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1

Low Dose Radiation Program: Radiation Biology and the Radiation Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and the Radiation Research Program Biology and the Radiation Research Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), always have been concerned about the health effects of ionizing radiation. Extensive research has been conducted under their sponsorship at all levels of biological organization from molecules to man. Over the past 60 years, studies using every type of radiation source have included exposure to both external radiation sources and to internally deposited radioactive materials. These exposures used different dose patterns and distributions delivered over a wide range of experimental times. This extensive research provided the basis for the new Low Dose Radiation Research Program, linking

2

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Institutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Institutions Institutions Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute Biological Bases for Radiation Adaptive Responses in the Lung-Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM USA Contact: Dr. Bobby R. Scott Program Objective Our research focuses on elucidating the biological bases for radiation adaptive responses in the lung and for suppressing lung cancer, and to use the knowledge gained to produce an improved systems-biology-based, risk model for lung cancer induction by low-dose, low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation. Research was initiated in October 2009. This research should help foster a new era of low-dose radiation risk/benefit assessment. It will have important implications for possible use of low-dose diagnostic radiation (e.g., X-rays) in cancer therapy. It

3

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Photo of two researchers standing on a platform near a solar tracker at the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory gathers solar radiation and meteorological data on South Table Mountain. NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) has been collecting continuous measurements of basic solar radiation components since 1981. Since then, it has expanded its expertise to include integrated metrology, optics, electronics, and data acquisition capabilities. In addition, the SRRL provides facilities for outdoor performance testing of new research instrumentation and energy conversion devices such as photovoltaic modules. The SRRL is located on NREL's South Table Mountain site in Golden, Colorado, where it has excellent solar access because of its unrestricted

4

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Solar Radiation Research Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Radiation Research Laboratory Photographs Solar Radiation Research Laboratory Photographs The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) houses more than 70 instruments to analyze and record solar radiation and surface meteorology data. Learn more about this equipment by exploring the photographs below. Click on a thumbnail to view the full image. Photo of researcher working on an instrument platform in front of the SRRL building. The SRRL is located on South Table Mountain in Golden, Colorado, at 39.74° N, 105.18° W, and 1,829 m AMSL. Photo of four researchers working on equipment atop the SRRL instrument deck. The SRRL's instrument deck is 96 ft long and 16 feet wide. Photo of two pyrheliometers mounted to an automatic sun-tracking base. These two SRRL pyrheliometers are mounted to automatically track the sun

5

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Research Foundations: Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Rings of Saturn, Sandia's workhorse pulsed-power machine. The Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Research Foundation seeks to advance science and engineering in the areas of radiation effects sciences, high energy density science, and pulsed-power science and technology to address critical national security issues. Why our work matters We address several issues key to nuclear security and maintaining a safe, secure, and effective nuclear stockpile. For example, radiation effects science ensures that engineered systems are able to operate as intended in the radiation environments they encounter. In addition, high energy density science validates models that are used to certify the performance of the

6

Thermodynamics of Radiative Emission Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A basic assumption implicit in the application of thermodynamics to the electromagnetic field is that the laws of thermodynamics are locally valid for radiative emission and absorption processes. This means that a certain minimum amount of entropy must be created by the radiative process itself. It is shown, by considering the extreme case in which the spontaneous emission of a natural spectral line is the only process taking place, that this assumption is correct, and that its validity is essentially a consequence of the uncertainty principle as expressed by the reciprocal relationship between natural line breadth and lifetime.

