapons grade to non-weapons grade uranium. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is one of the candidates for conversion of fuel from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). A well documented business model, including tasks, costs, and schedules was developed to plan the conversion of HFIR. Using Microsoft Project, a detailed outline of the conversion program was established and consists of LEU fuel design activities, a fresh fuel shipping cask, improvements to the HFIR reactor building, and spent fuel operations. Current-value costs total $76 million dollars, include over 100 subtasks, and will take over 10 years to complete. The model and schedule follows the path of the fuel from receipt from fuel fabricator to delivery to spent fuel storage and illustrates the duration, start, and completion dates of each subtask to be completed. Assumptions that form the basis of the cost estimate have significant impact on cost and schedule.

Primm, Trent [ORNL; Guida, Tracey [University of Pittsburgh

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

A strategy for transition from a uranium fueled, open cycle SFR to a transuranic fueled, closed cycle sodium cooled fast reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reactors utilizing a highly energetic neutron spectrum, often termed fast reactors, offer large fuel utilization improvements over the thermal reactors currently used for nuclear energy generation. Conventional fast reactor ...

Richard, Joshua (Joshua Glenn)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Major Safety Aspects of Advanced Candu Reactor and Associated Research and Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Candu{sup R} Reactor design is built on the proven technology of existing Candu plants and on AECL's knowledge base acquired over decades of nuclear power plant design, engineering, construction and research. Two prime objectives of ACR-700TM1 are cost reduction and enhanced safety. To achieve them some new features were introduced and others were improved from the previous Candu 6 and Candu 9 designs. The ACR-700 reactor design is based on the modular concept of horizontal fuel channels surrounded by a heavy water moderator, the same as with all Candu reactors. The major novelty in the ACR-700 is the use of slightly enriched fuel and light water as coolant circulating in the fuel channels. This results in a more compact reactor design and a reduction of heavy water inventory, both contributing to a significant decrease in cost compared to Candu reactors, which employ natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as coolant. The reactor core design adopted for ACR-700 also has some features that have a bearing on inherent safety, such as negative power and coolant void reactivity coefficient. Several improvements in engineered safety have been made as well, such as enhanced separation of the safety support systems. Since the ACR-700 design is an evolutionary development of the currently operating Candu plants, limited research is required to extend the validation database for the design and the supporting safety analysis. A program of safety related research and development has been initiated to address the areas where the ACR-700 design is significantly different from the Candu designs. This paper describes the major safety aspects of the ACR-700 with a particular focus on novel features and improvements over the existing Candu reactors. It also outlines the key areas where research and development efforts are undertaken to demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the design. (authors)

Bonechi, M.; Wren, D.J.; Hopwood, J.M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was a small water cooled, U-233/Th-232 cycle breeder reactor developed by the Pittsburgh Naval Reactors to improve utilization of the nation's nuclear fuel resources in light water reactors. The LWBR was operated at Shippingport Atomic Power Station (APS), which was a Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly Atomic Energy Commission)-owned reactor plant. Shippingport APS was the first large-scale, central-station nuclear power plant in the United States and the first plant of such size in the world operated solely to produce electric power. The Shippingport LWBR was operated successfully from 1977 to 1982 at the APS. During the five years of operation, the LWBR generated more than 29,000 effective full power hours (EFPH) of energy. After final shutdown, the 39 core modules of the LWBR were shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) at Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). At ECF, 12 of the 39 modules were dismantled and about 1000 of more than 17,000 rods were removed from the modules of proof-of-breeding and fuel performance testing. Some of the removed rods were kept at ECF, some were sent to Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in Idaho and some to ANL-East in Chicago for a variety of physical, chemical and radiological examinations. All rods and rod sections remaining after the experiments were shipped back to ECF, where modules and loose rods were repackaged in liners for dry storage. In a series of shipments, the liners were transported from ECF to Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The 47 liners containing the fully-rodded and partially-derodded core modules, the loose rods, and the rod scraps, are now stored in underground dry wells at CPP-749.

Illum, D.B.; Olson, G.L.; McCardell, R.K.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report July - September 1981  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) from July 1 through September 30, 1981, for the Division of Accident Evaluation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR} steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, lspra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

Edler, S. K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Cleanup Actions - Cleanup Actions Since the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) was shut down in 1968, many actions have been taken as part of the complex decommissioning. The actions undertaken throughout the BGRR complex ensure that the structures that remain are in a safe and stable condition and prepared it for long-term surveillance and maintenance. Regulatory Requirements The decommissioning of the BGRR was conducted under the federal Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). In 1992, an Interagency Agreement (PDF) among the DOE, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) became effective. The IAG provided the overall framework for conducting environmental restoration activities at

339

Determining Reactor Flux from Xenon-136 and Cesium-135 in Spent Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to infer the reactor flux from spent fuel or seized fissile material would enhance the tools of nuclear forensics and nuclear nonproliferation significantly. We show that reactor flux can be inferred from the ratios of xenon-136 to xenon-134 and cesium-135 to cesium-137. If the average flux of a reactor is known, the flux inferred from measurements of spent fuel could help determine whether that spent fuel was loaded as a blanket or close to the mid-plane of the reactor. The cesium ratio also provides information on reactor shutdowns during the irradiation of fuel, which could prove valuable for identifying the reactor in question through comparisons with satellite reactor heat monitoring data. We derive analytic expressions for these correlations and compare them to experimental data and to detailed reactor burn simulations. The enrichment of the original uranium fuel affects the correlations by up to 3 percent, but only at high flux.

Hayes, A C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Determining Reactor Flux from Xenon-136 and Cesium-135 in Spent Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to infer the reactor flux from spent fuel or seized fissile material would enhance the tools of nuclear forensics and nuclear nonproliferation significantly. We show that reactor flux can be inferred from the ratios of xenon-136 to xenon-134 and cesium-135 to cesium-137. If the average flux of a reactor is known, the flux inferred from measurements of spent fuel could help determine whether that spent fuel was loaded as a blanket or close to the mid-plane of the reactor. The cesium ratio also provides information on reactor shutdowns during the irradiation of fuel, which could prove valuable for identifying the reactor in question through comparisons with satellite reactor heat monitoring data. We derive analytic expressions for these correlations and compare them to experimental data and to detailed reactor burn simulations. The enrichment of the original uranium fuel affects the correlations by up to 3 percent, but only at high flux.

A. C. Hayes; Gerard Jungman

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research reactor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Distribution of characteristics of LWR [light water reactor] spent fuel  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to develop a collective description of the entire spent fuel inventory in terms of various fuel properties relevant to Approved Testing Materials (ATMs) using information available from the Characteristics Data Base (CBD), which is sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. A number of light-water reactor (LWR) characteristics were analyzed including assembly class representation, fuel burnup, enrichment, fuel fabrication data, defective fuel quantities, and, at PNL`s specific request, linear heat generation rate (LHGR) and the utilization of burnable poisons. A quantitative relationships was developed between burnup and enrichment for BWRs and PWRs. The relationship shows that the existing BWR ATM is near the center of the burnup-enrichment distribution, while the four PWR ATMs bracket the center of the burnup range but are on the low side of the enrichment range. Fuel fabrication data are based on vendor specifications for new fuel. Defective fuel distributions were analyzed in terms of assembly class and vendor design. LHGR values were calculated from utility data on burnup and effective full-power days; these calculations incorporate some unavoidable assumptions which may compromise the value of the results. Only a limited amount of data are available on burnable poisons at this time. Based on this distribution study, suggestions for additional ATMs are made. These are based on the class and design concepts and include BWR/2,3 barrier fuel, and the WE 17 {times} 17 class with integral burnable poison. Both should be at relatively high burnups. 16 refs., 5 figs., 15 tabs.

Reich, W.J.; Notz, K.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA); Moore, R.S. [Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (USA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

PCR+ In Diesel Fuels and Emissions Research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In past work for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), PCR+ was developed as an alternative methodology for building statistical models. PCR+ is an extension of Principal Components Regression (PCR), in which the eigenvectors resulting from Principal Components Analysis (PCA) are used as predictor variables in regression analysis. The work was motivated by the observation that most heavy-duty diesel (HDD) engine research was conducted with test fuels that had been ''concocted'' in the laboratory to vary selected fuel properties in isolation from each other. This approach departs markedly from the real world, where the reformulation of diesel fuels for almost any purpose leads to changes in a number of interrelated properties. In this work, we present new information regarding the problems encountered in the conventional approach to model-building and how the PCR+ method can be used to improve research on the relationship between fuel characteristics and engine emissions. We also discuss how PCR+ can be applied to a variety of other research problems related to diesel fuels.

