Sample records for research reactor conversion

  1. Friction pressure drop measurements and flow distribution analysis for LEU conversion study of MIT Research Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Susanna Yuen-Ting

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MIT Nuclear Research Reactor (MITR) is the only research reactor in the United States that utilizes plate-type fuel elements with longitudinal fins to augment heat transfer. Recent studies on the conversion to low-enriched ...

  2. Reactor core design and modeling of the MIT research reactor for conversion to LEU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newton, Thomas H. Jr. [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 138 Albany St., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Olson, Arne P.; Stillman, John A. [RERTR Program, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Feasibility design studies for conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR) to LEU are described. Because the reactor fuel has a rhombic cross section, a special input processor was created in order to model the reactor in great detail with the REBUS-PC diffusion theory code, in 3D (triangular-z) geometry. Comparisons are made of fuel assembly power distributions and control blade worth vs. axial position, between REBUS-PC results and Monte Carlo predictions from the MCNP code. Results for the original HEU core at zero burnup are also compared with measurement. These two analysis methods showed remarkable agreement. Ongoing fuel cycle studies are summarized. A status report will be given as to results thus far that affect key design decisions. Future work plans and schedules to achieve completion of the conversion are presented. (author)

  3. A Review of Previous Research in Direct Energy Conversion Fission Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUONG,HENRY; POLANSKY,GARY F.; SANDERS,THOMAS L.; SIEGEL,MALCOLM D.

    1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    From the earliest days of power reactor development, direct energy conversion was an obvious choice to produce high efficiency electric power generation. Directly capturing the energy of the fission fragments produced during nuclear fission avoids the intermediate conversion to thermal energy and the efficiency limitations of classical thermodynamics. Efficiencies of more than 80% are possible, independent of operational temperature. Direct energy conversion fission reactors would possess a number of unique characteristics that would make them very attractive for commercial power generation. These reactors would be modular in design with integral power conversion and operate at low pressures and temperatures. They would operate at high efficiency and produce power well suited for long distance transmission. They would feature large safety margins and passively safe design. Ideally suited to production by advanced manufacturing techniques, direct energy conversion fission reactors could be produced more economically than conventional reactor designs. The history of direct energy conversion can be considered as dating back to 1913 when Moseleyl demonstrated that charged particle emission could be used to buildup a voltage. Soon after the successful operation of a nuclear reactor, E.P. Wigner suggested the use of fission fragments for direct energy conversion. Over a decade after Wigner's suggestion, the first theoretical treatment of the conversion of fission fragment kinetic energy into electrical potential appeared in the literature. Over the ten years that followed, a number of researchers investigated various aspects of fission fragment direct energy conversion. Experiments were performed that validated the basic physics of the concept, but a variety of technical challenges limited the efficiencies that were achieved. Most research in direct energy conversion ceased in the US by the late 1960s. Sporadic interest in the concept appears in the literature until this day, but there have been no recent significant programs to develop the technology.

  4. Thermal hydraulic limits analysis for the MIT Research Reactor low enrichment uranium core conversion using statistical propagation of parametric uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiang, Keng-Yen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is evaluating the conversion from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel. In addition to the fuel element re-design from 15 to 18 plates per element, a reactor ...

  5. Neutronic calculations for the conversion to LEU of a research reactor core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varvayanni, M.; Catsaros, N.; Stakakis, E. [National Center for Scientific Research 'DEMOKRITOS', 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Grigoriadis, D. [National Center for Scientific Research 'DEMOKRITOS', 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Cyprus, P.O. Box 20537, Nicosia 1678 (Cyprus)

    2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For a five-year transitional period the Greek Research Reactor (GRR-1) was operating with a mixed core, containing both Low Enrichment (LEU) and High Enrichment (HEU) Uranium MTR- type fuel assemblies. The neutronic study of the GRR-1 conversion to LEU has been performed using a code system comprising the core-analysis code CITATION-LDI2 and the cell-calculation modules XSDRNPM and NITAWL-II of the SCALE code. A conceptual LEU core configuration was defined and analyzed with respect to the three dimensional multi-group neutron fluxes, the power distribution, the control-rod worth and the compliance with pre-defined Operation Limiting Conditions. Perturbation calculations and reactivity feedback computations were also carried out to provide input to a subsequent thermal-hydraulic study. (author)

  6. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Purdue University Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Hewit

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at Purdue University Reactor. With this work completed and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, the INL convened and engaged the project participants in a structured discussion to capture the lessons learned. The lessons learned process has allowed us to capture gaps, opportunities, and good practices, drawing from the project team’s experiences. These lessons will be used to raise the standard of excellence, effectiveness, and efficiency in all future conversion projects.

  7. Accident Analysis for the NIST Research Reactor Before and After Fuel Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek J.; Diamond D.; Cuadra, A.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.R.

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Postulated accidents have been analyzed for the 20 MW D2O-moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The analysis has been carried out for the present core, which contains high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel and for a proposed equilibrium core with low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses employ state-of-the-art calculational methods. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo neutron transport calculations were performed with the MCNPX code to determine homogenized fuel compositions in the lower and upper halves of each fuel element and to determine the resulting neutronic properties of the core. The accident analysis employed a model of the primary loop with the RELAP5 code. The model includes the primary pumps, shutdown pumps outlet valves, heat exchanger, fuel elements, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. Evaluations were performed for the following accidents: (1) control rod withdrawal startup accident, (2) maximum reactivity insertion accident, (3) loss-of-flow accident resulting from loss of electrical power with an assumption of failure of shutdown cooling pumps, (4) loss-of-flow accident resulting from a primary pump seizure, and (5) loss-of-flow accident resulting from inadvertent throttling of a flow control valve. In addition, natural circulation cooling at low power operation was analyzed. The analysis shows that the conversion will not lead to significant changes in the safety analysis and the calculated minimum critical heat flux ratio and maximum clad temperature assure that there is adequate margin to fuel failure.

  8. Expanding and optimizing fuel management and data analysis capabilities of MCODE-FM in support of MIT research reactor (MITR-II) LEU conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horelik, Nicholas E. (Nicholas Edward)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies are underway in support of the MIT research reactor (MITR-II) conversion from high enriched Uranium (HEU) to low enriched Uranium (LEU), as required by recent non-proliferation policy. With the same core configuration ...

  9. Neutronic safety and transient analyses for potential LEU conversion of the IR-8 research reactor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deen, J. R.; Hanan, N. A.; Smith, R. S.; Matos, J. E.; Egorenkov, P. M.; Nasonov, V. A.

    1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetic parameters, isothermal reactivity feedback coefficients and three transients for the IR-8 research reactor cores loaded with either HEU(90%), HEU(36%), or LEU (19.75%) fuel assemblies (FA) were calculated using three dimensional diffusion theory flux solutions, RELAP5/MOD3.2 and PARET. The prompt neutron generation time and effective delayed neutron fractions were calculated for fresh and beginning-of-equilibrium-cycle cores. Isothermal reactivity feedback coefficients were calculated for changes in coolant density, coolant temperature and fuel temperature in fresh and equilibrium cores. These kinetic parameters and reactivity coefficients were used in transient analysis models to predict power histories, and peak fuel, clad and coolant temperatures. The transients modeled were a rapid and slow loss-of-flow, a slow reactivity insertion, and a fast reactivity insertion.

  10. Thermal hydraulics analysis of the MIT research reactor in support of a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Yu-Chih, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MIT research reactor (MITR) is converting from the existing high enrichment uranium (HEU) core to a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core using a high-density monolithic UMo fuel. The design of an optimum LEU core for the ...

  11. Conversion and Evaluation of the University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor From High-Enriched To Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leo M. Bobek

    2003-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The process for converting the University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor (UMLRR) from high-enrichment uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel began in 1988. Several years of design reviews, computational modeling, and thermal hydraulic analyses resulted in a preliminary reference core design and configuration based on 20 standard, MTR-type, flat-plate, 19.75% enriched, uranium silicide (u3Si2) fuel elements. A final safety analysis for the fuel conversion was submitted to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in 1993. The NRC made two additional requests for additional information and supplements were submitted in 1994 and 1997. The new UMLRR Reactor Supervisor initiated an effort to change the LEU reference core configuration to eliminate a complicated control rod modification needed for the smaller core.

  12. Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neil Todreas; Pavel Hejzlar

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Conceptual designs of lead-cooled and liquid salt-cooled fast flexible conversion ratio reactors were developed. Both concepts have cores reated at 2400 MWt placed in a large-pool-type vessel with dual-free level, which also contains four intermediate heat exchanges coupling a primary coolant to a compact and efficient supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle power conversion system. Decay heat is removed passively using an enhanced Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System and a Passive Secondary Auxiliary Cooling System. The most important findings were that (1) it is feasible to design the lead-cooled and salt-cooled reactor with the flexible conversion ratio (CR) in the range of CR=0 and CR=1 n a manner that achieves inherent reactor shutdown in unprotected accidents, (2) the salt-cooled reactor requires Lithium thermal Expansion Modules to overcme the inherent salt coolant's large positive coolant temperature reactivity coefficient, (3) the preferable salt for fast spectrum high power density cores is NaCl-Kcl-MgCl2 as opposed to fluoride salts due to its better themal-hydraulic and neutronic characteristics, and (4) both reactor, but attain power density 3 times smaller than that of the sodium-cooled reactor.

  13. Cross section generation strategy for high conversion light water reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herman, Bryan R. (Bryan Robert)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High conversion water reactors (HCWR), such as the Resource-renewable Boiling Water Reactor (RBWR), are being designed with axial heterogeneity of alternating fissile and blanket zones to achieve a conversion ratio of ...

  14. Developing fuel management capabilities based on coupled Monte Carlo depletion in support of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR) conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, Paul K. (Paul Kollath)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pursuant to a 1986 NRC ruling, the MIT Reactor (MITR) is planning on converting from the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) for fuel. Prior studies have shown that the MITR will be able to ...

  15. Implications of Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretically, the transuranic conversion ratio (CR), i.e. the transuranic production divided by transuranic destruction, in a fast reactor can range from near zero to about 1.9, which is the average neutron yield from Pu239 minus 1. In practice, the possible range will be somewhat less. We have studied the implications of transuranic conversion ratio of 0.0 to 1.7 using the fresh and discharge fuel compositions calculated elsewhere. The corresponding fissile breeding ratio ranges from 0.2 to 1.6. The cases below CR=1 (“burners”) do not have blankets; the cases above CR=1 (“breeders”) have breeding blankets. The burnup was allowed to float while holding the maximum fluence to the cladding constant. We graph the fuel burnup and composition change. As a function of transuranic conversion ratio, we calculate and graph the heat, gamma, and neutron emission of fresh fuel; whether the material is “attractive” for direct weapon use using published criteria; the uranium utilization and rate of consumption of natural uranium; and the long-term radiotoxicity after fuel discharge. For context, other cases and analyses are included, primarily once-through light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup (UOX-51). For CR<1, the heat, gamma, and neutron emission increase as material is recycled. The uranium utilization is at or below 1%, just as it is in thermal reactors as both types of reactors require continuing fissile support. For CR>1, heat, gamma, and neutron emission decrease with recycling. The uranium utilization exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. exceeds 1%, especially as all the transuranic elements are recycled. At the system equilibrium, heat and gamma vary by somewhat over an order of magnitude as a function of CR. Isotopes that dominate heat and gamma emission are scattered throughout the actinide chain, so the modest impact of CR is unsurprising. Neutron emitters are preferentially found among the higher actinides, so the neutron emission varies much stronger with CR, about three orders of magnitude.

  16. Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) was the first reactor built in the U.S. for peacetime atomic research following World War II.  Construction began in 1947 and the reactor started...

  17. Reactor Safety Research Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S. K.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipeto- pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  18. Reactor Safety Research Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dotson, CW

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory from October 1 through December 31, 1979, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Evaluation of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibilty of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibilty of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include the loss-of-coolant accident simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; the fuel rod deformation and post-accident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, lspra, Italy; the blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and the experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  19. Closed Brayton cycle power conversion systems for nuclear reactors :

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Steven A.; Lipinski, Ronald J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Sanchez, Travis

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of a Sandia National Laboratories internally funded research program to study the coupling of nuclear reactors to gas dynamic Brayton power conversion systems. The research focused on developing integrated dynamic system models, fabricating a 10-30 kWe closed loop Brayton cycle, and validating these models by operating the Brayton test-loop. The work tasks were performed in three major areas. First, the system equations and dynamic models for reactors and Closed Brayton Cycle (CBC) systems were developed and implemented in SIMULINKTM. Within this effort, both steady state and dynamic system models for all the components (turbines, compressors, reactors, ducting, alternators, heat exchangers, and space based radiators) were developed and assembled into complete systems for gas cooled reactors, liquid metal reactors, and electrically heated simulators. Various control modules that use proportional-integral-differential (PID) feedback loops for the reactor and the power-conversion shaft speed were also developed and implemented. The simulation code is called RPCSIM (Reactor Power and Control Simulator). In the second task an open cycle commercially available Capstone C30 micro-turbine power generator was modified to provide a small inexpensive closed Brayton cycle test loop called the Sandia Brayton test-Loop (SBL-30). The Capstone gas-turbine unit housing was modified to permit the attachment of an electrical heater and a water cooled chiller to form a closed loop. The Capstone turbine, compressor, and alternator were used without modification. The Capstone systems nominal operating point is 1150 K turbine inlet temperature at 96,000 rpm. The annular recuperator and portions of the Capstone control system (inverter) and starter system also were reused. The rotational speed of the turbo-machinery is controlled by adjusting the alternator load by using the electrical grid as the load bank. The SBL-30 test loop was operated at the manufacturers site (Barber-Nichols Inc.) and installed and operated at Sandia. A sufficiently detailed description of the loop is provided in this report along with the design characteristics of the turbo-alternator-compressor set to allow other researchers to compare their results with those measured in the Sandia test-loop. The third task consisted of a validation effort. In this task the test loop was operated and compared with the modeled results to develop a more complete understanding of this electrically heated closed power generation system and to validate the model. The measured and predicted system temperatures and pressures are in good agreement, indicating that the model is a reasonable representation of the test loop. Typical deviations between the model and the hardware results are less than 10%. Additional tests were performed to assess the capability of the Brayton engine to continue to remove decay heat after the reactor/heater is shutdown, to develop safe and effective control strategies, and to access the effectiveness of gas inventory control as an alternative means to provide load following. In one test the heater power was turned off to simulate a rapid reactor shutdown, and the turbomachinery was driven solely by the sensible heat stored in the heater for over 71 minutes without external power input. This is an important safety feature for CBC systems as it means that the closed Brayton loop will keep cooling the reactor without the need for auxiliary power (other than that needed to circulate the waste heat rejection coolant) provided the heat sink is available.

  20. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for the University of Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Meyer

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under its programmatic responsibility for managing the University Research Reactor Conversions, has completed the conversion of the reactor at the University of Florida. This project was successfully completed through an integrated and collaborative effort involving the INL, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), DOE (Headquarters and Field Office), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Universities, and contractors involved in analyses, fuel design and fabrication, and SNF shipping and disposition. With the work completed with these two universities, and in anticipation of other impending conversion projects, INL convened and engaged the project participants in a structured discussion to capture lessons learned. The objectives of this meeting were to capture the observations, insights, issues, concerns, and ideas of those involved in the reactor conversions so that future efforts can be conducted with greater effectiveness, efficiency, and with fewer challenges.

  1. University Reactor Conversion Lessons Learned Workshop for Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric C. Woolstenhulme; Dana M. Meyer

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this meeting were to capture the observations, insights, issues, concerns, and ideas of those involved in the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center (TAMU NSC) TRIGA Reactor Conversion so that future efforts can be conducted with greater effectiveness, efficiency, and with fewer challenges. This workshop was held in conjunction with a similar workshop for the University of Florida Reactor Conversion. Some of the generic lessons from that workshop are included in this report for completeness.

  2. Direct conversion nuclear reactor space power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britt, E.J.; Fitzpatrick, G.O.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a study of space nuclear reactor power systems using either thermoelectric or thermionic energy converters. An in-core reactor design and two heat pipe cooled out-of-core reactor designs were considered. One of the out-of-core cases utilized, long heat pipes (LHP) directly coupled to the energy converter. The second utilized a larger number of smaller heat pipes (mini-pipe) radiatively coupled to the energy converter. In all cases the entire system, including power conditioning, was constrained to be launched in a single shuttle flight. Assuming presently available performance, both the LHP thermoelectric system and minipipe thermionic system, designed to produce 100 kWe for seven years, would have a specific mass near 22kg/kWe. The specific mass of the thermionic minipipe system designed for a one year mission is 165 kg/kWe due to less fuel swelling. Shuttle imposed growth limits are near 300 kWe and 1.2 MWe for the thermoelectric and thermionic systems, respectively. Converter performance improvements could double this potential, and over 10 MWe may be possible for very short missions.

  3. Direct Energy Conversion Fission Reactor for the period December 1, 1999 through February 29, 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.C.

    2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B135 Direct Energy Conversion Fission Reactor for the period December 1, 1999 through February 29, 2000

  4. DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD JUNE 1, 2001 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.C. BROWN

    2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD JUNE 1, 2001 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2001

  5. TRIGA research reactor activities around the world

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chesworth, R.H.; Razvi, J.; Whittemore, W.L. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States))

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent activities at several overseas TRIGA installations are discussed in this paper, including reactor performance, research programs under way, and plans for future upgrades. The following installations are included: (1) 14,000-kW TRIGA at the Institute for Nuclear Research, Pitesti, Romania; (2) 2,000-kW TRIGA Mark II at the Institute of Nuclear Technology, Dhaka, Bangladesh; (3) 3,000-kW TRIGA conversion, Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Quezon City, Philippines; and (4) other ongoing installations, including a 1,500-kW TRIGA Mark II at Rabat, Morocco, and a 1,000-kW conversion/upgrade at the Institute Asunto Nucleares, Bogota, Columbia.

  6. Microplasma Ball Reactor for Liquid Hydrocarbon Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slavens, Stephen M

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    of the main advantages of a transient arc discharge is the combination of relatively high power input and low plasma temperature. 2.1.2 Microplasmas An important new field in plasma research is the field of microplasmas. A microplasma is a plasma on a...

  7. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for Advanced Test Reactor LEU Fuel Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen; Michael A. Lehto; Noel R. Duckwitz

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located in the ATR Complex of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), was constructed in the 1960s for the purpose of irradiating reactor fuels and materials. Other irradiation services, such as radioisotope production, are also performed at ATR. The ATR is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) matrix (UAlx) in an aluminum sandwich plate cladding. The National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) strategic mission includes efforts to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material at civilian sites around the world. Converting research reactors from using HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU) was originally started in 1978 as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. Within this strategic mission, GTRI has three goals that provide a comprehensive approach to achieving this mission: The first goal, the driver for the modification that is the subject of this determination, is to convert research reactors from using HEU to LEU. Thus the mission of the ATR LEU Fuel Conversion Project is to convert the ATR and Advanced Test Reactor Critical facility (ATRC) (two of the six U.S. High-Performance Research Reactors [HPRR]) to LEU fuel by 2017. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project pre-conceptual design identified several issues that lead to the conclusion that the project is a major modification.

  8. Novel, Integrated Reactor / Power Conversion System (LMR-AMTEC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pablo Rubiolo, Principal Investigator

    2003-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The main features of this project were the development of a long life (up to 10 years) Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) and a static conversion subsystem comprising an Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric (AMTEC) topping cycle and a ThermoElectric (TE) Bottom cycle. Various coupling options of the LMR with the energy conversion subsystem were explored and, base in the performances found in this analysis, an Indirect Coupling (IC) between the LMR and the AMTEC/TE converters with Alkali Metal Boilers (AMB) was chosen as the reference design. The performance model of the fully integrated sodium-and potassium-AMTEC/TE converters shows that a combined conversion efficiency in excess of 30% could be achieved by the plant. (B204)

  9. 2012 Annual Report Research Reactor Infrastructure Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Morrell

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The content of this report is the 2012 Annual Report for the Research Reactor Infrastructure Program.

  10. Conversion feasibility studies for the Grenoble high flux reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mo, S.C.; Matos, J.E.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feasibility studies for conversion of the High Flux Reactor (RHF) at Grenoble France have been performed at the Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL). The uranium densities required for conversion of the RHF to reduced enrichment fuels were computed to be 7.9 g/cm{sup 3} with 20% enrichment, 4.8 g/cm{sup 3} with 29% enrichment, and 2.8 g/cm{sup 3} with 45% enrichment. Thermal flux reductions at the peak in the heavy water reflector were computed to be 3% with 45% enriched fuel and 7% with 20% enriched fuel. In each case, the reactor's 44 day cycle length was preserved and no changes were made in the fuel element geometry. If the cladding thickness could be reduced from 0.38 mm to 0.30 mm, the required uranium density with 20% enrichment would be about 6.0 g/cm{sup 3} and the thermal flux reduction at the peak in the heavy water reflector would be about 7%. Significantly higher uranium densities are required in the RHF than in heavy water reactors with more conventional designs because the neutron spectrum is much harder in the RHF. Reduced enrichment fuels with the uranium densities required for use in the RHF are either not available or are not licensable at the present time. 6 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. International Research Reactor Decommissioning Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leopando, Leonardo [Philippine Nuclear Research Institute, Quezon City (Philippines); Warnecke, Ernst [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many research reactors have been or will be shut down and are candidates for decommissioning. Most of the respective countries neither have a decommissioning policy nor the required expertise and funds to effectively implement a decommissioning project. The IAEA established the Research Reactor Decommissioning Demonstration Project (R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P) to help answer this need. It was agreed to involve the Philippine Research Reactor (PRR-1) as model reactor to demonstrate 'hands-on' experience as it is just starting the decommissioning process. Other facilities may be included in the project as they fit into the scope of R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P and complement to the PRR-1 decommissioning activities. The key outcome of the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P will be the decommissioning of the PRR-1 reactor. On the way to this final goal the preparation of safety related documents (i.e., decommissioning plan, environmental impact assessment, safety analysis report, health and safety plan, cost estimate, etc.) and the licensing process as well as the actual dismantling activities could provide a model to other countries involved in the project. It is expected that the R{sup 2}D{sup 2}P would initiate activities related to planning and funding of decommissioning activities in the participating countries if that has not yet been done.

  12. Power conversion system design for supercritical carbon dioxide cooled indirect cycle nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbs, Jonathan Paul

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO?) cycle is a promising advanced power conversion cycle which couples nicely to many Generation IV nuclear reactors. This work investigates the power conversion system design and ...

  13. Design of passive decay heat removal system for the lead cooled flexible conversion ratio fast reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitman, Joshua (Joshua J.)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lead-cooled flexible conversion ratio fast reactor shows many benefits over other fast-reactor designs; however, the higher power rating and denser primary coolant present difficulties for the design of a passive decay ...

  14. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 15th annual Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) international meeting was organized by Ris{o} National Laboratory in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency and Argonne National Laboratory. The topics of the meeting were the following: National Programs, Fuel Fabrication, Licensing Aspects, States of Conversion, Fuel Testing, and Fuel Cycle. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  15. NREL: Biomass Research - Thermochemical Conversion Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gifNREL NRELChemical and CatalystNewResearchConversion

  16. DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION (DEC) FISSION REACTORS - A U.S. NERI PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. BELLER; G. POLANSKY; ET AL

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct conversion of the electrical energy of charged fission fragments was examined early in the nuclear reactor era, and the first theoretical treatment appeared in the literature in 1957. Most of the experiments conducted during the next ten years to investigate fission fragment direct energy conversion (DEC) were for understanding the nature and control of the charged particles. These experiments verified fundamental physics and identified a number of specific problem areas, but also demonstrated a number of technical challenges that limited DEC performance. Because DEC was insufficient for practical applications, by the late 1960s most R&D ceased in the US. Sporadic interest in the concept appears in the literature until this day, but there have been no recent programs to develop the technology. This has changed with the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative that was funded by the U.S. Congress in 1999. Most of the previous concepts were based on a fission electric cell known as a triode, where a central cathode is coated with a thin layer of nuclear fuel. A fission fragment that leaves the cathode with high kinetic energy and a large positive charge is decelerated as it approaches the anode by a charge differential of several million volts, it then deposits its charge in the anode after its kinetic energy is exhausted. Large numbers of low energy electrons leave the cathode with each fission fragment; they are suppressed by negatively biased on grid wires or by magnetic fields. Other concepts include magnetic collimators and quasi-direct magnetohydrodynamic generation (steady flow or pulsed). We present the basic principles of DEC fission reactors, review the previous research, discuss problem areas in detail and identify technological developments of the last 30 years relevant to overcoming these obstacles. A prognosis for future development of direct energy conversion fission reactors will be presented.

  17. Advanced Reactor Research and Development Funding Opportunity...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of research, development, and demonstration related to advanced non-light water reactor concepts. A goal of the program is to facilitate greater engagement between DOE and...

  18. Reduced-Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal program objective and principal part of the proposed action is to improve the proliferation resistance of nuclear fuels used in research and test reactors by providing the technical means (through technical development, design, and testing) for reducing the uranium enrichment requirements of these fuels to substantially less than the 90 to 93% enrichment currently used. Operator acceptance of the reduced-enrichment-uranium (REU) fuel alternative will require minimizing of reactor performance reduction, fuel cycle cost increases, the number of new safety and licensing issues raised, and reactor and facility modifications. The other part of the proposed action is to assure the capability for commercial production and supply of REU fuel for use both in the US and abroad. The RERTR Program scope is limited to generic design studies, technical support to reactor operating organizations in preparing for conversions to REU fuels, fuel development, fuel demonstrations, and technical support for commercialization of REU fuels. This environmental assessment addresses the environmental consequences of RERTR Program activities and of specific conversions of typical reactors (the Ford Nuclear Reactor and one or two other to-be-designated demonstrations) to REU-fuel cycles, including domestic and international shipments of enriched uranium pertinent to the conduct of RERTR Program activities.

  19. Design, analysis and optimization of the power conversion system for the Modular Pebble Bed Reactor System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunyun, 1968-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Modular Pebble Bed Reactor system (MPBR) requires a gas turbine cycle (Brayton cycle) as the power conversion system for it to achieve economic competitiveness as a GenIV nuclear system. The availability of controllable ...

  20. Conversion of methanol to light olefins on SAPO-34: kinetic modeling and reactor design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Wahabi, Saeed M. H.

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    design of an MTO reactor, accounting for the strong exothermicity of the process. Multi-bed adiabatic and fluidized bed technologies show good potential for the industrial process for the conversion of methanol into olefins....

  1. Thermal hydraulic design and analysis of a large lead-cooled reactor with flexible conversion ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikiforova, Anna S., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis contributes to the Flexible Conversion Ratio Fast Reactor Systems Evaluation Project, a part of the Nuclear Cycle Technology and Policy Program funded by the Department of Energy through the Nuclear Energy ...

  2. United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastrucutre TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Morrell

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program at the Idaho National Laboratory manages and provides project management, technical, quality engineering, quality inspection and nuclear material support for the United States Department of Energy sponsored University Reactor Fuels Program. This program provides fresh, unirradiated nuclear fuel to Domestic University Research Reactor Facilities and is responsible for the return of the DOE-owned, irradiated nuclear fuel over the life of the program. This presentation will introduce the program management team, the universities supported by the program, the status of the program and focus on the return process of irradiated nuclear fuel for long term storage at DOE managed receipt facilities. It will include lessons learned from research reactor facilities that have successfully shipped spent fuel elements to DOE receipt facilities.

  3. ORIGINAL PAPER Reactor scale up for biological conversion of cellulosic biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    ORIGINAL PAPER Reactor scale up for biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to ethanol Xiongjun scale-up approach for biological conversion of cellulosic biomass to com- modity products of large scale bioreactors based on bench scale experimentation. Keywords CFD Á SSF Á Scale up Á Solids

  4. NREL: Biomass Research - Biochemical Conversion Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL's projects in biochemical conversion involve three basic steps to convert biomass feedstocks to fuels: Converting biomass to sugar or other fermentation feedstock Fermenting...

  5. Direct energy conversion in fission reactors: A U.S. NERI project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.; SEIDEL,DAVID B.; POLANSKY,GARY F.; ROCHAU,GARY E.; LIPINSKI,RONALD J.; BESENBRUCH,G.; BROWN,L.C.; PARISH,T.A.; ANGHAIE,S.; BELLER,D.E.

    2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In principle, the energy released by a fission can be converted directly into electricity by using the charged fission fragments. The first theoretical treatment of direct energy conversion (DEC) appeared in the literature in 1957. Experiments were conducted over the next ten years, which identified a number of problem areas. Research declined by the late 1960's due to technical challenges that limited performance. Under the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative the authors are determining if these technical challenges can be overcome with todays technology. The authors present the basic principles of DEC reactors, review previous research, discuss problem areas in detail, and identify technological developments of the last 30 years that can overcome these obstacles. As an example, the fission electric cell must be insulated to avoid electrons crossing the cell. This insulation could be provided by a magnetic field as attempted in the early experiments. However, from work on magnetically insulated ion diodes they know how to significantly improve the field geometry. Finally, a prognosis for future development of DEC reactors will be presented .

  6. NREL: Biomass Research - Thermochemical Conversion Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fuel synthesis reactor. NREL investigates thermochemical processes for converting biomass and its residues to fuels and intermediates using gasification and pyrolysis...

  7. BGRR-048, Rev. C Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BGRR-048, Rev. C Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Decommissioning Project DRAFT CANAL AND WATER ....................................................................................... 1 2.2 Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor

  8. Development of CFD models to support LEU Conversion of ORNL s High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khane, Vaibhav B [ORNL] [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL] [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is participating in the Global Threat Reduction Initiative to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. As an integral part of one of NNSA s subprograms, Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors, HFIR is being converted from the present HEU core to a low enriched uranium (LEU) core with less than 20% of U-235 by weight. Because of HFIR s importance for condensed matter research in the United States, its conversion to a high-density, U-Mo-based, LEU fuel should not significantly impact its existing performance. Furthermore, cost and availability considerations suggest making only minimal changes to the overall HFIR facility. Therefore, the goal of this conversion program is only to substitute LEU for the fuel type in the existing fuel plate design, retaining the same number of fuel plates, with the same physical dimensions, as in the current HFIR HEU core. Because LEU-specific testing and experiments will be limited, COMSOL Multiphysics was chosen to provide the needed simulation capability to validate against the HEU design data and previous calculations, and predict the performance of the proposed LEU fuel for design and safety analyses. To achieve it, advanced COMSOL-based multiphysics simulations, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD), are being developed to capture the turbulent flows and associated heat transfer in fine detail and to improve predictive accuracy [2].

  9. Impact of conversion to mixed-oxide fuels on reactor structural components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yahr, G.T.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel to replace conventional uranium fuel in commercial light-water power reactors will result in an increase in the neutron flux. The impact of the higher flux on the structural integrity of reactor structural components must be evaluated. This report briefly reviews the effects of radiation on the mechanical properties of metals. Aging degradation studies and reactor operating experience provide a basis for determining the areas where conversion to MOX fuels has the potential to impact the structural integrity of reactor components.

  10. DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 1, 2001 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.C. BROWN

    2003-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 1, 2001 THROUGH DECEMBER 31, 2002

  11. DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD DECEMBER 1,1999 THRIUGH FEBRUARY 29,2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LC BROWN

    2000-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD DECEMBER 1,1999 THRIUGH FEBRUARY 29,2000

  12. DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 1,2001 THROUGH DECEMBER 31,2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.C. BROWN

    2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD OCTOBER 1,2001 THROUGH DECEMBER 31,2001

  13. DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD DECEMBER 1,2000 THROUGH FEBRUARY 28,2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.C. BROWN

    2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD DECEMBER 1,2000 THROUGH FEBRUARY 28,2001

  14. DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 15,2000 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30,2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.C. BROWN

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK-B135 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR ANNUAL REPORT FOR THE PERIOD AUGUST 15,2000 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30,2001

  15. DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD JULY 1, 2002 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.C. BROWN

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct energy conversion is the only potential means for producing electrical energy from a fission reactor without the Carnot efficiency limitations. This project was undertaken by Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratories, The University of Florida, Texas A&M University and General Atomics to explore the possibilities of direct energy conversion. Other means of producing electrical energy from a fission reactor, without any moving parts, are also within the statement of proposed work. This report documents the efforts of General Atomics. Sandia National Laboratories, the lead laboratory, provides overall project reporting and documentation.

  16. DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD APRIL 1, 2002 THROUGH JUNE 30, 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.C. BROWN

    2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct energy conversion is the only potential means for producing electrical energy from a fission reactor without the Carnot efficiency limitations. This project was undertaken by Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratories, The University of Florida, Texas A&M University and General Atomics to explore the possibilities of direct energy conversion. Other means of producing electrical energy from a fission reactor, without any moving parts, are also within the statement of proposed work. This report documents the efforts of General Atomics. Sandia National Laboratories, the lead laboratory, provides overall project reporting and documentation.

  17. Direct Energy Conversion Fission Reactor September through November 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Lloyd C.

    2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK - B135 The initial kickoff meeting/brainstorming session was held as Albuquerque with the other participants in this study. The prompt critical pulse reactor was proposed at the brainstorming session. The other participants in this study, Sandia National Laboratories (lead), Los Alamos National Laboratory, University of Florida and Texas A and M University are separately funded and their work is separately reported. The combined reporting is done by Sandia.

  18. astra research reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    facilities operated by the department include the research reactor DR 3, the Isotope Laboratory 140 Compound cryopump for fusion reactors CERN Preprints Summary: We reconsider an...

  19. Design, Analysis and Optimization of the Power Conversion System for the Modular Pebble Bed Reactor System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pebble Bed Reactor system (MPBR) requires a gas turbine cycle (Brayton cycle) as the power conversion for the gas turbine cycle. The development of an initial reference design for an indirect helium cycle has for the system. Load transients simulations show that the indirect, three-shaft arrangement gas turbine power

  20. Design of a 2400MW liquid-salt cooled flexible conversion ratio reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petroski, Robert C

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 2400MWth liquid-salt cooled flexible conversion ratio reactor was designed, utilizing the ternary chloride salt NaCl-KCl-MgCI2 (30%-20%-50%) as coolant. The reference design uses a wire-wrapped, hex lattice core, and is ...

  1. Accelerator-based conversion (ABC) of reactor and weapons plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, R.J.; Trapp, T.J.; Arthur, E.D.; Bowman, C.D.; Davidson, J.W.; Linford, R.K.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An accelerator-based conversion (ABC) system is presented that is capable of rapidly burning plutonium in a low-inventory sub-critical system. The system also returns fission power to the grid and transmutes troublesome long-lived fission products to short lived or stable products. Higher actinides are totally fissioned. The system is suited not only to controlled, rapid burning of excess weapons plutonium, but to the long range application of eliminating or drastically reducing the world total inventory of plutonium. Deployment of the system will require the successful resolution of a broad range of technical issues introduced in the paper.

  2. NREL: Biomass Research - Biochemical Conversion Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gifNREL NREL RefinesAnalysisBiochemical Conversion

  3. Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder, G.L.

    2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the work performed during the first phase of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Research Announcement (NRA) Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System Compatible with Several Space Reactor Designs. The document includes an optimization of both 100-kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} (at the propulsion unit) Rankine cycle power conversion systems. In order to perform the mass optimization of these systems, several parametric evaluations of different design options were investigated. These options included feed and reheat, vapor superheat levels entering the turbine, three different material types, and multiple heat rejection system designs. The overall masses of these Nb-1%Zr systems are approximately 3100 kg and 6300 kg for the 100- kW{sub e} and 250-kW{sub e} systems, respectively, each with two totally redundant power conversion units, including the mass of the single reactor and shield. Initial conceptual designs for each of the components were developed in order to estimate component masses. In addition, an overall system concept was presented that was designed to fit within the launch envelope of a heavy lift vehicle. A technology development plan is presented in the report that describes the major efforts that are required to reach a technology readiness level of 6. A 10-year development plan was proposed.

  4. Testing of an advanced thermochemical conversion reactor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of work conducted by MTCI to verify and confirm experimentally the ability of the MTCI gasification process to effectively generate a high-quality, medium-Btu gas from a wider variety of feedstock and waste than that attainable in air-blown, direct gasification systems. The system's overall simplicity, due to the compact nature of the pulse combustor, and the high heat transfer rates attainable within the pulsating flow resonance tubes, provide a decided and near-term potential economic advantage for the MTCI indirect gasification system. The primary objective of this project was the design, construction, and testing of a Process Design Verification System for an indirectly heated, thermochemical fluid-bed reactor and a pulse combustor an an integrated system that can process alternative renewable sources of energy such as biomass, black liquor, municipal solid waste and waste hydrocarbons, including heavy oils into a useful product gas. The test objectives for the biomass portion of this program were to establish definitive performance data on biomass feedstocks covering a wide range of feedstock qualities and characteristics. The test objectives for the black liquor portion of this program were to verify the operation of the indirect gasifier on commercial black liquor containing 65 percent solids at several temperature levels and to characterize the bed carbon content, bed solids particle size and sulfur distribution as a function of gasification conditions. 6 refs., 59 figs., 29 tabs.

  5. DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION FISSION REACTOR FOR THE PERIOD JANUARY 1, 2002 THROUGH MARCH 31, 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.C. BROWN

    2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct energy conversion is the only potential means for producing electrical energy from a fission reactor without the Carnot efficiency limitations. This project was undertaken by Sandia National Laboratories, Los Alamos National Laboratories, The University of Florida, Texas A&M University and General Atomics to explore the possibilities of direct energy conversion. Other means of producing electrical energy from a fission reactor, without any moving parts, are also within the statement of proposed work. This report documents the efforts of General Atomics. Sandia National Laboratories, the lead laboratory, provides overall project reporting and documentation. The highlights of this reporting period are: (1) Cooling of the vapor core reactor and the MHD generator was incorporated into the Vapor Core Reactor model using standard heat transfer calculation methods. (2) Fission product removal, previously modeled as independent systems for each class of fission product, was incorporated into the overall fuel recycle loop of the Vapor Core Reactor. The model showed that the circulating activity levels are quite low. (3) Material distribution calculations were made for the ''pom-pom'' style cathode for the Fission Electric Cell. Use of a pom-pom cathode will eliminate the problem of hoop stress in the thin spherical cathode caused by the electric field.

  6. Energy Conversion, an Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasRelease Date:researchEmerging ThreatsEmployment

  7. Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors and the Pyro-Process: Conversion of Nuclear Waste into a Fuel Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belanger, David P.

    1 Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors and the Pyro-Process: Conversion of Nuclear Waste into a Fuel Source renewed interest amongst the nuclear science community as the debate over nuclear waste has increased .................................................................................27 2.1.2 Waste Minimization

  8. Reliability analysis of a passive cooling system using a response surface with an application to the Flexible Conversion Ratio Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fong, Christopher J. (Christopher Joseph)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive risk-informed methodology for passive safety system design and performance assessment is presented and demonstrated on the Flexible Conversion Ratio Reactor (FCRR). First, the methodology provides a framework ...

  9. Cold flow tudy of a fluidized bed reactor for catalytic conversion of methanol to low molecular weight hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, Shirish Ramniklal

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COLD FLOW STUDY OF A FLUIDIZED BED REACTOR FOR CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF METHANOL TO LOW MOLECULAR WEIGHT HYDROCAREONS A Thesis by SHIRISH RAMNIKLAL MEHTA Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfilment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE March 1982 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering COLD FLOW STUDY OF A FLUIDIZED BED REACTOR FOR CATALYTIC CONVERSION OF METHANOL TO LOW MOLECULAR WEIGHT HYDROCARBON A Thesis by SHIRISH RAMNIKLAL MEHTA...

  10. argonne research reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the MIT Research Reactor : Fiscal year 1968 MIT - DSpace Summary: A report of research and educational activities which utilized the Massachusetts Institute of Technology,...

  11. Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, January-June 1986: Reactor Safety Research Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the technology base supporting licensing decisions.