M. A. Weinstein

1960-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Staff Research Staff NREL's resource assessment and forecasting research staff provides expertise in renewable energy measurement and instrumentation through NREL's Power Systems Engineering Center. Photo of Mary Anderberg Mary Anderberg - Scientist M.S. Physics, University of Denver B.S. Physics, Auburn University Mary performs solar radiometric data quality analysis for the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program and provides programming support for the resource integration section. She also contributed to the National Solar Radiation Database update. In addition, Mary is the Web administrator of the Renewable Resource Data Center, for which she provides UNIX, C, Perl, and HTML support. Photo of Afshín Andreas Afshín Andreas - Senior Scientist

8

Research priorities for occupational radiation protection  

SciTech Connect

The Subpanel on Occupational Radiation Protection Research concludes that the most urgently needed research is that leading to the resolution of the potential effects of low-level ionizing radiation. This is the primary driving force in setting appropriate radiation protection standards and in directing the emphasis of radiation protection efforts. Much has already been done in collecting data that represents a compendium of knowledge that should be fully reviewed and understood. It is imperative that health physics researchers more effectively use that data and apply the findings to enhance understanding of the potential health effects of low-level ionizing radiation and improve the risk estimates upon which current occupational radiation protection procedures and requirements depend. Research must be focused to best serve needs in the immediate years ahead. Only then will we get the most out of what is accomplished. Beyond the above fundamental need, a number of applied research areas also have been identified as national priority issues. If effective governmental focus is achieved on several of the most important national priority issues, important occupational radiation protection research will be enhanced, more effectively coordinated, and more quickly applied to the work environment. Response in the near term will be enhanced and costs will be reduced by: developing microprocessor-aided {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes} instruments to simplify the use and processing of radiation data; developing more sensitive, energy-independent, and tissue-equivalent dosimeters to more accurately quantify personnel dose; and developing an improved risk assessment technology base. This can lead to savings of millions of dollars in current efforts needed to ensure personnel safety and to meet new, more stringent occupational guidelines.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) Instrument Calibrations Weather Observations Measurement Research Support Measurements & Instrumentation Team Center for Electric & Hydrogen Technologies & Systems http://www.nrel.gov/srrl NREL * * * * 1617 Cole Boulevard * * * * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 * * * * (303) 275-3000 Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Mission Provide a unique outdoor research facility for supporting renewable energy conversion technologies and climate change studies for the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE). Objectives * Provide Improved Methods for Radiometer Calibrations * Develop a Solar Resource Climate Database for Golden, Colorado

10

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Original Research Program Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Original Research Program Plan Original Research Program Plan Biological Effects of Low Dose and Dose Rate Radiation Prepared for the Office of Biological and Environmental Research by The Low Dose Radiation Research Program Plan Subcommittee of the Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee. II. Table of Contents Face Page Table of Contents Executive Summary Introduction Program Outline Low Dose Radiation vs. Endogenous Oxidative Damage - The Same or Different? Key Question Description Decision Making Value Recommendations and Costs Understanding Biological Responses to Radiation And Endogenous Damage Key Question Description Decision Making Value Recommendations and Costs Thresholds for Low Dose Radiation - Fact or Fiction? Key Question Description Decision Making Value Recommendations and Costs

11

Coherence in Spontaneous Radiation Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By considering a radiating gas as a single quantum-mechanical system, energy levels corresponding to certain correlations between individual molecules are described. Spontaneous emission of radiation in a transition between two such levels leads to the emission of coherent radiation. The discussion is limited first to a gas of dimension small compared with a wavelength. Spontaneous radiation rates and natural line breadths are calculated. For a gas of large extent the effect of photon recoil momentum on coherence is calculated. The effect of a radiation pulse in exciting "super-radiant" states is discussed. The angular correlation between successive photons spontaneously emitted by a gas initially in thermal equilibrium is calculated.

R. H. Dicke

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Radiation Preservation of Food, Commercialization Technology and Economics in Radiation Processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radiation Preservation of Food, Commercialization Technology and Economics in Radiation Processing ...