McAdams, H.T.

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

INVENTORY AND DESCRIPTION OF COMMERCIAL REACTOR FUELS WITHIN THE UNITED STATES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are currently 104 nuclear reactors in 31 states, operated by 51 different utilities. Operation of these reactors generates used fuel assemblies that require storage prior to final disposition. The regulatory framework within the United States (U.S.) allows for the licensing of used nuclear fuel storage facilities for an initial licensing period of up to 40 years with potential for license extensions in 40 years increments. Extended storage, for periods of up to 300 years, is being considered within the U.S. Therefore, there is an emerging need to develop the technical bases to support the licensing for long-term storage. In support of the Research and Development (R&D) activities required to support the technical bases, a comprehensive assessment of the current inventory of used nuclear fuel based upon publicly available resources has been completed that includes the most current projections of used fuel discharges from operating reactors. Negotiations with the nuclear power industry are ongoing concerning the willingness of individual utilities to provide information and material needed to complete the R&D activities required to develop the technical bases for used fuel storage for up to 300 years. This report includes a status of negotiations between DOE and industry in these regards. These negotiations are expected to result in a framework for cooperation between the Department and industry in which industry will provide and specific information on used fuel inventory and the Department will compensate industry for the material required for Research and Development and Testing and Evaluation Facility activities.

Vinson, D.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

A fuel for sub-critical fast reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Along with the problem of the nuclear waste transmutation, the problem of minimization of waste production is of current interest. It is not possible to eliminate production of waste at a nuclear power plant, but, as is shown in this report, it is in principle possible to arrange a fuel composition with no net production of transuranic elements. The idea is to find the transuranic elements composition to which the depleted uranium is continuously supplied during frequent reprocessing, and amount of each other transuranic fuel component remains unchanged in time. For each transuranic component, the balance is achieved by equating burnup and production rates. The production is due to neutron capture by the neighboring lighter isotope and subsequent beta-decay. The burnup includes fission, neutron capture and decays. For the calculations a simplified burnup model which accounts for 9 isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium is used. The calculated fuel composition consists mainly of uranium with minority of plutonium isotopes. Such a fuel, after usage in a sub-critical fast reactor, should be reprocessed. The fission product content increases during burnup, representing a net production of waste, while the transuranic elements and {sup 238}U should be recycled into a new fuel. For such a fuel cycle, the net consumption is only for 238U, and the net waste production is just fission products.

Moiseenko, V. E.; Chernitskiy, S. V.; Agren, O.; Noack, K. [Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center 'Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology', Akademichna St. 1, 61108 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Science Center 'Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology', Akademichna St. 1, 61108 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Uppsala University, Angstroem Laboratory, Division of Electricity, Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

345

Effect of High Reactor Water Zinc on Fuel Performance in Quad Cities 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to reduction in feedwater Fe, reactor water Zn concentrations have been increasing in U.S. boiling water reactors (BWRs). The fuel performance experience base is limited to 8 to 10 ppb, and no fuel surveillance was performed in a plant operated with greater than 12 ppb reactor water Zn. The impact of high reactor water Zn on fuel performance is unknown. However, the change in the trends is large enough to raise a concern, and it requires a confirmation of the fuel performance with fuel ...

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

346

RELAP5 model of the high flux isotope reactor with low enriched fuel thermal flux profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) currently uses highly enriched uranium (HEU) fabricated into involute-shaped fuel plates. It is desired that HFIR be able to use low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel while preserving the current performance capability for its diverse missions in material irradiation studies, isotope production, and the use of neutron beam lines for basic research. Preliminary neutronics and depletion simulations of HFIR with LEU fuel have arrived to feasible fuel loadings that maintain the neutronics performance of the reactor. This article illustrates preliminary models developed for the analysis of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the LEU core to ensure safe operation of the reactor. The beginning of life (BOL) LEU thermal flux profile has been modeled in RELAP5 to facilitate steady state simulation of the core cooling, and of anticipated and unanticipated transients. Steady state results are presented to validate the new thermal power profile inputs. A power ramp, slow depressurization at the outlet, and flow coast down transients are also evaluated. (authors)

Banfield, J.; Mervin, B.; Hart, S.; Ritchie, J.; Walker, S.; Ruggles, A.; Maldonado, G. I. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Tennessee Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996-2300 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

MIXED-OXIDE FUEL USE IN COMMERCIAL LIGHT WATER REACTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a Commission briefing on high-bumup fuel on March 25, 1997, the staff said that they would prepare a white paper on mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in anticipation of a DOE program to bum excess weapons plutonium in commercial reactors. This memorandum and its attachment comprise that paper and are provided to inform the Commissioners of technical issues associated with such a program. More recently, on February 5, 1999, I was contacted by the Nuclear Control Institute regarding a paper they have written on this subject. They presented that paper to the staff in a public meeting on April 7, 1999. The Nuclear Control Institute's written paper had been provided to the staff earlier, and we have taken the paper into consideration in preparing this memorandum. Back-ground In January 1997, the U.S. Department of Energy released a record of decision for the storage and disposition of weapons-usable fissile materials. In this record, DOE recommended that excess weapons-grade plutonium be disposed of by two methods: (1) reconstituting the plutonium into mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel rods and burning it in current light water reactors, and (2) immobilizing the plutonium in glass logs with appropriate radioactive isotopes to deter theft prior to geologic disposal. Based on current information, it now appears that, if the MOX fuel method is utilized, fuel fabrication will take place at the Savannah River site in South Carolina with burning in nearby Westinghouse-type PWRs. Although DOE will probably not receive funding in FY 2000 for developing a license application, Congress has already given its approval for NRC licensing authority over a MOX fuel fabrication facility operated under

United States; William D. Travers

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Computer-Based Model of the MIT Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A description is given of a model of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR) in which both the reactor's neutronic and thermal-hydraulic behaviors are replicated. The purpose of the model is to support control studies and the development of techniques for the automated diagnosis of reactivity transients. In particular, comparison of the model's predictions with actual measurements from the reactor will allow determination of whether the reactor is functioning as expected.

John A. Bernard; Lin-Wen Hu

2000-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

349

Development of a Safeguards Approach for a Small Graphite Moderated Reactor and Associated Fuel Cycle Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Small graphite-moderated and gas-cooled reactors have been around since the beginning of the atomic age. Though their existence in the past has been associated with nuclear weapons programs, they are capable of being used in civilian power programs. The simpler design constraints associated with this type of reactor would make them ideal for developing nations to bolster their electricity generation and help promote a greater standard of living in those nations. However, the same benefits that make this type of reactor desirable also make it suspicious to the international community as a possible means to shorten that state?s nuclear latency. If a safeguards approach could be developed for a fuel cycle featuring one of these reactors, it would ease the tension surrounding their existence and possibly lead to an increased latency through engineered barriers. The development of this safeguards approach follows a six step procedure. First, the fuel cycle was analyzed for the types of facilities found in it and how nuclear material flows between facilities. The goals of the safeguards system were established next, using the normal IAEA standards for the non-detection and false alarm probabilities. The 5 MWe Reactor was modeled for both plutonium production and maximum power capacity. Each facility was analyzed for material throughput and the processes that occur in each facility were researched. Through those processes, diversion pathways were developed to test the proposed safeguards system. Finally, each facility was divided into material balance areas and a traditional nuclear material accountancy system was set up to meet the established safeguards goals for the facility. The DPRK weapons program is a great example of the type of fuel cycle that is the problem. The three major facilities in the fuel cycle, the Fuel Fabrication Facility, the 5 MWe Reactor, and the Radiochemical Laboratory, can achieve the two goals of safeguards using traditional methods. Each facility can be adequately safeguarded using methods and practices that are relatively inexpensive and can obtain material balance periods close to the timeliness limits set forth by the IAEA. The Fuel Fabrication Facility can be safeguarded at both its current needed capacity and its full design capacity using inexpensive measurements. The material balance period needed for both capacities are reasonable. For the 5 MWe reactor, plutonium production is simulated to be 6.7 kg per year and is on the high side of estimates. The Radiochemical Laboratory can also be safeguarded at its current capacity. In fact, the timeliness goal for the facility dictates what the material balance period must be for the chosen set of detectors which make it very reasonable.

Rauch, Eric B.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development (R&D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF)...

351

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of National Research and Development (R&D) Programs Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Hydrogen & Fuel Cells: Review of...