  12. Documented Safety Analysis Addendum for the Neutron Radiography Reactor Facility Core Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Neutron Radiography Reactor Facility (NRAD) is a Training, Research, Isotope Production, General Atomics (TRIGA) reactor which was installed in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) in the mid 1970s. The facility provides researchers the capability to examine both irradiated and non-irradiated materials in support of reactor fuel and components programs through non-destructive neutron radiography examination. The facility has been used in the past as one facet of a suite of reactor fuels and component examination facilities available to researchers at the INL and throughout the DOE complex. The facility has also served various commercial research activities in addition to the DOE research and development support. The reactor was initially constructed using Fuel Lifetime Improvement Program (FLIP)- type highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel obtained from the dismantled Puerto Rico Nuclear Center (PRNC) reactor. In accordance with international non-proliferation agreements, the NRAD core will be converted to a low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel and will continue to utilize the PRNC control rods, control rod drives, startup source, and instrument console as was previously used with the HEU core. The existing NRAD Safety Analysis Report (SAR) was created and maintained in the preferred format of the day, combining sections of both DOE-STD-3009 and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.70. An addendum was developed to cover the refueling and reactor operation with the LEU core. This addendum follows the existing SAR format combining required formats from both the DOE and NRC. This paper discusses the project to successfully write a compliant and approved addendum to the existing safety basis documents.

  13. Preliminary core design studies for the advanced burner reactor over a wide range of conversion ratios.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, E. A.; Yang, W. S.; Hill, R. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A consistent set of designs for 1000 MWt commercial-scale sodium-cooled Advance Burner Reactors (ABR) have been developed for both metal and oxide-fueled cores with conversion ratios from breakeven (CR=1.0) to fertile-free (CR=0.0). These designs are expected to satisfy thermal and irradiation damage limits based on the currently available data. The very low conversion ratio designs require fuel that is beyond the current fuel database, which is anticipated to be qualified by and for the Advanced Burned Test Reactor. Safety and kinetic parameters were calculated, but a safety analysis was not performed. Development of these designs was required to achieve the primary goal of this study, which was to generate representative fuel cycle mass flows for system studies of ABRs as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). There are slight variations with conversion ratio but the basic ABR configuration consists of 144 fuel assemblies and between 9 and 22 primary control assemblies for both the metal and oxide-fueled cores. Preliminary design studies indicated that it is feasible to design the ABR to accommodate a wide range of conversion ratio by employing different assembly designs and including sufficient control assemblies to accommodate the large reactivity swing at low conversion ratios. The assemblies are designed to fit within the same geometry, but the size and number of fuel pins within each assembly are significantly different in order to achieve the target conversion ratio while still satisfying thermal limits. Current irradiation experience would allow for a conversion ratio of somewhat below 0.75. The fuel qualification for the first ABR should expand this experience to allow for much lower conversion ratios and higher bunrups. The current designs were based on assumptions about the performance of high and very high enrichment fuel, which results in significant uncertainty about the details of the designs. However, the basic fuel cycle performance trends such as conversion ratio and mass flow parameters are less sensitive to these parameters and the current results should provide a good basis for static and dynamic system analysis. The conversion ratio is fundamentally a ratio of the macroscopic cross section of U-238 capture to that of TRU fission. Since the microscopic cross sections only change moderately with fuel design and isotopic concentration for the fast reactor, a specific conversion ratio requires a specific enrichment. The approximate average charge enrichment (TRU/HM) is 14%, 21%, 33%, 56%, and 100% for conversion ratios of 1.0, 0.75, 0.50, 0.25, and 0.0 for the metal-fueled cores. The approximate average charge enrichment is 17%, 25%, 38%, 60%, and 100% for conversion ratios of 1.0, 0.75, 0.50, 0.25, and 0.0 for the oxide-fueled core. For the split batch cores, the maximum enrichment will be somewhat higher. For both the metal and oxide-fueled cores, the reactivity feedback coefficients and kinetics parameters seem reasonable. The maximum single control assembly reactivity faults may be too large for the low conversion ratio designs. The average reactivity of the primary control assemblies was increased, which may cause the maximum reactivity of the central control assembly to be excessive. The values of the reactivity coefficients and kinetics parameters show that some values appear to improve significantly at lower conversion ratios while others appear far less favorable. Detailed safety analysis is required to determine if these designs have adequate safety margins or if appropriate design modifications are required. Detailed system analysis data has been generated for both metal and oxide-fueled core designs over the entire range of potential burner reactors. Additional data has been calculated for a few alternative fuel cycles. The systems data has been summarized in this report and the detailed data will be provided to the systems analysis team so that static and dynamic system analyses can be performed.

  14. advanced reactor research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    student Harish Nair and undergraduate research student John Mills, David L. 45 Friction pressure drop measurements and flow distribution analysis for LEU conversion study of MIT...

  15. SEPARATION OF HYDROGEN AND CARBON DIOXIDE USING A NOVEL MEMBRANE REACTOR IN ADVANCED FOSSIL ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shamsuddin Ilias

    2005-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Inorganic membrane reactors offer the possibility of combining reaction and separation in a single operation at high temperatures to overcome the equilibrium limitations experienced in conventional reactor configurations. Such attractive features can be advantageously utilized in a number of potential commercial opportunities, which include dehydrogenation, hydrogenation, oxidative dehydrogenation, oxidation and catalytic decomposition reactions. However, to be cost effective, significant technological advances and improvements will be required to solve several key issues which include: (a) permselective thin solid film, (b) thermal, chemical and mechanical stability of the film at high temperatures, and (c) reactor engineering and module development in relation to the development of effective seals at high temperature and high pressure. In this project, we are working on the development and application of palladium and palladium-silver alloy thin-film composite membranes in membrane reactor-separator configuration for simultaneous production and separation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide at high temperature. From our research on Pd-composite membrane, we have demonstrated that the new membrane has significantly higher hydrogen flux with very high perm-selectivity than any of the membranes commercially available. The steam reforming of methane by equilibrium shift in Pd-composite membrane reactor is being studied to demonstrate the potential application of this new development. A two-dimensional, pseudo-homogeneous membrane-reactor model was developed to investigate the steam-methane reforming (SMR) reactions in a Pd-based membrane reactor. Radial diffusion was taken into consideration to account for the concentration gradient in the radial direction due to hydrogen permeation through the membrane. With appropriate reaction rate expressions, a set of partial differential equations was derived using the continuity equation for the reaction system. The equations were solved by finite difference method. The solution of the model equations is complicated by the coupled reactions. At the inlet, if there is no hydrogen, rate expressions become singular. To overcome this problem, the first element of the reactor was treated as a continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR). Several alternative numerical schemes were implemented in the solution algorithm to get a converged, stable solution. The model was also capable of handling steam-methane reforming reactions under non-membrane condition and equilibrium reaction conversions. Some of the numerical results were presented in the previous report. To test the membrane reactor model, we fabricated Pd-stainless steel membranes in tubular configuration using electroless plating method coupled with osmotic pressure. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX) were used to characterize the fabricated Pd-film composite membranes. Gas-permeation tests were performed to measure the permeability of hydrogen, nitrogen and helium using pure gas. The membranes showed excellent perm-selectivity for hydrogen. This makes the Pd-composite membrane attractive for selective separation and recovery of H{sub 2} from mixed gases at elevated temperature.

  16. An Account of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Thirteen Research Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, Murray Wilford [ORNL

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has built and operated 13 nuclear reactors in its 66-year history. The first was the graphite reactor, the world's first operational nuclear reactor, which served as a plutonium production pilot plant during World War II. It was followed by two aqueous-homogeneous reactors and two red-hot molten-salt reactors that were parts of power-reactor development programs and by eight others designed for research and radioisotope production. One of the eight was an all-metal fast burst reactor used for health physics studies. All of the others were light-water cooled and moderated, including the famous swimming-pool reactor that was copied dozens of times around the world. Two of the reactors were hoisted 200 feet into the air to study the shielding needs of proposed nuclear-powered aircraft. The final reactor, and the only one still operating today, is the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) that was built particularly for the production of californium and other heavy elements. With the world's highest flux and recent upgrades that include the addition of a cold neutron source, the 44-year-old HFIR continues to be a valuable tool for research and isotope production, attracting some 500 scientific visitors and guests to Oak Ridge each year. This report describes all of the reactors and their histories.

  17. REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR TECHNICAL NUCLEAR FORENSICS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, T.; Beals, D.; Sternat, M.

    2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical nuclear forensics (TNF) refers to the collection, analysis and evaluation of pre- and post-detonation radiological or nuclear materials, devices, and/or debris. TNF is an integral component, complementing traditional forensics and investigative work, to help enable the attribution of discovered radiological or nuclear material. Research is needed to improve the capabilities of TNF. One research area of interest is determining the isotopic signatures of research reactors. Research reactors are a potential source of both radiological and nuclear material. Research reactors are often the least safeguarded type of reactor; they vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power, and burn-up. Many research reactors are fueled with highly-enriched uranium (HEU), up to {approx}93% {sup 235}U, which could potentially be used as weapons material. All of them have significant amounts of radiological material with which a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) could be built. Therefore, the ability to attribute if material originated from or was produced in a specific research reactor is an important tool in providing for the security of the United States. Currently there are approximately 237 operating research reactors worldwide, another 12 are in temporary shutdown and 224 research reactors are reported as shut down. Little is currently known about the isotopic signatures of spent research reactor fuel. An effort is underway at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to analyze spent research reactor fuel to determine these signatures. Computer models, using reactor physics codes, are being compared to the measured analytes in the spent fuel. This allows for improving the reactor physics codes in modeling research reactors for the purpose of nuclear forensics. Currently the Oak Ridge Research reactor (ORR) is being modeled and fuel samples are being analyzed for comparison. Samples of an ORR spent fuel assembly were taken by SRNL for analytical and radiochemical analysis. The fuel assembly was modeled using MONTEBURNS(MCNP5/ ORIGEN2.2) and MCNPX/CINDER90. The results from the models have been compared to each other and to the measured data.

  18. Proceedings of the 1990 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global effort to reduce, and possibly, eliminate the international traffic in highly-enriched uranium caused by its use in research reactors requires extensive cooperation and free exchange of information among all participants. To foster this free exchange of information, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the thirteenth of a series which began in 1978. The common effort brought together, past, a large number of specialists from many countries. On hundred twenty-three participants from 26 countries, including scientists, reactor operators, and personnel from commercial fuel suppliers, research centers, and government organizations, convened in Newport, Rhode Island to discuss their results, their activities, and their plans relative to converting research reactors to low-enriched fuels. As more and more reactors convert to the use of low-enriched uranium, the emphasis of our effort has begun to shift from research and development to tasks more directly related to implementation of the new fuels and technologies that have been developed, and to refinements of those fuels and technologies. It is appropriate, for this reason, that the emphasis of this meeting was placed on safety and on conversion experiences. This individual papers in this report have been cataloged separately.

  19. Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Conversion Activities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renfro, David G [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes progress made during FY11 in ORNL activities to support converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloy. With both radial and axial contouring of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current levels achieved with HEU fuel. Studies are continuing to demonstrate that the fuel thermal safety margins can be preserved following conversion. Studies are also continuing to update other aspects of the reactor steady state operation and accident response for the effects of fuel conversion. Technical input has been provided to Oregon State University in support of their hydraulic testing program. The HFIR conversion schedule was revised and provided to the GTRI program. In addition to HFIR conversion activities, technical support was provided directly to the Fuel Fabrication Capability program manager.

  20. Advanced reactor safety research. Quarterly report, July-September 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, is conducting the Advanced Reactor Safety Research Program on behalf of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Sandia has been given the task to investigate seven major areas of interest which are intimately related to over-all NRC needs. These are: core debris behavior - inherent retention; containment analysis; elevated temperature design assessment; LMFBR accident delineation; advanced reactor core phenomenology; light water reactor (LWR) fuel damage phenomenology; and test and facility technology.

  1. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludewig, H. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Powers, D. A.; Hewson, John C.; LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Wright, A. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Phillips, J.; Zeyen, R. (Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Clement, B. (IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting, Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Los Alamos, NM); Wright, Steve; Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Suo-Anttila, Ahti Jorma; Denning, Richard (Ohio State University, Columbus, OH); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Ohno, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Miyhara, S. (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Farmer, M. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wade, D. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Grandy, C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Schmidt, R.; Cahalen, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Olivier, Tara Jean; Budnitz, R. (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d'%C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache, Cea, France); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Carbajo, Juan J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI); Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Porter D. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Lambert, J. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Hayes, S. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Sackett, J. (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Expert panels comprised of subject matter experts identified at the U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, LBL, and BNL), universities (University of Wisconsin and Ohio State University), international agencies (IRSN, CEA, JAEA, KAERI, and JRC-IE) and private consultation companies (Radiation Effects Consulting) were assembled to perform a gap analysis for sodium fast reactor licensing. Expert-opinion elicitation was performed to qualitatively assess the current state of sodium fast reactor technologies. Five independent gap analyses were performed resulting in the following topical reports: (1) Accident Initiators and Sequences (i.e., Initiators/Sequences Technology Gap Analysis), (2) Sodium Technology Phenomena (i.e., Advanced Burner Reactor Sodium Technology Gap Analysis), (3) Fuels and Materials (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Fuels and Materials: Research Needs), (4) Source Term Characterization (i.e., Advanced Sodium Fast Reactor Accident Source Terms: Research Needs), and (5) Computer Codes and Models (i.e., Sodium Fast Reactor Gaps Analysis of Computer Codes and Models for Accident Analysis and Reactor Safety). Volume II of the Sodium Research Plan consolidates the five gap analysis reports produced by each expert panel, wherein the importance of the identified phenomena and necessities of further experimental research and code development were addressed. The findings from these five reports comprised the basis for the analysis in Sodium Fast Reactor Research Plan Volume I.

  2. NUCLEAR POWER AND RESEARCH REACTORS 1939 1942 1943 1944

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    #12;#12;11 #12;2 NUCLEAR POWER AND RESEARCH REACTORS 1939 1942 1943 1944 Nuclear fission discovered Oak Ridge selected as site for World War II Manhattan Project First sustained and controlled nuclear 430 nuclear power reactors are operating in the world, and 103 nuclear power plants produce 20

  3. Development of Technical Nuclear Forensics for Spent Research Reactor Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sternat, Matthew Ryan 1982-

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    , an inverse analysis was developed to re-construct the burnup, initial uranium isotopic compositions, and cooling time of a research reactor spent fuel sample. A convergence acceleration technique was used that consisted of an analytical calculation to predict...

  4. BGRR-039, Rev. 0 Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ........................................................................................................ 17 4.0 Waste Management 17 5.0 Lessons Learned 18 6.0 REFERENCES 19 Appendix A Action MemorandumBGRR-039, Rev. 0 Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Decommissioning Project FINAL COMPLETION

  5. application research reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yuen-Ting 2008-01-01 18 Design and optimization of a high thermal flux research reactor via Kriging-based algorithm MIT - DSpace Summary: In response to increasing demands...

  6. Towards the reanalysis of void coefficients measurements at proteus for high conversion light water reactor lattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hursin, M.; Koeberl, O.; Perret, G. [Paul Scherrer Institut PSI, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High Conversion Light Water Reactors (HCLWR) allows a better usage of fuel resources thanks to a higher breeding ratio than standard LWR. Their uses together with the current fleet of LWR constitute a fuel cycle thoroughly studied in Japan and the US today. However, one of the issues related to HCLWR is their void reactivity coefficient (VRC), which can be positive. Accurate predictions of void reactivity coefficient in HCLWR conditions and their comparisons with representative experiments are therefore required. In this paper an inter comparison of modern codes and cross-section libraries is performed for a former Benchmark on Void Reactivity Effect in PWRs conducted by the OECD/NEA. It shows an overview of the k-inf values and their associated VRC obtained for infinite lattice calculations with UO{sub 2} and highly enriched MOX fuel cells. The codes MCNPX2.5, TRIPOLI4.4 and CASMO-5 in conjunction with the libraries ENDF/B-VI.8, -VII.0, JEF-2.2 and JEFF-3.1 are used. A non-negligible spread of results for voided conditions is found for the high content MOX fuel. The spread of eigenvalues for the moderated and voided UO{sub 2} fuel are about 200 pcm and 700 pcm, respectively. The standard deviation for the VRCs for the UO{sub 2} fuel is about 0.7% while the one for the MOX fuel is about 13%. This work shows that an appropriate treatment of the unresolved resonance energy range is an important issue for the accurate determination of the void reactivity effect for HCLWR. A comparison to experimental results is needed to resolve the presented discrepancies. (authors)

  7. Reactor Physics Methods and Preconceptual Core Design Analyses for Conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor to Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David W. Nigg; Sean R. Morrell

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the current long-term DOE policy and planning scenario, both the ATR and the ATRC will be reconfigured at an appropriate time within the next several years to operate with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This will be accomplished under the auspices of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, administered by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). At a minimum, the internal design and composition of the fuel element plates and support structure will change, to accommodate the need for low enrichment in a manner that maintains total core excess reactivity at a suitable level for anticipated operational needs throughout each cycle while respecting all control and shutdown margin requirements and power distribution limits. The complete engineering design and optimization of LEU cores for the ATR and the ATRC will require significant multi-year efforts in the areas of fuel design, development and testing, as well as a complete re-analysis of the relevant reactor physics parameters for a core composed of LEU fuel, with possible control system modifications. Ultimately, revalidation of the computational physics parameters per applicable national and international standards against data from experimental measurements for prototypes of the new ATR and ATRC core designs will also be required for Safety Analysis Report (SAR) changes to support routine operations with LEU. This report is focused on reactor physics analyses conducted during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 to support the initial development of several potential preconceptual fuel element designs that are suitable candidates for further study and refinement during FY-2013 and beyond. In a separate, but related, effort in the general area of computational support for ATR operations, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting a focused multiyear effort to introduce modern high-fidelity computational reactor physics software and associated validation protocols to replace several obsolete components of the current analytical tool set used for ATR neutronics support. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). It will also greatly facilitate the LEU conversion effort, since the upgraded computational capabilities are now at a stage where they can be, and in fact have been, used for the required physics analysis from the beginning. In this context, extensive scoping neutronics analyses were completed for six preconceptual candidate LEU fuel element designs for the ATR (and for its companion critical facility, ATRC). Of these, four exhibited neutronics performance in what is believed to be an acceptable range. However, there are currently some concerns with regard to fabricability and mechanical performance that have emerged for one of the four latter concepts. Thus three concepts have been selected for more comprehensive conceptual design analysis during the upcoming fiscal year.

  8. Direct Energy Conversion Fission Reactor, Gaseous Core Reactor with Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Generator; Final Report - Part I and Part II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samim Anghaie; Blair Smith; Travis Knight

    2002-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the power conversion cycle and efficiency. The technical issues involving the ionization mechanisms, the power management and distribution and radiation shielding and safety will be discussed in future reports.

  9. Research and educational activities at the MIT Research Reactor : Fiscal year 1968

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Department of Nuclear Engineering; 7102 Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Research Reactor. Staff; U.S. Atomic Energy Commission

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A report of research and educational activities which utilized the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, five-megawatt, heavy water, research reactor during fiscal year 1968 has been prepared for administrative use at MIT ...

  10. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The international effort to develop new research reactor fuel materials and designs based on the use of low-enriched uranium, instead of highly-enriched uranium, has made much progress during the eight years since its inception. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialist in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the ninth of a series which began in 1978. All previous meetings of this series are listed on the facing page. The focus of this meeting was on the LEU fuel demonstration which was in progress at the Oak Ridge Research (ORR) reactor, not far from where the meeting was held. The visit to the ORR, where a silicide LEU fuel with 4.8 g A/cm/sup 3/ was by then in routine use, illustrated how far work has progressed.

  11. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report Apr-Jun 81

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S.K.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from April 1 through June 30, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  12. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report April- June 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S. K.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL} from April1 through June 30, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, lspra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory {INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  13. Reactor Safety Research: Semiannual report, July-December 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories is conducting, under USNRC sponsorship, phenomenological research related to the safety of commercial nuclear power reactors. The research includes experiments to simulate the phenomenology of the accident conditions and the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety systems performance and behavior under abnormal conditions. The objective of this work is to provide NRC requisite data bases and analytical methods to (1) identify and define safety issues, (2) understand the progression of risk-significant accident sequences, and (3) conduct safety assessments. The collective NRC-sponsored effort at Sandia National Laboratories is directed at enhancing the tehcnology base supporting licensing decisions.

  14. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report January - March 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagen, C. M

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory from January 1 through March 31, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Evaluation of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibilty of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibilty of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes where serviceinduced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include the loss-of-coolant accident simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; the fuel rod deformation and post-accident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; the blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and the experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  15. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report July- September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S. K.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from April 1 through June 30, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission {NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  16. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report April -June 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S. K.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from April 1 through June 30, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission {NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; blowdown and reflood tests in the test facility at Cadarache, France; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  17. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report October - December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S K

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from October 1 through December 31, 1980, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining structural graphite strength, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NOE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the remaining integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Test assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR Test Reactor Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  18. Yale High Energy Physics Research: Precision Studies of Reactor Antineutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeger, Karsten M [Yale University

    2014-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This reports presents experimental research at the intensity frontier of particle physics with particular focus on the study of reactor antineutrinos and the precision measurement of neutrino oscillations. The experimental neutrino physics group of Professor Heeger and Senior Scientist Band at Yale University has had leading responsibilities in the construction and operation of the Daya Bay Reactor Antineutrino Experiment and made critical contributions to the discovery of non-zero$\\theta_{13}$. Heeger and Band led the Daya Bay detector management team and are now overseeing the operations of the antineutrino detectors. Postdoctoral researchers and students in this group have made leading contributions to the Daya Bay analysis including the prediction of the reactor antineutrino flux and spectrum, the analysis of the oscillation signal, and the precision determination of the target mass yielding unprecedented precision in the relative detector uncertainty. Heeger's group is now leading an R\\&D effort towards a short-baseline oscillation experiment, called PROSPECT, at a US research reactor and the development of antineutrino detectors with advanced background discrimination.

  19. Evaluation of ethane as a power conversion system working fluid for fast reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Jeffrey A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A supercritical ethane working fluid Brayton power conversion system is evaluated as an alternative to carbon dioxide. The HSC® chemical kinetics code was used to study thermal dissociation and chemical interactions for ...

  20. Design and optimization of a high thermal flux research reactor via Kriging-based algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kempf, Stephanie Anne

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to increasing demands for the services of research reactors, a 5 MW LEU-fueled research reactor core is developed and optimized to provide high thermal flux within specified limits upon thermal hydraulic ...

  1. Thermochemical Conversion Research and Development: Gasification and Pyrolysis (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass gasification and pyrolysis research and development activities at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

  2. Post Doctoral Researcher : Electrochemical Energy Conversion Applications are invited for a threeyear postdoctoral position in the Physical and Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    of hydrated metal oxide electrodes for use in energy conversion and storage devices'. Electrochemical Post Doctoral Researcher : Electrochemical Energy Conversion Applications are invited the School of Chemistry at Trinity College Dublin, led by Dr Mike Lyons. The successful applicant

  3. Catalytic conversion of methanol to low molecular weight olefins in a fluidized bed reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garza Tobias, Ricardo

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the production of methane, CO, and CO, . Also methanol conversion to coke was increased with temperature. The space velocity was a significant variable in determining the final product distribution and also in the rate of coke formation. The olefins... in the feed and catalyst age on propane yields, T~430'C (Methanol-DME conversion was greater than 95% on all experiments except 313 where it was 73%) The effect of dilution in the feed and catalyst age on the methane yields, T 430'C (Methanol...

  4. Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Energy Conversion for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors/Advanced Burner Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, James J.; Moisseytsev, Anton; Cho, Dae H.; Momozaki, Yoichi; Kilsdonk, Dennis J.; Haglund, Robert C.; Reed, Claude B.; Farmer, Mitchell T. [Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optimized supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle power converter has been developed for the 100 MWe (250 MWt) Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) eliminating the potential for sodium-water reactions and achieving a small power converter and turbine generator building. Cycle and plant efficiencies of 39.1 and 38.3 %, respectively, are calculated for the ABTR core outlet temperature of 510 deg. C. The ABTR S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle will incorporate Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger{sup TM} units in the Na-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchangers, high and low temperature recuperators, and cooler. A new sodium test facility is being completed to investigate the potential for transient plugging of narrow sodium channels typical of a Na-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchanger under postulated off-normal or accident conditions. (authors)

  5. Synthesis gas conversion in a mixed slurry reactor with iron-manganese catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennline, H.W.; Schehl, R.R.; Tischer, R.E.; Zarochak, M.F.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthesis gas was reacted over different compositions of iron-manganese Fischer-Tropsch catalysts in a slurry reactor. The reactor operates in a back-mixed mode with a continuous flow of feed gas through the catalyst suspended in the liquid medium. Four catalysts with iron-manganese ratios of 57/43, 44/56, 22/78, and 10/90 were investigated at identical process conditions after a standard activation procedure. With time on stream for each catalyst system, hydrogenation of olefins occurred, along with olefin isomerization reactions. Activity, selectivity, and stability are discussed in general. Analyses of used catalyst samples are also reported.

  6. Qualification of JEFF3.1.1 library for high conversion reactor calculations using the ERASME/R experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vidal, J. F.; Noguere, G.; Peneliau, Y.; Santamarina, A. [CEA, DEN, DER/SPRC/LEPh, Cadarache, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With its low CO{sub 2} production, Nuclear Energy appears to be an efficient solution to the global warming due to green-house effect. However, current LWR reactors are poor uranium users and, pending the development of Fast Neutron Reactors, alternative concepts of PWR with higher conversion ratio (HCPWR) are being studied again at CEA, first studies dating from the middle 80's. In these French designs, low moderation ratio has been performed by tightening the lattice pitch, achieving a conversion ratio of 0.8-0.9 with a MOX fuel coming from PWR UOX recycling. Theses HCPWRs are characterized by a harder neutron spectrum and the calculation uncertainties on the fundamental neutronics parameters are increased by a factor 3 regarding a standard PWR lattice, due to the major contribution of the Plutonium isotopes and of the epithermal energy range to the reaction rates. In order to reduce these uncertainties, a 3-year experimental validation program called ERASME has been performed by CEA from 1984 to 1986 in the EOLE reactor. Monte Carlo analysis of the ERASME/R experiments with the Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI4 allowed the qualification of the recommended JEFF.3.1.1 library for major neutronics parameters. K{sub eff} of the MOX under-moderated lattice is over-predicted by 440 {+-} 830 pcm (2{sigma}); the conversion ratio, indicator of the good use of uranium, is also slightly over-predicted: 2 % {+-} 4 % (2{sigma}) and the same for B4C absorber rods worth and soluble boron worth, over-predicted by 2 %, both in the 2 standard deviations range. The radial fission maps of heterogeneities (water-holes, B4C and fertile rods) are well reproduced: maximal (C-E)/E dispersion is 1.3 %, maximal power peak error is 2.7 %. The void reactivity worth is the only parameter poorly calculated with an overprediction of +12.4% {+-} 1.5%. ERASME/R analysis of MOX reactivity, void effect and spectral indexes will contribute to the reevaluation of {sup 241}Am and Plutonium isotopes nuclear data for the next library JEFF3.2. (authors)

  7. Long life catalytic membrane reactors for spontaneous conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, M., White, J., Deych, S., Millard, J., Myers, M., Sammells, A.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program is focusing on the development of mixed ionic and electronic conducting materials based on the brown millerite structure for use in catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs). These CMRs are being evaluated for promoting the spontaneous and highly selective oxidative reforming of carbon dioxide / natural gas mixtures to synthesis gas.

  8. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, A.K.; Cerbone, R.J.; Sastre, C.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  9. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerbone, R.J.; Ginsberg, T.; Guppy, J.G.; Sastre, C.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  10. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, July 1-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramano, A.J. (comp.)

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  11. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division quarterly progress report, 1 October-31 December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerbone, R.J.; Ginsberg, T.; Guppy, J.G.; Sastre, C.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, LMFBR Safety Experiments, SSC Code Development, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  12. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, July 1-September 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romano, A.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  13. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romano, A.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Progress Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR safety evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  14. Eastern Europe Research Reactor Initiative nuclear education and training courses - Current activities and future challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snoj, L. [Josef Stefan Inst., Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sklenka, L.; Rataj, J. [Dept. of Nuclear Reactor, Czech Technical Univ. in Prague, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Boeck, H. [Vienna Univ. of Technology/Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eastern Europe Research Reactor Initiative was established in January 2008 to enhance cooperation between the Research Reactors in Eastern Europe. It covers three areas of research reactor utilisation: irradiation of materials and fuel, radioisotope production, neutron beam experiments, education and training. In the field of education and training an EERRI training course was developed. The training programme has been elaborated with the purpose to assist IAEA Member States, which consider building a research reactor (RR) as a first step to develop nuclear competence and infrastructure in the Country. The major strength of the reactor is utilisation of three different research reactors and a lot of practical exercises. Due to high level of adaptability, the course can be tailored to specific needs of institutions with limited or no access to research reactors. (authors)

  15. Advanced sodium fast reactor accident source terms : research needs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, Dana Auburn; Clement, Bernard [IRSN/DPAM.SEMIC Bt 702, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France; Denning, Richard [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; Ohno, Shuji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan; Zeyen, Roland [Institute for Energy Petten, Saint-Paul-lez-Durance, France

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An expert opinion elicitation has been used to evaluate phenomena that could affect releases of radionuclides during accidents at sodium-cooled fast reactors. The intent was to identify research needed to develop a mechanistic model of radionuclide release for licensing and risk assessment purposes. Experts from the USA, France, the European Union, and Japan identified phenomena that could affect the release of radionuclides under hypothesized accident conditions. They qualitatively evaluated the importance of these phenomena and the need for additional experimental research. The experts identified seven phenomena that are of high importance and have a high need for additional experimental research: High temperature release of radionuclides from fuel during an energetic eventEnergetic interactions between molten reactor fuel and sodium coolant and associated transfer of radionuclides from the fuel to the coolantEntrainment of fuel and sodium bond material during the depressurization of a fuel rod with breached claddingRates of radionuclide leaching from fuel by liquid sodiumSurface enrichment of sodium pools by dissolved and suspended radionuclidesThermal decomposition of sodium iodide in the containment atmosphereReactions of iodine species in the containment to form volatile organic iodides. Other issues of high importance were identified that might merit further research as development of the mechanistic model of radionuclide release progressed.

  16. Advanced reactor safety research quarterly report, January-March 1982. Vol. 21

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning core debris behavior (inherent retention); containment analysis; elevated temperature design assessment; Clinch River risk assessment study; advanced reactor core phenomenology; LWR damaged fuel relocation phenomenology; and Annular Core Research Reactor facilities and operation.

  17. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier Research

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  18. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier Research

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  20. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier Research

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  1. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier Research

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  8. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier Research

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  9. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier Research

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  11. Light-Material Interactions in Energy Conversion - Energy Frontier Research

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  3. Center on Nanostructuring for Efficient Energy Conversion - Research

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  4. Research Program - Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion

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  5. Research Program - Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion

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  6. Research Program - Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn the Inorganic PV thrust, we developWe

  7. Research Program - Center for Solar and Thermal Energy Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesIn the Inorganic PV thrust, we developWeThe

  8. Center on Nanostructuring for Efficient Energy Conversion - Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms AboutRESEARCH CAPABILITIES The CNMSPartners External

  9. Center on Nanostructuring for Efficient Energy Conversion - Team & Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMForms AboutRESEARCH CAPABILITIES The CNMSPartners ExternalSeed

  10. A global approach of the representativity concept: Application on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, N. D.; Blaise, P.; Santamarina, A. [CEA, DEN/DER/SPRC Cadarache, F-13108 Saint Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of new types of reactor and the increase in the safety specifications and requirements induce an enhancement in both nuclear data knowledge and a better understanding of the neutronic properties of the new systems. This enhancement is made possible using ad hoc critical mock-up experiments. The main difficulty is to design these experiments in order to obtain the most valuable information. Its quantification is usually made by using representativity and transposition concepts. These theories enable to extract some information about a quantity of interest (an integral parameter) on a configuration, but generally a posteriori. This paper presents a more global approach of this theory, with the idea of optimizing the representativity of a new experiment, and its transposition a priori, based on a multiparametric approach. Using a quadratic sum, we show the possibility to define a global representativity which permits to take into account several quantities of interest at the same time. The maximization of this factor gives information about all quantities of interest. An optimization method of this value in relation to technological parameters (over-clad diameter, atom concentration) is illustrated on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case. This example tackles the problematic of plutonium experiment for the plutonium aging and a solution through the optimization of both the over-clad and the plutonium content. (authors)

  11. Role of research reactors in training of NPP personnel with special focus on training reactor VR-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sklenka, L.; Rataj, J.; Frybort, J.; Huml, O. [Dept. of Nuclear Reactors, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical Univ. in Prague, V Holesovickach 2, Prague 8, 180 00 (Czech Republic)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research reactors play an important role in providing key personnel of nuclear power plants a hands-on experience from operation and experiments at nuclear facilities. Training of NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) staff is usually deeply theoretical with an extensive utilisation of simulators and computer visualisation. But a direct sensing of the reactor response to various actions can only improve the personnel awareness of important aspects of reactor operation. Training Reactor VR-1 and its utilization for training of NPP operators and other professionals from Czech Republic and Slovakia is described. Typical experimental exercises and good practices in organization of a training program are demonstrated. (authors)

  12. Lunar Nuclear Power Plant With Solid Core Reactor, Heatpipes and Thermoelectric Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayre, Edwin D. [Engineering Consultant, 218 Brooke Acres Drive, Los Gatos, CA 95032 (United States); Ring, Peter J. [Advanced Methods and Materials, 1190 Mountain View-Alviso Rd. Suite P, Sunnyvale, CA 94089 (United States); Brown, Neil [Engineering Consultant, 5134 Cordoy Lane, San Jose, CA 95124 (United States); Elsner, Norbert B.; Bass, John C. [Hi-Z Technology, Inc., 7606 Miramar Rd. Suite 7400, San Diego, CA 92126 (United States)

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a lunar nuclear power plant with the advantages of minimum mass, with no moving parts, no pumped liquid coolant, a solid metal rugged core, with no single point of failure. The electrical output is 100 kilowatts with a 500 kilowatt thermal reactor. The thermoelectric converters surround the potassium heatpipes from the core and water heatpipes surround the converter and connect to the radiator. The solid core reactor is made from HT9 alloy. The fuel is uranium oxide with 90% enrichment. The thermoelectric converter is bonded to the outside of the 1.10 inch ID heat pipe and is 30 inches long. The thermoelectric couple is Si/SiGe-Si/SiC Quantum Well with over 20% efficiency with an 890 K hot side and a 490 K cold side and produces 625 Watts. 176 converters produce 110 kWe. With less than 10% loss in controls this yields 100 kWe for use. The cylindrical thermoelectric converter is designed and fabricated by HIPing to keep brittle materials in compression and to ensure conductivity. The solid core is fabricated by machining the heatpipe tubes with 6 grooves that are diffusion bonded together by HIPing to form the fuel tubes. The maximum temperature of the heat pipes is 940 K and the return flow temperature is 890 K. The reactor core is hexagonal shaped, 61 cm. wide and 76.2 cm high with 12 rotating control drums surrounding it. There is shielding to protect components and human habitation. The radiator is daisy shaped at 45 degrees with each petal 5.5 meters long. The design life is ten years.

  13. Research in nondestructive evaluation techniques for nuclear reactor concrete structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Dwight; Smith, Cyrus [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is to develop the scientific basis for understanding and predicting longterm environmental degradation behavior of material in nuclear power plants and to provide data and methods to assess the performance of systems, structures, and components (SSCs) essential to safe and sustained nuclear power plant operations. The understanding of aging-related phenomena and their impacts on SSCs is expected to be a significant issue for any nuclear power plant planning for long-term operations (i.e. service beyond the initial license renewal period). Management of those phenomena and their impacts during long-term operations can be better enable by improved methods and techniques for detection, monitoring, and prediction of SSC degradation. The MAaD Pathway R and D Roadmap for Concrete, 'Light Water Reactor Sustainability Nondestructive Evaluation for Concrete Research and Development Roadmap', focused initial research efforts on understanding the recent concrete issues at nuclear power plants and identifying the availability of concrete samples for NDE techniques evaluation and testing. [1] An overview of the research performed by ORNL in these two areas is presented here.

  14. Y-12 fulfills major milestone in fuel conversion commitment for...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Y-12 fulfills major milestone in fuel conversion commitment for Jamaican research reactor Posted: June 3, 2014 - 4:42pm The Y-12 National Security Complex recently completed...

  15. Current Research on Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, R. M.; Magrini-Bair, K. A.; Nimlos, M. R.; Pepiot, P.; Donohoe, B. S.; Hensley, J. E.; Phillips, S. D.

    2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermochemical research platform at the National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is primarily focused on conversion of biomass to transportation fuels using non-biological techniques. Research is conducted in three general areas relating to fuels synthesis via thermochemical conversion by gasification: (1) Biomass gasification fundamentals, chemistry and mechanisms of tar formation; (2) Catalytic tar reforming and syngas cleaning; and (3) Syngas conversion to mixed alcohols. In addition, the platform supports activities in both technoeconomic analysis (TEA) and life cycle assessment (LCA) of thermochemical conversion processes. Results from the TEA and LCA are used to inform and guide laboratory research for alternative biomass-to-fuels strategies. Detailed process models are developed using the best available material and energy balance information and unit operations models created at NREL and elsewhere. These models are used to identify cost drivers which then form the basis for research programs aimed at reducing costs and improving process efficiency while maintaining sustainability and an overall net reduction in greenhouse gases.

  16. IGORR-IV -- Proceedings of the fourth meeting of the International Group on Research Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenbalm, K.F. [comp.] [comp.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Group on Research Reactors was formed to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience among those institutions and individuals who are actively working to design, build, and promote new research reactors or to make significant upgrades to existing facilities. Twenty-nine papers were presented in five sessions and written versions of the papers or hard copies of the vugraphs used are published in these proceedings. The five sessions were: (1) Operating Research Reactors and Facility Upgrades; (2) Research Reactors in Design and Construction; (3) ANS Closeout Activities; (4) and (5) Research, Development, and Analysis Results.

  17. Semiconductor Physics and Quantum Solar Energy Conversion PV-related research at CvO University Oldenburg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semiconductor Physics and Quantum Solar Energy Conversion PV-related research at CvO University Oldenburg GRECO Cvo UNI OL/ Nds.PV-Symp. 06-2009 semiconductor physics / quantum solar energy conversion energy and semiconductor research (EHF) amongst regular lectures Educational Programs (PPRE, EUREC) #12

  18. Final Site-Specific Decommissioning Inspection Report for the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarah Roberts

    2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Report of site-specific decommissioning in-process inspection activities at the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor Facility.

  19. Investigation of the Performance of D2O-Cooled High-Conversion Reactors for Fuel Cycle Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents FY13 activities for the analysis of D2O cooled tight-pitch High-Conversion PWRs (HCPWRs) with U-Pu and Th-U fueled cores aiming at break-even or near breeder conditions while retaining the negative void reactivity. The analyses are carried out from several aspects which could not be covered in FY12 activities. SCALE 6.1 code system is utilized, and a series of simple 3D fuel pin-cell models are developed in order to perform Monte Carlo based criticality and burnup calculations. The performance of U-Pu fueled cores with axial and internal blankets is analyzed in terms of their impact on the relative fissile Pu mass balance, initial Pu enrichment, and void coefficient. In FY12, Pu conversion performances of D2O-cooled HCPWRs fueled with MOX were evaluated with small sized axial/internal DU blankets (approximately 4cm of axial length) in order to ensure the negative void reactivity, which evidently limits the conversion performance of HCPWRs. In this fiscal year report, the axial sizes of DU blankets are extended up to 30 cm in order to evaluate the amount of DU necessary to reach break-even and/or breeding conditions. Several attempts are made in order to attain the milestone of the HCPWR designs (i.e., break-even condition and negative void reactivity) by modeling of HCPWRs under different conditions such as boiling of D2O coolant, MOX with different 235U enrichment, and different target burnups. A similar set of analyses are performed for Th-U fueled cores. Several promising characteristics of 233U over other fissile like 239Pu and 235U, most notably its higher fission neutrons per absorption in thermal and epithermal ranges combined with lower ___ in the fast range than 239Pu allows Th-U cores to be taller than MOX ones. Such an advantage results in 4% higher relative fissile mass balance than that of U-Pu fueled cores while retaining the negative void reactivity until the target burnup of 51 GWd/t. Several other distinctions between U-Pu and Th-U fueled cores are identified by evaluating the sensitivity coefficients of keff, mass balance, and void coefficient. The effect of advanced iron alloy cladding (i.e., FeCrAl) on the performance of Pu conversion in MOX fueled cores is studied instead of using standard stainless-steel cladding. Variations in clad thickness and coolant-to-fuel volume ratio are also exercised. The use of FeCrAl instead of SS as a cladding alloy reduces the required Pu enrichment and improves the Pu conversion rate primarily due to the absence of nickel in the cladding alloy that results in the reduction of the neutron absorption. Also the difference in void coefficients between SS and FeCrAl alloys is nearly 500 pcm over the entire burnup range. The report also shows sensitivity and uncertainty analyses in order to characterize D2O cooled HCPWRs from different aspects. The uncertainties of integral parameters (keff and void coefficient) for selected reactor cores are evaluated at different burnup points in order to find similarities and trends respect to D2O-HCPWR.