H. F. Kraybill; D. C. Brunton

1960-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Image Gallery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Image Gallery Image Gallery These are images, photographs, and charts presented or developed for Low Dose Radiation Research Investigators’ Meetings. They may be used for presentations or reports. To save, right click on the picture, then choose "Save picture as." U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from various sources for 1980. various sources 1980 Enlarge Image. U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from various sources for 2006. various sources 2006 Enlarge Image. U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from man-made sources in the United States for 2006. man-made 2006 Enlarge Image. Ionizing Radiation Dose Ranges showing the wide range of radiation doses that humans experience (Rem) Enlarge Image. Ionizing Radiation Dose Ranges showing the wide range of radiation doses that humans experience

14

Radiation hormesis research findings and therapeutic applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In 1982, Professor Thomas Don Luckey of Missouri University asserted 'radiation hormesis' in the journal Health Physics. Following his assertion, the CRIEPI initiated a research programme on radiation hormesis to confirm 'is it true or not'. Twelve years of research with 8??14 universities in Japan produced fruitful results on radiation hormesis. Hormone response tests on rabbits, enzyme response tests on rats and mice, p53 gene responses from mice and rats and helper-T responses from human patients gave us impressive information to consider the therapeutic application of radiation hormesis.

Sadao Hattori

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Earlier Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earlier Events Earlier Events 2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 April 2000 Ionizing Radiation Science and Protection in the 21st Century, NCRP, April 5-6, Arlington, VA. RADIATION RESEARCH 2000, Association for Radiation Research, April 10-12, Bristol, UK. Florida Chapter of the Health Physics Society Spring 2000 Meeting, Gainesville, FL, April 13-14. 47th Annual Meeting of the Radiation Research Society, April 29-May 3, Albuquerque, NM. May 2000 IRPA-10 International Congress 2000, May 14-19, Hiroshima, Japan. IRPA-10 Secretariat, c/o Japan Convention Services, Inc., Nippon Press Center Building, 2-2-1, Uchisaiwai-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100, Japan. Phone: 81-3-3508-1214. Fax: 81-3-3508-0820. irpa10@convention.jp. 4th International Non-Ionizing Radiation Workshop, May 22-25, Kyoto,

16

Low Dose Radiation Program: 2010 Low Dose Radiation Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Radiation Research Program Investigators' Workshop Low Dose Radiation Research Program Investigators' Workshop »» Event Slide Show More than 150 people attended this year's workshop, held April 12-14 at the Renaissance M Street Hotel in Washington, D.C. In addition to 34 plenary talks and more than 70 poster presentations made by the program investigators, participants heard guest speakers from the National Cancer Institute and from sister low-dose programs in Europe and Japan. Remarks from DOE Dr. Anna Palmisano, Associate Director, Office of Science, Director for Biological and Environmental Research (BER), welcomed the meeting participants, thanked Low Dose Radiation Research Program Manager Dr. Noelle Metting for her leadership, and acknowledged the importance of the Low Dose Program to DOE because of its unique focus and important role. She

17

Ris National Laboratory Radiation Research Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risø National Laboratory Postprint Radiation Research Department Year 2007 Paper: www Radiation Physics, Lund University Hospital, 22185 Lund, Sweden 12 Lab. d'Analyses de Surveillance et d Tokai works, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1994, Japan 17 Risoe National Laboratory, 4000 Roskilde

18

Ris National Laboratory DTU Radiation Research Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-life of 2.13?105 yeas. Although 99 Tc is a naturally occurring radionuclide, the main sources of 99 TcRisø National Laboratory DTU Postprint Radiation Research Department Year 2007 Paper: www

19

Radiation Effects Research Foundation Links Past and Future ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Effects Research Foundation Links Past and Future Radiation Effects Research Foundation Links Past and Future August 2009 This document provides historical information...