352

Opportunities for the Precision Study of Reactor Antineutrinos at Very Short Baselines at US Research Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: pieter.mumm@nist.gov #12;2 past reactor experiments HFIR, ORNL NBSR, NIST ATR, INL available baselines at US research reactors 3 neutrino fit 3+1 neutrino fit Tuesday, August 7, 12 NIST ILL HFIR ATR SONGSNIST ILL HFIR ATR SONGS 10. 100 1000 core size reactor power reactorpower(MWth) 1meter ILL HFIR NBSR

353

Nuclear breeder reactor fuel element with axial tandem stacking and getter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A breeder reactor fuel element having a tandem arrangement of fissile and fertile fuel with a getter for fission product cesium disposed between the fissile and fertile sections. The getter is effective at reactor operating temperatures to isolate the cesium generated by the fissile material from reacting with the fertile fuel section.

Gibby, Ronald L. (Richland, WA); Lawrence, Leo A. (Kennewick, WA); Woodley, Robert E. (Richland, WA); Wilson, Charles N. (Richland, WA); Weber, Edward T. (Kennewick, WA); Johnson, Carl E. (Elk Grove, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cellulosic Ethanol Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Cellulosic Ethanol Research and Development Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State

355

Neutronic safety parameters and transient analyses for Poland's MARIA research reactor.  

SciTech Connect

Reactor kinetic parameters, reactivity feedback coefficients, and control rod reactivity worths have been calculated for the MARIA Research Reactor (Swierk, Poland) for M6-type fuel assemblies with {sup 235}U enrichments of 80% and 19.7%. Kinetic parameters were evaluated for family-dependent effective delayed neutron fractions, decay constants, and prompt neutron lifetimes and neutron generation times. Reactivity feedback coefficients were determined for fuel Doppler coefficients, coolant (H{sub 2}O) void and temperature coefficients, and for in-core and ex-core beryllium temperature coefficients. Total and differential control rod worths and safety rod worths were calculated for each fuel type. These parameters were used to calculate generic transients for fast and slow reactivity insertions with both HEU and LEU fuels. The analyses show that the HEU and LEU cores have very similar responses to these transients.

Bretscher, M. M.; Hanan, N. A.; Matos, J. E.; Andrzejewski, K.; Kulikowska, T.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

356

RELAP5 Application to Accident Analysis of the NIST Research Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed safety analyses have been performed for the 20 MW D{sub 2}O moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The time-dependent analysis of the primary system is determined with a RELAP5 transient analysis model that includes the reactor vessel, the pump, heat exchanger, fuel element geometry, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. A post-processing of the simulation results has been conducted to evaluate minimum critical heat flux ratio (CHFR) using the Sudo-Kaminaga correlation. Evaluations are performed for the following accidents: (1) the control rod withdrawal startup accident and (2) the maximum reactivity insertion accident. In both cases the RELAP5 results indicate that there is adequate margin to CHF and no damage to the fuel will occur because of sufficient coolant flow through the fuel channels and the negative scram reactivity insertion.

Baek, J.; Cuadra Gascon, A.; Cheng, L.Y.; Diamond, D.

2012-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

357

Fuel plantation research. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research in chemical induction of lightwood is summarized. Four large-scale proof of concept studies have been installed that test five paraquat treatments on a total of 71,228 trees. This wood will be used in actual pulp mill and extraction plant runs to determine oleoresin recovery and possible processing problems. Nearly 3,000 wood samples have been collected to ascertain duration of treatment effects. Results of complementary studies are also reported; most of these are concerned with optimization of paraquat application techniques and the effect of species differences on these methods. A large study was installed to field screen selected insecticides for insect pest control in lightwood operations, and interim results are presented. Dowco 214 (Reldon) proved to be an adequate substitute for BHC and 0.5% concentrations were as effective as 1%. Ten northern and seven western conifer species were tested for their reaction to paraquat treatment. All members of genus Pinus showed appreciable resin soaking but other coniferous genera did not. Feasibility of oleoresin substitution for petrochemicals was investigated.

Stubbs, J.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Short Term Irradiation Test of Fuel Containing Minor Actinides Using the Experimental Fast Reactor Joyo  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mixed oxide containing minor actinides (MA-MOX) fuel irradiation program is being conducted using the experimental fast rector Joyo of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency to research early thermal behavior of MA-MOX fuel. Two irradiation experiments were conducted as part of the short-term phase of this program in May and August 2006. Six prepared fuel pins included MOX fuel containing 3% or 5% americium (Am-MOX), and MOX fuel containing 2% americium and 2% neptunium (Np/Am-MOX). The first test was conducted with high linear heat rates of approximately 430 W/cm maintained during only 10 minutes. After 10 minutes irradiation test, the test subassembly was transferred to the hot cell facility and an Am-MOX pin and a Np/Am-MOX pin were replaced with dummy pins with neutron dosimeters. The test subassembly loaded with the remaining four fuel pins was re-irradiated in Joyo for 24-hours in August 2006 at nearly the same linear power to obtain re-distribution data on MA-MOX fuel. The linear heat rate for each MA-MOX test fuel pin was calculated using the Monte Carlo calculation code MCNP. The calculated fission rates were compared with the measured data based on the Nd-148 method. The maximum linear heat rate was approximately 444{+-}19 W/cm at the actual reactor power of 119.6 MWt. Post irradiation examination of these pins to confirm the absence of fuel melting and the local concentration under irradiation of NpO{sub 2-x} or AmO{sub 2-x}, in the (U,Pu)0{sub 2-x}, fuel are underway. The test results are expected to reduce uncertainties on the margin in the thermal design for MA-MOX fuel. (authors)

Sekine, Takashi; Soga, Tomonori; Koyama, Shin-ichi; Aoyama, Takafumi [Oarai Research and Development Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency. 4002 Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Wootan, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratoy, M/S K8-34, P.O. Box 999 Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort that works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operation of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging

360

An Account of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thirteen Research Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has built and operated 13 nuclear reactors in its 66-year history. The first was the graphite reactor, the world's first operational nuclear reactor, which served as a plutonium production pilot plant during World War II. It was followed by two aqueous-homogeneous reactors and two red-hot molten-salt reactors that were parts of power-reactor development programs and by eight others designed for research and radioisotope production. One of the eight was an all-metal fast burst reactor used for health physics studies. All of the others were light-water cooled and moderated, including the famous swimming-pool reactor that was copied dozens of times around the world. Two of the reactors were hoisted 200 feet into the air to study the shielding needs of proposed nuclear-powered aircraft. The final reactor, and the only one still operating today, is the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that was built particularly for the production of californium and other heavy elements. With the world's highest flux and recent upgrades that include the addition of a cold neutron source, the 44-year-old HFIR continues to be a valuable tool for research and isotope production, attracting some 500 scientific visitors and guests to Oak Ridge each year. This report describes all of the reactors and their histories.

Rosenthal, Murray Wilford [ORNL

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research reactor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - NREL Fuel Cell and Hydrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

codes and standards for buildings, components, systems, and vehicles. NREL's hydrogen and fuel cell research supports the Fuel Cell Technologies Office at the U.S. Department of...

362

Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - Otwock, Poland | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - Otwock, Poland | National Nuclear Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - Otwock, Poland | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Video Gallery > Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - ... Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - Otwock, Poland Maria Research Reactor loaded with LEU - Otwock, Poland

363

Proceedings of the 1988 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The international effort to develop and implement new research reactor fuels utilizing low-enriched uranium, instead of highly- enriched uranium, continues to make solid progress. This effort is the cornerstone of a widely shared policy aimed at reducing, and possibly eliminating, international traffic in highly-enriched uranium and the nuclear weapon proliferation concerns associated with this traffic. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialists in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the eleventh of a series which began 1978. Individual papers presented at the meeting have been cataloged separately.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor | Environmental Restoration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of multiple structures and systems that were necessary to operate and maintain the reactor. The most recognizable features of the complex include the Building 701 officeshigh...