  20. Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) - Survey of Materials Research and Development Needs to Assess Viability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip E. MacDonald

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supercritical water-cooled reactors (SCWRs) are among the most promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency [i.e., about 45% vs. 33% of current light water reactors (LWRs)] and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs achieve this with superior thermodynamic conditions (i.e., high operating pressure and temperature), and by reducing the containment volume and eliminating the need for recirculation and jet pumps, pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators and dryers. The reference SCWR design in the U.S. is a direct cycle, thermal spectrum, light-water-cooled and moderated reactor with an operating pressure of 25 MPa and inlet/outlet coolant temperature of 280/500 °C. The inlet flow splits, partly to a down-comer and partly to a plenum at the top of the reactor pressure vessel to flow downward through the core in special water rods to the inlet plenum. This strategy is employed to provide good moderation at the top of the core, where the coolant density is only about 15-20% that of liquid water. The SCWR uses a power conversion cycle similar to that used in supercritical fossil-fired plants: high- intermediate- and low-pressure turbines are employed with one moisture-separator re-heater and up to eight feedwater heaters. The reference power is 3575 MWt, the net electric power is 1600 MWe and the thermal efficiency is 44.8%. The fuel is low-enriched uranium oxide fuel and the plant is designed primarily for base load operation. The purpose of this report is to survey existing materials for fossil, fission and fusion applications and identify the materials research and development needed to establish the SCWR viabilitya with regard to possible materials of construction. The two most significant materials related factors in going from the current LWR designs to the SCWR are the increase in outlet coolant temperature from 300 to 500 °C and the possible compatibility issues associated with the supercritical water environment. • Reactor pressure vessel • Pumps and piping

  1. Sodium fast reactor fuels and materials : research needs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denman, Matthew R.; Porter, Douglas (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Art (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Lambert, John (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Hayes, Steven (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Natesan, Ken (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL); Ott, Larry J. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Garner, Frank (Radiation Effects Consulting. Richland, WA); Walters, Leon (Advanced Reactor Concepts, Idaho Falls, ID); Yacout, Abdellatif (Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An expert panel was assembled to identify gaps in fuels and materials research prior to licensing sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) design. The expert panel considered both metal and oxide fuels, various cladding and duct materials, structural materials, fuel performance codes, fabrication capability and records, and transient behavior of fuel types. A methodology was developed to rate the relative importance of phenomena and properties both as to importance to a regulatory body and the maturity of the technology base. The technology base for fuels and cladding was divided into three regimes: information of high maturity under conservative operating conditions, information of low maturity under more aggressive operating conditions, and future design expectations where meager data exist.

  2. Overview of the vanadium alloy researches for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J. M.; Chernov, V. M.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Muroga, Takeo

    2011-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Various vanadium alloys are being developed as one of the options of structural materials for advanced blankets of fusion reactors. Besides the large heats made in Japan and US, a 110 kg V-4Cr-4Ti ingot was produced in RF recently. Development of advanced vanadium alloys were also carried out, such as the ultra-fine grain alloys containing Y and that with W and TiC strengthening particles. Investigations were performed for further widening of temperature and mechanical application windows of the reference V-4Cr-4Ti alloy by plastic deformation and heat treatments. Neutron irradiation effects combined with lithium corrosion were studied. In addition, some efforts are oriented to issues related to DEMO blanket manufacturing technology, such as W coating for first wall protection and the welding technologies to fabricate large vanadium component. This paper highlights the recent activities of these vanadium alloy researches, discusses the critical issues and summarizes the remaining issues to be addressed.

  3. Advanced reactor safety research, quarterly report, October-December 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning advanced reactor core phenomenology; light water reactor severe core damage phenomenology; core debris behavior; containment analysis; elevated temperature design assessment; LMFBR accident delineation; and test and facility technology.

  4. Sodium fast reactor safety and licensing research plan. Volume I.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); LaChance, Jeffrey L.; Bari, R. (Brokhaven National Laboratory Upton, NY); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Denman, Matthew R.; Flanagan, George F. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report proposes potential research priorities for the Department of Energy (DOE) with the intent of improving the licensability of the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). In support of this project, five panels were tasked with identifying potential safety-related gaps in available information, data, and models needed to support the licensing of a SFR. The areas examined were sodium technology, accident sequences and initiators, source term characterization, codes and methods, and fuels and materials. It is the intent of this report to utilize a structured and transparent process that incorporates feedback from all interested stakeholders to suggest future funding priorities for the SFR research and development. While numerous gaps were identified, two cross-cutting gaps related to knowledge preservation were agreed upon by all panels and should be addressed in the near future. The first gap is a need to re-evaluate the current procedures for removing the Applied Technology designation from old documents. The second cross-cutting gap is the need for a robust Knowledge Management and Preservation system in all SFR research areas. Closure of these and the other identified gaps will require both a reprioritization of funding within DOE as well as a re-evaluation of existing bureaucratic procedures within the DOE associated with Applied Technology and Knowledge Management.

  5. Water Reactor Safety Research Division quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romano, A.J. (comp.)

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Water Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: LWR Thermal Hydraulic Development, Advanced Code Evaluation, TRAC Code Assessment, and Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing.

  6. Water Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, April 1-June 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abuaf, N.; Levine, M.M.; Saha, P.; van Rooyen, D.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Water Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: LWR Thermal Hydraulic Development, Advanced Code Evlauation, TRAC Code Assessment, and Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing.

  7. Water Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, October 1-December 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerbone, R.J.; Saha, P.; van Rooyen, D.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Water Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: Stress Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubing, Advanced Code Evaluation, Simulator Improvement Program, and LWR Assessment and Application.

  8. Instrumentation for Neutron Scattering at the Missouri University Research Reactor Paul F. Miceli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montfrooij, Wouter

    Instrumentation for Neutron Scattering at the Missouri University Research Reactor Paul F. Miceli Research Reactor (MURR) provides significant thermal neutron flux, which enables neutron scattering]. There are presently 5 instruments located on the beam port floor that are dedicated to neutron scattering: (1) TRIAX

  9. MIT Modular Pebble Bed Reactor (MPBR) A Summary of Research Activities and Accomplishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Disposal · Reactor Research/ Demonstration Facility · License by Test · Expert I&C System - Hands free.71MPa 69.7 C 4.67MPa Cooling RPV #12;BOP System Analysis and Dynamic Simulation Model DevelopmentMIT Modular Pebble Bed Reactor (MPBR) A Summary of Research Activities and Accomplishments Andrew C

  10. Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Survey of Materials Research and Development Needs to Support Early Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric Shaber; G. Baccaglini; S. Ball; T. Burchell; B. Corwin; T. Fewell; M. Labar; P. MacDonald; P. Rittenhouse; Russ Vollam; F. Southworth

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The VHTR reference concept is a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. It is expected that the VHTR will be purchased in the future as either an electricity producing plant with a direct cycle gas turbine or a hydrogen producing (or other process heat application) plant. The process heat version of the VHTR will require that an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and primary gas circulator be located in an adjoining power conversion vessel. A third VHTR mission - actinide burning - can be accomplished with either the hydrogen-production or gas turbine designs. The first ''demonstration'' VHTR will produce both electricity and hydrogen using the IHX to transfer the heat to either a hydrogen production plant or the gas turbine. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. The purpose of this report is to identify the materials research and development needs for the VHTR. To do this, we focused on the plant design described in Section 2, which is similar to the GT-MHR plant design (850 C core outlet temperature). For system or component designs that present significant material challenges (or far greater expense) there may be some viable design alternatives or options that can reduce development needs or allow use of available (cheaper) materials. Nevertheless, we were not able to assess those alternatives in the time allotted for this report and, to move forward with this material research and development assessment, the authors of this report felt that it was necessary to use a GT-MHR type design as the baseline design.

  11. U.S. Department of Energy Program of International Technical Cooperation for Research Reactor Utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chong, D.; Manning, M.; Ellis, R.; Apt, K.; Flaim, S.; Sylvester, K.

    2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) has initiated collaborations with the national nuclear authorities of Egypt, Peru, and Romania for the purpose of advancing the commercial potential and utilization of their respective research reactors. Under its Office of International Safeguards ''Sister Laboratory'' program, DOE/NNSA has undertaken numerous technical collaborations over the past decade intended to promote peaceful applications of nuclear technology. Among these has been technical assistance in research reactor applications, such as neutron activation analysis, nuclear analysis, reactor physics, and medical radioisotope production. The current collaborations are intended to provide the subject countries with a methodology for greater commercialization of research reactor products and services. Our primary goal is the transfer of knowledge, both in administrative and technical issues, needed for the establishment of an effective business plan and utilization strategy for the continued operation of the countries' research reactors. Technical consultation, cooperation, and the information transfer provided are related to: identification, evaluation, and assessment of current research reactor capabilities for products and services; identification of opportunities for technical upgrades for new or expanded products and services; advice and consultation on research reactor upgrades and technical modifications; characterization of markets for reactor products and services; identification of competition and estimation of potential for market penetration; integration of technical constraints; estimation of cash flow streams; and case studies.

  12. anuclear research reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods of nulcear fusion: inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). Existing thermonuclear reactors are very complex, expensive, large, and...

  13. Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Sandia National Laboratories achieves 10,000th reactor pulse operation | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the...

  14. Monitoring and Control Research Using a University Reactor and SBWR Test-Loop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert M. Edwards

    2003-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The existing hybrid simulation capability of the Penn State Breazeale nuclear reactor was expanded to conduct research for monitoring, operations and control. Hybrid simulation in this context refers to the use of the physical time response of the research reactor as an input signal to a real-time simulation of power-reactor thermal-hydraulics which in-turn provides a feedback signal to the reactor through positioning of an experimental changeable reactivity device. An ECRD is an aluminum tube containing an absorber material that is positioned in the central themble of the reactor kinetics were used to expand the hybrid reactor simulation (HRS) capability to include out-of-phase stability characteristics observed in operating BWRs.

  15. Materials science division light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, October - December 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during October, November, and December 1981 on water-reactor-safety problems. The research and development areas covered are environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors, transient fuel response and fission-product release, and clad properties for code verification.

  16. Light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during April, May, and June 1981 on water-reactor-safety problems. The research and development areas covered are transient fuel response and fission-product release and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors.

  17. Roadmap for Nondestructive Evaluation of Reactor Pressure Vessel Research and Development by the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Matlack, Katie [Georgia Institute of Technology; Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Light, Glenn [Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy s (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is a five year effort which works to develop the fundamental scientific basis to understand, predict, and measure changes in materials and systems, structure, and components as they age in environments associated with continued long-term operations of existing commercial nuclear power reactors. This year, the Materials Aging and Degradation (MAaD) Pathway of this program has placed emphasis on emerging Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) methods which support these objectives. DOE funded Research and Development (R&D) on emerging NDE techniques to support commercial nuclear reactor sustainability is expected to begin next year. This summer, the MAaD Pathway invited subject matter experts to participate in a series of workshops which developed the basis for the research plan of these DOE R&D NDE activities. This document presents the results of one of these workshops which are the DOE LWRS NDE R&D Roadmap for Reactor Pressure Vessels (RPV). These workshops made a substantial effort to coordinate the DOE NDE R&D with that already underway or planned by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) through their representation at these workshops.

  18. Technician's Perspective on an Ever-Changing Research Environment: Catalytic Conversion of Biomass to Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thibodeaux, J.; Hensley, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The biomass thermochemical conversion platform at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) develops and demonstrates processes for the conversion of biomass to fuels and chemicals including gasification, pyrolysis, syngas clean-up, and catalytic synthesis of alcohol and hydrocarbon fuels. In this talk, I will discuss the challenges of being a technician in this type of research environment, including handling and working with catalytic materials and hazardous chemicals, building systems without being given all of the necessary specifications, pushing the limits of the systems through ever-changing experiments, and achieving two-way communication with engineers and supervisors. I will do this by way of two examples from recent research. First, I will describe a unique operate-to-failure experiment in the gasification of chicken litter that resulted in the formation of a solid plug in the gasifier, requiring several technicians to chisel the material out. Second, I will compare and contrast bench scale and pilot scale catalyst research, including instances where both are conducted simultaneously from common upstream equipment. By way of example, I hope to illustrate the importance of researchers 1) understanding the technicians' perspective on tasks, 2) openly communicating among all team members, and 3) knowing when to voice opinions. I believe the examples in this talk will highlight the crucial role of a technical staff: skills attained by years of experience to build and operate research and production systems. The talk will also showcase the responsibilities of NREL technicians and highlight some interesting behind-the-scenes work that makes data generation from NREL's thermochemical process development unit possible.

  19. Thermonuclear Fusion Research Progress and the Way to the Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Raymond [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, Royal Military Academy, Association EURATOM - Belgian State, 1000 Brussels (Belgium)

    2006-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper reviews the progress of fusion research and its prospects for electricity generation. It starts with a reminder of the principles of thermonuclear fusion and a brief discussion of its potential role in the future of the world energy production. The reactions allowing energy production by fusion of nuclei in stars and on earth and the conditions required to sustain them are reviewed. At the high temperatures required for fusion (hundred millions kelvins), matter is completely ionized and has reached what is called its 4th state: the plasma state. The possible means to achieve these extreme temperatures is discussed. The remainder of the paper focuses on the most promising of these approaches, magnetic confinement. The operating principles of the presently most efficient machine of this type -- the tokamak -- is described in some detail. On the road to producing energy with fusion, a number of obstacles have to be overcome. The plasma, a fluid that reacts to electromagnetic forces and carries currents and charges, is a complex medium. Fusion plasma is strongly heated and is therefore a good example of a system far from equilibrium. A wide variety of instabilities can grow in this system and lead to self-organized structures and spontaneous cycles. Turbulence is generated that degrades the confinement and hinders easy achievement of long lasting hot plasmas. Physicists have learned how to quench turbulence, thereby creating sort of insulating bottles inside the plasma itself to circumvent this problem. The recent history of fusion performance is outlined and the prospect of achieving power generation by fusion in a near future is discussed in the light of the development of the 'International Tokamak Experimental Reactor' project ITER.

  20. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report October - December 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S. K.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) from October 1 through December 31, 1981, for the Division of Accident Evaluation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where serviceinduced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and post accident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, lspra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  1. Reactor Safety Research Programs Quarterly Report July - September 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S. K.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest laboratory (PNL) from July 1 through September 30, 1981, for the Division of Accident Evaluation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR} steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, lspra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Idaho Falls, Idaho. These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  2. EA-0912: Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to accept 409 spent fuel elements from eight foreign research reactors in seven European countries.  The spent fuel would be shipped across...

  3. Light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massey, W.E.; Kyger, J.A.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during January, February, and March 1980 on water-reactor-safety problems. The research and development area covered is Transient Fuel Response and Fission-Product Release.

  4. Light-water-reactor safety research program: quarterly progress report, July-September, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massey, W.E.; Till, C.E.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during July, August, and September 1980 on water-reactor-safety problems. The research and development area covered is Transient Fuel Response and Fission-product Release.

  5. Air pollution control technology for municipal solid waste-to-energy conversion facilities: capabilities and research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, J F; Young, J C

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three major categories of waste-to-energy conversion processes in full-scale operation or advanced demonstration stages in the US are co-combustion, mass incineration, and pyrolysis. These methods are described and some information on US conversion facilities is tabulated. Conclusions and recommendations dealing with the operation, performance, and research needs for these facilities are given. Section II identifies research needs concerning air pollution aspects of the waste-to-energy processes and reviews significant operating and research findings for the co-combustion, mass incinceration, and pyrolysis waste-to-energy systems.

  6. Light water reactor safety research program. Volume 12: quarterly report, Apr-Jun 79

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the progress of the Light Water Reactor Safety Research Program during the 2nd quarter of 1979. Specifically, the report summarizes progress in five major areas of research. They are: (1) the molten core/concrete interactions study; (2) steam explosion research phenomena; (3) statistical LOCA analysis; (4) UHI model development; (5) two-phase jet loads.

  7. Overview of Multi-Kilowatt Free-Piston Stirling Power Conversion Research at GRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, Steven M.; Mason, Lee S.; Dyson, Rodger W. [Thermal Energy Conversion Branch, NASA Glenn Research Center 21000 Brookpark Rd., Cleveland, OH 44135 (United States); Penswick, L. Barry [SEST Inc., 18000 Jefferson Park, Middleburg Hts, OH 44130 (United States)

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    As a step towards development of Stirling power conversion for potential use in Fission Surface Power (FSP) systems, a pair of commercially available 1 kW class free-piston Stirling convertors and a pair of commercially available pressure wave generators (which will be plumbed together to create a high power Stirling linear alternator test rig) have been procured for in-house testing at Glenn Research Center. Delivery of both the Stirling convertors and the linear alternator test rig is expected by October, 2007. The 1 kW class free-piston Stirling convertors will be tested at GRC to map and verify performance. The convertors will later be modified to operate with a NaK liquid metal pumped loop for thermal energy input. The high power linear alternator test rig will be used to map and verify high power Stirling linear alternator performance and to develop power management and distribution (PMAD) methods and techniques. This paper provides an overview of the multi-kilowatt free-piston Stirling power conversion work being performed at GRC.

  8. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses for thermo-hydraulic calculation of research reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartini, Entin; Andiwijayakusuma, Dinan [Center for Development of Nuclear Informatics - National Nuclear Energy Agency PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang, Banten (Indonesia)] [Center for Development of Nuclear Informatics - National Nuclear Energy Agency PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang, Banten (Indonesia); Isnaeni, Muh Darwis [Center for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety- National Nuclear Energy Agency PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang, Banten (Indonesia)] [Center for Reactor Technology and Nuclear Safety- National Nuclear Energy Agency PUSPIPTEK, Serpong, Tangerang, Banten (Indonesia)

    2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis of input parameters on thermohydraulic calculations for a research reactor has successfully done in this research. The uncertainty analysis was carried out on input parameters for thermohydraulic calculation of sub-channel analysis using Code COOLOD-N. The input parameters include radial peaking factor, the increase bulk coolant temperature, heat flux factor and the increase temperature cladding and fuel meat at research reactor utilizing plate fuel element. The input uncertainty of 1% - 4% were used in nominal power calculation. The bubble detachment parameters were computed for S ratio (the safety margin against the onset of flow instability ratio) which were used to determine safety level in line with the design of 'Reactor Serba Guna-G. A. Siwabessy' (RSG-GA Siwabessy). It was concluded from the calculation results that using the uncertainty input more than 3% was beyond the safety margin of reactor operation.

  9. Plant Design and Cost Estimation of a Natural Circulation Lead-Bismuth Reactor with Helium Power Conversion Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, D.

    The analysis of an indirect helium power conversion system with lead-bismuth natural circulation primary system has been performed. The work of this report is focused on 1) identifying the allowable design region for the ...

  10. Plant Design and Cost Estimation of a Natural Circulation Lead-Bismuth Reactor with Steam Power Conversion Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, D.

    The analysis of an indirect steam power conversion system with lead-bismuth natural circulation primary system has been performed. The work of this report is focused on 1) identifying the allowable design region for the ...

  11. MODULAR PEBBLE BED REACTOR PROJECT UNIVERSITY RESEARCH CONSORTIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of important parameters using statistical/factorial tools. The fits will be used in a Monte Carlo fuel between air and helium for use in the energy-conversion cycle of the MPBR has been completed and formed for funding beginning in FY01. Two other NERI proposals, dealing with the development of a burnup "meter

  12. DISMANTLING OF THE UPPER RPV COMPONENTS OF THE KARLSRUHE MULTI-PURPOSE RESEARCH REACTOR (MZFR), GERMANY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prechtl, E.; Suessdorf, W.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-purpose Research Reactor was a pressurized-water reactor cooled and moderated with heavy water. It was built from 1961 to 1966 and went critical for the first time on 29 September 1965. After nineteen years of successful operation, the reactor was de-activated on 3 May 1984. The reactor had a thermal output of 200 MW and an electrical output of 50 MW. The MZFR not only served to supply electrical power, but also as a test bed for: - research into various materials for reactor building (e. g. zirkaloy), - the manufacturing and operating industry to gain experience in erection and operation, - training scientific and technical reactor staff, and - power supply (first nuclear combined-heat-and-power system, 1979-1984). The experience gained in operating the MZFR was very helpful for the development and operation of power reactors. At first, safe containment and enclosure of the plant was planned, but then it was decided to dismantle the plant completely, step by step, in view o f the clear advantages of this approach. The decommissioning concept for the complete elimination of the plant down to a green-field site provides for eight steps. A separate decommissioning license is required for each step. As part of the dismantling, about 72,000 Mg [metric tons] of concrete and 7,200 Mg of metal (400 Mg RPV) must be removed. About 700 Mg of concrete (500 Mg biological shield) and 1300 Mg of metal must be classified as radioactive waste.

  13. Unique applications of research reactors with TRIGA UZrH[sub x] fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittemore, W.L. (General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The TRIGA reactor fuel (UZrH[sub x]) in research reactors provides significant safety features that have permitted varied and unique applications. The safety features include a very large, prompt, negative temperature coefficient of reactivity; very high safety limit for fuel temperature (1150[degrees]C); and large fission product retention even for unclad fuel. The recognized safety of these reactors has permitted them to be located as appropriate on university campuses in buildings housing lecture halls and in hospitals. It has also facilitated installation of in-core or near-core experiments and facilities, including liquid hydrogen or other cryogenic neutron sources.

  14. Dry Storage of Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel - 13321

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.M.; Dunsmuir, M.D.; Leduc, D.R.; Severynse, T.F.; Sindelar, R.L. [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States); Moore, E.N. [Moore Nuclear Energy, LLC (United States)] [Moore Nuclear Energy, LLC (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spent fuel from domestic and foreign research reactors is received and stored at the Savannah River Site's L Area Material Storage (L Basin) Facility. This DOE-owned fuel consists primarily of highly enriched uranium in metal, oxide or silicide form with aluminum cladding. Upon receipt, the fuel is unloaded and transferred to basin storage awaiting final disposition. Disposition alternatives include processing via the site's H Canyon facility for uranium recovery, or packaging and shipment of the spent fuel to a waste repository. A program has been developed to provide a phased approach for dry storage of the L Basin fuel. The initial phase of the dry storage program will demonstrate loading, drying, and storage of fuel in twelve instrumented canisters to assess fuel performance. After closure, the loaded canisters are transferred to pad-mounted concrete overpacks, similar to those used for dry storage of commercial fuel. Unlike commercial spent fuel, however, the DOE fuel has high enrichment, very low to high burnup, and low decay heat. The aluminum cladding presents unique challenges due to the presence of an oxide layer that forms on the cladding surface, and corrosion degradation resulting from prolonged wet storage. The removal of free and bound water is essential to the prevention of fuel corrosion and radiolytic generation of hydrogen. The demonstration will validate models predicting pressure, temperature, gas generation, and corrosion performance, provide an engineering scale demonstration of fuel handling, drying, leak testing, and canister backfill operations, and establish 'road-ready' storage of fuel that is suitable for offsite repository shipment or retrievable for onsite processing. Implementation of the Phase I demonstration can be completed within three years. Phases II and III, leading to the de-inventory of L Basin, would require an additional 750 canisters and 6-12 years to complete. Transfer of the fuel from basin storage to dry storage requires integration with current facility operations, and selection of equipment that will allow safe operation within the constraints of existing facility conditions. Examples of such constraints that are evaluated and addressed by the dry storage program include limited basin depth, varying fuel lengths up to 4 m, (13 ft), fissile loading limits, canister closure design, post-load drying and closure of the canisters, instrument selection and installation, and movement of the canisters to storage casks. The initial pilot phase restricts the fuels to shorter length fuels that can be loaded to the canister directly underwater; subsequent phases will require use of a shielded transfer system. Removal of the canister from the basin, followed by drying, inerting, closure of the canister, and transfer of the canister to the storage cask are completed with remotely operated equipment and appropriate shielding to reduce personnel radiation exposure. (authors)

  15. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, January-March 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S.K. (ed.)

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1982, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities.

  16. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, July-September 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S.K. (ed.)

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, and examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics. Accelerated pellet-cladding interaction modeling is being conducted to predict the probability of fuel rod failure under normal operating conditions. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Experimental data and validated models are being used to determine a method for evaluating the acceptance of welded or weld-repaired stainless steel piping. Thermal-hydraulic models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Severe fuel damage accident tests are being conducted at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; and an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program is being performed at Halden, Norway. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities, including the Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy, and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility.

  17. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, April-June 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S.K. (ed.)

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from April 1 through June 30, 1982, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities.

  18. Light-Water-Reactor Safety Research Program. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massey, W.E.; Kyger, J.A.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during October, November, and December 1979 on water-reactor-safety problems. The research and development areas covered are: (1) Heat Transfer Coordination for LOCA Research Programs and (2) Transient Fuel Response and Fission-Product Release. 29 refs., 39 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Interim status report on lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR) research and development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tzanos, C. P.; Sienicki, J. J.; Moisseytsev, A.; Smith, C. F.; de Caro, M.; Halsey, W. G.; Li, N.; Hosemann, P.; Zhang, J.; Bolind, A.; LLNL; LANL; Univ. of Illinois

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the status of Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) research and development carried out during the first half of FY 2008 under the U.S. Department of Energy Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor research and development has recently been transferred from Generation IV to the Reactor Campaign of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). Another status report shall be issued at the end of FY 2008 covering all of the LFR activities carried out in FY 2008 for both Generation IV and GNEP. The focus of research and development in FY 2008 is an initial investigation of a concept for a LFR Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) Technology Pilot Plant (TPP)/demonstration test reactor (demo) incorporating features and operating conditions of the European Lead-cooled SYstem (ELSY) {approx} 600 MWe lead (Pb)-cooled LFR preconceptual design for the transmutation of waste and central station power generation, and which would enable irradiation testing of advanced fuels and structural materials. Initial scoping core concept development analyses have been carried out for a 100 MWt core composed of sixteen open-lattice 20 by 20 fuel assemblies largely similar to those of the ELSY preconceptual fuel assembly design incorporating fuel pins with mixed oxide (MOX) fuel, central control rods in each fuel assembly, and cooled with Pb coolant. For a cycle length of three years, the core is calculated to have a conversion ratio of 0.79, an average discharge burnup of 108 MWd/kg of heavy metal, and a burnup reactivity swing of about 13 dollars. With a control rod in each fuel assembly, the reactivity worth of an individual rod would need to be significantly greater than one dollar which is undesirable for postulated rod withdrawal reactivity insertion events. A peak neutron fast flux of 2.0 x 10{sup 15} (n/cm{sup 2}-s) is calculated. For comparison, the 400 MWt Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) achieved a peak neutron fast flux of 7.2 x 10{sup 15} (n/cm{sup 2}-s) and the initially 563 MWt PHENIX reactor attained 2.0 x 10{sup 15} (n/cm{sup 2}-s) before one of three intermediate cooling loops was shut down due to concerns about potential steam generator tube failures. The calculations do not assume a test assembly location for advanced fuels and materials irradiation in place of a fuel assembly (e.g., at the center of the core); the calculations have not examined whether it would be feasible to replace the central assembly by a test assembly location. However, having only fifteen driver assemblies implies a significant effect due to perturbations introduced by the test assembly. The peak neutron fast flux is low compared with the fast fluxes previously achieved in FFTF and PHENIX. Furthermore, the peak neutron fluence is only about half of the limiting value (4 x 10{sup 23} n/cm{sup 2}) typically used for ferritic steels. The results thus suggest that a larger power level (e.g., 400 MWt) and a larger core would be better for a TPP based upon the ELSY fuel assembly design and which can also perform irradiation testing of advanced fuels and materials. In particular, a core having a higher power level and larger dimensions would achieve a suitable average discharge burnup, peak fast flux, peak fluence, and would support the inclusion of one or more test assembly locations. Participation in the Generation IV International Forum Provisional System Steering Committee for the LFR is being maintained throughout FY 2008. Results from the analysis of samples previously exposed to flowing lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) in the DELTA loop are summarized and a model for the oxidation/corrosion kinetics of steels in heavy liquid metal coolants was applied to systematically compare the calculated long-term (i.e., following several years of growth) oxide layer thicknesses of several steels.

  20. Assumptions and Criteria for Performing a Feasability Study of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Core to Use Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primm, R.T., III; Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C.; Moses, D.L.; Binder, J.L.; Xoubi, N. (U. of Cincinnati)

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational study will be initiated during fiscal year 2006 to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from highly enriched uranium fuel to low-enriched uranium. The study will be limited to steady-state, nominal operation, reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic analyses of a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel powder--U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. The purposes of this document are to (1) define the scope of studies to be conducted, (2) define the methodologies to be used to conduct the studies, (3) define the assumptions that serve as input to the methodologies, (4) provide an efficient means for communication with the Department of Energy and American research reactor operators, and (5) expedite review and commentary by those parties.

  1. Light-water-reactor safety materials engineering research programs. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1985. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes work performed by the Materials Science and Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory during January, February, and March 1985 on water reactor safety problems. The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light-Water Reactors and Long-Term Embrittlement of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels in Light-Water-Reactor Systems. 42 refs.

  2. Light-water-reactor safety materials engineering research programs. Volume 3. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes work performed by the Materials Science and Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory during October, November, and December 1984 on water reactor safety problems. The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light-Water Reactors and Long-Term Embrittlement of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels in Light-Water-Reactor Systems.

  3. Melt-Dilute Treatment Technology for Aluminum Based Research Reactor Spent Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.

    1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy has selected the Savannah River Site (SRS) as the location to consolidate and store Aluminum Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF), originating in the United States, from Foreign Research Reactor (FRR) and Domestic Research Reactor (DRR) through the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) process. These SNF are either in service, being stored in water basins or in dry storage casks at the reactor sites, or have been transferred to SRS and stored in water basins. A portion of this inventory contains HEU. Since the fuel receipts would continue for several decades beyond projected SRS canyon operations, it is anticipated that it will be necessary to develop disposal technologies that do not rely on reprocessing. The Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Task Team, appointed by the Office of Spent Fuel Management of DOE, assessed and identified the most promising technology options for the alternative disposition of aluminum based domestic and foreign research reactor SNF in a geologic repository. The most promising options identified by the task team were direct/ co-disposal and melt-dilute technologies. The DOE through the SRS has evaluated the two options and has identified Melt-Dilute Treatment Technology as the preferred alternative in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the ultimate disposal of Al-SNF in the Mined Geologic Disposal System.

  4. Proceedings of the 1988 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The international effort to develop and implement new research reactor fuels utilizing low-enriched uranium, instead of highly- enriched uranium, continues to make solid progress. This effort is the cornerstone of a widely shared policy aimed at reducing, and possibly eliminating, international traffic in highly-enriched uranium and the nuclear weapon proliferation concerns associated with this traffic. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialists in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the eleventh of a series which began 1978. Individual papers presented at the meeting have been cataloged separately.

  5. A Computer Program Predicting Steady-State Performance of a Nuclear Research Reactor's Cooling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamel Sidi Ali [Nuclear Research Center of Birine (Algeria)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performances of a nuclear reactor are directly affected by its cooling system, especially when it uses wet towers to evacuate the heat generated in the nuclear reactor core. Failure of the cooling system can yield very serious damages to most of the components of the nuclear reactor core. In this work, a computer program simulating the thermal behavior of a nuclear research reactor's cooling system is presented. Starting from the proposed start-up data of the reactor, the program predicts the cooling capacity of the nuclear reactor while taking into account the current climate conditions and also monitors the behavior of the thermal equipment involved in this process and this for different levels of power. The proposed simulation is based on a set of heat transfer equations representing all the equipment making up the cooling system up to the nuclear reactor core. Owing to the proposed inter-connected set of equations used to predict the thermal behaviour of the system, this program allows the user to modify at will a specified parameter and study the induced resulting effects on the rest of the system. The computer program developed has been experimentally validated on an operational system generating 6.8 MW and the obtained results are in good agreement with experiment. The results produced by the program concern the capacity of the cooling system to evacuate all the heat generated in the nuclear reactor core while taking into account the current climate conditions, the determination of the optimal number of thermal equipment that need to be engaged, the monitoring of the reactor core's entry end exit temperatures as well as the temperatures of all the components of the cooling system. Moreover, the program gives all the characteristics of air at the exit of the cooling towers and the loss of water due to the cooling process. (authors)

  6. austrian research reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    form + form "programme specific data" + cost sheet; other forms FOR PROPOSALS Joint Projects The Austrian Science Fund (FWF) and the Slovenian Research AgencyJavna...

  7. ames laboratory research reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the authors Perona, Pietro 75 Ris National Laboratory DTU Optics and Plasma Research Department Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources Websites Summary: Ris...

  8. australian replacement research reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Botea, Adi 63 Section 4 Report on performance 43 Australian Research Council Annual Report 200708 Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: and Facilities scheme...

  9. Light Water Reactor Safety Research Program. Semiannual report, April-September 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M.

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents progress made in Light Water Reactor Safety research conducted by Division 6441 in the period from April 1982 to September 1982. The programs conducted under investigation include Core Concrete Interactions, Core Melt-Coolant Interactions, Containment Emergency Sump Performance, the Hydrogen Program, and Combustible Gas in Containment Program. 50 references.

  10. argonne tank research and test reactor-aarr: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    argonne tank research and test reactor-aarr First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Tests using...

  11. MANAGEMENT OF RESEARCH AND TEST REACTOR ALUMINUM SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL - A TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinson, D.

    2010-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Program is responsible for the receipt and storage of aluminum research reactor spent nuclear fuel or used fuel until ultimate disposition. Aluminum research reactor used fuel is currently being stored or is anticipated to be returned to the U.S. and stored at DOE-EM storage facilities at the Savannah River Site and the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. This paper assesses the technologies and the options for safe transportation/receipt and interim storage of aluminum research reactor spent fuel and reviews the comprehensive strategy for its management. The U.S. Department of Energy uses the Appendix A, Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Criteria, to identify the physical, chemical, and isotopic characteristics of spent nuclear fuel to be returned to the United States under the Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel Acceptance Program. The fuel is further evaluated for acceptance through assessments of the fuel at the foreign sites that include corrosion damage and handleability. Transport involves use of commercial shipping casks with defined leakage rates that can provide containment of the fuel, some of which are breached. Options for safe storage include wet storage and dry storage. Both options must fully address potential degradation of the aluminum during the storage period. This paper focuses on the various options for safe transport and storage with respect to technology maturity and application.

  12. A RESEARCH ON SEAMLESS PLATFORM CHANGE OF REACTOR PROTECTION SYSTEM FROM PLC TO FPGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul, 143-701, Republic of Korea 2 Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Man 1. INTRODUCTION A safety grade PLC is an industrial digital computer used to develop safety-critical systems such as RPS (Reactor Protection System) for nuclear power plants. The software loaded into a PLC

  13. Environmental Assessment of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy has completed the Environmental Assessment (EA) of Urgent-Relief Acceptance of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel and issued a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) for the proposed action. The EA and FONSI are enclosed for your information. The Department has decided to accept a limited number of spent nuclear fuel elements (409 elements) containing uranium that was enriched in the United States from eight research reactors in Austria, Denmark, Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Sweden, and Switzerland. This action is necessary to maintain the viability of a major US nuclear weapons nonproliferation program to limit or eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium in civil programs. The purpose of the EA is to maintain the cooperation of the foreign research reactor operators with the nonproliferation program while a more extensive Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is prepared on a proposed broader policy involving the acceptance of up to 15,000 foreign research reactor spent fuel elements over a 10 to 15 year period. Based on an evaluation of transport by commercial container liner or chartered vessel, five eastern seaboard ports, and truck and train modes of transporting the spent fuel overland to the Savannah River Sits, the Department has concluded that no significant impact would result from any combination of port and made of transport. In addition, no significant impacts were found from interim storage of spent fuel at the Savannah River Site.

  14. Water Research 38 (2004) 38693880 A reactor model for pulsed pumping groundwater remediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lastoskie, Christian M.

    Water Research 38 (2004) 3869­3880 A reactor model for pulsed pumping groundwater remediation C; accepted 11 June 2004 Abstract A hybrid in situ bioremediation/pulsed pumping strategy has been developed to cost effectively remediate a carbon tetrachloride plume in Schoolcraft, Michigan. The pulsed pumping

  15. Planning Document for an NBSR Conversion Safety Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diamond D. J.; Baek J.; Hanson, A.L.; Cheng, L-Y.; Brown, N.; Cuadra, A.

    2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) is a reactor-laboratory complex providing the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the nation with a world-class facility for the performance of neutron-based research. The heart of this facility is the National Bureau of Standards Reactor (NBSR). The NBSR is a heavy water moderated and cooled reactor operating at 20 MW. It is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. A Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program is underway to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This program includes the qualification of the proposed fuel, uranium and molybdenum alloy foil clad in an aluminum alloy, and the development of the fabrication techniques. This report is a planning document for the conversion Safety Analysis Report (SAR) that would be submitted to, and approved by, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) before the reactor could be converted.This report follows the recommended format and content from the NRC codified in NUREG-1537, “Guidelines for Preparing and Reviewing Applications for the Licensing of Non-power Reactors,” Chapter 18, “Highly Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium Conversions.” The emphasis herein is on the SAR chapters that require significant changes as a result of conversion, primarily Chapter 4, Reactor Description, and Chapter 13, Safety Analysis. The document provides information on the proposed design for the LEU fuel elements and identifies what information is still missing. This document is intended to assist ongoing fuel development efforts, and to provide a platform for the development of the final conversion SAR. This report contributes directly to the reactor conversion pillar of the GTRI program, but also acts as a boundary condition for the fuel development and fuel fabrication pillars.

  16. Research Reactors and Radiation Facilities for Joint Use Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    on the mountain area in the northern part of Gifu-prefecture of Japan. The observatory is equipped with a 65cm science and technology, material science, radiation life science, and radiation medical science of excellence to promote leading research on the efficient multidisciplinary utilization of nuclear science

  17. EVALUATION OF CORE PHYSICS ANALYSIS METHODS FOR CONVERSION OF THE INL ADVANCED TEST REACTOR TO LOW-ENRICHMENT FUEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark DeHart; Gray S. Chang

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational neutronics studies to support the possible conversion of the ATR to LEU are underway. Simultaneously, INL is engaged in a physics methods upgrade project to put into place modern computational neutronics tools for future support of ATR fuel cycle and experiment analysis. A number of experimental measurements have been performed in the ATRC in support of the methods upgrade project, and are being used to validate the new core physics methods. The current computational neutronics work is focused on performance of scoping calculations for the ATR core loaded with a candidate LEU fuel design. This will serve as independent confirmation of analyses that have been performed previously, and will evaluate some of the new computational methods for analysis of a candidate LEU fuel for ATR.