20

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Program Workshop I Abstracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation William F. Morgan and John H.J. Petrini Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland at Baltimore, Baltimore, MD Summary: The goal of our application is to improve the scientific basis for understanding potential risks to the population from low dose radiation exposure based on potential genetic differences that may modulate an individual's sensitivity to low doses of radiation. Abstract: The goal of this application is to improve the scientific basis for understanding potential risks to the population from low dose radiation exposure. We propose to address specific genetic factors that affect individual susceptibility to low dose radiation and ask the question do genetic differences exist that make some individuals more sensitive to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee CHARTER June 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

22

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Background. Extensive research on the health effects of radiation using standard epidemiological and toxicological approaches has been done for decades to characterize responses of populations and individuals to high radiation doses, and to set exposure standards to protect both the public and the workforce. These standards were set using models that extrapolated from the cancers observed following exposure to high doses of radiation to predicted, but not measurable, changes in cancer frequency at low radiation doses. The use of models was necessary because of our inability to detect changes in cancer incidence following low doses of radiation. Historically, the predominant approach has been the Linear-no-Threshold model (see Wikipedia entry) and collective dose concept that assumes each unit of radiation, no

23

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratories National Laboratories The Low Dose Radiation Program funding encompasses several Scientific Focus Areas (SFAs). The SFAs fund merit-reviewed research at DOE national laboratories. This management approach was created in 2008 by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Science. PNNL's Low Dose Radiation Research Program Scientific Focus Area Linear and Nonlinear Tissue-Signaling Mechanisms in Response to Low Dose and Low Dose-Rate Radiation This program is funded as a U.S. Department of Energy Scientific Focus Area (SFA), and is an integrated cooperative program to understand low dose radiation effects in a complex model system. Coordinating Multidisciplinary Expertise The SFAs are designed to take advantage of the multidisciplinary,

24

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Argonne scientists study climate change 1 of 22 Argonne scientists study climate change The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science provided $60 million in ARRA funding for climate research to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a DOE national user facility that has been operating climate observing sites around the world for nearly two decades. These sites help scientists study clouds and their influence on the sun's radiant energy, which heats our planet. Above is one of the purchases: the Vaisala Present Weather Detector. It optically measures visibility, present weather, precipitation intensity, and precipitation type. It provides a measure of current weather conditions by combining measurements from three

25

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Radiation Effects in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Effects in Differentiating Human Lens Cells Radiation Effects in Differentiating Human Lens Cells E.A. Blakely1, M.P. McNamara1, P.Y. Chang1, K.A. Bjornstad1, D. Sudar1, and A.C. Thompson2 1Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California; 2Advanced Light Source Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California. Introduction The human lens is one of the most radiosensitive organs of the body. Cataract, the opacification of the lens, is a late-appearing response to radiation damage. There are few data available on the late radiation effects of exposure in space flight to charged particle beams, the most prevalent of which are protons. Basic research in this area is needed to integrate the responses of both critical and other representative tissues

26

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DOE Lowdose Radiation Program Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Authors: William F. Morgan1 and Marianne B. Sowa2 Institutions: 1Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland, Baltimore MD 21201 2 Chemical Structure and Dynamics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 We have recently installed a low LET electron microbeam that generates energetic electrons to mimic radiation damage from gamma and x-ray sources. It has been designed such that high-energy electrons deposit energy in a pre-selected subset of cells leaving neighboring cells unirradiated (Figure 1). In this way it is possible to examine non-targeted effects associated with low dose radiation exposure including induced genomic instability and

27

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Frequencies of Radiation-Induced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequencies of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Interchanges and Frequencies of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Interchanges and Randomness of Chromosome Territory Locations Relative to One Another. Authors: RK Sachs,§ MN Cornforth,‡ KM Greulich-Bode,* L Hlatky, and DJ Brenner|| Institutions: §Department of Mathematics, University of California, ‡University of Texas Medical Branch, *Department of Skin Carcinogenesis, German Cancer Research Center DFCI, Harvard Medical School, ||Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University. Leukemogenesis, and perhaps carcinogenesis in general, often involves specific chromosome translocations. Radiation-induced chromosome translocation frequencies are strongly influenced by how close participating chromosomes are to one another in an interphase cell nucleus. We sought to determine whether chromosomes in human peripheral blood