365

RERTR program reduces use of enriched uranium in research reactors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RERTR program reduces use of enriched uranium in research reactors RERTR program reduces use of enriched uranium in research reactors worldwide Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share RERTR program reduces use of enriched uranium in research reactors worldwide The High Flux Reactor in Petten, the Netherlands READY TO CONVERT - The High Flux Reactor in Petten, the Netherlands, has

366

THORIUM BREEDER REACTOR EVALUATION. PART 1. FUEL YIELD AND FUEL CYCLE COSTS IN FIVE THERMAL BREEDERS  

SciTech Connect

The performances of aqueous-homogeneous (AHBR), molten-salt (MSBR), liquid-bismuth (LBBR), gas-cooled graphite-moderated (GGBR), and deuterium- moderated gas-cooled (DGBR) breeder reactors were evaluated in respect to fuel yield, fuel cycle costs, and development status. A net electrical plant capability of 1000 Mwe was selected, and the fuel and fertile streams were processed continuously on-site. The maximum annual fuel yields were 1.5 mills/ kwhr. The minimum estimated fuel cycle costs were 0.9, 0.6, 1.0, 1.2, and 1.3 mills/kwhr at fuel yields of were 0.9, 0.9, 1.5, 1.5, and 1.3 mills/kwhr. Only the AHBR and the MSBR are capable of achieving fuel yields substantially in excess of 4%/yr, and therefore, in view of the uncertainties in nuclear data and efficiencies of processing methods, only these two can be listed with confidence as being able to satisfy the main criterion of the AEC longrange thorium breeder program, viz. a doubling time of 25 years or less. The development effort required to bring the various concepts to the stage where a prototype station could be designed was estimated to be least for the AHBR, somewhat more for the MSBR, and several times as much for the other systems. The AHBR was judged to rank first in regard to nuclear capability, fuel cycle potential, and status of development. (auth)

Alexander, L.G.; Carter, W.L.; Chapman, R.H.; Kinyon, R.W.; Miller, J.W.; Van Winkle, R.

1961-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

367

Nuclear processes in magnetic fusion reactors with polarized fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the processes $d +d \\to n +{^3He}$, $d +{^3He} \\to p +{^4He}$, $d +{^3H} \\to n +{^4He}$, ${^3He} +{^3He}\\to p+p +{^4He}$, ${^3H} +{^3He}\\to d +{^4He}$, with particular attention for applications in fusion reactors. After a model independent parametrization of the spin structure of the matrix elements for these processes at thermal colliding energies, in terms of partial amplitudes, we study polarization phenomena in the framework of a formalism of helicity amplitudes. The strong angular dependence of the final nuclei and of the polarization observables on the polarizations of the fuel components can be helpful in the design of the reactor shielding, blanket arrangement etc..We analyze also the angular dependence of the neutron polarization for the processes $\\vec d +\\vec d \\to n +{^3He}$ and $\\vec d +\\vec {^3H} \\to n +{^4He}$.

Rekalo, M P; Rekalo, Michail P.; Tomasi-Gustafsson, Egle

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Dr. Hussein Khalil at Reactor and Fuel Cycle Technologies Subcommittee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Blue Blue ribbon presentation by Dr. Hussein Khalil Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share Blue ribbon presentation by Hussein Khalil Hussein Khalil Dr. Hussein Khalil during the panel discussion Oct. 21, 2010 On October 12 Hussein Khalil, director of Argonne's Nuclear Engineering Division, participated in a Reactor and Fuel Cycle Technologies

369

Nuclear processes in magnetic fusion reactors with polarized fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the processes $d +d \\to n +{^3He}$, $d +{^3He} \\to p +{^4He}$, $d +{^3H} \\to n +{^4He}$, ${^3He} +{^3He}\\to p+p +{^4He}$, ${^3H} +{^3He}\\to d +{^4He}$, with particular attention for applications in fusion reactors. After a model independent parametrization of the spin structure of the matrix elements for these processes at thermal colliding energies, in terms of partial amplitudes, we study polarization phenomena in the framework of a formalism of helicity amplitudes. The strong angular dependence of the final nuclei and of the polarization observables on the polarizations of the fuel components can be helpful in the design of the reactor shielding, blanket arrangement etc..We analyze also the angular dependence of the neutron polarization for the processes $\\vec d +\\vec d \\to n +{^3He}$ and $\\vec d +\\vec {^3H} \\to n +{^4He}$.

Michail P. Rekalo; Egle Tomasi-Gustafsson

2000-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

370

Computational Fuel Cell Research and SOFC Modeling at Penn State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational Fuel Cell Research and SOFC Modeling at Penn State Chao-Yang Wang Professor of PEM Fuel Cells SOFC Modeling & Simulation Fuel Cell Controls Summary #12;ECEC Overview Vision: provide, DMFC, and SOFC #12;ECEC Facilities (>5,000 sq ft) Fuel Cell/Battery Experimental Labs Fuel Cell

371

Investigation of Freeze-Cast Scaffolds as an Advanced Reactor Fuel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Materials and Fuels for the Current and Advanced Nuclear Reactors II ... A Rate-Theory Approach to Irradiation Damage Modeling with Random ...

372

Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume I.  

SciTech Connect

This report proposes potential research priorities for the Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety-related gaps in available information, data, and models needed to support the licensing of a SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology, accident sequences and initiators, source term characterization, codes and methods, and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this report to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for the SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the Applied Technology designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust Knowledge Management and Preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with Applied Technology and Knowledge Management.

Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory Upton, NY); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.; Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Comprehensive Thermal Hydraulics Research of the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is conducting research on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core will be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during reactor core-accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, perform research and development (R&D) that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: • High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior • High temperature materials qualification • Design methods development and validation • Hydrogen production technologies • Energy conversion. This paper presents current R&D work that addresses fundamental thermal hydraulics issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs.

Chang Oh; Eung Kim; Richard Schultz; Mike Patterson; David Petti; Hyung Kang

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Reactor fuel conversion assistance request. Technical progress report, August 15, 1992--May 14, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the progress that has been made on the preparations required to convert the WSU TRIGA reactor from High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel.

Tripard, G.E.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Reactor fuel conversion assistance request: Technical progress report, August 15, 1992-December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the progress that has been made on the preparations required to convert the WSU TRIGA reactor from High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel.

Tripard, G.E.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

An integrated performance model for high temperature gas cooled reactor coated particle fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of coated fuel particles is essential for the development and deployment of High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) systems for future power generation. Fuel performance modeling is indispensable for understanding ...

Wang, Jing, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Conceptual design of an annular-fueled superheat boiling water reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The conceptual design of an annular-fueled superheat boiling water reactor (ASBWR) is outlined. The proposed design, ASBWR, combines the boiler and superheater regions into one fuel assembly. This ensures good neutron ...

Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Isotope correlation studies relative to high enrichment test reactor fuels  

SciTech Connect

Several correlations of fission product isotopic ratios with atom percent fission and neutron flux, for highly enriched /sup 235/U fuel irradiated in two different water moderated thermal reactors, have been evaluated. In general, excellent correlations were indicated for samples irradiated in the same neutron spectrum; however, significant differences in the correlations were noted with the change in neutron spectrum. For highly enriched /sup 235/U fuel, the correlation of the isotopic ratio /sup 143/Nd//sup 145 +146/Nd with atom percent fission has wider applicability than the other fission product isotopic ratio evaluated. The /sup 137/Cs//sup 135/Cs atom ratio shows promise for correlation with neutron flux. Correlations involving heavy element ratios are very sensitive to the neutron spectrum.

Maeck, W.J.; Tromp, R.L.; Duce, F.A.; Emel, W.A.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Basic Research for the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Basic Research for the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Basic Research for the Hydrogen Fuel Initiative Institution Project Title Category A: Novel Hydrogen Storage Materials Massachusetts Institute of Technology Theory and Modeling of Materials for Hydrogen Storage Washington University In Situ NMR Studies of Hydrogen Storage Systems University of Pennsylvania Chemical Hydrogen Storage in Ionic Liquid Media Colorado School of Mines Molecular Hydrogen Storage in Novel Binary Clathrate Hydrates at Near-Ambient Temperatures and Pressures Georgia Institute of Technology First-Principles Studies of Phase Stability and Reaction Dynamics in Complex Metal Hydrides Louisiana Tech University Understanding the Local Atomic-Level Effect of Dopants In Complex Metal Hydrides Using Synchrotron X-ray Absorption

380

Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) sponsors a program of research, development, and demonstration related to advanced non-light water reactor concepts. A goal of the program is to facilitate greater engagement between DOE and industry. During FY12, DOE established a Technical Review Panel (TRP) process to identify R&D needs for viable advanced reactor concepts in order to inform DOE-NE R&D investment decisions. That process involved the use of a Request for Information (RFI) to solicit concept information from industry and engage technical experts to evaluate those concepts. Having completed this process, DOE desires to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research reactor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity Announcement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) sponsors a program of research, development, and demonstration related to advanced non-light water reactor concepts. A goal of the program is to facilitate greater engagement between DOE and industry. During FY12, DOE established a Technical Review Panel (TRP) process to identify R&D needs for viable advanced reactor concepts in order to inform DOE-NE R&D investment decisions. That process involved the use of a Request for Information (RFI) to solicit concept information from industry and engage technical experts to evaluate those concepts. Having completed this process, DOE desires to

382

Axially staggered seed-blanket reactor fuel module construction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heterogeneous nuclear reactor of the seed-blanket type is provided wher the fissile (seed) and fertile (blanket) nuclear fuels are segregated axially within each fuel element such that fissile and fertile regions occur in an alternating pattern along the length of the fuel element. Further, different axial stacking patterns are used for the fuel elements of at least two module types such that when modules of different types are positioned adjacent to one another, the fertile regions of the modules are offset or staggered. Thus, when a module of one type is surrounded by modules of the second type the fertile regions thereof will be surrounded on all sides by fissile material. This provides enhanced neutron communication both radially and axially, thereby resulting in greater power oscillation stability than other axial arrangements. The arrangements of the fissile and fertile regions in an alternating axial manner minimizes the radial power peaking factors and provides a more optional thermal-hydraulic design than is afforded by radial arrangements.