  18. A risk characterization of safety research areas for Integral Fast Reactor program planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, C.J.; Cahalan, J.E.; Hill, D.J.; Kramer, J.M.; Marchaterre, J.F.; Pedersen, D.R.; Sevy, R.H.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Wei, T.Y.; Wright, A.E.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper characterizes the areas of Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) safety research in terms of their importance in addressing the risk of core disruption sequences for innovative designs. Such sequences have traditionally been determined to constitute the primary risk to public health and safety. All core disruption sequences are folded into four fault categories: classic unprotected (unscrammed) events; loss of decay heat; local fault propagation; and failure of critical reactor structures. Event trees are used to describe these sequences and the areas in the IFR Safety and related Base Technology research programs are discussed with respect to their relevance in addressing the key issues in preventing or delimiting core disruptive sequences. Thus a measure of potential for risk reduction is obtained for guidance in establishing research priorites.

  19. Fresh and Spent Nuclear Fuel Repatriation from the IRT-2000 Research Reactor Facility, Sofia, Bulgaria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. J. Allen; T. G. Apostolov; I. S. Dimitrov

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The IRT 2000 research reactor, operated by the Bulgarian Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy (INRNE), safely shipped all of their Russian-origin nuclear fuel from the Republic of Bulgaria to the Russian Federation beginning in 2003 and completing in 2008. These fresh and spent fuel shipments removed all highly enriched uranium (HEU) from Bulgaria. The fresh fuel was shipped by air in December 2003 using trucks and a commercial cargo aircraft. One combined spent fuel shipment of HEU and low enriched uranium (LEU) was completed in July 2008 using high capacity VPVR/M casks transported by truck, barge, and rail. The HEU shipments were assisted by the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return Program (RRRFR) and the LEU spent fuel shipment was funded by Bulgaria. This report describes the work, approvals, organizations, equipment, and agreements required to complete these shipments and concludes with several major lessons learned.

  20. French Atomic Energy Commission innovation program for future reactors research and development on safety systems and new technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raymond, P. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, St. Paul lez Durance (France)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CEA R&D program for water nuclear reactors is mainly divided in three program issues: R&D for operating reactors, R&D for the next generation of reactor in support of the European Pressurised Reactor (EPR) project - Innovative systems and future reactors. This {open_quotes}Innovative Systems and future reactors{close_quotes} R&D program involves various mean and long term studies on the following fields: Advanced Core Design and Fuel Cycle Strategies; New safety systems and technologies - Severe accident - Reactors evaluation and design - Advanced fuels, absorbers and burnable poisons. In the following communication, we will present the motivations, the objectives and the main results of the various research programs linked to these items. 19 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Development of Regulatory Technical Requirements for the Advanced Integral Type Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Yune, Young Gill; Kim, Woong Sik; Kim, Hho Jung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Kusung-dong, Yusung-ku, Taejon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the current status of the study on the development of regulatory technical requirements for the licensing review of an advanced integral type research reactor of which the license application is expected in a few years. According to the Atomic Energy Act of Korea, both research and education reactors are subject to the technical requirements for power reactors in the licensing review. But, some of the requirements may not be applicable or insufficient for the licensing reviews of reactors with unique design features. Thus it is necessary to identify which review topics or areas can not be addressed by the existing requirements and to develop the required ones newly or supplement appropriately. Through the study performed so far, it has been identified that the following requirements need to be developed newly for the licensing review of SMART-P: the use of proven technology, the interfacial facility, the non-safety systems, and the metallic fuels. The approach and basis for the development of each of the requirements are discussed. (authors)

  2. Testing of a Transport Cask for Research Reactor Spent Fuel - 13003

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mourao, Rogerio P.; Leite da Silva, Luiz [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, Belo Horizonte (Brazil)] [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, Belo Horizonte (Brazil); Miranda, Carlos A.; Mattar Neto, Miguel [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Quintana, Jose F.A.; Saliba, Roberto O. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Bariloche (Argentina)] [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Bariloche (Argentina); Novara, Oscar E. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the beginning of the last decade three Latin American countries that operate research reactors - Argentina, Brazil and Chile - have been joining efforts to improve the regional capability in the management of spent fuel elements from the TRIGA and MTR reactors operated in the region. A main drive in this initiative, sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency, is the fact that no definite solution regarding the back end of the research reactor fuel cycle has been taken by any of the participating country. However, any long-term solution - either disposition in a repository or storage away from reactor - will involve at some stage the transportation of the spent fuel through public roads. Therefore, a licensed cask that provides adequate shielding, assurance of subcriticality, and conformance to internationally accepted safety, security and safeguards regimes is considered a strategic part of any future solution to be adopted at a regional level. As a step in this direction, a packaging for the transport of irradiated fuel for MTR and TRIGA research reactors was designed by the tri-national team and a half-scale model equipped with the MTR version of the internal basket was constructed in Argentina and Brazil and tested in Brazil. Three test campaigns have been carried out so far, covering both normal conditions of transportation and hypothetical accident conditions. After failing the tests in the first two test series, the specimen successfully underwent the last test sequence. A second specimen, incorporating the structural improvements in view of the previous tests results, will be tested in the near future. Numerical simulations of the free drop and thermal tests are being carried out in parallel, in order to validate the computational modeling that is going to be used as a support for the package certification. (authors)

  3. Pit disassembly and conversion demonstration environmental assessment and research and development activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant portion of the surplus plutonium is in the form of pits, a nuclear weapons component. Pits are composed of plutonium which is sealed in a metallic shell. These pits would need to be safely disassembled and permanently converted to an unclassified form that would be suitable for long-term disposition and international inspection. To determine the feasibility of an integrated pit disassembly and conversion system, a Pit Disassembly and Conversion Demonstration is proposed to take place at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This demonstration would be done in existing buildings and facilities, and would involve the disassembly of up to 250 pits and conversion of the recovered plutonium to plutonium metal ingots and plutonium dioxide. This demonstration also includes the conversion of up to 80 kilograms of clean plutonium metal to plutonium dioxide because, as part of the disposition process, some surplus plutonium metal may be converted to plutonium dioxide in the same facility as the surplus pits. The equipment to be used for the proposed demonstration addressed in this EA would use some parts of the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) capability, other existing equipment/capacities, plus new equipment that was developed at other sites. In addition, small-scale R and D activities are currently underway as part of the overall surplus plutonium disposition program. These R and D activities are related to pit disassembly and conversion, MOX fuel fabrication, and immobilization (in glass and ceramic forms). They are described in Section 7.0. On May 16, 1997, the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) notified potentially affected states and tribes that this EA would be prepared in accordance with NEPA. This EA has been prepared to provide sufficient information for DOE to determine whether a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) is warranted or whether an EIS must be prepared.

  4. Strategic Plan for Light Water Reactor Research and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this strategic plan is to establish a framework that will allow the Department of Energy (DOE) and the nuclear power industry to jointly plan the nuclear energy research and development (R&D) agenda important to achieving the Nation's energy goals. This strategic plan has been developed to focus on only those R&D areas that will benefit from a coordinated government/industry effort. Specifically, this plan focuses on safely sustaining and expanding the electricity output from currently operating nuclear power plants and expanding nuclear capacity through the deployment of new plants. By focusing on R&D that addresses the needs of both current and future nuclear plants, DOE and industry will be able to take advantage of the synergism between these two technology areas, thus improving coordination, enhancing efficiency, and further leveraging public and private sector resources. By working together under the framework of this strategic plan, DOE and the nuclear industry reinforce their joint commitment to the future use of nuclear power and the National Energy Policy's goal of expanding its use in the United States. The undersigned believe that a public-private partnership approach is the most efficient and effective way to develop and transfer new technologies to the marketplace to achieve this goal. This Strategic Plan is intended to be a living document that will be updated annually.

  5. Materials Science and Technology Division light-water-reactor safety research program: quarterly progress report, January-March 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during January, February and March 1983 on water reactor safety problems. The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors, Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release, Clad Properties for Code Verification, and Long-Term Embrittlement of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels in LWR Systems.

  6. Materials Science Division light-water-reactor safety-research program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1982. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shack, W.J.; Rest, J.; Kassner, T.F.; Chung, H.M.; Claytor, T.N.; Kupperman, D.S.; Maiya, P.S.; Nichols, F.A.; Park, J.Y.; Ruther, W.E.; Yaggee, F.L.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during April, May, and June 1982 on water-reactor-safety problems. The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors, Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release, and Clad Properties for Code Verification.

  7. Materials Science Division light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shack, W.J.; Rest, J.; Kassner, T.F.; Neimark, L.A.; Chung, H.M.; Claytor, T.N.; Kupperman, D.S.; Maiya, P.S.; Nichols, F.A.; Park, J.Y.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during July, August, and September 1982 on water reactor safety problems. The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors, Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release, Clad Properties for Code Verification, Posttest Fuel Examination of the ORNL Fission Product Release Tests, and Examination of TMI-2 Fuel Specimens.

  8. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials with Particles and Components Testing (IMPACT) facility and the Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) Radiochemistry Processing Laboratory (RPL) and PIE facilities were added. The ATR NSUF annually hosts a weeklong event called User’s Week in which students and faculty from universities as well as other interested parties from regulatory agencies or industry convene in Idaho Falls, Idaho to see presentations from ATR NSUF staff as well as select researchers from the materials research field. User’s week provides an overview of current materials research topics of interest and an opportunity for young researchers to understand the process of performing work through ATR NSUF. Additionally, to increase the number of researchers engaged in LWR materials issues, a series of workshops are in progress to introduce research staff to stress corrosion cracking, zirconium alloy degradation, and uranium dioxide degradation during in-reactor use.

  9. A simple setup for neutron tomography at the Portuguese Nuclear Research Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Stanojev Pereira; J. G. Marques; R. Pugliesi

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple setup for neutron radiography and tomography was recently installed at the Portuguese Research Reactor. The objective of this work was to determine the operational characteristics of the installed setup, namely the irradiation time to obtain the best dynamic range for individual images and the spatial resolution. The performance of the equipment was demonstrated by imaging a fragment of a 17th century decorative tile.

  10. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form.

  11. Decommissioning of German Research Reactors Under the Governance of the Federal Ministry of Education and Research - 12154

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weigl, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Projekttraeger Karlsruhe (PTKA-WTE), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1956, nuclear research and development (R and D) in Germany has been supported by the Federal Government. The goal was to help German industry to become competitive in all fields of nuclear technology. National research centers were established and demonstration plants were built. In the meantime, all these facilities were shut down and are now in a state of decommissioning and dismantling (D and D). Meanwhile, Germany is one of the leading countries in the world in the field of D and D. Two big demonstration plants, the Niederaichbach Nuclear Power Plant (KKN) a heavy-water cooled pressure tube reactor with carbon-dioxide cooling and the Karlstein Superheated Steam Reactor (HDR) a boiling light water reactor with a thermal power of 100 MW, are totally dismantled and 'green field' is reached. Another big project was finished in 2008. The Forschungs-Reaktor Juelich 1 (FRJ1), a research reactor with a thermal power of 10 MW was completely dismantled and in September 2008 an oak tree was planted on a green field at the site, where the FRJ1 was standing before. This is another example for German success in the field of D and D. Within these projects a lot of new solutions and innovative techniques were tested, which were developed at German universities and in small and medium sized companies mostly funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). Some examples are underwater-cutting technologies like plasma arc cutting and contact arc metal cutting. This clearly shows that research on the field of D and D is important for the future. Moreover, these research activities are important to save the know-how in nuclear engineering in Germany and will enable enterprises to compete on the increasing market of D and D services. The author assumes that an efficient decommissioning of nuclear installations will help stabilize the credibility of nuclear energy. Some critics of nuclear energy are insisting that a return to 'green field sites' is not possible. The successful completion of two big D and D projects (HDR and KKN), which reached green field conditions, are showing quite the contrary. Moreover, research on D and D technologies offers the possibility to educate students on a field of nuclear technology, which will be very important in the future. In these days D and D companies are seeking for a lot of young engineers and this will not change in the coming years. (authors)

  12. Estimate of radiation release from MIT reactor with low enriched uranium (LEU) core during maximum hypothetical accident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plumer, Kevin E. (Kevin Edward)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with a 1986 NRC ruling, the MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is planning on converting from the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) for fuel. A component of the conversion analysis ...

  13. Evaluation of the thermal-hydraulic operating limits of the HEU-LEU transition cores for the MIT Research Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yunzhi (Yunzhi Diana)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is in the process of conducting a design study to convert from High Enrichment Uranium (HEU) fuel to Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) fuel. The currently selected LEU fuel design contains 18 ...

  14. Materials Science and Technology Division, light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shack, W.J.; Rest, J.; Kassner, T.F.; Ayrault, G.; Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kupperman, D.S.; Maiya, P.S.; Nichols, F.A.; Park, J.Y.

    1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors, Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release, Clad Properties for Code Verification, and Long-Term Embrittlement of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels in LWR Systems.

  15. NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF U10MO MONOLITHIC MINIPLATES FOR RESEARCH AND TEST REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hakan Ozaltun & Herman Shen

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article presents assessment of the mechanical behavior of U-10wt% Mo (U10Mo) alloy based monolithic fuel plates subject to irradiation. Monolithic, plate-type fuel is a new fuel form being developed for research and test reactors to achieve higher uranium densities within the reactor core to allow the use of low-enriched uranium fuel in high-performance reactors. Identification of the stress/strain characteristics is important for understanding the in-reactor performance of these plate-type fuels. For this work, three distinct cases were considered: (1) fabrication induced residual stresses (2) thermal cycling of fabricated plates; and finally (3) transient mechanical behavior under actual operating conditions. Because the temperatures approach the melting temperature of the cladding during the fabrication and thermal cycling, high temperature material properties were incorporated to improve the accuracy. Once residual stress fields due to fabrication process were identified, solution was used as initial state for the subsequent simulations. For thermal cycling simulation, elasto-plastic material model with thermal creep was constructed and residual stresses caused by the fabrication process were included. For in-service simulation, coupled fluid-thermal-structural interaction was considered. First, temperature field on the plates was calculated and this field was used to compute the thermal stresses. For time dependent mechanical behavior, thermal creep of cladding, volumetric swelling and fission induced creep of the fuel foil were considered. The analysis showed that the stresses evolve very rapidly in the reactor. While swelling of the foil increases the stress of the foil, irradiation induced creep causes stress relaxation.

  16. Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a system model that can be used to analyze three advance small modular reactor (SMR) designs through their lifetime. Neutronics of these reactor designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX/6). The system models were developed in Matlab and Simulink. A major thrust of this research was the initial scoping analysis of Sandia's concept of a long-life fast reactor (LLFR). The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional light water reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs (e.g. high temperature gas reactor (HTGR)). The system model has subroutines for lifetime reactor feedback and operation calculations, thermal hydraulic effects, load demand changes and a simplified SCO2 Brayton cycle for power conversion.

  17. Decommissioning Small Research and Training Reactors; Experience on Three Recent University Projects - 12455

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, Thomas [LVI Services Inc. (United States); DeWitt, Corey; Miller, Dustin; Colborn, Kurt [Enercon Services, Inc. (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning small reactors within the confines of an active University environment presents unique challenges. These range from the radiological protection of the nearby University population and grounds, to the logistical challenges of working in limited space without benefit of the established controlled, protected, and vital areas common to commercial facilities. These challenges, and others, are discussed in brief project histories of three recent (calendar year 2011) decommissioning activities at three University training and research reactors. These facilities include three separate Universities in three states. The work at each of the facilities addresses multiple phases of the decommissioning process, from initial characterization and pre-decommissioning waste removal, to core component removal and safe storage, through to complete structural dismantlement and site release. The results of the efforts at each University are presented, along with the challenges that were either anticipated or discovered during the decommissioning efforts, and results and lessons learned from each of the projects. (authors)

  18. RELAP5 Application to Accident Analysis of the NIST Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baek, J.; Cuadra Gascon, A.; Cheng, L.Y.; Diamond, D.

    2012-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed safety analyses have been performed for the 20 MW D{sub 2}O moderated research reactor (NBSR) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). The time-dependent analysis of the primary system is determined with a RELAP5 transient analysis model that includes the reactor vessel, the pump, heat exchanger, fuel element geometry, and flow channels for both the six inner and twenty-four outer fuel elements. A post-processing of the simulation results has been conducted to evaluate minimum critical heat flux ratio (CHFR) using the Sudo-Kaminaga correlation. Evaluations are performed for the following accidents: (1) the control rod withdrawal startup accident and (2) the maximum reactivity insertion accident. In both cases the RELAP5 results indicate that there is adequate margin to CHF and no damage to the fuel will occur because of sufficient coolant flow through the fuel channels and the negative scram reactivity insertion.

  19. Description of a research reactor control system using a programmable controller

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battle, R.E.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the design features, testing methods, and operational experience of a programmable controller (PC) installed as a neutron flux controller in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The PC was designed to control neutron flux from 1 to 105% for three selectable ranges. The PC generates a flux setpoint under operator control, calculates the reactor heat power from flow and temperature signals, calculates a neutron flux calibration factor based on the heat power, and positions a control rod based on the flux-setpoint difference. The programmable controller was tested by controlling an analog computer model of the ORR. The equipment was installed in August 1985, and except for some startup problems, the system has performed well.

  20. Research and Development Roadmaps for Nondestructive Evaluation of Cables, Concrete, Reactor Pressure Vessels, and Piping Fatique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL] [ORNL; Bakhtiari, Sasan [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL] [ORNL; Simmons, Kevin [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Coble, Jamie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Brenchley, David [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Meyer, Ryan [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To address these research needs, the MAaD Pathway supported a series of workshops in the summer of 2012 for the purpose of developing R&D roadmaps for enhancing the use of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) technologies and methodologies for detecting aging and degradation of materials and predicting the remaining useful life. The workshops were conducted to assess requirements and technical gaps related to applications of NDE for cables, concrete, reactor pressure vessels (RPV), and piping fatigue for extended reactor life. An overview of the outcomes of the workshops is presented here. Details of the workshop outcomes and proposed R&D also are available in the R&D roadmap documents cited in the bibliography and are available on the LWRS Program website (http://www.inl.gov/lwrs).

  1. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have concluded, however, that with adequate engineered cooling of the vessel, the A508/533 steels are also acceptable.

  2. Advanced reactor safety research. Quarterly report, October-December 1981. Volume 20

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning the inherent retention of core debris following a severe reactor accident; containment analysis for LWR and LMFBR type reactors; LMFBR accident delineation; advanced reactor core phenomenology; LWR damaged fuel phenomenology; and ACRR status.

  3. Light Water Reactor Safety Research Program. Semiannual report, October 1983-March 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the investigations and analyses conducted at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, in support of the Light Water Reactor Safety Research Program from October 1983 through March 1984. The Fuel-Coolant Interactions Study investigates the mechanism of concrete erosion by molten core materials, the nature and rate of generation of evolved gases, and the effects of fission-product release. The Hydrogen Behavior and Mitigative and Preventive Schemes Programs investigate the HECTR code for modeling hydrogen deflagration, and the Grand Gulf Igniter System II is being reviewed. All activities are continuing. 53 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data.

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced research reactor Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to build the world's most advanced nuclear fusion reactor... ) International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), which will be built at Cadarache, near the...

  6. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production, with an outlet gas temperature in the range of 750°C, and a design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. This technology development plan details the additional research and development (R&D) required to design and license the NGNP RPV, assuming that A 508/A 533 is the material of construction. The majority of additional information that is required is related to long-term aging behavior at NGNP vessel temperatures, which are somewhat above those commonly encountered in the existing database from LWR experience. Additional data are also required for the anticipated NGNP environment. An assessment of required R&D for a Grade 91 vessel has been retained from the first revision of the R&D plan in Appendix B in somewhat less detail. Considerably more development is required for this steel compared to A 508/A 533 including additional irradiation testing for expected NGNP operating temperatures, high-temperature mechanical properties, and extensive studies of long-term microstructural stability.

  7. System Upgrades at the Advanced Test Reactor Help Ensure that Nuclear Energy Research Continues at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig Wise

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fully operational in 1967, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a first-of-its-kind materials test reactor. Located on the Idaho National Laboratory’s desert site, this reactor remains at the forefront of nuclear science, producing extremely high neutron irradiation in a relatively short time span. The Advanced Test Reactor is also the only U.S. reactor that can replicate multiple reactor environments concurrently. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Department of Energy recently invested over 13 million dollars to replace three of ATR’s instrumentation and control systems. The new systems offer the latest software and technology advancements, ensuring the availability of the reactor for future energy research. Engineers and project managers successfully completed the four year project in March while the ATR was in a scheduled maintenance outage. “These new systems represent state-of-the-art monitoring and annunciation capabilities,” said Don Feldman, ATR Station Manager. “They are comparable to systems currently used for advanced reactor designs planned for construction in the U.S. and in operation in some foreign countries.”

  8. Technical Support to SBIR Phase II Project: Improved Conversion of Cellulose Waste to Ethanol Using a Dual Bioreactor System: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-310

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, M.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over-dependence on fossil fuel has spurred research on alternative energy. Inedible plant materials such as grass and corn stover represent abundant renewable natural resources that can be transformed into biofuel. Problems in enzymatic conversion of biomass to sugars include the use of incomplete synergistic enzymes, end-product inhibition, and adsorption and loss of enzymes necessitating their use in large quantities. Technova Corporation will develop a defined consortium of natural microorganisms that will efficiently break down biomass to energy-rich soluble sugars, and convert them to cleaner-burning ethanol fuel. The project will also develop a novel biocatalytic hybrid reactor system dedicated to this bioprocess, which embodies recent advances in nanotechnology. NREL will participate to develop a continuous fermentation process.

  9. The current state of the Russian reduced enrichment research reactors program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aden, V.G.; Kartashov, E.F.; Lukichev, V.A. [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last year after the 16-th International Conference on Reducing Fuel Enrichment in Research Reactors held in October, 1993 in Oarai, Japan, the conclusive stage of the Program on reducing fuel enrichment (to 20% in U-235) in research reactors was finally made up in Russia. The Program was started late in 70th and the first stage of the Program was completed by 1986 which allowed to reduce fuel enrichment from 80-90% to 36%. The completion of the Program current stage, which is counted for 5-6 years, will exclude the use of the fuel enriched by more than 20% from RF to other countries such as: Poland, Czeck Republick, Hungary, Roumania, Bulgaria, Libya, Viet-Nam, North Korea, Egypt, Latvia, Ukraine, Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan. In 1994 the Program, approved by RF Minatom authorities, has received the status of an inter-branch program since it was admitted by the RF Ministry for Science and Technical Policy. The Head of RF Minatom central administrative division N.I.Ermakov was nominated as the Head of the Russian Program, V.G.Aden, RDIPE Deputy Director, was nominated as the scientific leader. The Program was submitted to the Commission for Scientific, Technical and Economical Cooperation between USA and Russia headed by Vice-President A. Gore and Prime Minister V. Chemomyrdin and was given support also.

  10. Light water reactor safety research program, quarterly report, July-September 1980. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report covers research performed during July-September 1980 for the NRC Light Water Reactor Safety Research Program comprised of: (1) The Molten Fuel Concrete Interactions (MFCI) study of experimental and analytical investigations of the chemical and physical phenomena associated with interactions between molten core materials and concrete; (2) Steam Explosion Phenomena program to assess the probability and consequences of steam explosions during postulated meltdown accidents in LWRs; (3) Separate Effects Tests for TRAP Code Development investigating vapor pressures of fission-product species at elevated temperatures, chemical compound formation and reaction rates; (4) Containment Emergency Sump Performance (CESP) program to investigate the reliability of ECCS sumps; (5) Hydrogen Program designed to quantify the threat posed by hydrogen released during LWR accidents; and (6) Combustible Gas in Containment Program to study the generation of H2 from the corrosion of zinc and other materials located within LWR containment buildings.

  11. Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. 1983 Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights of progress achieved in the program of thermochemical conversion of biomass into clean fuels during 1983 are summarized. Gasification research projects include: production of a medium-Btu gas without using purified oxygen at Battelle-Columbus Laboratories; high pressure (up to 500 psia) steam-oxygen gasification of biomass in a fluidized bed reactor at IGT; producing synthesis gas via catalytic gasification at PNL; indirect reactor heating methods at the Univ. of Missouri-Rolla and Texas Tech Univ.; improving the reliability, performance, and acceptability of small air-blown gasifiers at Univ. of Florida-Gainesville, Rocky Creek Farm Gasogens, and Cal Recovery Systems. Liquefaction projects include: determination of individual sequential pyrolysis mechanisms at SERI; research at SERI on a unique entrained, ablative fast pyrolysis reactor for supplying the heat fluxes required for fast pyrolysis; work at BNL on rapid pyrolysis of biomass in an atmosphere of methane to increase the yields of olefin and BTX products; research at the Georgia Inst. of Tech. on an entrained rapid pyrolysis reactor to produce higher yields of pyrolysis oil; research on an advanced concept to liquefy very concentrated biomass slurries in an integrated extruder/static mixer reactor at the Univ. of Arizona; and research at PNL on the characterization and upgrading of direct liquefaction oils including research to lower oxygen content and viscosity of the product. Combustion projects include: research on a directly fired wood combustor/gas turbine system at Aerospace Research Corp.; adaptation of Stirling engine external combustion systems to biomass fuels at United Stirling, Inc.; and theoretical modeling and experimental verification of biomass combustion behavior at JPL to increase biomass combustion efficiency and examine the effects of additives on combustion rates. 26 figures, 1 table.

  12. Solid State Reactor Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, G.T.

    2004-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solid State Reactor (SSR) is an advanced reactor concept designed to take advantage of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) recently developed graphite foam that has enhanced heat transfer characteristics and excellent high-temperature mechanical properties, to provide an inherently safe, self-regulated, source of heat for power and other potential applications. This work was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) program (Project No. 99-064) from August 1999 through September 30, 2002. The initial concept of utilizing the graphite foam as a basis for developing an advanced reactor concept envisioned that a suite of reactor configurations and power levels could be developed for several different applications. The initial focus was looking at the reactor as a heat source that was scalable, independent of any heat removal/power conversion process. These applications might include conventional power generation, isotope production and destruction (actinides), and hydrogen production. Having conducted the initial research on the graphite foam and having performed the scoping parametric analyses from neutronics and thermal-hydraulic perspectives, it was necessary to focus on a particular application that would (1) demonstrate the viability of the overall concept and (2) require a reasonably structured design analysis process that would synthesize those important parameters that influence the concept the most as part of a feasible, working reactor system. Thus, the application targeted for this concept was supplying power for remote/harsh environments and a design that was easily deployable, simplistic from an operational standpoint, and utilized the new graphite foam. Specifically, a 500-kW(t) reactor concept was pursued that is naturally load following, inherently safe, optimized via neutronic studies to achieve near-zero reactivity change with burnup, and proliferation resistant. These four major areas of research were undertaken: (1) establishing the design and safety-related basis via neutronic and reactor control assessments with the graphite foam as heat transfer medium; (2) evaluating the thermal performance of the graphite foam for heat removal, reactor stability, reactor operations, and overall core thermal characteristics; (3) characterizing the physical properties of the graphite foam under normal and irradiated conditions to determine any effects on structure, dimensional stability, thermal conductivity, and thermal expansion; and (4) developing a power conversion system design to match the reactor operating parameters.

  13. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program summary, Project No. 669

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The staff of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission has prepared Volume 1 of a safety evaluation report (SER), NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document -- Program Summary,'' to document the results of its review of the Electric Power Research Institute's Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document.'' This SER provides a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff's review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  14. Biological research survey for the efficient conversion of biomass to biofuels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent, Michael Stuart; Andrews, Katherine M. (Computational Biosciences)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this four-week late start LDRD was to assess the current status of science and technology with regard to the production of biofuels. The main focus was on production of biodiesel from nonpetroleum sources, mainly vegetable oils and algae, and production of bioethanol from lignocellulosic biomass. One goal was to assess the major technological hurdles for economic production of biofuels for these two approaches. Another goal was to compare the challenges and potential benefits of the two approaches. A third goal was to determine areas of research where Sandia's unique technical capabilities can have a particularly strong impact in these technologies.

  15. Frontier of Fusion Research: Path to the Steady State Fusion Reactor by Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motojima, Osamu [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki-shi, Gifu-ken, 509-5292 (Japan)

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ITER, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, which will be built in Cadarache in France, has finally started this year, 2006. Since the thermal energy produced by fusion reactions divided by the external heating power, i.e., the Q value, will be larger than 10, this is a big step of the fusion research for half a century trying to tame the nuclear fusion for the 6.5 Billion people on the Earth. The source of the Sun's power is lasting steadily and safely for 8 Billion years. As a potentially safe environmentally friendly and economically competitive energy source, fusion should provide a sustainable future energy supply for all mankind for ten thousands of years. At the frontier of fusion research important milestones are recently marked on a long road toward a true prototype fusion reactor. In its own merits, research into harnessing turbulent burning plasmas and thereby controlling fusion reaction, is one of the grand challenges of complex systems science.After a brief overview of a status of world fusion projects, a focus is given on fusion research at the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS) in Japan, which is playing a role of the Inter University Institute, the coordinating Center of Excellence for academic fusion research and by the Large Helical Device (LHD), the world's largest superconducting heliotron device, as a National Users' facility. The current status of LHD project is presented focusing on the experimental program and the recent achievements in basic parameters and in steady state operations. Since, its start in a year 1998, a remarkable progress has presently resulted in the temperature of 140 Million degree, the highest density of 500 Thousand Billion/cc with the internal density barrier (IDB) and the highest steady average beta of 4.5% in helical plasma devices and the largest total input energy of 1.6 GJ, in all magnetic confinement fusion devices. Finally, a perspective is given of the ITER Broad Approach program as an integrated part of ITER and Development of Fusion Energy project Agreement. Moreover, the relationship with the NIFS' new parent organization the National Institutes of Natural Sciences and with foreign research institutions is briefly explained.

  16. Status report on the Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) /Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) and supporting research and development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sienicki, J. J.; Moisseytsev, A.; Yang, W. S.; Wade, D. C.; Nikiforova, A.; Hanania, P.; Ryu, H. J.; Kulesza, K. P.; Kim, S. J.; Halsey, W. G.; Smith, C. F.; Brown, N. W.; Greenspan, E.; de Caro, M.; Li, N.; Hosemann, P.; Zhang, J.; Yu, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division; LLNL; LANL; Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.; Ecole des Mines de Paris; Oregon State Univ.; Univ.of California at Berkley

    2008-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an update on development of a pre-conceptual design for the Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) plant concept and supporting research and development activities. SSTAR is a small, 20 MWe (45 MWt), natural circulation, fast reactor plant for international deployment concept incorporating proliferation resistance for deployment in non-fuel cycle states and developing nations, fissile self-sufficiency for efficient utilization of uranium resources, autonomous load following making it suitable for small or immature grid applications, and a high degree of passive safety further supporting deployment in developing nations. In FY 2006, improvements have been made at ANL to the pre-conceptual design of both the reactor system and the energy converter which incorporates a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle providing higher plant efficiency (44 %) and improved economic competitiveness. The supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle technology is also applicable to Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors providing the same benefits. One key accomplishment has been the development of a control strategy for automatic control of the supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle in principle enabling autonomous load following over the full power range between nominal and essentially zero power. Under autonomous load following operation, the reactor core power adjusts itself to equal the heat removal from the reactor system to the power converter through the large reactivity feedback of the fast spectrum core without the need for motion of control rods, while the automatic control of the power converter matches the heat removal from the reactor to the grid load. The report includes early calculations for an international benchmarking problem for a LBE-cooled, nitride-fueled fast reactor core organized by the IAEA as part of a Coordinated Research Project on Small Reactors without Onsite Refueling; the calculations use the same neutronics computer codes and methodologies applied to SSTAR. Another section of the report details the SSTAR safety design approach which is based upon defense-in-depth providing multiple levels of protection against the release of radioactive materials and how the inherent safety features of the lead coolant, nitride fuel, fast neutron spectrum core, pool vessel configuration, natural circulation, and containment meet or exceed the requirements for each level of protection. The report also includes recent results of a systematic analysis by LANL of data on corrosion of candidate cladding and structural material alloys of interest to SSTAR by LBE and Pb coolants; the data were taken from a new database on corrosion by liquid metal coolants created at LANL. The analysis methodology that considers penetration of an oxidation front into the alloy and dissolution of the trailing edge of the oxide into the coolant enables the long-term corrosion rate to be extracted from shorter-term corrosion data thereby enabling an evaluation of alloy performance over long core lifetimes (e.g., 30 years) that has heretofore not been possible. A number of candidate alloy specimens with special treatments or coatings which might enhance corrosion resistance at the temperatures at which SSTAR would operate were analyzed following testing in the DELTA loop at LANL including steels that were treated by laser peening at LLNL; laser peening is an approach that alters the oxide-metal bonds which could potentially improve corrosion resistance. LLNL is also carrying out Multi-Scale Modeling of the Fe-Cr system with the goal of assisting in the development of cladding and structural materials having greater resistance to irradiation.

  17. Reactor pressure vessel integrity research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, W.R.; Pennell, W.E.; Pace, J.V.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Maintaining the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water-cooled nuclear power plant is crucial in preventing and controlling severe accidents that have the potential for major contamination release. The RPV is the only key safety-related component of the plant for which a duplicate or redundant backup system does not exist. It is therefore imperative to understand and be able to predict the integrity inherent in the RPV. For this reason, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has established the related research programs at ORNL described herein to provide for the development and confirmation of the methods used for: (1) establishing the irradiation exposure conditions within the RPV in the Embrittlement Data Base and Dosimetry Evaluation Program, (2) assessing the effects of irradiation on the RPV materials in the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program, and (3) developing overall structural and fracture analyses of RPVs in the Heavy-Section Steel Technology Program.

  18. The progress of neutron texture diffractometer at China Advanced Research Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, MeiJuan; Liu, YunTao; Tian, GengFang; Gao, JianBo; Yu, ZhouXiang; Li, YuQing; Wu, LiQi; Yang, LinFeng; Sun, Kai; Wang, HongLi; Chen, DongFeng

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first neutron texture diffractometer in China has been built at China Advanced Research Reactor due to the strong demands of texture measurement with neutrons from domestic user community. This neutron texture diffractometer has high neutron intensity, moderate resolution and is mainly applied to study the texture in the commonly used industrial materials and engineering components. In this paper, the design and characteristics of this instrument are described. The results for calibration with neutrons and quantitative texture analysis of Zr alloy plate are presented. The comparison of texture measurement among different neutron texture diffractometer of HIPPO at LANSCE, Kowari at ANSTO and neutron texture diffractometer at CARR illustrates the reliable performance of this texture diffractometer.

  19. Final Site Specific Decommissioning Inspection Report #2 for the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor, Seattle, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.J. Roberts

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period of August through November 2006, ORISE performed a comprehensive IV at the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor Facility. The objective of the ORISE IV was to validate the licensee’s final status survey processes and data, and to assure the requirements of the DP and FSSP were met.

  20. Light-water-reactor safety fuel systems research programs. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1985. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes work performed by the Materials Science and Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory during January, February, and March 1985 on water reactor safety problems related to fuel and cladding. The research and development areas covered are Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release and Clad Properties for Code Verification. 15 refs.

  1. Light-water-reactor safety fuel systems research programs. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1984. [Fuel and cladding problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes work performed by the Materials Science and Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory during January, February, and March 1984 on water reactor safety problems related to fuel and cladding. The research and development areas covered are Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release and Clad Properties for Code Verification.

  2. Light-water-reactor safety fuel systems research programs. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1984. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes work performed by the Materials Science and Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory during July, August, and September 1984 on water reactor safety problems related to fuel and cladding. The research and development areas covered are Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release and Clad Properties for Code Verification. 17 refs., 23 figs., 5 tabs.

  3. Light-water-reactor safety fuel systems research programs. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1984. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report report summarizes work performed by the Materials Science and Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory during April, May, and June 1984 on water reactor safety problems related to fuel and cladding. The research and development areas covered are Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release and Clad Properties for Code Verification.

  4. Light-water-reactor safety fuel systems research programs. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1984. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes work performed by the Materials Science and Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory during October, November, and December 1984 on water reactor safety problems related to fuel and cladding. The research and development areas covered are Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release and Clad Properties for Code Verification. 30 refs., 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Dismantling Structures and Equipment of the MR Reactor and its Loop Facilities at the National Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute' - 12051

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volkov, V.G.; Danilovich, A.S.; Zverkov, Yu. A.; Ivanov, O.P.; Kolyadin, V.I.; Lemus, A.V.; Muzrukova, V.D.; Pavlenko, V.I.; Semenov, S.G.; Fadin, S.Yu.; Shisha, A.D.; Chesnokov, A.V. [National Research Center 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008 a design of decommissioning of research reactors MR and RFT has been developed in the National research Center 'Kurchatov institute'. The design has been approved by Russian State Authority in July 2009 year and has received the positive conclusion of ecological expertise. In 2009-2010 a preparation for decommissioning of reactors MR and RFT was spent. Within the frames of a preparation a characterization, sorting and removal of radioactive objects, including the irradiated fuel, from reactor storage facilities and pool have been executed. During carrying out of a preparation on removal of radioactive objects from reactor sluice pool water treating has been spent. For these purposes modular installation for clearing and processing of a liquid radioactive waste 'Aqua - Express' was used. As a result of works it was possible to lower volume activity of water on three orders in magnitude that has allowed improving essentially of radiating conditions in a reactor hall. Auxiliary systems of ventilation, energy and heat supplies, monitoring systems of radiating conditions of premises of the reactor and its loop-back installations are reconstructed. In 2011 the license for a decommissioning of the specified reactors has been received and there are begun dismantling works. Within the frames of works under the design the armature and pipelines are dismantled in a under floor space of a reactor hall where a moving and taking away pipelines of loop facilities and the first contour of the MR reactor were replaced. A dismantle of the main equipment of loop facility with the gas coolant has been spent. Technologies which were used on dismantle of the radioactive contaminated equipment are presented, the basic works on reconstruction of systems of maintenance of on the decommissioning works are described, the sequence of works on the decommissioning of reactors MR and RFT is shown. Dismantling works were carried out with application of means of a dust suppression that, in aggregate with standard means at such works of individual protection of the personnel and devices of radiating control, has allowed to lower risk of action of radiation on the personnel, the population and environment at the expense of reduction of volume activity of radioactive aerosols in air. (authors)

  6. Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, Rebecca [Bryant Research, LLC; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one-on-one interviews and traditional and online focus groups with scientists. The latter include SNS, HFIR, and APS users as well as scientists at ORNL, some of whom had not yet used HFIR and/or SNS. These approaches informed development of the second phase, a quantitative online survey. The survey consisted of 16 questions and 7 demographic categorizations, 9 open-ended queries, and 153 pre-coded variables and took an average time of 18 minutes to complete. The survey was sent to 589 SNS/HFIR users, 1,819 NSLS users, and 2,587 APS users. A total of 899 individuals provided responses for this study: 240 from NSLS; 136 from SNS/HFIR; and 523 from APS. The overall response rate was 18%.

  7. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Projects on Structural Integrity of Reactor Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Server, W. L. [ATI Consulting, Pinehurst, NC; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted a series of Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) that have focused on irradiated reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel fracture toughness properties and approaches for assuring structural integrity of RPVs throughout operating life. A series of nine CRPs have been sponsored by the IAEA, starting in the early 1970s, focused on neutron radiation effects on RPV steels. The purpose of the CRPs was to develop comparisons and correlations to test the uniformity of irradiated results through coordinated international research studies and data sharing. Consideration of dose rate effects, effects of alloying (nickel, manganese, silicon, etc.) and residual elements (eg., copper and phosphorus), and drop in upper shelf toughness are also important for assessing neutron embrittlement effects. The ultimate use of embrittlement understanding is assuring structural integrity of the RPV under current and future operation and accident conditions. Material fracture toughness is the key ingredient needed for this assessment, and many of the CRPs have focused on measurement and application of irradiated fracture toughness. This paper presents an overview of the progress made since the inception of the CRPs in the early 1970s. The chronology and importance of each CRP have been reviewed and put into context for continued and long-term safe operation of RPVs.