28

Opportunities in Catalysis Research Using Synchrotron Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Catalysis Research Using Synchrotron Radiation in Catalysis Research Using Synchrotron Radiation Tuesday 10/8/02 Chair: Lars Pettersson 1:30-1:40 Anders Nilsson Welcome 1:40-2:30 Gabor Somorjai University of California, Berkeley and LBLN Need for New Directions of Research at the Frontiers of Catalysis Science 2:30-3:00 Geoff Thornton University of Manchester Influence of defects on the reactivity of ZnO 3:00-3:30 Anders Nilsson Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of Surfaces and Reactions 3:30-3:45 Break Chair: Anders Nilsson 3:45-4:15 Lars Pettersson Stockholm University Adsorbate-Substrate Bonding: An Experimental and Theoretical MO Picture 4:15-4:45 Miquel Salmeron Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Photoelectron Spectroscopy studies of surfaces in high pressure gas

29

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Highlights - Health Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Physics Special Issue Features Contributions by Low Dose Health Physics Special Issue Features Contributions by Low Dose Investigators Health Physics The March 2011 special issue of Health Physics highlights the Victor Bond Workshop held May 2-5, 2010, in Richland, Wash. The workshop honored the late Dr. Victor (Vic) Bond for his lifetime achievement in the radiation sciences. Dr. Bond's research resulted in numerous influential scientific papers that contributed greatly to the understanding of radiation effects in biological systems. The workshop attracted internationally recognized experts in biophysics, experimental radiation biology, epidemiology, and risk assessment to discuss issues of low-dose risk. Participants included current and previously funded U.S. Department of Energy Low Dose Radiation Research

30

Hospital Sterile Processing | GE Global Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Researches Use of Robots for Hospital Sterile Processing GE Researches Use of Robots for Hospital Sterile Processing GE principal investigator Lynn DeRose discusses the robotic...

31

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Universities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Universities Universities | Duke University | Loma Linda University | Northwestern University | University of Chicago | University of California Davis | Northwestern University University of Chicago University of California Davis Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on NF-κB Signaling Networks and Mitochondria Principal Investigator: Dr. Gayle Woloschak DOE Low Dose Research Program Projects Low dose-low dose rate irradiation leads to long term changes in numbers of mitochondria and mitochondrial genomes - Principal Investigator: Gayle Woloschak, Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA NF-κB-mediated pro-survival network in low dose radiation-induced adaptive protection - Principal Investigator: Jian Jian Li, Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Davis,

32

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Optical Metrology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Metrology Laboratory Optical Metrology Laboratory Photo of a laser and a spectral irradiance calibration system used to create lamp-detector alignment. Researchers use a spectral irradiance calibration alignment jig and a laser beam to align a calibration source and test unit. The NREL Optical Metrology Laboratory ensures that optical radiation resource measurement equipment is calibrated to national or international standards to ensure the quality and traceability of data. NREL considers optical radiation to range from 250 nm to 2,500 nm and to include the ultraviolet (250-400 nm), visible (400-750 nm), near infrared (750-1,100 nm), and shortwave infrared (1,100-2,500 nm) ranges. Activities The Optical Metrology Laboratory provides National Institute of Standards and Technology-traceable measurements for:

33

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Highlights - Real-time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-time imaging of repair processes possible with Nickel-63 Real-time imaging of repair processes possible with Nickel-63 microirradiator Microscope Microscope stage-mounted microirradiation system. (A) Overall system shown mounted on a micromanipulator housed within a heated, humidified, environmental chamber of a microscope. (B) Close-up showing attachment of device to the micromanipulator. (C) Detail showing the bend in the enclosing capillary, which allows positioning of the active surface directly above the target cell. (D) Microirradiator tip in dissecting microscope. (E) Close-up view through microscope optics (scale bar, 10 microns.) Background: Scientists know that mammalian cells begin a nucleoplasmic repair process within seconds after being exposed to ionizing radiation. Real-time imaging of this process could further understanding of the