Cowell, Gary K. (Monroeville, PA); DiGuiseppe, Carl P. (West Mifflin, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

The Nuclear Fuel Industry Research Program Overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This overview introduces the Nuclear Fuel Industry (NFIR) program to member utilities while also serving as a research status update for program participants. It includes detailed descriptions of various projects, relating both the technical backgrounds and the overall scope of work. NFIR program activities are geared toward providing long-term benefits to utilities and vendors by ensuring the safe and reliable use of core materials and components. Specific information can be obtained from published tech...

1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

384

Reactor Physics and Criticality Benchmark Evaluations for Advanced Nuclear Fuel - Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear industry interest in advanced fuel and reactor design often drives towards fuel with uranium enrichments greater than 5 wt% 235U. Unfortunately, little data exists, in the form of reactor physics and criticality benchmarks, for uranium enrichments ranging between 5 and 10 wt% 235U. The primary purpose of this project is to provide benchmarks for fuel similar to what may be required for advanced light water reactors (LWRs). These experiments will ultimately provide additional information for application to the criticality-safety bases for commercial fuel facilities handling greater than 5 wt% 235U fuel.

William Anderson; James Tulenko; Bradley Rearden; Gary Harms

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

385

Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Cell Research and Applications Fuel Cell Research and Applications Jump to: navigation, search Name Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications Place The Woodlands, Texas Zip TX 77381 Product A multi-sponsor research consortium that tests and evaluates commercial and near-commercial fuel cell systems. References Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications is a company located in The Woodlands, Texas . References ↑ "Center for Fuel Cell Research and Applications" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Center_for_Fuel_Cell_Research_and_Applications&oldid=343358

386

Economic Analyiss of "Symbiotic" Light Water Reactor/Fast Burner Reactor Fuel Cycles Proposed as Part of the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spreadsheet-based 'static equilibrium' economic analysis was performed for three nuclear fuel cycle scenarios, each designed for 100 GWe-years of electrical generation annually: (1) a 'once-through' fuel cycle based on 100% LWRs fueled by standard UO2 fuel assemblies with all used fuel destined for geologic repository emplacement, (2) a 'single-tier recycle' scenario involving multiple fast burner reactors (37% of generation) accepting actinides (Pu,Np,Am,Cm) from the reprocessing of used fuel from the uranium-fueled LWR fleet (63% of generation), and (3) a 'two-tier' 'thermal+fast' recycle scenario where co-extracted U,Pu from the reprocessing of used fuel from the uranium-fueled part of the LWR fleet (66% of generation) is recycled once as full-core LWR MOX fuel (8% of generation), with the LWR MOX used fuel being reprocessed and all actinide products from both UO2 and MOX used fuel reprocessing being introduced into the closed fast burner reactor (26% of generation) fuel cycle. The latter two 'closed' fuel cycles, which involve symbiotic use of both thermal and fast reactors, have the advantages of lower natural uranium requirements per kilowatt-hour generated and less geologic repository space per kilowatt-hour as compared to the 'once-through' cycle. The overall fuel cycle cost in terms of $ per megawatt-hr of generation, however, for the closed cycles is 15% (single tier) to 29% (two-tier) higher than for the once-through cycle, based on 'expected values' from an uncertainty analysis using triangular distributions for the unit costs for each required step of the fuel cycle. (The fuel cycle cost does not include the levelized reactor life cycle costs.) Since fuel cycle costs are a relatively small percentage (10 to 20%) of the overall busbar cost (LUEC or 'levelized unit electricity cost') of nuclear power generation, this fuel cycle cost increase should not have a highly deleterious effect on the competitiveness of nuclear power. If the reactor life cycle costs are included in the analysis, with the fast reactors having a higher $/kw(e) capital cost than the LWRs, the overall busbar generation cost ($/MWh) for the closed cycles is approximately 12% higher than for the all-LWR once-through fuel cycle case, again based on the expected values from an uncertainty analysis. It should be noted that such a percentage increase in the cost of nuclear power is much smaller than that expected for fossil fuel electricity generation if CO2 is costed via a carbon tax, cap and trade regimes, or carbon capture and sequestration (CCS).

Williams, Kent Alan [ORNL; Shropshire, David E. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Present Status Of Research Reactor Decommissioning Program In Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

At present, Indonesia has 3 research reactors: MTR-type multipurpose reactor of 30 MW at Serpong site, TRIGA-type research reactor of 1 MW at Bandung site, and small TRIGA - type reactor of 100 kW at Yogyakarta Research Center. The oldest one is the TRIGA reactor at Bandung site, which went critical at 250 kW in 1964, then was operated at maximum of 1000 kW by 1971. The reactor has operated for a total of 35 years. There is no decision for decommissioning this reactor; however, slowly but surely, it will be an object for a near-future decommissioning program. Anticipation of the situation is necessary. For the Indonesian case, early decommissioning strategy for a research reactor and restricted use of the site for another nuclear installation is favorable under high land pricing, availability of radwaste repository, and cost analysis. Graphite from Triga reactor reflector is recommended for direct disposal after conditioning, without volume reduction treatment. Development of human ...

Mulyanto And Gunandjar

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Molten carbonate fuel cell research at ORNL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activities at ORNL during the period July 1976 to February 1977 on the molten carbonate fuel cell program, funded by the ERDA Division of Conservation Research and Technology, are summarized. This period marks the initiation of molten carbonate fuel cell research at ORNL, making use of the extensive background of expertise and facilities in molten salt research. The activities described include a literature survey on molten carbonates, design, acquisition and installation of apparatus for experimental studies of molten carbonates, initial experiments on materials compatibility with molten carbonates, electrolysis experiments for the determination of transference numbers, and theoretical studies of transport behavior and the coupling of mass flows in molten carbonate mixtures. Significant accomplishments were the theoretical prediction of a possibly appreciable change in the alkali ion ratio at molten carbonate fuel cell electrodes, operated at high current densities, as a result of mobility differences of the alkali ions; design, construction and assembly of an electrolysis cell, and initiation of measurements of composition profiles in mixed alkali carbonate electrolytes; initiation of differential scanning calorimetry of pure alkali carbonates for quantitative measurement of transition enthalpies, eventually leading to new, more reliable values of the enthalpies and free energies of formation of the pure and mixed carbonates.

Braunstein, J.; Bronstein, H. R.; Cantor, S.; Heatherly, D.; Vallet, C. E.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

An integrated approach for the verification of fresh mixed oxide fuel (MOX) assemblies at light water reactor MOX recycle reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an integrated approach for the verification of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel assemblies prior to their being loaded into the reactor. There is a coupling of the verification approach that starts at the fuel fabrication plant and stops with the transfer of the assemblies into the thermal reactor. The key measurement points are at the output of the fuel fabrication plant, the receipt at the reactor site, and the storage in the water pool as fresh fuel. The IAEA currently has the capability to measure the MOX fuel assemblies at the output of the fuel fabrication plants using a passive neutron coincidence counting systems of the passive neutron collar (PNCL) type. Also. at the MOX reactor pool, the underwater coincidence counter (UWCC) has been developed to measure the MOX assemblies in the water. The UWCC measurement requires that the fuel assembly be lifted about two meters up in the storage rack to avoid interference from the fuel that is stored in the rack. This paper presents a new method to verify the MOX fuel assemblies that are in the storage rack without the necessity of moving the fuel. The detector system is called the Underwater MOX Verification System (UMVS). The integration and relationship of the three measurements systems is described.

Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lee, Sang - Yoon [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Oxidation of automotive primary reference fuels in a high pressure flow reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Automotive engine knock limits the maximum operating compression ratio and ultimate thermodynamic efficiency of spark-ignition (SI) engines. In compression-ignition (CI) or diesel cycle engines the premixed urn phase, which occurs shortly after injection, determines the time it takes for autoignition to occur. In order to improve engine efficiency and to recommend more efficient, cleaner-burning alternative fuels, we must understand the chemical kinetic processes which lead to autoignition in both SI and CI engines. These engines burn large molecular-weight blended fuels, a class to which the primary reference fuels (PRF), n-heptane and isooctane belong. In this study, experiments were performed under engine-like conditions in a high pressure flow reactor using both the pure PRF fuels and their mixtures in the temperature range 550-880 K and at 12.5 atm pressure. These experiments not only provide information on the reactivity of each fuel but also identify the major intermediate products formed during the oxidation process. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is used to simulate these experiments and comparisons of experimentally measures and model predicted profiles for O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and temperature rise are presented. Intermediates identified in the flow reactor are compared with those present in the computations, and the kinetic pathways leading to their formation are discussed. In addition, autoignition delay times measured in a shock tube over the temperature range 690- 1220 K and at 40 atm pressure were simulated. Good agreement between experiment and simulation was obtained for both the pure fuels and their mixtures. Finally, quantitative values of major intermediates measured in the exhaust gas of a cooperative fuels research engine operating under motored engine conditions are presented together with those predicted by the detailed method.

Curran, H.J.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Callahan, C.V.; Dryer, F.L. [Princeton Univ., Areospace Engineering. NJ (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

A compact breed and burn fast reactor using spent nuclear fuel blanket  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long-life breed-and-burn (B and B) type fast reactor has been investigated from the neutronics points of view. The B and B reactor has the capability to breed the fissile fuels and use the bred fuel in situ in the same reactor. In this work, feasibility of a compact sodium-cooled B and B fast reactor using spent nuclear fuel as blanket material has been studied. In order to derive a compact B and B fast reactor, a tight fuel lattice and relatively large fuel pin are used to achieve high fuel volume fraction. The core is initially loaded with an LEU (Low Enriched Uranium) fuel and a metallic fuel is used in the core. The Monte Carlo depletion has been performed for the core to see the long-term behavior of the B and B reactor. Several important parameters such as reactivity coefficients, delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron generation lifetime, fission power, and fast neutron fluence, are analyzed through Monte Carlo reactor analysis. Evolution of the core fuel composition is also analyzed as a function of burnup. Although the long-life small B and B fast reactor is found to be feasible from the neutronics point of view, it is characterized to have several challenging technical issues including a very high fast neutron fluence of the structural materials. (authors)

Hartanto, D.; Kim, Y. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology KAIST, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon, 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR).  

SciTech Connect

A neutronic feasibility study for converting the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with Brookhaven National Laboratory. Two possible LEU cores were identified that would provide nearly the same neutron flux and spectrum as the present HEU core at irradiation facilities that are used for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy and for animal research. One core has 17 and the other has 18 LEU MTR-type fuel assemblies with uranium densities of 2.5g U/cm{sup 3} or less in the fuel meat. This LEU fuel is fully-qualified for routine use. Thermal hydraulics and safety analyses need to be performed to complete the feasibility study.

Hanan, N. A.

1998-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

393

Hydrogen and fuel cell research | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen and fuel cell research Hydrogen and fuel cell research Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Hydrogen and fuel cell research Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Resource Type: Website Website: www.nrel.gov/hydrogen/proj_fc_bus_eval.html This webside contributes to the growing role that advanced technologies play in addressing the nation's energy challenges. Their projects focus on hydrogen production, delivery, and storage; fuel cells; technology validation; safety, codes, and standards; analysis; education; and manufacturing. References Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hydrogen_and_fuel_cell_research&oldid=515025" Categories: Transportation Toolkits

394

NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF U10MO MONOLITHIC MINIPLATES FOR RESEARCH AND TEST REACTORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents assessment of the mechanical behavior of U-10wt% Mo (U10Mo) alloy based monolithic fuel plates subject to irradiation. Monolithic, plate-type fuel is a new fuel form being developed for research and test reactors to achieve higher uranium densities within the reactor core to allow the use of low-enriched uranium fuel in high-performance reactors. Identification of the stress/strain characteristics is important for understanding the in-reactor performance of these plate-type fuels. For this work, three distinct cases were considered: (1) fabrication induced residual stresses (2) thermal cycling of fabricated plates; and finally (3) transient mechanical behavior under actual operating conditions. Because the temperatures approach the melting temperature of the cladding during the fabrication and thermal cycling, high temperature material properties were incorporated to improve the accuracy. Once residual stress fields due to fabrication process were identified, solution was used as initial state for the subsequent simulations. For thermal cycling simulation, elasto-plastic material model with thermal creep was constructed and residual stresses caused by the fabrication process were included. For in-service simulation, coupled fluid-thermal-structural interaction was considered. First, temperature field on the plates was calculated and this field was used to compute the thermal stresses. For time dependent mechanical behavior, thermal creep of cladding, volumetric swelling and fission induced creep of the fuel foil were considered. The analysis showed that the stresses evolve very rapidly in the reactor. While swelling of the foil increases the stress of the foil, irradiation induced creep causes stress relaxation.

Hakan Ozaltun & Herman Shen

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Maximum Fuel Utilization in Advanced Fast Reactors without Actinides Separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wood, Completely automated nuclear reactors for long- termhandbook: Nuclear physics and reactor theory. 1993. (121 p).The analysis of any nuclear reactor system is closely

Heidet, Florent

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Fuel Cell System Contaminants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell System Contaminants Material Screening Data NREL designed this interactive material selector tool to help fuel cell developers and material suppliers explore the results...

397

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Manufacturing Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Manufacturing Research and Development The Fuel Cell Technologies Office's manufacturing research and development (R&D) activity improves processes and reduces the cost of...

398

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Preface Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan Page i Preface The Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan (MYRD&D...

399

Engineering activities at the MIT research reactor in support of power reactor technology  

SciTech Connect

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) research reactor (MITR-II) is a 5-MW(thermal) light-water-cooled and-moderated reactor (LWR) with in-core neutron and gamma dose rates that closely approximate those in current LWRs. Compact in-pile loops that simulate pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) thermal hydraulics and coolant chemistry have been designed for installation in the MITR-II. A PWR loop has been completed and is currently operating in the reactor. A BWR loop is under construction, and an in-pile facility for irradiation-assisted stress corrosion crack (IASCC) testing is being designed. Another major area of research and on-line testing is the closed-loop, nonlinear, digital control of various reactor parameters, including the power level, temperature, and net energy production.

Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A.; Driscoll, M.J.; Kohse, G.E.; Ballinger, R.G.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Spatially Resolved Strain Fields in Nuclear Fuel Plates Determined ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The U.S. Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program converts research reactors which utilize highly enriched uranium fuel to  ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research reactor fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the IR-8 research reactor.  

SciTech Connect

Equilibrium fuel cycle comparisons for the IR-8 research reactor were made for HEU(90%), HEU(36%), and LEU (19.75%) fuel assembly (FA) designs using three dimensional multi-group diffusion theory models benchmarked to detailed Monte Carlo models of the reactor. Comparisons were made of changes in reactivity, cycle length, average {sup 235}U discharge burnup, thermal neutron flux, and control rod worths for the 90% and 36% enriched IRT-3M fuel assembly and the 19.75% enriched IRT-4M fuel assembly with the same fuel management strategy. The results of these comparisons showed that a uranium density of 3.5 g/cm{sup 3} in the fuel meat would be required in the LEU IRT-4M fuel assembly to match the cycle length of the HEU(90%) IRT-3M FA and an LEU density of 3.7 g/cm{sup 3} is needed to match the cycle length of the HEU(36%) IRT-3M FA.

Deen, J. R.