  8. Low Level Radioactive Wastes Conditioning during Decommissioning of Salaspils Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramenkova, G.; Klavins, M. [Faculty of Geographical and Earth Sciences, University of Latvia, 19 Rainis Boulevard, Riga, LV-1586 (Latvia); Abramenkovs, A. [Ministry of Environment, Hazardous Wastes Management State Agency, 31 Miera Street, Salaspils, LV-2169 (Latvia)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The decommissioning of Salaspils research reactor is connected with the treatment of 2200 tons different materials. The largest part of all materials ({approx}60 % of all dismantled materials) is connected with low level radioactive wastes conditioning activities. Dismantled radioactive materials were cemented in concrete containers using water-cement mortar. According to elaborated technology, the tritiated water (150 tons of liquid wastes from special canalization tanks) was used for preparation of water-cement mortar. Such approach excludes the emissions of tritiated water into environment and increases the efficiency of radioactive wastes management system for decommissioning of Salaspils research reactor. The Environmental Impact Assessment studies for Salaspils research reactor decommissioning (2004) and for upgrade of repository 'Radons' for decommissioning purposes (2005) induced the investigations of radionuclides release parameters from cemented radioactive waste packages. These data were necessary for implementation of quality assurance demands during conditioning of radioactive wastes and for safety assessment modeling for institutional control period during 300 years. Experimental studies indicated, that during solidification of water- cement samples proceeds the increase of temperature up to 81 deg. C. It is unpleasant phenomena since it can result in damage of concrete container due to expansion differences for mortar and concrete walls. Another unpleasant factor is connected with the formation of bubbles and cavities in the mortar structure which can reduce the mechanical stability of samples and increase the release of radionuclides from solidified cement matrix. The several additives, fly ash and PENETRON were used for decrease of solidification temperature. It was found, that addition of fly ash to the cement-water mortar can reduce the solidification temperature up to 62 deg. C. Addition of PENETRON results in increasing of solidification temperature up to 83 deg. C. Experimental data shows, that water/cement ratio significantly influences on water-cement mortar's viscosity and solidified samples mechanical stability. Increasing of water ratio from 0.45 up to 0.65 decreases water-cement mortar's viscosity from 1100 mPas up to 90 mPas. Significant reduction of viscosity is an important factor, which facilitates the fulfillment all gaps and cavities with the mortar during conditioning of solid radioactive wastes in containers. On the other hand, increase water ratio from 0.45 up to 0.65 decreases mechanical stability of water-cement samples from 23 N/mm{sup 2} to the 12 N/mm{sup 2}. It means that water-cement bulk stability significantly decreases with increasing of water content. Technologically is important to increase the tritiated water content in container with cemented radioactive wastes. It gives a possibility to increase the fulfillment of container with radioactive materials. On the other hand, additional water significantly reduces bulk stability of containers with cemented radioactive wastes, which can result in disintegration of radioactive wastes packages in repository during 300 years. Taking into account the experimental results, it is not recommended to exceed the water/cement ratio more than 0.60. Tritium and Cs{sup 137} leakage tests show, that radionuclides release curves has a complicate structure. Experimental results indicated that addition of fly ash result in facilitation of tritium and cesium release in water phase. This is unpleasant factor, which significantly decreases the safety of disposed radioactive wastes. Despite the positive impact on solidification temperature drop, the addition of fly ash to the cement-water mortar is not recommended in case of cementation of radionuclides in concrete containers. In conclusion: The cementation processes of solid radioactive wastes in concrete containers were investigated. The influence of additives on cementation processes was studied. It was shown, that the increasing of water ratio from 0.45 up to 0.65 decreases water-cement mortar

  9. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBL-8945 GOTEC-01 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICALat Three Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)effect of an operating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion plant

  10. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBL-8945 GOTEC-01 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICALThree Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites:an operating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion plant were in-

  11. Light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, July to September 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors; transient fuel response and fission-product release; and clad properties for code verification.

  12. Research on the external fluid mechanics of ocean thermal energy conversion plants : report covering experiments in a current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fry, David J. (David James)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a set of experiments in a physical model study to explore plume transport and recirculation potential for a range of generic Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant designs and ambient conditions. ...

  13. Analysis of a research reactor under anticipated transients without scram events using the RELAP5/MOD3.2 computer program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hari, Sridhar

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . 54 III Primary Loop Parameters: Comparison of Research Reactor With a Typical PWR. IV Summary of the Results of the Simulated Transients. . . 57 93 ACRONYMS AAEC ANL Australian Atomic Energy Commission Argonne National Laboratory ANSTO... Basis Accident Emergency Core Cooling System High Flux Australian Reactor HIFAR specific version of the ZAPP code High Flux Isotope Reactor International Atomic Energy Agency Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Loss of Coolant Accident Critical...

  14. Radiation Exposures Associated with Shipments of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MASSEY,CHARLES D.; MESSICK,C.E.; MUSTIN,T.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experience has shown that the analyses of marine transport of spent fuel in the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) were conservative. It is anticipated that for most shipments. The external dose rate for the loaded transportation cask will be more in line with recent shipments. At the radiation levels associated with these shipments, we would not expect any personnel to exceed radiation exposure limits for the public. Package dose rates usually well below the regulatory limits and personnel work practices following ALARA principles are keeping human exposures to minimal levels. However, the potential for Mure shipments with external dose rates closer to the exclusive-use regulatory limit suggests that DOE should continue to provide a means to assure that individual crew members do not receive doses in excess of the public dose limits. As a minimum, the program will monitor cask dose rates and continue to implement administrative procedures that will maintain records of the dose rates associated with each shipment, the vessel used, and the crew list for the vessel. DOE will continue to include a clause in the contract for shipment of the foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel requiring that the Mitigation Action Plan be followed.

  15. Summary engineering description of underwater fuel storage facility for foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlke, H.J.; Johnson, D.A.; Rawlins, J.K.; Searle, D.K.; Wachs, G.W.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a summary description for an Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) for foreign research reactor (FRR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A FRR SNF environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared and will include both wet and dry storage facilities as storage alternatives. For the UFSF presented in this document, a specific site is not chosen. This facility can be sited at any one of the five locations under consideration in the EIS. These locations are the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. Generic facility environmental impacts and emissions are provided in this report. A baseline fuel element is defined in Section 2.2, and the results of a fission product analysis are presented. Requirements for a storage facility have been researched and are summarized in Section 3. Section 4 describes three facility options: (1) the Centralized-UFSF, which would store the entire fuel element quantity in a single facility at a single location, (2) the Regionalized Large-UFSF, which would store 75% of the fuel element quantity in some region of the country, and (3) the Regionalized Small-UFSF, which would store 25% of the fuel element quantity, with the possibility of a number of these facilities in various regions throughout the country. The operational philosophy is presented in Section 5, and Section 6 contains a description of the equipment. Section 7 defines the utilities required for the facility. Cost estimates are discussed in Section 8, and detailed cost estimates are included. Impacts to worker safety, public safety, and the environment are discussed in Section 9. Accidental releases are presented in Section 10. Standard Environmental Impact Forms are included in Section 11.

  16. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Research and Development Program Plan -- Fiscal Year 2009–2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power has reliably and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. By the year 2030, domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to grow to levels of 16 to 36% higher than 2007 levels. At the same time, most currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their 60-year operating licenses. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary this year. U.S. regulators have begun considering extended operations of nuclear power plants and the research needed to support long-term operations. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Research and Development (R&D) Program, developed and sponsored by the Department of Energy, is performed in close collaboration with industry R&D programs. The purpose of the LWRS R&D Program is to provide technical foundations for licensing and managing long-term, safe and economical operation of the current operating nuclear power plants. The LWRS R&D Program vision is captured in the following statements: Existing operating nuclear power plants will continue to safely provide clean and economic electricity well beyond their first license- extension period, significantly contributing to reduction of United States and global carbon emissions, enhancement of national energy security, and protection of the environment. There is a comprehensive technical basis for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, economical operation of nuclear power plants. Sustaining the existing operating U.S. fleet also will improve its international engagement and leadership on nuclear safety and security issues.

  17. Materials Science and Technology Division Light-Water-Reactor Safety Research Program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1983. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shack, W.J.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during April, May, and June 1983 on water reactor safety problems. The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors, Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release, Clad Properties for Code Verification, and Long-Term Embrittlement of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels in LWR Systems.

  18. Materials Science and Technology Division light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1983. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This progress report summarizes the Argonne National Laboratory work performed during July, August, and September 1983 on water reactor safety problems. The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors (reported elsewhere), Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release, Clad Properties for Code Verification, and Long-Term Embrittlement of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels in LWR Systems (reported elsewhere).

  19. Catalyst and process development for synthesis gas conversion to isobutylene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony, R.G.; Akgerman, A.

    1992-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to develop a new catalyst, the kinetics for this catalyst, reactor models for trickle bed, slurry and fixed bed, and simulate the performance of fixed bed trickle flow reactors, slurry flow reactors, and fixed bed gas phase reactors for conversion of a hydrogen lean synthesis gas to isobutylene.

  20. Neutronic Analyses for HEU to LEU fuel conversion of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, E. H.; Newton, T. H.; Bergeron, A.; Horelik, N.; Stevens, J. G (Nuclear Engineering Division); ( NS)

    2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) reactor (MITR-II), based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, is a research reactor designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on a mixture of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of compact high performance reactors like the MITR-II. This report presents the results of steady state neutronic safety analyses for conversion of MITR-II from the use of HEU fuel to the use of U-Mo LEU fuel. The objective of this work was to demonstrate that the safety analyses meet current requirements for an LEU core replacement of MITR-II.

  1. Advanced reactor safety research quarterly report, October-December 1982. Volume 24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes progress in a number of activities dealing with current safety issues relevant to both light water reactors (LWRs) and breeder reactors. The work includes a broad range of experiments to simulate accidental conditions to provide the required data base to understand important accident sequences and to serve as a basis for development and verification of the complex computer simulation models and codes used in accident analysis and licensing reviews. Such a program must include the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety system performance under a broad variety of abnormal conditions. Current major emphasis is focused on providing information to NRC relevant to (1) its deliberations and decisions dealing with severe LWR accidents and (2) its safety evaluation of the proposed Clinch River Breeder Reactor.

  2. Research on acceleration method of reactor physics based on FPGA platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, C.; Yu, G.; Wang, K. [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical designs of the new concept reactors which have complex structure, various materials and neutronic energy spectrum, have greatly improved the requirements to the calculation methods and the corresponding computing hardware. Along with the widely used parallel algorithm, heterogeneous platforms architecture has been introduced into numerical computations in reactor physics. Because of the natural parallel characteristics, the CPU-FPGA architecture is often used to accelerate numerical computation. This paper studies the application and features of this kind of heterogeneous platforms used in numerical calculation of reactor physics through practical examples. After the designed neutron diffusion module based on CPU-FPGA architecture achieves a 11.2 speed up factor, it is proved to be feasible to apply this kind of heterogeneous platform into reactor physics. (authors)

  3. Conceptual Design of Molten Salt Loop Experiment for MIT Research Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bean, Malcolm K.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molten salt is a promising coolant candidate for Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) Gen-IV designs. The low neutron absorption, high thermal capacity, chemical inertness, and high boiling point at low pressure of ...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Biochemical Conversion Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with: Biochemical Conversion Program * Biofuels * Combustion Research Facility * CRF * Energy * Lignocellulosic biomass * Microalgae * SAND 2011-5054W * Transportation Energy...

  5. Development of refined MCNPX-PARET multi-channel model for transient analysis in research reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalcheva, S.; Koonen, E. [SCK-CEN, BR2 Reactor Dept., Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Olson, A. P. [RERTR Program, Nuclear Engineering Div., Argonne National Laboratory, Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactivity insertion transients are often analyzed (RELAP, PARET) using a two-channel model, representing the hot assembly with specified power distribution and an average assembly representing the remainder of the core. For the analysis of protected by the reactor safety system transients and zero reactivity feedback coefficients this approximation proves to give adequate results. However, a more refined multi-channel model representing the various assemblies, coupled through the reactivity feedback effects to the whole reactor core is needed for the analysis of unprotected transients with excluded over power and period trips. In the present paper a detailed multi-channel PARET model has been developed which describes the reactor core in different clusters representing typical BR2 fuel assemblies. The distribution of power and reactivity feedback in each cluster of the reactor core is obtained from a best-estimate MCNPX calculation using the whole core geometry model of the BR2 reactor. The sensitivity of the reactor response to power, temperature and energy distributions is studied for protected and unprotected reactivity insertion transients, with zero and non-zero reactivity feedback coefficients. The detailed multi-channel model is compared vs. simplified fewer-channel models. The sensitivities of transient characteristics derived from the different models are tested on a few reactivity insertion transients with reactivity feedback from coolant temperature and density change. (authors)

  6. Materials Science and Technology Division Light-Water-Reactor Safety Research Program. Volume 4. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research and development areas covered are Environmentally Assisted Cracking in Light Water Reactors, Transient Fuel Response and Fission Product Release, Clad Properties for Code Verification, and Long-Term Embrittlement of Cast Duplex Stainless Steels in LWR Systems.

  7. Analysis of a research reactor under anticipated transients without scram events using the RELAP5/MOD3.2 computer program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hari, Sridhar

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations for two series of anticipated transients phics. without scram (ATWS) events have been carried out for a small, hypothetical, research reactor based on the High Flux Australian Reador HIFAR using the RELAPS/MOD3.Z computer program...

  8. The BGU/CERN solar hydrothermal reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertolucci, Sergio; Caspers, Fritz; Garb, Yaakov; Gross, Amit; Pauletta, Stefano

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a novel solar hydrothermal reactor (SHR) under development by Ben Gurion University (BGU) and the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN. We describe in broad terms the several novel aspects of the device and, by extension, of the niche it occupies: in particular, enabling direct off-grid conversion of a range of organic feedstocks to sterile useable (solid, liquid) fuels, nutrients, products using only solar energy and water. We then provide a brief description of the high temperature high efficiency panels that provide process heat to the hydrothermal reactor, and review the basics of hydrothermal processes and conversion taking place in this. We conclude with a description of a simulation of the pilot system that will begin operation later this year.

  9. Scaling study for SP-100 reactor technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, A.C.; McKissock, B. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA); National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (USA). Lewis Research Center)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we explored several ways of extending SP-100 reactor technology to higher power levels. One approach was to use the reference SP-100 pin design and increase the fuel pin length and the number of fuel pins as needed to provide higher capability. The impact on scaling of a modified and advanced SP-100 reactor technology was also explored. Finally, the effect of using alternative power conversion subsystems, with SP-100 reactor technology was investigated. One of the principal concerns for any space-based system is mass; consequently, this study focused on estimating reactor, shield, and total system mass. The RSMASS code (Marshall 1986) was used to estimate reactor and shield mass. Simple algorithms developed at NASA Lewis Research Center were used to estimate the balance of system mass. Power ranges from 100 kWe to 10 MWe were explored assuming both one year and seven years of operation. Thermoelectric, Stirling, Rankine, and Brayton power conversion systems were investigated. The impact on safety, reliability, and other system attributes, caused by extending the technology to higher power levels, was also investigated. 6 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. 478 IEEE Transactionson Energy Conversion,vol.7, No. 3, September1092. THE PENN STATE INTELLIGENT DISTRIBUTED CONTROL RESEARCH LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    microprocessor-based control system which is interfaced to real-time simulations of power plant processes, intelligent, and other advancedcontroltechniques for nuclear power plants. Keywords -simulation reactor power plant. This test-bed, which may be expanded to simulate other nuclear power plant

  11. Prototype Tests for the Recovery and Conversion of UF6Chemisorbed in NaF Traps for the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Cul, G.D.

    2000-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site includes the removal of about 37 kg of uranium. Of that inventory, about 23 kg have already been removed from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is being stored in Building 3019. The planned recovery of {approx}11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a chemical form [uranium oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8})], which is suitable for long-term storage. This document describes the process that will be used to recover and convert the uranium in the NaF traps into a stable oxide for long-term storage. Included are a description of the process, equipment, test results, and lessons learned. The process was developed for remote operation in a hot cell. Lessons learned from the prototype testing were incorporated into the process design.

  12. Prototype Tests for the Recovery and Conversion of UF6 Chemisorbed in NaF Traps for the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Cul, G.D.; Icenhour, A.S.; Simmons, D.W.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site includes the removal of about 37 kg of uranium. Of that inventory, about 23 kg have already been removed from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is being stored in Building 3019. The planned recovery of -11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a chemical form [uranium oxide], which is suitable for long-term storage. This document describes the process that will be used to recover and convert the uranium in the NaF traps into a stable oxide for long-term storage. Included are a description of the process, equipment, test results, and lessons learned. The process was developed for remote operation in a hot cell. Lessons learned from the prototype testing were incorporated into the process design.

  13. Twenty-second water reactor safety information meeting. Volume 2: Severe accident research, thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs, high-burnup fuel behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monteleone, S. [comp.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twenty-Second Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 24-26, 1994. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from Finland, France, Italy, Japan, Russia, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting.

  14. EXPERIMENT OPERATIONS PLAN FOR A LOSS-OF-COOLANT ACCIDENT SIMULATION IN THE NATIONAL RESEARCH UNIVERSAL REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russcher, G. E.; Cannon, L. W.; Goodman, R. L.; Hesson, G. M.; King, L. L.; McDuffie, P. N.; Marshall, R. K.; Nealley, C.; Pilger, J. P.; Mohr, C. L.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident phenomena are being simulated with a series of experiments in the U-2 loop of the National Research Universal Reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The first of these experiments includes up to 45 parametric thermal-hydraulic tests to establish the relationship between the reflood delay time of emergency coolant, the reflooding rate, and the resultant fuel rod cladding peak temperature. This document contains both experiment proposal and assembly proposal information. The intent of this document is to supply information required by the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), and to identify the planned procedures and data that will be used both to establish readiness to proceed from one test phase to the next and to operate the experiment. Operating control settings and limits are provided for both experimenter systems and CRNL systems. A hazards review summarizes safety issues that have been addressed during the development of the experiment plan.

  15. Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition from normal high-flow operation to natural circulation. Low-flow coolant events are the most difficult to design for because they involve the most complex thermal-hydraulic behavior induced by the dominance of thermal-buoyancy forces acting on the coolants. Such behavior can cause multiple-component flow interaction phenomena, which are not adequately understood or appreciated by reactor designers as to their impact on reactor performance and safety. Since the early 1990s, when DOE canceled the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program, little has been done experimentally to further understand the importance of the complex thermal-buoyancy phenomena and their impact on reactor design or to improve the ability of three-dimensional (3-D) transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and structures codes to model the phenomena. An improved experimental data base and the associated improved validated codes would provide needed design tools to the reactor community. The improved codes would also facilitate scale-up from small-scale testing to prototype size and would facilitate comparing performance of one reactor/component design with another. The codes would also have relevance to the design and safety of water-cooled reactors. To accomplish the preceding, it is proposed to establish a national GNEP-LMR research and development center at Argonne having as its foundation state-of-art science-based infrastructure consisting of: (a) thermal-hydraulic experimental capabilities for conducting both water and sodium testing of individual reactor components and complete reactor in-vessel models and (b) a computational modeling development and validation capability that is strongly interfaced with the experimental facilities. The proposed center would greatly advance capabilities for reactor development by establishing the validity of high-fidelity (i.e., close to first principles) models and tools. Such tools could be used directly for reactor design or for qualifying/tuning of lower-fidelity models, which now require costly experimental qualification for each different type of design

  16. Reactor-safety research programs. Quarterly report, July-September 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S.K. (ed.)

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions.

  17. Reactor-safety research programs. Quarterly report, October-December 1982. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S.K. (ed.)

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized-water-reactor steam-generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the bahavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities.

  18. Reactor safety research programs. Volume 1. Quarterly report, January-March 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S.K. (ed.)

    1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory from January 1 through March 31, 1983, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Evaluation of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions.

  19. The DF-4 fuel damage experiment in ACRR (Annual Core Research Reactor) with a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) control blade and channel box

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauntt, R.O.; Gasser, R.D.; Ott, L.J. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DF-4 test was an experimental investigation into the melt progression behavior of boiling water reactor (BWR) core components under high temperature severe core damage conditions. In this study 14 zircaloy clad UO{sub 2} fuel rods, and representations of the zircaloy fuel canister and stainless steel/B{sub 4}C control blade were assembled into a 0.5 m long test bundle. The test bundle was fission heated in a flowing steam environment, using the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia Laboratories, simulating the environmental conditions of an uncovered BWR core experiencing high temperature damage as a result residual fission product decay heating. The experimental results provide information on the thermal response of the test bundle components, the rapid exothermic oxidation of the zircaloy fuel cladding and canister, the production of hydrogen from metal-steam oxidation, and the failure behavior of the progressively melting bundle components. This information is provided in the form of thermocouple data, steam and hydrogen flow rate data, test bundle fission power data and visual observation of the damage progression. In addition to BWR background information, this document contains a description of the experimental hardware with details on how the experiment was instrumented and diagnosed, a description of the test progression, and a presentation of the on-line measurements. Also in this report are the results of a thermal analysis of the fueled test section of the fueled test section of the experiment demonstrating an overall consistency in the measurable quantities from the test. A discussion of the results is provided. 38 refs., 72 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. Solar Thermal Conversion of Biomass to Synthesis Gas: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-00335

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Netter, J.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CRADA is established to facilitate the development of solar thermal technology to efficiently and economically convert biomass into useful products (synthesis gas and derivatives) that can replace fossil fuels. NREL's High Flux Solar Furnace will be utilized to validate system modeling, evaluate candidate reactor materials, conduct on-sun testing of the process, and assist in the development of solar process control system. This work is part of a DOE-USDA 3-year, $1M grant.

  1. "Approaches to Ultrahigh Efficiency Solar Energy Conversion"...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    "Approaches to Ultrahigh Efficiency Solar Energy Conversion" Webinar Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events EFRC News...

  2. "Fundamental Challenges in Solar Energy Conversion" workshop...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Fundamental Challenges in Solar Energy Conversion" workshop hosted by LMI-EFRC Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events...

  3. Advanced reactor safety research. Quarterly report, July-September 1982. Volume 23

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning core debris behavior; high-temperature fission-product chemistry and transport; containment analysis; elevated temperature materials assessment; development of LMFBR regulatory criteria and source terms; advanced reactor core phenomenology; LWR damaged fuel phenomenology; and ACRR status.

  4. Research article A modified batch reactor system to study equilibrium-reactive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    the characteristics of batch experiments and provides complete control over the reaction time; in addition, the setup-reactor SER experiments to investigate arsenic adsorption and transport on iron-oxide coated sand to column experiments and allows better control over system parameters such as pH, reaction time, and solid

  5. Advanced reactor safety research. Quarterly report, April-June 1982. Volume 22

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overall objective of this work is to provide NRC a comprehensive data base essential to (1) defining key safety issues, (2) understanding risk-significant accident sequences, (3) developing and verifying models used in safety assessments, and (4) assuring the public that power reactor systems will not be licensed and placed in commercial service in the United States without appropriate consideration being given to their effects on health and safety. This report describes progress in a number of activities dealing with current safety issues relevant to both light water and breeder reactors. The work includes a broad range of experiments to simulate accidental conditions to provide the required data base to understand important accident sequences and to serve as a basis for development and verification of the complex computer simulation models and codes used in accident analysis and licensing reviews. Such a program must include the development of analytical models, verified by experiment, which can be used to predict reactor and safety system performance under a broad variety of abnormal conditions. Current major emphasis is focused on providing information to NRC relevant to (1) its deliberations and decisions dealing with severe LWR accidents, and (2) its safety evaluation of the proposed Clinch River Breeder Reactor.

  6. LOCA simulation in the national research universal reactor program: postirradiation examination results for the third materials experiment (MT-3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rausch, W.N.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of in-reactor experiments were conducted using full-length 32-rod pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel bundles as part of the Loss-of-Coolant Accident (LOCA) Simulation Program. The third materials experiment (MT-3) was the sixth in the series of thermal-hydraulic and materials deformation/rutpure experiments conducted in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor, Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. The main objective of the experiment was to evaluate ballooning and rupture during active two-phase cooling in the temperature range from 1400 to 1500/sup 0/F (1030 to 1090 K). The 12 test rods in the center of the 32-rod bundle were initially pressurized to 550 psi (3.8 MPa) to insure rupture in the correct temperature range. All 12 of the rods ruptured, with an average peak bundle strain of approx. 55%. The UKAEA also funded destructive postirradiation examination (PIE) of several of the ruptured rods from the MT-3 experiment. This report describes the work performed and presents the PIE results. Information obtained during the PIE included cladding thickness measurements metallography, and particle size analysis of the cracked and broken fuel pellets.

  7. Examples of the use of PSA in the design process and to support modifications at two research reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D.H.; Bley, D.C.; Lin, J.C. [PLG, Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Ramsey, C.T.; Linn, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many, if not most, of the world`s commercial nuclear power plants have been the subject of plant-specific probabilistic safety assessments (PSA). A growing number of other nuclear facilities as well as other types of industrial installations have been the focus of plant-specific PSAs. Such studies have provided valuable information concerning the nature of the risk of the individual facility and have been used to identify opportunities to manage that risk. This paper explores the risk management activities associated with two research reactors in the United States as a demonstration of the versatility of the use of PSA to support risk-related decision making.

  8. Proceedings of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission twentieth water reactor safety information meeting; Volume 2, Severe accident research, Thermal hydraulics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, A.J. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This three-volume report contains papers presented at the Twentieth Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 21--23, 1992. The papers describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included 10 different papers presented by researchersfrom CEC, China, Finland, France, Germany, Japan, Spain and Taiwan. Selected papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  9. A History or Geothermal Energy Research and Development in the United States: Energy Conversion 1976-2006

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: The Future of BadTHEEnergyReliability2015GrossA Few SimpleEnergy Conversion

  10. Light water reactor safety research program. Quarterly report Jan-Mar 80

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, M.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Molten Fuel Concrete Interactions (MFCI) study is comprised of experimental and analytical investigations of the chemical and physical phenomena associated with interactions between molten core materials and concrete. Such interactions are possible during hypothetical fuel-melt accidents in light water reactors (LWRs) when molten fuel and steel from the reactor core penetrate the pressure vessel and cascade onto the concrete substructure. The purpose of the MFCI study is to develop an understanding of these interactions suitable for risk assessment. Emphasis is placed on identifying and investigating the dominant interaction phenomena occurring between prototypic materials. The table of contents is the following: Molten fuel concrete interactions study; Steam explosion phenomena; Separate effects tests for TRAP code development; and Containment emergency sump performance.

  11. Research at ITER towards DEMO: Specific reactor diagnostic studies to be carried out on ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasilnikov, A. V.; Kaschuck, Y. A.; Vershkov, V. A.; Petrov, A. A.; Petrov, V. G.; Tugarinov, S. N. [Institution Project center ITER, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In ITER diagnostics will operate in the very hard radiation environment of fusion reactor. Extensive technology studies are carried out during development of the ITER diagnostics and procedures of their calibration and remote handling. Results of these studies and practical application of the developed diagnostics on ITER will provide the direct input to DEMO diagnostic development. The list of DEMO measurement requirements and diagnostics will be determined during ITER experiments on the bases of ITER plasma physics results and success of particular diagnostic application in reactor-like ITER plasma. Majority of ITER diagnostic already passed the conceptual design phase and represent the state of the art in fusion plasma diagnostic development. The number of related to DEMO results of ITER diagnostic studies such as design and prototype manufacture of: neutron and ?–ray diagnostics, neutral particle analyzers, optical spectroscopy including first mirror protection and cleaning technics, reflectometry, refractometry, tritium retention measurements etc. are discussed.

  12. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, January-March 1985. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S.K. (ed.)

    1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory from January 1 through March 31, 1985, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Results from an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program being performed at Halden, Norway, are reported. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Thermal-hydraulic computer programs are providing best-estimate analyses for a variety of safety issues in light-water reactors. Severe fuel damage tests are being conducted in the NRU Reactor, Chalk River, Canada.

  13. Light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, July-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massey, W.E.; Till, C.E.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A physically realistic description of fuel swelling and fission-gas release is needed to aid in predicting the behavior of fuel rods and fission gases under certain hypothetical light-water-reactor (LWR) accident conditions. To satisfy this need, a comprehensive computer-base model, the Steady-State and Transient Gas-Release and Swelling Subroutine (GRASS-SST), its faster-running version, FASTGRASS, and correlations based on analyses performed with GRASS-SST, PARAGRASS, are being developed at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). This model is being incorporated into the Fuel-Rod Analysis Program (FRAP) code being developed by EG and G Idaho, Inc., at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The analytical effort is supported by a data base and correlations developed from characterization of irradiated LWR fuel and from out-of-reactor transient heating tests of irradiated commercial and experimental LWR fuel under a range of thermal conditions. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, April-June 1983. Vol. 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S.K. (ed.)

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory from April 1 through June 30, 1983, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Experimental data and validated models are being used to determine a method for evaluating the acceptance of welded or weld-repaired stainless steel piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior or full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Severe fuel damage accident tests are being conducted at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; and an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program is being performed at Halden, Norway. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities, including fuel rod deformation and severe fuel damage tests for the Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho.

  15. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, October-December 1983. Vol. 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S.K. (ed.)

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation include investigating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems and examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics. Accelerated pellet-cladding interaction modeling is being conducted to predict the probability of fuel rod failure under normal operating conditions. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Experimental data and validated models are being used to determine a method for evaluating the acceptance of welded or weld-repaired stainless steel piping. Thermal-hydraulic models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Severe fuel damage accident tests are being conducted at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program is being performed at Halden, Norway; and fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility.

  16. FISSION REACTORS KEYWORDS: high-temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildiz, Bilge

    that is directly cou- pled to an advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR) is pro- posed in this paper. The system features conversion system, and the progress in the electrolysis cell materials field can help the econom- ical by a supercritical CO2 ~SCO2! power conversion system that is directly coupled to an advanced gas-cooled reactor

  17. Basic research needs in seven energy-related technologies, conservation, conversion, transmission and storage, environmental fission, fossil, geothermal, and solar

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume comprises seven studies performed by seven groups at seven national laboratories. The laboratories were selected because of their assigned lead roles in research pertaining to the respective technologies. Researches were requested to solicit views of other workers in the fields.

  18. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, Don

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  19. Advanced Test Reactor Tour

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Miley, Don

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  20. Research on direct containment heating and pressurized melt expulsion from the reactor coolant system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarbell, W.W.; Pilch, M.; Brockmann, J.E.; Powers, D.A.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The expulsion of high temperature core debris from the reactor cavity into the containment atmosphere has recently been identified as an important potential contributor to containment failure in the event of a severe accident. Experiments and analyses have shown that failure of the reactor vessel while the primary system is pressurized can result in the rapid discharge of molten core debris into the cavity. Gas from the blowdown of the coolant system may then entrain the debris as fine particulate that may be carried out of the cavity region. Containment loading can result from the combustion of hydrogen produced by the interaction of the debris with steam from the primary system and from thermal and chemical energy transferred from the debris to the atmosphere is directed towards identifying and quantifying the phenomena associated with the pressurized discharge of the core debris and the direct containment heating processes. Experiments are being performed to provide the information needed to develop phenomenological models for use in system level code predictions. Emphasis has been primarily on the use of scaled cavities (ranging from 1:10 to 1:50 linear scale) and the quantification of the extent of the material dispersed. Information has been obtained on the physics of the jet behavior, the entrainment of the debris, debris characteristics (e.g., size and number distributions), debris-gas heat transfer and chemistry, aerosol generation, and the influence of water. Models and codes are reviewed and discussed and representative calculations are presented.

  1. Reactor Safety Research Programs. Quarterly report, July-September 1984. Volume 3. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S.K. (ed.)

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory from July 1 through September 30, 1984, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Results from an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program being performed at Halden, Norway, are reported. Accelerated pellet-cladding interaction modeling is being conducted to predict the probability of fuel rod failure under normal operating conditions. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Thermal-hydraulic models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Severe fuel damage accident tests are being conducted in the NRU Reactor, Chalk River, Canada.

  2. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, January-March 1984. Vol. 1. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S.K. (ed.)

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory from January 1 through March 31, 1984, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Results from an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program being performed at Halden, Norway, are reported. Accelerated pellet-cladding interaction modeling is being conducted to predict the probability of fuel rod failure under normal operating conditions. Experimental data on analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Thermal-hydraulic models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Severe fuel damage accident tests are being conducted at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada.

  3. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, April-June 1984. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S.K. (ed.)

    1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document summarizes work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory from April 1 through June 30, 1984, for the Division of Accident Evaluation and the Division of Engineering Technology, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Results from an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program being performed at Halden, Norway, are reported. Accelerated pellet-cladding interaction modeling is being conducted to predict the probability of fuel rod failure under normal operating conditions. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Thermal-hydraulic models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Severe fuel damage accident tests are being conducted at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada.

  4. Decommissioning of the Dragon High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Located at the Former United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) Research Site at Winfrith - 13180

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Anthony A. [Research Sites Restoration Ltd, Winfrith, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [Research Sites Restoration Ltd, Winfrith, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dragon Reactor was constructed at the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Winfrith in Dorset through the late 1950's and into the early 1960's. It was a High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR) with helium gas coolant and graphite moderation. It operated as a fuel testing and demonstration reactor at up to 20 MW (Thermal) from 1964 until 1975, when international funding for this project was terminated. The fuel was removed from the core in 1976 and the reactor was put into Safestore. To meet the UK's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) objective to 'drive hazard reduction' [1] it is necessary to decommission and remediate all the Research Sites Restoration Ltd (RSRL) facilities. This includes the Dragon Reactor where the activated core, pressure vessel and control rods and the contaminated primary circuit (including a {sup 90}Sr source) still remain. It is essential to remove these hazards at the appropriate time and return the area occupied by the reactor to a safe condition. (author)

  5. Plasmonic conversion of solar energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clavero, Cesar

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic Research Needs for Solar Energy Utilization, BasicS. Pillai and M. A. Green, Solar Energy Materials and SolarPlasmonic conversion of solar energy César Clavero Plasma

  6. Materials for electrochemical energy storage and conversion II -- Batteries, capacitors and fuel cells. Materials Research Society symposium proceedings, Volume 496

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginley, D.S.; Doughty, D.H.; Scrosati, B.; Takamura, T.; Zhang, Z.J. [eds.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our energy-hungry world is increasingly relying on new methods to store and convert energy for portable electronics, as well as new, environmentally friendly modes of transportation and electrical energy generation. The availability of advanced materials is linked to the commercial success of improved power sources such as batteries, fuel cells and capacitors with higher specific energy and power, longer cycle life and rapid change/discharge rates. The papers in this symposium were heavily weighted toward lithium batteries. The proceedings volume is organized into six sections highlighting: general papers on a wide variety of rechargeable battery technologies; new approaches to modeling of Li batteries; advances in fuel-cell technology; new work on Li battery cathodes; anodes and electrolytes; and work on super-capacitors. The authors think the volume is an excellent snapshot of the current state of the art in energy storage and conversion technologies, many of which will make a significant impact on society. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume.

  7. The power distribution and neutron fluence measurements and calculations in the VVER-1000 Mock-Up on the LR-0 research reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostal, M.; Juricek, V.; Rypar, V.; Svadlenkova, M. [Research Center Rez Ltd., 250 68 Husinec-Rez 130 (Czech Republic); Cvachovec, F. [Univ. of Defence, Kounicova 65, 662 10 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The power density distribution in a reactor has significant influence on core structures and pressure vessel mechanical resistance, as well as on the physical characteristics of nuclear fuel. This quantity also has an effect on the leakage neutron and photon field. This issue has become of increasing importance, as it touches on actual questions of the VVER nuclear power plant life time extension. This paper shows the comparison of calculated and experimentally determined pin by pin power distributions. The calculation has been performed with deterministic and Monte Carlo approaches. This quantity is accompanied by the neutron and photon flux density calculation and measurements at different points of the light water zero-power (LR-0) research reactor mock-up core, reactor built-in component (core barrel), and reactor pressure vessel and model. The effect of the different data libraries used for calculation is discussed. (authors)

  8. Material Sample Collection with Tritium and Gamma Analyses at the University of Illinois's Nuclear Research Laboratory TRIGA Nuclear Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charters, G.; Aggarwal, S. [New Millennium Nuclear Technologies, 575 Union Blvd, Suite 102, Lakewood, CO 80228 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The University of Illinois in Champaign-Urbana has an Advanced TRIGA reactor facility which was built in 1960 and operated until August 1998. The facility was shutdown for a variety of reasons, primarily due to a lack of usage by the host institution. In 1998 the reactor went into SAFSTOR and finally shipped its fuel in 2004. At the present time a site characterization and decommissioning plan are in process and hope to be submitted to the NRC in early 2006. The facility had to be fully characterized and part of this characterization involved the collection and analysis of samples. This included various solid media such as, concrete, graphite, metals, and sub-slab surface soils for immediate analysis of Activation and Tritium contamination well below the easily measured surfaces. This detailed facility investigation provided a case to eliminate historical unknowns, increasing the confidence for the segregation and packaging of high specific activity Low Level Radwaste (LLRW), from which a strategy of 'surgical-demolition' and segregation could be derived thus maximizing the volumes of 'clean material'. Performing quantitative volumetric concrete or metal radio-analyses safer and faster (without lab intervention) was a key objective of this dynamic characterization approach. Currently, concrete core bores are shipped to certified laboratories where the concrete residue is run through a battery of tests to determine the contaminants. The existing core boring operation volatilises or washes out some of the contaminants (like tritium) and oftentimes cross-contaminates the are a around the core bore site. The volatilization of the contaminants can lead to airborne problems in the immediate vicinity of the core bore. Cross-contamination can increase the contamination area and thereby increase the amount of waste generated that needs to be treated and stabilized before disposal. The goal was to avoid those field activities that could cause this type of release. Therefore, TRUPRO{sup R}, a sampling and profiling tool in conjunction with radiometric instrumentation was utilized to produce contamination profiles through the material being studied. All samples (except metals) on-site were analyzed within 10 minutes for tritium using a calibrated portable liquid scintillation counter (LSC) and analyzed for gamma activation products using a calibrated ISOCS. Improved sample collection with near real time analysis along with more historical hazard analysis enhanced significantly over the baseline coring approach the understanding of the depth distribution of contaminants. The water used in traditional coring can result in a radioactive liquid waste that needs to be dealt with. This would have been an issue at University of Illinois. Considerable time, risk reduction and money are saved using this profiling approach. (authors)

  9. Reactor safety research programs. Quarterly report, October-December 1984. Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edler, S.K. (ed.)

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results from an instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program being performed at Halden, Norway, are reported. Accelerated pellet-cladding interaction modeling is being conducted to predict the probability of fuel rod failure under normal operating conditions. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision making regarding pipe-to-pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho. High-temperature materials property tests are being conducted to provide data on severe core damage fuel behavior. Thermal-hydraulic computer programs are providing best-estimate analyses for a variety of safety issues in light-water reactors. 8 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Design of a low enrichment, enhanced fast flux core for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Tyler Shawn

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Worldwide, there is limited test reactor capacity to perform the required irradiation experiments on advanced fast reactor materials and fuel designs. This is particularly true in the U.S., which no longer has an operating ...