1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

402

Powder Metallurgy of Uranium Alloy Fuels for TRU-Burning Reactors Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Overview Fast reactors were evaluated to enable the transmutation of transuranic isotopes generated by nuclear energy systems. The motivation for this was that TRU isotopes have high radiotoxicity and relatively long half-lives, making them unattractive for disposal in a long-term geologic repository. Fast reactors provide an efficient means to utilize the energy content of the TRUs while destroying them. An enabling technology that requires research and development is the fabrication metallic fuel containing TRU isotopes using powder metallurgy methods. This project focused upon developing a powder metallurgical fabrication method to produce U-Zr-transuranic (TRU) alloys at relatively low processing temperatures (500ºC to 600ºC) using either hot extrusion or alpha-phase sintering for charecterization. Researchers quantified the fundamental aspects of both processing methods using surrogate metals to simulate the TRU elements. The process produced novel solutions to some of the issues relating to metallic fuels, such as fuel-cladding chemical interactions, fuel swelling, volatility losses during casting, and casting mold material losses. Workscope There were two primary tasks associated with this project: 1. Hot working fabrication using mechanical alloying and extrusion • Design, fabricate, and assemble extrusion equipment • Extrusion database on DU metal • Extrusion database on U-10Zr alloys • Extrusion database on U-20xx-10Zr alloys • Evaluation and testing of tube sheath metals 2. Low-temperature sintering of U alloys • Design, fabricate, and assemble equipment • Sintering database on DU metal • Sintering database on U-10Zr alloys • Liquid assisted phase sintering on U-20xx-10Zr alloys Appendices Outline Appendix A contains a Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D) poster and contact presentation where TAMU made primary contributions. Appendix B contains MSNE theses and final defense presentations by David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich outlining the beginning of the materials processing setup. Also included within this section is a thesis proposal by Jeff Hausaman. Appendix C contains the public papers and presentations introduced at the 2010 American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting. Appendix A—MSNE theses of David Garnetti and Grant Helmreich and proposal by Jeff Hausaman A.1 December 2009 Thesis by David Garnetti entitled “Uranium Powder Production Via Hydride Formation and Alpha Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications” A.2 September 2009 Presentation by David Garnetti (same title as document in Appendix B.1) A.3 December 2010 Thesis by Grant Helmreich entitled “Characterization of Alpha-Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Applications” A.4 October 2010 Presentation by Grant Helmreich (same title as document in Appendix B.3) A.5 Thesis Proposal by Jeffrey Hausaman entitled “Hot Extrusion of Alpha Phase Uranium-Zirconium Alloys for TRU Burning Fast Reactors” Appendix B—External presentations introduced at the 2010 ANS Winter Meeting B.1 J.S. Hausaman, D.J. Garnetti, and S.M. McDeavitt, “Powder Metallurgy of Alpha Phase Uranium Alloys for TRU Burning Fast Reactors,” Proceedings of 2010 ANS Winter Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, November 7-10, 2010 B.2 PowerPoint Presentation Slides from C.1 B.3 G.W. Helmreich, W.J. Sames, D.J. Garnetti, and S.M. McDeavitt, “Uranium Powder Production Using a Hydride-Dehydride Process,” Proceedings of 2010 ANS Winter Meeting, Las Vegas, Nevada, USA, November 7-10, 2010 B.4. PowerPoint Presentation Slides from C.3 B.5 Poster Presentation from C.3 Appendix C—Fuel cycle research and development undergraduate materials and poster presentation C.1 Poster entitled “Characterization of Alpha-Phase Sintering of Uranium and Uranium-Zirconium Alloys” presented at the Fuel Cycle Technologies Program Annual Meeting C.2 April 2011 Honors Undergraduate Thesis by William Sames, Research Fellow, entitled “Uranium Metal Powder Production, Particle Dis

Sean M. McDeavitt

2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

403

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Search More Search Options Site Map NREL's Energy Storage Project is leading the charge on battery thermal management, modeling, and systems solutions to enhance the performance of fuel cell, hybrid electric, and electric vehicles (FCVs, HEVs, and EVs) for a cleaner, more secure transportation future. NREL's experts work closely with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), industry, and automotive manufacturers to improve energy storage devices, such as battery modules and ultracapacitors, by enhancing their thermal performance and life-cycle cost. Activities also involve modeling and simulation to evaluate technical targets and energy storage parameters, and investigating combinations of energy storage systems to increase vehicle efficiency. Much of this research is conducted at our state-of-the-art energy storage

404

Fuel qualification issues and strategies for reactor-based surplus plutonium disposition  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed irradiation of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in existing commercial reactors as a disposition method for surplus plutonium from the weapons program. The burning of MOX fuel in reactors is supported by an extensive technology base; however, the infrastructure required to implement reactor-based plutonium disposition does not exist domestically. This report identifies and examines the actions required to qualify and license weapons-grade (WG) plutonium-based MOX fuels for use in domestic commercial light-water reactors (LWRs).

Cowell, B.S.; Copeland, G.L.; Moses, D.L.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Fuel Combustion Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Combustion Lab Fuel Combustion Lab NREL's Fuel Combustion Laboratory focuses on characterizing fuels at the molecular level. This information can then be used to understand and predict the fuel's effect on engine performance and emissions. By understanding the effects of fuel chemistry on ignition we can develop fuels that enable more efficient engine designs, using both today's technology and future advanced combustion concepts. This lab supports the distributed Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Laboratory, and the Biofuels activity. Photo of assembled IQT. Ignition Quality Tester The central piece of equipment in the Fuel Combustion Laboratory is the Ignition Quality Tester (IQT(tm)). The IQT(tm) is a constant volume combustion vessel that is used to study ignition properties of liquid

406

Assessment of Startup Fuel Options for the GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR)  

SciTech Connect

The Global Nuclear Energy Program (GNEP) includes a program element for the development and construction of an advanced sodium cooled fast reactor to demonstrate the burning (transmutation) of significant quantities of minor actinides obtained from a separations process and fabricated into a transuranic bearing fuel assembly. To demonstrate and qualify transuranic (TRU) fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype is needed. The ABR would necessarily be started up using conventional metal alloy or oxide (U or U, Pu) fuel. Startup fuel is needed for the ABR for the first 2 to 4 core loads of fuel in the ABR. Following start up, a series of advanced TRU bearing fuel assemblies will be irradiated in qualification lead test assemblies in the ABR. There are multiple options for this startup fuel. This report provides a description of the possible startup fuel options as well as possible fabrication alternatives available to the program in the current domestic and international facilities and infrastructure.

Jon Carmack (062056); Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu (103171); David Alberstein

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Automated startup of the MIT research reactor  

SciTech Connect

This summary describes the development, implementation, and testing of a generic method for performing automated startups of nuclear reactors described by space-independent kinetics under conditions of closed-loop digital control. The technique entails first obtaining a reliable estimate of the reactor's initial degree of subcriticality and then substituting that estimate into a model-based control law so as to permit a power increase from subcritical on a demanded trajectory. The estimation of subcriticality is accomplished by application of the perturbed reactivity method. The shutdown reactor is perturbed by the insertion of reactivity at a known rate. Observation of the resulting period permits determination of the initial degree of subcriticality. A major advantage to this method is that repeated estimates are obtained of the same quantity. Hence, statistical methods can be applied to improve the quality of the calculation.

Kwok, K.S. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Energy Research Project Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Advanced Energy Advanced Energy Research Project Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Energy Research Project Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Energy Research Project Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Energy Research Project Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Energy Research Project Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Energy Research Project Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Advanced Energy Research Project Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Advanced Energy Research Project Grants The Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) was established

409

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Research and Vehicle Research and Development Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Research and Development Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Vehicle Research and Development Grants The Indiana Economic Development Corporation (IDEC) administers the Indiana

410

Radiation Shielding Analysis for Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors (DUPIC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a part of the compatibility analysis of DUPIC fuel in Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors, the radiation physics calculations have been performed for the CANDU primary shielding system, which was originally designed for natural uranium core. At first, the conventional CANDU primary shield analysis method was validated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B in order to assess the current analysis code system and the cross-section data. The computational benchmark calculation was performed for the CANDU end shield system, which has shown that the conventional method produces results consistent with the reference calculations as far as the total dose rate and total heat deposition rate are concerned. Second, the primary shield system analysis was performed for the DUPIC fuel core based on the power distribution obtained from the time-average core model, and the results have shown that the dose rates and heat deposition rates through the primary shield of the DUPIC fuel core are not much different from those of the natural uranium core because the power levels on the core periphery are similar for both cores. This study has shown that the current primary shield system is adaptable for the DUPIC fuel CANDU core without design modification.