  11. Dealing with Historical Discrepancies: The Recovery of National Research Experiment (NRX) Reactor Fuel Rods at Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) - 13324

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vickerd, Meggan [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON, K0J 1J0 (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the 1952 National Research Experiment (NRX) Reactor accident, fuel rods which had short irradiation histories were 'temporarily' buried in wooden boxes at the 'disposal grounds' during the cleanup effort. The Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP), funded by Natural Resources Canada (NRCan), strategically retrieves legacy waste and restores lands affected by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) early operations. Thus under this program the recovery of still buried NRX reactor fuel rods and their relocation to modern fuel storage was identified as a priority. A suspect inventory of NRX fuels was compiled from historical records and various research activities. Site characterization in 2005 verified the physical location of the fuel rods and determined the wooden boxes they were buried in had degraded such that the fuel rods were in direct contact with the soil. The fuel rods were recovered and transferred to a modern fuel storage facility in 2007. Recovered identification tags and measured radiation fields were used to identify the inventory of these fuels. During the retrieval activity, a discrepancy was discovered between the anticipated number of fuel rods and the number found during the retrieval. A total of 32 fuel rods and cans of cut end pieces were recovered from the specified site, which was greater than the anticipated 19 fuel rods and cans. This discovery delayed the completion of the project, increased the associated costs, and required more than anticipated storage space in the modern fuel storage facility. A number of lessons learned were identified following completion of this project, the most significant of which was the potential for discrepancies within the historical records. Historical discrepancies are more likely to be resolved by comprehensive historical record searches and site characterizations. It was also recommended that a complete review of the wastes generated, and the total affected lands as a result of this historic 1952 NRX accident be undertaken. These lessons and recommendations have lead to changes in how the NLLP is executed in the CRL waste management areas. (authors)

  12. Groundwater Monitoring and Control Before Decommissioning of the Research Reactor VVR-S from Magurele-Bucharest

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dragusin, Mitica [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering-Horia Hulubei - IFIN-HH, Bucharest-Magurele, Romania, POBox MG-6, 077125, Ilfov (Romania)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The research reactor type VVR-S (tank type, water is cooler, moderator and reflector, thermal power- 2 MW, thermal energy- 9. 52 GW d) was put into service in July 1957 and, in December 1997 was shout down. In 2002, Romanian Government decided to put the research reactor in the permanent shut-down in order to start the decommissioning. This nuclear facility was used in nuclear research and radioisotope production for 40 years, without events, incidents or accidents. Within the same site, in the immediate vicinity of the research reactor, there are many other nuclear facilities: Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant, Tandem Van der Graaf heavy ions accelerator, Cyclotron, Industrial Irradiator, Radioisotope Production Center. The objectives of this work were dedicated on the water underground analyses described in the following context: - presentation of the approaches in planning the number of drillings, vertical soil profiles (characteristics, analyses, direction of the flow of underground water, uncertainties in measurements); - presentation of the instrumentation used in analyses of water, soil and vegetation samples - analyses and final conclusions on results of the measurements; - comparison of the results of measurements on underground water from drillings with the measurements results on samples from the town and the system of drinking water - supplied from the second level of underground water. According to the analysis, in general, no values higher than the Minimum Detectable Activity were detected in water samples (MDA) for Pb{sup 212}, Bi{sup 214}, Pb{sup 214}, Ac{sup 228}, but situated under values foreseen in drinking water. Distribution of Uranium As results of the Uranium determination, values higher than 0,004 mg/l (4 ppb) were detected, values that represent the average contents in the underground water. The higher values, 2-3 times higher than background, were detected in the water from the drillings F15, F12, F5, F13, drillings located between RWTP (Radioactive Waste Treatment Plant) - the 300 m{sup 3} tanks and the Spent Filters Storage (SFS). At south of this area, on the leaking direction of the underground water layer, in the drillings F1, F2, F3, F18 and at east, in F6, F7, the natural Uranium values are within the background for the underground-water. Distribution of Radon For the Radon determination with RAD 7 equipment, water samples were taken from the same piezo-metrical drilling, 2 or 4 times during of six months period, and then, the average contents were calculated, which varied between 0,35 - 2,1 Bq/l. The values higher than 1,1 -1,2 Bq/l were detected in the water taken from the drillings located in the northern part (F10, F11) and in the eastern part (F6, F8) of the Institute fences (around of the radioactive waste storage facilities). The concentrations of 0,3 - 0,5 Bq/l are in the underground-water layer 'intercepted' by the piezo-metrical drillings (F1, F2, F3) located near the Nuclear Reactor. Concentration of heavy metals: 0.04-0.08 mg/l Pb in F5, F14, F7, F8 exceeding MCA-Maximum Admissible Concentration (0.01 mg/l) for Pb, and for Zn in F5, F7, F8, F14 are 0.2-0.5 mg/l situated under MCA , and 0.18 mg/l in F18, in accordance with tendency of decreasing of concentration of contaminants. After 50 years of deploying nuclear activities on the site the underground water quality is in very good condition. Taking into consideration the direction of the underground water flow, it results that, only in the area of underground pipe, around of the research reactor and radioactive waste treatment plant, the quality of water is influenced, and remediation actions are not necessary. Based on measurements executed in F18, the water quality is the same with any other part of the region. During the decommissioning of the Research Reactor, the samples from 18 drillings will be analysed monthly, and the contents of the heavy metals, Pb and Zn, will be monitored carefully, together with all the factors: air, soil, vegetation, subsoil, water surface and underground water. A great attention will be paid t

  13. Prompt Neutron Lifetime for the NBSR Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, A.L.; Diamond, D.

    2012-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In preparation for the proposed conversion of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor (NBSR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, certain point kinetics parameters must be calculated. We report here values of the prompt neutron lifetime that have been calculated using three independent methods. All three sets of calculations demonstrate that the prompt neutron lifetime is shorter for the LEU fuel when compared to the HEU fuel and longer for the equilibrium end-of-cycle (EOC) condition when compared to the equilibrium startup (SU) condition for both the HEU and LEU fuels.

  14. Proceedings of the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting: Volume 1, Plenary session; Advanced reactor research; advanced control system technology; advanced instrumentation and control hardware; human factors research; probabilistic risk assessment topics; thermal hydraulics; thermal hydraulic research for advanced passive LWRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monteleone, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25--27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Individual papers have been cataloged separately. This document, Volume 1 covers the following topics: Advanced Reactor Research; Advanced Instrumentation and Control Hardware; Advanced Control System Technology; Human Factors Research; Probabilistic Risk Assessment Topics; Thermal Hydraulics; and Thermal Hydraulic Research for Advanced Passive Light Water Reactors.

  15. Thermochemical conversion of waste materials to valuable products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saraf, S. [Engineering Technologies, Lombard, IL (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential offered by a large variety of solid and liquid wastes for generating value added products is widely recognized. Extensive research and development has focused on developing technologies to recover energy and valuable products from waste materials. These treatment technologies include use of waste materials for direct combustion, upgrading the waste materials into useful fuel such as fuel gas or fuel oil, and conversion of waste materials into higher value products for the chemical industry. Thermal treatment in aerobic (with oxygen) conditions or direct combustion of waste materials in most cases results in generating air pollution and thereby requiring installation of expensive control devices. Thermochemical conversion in aerobic (without oxygen) conditions, referred to as thermal decomposition (destructive distillation) results in formation of usable liquid, solid, and gaseous products. Thermochemical conversion includes gasification, liquefaction, and thermal decomposition (pyrolysis). Each thermochemical conversion process yields a different range of products and this paper will discuss thermal decomposition in detail. This paper will also present results of a case study for recovering value added products, in the form of a liquid, solid, and gas, from thermal decomposition of waste oil and scrap tires. The product has a high concentration of benzene, xylene, and toluene. The solid product has significant amounts of carbon black and can be used as an asphalt modifier for road construction. The gas product is primarily composed of methane and is used for heating the reactor.

  16. Methods for natural gas and heavy hydrocarbon co-conversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Nelson, Lee O. (Idaho Falls, ID); Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor for reactive co-conversion of heavy hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon gases and includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell having a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. An inlet is provided for feeding heavy hydrocarbons and other reactive materials to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a variety of light sources for providing ultraviolet light within the discharge plasma cell. Methods for upgrading heavy hydrocarbons are also disclosed.

  17. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. (Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States)); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. (Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This technology is important to reduce the technical and economic risks inherent in utilizing coal, a feedstock whose variable and often unexpected behavior presents a significant challenge. This program will merge significant advances made at Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. (AFR) in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior, with technology being developed at Brigham Young University (BYU) in comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors. The foundation to describe coal-specific conversion behavior is AFR's Functional Group (FG) and Devolatilization, Vaporization and Crosslinking (DVC) models, developed under previous and on-going METC sponsored programs. These models have demonstrated the capability to describe the time dependent evolution of individual gas species, and the amount and characteristics of tar and char. The combined FG-DVC model will be integrated with BYU's comprehensive two-dimensional reactor model, PCGC-2, which is currently the most widely used reactor simulation for combustion or gasification. The program includes: (i) validation of the submodels by comparison with laboratory data obtained in this program, (ii) extensive validation of the modified comprehensive code by comparison of predicted results with data from bench-scale and process scale investigations of gasification, mild gasification and combustion of coal or coal-derived products in heat engines, and (iii) development of well documented user friendly software applicable to a workstation'' environment.

  18. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. (Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States)) [Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. (Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)) [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This technology is important to reduce the technical and economic risks inherent in utilizing coal, a feedstock whose variable and often unexpected behavior presents a significant challenge. This program will merge significant advances made at Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. (AFR) in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior, with technology being developed at Brigham Young University (BYU) in comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors. The foundation to describe coal-specified conversion behavior is ARF's Functional Group (FG) and Devolatilization, Vaporization, and Crosslinking (DVC) models, developed under previous and on-going METC sponsored programs. These models have demonstrated the capability to describe the time dependent evolution of individual gas species, and the amount and characteristics of tar and char. The combined FG-DVC model will be integrated with BYU's comprehensive two-dimensional reactor model, PCGC-2, which is currently the most widely used reactor simulation for combustion or gasification. The program includes: (1) validation of the submodels by comparison with laboratory data obtained in this program, (2) extensive validation of the modified comprehensive code by comparison of predicted results with data from bench-scale and process scale investigations of gasification, mild gasification and combustion of coal or coal-derived products in heat engines, and (3) development of well documented user friendly software applicable to a workstation'' environment.

  19. Experiment Operations Plan for a Loss-of-Coolant Accident Simulation in the National Research Universal Reactor Materials Tests 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russcher, G. E.; Wilson, C. L.; Marshall, R, K.; King, L. L.; Parchen, L. J.; Pilger, J. P.; Hesson, G. M.; Mohr, C. L.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) simulation program is evaluating the thermal-hydraulic and mechanical effects of LOCA conditions on pressurized water reactor test fuel bundles. This experiment operation plan for the second and third experiments of the program will provide peak fuel cladding temperatures of up to 1172K (1650{degree}F) and 1061K (1450{degree}) respectively. for a long enough time to cause test fuel cladding deformation and rupture in both. Reflood coolant delay times and the reflooding rates for the experiments were selected from thermal-hydraulic data measured in the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor facilities and test train assembly during the first experiment.

  20. Catalyst and process development for synthesis gas conversion to isobutylene. Final report, September 1, 1990--January 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony, R.G.; Akgerman, A.

    1994-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous work on isosynthesis (conversion of synthesis gas to isobutane and isobutylene) was performed at very low conversions or extreme process conditions. The objectives of this research were (1) determine the optimum process conditions for isosynthesis; (2) determine the optimum catalyst preparation method and catalyst composition/properties for isosynthesis; (3) determine the kinetics for the best catalyst; (4) develop reactor models for trickle bed, slurry, and fixed bed reactors; and (5) simulate the performance of fixed bed trickle flow reactors, slurry flow reactors, and fixed bed gas phase reactors for isosynthesis. More improvement in catalyst activity and selectivity is needed before isosynthesis can become a commercially feasible (stand-alone) process. Catalysts prepared by the precipitation method show the most promise for future development as compared with those prepared hydrothermally, by calcining zirconyl nitrate, or by a modified sol-gel method. For current catalysts the high temperatures (>673 K) required for activity also cause the production of methane (because of thermodynamics). A catalyst with higher activity at lower temperatures would magnify the unique selectivity of zirconia for isobutylene. Perhaps with a more active catalyst and acidification, oxygenate production could be limited at lower temperatures. Pressures above 50 atm cause an undesirable shift in product distribution toward heavier hydrocarbons. A model was developed that can predict carbon monoxide conversion an product distribution. The rate equation for carbon monoxide conversion contains only a rate constant and an adsorption equilibrium constant. The product distribution was predicted using a simple ratio of the rate of CO conversion. This report is divided into Introduction, Experimental, and Results and Discussion sections.

  1. Direct Conversion of Biomass to Fuel | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Conversion of Biomass to Fuel UGA, ORNL research team engineers microbes for the direct conversion of biomass to fuel July 11, 2014 New research from the University of...

  2. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biofouling and Corrosion of OTEC Plants at Selected Sites.the Placement of a Moored OTEC Plant. Atlantic OceanographicThermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites: Puerto Rico, St.

  3. Nuclear Fission Reactor Safety Research in FP7 and future perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbil, Roger

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The European Union (?U) has defined in the Europe 2020 strategy and 2050 Energy Roadmap its long-term vision for establishing a secure, sustainable and competitive energy system and setting up legally binding targets by 2020 for reducing greenhouse emissions, by increasing energy efficiency and the share of renewable energy sources while including a significant share from nuclear fission. Nuclear energy can enable the further reduction in harmful emissions and can contribute to the EU’s competitive energy system, security of supply and independence from fossil fuels. Nuclear fission is a valuable option for those 14 EU countries that promote its use as part of their national energy mix. The European Group on Ethics in Science and New Technologies (EGE) adopted its Opinion No.27 ‘An ethical framework for assessing research, production and use of energy’ and proposed an integrated ethics approach for the research, production and use of energy in the EU, seeking equilibrium among four criteria – access ...

  4. Successful Completion of the Largest Shipment of Russian Research Reactor High-Enriched Uranium Spent Nuclear Fuel from Czech Republic to Russian Federation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Tyacke; Dr. Igor Bolshinsky; Jeff Chamberlin

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On December 8, 2007, the largest shipment of high-enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel was successfully made from a Russian-designed nuclear research reactor in the Czech Republic to the Russian Federation. This accomplishment is the culmination of years of planning, negotiations, and hard work. The United States, Russian Federation, and the International Atomic Energy Agency have been working together on the Russian Research Reactor Fuel Return (RRRFR) Program in support of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative. In February 2003, RRRFR Program representatives met with the Nuclear Research Institute in Rež, Czech Republic, and discussed the return of their high-enriched uranium spent nuclear fuel to the Russian Federation for reprocessing. Nearly 5 years later, the shipment was made. This paper discusses the planning, preparations, coordination, and cooperation required to make this important international shipment.

  5. Control strategies for supercritical carbon dioxide power conversion systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carstens, Nathan, 1978-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-C02) recompression cycle is a promising advanced power conversion cycle which couples well to numerous advanced nuclear reactor designs. This thesis investigates the dynamic simulation ...

  6. Materials Science Division light-water-reactor safety research program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shack, W.J.; Rest, J.; Kassner, T.F.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information is presented concerning environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors; transient fuel response and fission product release; and clad properties for code verification.

  7. Power distributions in fresh and depleted LEU and HEU cores of the MITR reactor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, E.H.; Horelik, N.E.; Dunn, F.E.; Newton, T.H., Jr.; Hu, L.; Stevens, J.G. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (2MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory and Nuclear Science and Engineering Department)

    2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Toward this goal, core geometry and power distributions are presented. Distributions of power are calculated for LEU cores depleted with MCODE using an MCNP5 Monte Carlo model. The MCNP5 HEU and LEU MITR models were previously compared to experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. This same model was used with a finer spatial depletion in order to generate power distributions for the LEU cores. The objective of this work is to generate and characterize a series of fresh and depleted core peak power distributions, and provide a thermal hydraulic evaluation of the geometry which should be considered for subsequent thermal hydraulic safety analyses.

  8. Applications of Nd:YAG laser micromanufacturing in High Temperature Gas Reactor research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    I. J. van Rooyen; C. A. Smal; J. Steyn; H. Greyling

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two innovative applications of Nd:YAG laser micromachining techniques are demonstrated in this publication. Research projects to determine the fission product transport mechanisms in TRISO coated particles necessitate heat treatment studies as well as the manufacturing of a unique sealed system for experimentation at very high temperatures. This article describes firstly the design and creation of an alumina jig designed to contain 500 {mu}m diameter ZrO2 spheres intended for annealing experiments at temperatures up to 1600 C. Functional requirements of this jig are the precision positioning of spheres for laser ablation, welding and post weld heat treatment in order to ensure process repeatability and accurate indexing of individual spheres. The design challenges and the performance of the holding device are reported. Secondly the manufacture of a sealing system using laser micromachining is reported. ZrO2 micro plugs isolate the openings of micro-machined cavities to produce a gas-tight seal fit for application in a high temperature environment. The technique is described along with a discussion of the problems experienced during the sealing process. Typical problems experienced were seating dimensions and the relative small size ({approx} 200 {mu}m) of these plugs that posed handling challenges. Manufacturing processes for both the tapered seating cavity and the plug are demonstrated. In conclusion, this article demonstrates the application of Nd-YAG micromachining in an innovative way to solve practical research problems.

  9. Radiological Survey of Contaminated Installations of Research Reactor before Dismantling in High Dose Conditions with Complex for Remote Measurements of Radioactivity - 12069

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danilovich, Alexey; Ivanov, Oleg; Lemus, Alexey; Smirnov, Sergey; Stepanov, Vyacheslav; Volkovich, Anatoly [National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decontamination and decommissioning of the research reactors MR (Testing Reactor) and RFT (Reactor of Physics and Technology) has recently been initiated in the National Research Center (NRC) 'Kurchatov institute', Moscow. These research reactors have a long history and many installations - nine loop facilities for experiments with different kinds of fuel. When decommissioning nuclear facilities it is necessary to measure the distribution of radioactive contamination in the rooms and at the equipment at high levels of background radiation. At 'Kurchatov Institute' some special remote control measuring systems were developed and they are applied during dismantling of the reactors MR and RFT. For a survey of high-level objects a radiometric system mounted on the robotic Brokk vehicle is used. This system has two (4? and collimated) dose meters and a high resolution video camera. Maximum measured dose rate for this system is ?8.5 Sv/h. To determine the composition of contaminants, a portable spectrometric system is used. It is a remotely controlled, collimated detector for scanning the distribution of radioactive contamination. To obtain a detailed distribution of contamination a remote-controlled gamma camera is applied. For work at highly contaminated premises with non-uniform background radiation, another camera is equipped with rotating coded mask (coded aperture imaging). As a result, a new system of instruments for remote radioactivity measurements with wide range of sensitivity and angular resolution was developed. The experience and results of measurements in different areas of the reactor and at its loop installations, with emphasis on the radioactive survey of highly-contaminated samples, are presented. These activities are conducted under the Federal Program for Nuclear and Radiation Safety of Russia. Adaptation of complex remote measurements of radioactivity and survey of contaminated installations of research reactor before dismantling in high dose conditions has proven successful. The radioactivity measuring devices for operation at high, non-uniform dose background were tested in the field and a new data of measurement of contamination distribution in the premises and installations were obtained. (authors)

  10. Biomass thermochemical conversion program. 1985 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wood and crop residues constitute a vast majority of the biomass feedstocks available for conversion, and thermochemical processes are well suited for conversion of these materials. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research on this conversion technology for renewable energy through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The Program is part of DOE's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division, Office of Renewable Technologies. This report briefly describes the Thermochemical Conversion Program structure and summarizes the activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1985. 32 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Cost Effective Bioethanol via Acid Pretreatment of Corn Stover, Saccharification, and Conversion via a Novel Fermentation Organism: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-12-485

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dowe, N.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research program will convert acid pretreated corn stover to sugars at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and then transfer these sugars to Honda R&D and its partner the Green Earth Institute (GEI) for conversion to ethanol via a novel fermentation organism. In phase one, NREL will adapt its pretreatment and saccharification process to the unique attributes of this organism, and Honda R&D/GEI will increase the sugar conversion rate as well as the yield and titer of the resulting ethanol. In later phases, NREL, Honda R&D, and GEI will work together at NREL to optimize and scale-up to pilot-scale the Honda R&D/GEI bioethanol production process. The final stage will be to undertake a pilot-scale test at NREL of the optimized bioethanol conversion process.

  12. Neutronics Design and Fuel Cycle Analysis of a High Conversion BWR with Pu-Th Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Yunlin; Downar, T.J. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47906-1290 (United States); Takahashi, H.; Rohatgi, U.S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI), a 'Generation IV' high conversion Boiling Water Reactor design is being investigated at Purdue University and Brookhaven National Laboratory. One of the primary innovative design features of the core proposed here is the use of Thorium as fertile material. In addition to the advantageous nonproliferation and waste characteristics of thorium fuel cycles, the use of thorium is particularly important in a tight pitch, high conversion lattice in order to insure a negative void coefficient throughout the operating life of the reactor. The principal design objective of a high conversion light water reactor is to substantially increase the conversion ratio (fissile atoms produced per fissile atoms consumed) of the reactor without compromising the safety performance of the plant. Since existing LWRs have a relatively low conversion ratio they require relatively frequent refueling which limits the economic efficiency of the plant. Also, the high volume of spent fuel can pose a burden for waste storage and the accumulation of plutonium in the uranium fuel cycle can become a materials proliferation issue. The development of Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR) as an alternative technology to alleviate some of these concerns has been delayed for various reasons. An intermediate solution has been to examine tight pitch light water reactors which can provide significant improvements in the fuel cycle performance of the existing LWRs by taking advantage of the increased conversion ratios from the harder neutron spectrum in the tight pitch lattice, as well as the by taking advantage of the waste and nonproliferation benefits of the thorium fuel cycle. Several High Conversion BWR designs have been proposed by researchers in Japan and elsewhere during the past several years. One of the more promising HCR designs is the Reduced Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) proposed by JAERI [1]. Their design was based on a uranium fuel cycle and showed significant improvements in the fuel cycle performance compared to conventional BWRs. However, one of the drawbacks of their design was the potential for a positive void coefficient. In order to insure a negative void coefficient, the JAERI researchers designed a 'flat core' and introduced void tube assemblies in order to enhance neutron leakage in the event of core voiding. The use of thorium in the Purdue/BNL HCBWR design proposed here obviates the need for void tubes and makes it possible to increase the core height and improve neutron economy without the risk of a positive void coefficient. The principal reason for the improvement in the void coefficient is because Th-232 has a smaller fast fission cross section and resonance integral than U-238. In the design proposed here, it is possible to eliminate the void tubes in the RMWR design and replace the axial blanket with active fuel to increase the core height and further improve neutron economy. The core analyses in the work here was performed with the Purdue Fuel Management Code System [2] which is based on the Studsvik/Scandpower lattice physics code HELIOS, and the U.S. NRC core neutronics simulator, PARCS, which is coupled to the thermal-hydraulics code RELAP5. All these codes have been well assessed and benchmarked for analysis of light water reactor systems. (authors)

  13. Thermochemical Conversion Pilot Plant (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The state-of-the-art thermochemical conversion pilot plant includes several configurable, complementary unit operations for testing and developing various reactors, filters, catalysts, and other unit operations. NREL engineers and scientists as well as clients can test new processes and feedstocks in a timely, cost-effective, and safe manner to obtain extensive performance data on processes or equipment.

  14. Simulator-interfaced light water reactor instruction and research. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bergner, T.; Carteaux, P.; Christenson, J.; Hajek, B.; Miller, D.; Pearson, C.; Rutz, E.; Simkins, R.; Stubblefield, J.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to develop a comprehensive program of simulator-interfaced instruction and research, the American Electric Power Corporation and Centerior Energy Corporation are working with the Nuclear Engineering programs at the University of cincinnati and the Ohio State University. The first phase of the program, the development and presentation of a course sequence on commercial nuclear power plant systems design and operation, has been completed. Program instruction began on January 3, 1994 with the first presentation to 29 undergraduate and graduate engineering students at the University of Cincinnati and the Ohio State University. The sequence covered two academic quarters and included visits to each of the nuclear power plants involved in the collaboration. Class lectures were presented in video-classrooms such that instructors at one site could reach not only their own students but students at the other university as well. Class lecture material was developed primarily from similar materials utilized and developed by the utilities to train their own engineers and operators. The initial development effort was described in an earlier progress report. The collaborative effort required to present the course sequence has produced a variety of benefits, some expected and some unexpected. These include: (1) university course material prepared from actual operating plant resources, not merely textbook cases; (2) enhancement of traditional learning setting with significant time spent at the plant simulators; (3) opportunities for students to tour working nuclear power plants; (4) professional enrichment and development for the collaborators through frequent interaction with peers at various plants and universities; (5) initiation of research projects of mutual interest to utilities and universities; (6) enhancement of students` ability to make early contributions in the plant engineering workforce through more complete understanding of plant operations; (7) bringing the OSU and UC faculty to the forefront of the development of new instructional technologies (multi-media, real-time distance learning applications). The initial offering of the course on LWR systems and operations was very successful in providing university students learning opportunities they did not have in other classes. Student evaluations indicated their appreciation for the opportunities to visit the plant sites, perform plant evolutions in the simulators and interact with the utility training personnel. Several students were so positive in their reactions that they recommended making the course sequence a required part of the nuclear power engineering curriculum.

  15. Implementation of MPC and A systems at the VNIIEF research (reactor) site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skripka, G.; Koloyartsev, V.; Mikijchuk, N. [Rossijskij Federal`nyj Yadernyj Tsentr, Arzamas (Russian Federation). Nauchno-Issledovatel`skij Inst. Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki] [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the US-Russian Lab-to-Lab program for strengthening nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A), an integrated MPC and A system is being installed at a large site within the VNIIEF complex to upgrade safeguards on the nuclear material stored and used at this site. In addition to storage facilities, the site houses a number of critical facilities at which nuclear physics research is conducted. The design of the MPC and A system is based on the test bed work presented earlier and provides the functions of nondestructive measurements for plutonium and highly enriched uranium, item control, personnel access control, radiation portal monitoring, and computed on-line accounting. The system controls, monitors, and accounts for nuclear material and people as the material moves through three material balance areas, a measurement room, and a number of control points. It also assists with physical inventory taking. The instrumentation used to implement these functions will include US commercial equipment as well as Russian-designed and -fabricated items.

  16. Electrochemical separation of aluminum from uranium for research reactor spent nuclear fuel applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slater, S. A.; Willit, J. L.; Gay, E. C.; Chemical Engineering

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) are developing an electrorefining process to treat aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel by electrochemically separating aluminum from uranium. The aluminum electrorefiner is modeled after the high-throughput electrorefiner developed at ANL. Aluminum is electrorefined, using a fluoride salt electrolyte, in a potential range of -0.1 V to -0.2 V, while uranium is electrorefined in a potential range of -0.3 V to -0.4 V; therefore, aluminum can be selectively separated electrochemically from uranium. A series of laboratory-scale experiments was performed to demonstrate the aluminum electrorefining concept. These experiments involved selecting an electrolyte (determining a suitable fluoride salt composition); selecting a crucible material for the electrochemical cell; optimizing the operating conditions; determining the effect of adding alkaline and rare earth elements to the electrolyte; and demonstrating the electrochemical separation of aluminum from uranium, using a U-Al-Si alloy as a simulant for aluminum-based spent nuclear fuel. Results of the laboratory-scale experiments indicate that aluminum can be selectively electrotransported from the anode to the cathode, while uranium remains in the anode basket.

  17. Thermal Hydraulics of the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang Oh; Eung Kim; Richard Schultz; Mike Patterson; Davie Petti

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core will be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during reactor core-accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, perform research and development (R&D) that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: • High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior • High temperature materials qualification • Design methods development and validation • Hydrogen production technologies • Energy conversion. This paper presents current R&D work that addresses fundamental thermal hydraulics issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs.

  18. OXIDATIVE COUPLING OF METHANE USING INORGANIC MEMBRANE REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Y.H. Ma; Dr. W.R. Moser; Dr. A.G. Dixon; Dr. A.M. Ramachandra; Dr. Y. Lu; C. Binkerd

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to study the oxidative coupling of methane in catalytic inorganic membrane reactors. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and higher yields than in conventional non-porous, co-feed, fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for the formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause of decreased selectivity in the oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Membrane reactor technology also offers the potential for modifying the membranes both to improve catalytic properties as well as to regulate the rate of the permeation/diffusion of reactants through the membrane to minimize by-product generation. Other benefits also exist with membrane reactors, such as the mitigation of thermal hot-spots for highly exothermic reactions such as the oxidative coupling of methane. The application of catalytically active inorganic membranes has potential for drastically increasing the yield of reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity.

  19. Conversion of methane and acetylene into gasoline range hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alkhawaldeh, Ammar

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conversion Apparatus. . . 20 22 Temperature Profile Inside the Reactor. . 30 Methane and Acetylene Conversion over Time on Stream, T = 412 C, Molar Feed Ratio = 6/I (CH4/CqHr). . 36 Mass Flow Rate (g/s) of the Effluent Gas (Unreacted Methane... and Acetylene, Isobutane, Ethylene, and Nitrogen) from the Reactor Integrated over Time on Stream. 40 Mass Flow Rate (g/s) of the Gas Products (Isobutane and Ethylene) Integrated over Time on Stream. 41 Methane and Acetylene Conversion over Time on Stream...

  20. Proceedings of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission review group conference on advanced instrumentation research for reactor safety held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory on July 29-31, 1980. Conference proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hon, A.L.; Basdekas, D.; Hsu, Y.Y.; Kondic, N.; Van Houten, R.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report compiles the technical presentations during the Advanced Instrumentation Research for the Reactor Safety Review Group Meeting held in July 1980. The three-day meeting covered the Power Plant Instrumentation, Two-Phase Flow Instrumentation, Fuel Behavior Research Instrumentation and Advanced Reactor Instrumentation research programs sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Division of Reactor Safety Research. In addition, two invited papers from the nuclear industry were also presented. The conference is held each year to review the up-to-date instrumentation research results by the contractors. It also provides the opportunity for the researchers and experts to exchange experience on advanced instrumentation development. The report serves as a vehicle to disseminate the state-of-the-art information to the research community and the nuclear industry.

  1. Modular Pebble Bed Reactor High Temperature Gas Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Built · Site Assembled · On--line Refueling · Modules added to meet demand. · No Reprocessing · High Experiments · Non-Proliferation · Safeguards · Waste Disposal · Reactor Research/ Demonstration Facility

  2. Nuclear reactor safeguards and monitoring with antineutrino detectors A. Bernsteina)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gratta, Giorgio

    Nuclear reactor safeguards and monitoring with antineutrino detectors A. Bernsteina) Sandia of nuclear reactor types, including power reactors, research reactors, and plutonium production reactors-understood principles that govern the core's evolution in time, can be used to determine whether the reactor is being

  3. Energy Conversion and Storage Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, E.J.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemistry and materials science principles to solve problems in (1) production of new synthetic fuels, (2) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, (3) development of advanced thermochemical processes for energy conversion, (4) characterization of complex chemical processes, and (5) application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis. Electrochemistry research aims to develop advanced power systems for electric vehicle and stationary energy storage applications. Topics include identification of new electrochemical couples for advanced rechargeable batteries, improvements in battery and fuel-cell materials, and the establishment of engineering principles applicable to electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Chemical Applications research includes topics such as separations, catalysis, fuels, and chemical analyses. Included in this program area are projects to develop improved, energy-efficient methods for processing waste streams from synfuel plants and coal gasifiers. Other research projects seek to identify and characterize the constituents of liquid fuel-system streams and to devise energy-efficient means for their separation. Materials Applications research includes the evaluation of the properties of advanced materials, as well as the development of novel preparation techniques. For example, the use of advanced techniques, such as sputtering and laser ablation, are being used to produce high-temperature superconducting films.

  4. Catalyst and process development for synthesis gas conversion to isobutylene. Quarterly report, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony, R.G.; Akgerman, A.

    1992-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to develop a new catalyst, the kinetics for this catalyst, reactor models for trickle bed, slurry and fixed bed, and simulate the performance of fixed bed trickle flow reactors, slurry flow reactors, and fixed bed gas phase reactors for conversion of a hydrogen lean synthesis gas to isobutylene.

  5. High Temperature Gas Reactors The Next Generation ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Proof Advanced Reactor and Gas Turbine #12;Flow through Power Conversion Vessel 8 #12;9 TRISO Fuel Particle1 High Temperature Gas Reactors The Next Generation ? Professor Andrew C Kadak Massachusetts of Brayton vs. Rankine Cycle · High Temperature Helium Gas (900 C) · Direct or Indirect Cycle · Originally

  6. Dynamic optimization of a plate reactor start-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a plate reactor #12;Safety conditions for ignition and conversion Avoid regions in the state-space, where reactor #12;Details of the NMPC implementation Cost function = tp t0 (x(t), u(t), ¯u(t), r(t))dt =1 + 1 2Dynamic optimization of a plate reactor start-up Staffan Haugwitz, Per Hagander and John Bagterp

  7. The Innovations, Technology and Waste Management Approaches to Safely Package and Transport the World's First Radioactive Fusion Research Reactor for Burial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keith Rule; Erik Perry; Jim Chrzanowski; Mike Viola; Ron Strykowsky

    2003-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Original estimates stated that the amount of radioactive waste that will be generated during the dismantling of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor will approach two million kilograms with an associated volume of 2,500 cubic meters. The materials were activated by 14 MeV neutrons and were highly contaminated with tritium, which present unique challenges to maintain integrity during packaging and transportation. In addition, the majority of this material is stainless steel and copper structural metal that were specifically designed and manufactured for this one-of-a-kind fusion research reactor. This provided further complexity in planning and managing the waste. We will discuss the engineering concepts, innovative practices, and technologies that were utilized to size reduce, stabilize, and package the many unique and complex components of this reactor. This waste was packaged and shipped in many different configurations and methods according to the transportation regulations and disposal facility requirements. For this particular project, we were able to utilize two separate disposal facilities for burial. This paper will conclude with a complete summary of the actual results of the waste management costs, volumes, and best practices that were developed from this groundbreaking and successful project.

  8. 4 year PhD Studentships : Electrochemical Energy Conversion. Applications are invited for a fouryear PhD Research position in the Physical and Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    and medium temperature fuel cells, and the optimization of the latter reactions at electrode and storage, and its cold combustion in a fuel cell to generate electricity. There has been a considerable splitting reactors and fuel cells. This project will use a range of state of art electrochemical techniques

  9. Solar Thermoelectric Energy Conversion

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SOLID-STATE SOLAR-THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION CENTER NanoEngineering Group Solar Thermoelectric Energy Conversion Gang Chen, 1 Daniel Kraemer, 1 Bed Poudel, 2 Hsien-Ping Feng, 1 J....

  10. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE BROOKHAVEN GRAPHITE RESEARCH REACTOR ENGINEERED CAP, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK DCN 5098-SR-07-0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has reviewed the project documentation and data for the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) Engineered Cap at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) have completed removal of affected soils and performed as-left surveys by BSA associated with the BGRR Engineered Cap. Sample results have been submitted, as required, to demonstrate that remediation efforts comply with the cleanup goal of {approx}15 mrem/yr above background to a resident in 50 years (BNL 2011a).

  11. Establishing a Cost Basis for Converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from High Enriched to Low Enriched Uranium Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Primm, Trent [ORNL; Guida, Tracey [University of Pittsburgh

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the auspices of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program, the National Nuclear Security Administration /Department of Energy (NNSA/DOE) has, as a goal, to convert research reactors worldwide from weapons grade to non-weapons grade uranium. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is one of the candidates for conversion of fuel from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). A well documented business model, including tasks, costs, and schedules was developed to plan the conversion of HFIR. Using Microsoft Project, a detailed outline of the conversion program was established and consists of LEU fuel design activities, a fresh fuel shipping cask, improvements to the HFIR reactor building, and spent fuel operations. Current-value costs total $76 million dollars, include over 100 subtasks, and will take over 10 years to complete. The model and schedule follows the path of the fuel from receipt from fuel fabricator to delivery to spent fuel storage and illustrates the duration, start, and completion dates of each subtask to be completed. Assumptions that form the basis of the cost estimate have significant impact on cost and schedule.

  12. Power conversion technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newton, M. A.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Power Conversion Technologies thrust area identifies and sponsors development activities that enhance the capabilities of engineering at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the area of solid- state power electronics. Our primary objective is to be a resource to existing and emerging LLNL programs that require advanced solid-state power electronic technologies.. Our focus is on developing and integrating technologies that will significantly impact the capability, size, cost, and reliability of future power electronic systems. During FY-96, we concentrated our research efforts on the areas of (1) Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR); (2) novel solid-state opening switches; (3) advanced modulator technology for accelerators; (4) compact accelerators; and (5) compact pulse generators.

  13. Synthesis gas conversion in a mixed slurry reactor with iron-manganese catalysts. [Four catalysts with iron-manganese ratios of 57/43, 44/56, 22/78, and 10/90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennline, H.W.; Zarochak, M.F.; Tischer, R.E.; Schehl, R.R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synthesis gas was reacted over different compositions of iron-manganese Fischer-Tropsch catalysts in a slurry reactor. The reactor operates in a back-mixed mode with a continuous flow of feed gas through the catalyst suspended in the liquid medium. Four catalysts with iron-manganese ratios of 57/43, 44/56, 22/78, and 10/90 were investigated at identical process conditions after a standard activation procedure. With time on stream for each catalyst system, hydrogenation of olefins occurred, along with olefin isomerization reactions. Activity, selectivity, and stability are discussed in general. Analyses of used catalyst samples are also reported. 20 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through July 1999.

  15. Engineering development of ceramic membrane reactor system for converting natural gas to hydrogen and synthesis gas for liquid transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through June 1998.

  16. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through November 1999.

  17. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through February 1999.

  18. Engineering development of ceramic membrane reactor system for converting natural gas to hydrogen and synthesis gas for liquid transportation fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through April 1998.

  19. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through September 1999.

  20. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through January 2000.

  1. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through December 1999.

  2. ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC MEMBRANE REACTOR SYSTEM FOR CONVERTING NATURAL GAS TO HYDROGEN AND SYNTHESIS GAS FOR LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract is to research, develop and demonstrate a novel ceramic membrane reactor system for the low-cost conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas and hydrogen for liquid transportation fuels: the ITM Syngas process. Through an eight-year, three-phase program, the technology will be developed and scaled up to obtain the technical, engineering, operating and economic data necessary for the final step to full commercialization of the Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) conversion technology. This report is a summary of activities through October 1999.

  3. Numerical simulations of ion transport membrane oxy-fuel reactors for CO? capture applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Jongsup

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations were performed to investigate the key features of oxygen permeation and hydrocarbon conversion in ion transport membrane (ITM) reactors. ITM reactors have been suggested as a novel technology to enable ...

  4. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapter 1, project number 669

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume 1, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  5. NRC review of Electric Power Research Institute`s advanced light water reactor utility requirements document. Passive plant designs, chapters 2-13, project number 669

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is preparing a compendium of technical requirements, referred to as the {open_quotes}Advanced Light Water Reactor [ALWR] Utility Requirements Document{close_quotes}, that is acceptable to the design of an ALWR power plant. When completed, this document is intended to be a comprehensive statement of utility requirements for the design, construction, and performance of an ALWR power plant for the 1990s and beyond. The Requirements Document consists of three volumes. Volume I, {open_quotes}ALWR Policy and Summary of Top-Tier Requirements{close_quotes}, is a management-level synopsis of the Requirements Document, including the design objectives and philosophy, the overall physical configuration and features of a future nuclear plant design, and the steps necessary to take the proposed ALWR design criteria beyond the conceptual design state to a completed, functioning power plant. Volume II consists of 13 chapters and contains utility design requirements for an evolutionary nuclear power plant [approximately 1350 megawatts-electric (MWe)]. Volume III contains utility design requirements for nuclear plants for which passive features will be used in their designs (approximately 600 MWe). In April 1992, the staff of the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, issued Volume 1 and Volume 2 (Parts 1 and 2) of its safety evaluation report (SER) to document the results of its review of Volumes 1 and 2 of the Requirements Document. Volume 1, {open_quotes}NRC Review of Electric Power Research Institute`s Advanced Light Water Reactor Utility Requirements Document - Program Summary{close_quotes}, provided a discussion of the overall purpose and scope of the Requirements Document, the background of the staff`s review, the review approach used by the staff, and a summary of the policy and technical issues raised by the staff during its review.