Roh, Gyuhong; Choi, Hangbok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (OFCT) has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development (R&D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high level nuclear waste (HLW). The Mission of the UFDC is To identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The U.S. has, for the past twenty-plus years, focused efforts on disposing

412

Transuranic material recovery in the Integral Fast Reactor fuel cycle demonstration  

SciTech Connect

The Integral Fast Reactor is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept that is being developed by Argonne National Laboratory. It takes advantage of the properties of metallic fuel and liquid metal cooling to offer significant improvements in reactor safety, operation, fuel cycle economics, environmental protection, and safeguards. The plans for demonstrating the IFR fuel cycle, including its waste processing options, by processing irradiated fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II fuel in its associated Fuel Cycle Facility have been developed for the first refining series. This series has been designed to provide the data needed for the further development of the IFR program. An important piece of the data needed is the recovery of TRU material during the reprocessing and waste operations.

Benedict, R.W.; Goff, K.M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Fast Reactor Spent Fuel Processing: Experience and Criticality Safety  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses operational and criticality safety experience associated with the Idaho National Laboratory Fuel Conditioning Facility which uses a pyrometallurgical process to treat spent fast reactor metallic fuel. The process is conducted in an inert atmosphere hot cell. The process starts with chopping metallic fuel elements into a basket. The basket is lowered into molten salt (LiCl-KCl) along with a steel mandrel. Active metal fission products, transuranic metals and sodium metal in the spent fuel undergo chemical oxidation and form chlorides. Voltage is applied between the basket, which serves as an anode, and the mandrel, which serves as a cathode, causing metallic uranium in the spent fuel to undergo electro-chemical oxidation thereby forming uranium chloride. Simultaneously at the cathode, uranium chloride undergoes electro-chemical reduction and deposits uranium metal onto the mandrel. The uranium metal and accompanying entrained salt are placed in a distillation furnace where the uranium melts forming an ingot and the entrained salt boils and subsequently condenses in a separate crucible. The uranium ingots are placed in long term storage. During the ten year operating history, over one hundred criticality safety evaluations were prepared. All criticality safety related limits and controls for the entire process are contained in a single document which required over thirty revisions to accommodate the process changes. Operational implementation of the limits and controls includes use of a near real-time computerized tracking system. The tracking system uses an Oracle database coupled with numerous software applications. The computerized tracking system includes direct fuel handler interaction with every movement of material. Improvements to this system during the ten year history include introduction of web based operator interaction, tracking of moderator materials and the development of a plethora database queries to assist in day to day operations as well as obtaining historical information. Over 12,000 driver fuel elements have been processed resulting in the production of 2500 kg of 20% enriched uranium. Also, over one thousand blanket fuel elements have been processed resulting in the production of 2400 kg of depleted uranium. These operations required over 35,000 fissile material transfers between zones and over 6000 transfers between containers. Throughout all of these movements, no mass limit violations occurred. Numerous lessons were learned over the ten year operating history. From a criticality safety perspective, the most important lesson learned was the involvement of a criticality safety practitioner in daily operations. A criticality safety engineer was assigned directly to facility operations, and was responsible for implementation of limits and controls including upkeep of the associated computerized tracking files. The criticality safety engineer was also responsible for conducting fuel handler training activities including serving on fuel handler qualification oral boards, and continually assessing operations from a criticality control perspective. The criticality safety engineer also attended bimonthly project planning meetings to identify upcoming process changes that would require criticality safety evaluation. Finally, the excellent criticality safety record was due in no small part to the continual support, involvement, trust, and confidence of project and operations mana

Chad Pope

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

On the Criticality Safety of Transuranic Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Transport Casks  

SciTech Connect

This work addresses the neutronic performance and criticality safety issues of transport casks for fuel pertaining to low conversion ratio sodium cooled fast reactors, conventionally known as Advanced Burner Reactors. The criticality of a one, three, seven and 19-assembly cask capacity is presented. Both dry “helium” and flooded “water” filled casks are considered. No credit for fuel burnup or fission products was assumed. As many as possible of the conservatisms used in licensing light water reactor universal transport casks were incorporated into this SFR cask criticality design and analysis. It was found that at 7-assemblies or more, adding moderator to the SFR cask increases criticality margin. Also, removal of MAs from the fuel increases criticality margin of dry casks and takes a slight amount of margin away for wet casks. Assuming credit for borated fuel tube liners, this design analysis suggests that as many as 19 assemblies can be loaded in a cask if limited purely by criticality safety. If no credit for boron is assumed, the cask could possibly hold seven assemblies if low conversion ratio fast reactor grade fuel and not breeder reactor grade fuel is assumed. The analysis showed that there is a need for new cask designs for fast reactors spent fuel transportation. There is a potential of modifying existing transportation cask design as the starting point for fast reactor spent fuel transportation.

Samuel Bays; Ayodeji Alajo

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Education and Research Program  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Propane Education and Propane Education and Research Program to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Education and Research Program on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Education and Research Program on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Education and Research Program on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Education and Research Program on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Education and Research Program on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Propane Education and Research Program on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Propane Education and Research Program The State Liquefied Compressed Gas Board (Board), operated through the

416

Argonne's pyroprocessing and advanced reactor research featured on WGN  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne's pyroprocessing and advanced reactor research featured on WGN Argonne's pyroprocessing and advanced reactor research featured on WGN radio Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Highlights Bookmark and Share Argonne's pyroprocessing and advanced reactor research featured on WGN radio Uranium dendrites These tiny branches, or "dendrites," of pure uranium form when engineers

417

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the cost and increasing the performance of fuel cell propulsion systems, and most major vehicle manufacturers are geared to launch fuel cell electric vehicles in the U.S. market...

418

Engines - Fuel Injection and Spray Research - Alternative Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sprays Alternative fuel sprays Non-petroleum fuels are gaining popularity in the U.S. Ethanol is being blended with gasoline in varying proportions, and biodiesel is being sold at...

419

Incorporation of Hydride Nuclear Fuels in Commercial Light Water Reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experience in the nuclear fuels field. I am also extremelyreactor core components, nuclear fuel-element design hasreactors, commercial nuclear fuel still consists of uranium

Terrani, Kurt Amir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

FUEL CYCLE COSTS IN A GRAPHITE MODERATED SLIGHTLY ENRICHED FUSED SALT REACTOR  

SciTech Connect

A fuel cycle economic study has been made for a 315Mwe graphite- moderated slightly enriched fused-salt reactor. Fuel cycle costs of less than 1.5 mills may be possible for such reactors operating on a ten-year cycle even when the fuel is discarded at the end of the cycle. Recovery of the uranium and plutonium at the end of the cycle reduces the fuel cycle costs to approximates 1 mill/kwh. Changes in the waste storage cost, reprocessing cost or salt inventory have a relatively minor effect on fuel cycle costs. (auth)

Guthrie, C.E.

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Nuclear reactor and materials science research: Final technical report, May 1, 1985-September 30, 1986. [Academic and research utilization of reactor  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the 17-month period of the grant, May 1, 1985 - September 30, 1986, the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) was operated in support of research and academic programs in the physical and life sciences and in related engineering fields. The period encompassed MIT's fiscal year utilization of the reactor during that period may be classified as follows: neutron beam tube research, nuclear materials research and development, radiochemistry and trace analysis, nuclear medicine, radiation health physics, computer control of reactors, dose reduction in nuclear power reactors, reactor irradiations and services for groups outside MIT, and MIT research reactor. This paper provides detailed information on this research academic utilization.

Harling, O.K.

1987-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

422

Failure Root Cause of PCI Suspect Fuel Rods from Kernkraftwerk Leibstadt (KKL) Reactor: Part 2: PIE of Failed and Sibling Sound Rods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers can best determine in-reactor fuel behavior by performing detailed post irradiation examinations (PIE) of carefully selected fuel rods. By applying PIE techniques to failed and sibling sound rods, they can often determine the failure mechanism or root cause. Similarly, they can obtain critical performance-limiting data by PIE of sound high burn-up fuel rods. The investigations and results detailed in this report achieve both of these goals.

2000-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Research and Development to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Research and Development on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles Medium-Duty Vehicles Light-Duty Vehicles School Buses Laws & Incentives

424

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Request to Report Research on Second  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Request to Report Request to Report Research on Second Generation Biofuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Request to Report Research on Second Generation Biofuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Request to Report Research on Second Generation Biofuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Request to Report Research on Second Generation Biofuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Request to Report Research on Second Generation Biofuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Request to Report Research on Second Generation Biofuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Request to Report Research on Second Generation Biofuels on AddThis.com... More in this section...