  6. The use of U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ dispersed in aluminum in plate-type fuel elements for research and test reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Hofman, G.L.; Wiencek, T.C.; Copeland, G.L.; Hobbs, R.W.; Senn, R.L.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-density fuel based on U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ dispersed in aluminum has been developed and tested for use in converting plate-type research and test reactors from the use of highly enriched uranium to the use of low-enriched uranium. Results of preirradiation testing and the irradiation and postirradiation examination of miniature fuel plates and full-sized fuel elements are summarized. Swelling of the U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ fuel particles is a linear function of the fission density in the particle to well beyond the fission density achievable in low-enriched fuels. U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/ particle swelling rate is approximately the same as that of the commonly used UAl/sub x/ fuel particle. The presence of minor amounts of U/sub 3/Si or uranium solid solution in the fuel result in greater, but still acceptable, fuel swelling. Blister threshold temperatures are at least as high as those of currently used fuels. An exothermic reaction occurs near the aluminum melting temperature, but the measured energy releases were low enough not to substantially worsen the consequences of an accident. U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-aluminum dispersion fuel with uranium densities up to at least 4.8 Mg/m/sup 3/ is a suitable LEU fuel for typical plate-type research and test reactors. 42 refs., 28 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting. Volume 3, Primary system integrity; Aging research, products and applications; Structural and seismic engineering; Seismology and geology: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monteleone, S. [comp.] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [comp.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This three-volume report contains 90 papers out of the 102 that were presented at the Twenty-First Water Reactor Safety Information Meeting held at the Bethesda Marriott Hotel, Bethesda, Maryland, during the week of October 25-27, 1993. The papers are printed in the order of their presentation in each session and describe progress and results of programs in nuclear safety research conducted in this country and abroad. Foreign participation in the meeting included papers presented by researchers from France, Germany, Japan, Russia, Switzerland, Taiwan, and United Kingdom. The titles of the papers and the names of the authors have been updated and may differ from those that appeared in the final program of the meeting. Selected papers were indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  8. Department of Earth and Mineral Engineering Spring 2011 Oxidative Coupling of Methane Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    Reactor Overview The sponsor has tasked our team with the design, construction and testing of an experimental reactor designed to couple methane to ethane and dehydrogenate ethane to ethylene. The reactor and build the reactor and perform methane conversion testing to provide proof of concept for the OCM

  9. Kinetics of high-conversion hydrocracking of bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagaishi, H.; Gray, M.R. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Chan, E.W.; Sanford, E.C. [Syncrude Canada, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Residues are complex mixtures of thousands of components. This mixture will change during hydrocracking, so that high conversion may result in a residue material with different characteristics from the starting material. Our objective is to determine the kinetics of residue conversion and yields of distillates at high conversions, and to relate these observations to the underlying chemical reactions. Athabasca bitumen was reacted in a 1-L CSTR in a multipass operation. Product from the first pass was collected, then run through the reactor again and so on, giving kinetic data under conditions that simulated a multi-reactor or packed-bed operation. Experiments were run both with hydrocracking catalyst and without added catalyst. Products were analyzed by distillation, elemental analysis, NMR, and GPC. These data will be used to derive a kinetic model for hydrocracking of bitumen residue covering a wide range of conversion (from 30% to 95%+), based on the underlying chemistry.

  10. Method for direct conversion of gaseous hydrocarbons to liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C.; Lessing, Paul A.

    2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical reactor for direct conversion of hydrocarbons includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell and a solid oxide electrochemical cell in fluid communication therewith. The discharge plasma cell comprises a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. The electrochemical cell comprises a mixed-conducting solid oxide electrolyte membrane tube positioned between a porous cathode and a porous anode, and a gas inlet tube for feeding oxygen containing gas to the porous cathode. An inlet is provided for feeding hydrocarbons to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a light source for directing ultraviolet light into the discharge plasma cell and the electrochemical cell.

  11. The IAEA Coordinated Research Program on HTGR Reactor Physics, Thermal-hydraulics and Depletion Uncertainty Analysis: Description of the Benchmark Test Cases and Phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederik Reitsma; Gerhard Strydom; Bismark Tyobeka; Kostadin Ivanov

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. The uncertainties in the HTR analysis tools are today typically assessed with sensitivity analysis and then a few important input uncertainties (typically based on a PIRT process) are varied in the analysis to find a spread in the parameter of importance. However, one wish to apply a more fundamental approach to determine the predictive capability and accuracies of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics and depletion simulations used for reactor design and safety assessment. Today there is a broader acceptance of the use of uncertainty analysis even in safety studies and it has been accepted by regulators in some cases to replace the traditional conservative analysis. Finally, there is also a renewed focus in supplying reliable covariance data (nuclear data uncertainties) that can then be used in uncertainty methods. Uncertainty and sensitivity studies are therefore becoming an essential component of any significant effort in data and simulation improvement. In order to address uncertainty in analysis and methods in the HTGR community the IAEA launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling early in 2012. The project is built on the experience of the OECD/NEA Light Water Reactor (LWR) Uncertainty Analysis in Best-Estimate Modelling (UAM) benchmark activity, but focuses specifically on the peculiarities of HTGR designs and its simulation requirements. Two benchmark problems were defined with the prismatic type design represented by the MHTGR-350 design from General Atomics (GA) while a 250 MW modular pebble bed design, similar to the INET (China) and indirect-cycle PBMR (South Africa) designs are also included. In the paper more detail on the benchmark cases, the different specific phases and tasks and the latest status and plans are presented.

  12. Research on the HYLIFE liquid-first-wall concept for future laser-fusion reactors. Final report No. 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, M.A.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been proposed to protect the structural walls of a future laser fusion reactor with a curtain or fluid-wall of liquid lithium jets. As part of the investigation of this concept, experiments have been performed on planar sheet water jets issuing vertically downward from slit nozzles. The nozzles were subjected to transverse forced harmonic excitation to simulate the vibrational environment of the laser fusion reactor, and experiments were run at both 1 atm and at lower ambient pressures. Linear temporal stability theory is shown to predict the onset of the unstable regime and the initial spatial growth rates quite well for the cases where the amplitudes of the nozzle vibration are not too large and the waveform is nearly sinusoidal. In addition, both the linear theory and a simplified trajectory theory are shown to predict the initial wave envelope amplitudes very well. For larger amplitude nozzle excitation, the waveform becomes highly nonlinear and non-sinusoidal and can resemble a sawtooth waveform in some cases; these latter experimental results can only be partially explained by existing theories at the present time.

  13. Nonthermal plasma systems and methods for natural gas and heavy hydrocarbon co-conversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C.; Nelson, Lee O.; Detering, Brent A.

    2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactor for reactive co-conversion of heavy hydrocarbons and hydrocarbon gases and includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell having a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. An inlet is provided for feeding heavy hydrocarbons and other reactive materials to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a variety of light sources for providing ultraviolet light within the discharge plasma cell. Methods for upgrading heavy hydrocarbons are also disclosed.

  14. QUANTUM CONVERSION IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvin, Melvin

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    QUANTUM CONVERSION IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS Melvin Calvin Januaryas it occurs in modern photosynthesis can only take place inof the problem or photosynthesis, or any specific aspect of

  15. 1982 annual report: Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a brief overview of the Thermochemical Conversion Program's activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1982. The objective of the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program is to generate scientific data and fundamental biomass converison process information that, in the long term, could lead to establishment of cost effective processes for conversion of biomass resources into clean fuels and petrochemical substitutes. The goal of the program is to improve the data base for biomass conversion by investigating the fundamental aspects of conversion technologies and exploring those parameters which are critical to these conversion processes. To achieve this objective and goal, the Thermochemical Conversion Program is sponsoring high-risk, long-term research with high payoff potential which industry is not currently sponsoring, nor is likely to support. Thermochemical conversion processes employ elevated temperatures to convert biomass materials into energy. Process examples include: combustion to produce heat, steam, electricity, direct mechanical power; gasification to produce fuel gas or synthesis gases for the production of methanol and hydrocarbon fuels; direct liquefaction to produce heavy oils or distillates; and pyrolysis to produce a mixture of oils, fuel gases, and char. A bibliography of publications for 1982 is included.

  16. CHEMICAL PROCESS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flow modeling of coal or related slurries will be carriedconsumption by the coal contained in the slurry. FOOTNOTE9777 (1979), Slurry-Reactor Development for Coal Conversion

  17. Energy conversion & storage program. 1994 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, E.J.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program investigates state-of-the-art electrochemistry, chemistry, and materials science technologies for: (1) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells; (2) development of high-efficiency thermochemical processes for energy conversion; (3) characterization of complex chemical processes and chemical species; (4) study and application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Research projects focus on transport process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis.

  18. Recovery and Blend-Down Uranium for Beneficial use in Commercial Reactors - 13373

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magoulas, Virginia [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 2001 the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) signed an Interagency Agreement to transfer approximately 33 MT of off-specification (off-spec) highly enriched uranium (HEU) from DOE to TVA for conversion to commercial reactor fuel. Since that time additional surplus off-spec HEU material has been added to the program, making the total approximately 46 MT off-spec HEU. The disposition path for approximately half (23 MT) of this 46 MT of surplus HEU material, was down blending through the H-canyon facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The HEU is purified through the H-canyon processes, and then blended with natural uranium (NU) to form low enriched uranium (LEU) solution with a 4.95% U-235 isotopic content. This material was then transported to a TVA subcontractor who converted the solution to uranium oxide and then fabricated into commercial light water reactor (LWR) fuel. This fuel is now powering TVA reactors and supplying electricity to approximately 1 million households in the TVA region. There is still in excess of approximately 10 to 14 MT of off-spec HEU throughout the DOE complex or future foreign and domestic research reactor returns that could be recovered and down blended for use in either currently designed light water reactors, ?5% enriched LEU, or be made available for use in subsequent advanced 'fast' reactor fuel designs, ?19% LEU. (authors)

  19. Methane coupling by membrane reactor. Quarterly technical progress report, June 25--September 24, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Y.H.

    1997-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A new reactor module was constructed as a porous membrane reactor or radial flow reactor for the study of methane oxidative coupling. A Mn-W-Na/SiO{sub 2} catalyst was prepared by the slurry mixing method and its catalytic activity was evaluated in a porous alumina membrane reactor. Experimental results showed that the Mn-W-Na/SiO{sub 2} catalyst calcined at 900 C was not stable during methane oxidative coupling. After 1,050 C calcination the catalyst became stable, however its activity was not as good as the one prepared by incipient wetness impregnation. The dense membrane tube obtained from Eltron Research Inc. was tested in a membrane reactor for the catalytic oxidative coupling of methane. The Mn-W-Na/SiO{sub 2} catalyst prepared by the incipient wetness impregnation method was packed inside the membrane tube. The initial oxygen flux was 0.02 cc/cm{sup 2}-min. It increased to 0.34 cc/cm{sup 2}-min after reaction and remained unchanged during a period of 31 days on stream. In a temperature range of 688 C to 977 C, the increase in oxygen flux with temperature obeyed the Arrhenius law. The C{sub 2} yield was about 10% at a methane conversion of 20%. The yield of the membrane reactor with Eltron membrane tube was higher than that with the Argonne membrane tube.

  20. System Requirements Document for the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aigner, R.D.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the conversion process is to convert the {sup 233}U fluoride compounds that are being extracted from the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) equipment to a stable oxide for long-term storage at Bldg. 3019.

  1. ORGANISATIONAL CHART 2009 Laboratory: Research, Development and Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Centre REACTOR SAFETY COMMITTEE Chairman: I.A. Papazoglou ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT SECRETARIAT: I. Marketou G. Pantelias Operation & Maintenance of Research Reactor I. Stamatelatos Nuclear Analytical Technology S. Mesoloras RESEARCH REACTOR LABORATORY Deputy: I. Stamatelatos Reactor Safety C. Housiadas

  2. Fundamental Thermal Fluid Physics of High Temperature Flows in Advanced Reactor Systems - Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Program Interoffice Work Order (IWO) MSF99-0254 Final Report for Period 1 August 1999 to 31 December 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEligot, D.M.; Condie, K.G.; Foust, T.D.; McCreery, G.E.; Pink, R.J.; Stacey, D.E. (INEEL); Shenoy, A.; Baccaglini, G. (General Atomics); Pletcher, R.H. (Iowa State U.); Wallace, J.M.; Vukoslavcevic, P. (U. Maryland); Jackson, J.D. (U. Manchester, UK); Kunugi, T. (Kyoto U., Japan); Satake, S.-i. (Tokyo U. Science, Japan)

    2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of advanced reactors for higher efficiency and enhanced safety and for deployable reactors for electrical power generation, process heat utilization and hydrogen generation. While key applications would be advanced gas-cooled reactors (AGCRs) using the closed Brayton cycle (CBC) for higher efficiency (such as the proposed Gas Turbine - Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) of General Atomics [Neylan and Simon, 1996]), results of the proposed research should also be valuable in reactor systems with supercritical flow or superheated vapors, e.g., steam. Higher efficiency leads to lower cost/kwh and reduces life-cycle impacts of radioactive waste (by reducing waters/kwh). The outcome will also be useful for some space power and propulsion concepts and for some fusion reactor concepts as side benefits, but they are not the thrusts of the investigation. The objective of the project is to provide fundamental thermal fluid physics knowledge and measurements necessary for the development of the improved methods for the applications.

  3. New material for thermonuclear fusion reactors | EurekAlert! Science News

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... Jan-2012 New material for thermonuclear fusion reactors ... to develop new materials for thermonuclear fusion reactors. Their research focuses ... to develop new materials for thermonuclear fusion reactors. Their research focuses ...

  4. Experiment Operations Plan for a Loss-of-Coolant Accident Simulation in the National Research Universal Reactor Materials Test 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russcher, G. E.; Barner, J. O.; Hesson, G. M.; Wilson, C. L.; Parchen, L. J.; Cunningham, M. E.; Marshall, R. K.; Mohr, C. L.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) simulation program is evaluating the thermal-hydraulic and mechanical effects on pressurized water reactor (PWR) test fuel bundles. This Experiment Operation Plan (EOP) Addendum 2, together with the referenced EOP, describes the desired operating conditions and additional hazards review associated with the four-part MT-2 experiment. The primary portions of the experiment, MT-2.2 and MT-2.3, will evaluate the following: 1) the mechanical deformation of pressurized fuel rods subjected to a slow LOCA, using reflood water for temperature control, that is designed to produce cladding temperatures in the range from 1033 to 1089K (1400 to 1500°F) for an extended time, and 2) the effects of the deformed and possibly failed cladding on the thermal-hydraulic performance of the test assembly during simulated LOCA heating and reflooding. The secondary portions of the experiment, MT-2.1 and MT-2.4, are intended to provide thermal-hydraulic calibration information during two-stage reflood conditions for 1) relatively low cladding temperatures, <839K (1050°F), on nondeformed rods, and 2) moderately high cladding temperatures, <1089K (1500°F), on deformed rods.

  5. Radiological consequences of ship collisions that might occur in U.S. Ports during the shipment of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel to the United States in break-bulk freighters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sprung, J.L.; Bespalko, S.J.; Massey, C.D.; Yoshimura, R. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, J.D. [GRAM Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reardon, P.C. [PCRT Technologies, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ebert, M.W.; Gallagher D.W. [Science Applications International Corp., Reston, VA (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accident source terms, source term probabilities, consequences, and risks are developed for ship collisions that might occur in U.S. ports during the shipment of spent fuel from foreign research reactors to the United States in break-bulk freighters.

  6. Experience in Remote Demolition of the Activated Biological Shielding of the Multi Purpose Research Reactor (MZFR) on the German Karlsruhe Site - 12208

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenmann, Beata; Fleisch, Joachim; Prechtl, Erwin; Suessdorf, Werner; Urban, Manfred [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O.Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009, WAK Decommissioning and Waste Management GmbH (WAK) became owner and operator of the waste treatment facilities of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) as well as of the prototype reactors, the Compact Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (KNK) and Multi-Purpose Reactor (MZFR), both being in an advanced stage of dismantling. Together with the dismantling and decontamination activities of the former WAK reprocessing facility since 1990, the envisaged demolishing of the R and D reactor FR2 and a hot cell facility, all governmentally funded nuclear decommissioning projects on the Karlsruhe site are concentrated under the WAK management. The small space typical of prototype research reactors represented a challenge also during the last phase of activated dismantling, dismantling of the activated biological shield of the MZFR. Successful demolition of the biological shield required detailed planning and extensive testing in the years before. In view of the limited space and the ambient dose rate that was too high for manual work, it was required to find a tool carrier system to take up and control various demolition and dismantling tools in a remote manner. The strategy formulated in the concept of dismantling the biological shield by means of a modified electro-hydraulic demolition excavator in an adaptable working scaffolding turned out to be feasible. The following boundary conditions were essential: - Remote exchange of the dismantling and removal tools in smallest space. - Positioning of various supply facilities on the working platform. - Avoiding of interfering edges. - Optimization of mass flow (removal of the dismantled mass from the working area). - Maintenance in the surroundings of the dismantling area (in the controlled area). - Testing and qualification of the facilities and training of the staff. Both the dismantling technique chosen and the proceeding selected proved to be successful. Using various designs of universal cutters developed on the basis of wall saws, both the activated steel liner and the inner reinforcing layer were cut remotely in one process. This allowed for the efficient execution of the following remote concrete removal steps using mining techniques. The electro-hydraulic demolition excavator that was purchased and then modified turned out to be an ideal tool carrier system with rapid-exchange coupling. Due to the high availability, no major delays occurred. This also was a result of the consistently implemented maintenance and repair concept. With the excavator installed in a modifiable scaffolding suspended from a rotating carrier ring, all dismantling areas could be reached and treated in spite of the small space. Thanks to an optimum organization of work-flows, routine change of dismantling work, and maintenance or repair, the iterative radiological measurement campaigns could be integrated in the whole activity without the dismantling work being disturbed significantly. The ventilation system with pressure grading and pre-filtration units ensured a low contamination level in the dismantling area. It was also possible to manage the dust formed by the milling of concrete surfaces. As it was possible to further cut metal parts and crushed concrete later on, residue flows were optimized. The planned overall period for testing, dismantling the bio-shield and removing the equipment was 36 months. The final duration was 39 months. (authors)

  7. ADEPT: Efficient Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ADEPT Project: In today’s increasingly electrified world, power conversion—the process of converting electricity between different currents, voltage levels, and frequencies—forms a vital link between the electronic devices we use every day and the sources of power required to run them. The 14 projects that make up ARPA-E’s ADEPT Project, short for “Agile Delivery of Electrical Power Technology,” are paving the way for more energy efficient power conversion and advancing the basic building blocks of power conversion: circuits, transistors, inductors, transformers, and capacitors.

  8. Solar Thermal Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal conversion process of solar energy is based on well-known phenomena of heat transfer (Kreith 1976). In all thermal conversion processes, solar radiation is absorbed at the surface of a receiver, which contains or is in contact with flow passages through which a working fluid passes. As the receiver heats up, heat is transferred to the working fluid which may be air, water, oil, or a molten salt. The upper temperature that can be achieved in solar thermal conversion depends on the insolation, the degree to which the sunlight is concentrated, and the measures taken to reduce heat losses from the working fluid.

  9. Object Closure Conversion * Neal Glew

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glew, Neal

    of closure conversion. This paper argues that a direct formulation of object closure conversio* *n Object Closure Conversion * Neal into closed code and auxiliary data* * structures. Closure conversion has been extensively studied

  10. Summer 2014 Undergraduate Research Experience in Physics: Materials and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) nuclear reactor found on a college campus. The MU Research Reactor (MURR) provides advanced research experiments, theory, and modeling and span a variety of research projects (see http

  11. Energy conversion & storage program. 1995 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, E.J.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1995 annual report discusses laboratory activities in the Energy Conversion and Storage (EC&S) Program. The report is divided into three categories: electrochemistry, chemical applications, and material applications. Research performed in each category during 1995 is described. Specific research topics relate to the development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, the development of high-efficiency thermochemical processes for energy conversion, the characterization of new chemical processes and complex chemical species, and the study and application of novel materials related to energy conversion and transmission. Research projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials and deposition technologies, and advanced methods of analysis.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: Thermochemical Conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biofuels Biofuels Publications Biochemical Conversion Program Lignocellulosic Biomass Microalgae Thermochemical Conversion Sign up for our E-Newsletter Required.gif?3.21 Email...

  13. University Reactor Matching Grants Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Valentine; Farzad Rahnema; Said Abdel-Khalik

    2003-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    During the 2002 Fiscal year, funds from the DOE matching grant program, along with matching funds from the industrial sponsors, have been used to support research in the area of thermal-hydraulics. Both experimental and numerical research projects have been performed. Experimental research focused on two areas: (1) Identification of the root cause mechanism for axial offset anomaly in pressurized water reactors under prototypical reactor conditions, and (2) Fluid dynamic aspects of thin liquid film protection schemes for inertial fusion reactor chambers. Numerical research focused on two areas: (1) Multi-fluid modeling of both two-phase and two-component flows for steam conditioning and mist cooling applications, and (2) Modeling of bounded Rayleigh-Taylor instability with interfacial mass transfer and fluid injection through a porous wall simulating the ''wetted wall'' protection scheme in inertial fusion reactor chambers. Details of activities in these areas are given.

  14. Structured luminescence conversion layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berben, Dirk; Antoniadis, Homer; Jermann, Frank; Krummacher, Benjamin Claus; Von Malm, Norwin; Zachau, Martin

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus device such as a light source is disclosed which has an OLED device and a structured luminescence conversion layer deposited on the substrate or transparent electrode of said OLED device and on the exterior of said OLED device. The structured luminescence conversion layer contains regions such as color-changing and non-color-changing regions with particular shapes arranged in a particular pattern.

  15. Sandia Energy - Energy Conversion Efficiency

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Press ReleasesInApplied &ClimateContactEnergy Conversion

  16. Thermonuclear Reflect AB-Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2008-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The author offers a new kind of thermonuclear reflect reactor. The remarkable feature of this new reactor is a three net AB reflector, which confines the high temperature plasma. The plasma loses part of its energy when it contacts with the net but this loss can be compensated by an additional permanent plasma heating. When the plasma is rarefied (has a small density), the heat flow to the AB reflector is not large and the temperature in the triple reflector net is lower than 2000 - 3000 K. This offered AB-reactor has significantly less power then the currently contemplated power reactors with magnetic or inertial confinement (hundreds-thousands of kW, not millions of kW). But it is enough for many vehicles and ships and particularly valuable for tunnelers, subs and space apparatus, where air to burn chemical fuel is at a premium or simply not available. The author has made a number of innovations in this reactor, researched its theory, developed methods of computation, made a sample computation of typical project. The main point of preference for the offered reactor is its likely cheapness as a power source. Key words: Micro-thermonuclear reactor, Multi-reflex AB-thermonuclear reactor, Self-magnetic AB-thermonuclear reactor, aerospace thermonuclear engine.

  17. Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven National Laboratory William C. Horak, Chair Nuclear Science and Technology Department #12;BNL Nuclear Energy Research Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor - 1948 National Nuclear Data Center - 1952* High Flux Beam Reactor - 1964 Technical Support for NRC - 1974

  18. Technical and economic assessment of processes for the production of butanol and acetone. Phase two: analysis of research advances. Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial objective of this work was to develop a methodology for analyzing the impact of technological advances as a tool to help establish priorities for R and D options in the field of biocatalysis. As an example of a biocatalyzed process, butanol/acetone fermentation (ABE process) was selected as the specific topic of study. A base case model characterizing the technology and economics associated with the ABE process was developed in the previous first phase of study. The project objectives were broadened in this second phase of work to provide parametric estimates of the economic and energy impacts of a variety of research advances in the hydrolysis, fermentation and purification sections of the process. The research advances analyzed in this study were based on a comprehensive literature review. The six process options analyzed were: continuous ABE fermentaton; vacuum ABE fermentation; Baelene solvent extraction; HRI's Lignol process; improved prehydrolysis/dual enzyme hydrolysis; and improved microorganism tolerance to butanol toxicity. Of the six options analyzed, only improved microorganism tolerance to butanol toxicity had a significant positive effect on energy efficiency and economics. This particular process option reduced the base case production cost (including 10% DCF return) by 20% and energy consumption by 16%. Figures and tables.

  19. Power conversion unit studies for the next generation nuclear plant coupled to a high-temperature steam electrolysis facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barner, Robert Buckner

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    -cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), Molten Salt Reactor (MSR), Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), Supercritical-water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) and the Very-high-temperature Reactor (VHTR). An international effort to develop these new... and the hydrogen production plant4,5. Davis et al. investigated the possibility of helium and molten salts in the IHTL2. The thermal efficiency of the power conversion unit is paramount to the success of this next generation technology. Current light water...

  20. Digital optical conversion module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.

    1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A digital optical conversion module used to convert an analog signal to a computer compatible digital signal including a voltage-to-frequency converter, frequency offset response circuitry, and an electrical-to-optical converter. Also used in conjunction with the digital optical conversion module is an optical link and an interface at the computer for converting the optical signal back to an electrical signal. Suitable for use in hostile environments having high levels of electromagnetic interference, the conversion module retains high resolution of the analog signal while eliminating the potential for errors due to noise and interference. The module can be used to link analog output scientific equipment such as an electrometer used with a mass spectrometer to a computer. 2 figs.

  1. Lessons Learned from the Application of Bulk Characterization to Individual Containers on the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Decommissioning Project at Brookhaven National Laboratory - 12056

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneitel, Terri [US DOE, Brookhaven Site Office (United States); Rocco, Diane [Brookhaven National Laboratory (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When conducting environmental cleanup or decommissioning projects, characterization of the material to be removed is often performed when the material is in-situ. The actual demolition or excavation and removal of the material can result in individual containers that vary significantly from the original bulk characterization profile. This variance, if not detected, can result in individual containers exceeding Department of Transportation regulations or waste disposal site acceptance criteria. Bulk waste characterization processes were performed to initially characterize the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) graphite pile and this information was utilized to characterize all of the containers of graphite. When the last waste container was generated containing graphite dust from the bottom of the pile, but no solid graphite blocks, the material contents were significantly different in composition from the bulk waste characterization. This error resulted in exceedance of the disposal site waste acceptance criteria. Brookhaven Science Associates initiated an in-depth investigation to identify the root causes of this failure and to develop appropriate corrective actions. The lessons learned at BNL have applicability to other cleanup and demolition projects which characterize their wastes in bulk or in-situ and then extend that characterization to individual containers. (authors)

  2. Hybrid Molten Salt Reactor (HMSR) System Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woolley, Robert D [PPPL; Miller, Laurence F [PPPL

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Can the hybrid system combination of (1) a critical fission Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) having a thermal spectrum and a high Conversion Ratio (CR) with (2) an external source of high energy neutrons provide an attractive solution to the world's expanding demand for energy? The present study indicates the answer is an emphatic yes.

  3. Nuclear reactor engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapters are presented concerning energy from nuclear fission; nuclear reactions and radiations; diffusion and slowing-down of neutrons; principles of reactor analysis; nuclear reactor kinetics and control; energy removal; non-fuel reactor materials; the reactor fuel system; radiation protection and environmental effects; nuclear reactor shielding; nuclear reactor safety; and power reactor systems.

  4. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes. 23rd quarterly report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. [Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This technology is important to reduce the technical and economic risks inherent in utilizing coal, a feedstock whose variable and often unexpected behavior presents a significant challenge. This program will merge significant advances made at Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. (AFR) in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior, with technology being developed at Brigham Young University (BYU) in comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors. The foundation to describe coal-specific conversion behavior is AFR`s Functional Group (FG) and Devolatilization, Vaporization and Crosslinking (DVC) models, developed under previous and on-going METC sponsored programs. These models have demonstrated the capability to describe the time dependent evolution of individual gas species, and the amount and characteristics of tar and char. The combined FG-DVC model will be integrated with BYU`s comprehensive two-dimensional reactor model, PCGC-2, which is currently the most widely used reactor simulation for combustion or gasification. The program includes: (i) validation of the submodels by comparison with laboratory data obtained in this program, (ii) extensive validation of the modified comprehensive code by comparison of predicted results with data from bench-scale and process scale investigations of gasification, mild gasification and combustion of coal or coal-derived products in heat engines, and (iii) development of well documented user friendly software applicable to a ``workstation`` environment.

  5. Coupled Reactor Kinetics and Heat Transfer Model for Heat Pipe Cooled Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WRIGHT,STEVEN A.; HOUTS,MICHAEL

    2000-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat pipes are often proposed as cooling system components for small fission reactors. SAFE-300 and STAR-C are two reactor concepts that use heat pipes as an integral part of the cooling system. Heat pipes have been used in reactors to cool components within radiation tests (Deverall, 1973); however, no reactor has been built or tested that uses heat pipes solely as the primary cooling system. Heat pipe cooled reactors will likely require the development of a test reactor to determine the main differences in operational behavior from forced cooled reactors. The purpose of this paper is to describe the results of a systems code capable of modeling the coupling between the reactor kinetics and heat pipe controlled heat transport. Heat transport in heat pipe reactors is complex and highly system dependent. Nevertheless, in general terms it relies on heat flowing from the fuel pins through the heat pipe, to the heat exchanger, and then ultimately into the power conversion system and heat sink. A system model is described that is capable of modeling coupled reactor kinetics phenomena, heat transfer dynamics within the fuel pins, and the transient behavior of heat pipes (including the melting of the working fluid). The paper focuses primarily on the coupling effects caused by reactor feedback and compares the observations with forced cooled reactors. A number of reactor startup transients have been modeled, and issues such as power peaking, and power-to-flow mismatches, and loading transients were examined, including the possibility of heat flow from the heat exchanger back into the reactor. This system model is envisioned as a tool to be used for screening various heat pipe cooled reactor concepts, for designing and developing test facility requirements, for use in safety evaluations, and for developing test criteria for in-pile and out-of-pile test facilities.

  6. Challenges in the Development of Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Sabharwall; M.C. Teague; S.M. Bragg-Sitton; M.W. Patterson

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past generations of nuclear reactors have been successively developed and the next generation is currently being developed, demonstrating the constant progress and technical and industrial vitality of nuclear energy. In 2000 US Department of Energy launched Generation IV International Forum (GIF) which is one of the main international frameworks for the development of future nuclear systems. The six systems that were selected were: sodium cooled fast reactor, lead cooled fast reactor, supercritical water cooled reactor, very high temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR), gas cooled fast reactor and molten salt reactor. This paper discusses some of the proposed advanced reactor concepts that are currently being researched to varying degrees in the United States, and highlights some of the major challenges these concepts must overcome to establish their feasibility and to satisfy licensing requirements.

  7. Summary of Research Instruction Research Instruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaji, Hajime

    for Passive corium cooling system under severe accident and reactor components (e.g. Fuel assembly, Steam Master's Program Doctoral Program Summary of Research Instruction Research Instruction Doctoral Program Summary of Research Instruction Research Instruction Application Code Name

  8. NREL: Biomass Research - Daniel J. Schell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    more than 30 years of research experience in bio-based conversion of lignocellulosic biomass and has extensive expertise in integrated biomass conversion operations at the bench...

  9. Photovoltaic Energy Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glashausser, Charles

    than electricity from coal if cost of carbon capture is factored in Great promise for solving globalPhotovoltaic Energy Conversion Frank Zimmermann #12;Solar Electricity Generation Consumes no fuel No pollution No greenhouse gases No moving parts, little or no maintenance Sunlight is plentiful

  10. ENERGY CONVERSION Spring 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    : Gas turbine power plants and air craft propulsion Week 5: Liquidvapor mixtures, vapor power systems: Selected problems will be solved and questions about lecture material or assignments of the course material. However, you are permitted to use a photocopy of unit conversion tables from

  11. Materials for coal conversion and utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sixth annual conference on materials for coal conversion and utilization was held October 13-15, 1981 at the National Bureau of Standards Gaithersburg, Maryland. It was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Gas Research Institute and the National Bureau of Standards. Fifty-eight papers from the proceedings have been entered individually into EDB and ERA; four papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

  12. Bioconversion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCarty, Perry L. (Stanford, CA); Bachmann, Andre (Palo Alto, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A bioconversion reactor for the anaerobic fermentation of organic material. The bioconversion reactor comprises a shell enclosing a predetermined volume, an inlet port through which a liquid stream containing organic materials enters the shell, and an outlet port through which the stream exits the shell. A series of vertical and spaced-apart baffles are positioned within the shell to force the stream to flow under and over them as it passes from the inlet to the outlet port. The baffles present a barrier to the microorganisms within the shell causing them to rise and fall within the reactor but to move horizontally at a very slow rate. Treatment detention times of one day or less are possible.

  13. Catalytic reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aaron, Timothy Mark (East Amherst, NY); Shah, Minish Mahendra (East Amherst, NY); Jibb, Richard John (Amherst, NY)

    2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalytic reactor is provided with one or more reaction zones each formed of set(s) of reaction tubes containing a catalyst to promote chemical reaction within a feed stream. The reaction tubes are of helical configuration and are arranged in a substantially coaxial relationship to form a coil-like structure. Heat exchangers and steam generators can be formed by similar tube arrangements. In such manner, the reaction zone(s) and hence, the reactor is compact and the pressure drop through components is minimized. The resultant compact form has improved heat transfer characteristics and is far easier to thermally insulate than prior art compact reactor designs. Various chemical reactions are contemplated within such coil-like structures such that as steam methane reforming followed by water-gas shift. The coil-like structures can be housed within annular chambers of a cylindrical housing that also provide flow paths for various heat exchange fluids to heat and cool components.

  14. Methane coupling by membrane reactor. Quarterly technical progress report, March 25, 1993--June 24, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi Hua Ma

    1993-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this research is to develop and study an inorganic catalytic membrane reactor which will allow the oxidative coupling of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at near 100% selectivity and relatively higher conversion, by control of the oxygen supply through the membrane. The reactor setup has been completed. Repairs and purchase of new mass flow control equipment have been undertaken to enable accurate quantitative analysis of gas mixtures using the GC-MS. A four point sub miniature thermocouple assembly has been installed which allows temperature gaskets and seals have been tried to achieve good sealing at reaction temperatures. Gas permeability data have been obtained to monitor the change in porosity of a 20 nm pore size {alpha}-alumina membrane with increasing number of perovskite depositions.

  15. Chemistry of Furan Conversion into Aromatics and Olefins over HZSM-5: A Model Biomass Conversion Reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Yu-Ting [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Huber, George W. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The conversion of furan (a model of cellulosic biomass) over HZSM-5 was investigated in a thermogravimetric analysis–mass spectrometry system, in situ Fourier transform infrared analysis, and in a continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor. Furan adsorbed as oligomers at room temperature with a 1.73 of adsorbed furan/Al ratio. These oligomers were polycyclic aromatic compounds that were converted to CO, CO?, aromatics, and olefins at temperatures from 400 to 600 °C. Aromatics (e.g., benzene, toluene, and naphthalene), oligomer isomers (e.g., benzofuran, 2,2-methylenebisfuran, and benzodioxane), and heavy oxygenates (C??{sub +} oligomers) were identified as intermediates formed inside HZSM-5 at different reaction temperatures. During furan conversion, graphite-type coke formed on the catalyst surface, which caused the aromatics and olefins formation to deactivate within the first 30 min of time on-stream. We have measured the effects of space velocity and temperature for furan conversion to help us understand the chemistry of biomass conversion inside zeolite catalysts. The major products for furan conversion included CO, CO?, allene, C?–C? olefins, benzene, toluene, styrene, benzofuran, indene, and naphthalene. The aromatics (benzene and toluene) and olefins (ethylene and propylene) selectivity decreased with increasing space velocity. Unsaturated hydrocarbons such as allene, cyclopentadiene, and aromatics selectivity increased with increasing space velocity. The product distribution was selective to olefins and CO at high temperatures (650 °C) but was selective to aromatics (benzene and toluene) at intermediate temperatures (450–600 °C). At low temperatures (450 °C), benzofuran and coke contributed 60% of the carbon selectivity. Several different reactions were occurring for furan conversion over zeolites. Some important reactions that we have identified in this study include Diels–Alder condensation (e.g., two furans form benzofuran and water), decarbonylation (e.g., furan forms CO and allene), oligomerization (allene forms olefins and aromatics plus hydrogen), and alkylation (e.g., furan plus olefins). The product distribution was far from thermodynamic equilibrium.

  16. Foreign Research Reactor/Domestic Research Reactor Receipt Coordinator,

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov Office ofDepartment ofr EEONuclearNuclearNationalMinds"

  17. Irradiation Experiment Conceptual Design Parameters for NBSR Fuel Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, N. R.; Brown, N. R.; Baek, J. S; Hanson, A. L.; Cuadra, A.; Cheng, L. Y.; Diamond, D. J.

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been proposed to convert the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor, known as the NBSR, from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-Enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The motivation to convert the NBSR to LEU fuel is to reduce the risk of proliferation of special nuclear material. This report is a compilation of relevant information from recent studies related to the proposed conversion using a metal alloy of LEU with 10 w/o molybdenum. The objective is to inform the design of the mini-plate and full-size-Plate irradiation experiments that are being planned. This report provides relevant dimensions of the fuel elements, and the following parameters at steady state: average and maximum fission rate density and fission density, fuel temperature distribution for the plate with maximum local temperature, and two-dimensional heat flux profiles of fuel plates with high power densities. The latter profiles are given for plates in both the inner and outer core zones and for cores with both fresh and depleted shim arms (reactivity control devices). A summary of the methodology to obtain these results is presented. Fuel element tolerance assumptions and hot channel factors used in the safety analysis are also given.

  18. Irradiation Experiment Conceptual Design Parameters for NBSR Fuel Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown N. R.; Brown,N.R.; Baek,J.S; Hanson, A.L.; Cuadra,A.; Cheng,L.Y.; Diamond, D.J.

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been proposed to convert the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) research reactor, known as the NBSR, from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The motivation to convert the NBSR to LEU fuel is to reduce the risk of proliferation of special nuclear material. This report is a compilation of relevant information from recent studies related to the proposed conversion using a metal alloy of LEU with 10 w/o molybdenum. The objective is to inform the design of the mini-plate and full-size plate irradiation experiments that are being planned. This report provides relevant dimensions of the fuel elements, and the following parameters at steady state: average and maximum fission rate density and fission density, fuel temperature distribution for the plate with maximum local temperature, and two-dimensional heat flux profiles of fuel plates with high power densities. . The latter profiles are given for plates in both the inner and outer core zones and for cores with both fresh and depleted shim arms (reactivity control devices). In addition, a summary of the methodology to obtain these results is presented.

  19. Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, R.D.; Foral, M.J.

    1992-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Amoco oil Company, has investigated the direct, non-catalytic conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels (particularly methanol) via partial oxidation. The primary hydrocarbon feed used in these studies was natural gas. This report describes work completed in the course of our two-year project. In general we determined that the methanol yields delivered by this system were not high enough to make it economically attractive. Process variables studied included hydrocarbon feed composition, oxygen concentration, temperature and pressure effects, residence time, reactor design, and reactor recycle.

  20. Development of Improved Models and Designs for Coated-Particle Gas Reactor Fuels -- Final Report under the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Petti; Philippe Martin; Mayeul Phélip; Ronald Ballinger; Petti does not have NT account

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this INERI project was to develop improved fuel behavior models for gas reactor coated-particle fuels and to explore improved coated-particle fuel designs that could be used reliably at very high burnups and potentially in gas-cooled fast reactors. Project participants included the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEEL), Centre Étude Atomique (CEA), and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). To accomplish the project objectives, work was organized into five tasks.

  1. Wind Energy Conversion Systems (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section distinguishes between large (capacity 5,000 kW or more) and small (capacity of less than 5,000 kW) wind energy conversion systems (WECS), and regulates the siting of large conversion...

  2. Wind energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Longrigg, Paul (Golden, CO)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

  3. Neutronic reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wende, Charles W. J. (Augusta, GA); Babcock, Dale F. (Wilmington, DE); Menegus, Robert L. (Wilmington, DE)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor includes an active portion with fissionable fuel and neutron moderating material surrounded by neutron reflecting material. A control element in the active portion includes a group of movable rods constructed of neutron-absorbing material. Each rod is movable with respect to the other rods to vary the absorption of neutrons and effect control over neutron flux.

  4. Hydrocarbon conversion process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buss, W.C.; Field, L.A.; Robinson, R.C.

    1984-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrocarbon conversion process is disclosed having a very high selectivity for dehydrocyclization. In one aspect of this process, a hydrocarbon feed is subjected to hydrotreating, then the hydrocarbon feed is passed through a sulfur removal system which reduces the sulfur concentration of the hydrocarbon feed to below 500 ppb, and then the hydrocarbon feed is reformed over a dehydrocyclization catalyst comprising a large pore zeolite containing at least one Group VIII metal to produce aromatics and hydrogen.

  5. Object Closure Conversion Cornell University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glew, Neal

    that a direct formulation of object closure conversion is interesting and gives further insight into generalObject Closure Conversion Neal Glew Cornell University 24 August 1999 Abstract An integral part of implementing functional languages is closure conversion--the process of converting code with free variables

  6. Sandia National Laboratories: Wavelength Conversion Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TechnologiesWavelength Conversion Materials Wavelength Conversion Materials Overview of SSL Wavelength Conversion Materials Rare-Earth Phosphors Inorganic phosphors doped with...

  7. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftin Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology haveThe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 2rogrammatic

  8. Conversion of Questionnaire Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Danny H [ORNL] [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the survey, respondents are asked to provide qualitative answers (well, adequate, needs improvement) on how well material control and accountability (MC&A) functions are being performed. These responses can be used to develop failure probabilities for basic events performed during routine operation of the MC&A systems. The failure frequencies for individual events may be used to estimate total system effectiveness using a fault tree in a probabilistic risk analysis (PRA). Numeric risk values are required for the PRA fault tree calculations that are performed to evaluate system effectiveness. So, the performance ratings in the questionnaire must be converted to relative risk values for all of the basic MC&A tasks performed in the facility. If a specific material protection, control, and accountability (MPC&A) task is being performed at the 'perfect' level, the task is considered to have a near zero risk of failure. If the task is performed at a less than perfect level, the deficiency in performance represents some risk of failure for the event. As the degree of deficiency in performance increases, the risk of failure increases. If a task that should be performed is not being performed, that task is in a state of failure. The failure probabilities of all basic events contribute to the total system risk. Conversion of questionnaire MPC&A system performance data to numeric values is a separate function from the process of completing the questionnaire. When specific questions in the questionnaire are answered, the focus is on correctly assessing and reporting, in an adjectival manner, the actual performance of the related MC&A function. Prior to conversion, consideration should not be given to the numeric value that will be assigned during the conversion process. In the conversion process, adjectival responses to questions on system performance are quantified based on a log normal scale typically used in human error analysis (see A.D. Swain and H.E. Guttmann, 'Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis with Emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications,' NUREG/CR-1278). This conversion produces the basic event risk of failure values required for the fault tree calculations. The fault tree is a deductive logic structure that corresponds to the operational nuclear MC&A system at a nuclear facility. The conventional Delphi process is a time-honored approach commonly used in the risk assessment field to extract numerical values for the failure rates of actions or activities when statistically significant data is absent.

  9. US, Russian Federation Sign Joint Statement on Reactor Conversion |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sureReportsofDepartmentSeries | Department ofDepartmentChinaUPDATE:US

  10. Partial oxidation of methane to syngas in different reactor types

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lapszewicz, J.A.; Campbell, I.; Charlton, B.G.; Foulds, G.A. [CSIRO Division of Coal and Energy Technology, Menai (Australia)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of Rh/ZnO/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst for partial oxidation of methane to syngas was compared in fixed and fluidised bed reactors. Catalyst activity was found not to be a limiting factor under any experimental conditions and complete oxygen conversions were observed in all tests. In the fixed bed reactor both methane conversion and syngas selectivity were increasing with space velocity as the result of an autothermal effect. Satisfactory control of the catalyst temperature at high space velocities could only be achieved with addition of inert diluent or steam to the feed. Different conversion and selectivity patterns were observed in fluidised bed reactor. Methane conversion and carbon monoxide selectivity were decreasing with increasing gas flow. By contrast, hydrogen selectivity showed distinct maximum at medium space velocities. These results are interpreted in terms of catalyst backmixing and its effect on primary and secondary reactions. Improved temperature control was also achieved in fluidised bed reactor. Several experiments using fluidised bed reactor were carried out at elevated pressures. To eliminate the occurrence of non-catalytic gas phase reactions between methane and oxygen very short feed mixing times (< 1 ms) were employed. Despite these measures the reactor could not be successfully operated at pressures above 0.7 MPa. The implications of these findings for process development are discussed.

  11. Energy Conversion, an Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-StateEnergyHeavy Duty Vehicle Efficiency Energy

  12. Energy Conversion, an Energy Frontier Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContractElectron-StateEnergyHeavy Duty Vehicle Efficiency EnergyDirector's

  13. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production, Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Project 2001-001, Westinghouse Electric Co. Grant Number: DE-FG07-02SF22533, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philip E. MacDonald

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the six reactor technologies selected for research and development under the Generation IV program. SCWRs are promising advanced nuclear systems because of their high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% versus about 33% efficiency for current Light Water Reactors [LWRs]) and considerable plant simplification. SCWRs are basically LWRs operating at higher pressure and temperatures with a direct once-through cycle. Operation above the critical pressure eliminates coolant boiling, so the coolant remains single-phase throughout the system. Thus, the need for a pressurizer, steam generators, steam separators, and dryers is eliminated. The main mission of the SCWR is generation of low-cost electricity. It is built upon two proven technologies: LWRs, which are the most commonly deployed power generating reactors in the world, and supercritical fossil-fired boilers, a large number of which are also in use around the world. The reference SCWR design for the U.S. program is a direct cycle system operating at 25.0 MPa, with core inlet and outlet temperatures of 280 and 500 C, respectively. The coolant density decreases from about 760 kg/m3 at the core inlet to about 90 kg/m3 at the core outlet. The inlet flow splits with about 10% of the inlet flow going down the space between the core barrel and the reactor pressure vessel (the downcomer) and about 90% of the inlet flow going to the plenum at the top of the rector pressure vessel, to then flow down through the core in special water rods to the inlet plenum. Here it mixes with the feedwater from the downcomer and flows upward to remove the heat in the fuel channels. This strategy is employed to provide good moderation at the top of the core. The coolant is heated to about 500 C and delivered to the turbine. The purpose of this NERI project was to assess the reference U.S. Generation IV SCWR design and explore alternatives to determine feasibility. The project was organized into three tasks: Task 1. Fuel-cycle Neutronic Analysis and Reactor Core Design Task 2. Fuel Cladding and Structural Material Corrosion and Stress Corrosion Cracking Task 3. Plant Engineering and Reactor Safety Analysis. moderator rods. materials.

  14. International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermalhydraulics, NURETH-15 NURETH15-xxx Pisa, Italy, May 12-15, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The 15th International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermalhydraulics, NURETH-15 NURETH15-xxx technologies in the context of generation IV nuclear power reactors. In order to improve electric efficiency during last years as a possible energy conversion cycle for Sodium nuclear Fast Reactors (SFRs) [1

  15. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, Toshifumi (Wading River, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  16. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sugama, T.

    1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

  17. Proceedings of the 25th intersociety energy conversion engineering conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, P.A.; Schertz, W.W.; Till, R.H.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book contains the proceedings of the 25th Intersociety Energy Conversion Engineering Conference. Volume 5 is organized under the following headings: Photovoltaics I, Photovoltaics II, Geothermal power, Thermochemical conversion of biomass, Energy from waste and biomass, Solar thermal systems for environmental applications, Solar thermal low temperature systems and components, Solar thermal high temperature systems and components, Wind systems, Space power sterling technology Stirling cooler developments, Stirling solar terrestrial I, Stirling solar terrestrial II, Stirling engine generator sets, Stirling models and simulations, Stirling engine analysis, Stirling models and simulations, Stirling engine analysis, Stirling engine loss understanding, Novel engine concepts, Coal conversion and utilization, Power cycles, MHD water propulsion I, Underwater vehicle powerplants - performance, MHD underwater propulsion II, Nuclear power, Update of advanced nuclear power reactor concepts.

  18. Challenges and Opportunities in Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Conversion Challenges and Opportunities in Thermoelectric Energy Conversion 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Lawrence Berkeley...

  19. Comparison and validation of HEU and LEU modeling results to HEU experimental benchmark data for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology MITR reactor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newton, T. H.; Wilson, E. H; Bergeron, A.; Horelik, N.; Stevens, J. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (MIT Nuclear Reactor Lab.)

    2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Towards this goal, comparisons of MCNP5 Monte Carlo neutronic modeling results for HEU and LEU cores have been performed. Validation of the model has been based upon comparison to HEU experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. The objective of this work was to demonstrate a model which could represent the experimental HEU data, and therefore could provide a basis to demonstrate LEU core performance. This report presents an overview of MITR-II model geometry and material definitions which have been verified, and updated as required during the course of validation to represent the specifications of the MITR-II reactor. Results of calculations are presented for comparisons to historical HEU start-up data from 1975-1976, and to other experimental benchmark data available for the MITR-II Reactor through 2009. This report also presents results of steady state neutronic analysis of an all-fresh LEU fueled core. Where possible, HEU and LEU calculations were performed for conditions equivalent to HEU experiments, which serves as a starting point for safety analyses for conversion of MITR-II from the use of HEU fuel to the use of UMo LEU fuel.

  20. Advanced High-Temperature, High-Pressure Transport Reactor Gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Swanson; Daniel Laudal

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Coal and Environmental Systems has as its mission to develop advanced gasification-based technologies for affordable, efficient, zero-emission power generation. These advanced power systems, which are expected to produce near-zero pollutants, are an integral part of DOE's Vision 21 Program. DOE has also been developing advanced gasification systems that lower the capital and operating costs of producing syngas for chemical production. A transport reactor has shown potential to be a low-cost syngas producer compared to other gasification systems since its high-throughput-per-unit cross-sectional area reduces capital costs. This work directly supports the Power Systems Development Facility utilizing the KBR transport reactor located at the Southern Company Services Wilsonville, Alabama, site. Over 2800 hours of operation on 11 different coals ranging from bituminous to lignite along with a petroleum coke has been completed to date in the pilot-scale transport reactor development unit (TRDU) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC). The EERC has established an extensive database on the operation of these various fuels in both air-blown and oxygen-blown modes utilizing a pilot-scale transport reactor gasifier. This database has been useful in determining the effectiveness of design changes on an advanced transport reactor gasifier and for determining the performance of various feedstocks in a transport reactor. The effects of different fuel types on both gasifier performance and the operation of the hot-gas filter system have been determined. It has been demonstrated that corrected fuel gas heating values ranging from 90 to 130 Btu/scf have been achieved in air-blown mode, while heating values up to 230 Btu/scf on a dry basis have been achieved in oxygen-blown mode. Carbon conversions up to 95% have also been obtained and are highly dependent on the oxygen-coal ratio. Higher-reactivity (low-rank) coals appear to perform better in a transport reactor than the less reactive bituminous coals. Factors that affect TRDU product gas quality appear to be coal type, temperature, and air/coal ratios. Testing with a higher-ash, high-moisture, low-rank coal from the Red Hills Mine of the Mississippi Lignite Mining Company has recently been completed. Testing with the lignite coal generated a fuel gas with acceptable heating value and a high carbon conversion, although some drying of the high-moisture lignite was required before coal-feeding problems were resolved. No ash deposition or bed material agglomeration issues were encountered with this fuel. In order to better understand the coal devolatilization and cracking chemistry occurring in the riser of the transport reactor, gas and solid sampling directly from the riser and the filter outlet has been accomplished. This was done using a baseline Powder River Basin subbituminous coal from the Peabody Energy North Antelope Rochelle Mine near Gillette, Wyoming.

  1. Novel Composite Hydrogen-Permeable Membranes for Non-Thermal Plasma Reactors for the Decomposition of Hydrogen Sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris D. Argyle; John F. Ackerman; Suresh Muknahallipatna; Jerry C. Hamann; Stanislaw Legowski; Guibing Zhao; Sanil John

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this experimental project is to design and fabricate a reactor and membrane test cell to dissociate hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) in a non-thermal plasma and recover hydrogen (H{sub 2}) through a superpermeable multi-layer membrane. Superpermeability of hydrogen atoms (H) has been reported by some researchers using membranes made of Group V transition metals (niobium, tantalum, vanadium, and their alloys), although it has yet to be confirmed in this study. Several pulsed corona discharge (PCD) reactors have been fabricated and used to dissociate H{sub 2}S into hydrogen and sulfur. Visual observation shows that the corona is not uniform throughout the reactor. The corona is stronger near the top of the reactor in argon, while nitrogen and mixtures of argon or nitrogen with H{sub 2}S produce stronger coronas near the bottom of the reactor. Both of these effects appear to be explainable base on the different electron collision interactions with monatomic versus polyatomic gases. A series of experiments varying reactor operating parameters, including discharge capacitance, pulse frequency, and discharge voltage were performed while maintaining constant power input to the reactor. At constant reactor power input, low capacitance, high pulse frequency, and high voltage operation appear to provide the highest conversion and the highest energy efficiency for H{sub 2}S decomposition. Reaction rates and energy efficiency per H{sub 2}S molecule increase with increasing flow rate, although overall H{sub 2}S conversion decreases at constant power input. Voltage and current waveform analysis is ongoing to determine the fundamental operating characteristics of the reactors. A metal infiltrated porous ceramic membrane was prepared using vanadium as the metal and an alumina tube. Experiments with this type of membrane are continuing, but the results thus far have been consistent with those obtained in previous project years: plasma driven permeation or superpermeability has not been observed. A new test cell specially designed to test the membranes has been constructed to provide basic science data on superpermeability.

  2. Energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, L.M.

    1985-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy conversion system includes a photo-voltaic array for receiving solar radiation and converting such radiation to electrical energy. The photo-voltaic array is mounted on a stretched membrane that is held by a frame. Tracking means for orienting the photo-voltaic array in predetermined positions that provide optimal exposure to solar radiation cooperate with the frame. An enclosure formed of a radiation transmissible material includes an inside containment space that accommodates the photo-voltaic array on the stretched membrane, the frame and the tracking means, and forms a protective shield for all such components. The enclosure is preferably formed of a flexible inflatable material and maintains its preferred form, such as a dome, under the influence of a low air pressure furnished to the dome. Under this arrangement the energy conversion system is streamlined for minimizing wind resistance, sufficiently weathproof for providing protection against weather hazards such as hail, capable of using diffused light, lightweight for low-cost construction and operational with a minimal power draw.

  3. Energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, Lawrence M. (Lakewood, CO)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy conversion system includes a photo-voltaic array for receiving solar radiation and converting such radiation to electrical energy. The photo-voltaic array is mounted on a stretched membrane that is held by a frame. Tracking means for orienting the photo-voltaic array in predetermined positions that provide optimal exposure to solar radiation cooperate with the frame. An enclosure formed of a radiation transmissible material includes an inside containment space that accommodates the photo-voltaic array on the stretched membrane, the frame and the tracking means, and forms a protective shield for all such components. The enclosure is preferably formed of a flexible inflatable material and maintains its preferred form, such as a dome, under the influence of a low air pressure furnished to the dome. Under this arrangement the energy conversion system is streamlined for minimizing wind resistance, sufficiently weatherproof for providing protection against weather hazards such as hail, capable of using diffused light, lightweight for low-cost construction, and operational with a minimal power draw.

  4. Feasibility of breeding in hard spectrum boiling water reactors with oxide and nitride fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Bo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study assesses the neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and fuel performance aspects of using nitride fuel in place of oxides in Pu-based high conversion light water reactor designs. Using the higher density nitride fuel ...

  5. Structure of processes in flow reactor and closed reactor: Flow reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

    Structure of processes in flow reactor and closed reactor: Flow reactor Closed reactor Active Zone -- chemical quasi- equilibria, similarity principles and macroscopic kinetics", in: Lectures on Plasma Physics

  6. Apparatus and methods for direct conversion of gaseous hydrocarbons to liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C.; Lessing, Paul A.

    2006-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical reactor for direct conversion of hydrocarbons includes a dielectric barrier discharge plasma cell and a solid oxide electrochemical cell in fluid communication therewith. The discharge plasma cell comprises a pair of electrodes separated by a dielectric material and passageway therebetween. The electrochemical cell comprises a mixed-conducting solid oxide electrolyte membrane tube positioned between a porous cathode and a porous anode, and a gas inlet tube for feeding oxygen containing gas to the porous cathode. An inlet is provided for feeding hydrocarbons to the passageway of the discharge plasma cell, and an outlet is provided for discharging reaction products from the reactor. A packed bed catalyst may optionally be used in the reactor to increase efficiency of conversion. The reactor can be modified to allow use of a light source for directing ultraviolet light into the discharge plasma cell and the electrochemical cell.

  7. Status of Preconceptual Design of the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ingersoll, D.T.

    2004-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A new reactor plant concept is presented that combines the benefits of ceramic-coated, high-temperature particle fuel with those of clean, high-temperature, low-pressure molten salt coolant. The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concept is a collaboration of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, and the University of California at Berkeley. The purpose of the concept is to provide an advanced design capable of satisfying the top-level functional requirements of the U.S. Department of Energy Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), while also providing a technology base that is sufficiently robust to allow future development paths to higher temperatures and larger outputs with highly competitive economics. This report summarizes the status of the AHTR preconceptual design. It captures the results from an intense effort over a period of 3 months to (1) screen and examine potential feasibility concerns with the concept; (2) refine the conceptual design of major systems; and (3) identify research, development, and technology requirements to fully mature the AHTR design. Several analyses were performed and are presented to quantify the AHTR performance expectations and to assist in the selection of several design parameters. The AHTR, like other NGNP reactor concepts, uses coated particle fuel in a graphite matrix. But unlike the other NGNP concepts, the AHTR uses molten salt rather than helium as the primary system coolant. The considerable previous experience with molten salts in nuclear environments is discussed, and the status of high-temperature materials is reviewed. The large thermal inertia of the system, the excellent heat transfer and fission product retention characteristics of molten salt, and the low-pressure operation of the primary system provide significant safety attributes for the AHTR. Compared with helium coolant, a molten salt cooled reactor will have significantly lower fuel temperatures (150-200-C lower) for the equivalent temperature of heat delivered to either the power conversion system or a hydrogen production plant. Using a comparative cost analysis, the construction costs per unit output are projected to be 50-55% of the costs for modular gas-cooled or sodium-cooled reactor systems. This is primarily a consequence of substantially larger power output and higher conversion efficiency for the AHTR. The AHTR has a number of unique technical challenges in meeting the NGNP requirements; however, it appears to offer advantages over high-temperature helium-cooled reactors and provides an alternative development path to achieve the NGNP requirements. Primary challenges include optimizing the core design for improved response to transients, designing an internal blanket to thermally protect the reactor vessel, and engineering solutions to high-temperature refueling and maintenance.

  8. Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. 1984 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the program is to generate scientific data and conversion process information that will lead to establishment of cost-effective process for converting biomass resources into clean fuels. The goal of the program is to develop the data base for biomass thermal conversion by investigating the fundamental aspects of conversion technologies and by exploring those parameters that are critical to the conversion processes. The research activities can be divided into: (1) gasification technology; (2) liquid fuels technology; (3) direct combustion technology; and (4) program support activities. These activities are described in detail in this report. Outstanding accomplishments during fiscal year 1984 include: (1) successful operation of 3-MW combustor/gas turbine system; (2) successful extended term operation of an indirectly heated, dual bed gasifier for producing medium-Btu gas; (3) determination that oxygen requirements for medium-Btu gasification of biomass in a pressurized, fluidized bed gasifier are low; (4) established interdependence of temperature and residence times on biomass pyrolysis oil yields; and (5) determination of preliminary technical feasibility of thermally gasifying high moisture biomass feedstocks. A bibliography of 1984 publications is included. 26 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) FY05 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. D. Weaver; T. Marshall; T. Totemeier; J. Gan; E.E. Feldman; E.A Hoffman; R.F. Kulak; I.U. Therios; C. P. Tzanos; T.Y.C. Wei; L-Y. Cheng; H. Ludewig; J. Jo; R. Nanstad; W. Corwin; V. G. Krishnardula; W. F. Gale; J. W. Fergus; P. Sabharwall; T. Allen

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radio toxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. Nevertheless, the GFR was chosen as one of only six Generation IV systems to be pursued based on its ability to meet the Generation IV goals in sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with on outlet temperature of 850 C at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in participating in research related to the development of the GFR. These are Euratom (European Commission), France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Of these, Euratom (including the United Kingdom and Switzerland), France, and Japan have active research activities with respect to the GFR. The research includes GFR design and safety, and fuels/in-core materials/fuel cycle projects. This report outlines the current design status of the GFR, and includes work done in the areas mentioned above for this fiscal year. In addition, this report fulfills the Level 2 milestones, ''Complete annual status report on GFR reactor design'', and ''Complete annual status report on pre-conceptual GFR reactor designs'' in work package GI0401K01. GFR funding for FY05 included FY04 carryover funds, and was comprised of multiple tasks. These tasks involved a consortium of national laboratories and universities, including the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Auburn University (AU), Idaho State University (ISU), and the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW-M). The total funding for FY05 was $1000K, with FY04 carryover of $174K. The cost breakdown can be seen in Table 1.

  10. Introduction to Solar Photon Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nozik, A.; Miller, J.

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficient and cost-effective direct conversion of solar photons into solar electricity and solar fuels is one of the most important scientific and technological challenges of this century. It is estimated that at least 20 terawatts of carbon-free energy (1 and 1/2 times the total amount of all forms of energy consumed today globally), in the form of electricity and liquid and gaseous fuels, will be required by 2050 in order to avoid the most serious consequences of global climate change and to ensure adequate global energy supply that will avoid economic chaos. But in order for solar energy to contribute a major fraction of future carbon-free energy supplies, it must be priced competitively with, or perhaps even be less costly than, energy from fossil fuels and nuclear power as well as other renewable energy resources. The challenge of delivering very low-cost solar fuels and electricity will require groundbreaking advances in both fundamental and applied science. This Thematic Issue on Solar Photon Conversion will provide a review by leading researchers on the present status and prognosis of the science and technology of direct solar photoconversion to electricity and fuels. The topics covered include advanced and novel concepts for low-cost photovoltaic (PV) energy based on chemistry (dye-sensitized photoelectrodes, organic and molecular PV, multiple exciton generation in quantum dots, singlet fission), solar water splitting, redox catalysis for water oxidation and reduction, the role of nanoscience and nanocrystals in solar photoconversion, photoelectrochemical energy conversion, and photoinduced electron transfer. The direct conversion of solar photons to electricity via photovoltaic (PV) cells is a vital present-day commercial industry, with PV module production growing at about 75%/year over the past 3 years. However, the total installed yearly averaged energy capacity at the end of 2009 was about 7 GW-year (0.2% of global electricity usage). Thus, there is potential for the PV industry to grow enormously in the future (by factors of 100-300) in order for it to provide a significant fraction of total global electricity needs (currently about 3.5 TW). Such growth will be greatly facilitated by, and probably even require, major advances in the conversion efficiency and cost reduction for PV cells and modules; such advances will depend upon advances in PV science and technology, and these approaches are discussed in this Thematic Issue. Industrial and domestic electricity utilization accounts for only about 30% of the total energy consumed globally. Most ({approx}70%) of our energy consumption is in the form of liquid and gaseous fuels. Presently, solar-derived fuels are produced from biomass (labeled as biofuels) and are generated through biological photosynthesis. The global production of liquid biofuels in 2009 was about 1.6 million barrels/day, equivalent to a yearly output of about 2.5 EJ (about 1.3% of global liquid fuel utilization). The direct conversion of solar photons to fuels produces high-energy chemical products that are labeled as solar fuels; these can be produced through nonbiological approaches, generally called artificial photosynthesis. The feedstocks for artificial photosynthesis are H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}, either reacting as coupled oxidation-reduction reactions, as in biological photosynthesis, or by first splitting H{sub 2}O into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} and then reacting the solar H{sub 2} with CO{sub 2} (or CO produced from CO2) in a second step to produce fuels through various well-known chemical routes involving syngas, water gas shift, and alcohol synthesis; in some applications, the generated solar H{sub 2} itself can be used as an excellent gaseous fuel, for example, in fuel cells. But at the present time, there is no solar fuels industry. Much research and development are required to create a solar fuels industry, and this Thematic Issue presents several reviews on the relevant solar fuels science and technology. The first three manuscripts relate to the daunting problem of producing

  11. Plant maintenance and advanced reactors, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of the September-October issue is on plant maintenance and advanced reactors. Major articles/reports in this issue include: Advanced plants to meet rising expectations, by John Cleveland, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna; A flexible and economic small reactor, by Mario D. Carelli and Bojan Petrovic, Westinghouse Electric Company; A simple and passively safe reactor, by Yury N. Kuznetsov, Research and Development Institute of Power Engineering (NIKIET), Russia; Gas-cooled reactors, by Jeffrey S. Merrifield, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; ISI project managment in the PRC, by Chen Chanbing, RINPO, China; and, Fort Calhoun refurbishment, by Sudesh Cambhir, Omaha Public Power District.

  12. Sandia National Laboratories: biomass conversion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    biomass conversion Sandia Video Featured by DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office On December 10, 2014, in Biofuels, Biomass, Capabilities, Energy, Facilities, JBEI, News, News &...

  13. Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2010, Prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, May 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Lewis D. A. Hagemeyer Y. U. McCormick

    2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2010 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no NRC-licensed low-level waste disposal facilities currently in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Annual reports for 2010 were received from a total of 190 NRC licensees. The summation of reports submitted by the 190 licensees indicated that 192,424 individuals were monitored, 81,961 of whom received a measurable dose. When adjusted for transient workers who worked at more than one licensee during the year, there were actually 142,471 monitored individuals and 62,782 who received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 10,617 person-rem, which represents a 12% decrease from the 2009 value. This decrease was primarily due to the decrease in collective dose at commercial nuclear power reactors, as well as a decrease in the collective dose for most of the other categories of NRC licensees. The number of individuals receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in an average measurable dose of 0.13 rem for 2010. The average measurable dose is defined as the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) divided by the number of individuals receiving a measurable dose. In calendar year 2010, the average annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor (LWR) licensees was 83 person-rem. This represents a 14% decrease from the value reported for 2009 (96 person-rem). The decrease in collective dose for commercial nuclear power reactors was due to an 11% decrease in total outage hours in 2010. During outages, activities involving increased radiation exposure such as refueling and maintenance are performed while the reactor is not in operation. The average annual collective dose per reactor for boiling water reactors (BWRs) was 137 personrem for 35 BWRs, and 55 person-rem for 69 pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Analyses of transient individual data indicate that 29,333 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient individuals by multiple licensees. The adjustment to account for transient individuals has been specifically noted in footnotes in the figures and tables for commercial nuclear power reactors. In 2010, the average measurable dose per individual for all licensees calculated from reported data was 0.13 rem. Although the average measurable dose per individual from data submitted by licensees was 0.13 rem, a corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose per individual of 0.17 rem.

  14. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Huntington Beach, CA); Sahimi, Muhammad (Altadena, CA); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Richmond, CA); Harale, Aadesh (Los Angeles, CA); Park, Byoung-Gi (Yeosu, KR); Liu, Paul K. T. (Lafayette Hill, PA)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  15. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) Decay Heat Removal Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. D. Weaver; L-Y. Cheng; H. Ludewig; J. Jo

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current research and development on the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) has focused on the design of safety systems that will remove the decay heat during accident conditions, ion irradiations of candidate ceramic materials, joining studies of oxide dispersion strengthened alloys; and within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) the fabrication of carbide fuels and ceramic fuel matrix materials, development of non-halide precursor low density and high density ceramic coatings, and neutron irradiation of candidate ceramic fuel matrix and metallic materials. The vast majority of this work has focused on the reference design for the GFR: a helium-cooled, direct power conversion system that will operate with an outlet temperature of 850ºC at 7 MPa. In addition to the work being performed in the United States, seven international partners under the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) have identified their interest in participating in research related to the development of the GFR. These are Euratom (European Commission), France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Of these, Euratom (including the United Kingdom), France, and Japan have active research activities with respect to the GFR. The research includes GFR design and safety, and fuels/in-core materials/fuel cycle projects. This report is a compilation of work performed on decay heat removal systems for a 2400 MWt GFR during this fiscal year (FY05).

  16. Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) FY04 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. D. Weaver; T. C. Totemeier; D. E. Clark; E. E. Feldman; E. A. Hoffman; R. B. Vilim; T. Y. C. Wei; J. Gan; M. K. Meyer; W. F. Gale; M. J. Driscoll; M. Golay; G. Apostolakis; K. Czerwinski

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) was chosen as one of the Generation IV nuclear reactor systems to be developed based on its excellent potential for sustainability through reduction of the volume and radio toxicity of both its own fuel and other spent nuclear fuel, and for extending/utilizing uranium resources orders of magnitude beyond what the current open fuel cycle can realize. In addition, energy conversion at high thermal efficiency is possible with the current designs being considered, thus increasing the economic benefit of the GFR. However, research and development challenges include the ability to use passive decay heat removal systems during accident conditions, survivability of fuels and in-core materials under extreme temperatures and radiation, and economical and efficient fuel cycle processes. Nevertheless, the GFR was chosen as one of only six Generation IV systems to be pursued based on its ability to meet the Generation IV goals in sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection.

  17. Nuclear reactor engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glasstone, S.; Sesonske, A.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A book is reviewed which emphasizes topics directly related to the light water reactor power plant and the fast reactor power system. Current real-world problems are addressed throughout the text, and a chapter on safety includes much of the postThree Mile Island impact on operating systems. Topics covered include Doppler broadening, neutron resonances, multigroup diffusion theory, reactor kinetics, reactor control, energy removal, nonfuel materials, reactor fuel, radiation protection, environmental effects, and reactor safety.

  18. Reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marica Baldoncini; Ivan Callegari; Giovanni Fiorentini; Fabio Mantovani; Barbara Ricci; Virginia Strati; Gerti Xhixha

    2015-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Antineutrinos produced at nuclear reactors constitute a severe source of background for the detection of geoneutrinos, which bring to the Earth's surface information about natural radioactivity in the whole planet. In this framework we provide a reference worldwide model for antineutrinos from reactors, in view of reactors operational records yearly published by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). We evaluate the expected signal from commercial reactors for ongoing (KamLAND and Borexino), planned (SNO+) and proposed (Juno, RENO-50, LENA and Hanohano) experimental sites. Uncertainties related to reactor antineutrino production, propagation and detection processes are estimated using a Monte Carlo based approach, which provides an overall site dependent uncertainty on the signal in the geoneutrino energy window on the order of 3%. We also implement the off-equilibrium correction to the reference reactor spectra associated with the long-lived isotopes and we estimate a 2.4% increase of the unoscillated event rate in the geoneutrino energy window due to the storage of spent nuclear fuels in the cooling pools. We predict that the research reactors contribute to less than 0.2% to the commercial reactor signal in the investigated 14 sites. We perform a multitemporal analysis of the expected reactor signal over a time lapse of 10 years using reactor operational records collected in a comprehensive database published at www.fe.infn.it/antineutrino.

  19. Updating reactor control: mini-computers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, K.C.; Sandquist, G.M. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An aging reactor control console and a limited operating budget have impeded many research projects in the TRIGA reactor facility at the University of Utah. The, University's present console is Circa 1959 vintage and repairs to the console are frequently required which present many electronic problems to a staff with little electronic training. As an alternative to a single function control console we are developing a TRIGA control system based upon a mini-computer. The system hardware has been specified and the hardware is currently being acquired. The software will be programmed by the staff to customize the system to the reactor's physical systems and technical specifications. The software will be designed to monitor and control all reactor functions, control a pneumatic sample transfer system, acquire and analyze neutron activation data, provide reactor facility security surveillance, provide reactor documentation including online logging of physical parameters, and record regularly scheduled reactor calibrations and laboratory accounting procedures. The problem of hardware rewiring and changing technical specifications and changing safety system characteristics can be easily handled in the software. Our TRIGA reactor also functions as a major educational resource using available reactor based software. The computer control system can be employed to provide on-line training in reactor physics and kinetics. (author)

  20. anaerobic hybrid reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    required for thermonuclear reactors R@frascati.enea.it Abstract. For the progress of the thermonuclear fusion energy research based on the tokamak concept in ITER (International...

  1. advanced marine reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fueling; - Te ITB formation - Heat accumulation ? Extension of research area towards reactor-relevant regime Development of ECRF (110 GHz) and N 28 An Advanced Computational...

  2. Global Optimization of Chemical Reactors and Kinetic Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALHUSSEINI, ZAYNA ISHAQ

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    i> plot. Chemical Engineering Research and Design. 2012; 90,Chemical Engineering Science 2002b; 57(15): Feinberg, M. Optimal reactor design

  3. Initial Design of a Dual Fluidized Bed Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun, Minyoung

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    bed, Chemical Engineering Research and Design, Volume 90,Design of a Dual Fluidized Bed Reactor by Minyoung Yun Master of Science, Graduate Program in Chemical and Environmental Engineering

  4. Small Modular Reactors Presentation to Secretary of Energy Advisory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Energy Advisory Board - Deputy Assistant Secretary John Kelly DOE Small Modular Reactor Program (SMR) Research, Development & Deployment (RD&D) to enable the deployment of a...

  5. Gas-cooled reactor programs. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor technology development program. Annual progress report, December 31, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasten, P.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Bartine, D.E.; Sanders, J.P.

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ORNL continues to make significant contributions to the national program. In the HTR fuels area, we are providing detailed statistical information on the fission product retention performance of irradiated fuel. Our studies are also providing basic data on the mechanical, physical, and chemical behavior of HTR materials, including metals, ceramics, graphite, and concrete. The ORNL has an important role in the development of improved HTR graphites and in the specification of criteria that need to be met by commercial products. We are also developing improved reactor physics design methods. Our work in component development and testing centers in the Component Flow Test Loop (CFTL), which is being used to evaluate the performance of the HTR core support structure. Other work includes experimental evaluation of the shielding effectiveness of the lower portions of an HTR core. This evaluation is being performed at the ORNL Tower Shielding Facility. Researchers at ORNL are developing welding techniques for attaching steam generator tubing to the tubesheets and are testing ceramic pads on which the core posts rest. They are also performing extensive testing of aggregate materials obtained from potential HTR site areas for possible use in prestressed concrete reactor vessels. During the past year we continued to serve as a peer reviewer of small modular reactor designs being developed by GA and GE with balance-of-plant layouts being developed by Bechtel Group, Inc. We have also evaluated the national need for developing HTRs with emphasis on the longer term applications of the HTRs to fossil conversion processes.

  6. Effect of biomass feedstock chemical and physical properties on energy conversion processes: Volume 1, Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butner, R.S.; Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.; Pyne, J.W.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory has completed an initial investigation of the effects of physical and chemical properties of biomass feedstocks relative to their performance in biomass energy conversion systems. Both biochemical conversion routes (anaerobic digestion and ethanol fermentation) and thermochemical routes (combustion, pyrolysis, and gasification) were included in the study. Related processes including chemical and physical pretreatment to improve digestibility, and size and density modification processes such as milling and pelletizing were also examined. This overview report provides background and discussion of feedstock and conversion relationships, along with recommendations for future research. The recommendations include (1) coordinate production and conversion research programs; (2) quantify the relationship between feedstock properties and conversion priorities; (3) develop a common framework for evaluating and characterizing biomass feedstocks; (4) include conversion effects as part of the criteria for selecting feedstock breeding programs; and (5) continue emphasis on multiple feedstock/conversion options for biomass energy systems. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Multiplicity features of adiabatic autothermal reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lovo, M.; Balakotaiah, V. (Houston Univ., TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper singularity theory, large activation energy asymptotic, and numerical methods are used to present a comprehensive study of the steady-state multiplicity features of three classical adiabatic autothermal reactor models: tubular reactor with internal heat exchange, tubular reactor with external heat exchange, and the CSTR with external heat exchange. Specifically, the authors derive the exact uniqueness-multiplicity boundary, determine typical cross-sections of the bifurcation set, and classify the different types of bifurcation diagrams of conversion vs. residence time. Asymptotic (limiting) models are used to determine analytical expressions for the uniqueness boundary and the ignition and extinction points. The analytical results are used to present simple, explicit and accurate expressions defining the boundary of the region of autothermal operation in the physical parameter space.

  8. technology offer Research and Transfer Support | Tanja Sovic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szmolyan, Peter

    in bubbling regime by operating the secon- dary reactor in turbulent or fast flui- dization regime. It allows gas-solid con- tact over the whole height of the reactor and potentially allows operation with lower combustion/ref orming oxygen and heat transport high in both reactors, no gas phase conversion without solids

  9. West European nuclear power generation research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turinsky, P.J.; Baron, S.; Burch, W.D.; Corradini, M.L.; Lucas, G.E.; Matthews, R.B.; Uhrig, R.E.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the status of West European research and development (R&D) in support of nuclear power generation. The focus is on light-water reactors (LWRs), as they will likely be the only concept commerically implemented within the next decade. To a laser degree, alternative concepts such as the high-temperature gas cooled reactor and the liquid-metal reactor (LMR) are also assessed. To bound the study, only the fuel cycle stages of fuel fabrication, power generation, and fuel reprocessing are considered. Under the topic of power generation, the subtopics of core reactor physics, materials, instrumentation and control systems, nuclear power safety, and power plant fabrication and construction are addressed. The front-end fuel cycle stages of mining and milling, conversion and enrichment, and the back-end fuel cycle stages of waste conditioning and disposal and not considered. Most assessments for light-water reactor R&D are completed on a country-by-country basis since there is limited cooperation among the West European countries due to the commercial relevance of R&D in this area.

  10. West European nuclear power generation research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turinsky, P.J.; Baron, S.; Burch, W.D.; Corradini, M.L.; Lucas, G.E.; Matthews, R.B.; Uhrig, R.E.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses the status of West European research and development (R D) in support of nuclear power generation. The focus is on light-water reactors (LWRs), as they will likely be the only concept commerically implemented within the next decade. To a laser degree, alternative concepts such as the high-temperature gas cooled reactor and the liquid-metal reactor (LMR) are also assessed. To bound the study, only the fuel cycle stages of fuel fabrication, power generation, and fuel reprocessing are considered. Under the topic of power generation, the subtopics of core reactor physics, materials, instrumentation and control systems, nuclear power safety, and power plant fabrication and construction are addressed. The front-end fuel cycle stages of mining and milling, conversion and enrichment, and the back-end fuel cycle stages of waste conditioning and disposal and not considered. Most assessments for light-water reactor R D are completed on a country-by-country basis since there is limited cooperation among the West European countries due to the commercial relevance of R D in this area.

  11. SRS Small Modular Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The small modular reactor program at the Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory.

  12. SRS Small Modular Reactors

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The small modular reactor program at the Savannah River Site and the Savannah River National Laboratory.

  13. Reactor safety method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vachon, Lawrence J. (Clairton, PA)

    1980-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to safety means for preventing a gas cooled nuclear reactor from attaining criticality prior to start up in the event the reactor core is immersed in hydrogenous liquid. This is accomplished by coating the inside surface of the reactor coolant channels with a neutral absorbing material that will vaporize at the reactor's operating temperature.

  14. Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) Program Continuous Fiber Wound Ceramic Composite (CFCC) for Commercial Water Reactor Fuel-Technical Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This project began on August 1, 1999. As of July 1, 2000, the progress has been in materials production, test planning, testing facility design & instruction, and calibration. One new subcontractor was added to provide a solution to the CFCC material permeability issue (Northwestern University). This is in addition to the three subcontracts that were previously in place (McDermott Technologies Inc. for continuous fiber reinforced ceramic tubing fabrication, Swales Aerospace for LOCA testing of tubes, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology for In Reactor testing of tubes).

  15. HOOTS99 Preliminary Version Object Closure Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glew, Neal

    classes is an exam* *ple of closure conversion. This paper argues that a direct formulation of object HOOTS99 Preliminary Version Object Closure Conversion __________________________________________________________________________ Abstract An integral part of implementing functional languages is closure conversion_the process

  16. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~June 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

  17. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftr:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

  18. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)r:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

  19. Reduced Order Based Compensator Control of Thin Film Growth in a CVD Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reduced Order Based Compensator Control of Thin Film Growth in a CVD Reactor H.T. Banks and H chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors. An in­ tegral component of this research program is the design of the reactor so that control and sensing are a basic component of the optimal design e#orts for the reactor. We

  20. Reduced Order Based Compensator Control of Thin Film Growth in a CVD Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reduced Order Based Compensator Control of Thin Film Growth in a CVD Reactor H.T. Banks and H chemical vapor deposition (CVD) reactors. An in- tegral component of this research program is the design of the reactor so that control and sensing are a basic component of the optimal design efforts for the reactor