34

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

35

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

36

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

37

DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy Resources with Additional Information Planned radiation treatment Peregrine calculation from Mission Possible: DOE Advanced Biomedical Technology Research, page 10 Over the time span of many years, DOE's research has made many contributions to radiation and cancer therapy, including PEREGRINE and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). 'PEREGRINE, a hardware and software system that addresses the problem of radiation therapy dosage using fundamental physics principles, is a revolutionary new tool for analyzing and planning radiation treatment for cancer patients. About 90 percent of radiation treatment patients receive photon therapy, which is PEREGRINE's principal application. PEREGRINE may also be applied to the less frequently used electron-beam therapy and to brachytherapy, which is radiation therapy from an internally planted radiation source. It is effective for radiography, which predicts the pattern of radiation that is transmitted through a patient or other object.'1

38

Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Style Guide Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility March 2013 Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility March 2013 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research March 2013 ii Contents 1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................................................................................... 1 2.1 Usage ............................................................................................................................................ 1

39

ESnet supports Sandia and APNIC IPv6 Background Radiation research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

supports Sandia and APNIC IPv6 Background Radiation research Engineering Services The Network OSCARS Fasterdata IPv6 Network IPv6 Implementation Checklist ESnet IPv6 Mirror Servers...

40

Third Radiation Effects Research Foundation Board of Councilors Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third Radiation Effects Research Foundation Board of Councilors Third Radiation Effects Research Foundation Board of Councilors Meeting Held in Hiroshima Third Radiation Effects Research Foundation Board of Councilors Meeting Held in Hiroshima July 22, 2013 - 4:54pm Addthis Third Radiation Effects Research Foundation Board of Councilors Meeting Held in Hiroshima The third Board of Councilors (BOC) meeting was held on June 18-19 at the Hiroshima Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), a bi-national U.S.-Japan research organization. The BOC is the highest decision-making body at RERF, consisting of eight Councilors elected from the United States and Japan. A total of 23 participants, including 8 Councilors from the United States and Japan and officials from the U.S. and Japanese Governments, were present at the meeting. The Office of Health, Safety and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2007  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the program, and presents key accomplishments in 2007. Notable achievements include: Successful review of the ACRF as a user facility by the DOE Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee. The subcommittee reinforced the importance of the scientific impacts of this facility, and its value for the international research community. Leadership of the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign. This multi-agency, interdisciplinary field campaign involved enhanced surface instrumentation at the ACRF Southern Great Plains site and, in concert with the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study sponsored by the DOE Atmospheric Science Program, coordination of nine aircraft through the ARM Aerial Vehicles Program. Successful deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility in Germany, including hosting nearly a dozen guest instruments and drawing almost 5000 visitors to the site. Key advancements in the representation of radiative transfer in weather forecast models from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Development of several new enhanced data sets, ranging from best estimate surface radiation measurements from multiple sensors at all ACRF sites to the extension of time-height cloud occurrence profiles to Niamey, Niger, Africa. Publication of three research papers in a single issue (February 2007) of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

LR Roeder

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Edinburgh Research Explorer Probabilistic Programming Process Algebra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Edinburgh Research Explorer Probabilistic Programming Process Algebra Citation for published version: Georgoulas, A, Hillston, J, Milios, D & Sanguinetti, G 2014, 'Probabilistic Programming Process.1007/978-3-319-10696-0_21 Link: Link to publication record in Edinburgh Research Explorer Document Version: Preprint (usually

Millar, Andrew J.

43

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Properties of the 1997 TWP Smoke Event Submitter: Spinhirne, J., University of Arizona Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal...

44

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

45

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Melvyn Folkard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Melvyn Folkard Melvyn Folkard Gray Cancer Institute About this Project Currently Funded Projects A Variable Energy Soft X-ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect Technical Abstracts 2005 Workshop: A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray Microprobe to Investiage Mechanisms of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect Folkard, M., Vojnovic, B., Schettiono, G., Atkinson, K., Prise, K.M., Michael, B.D. 2003 Workshop: A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation -Induced Bystander Effect. Folkard, M., Vojnovic, B., Schettino, G., Atkinson, K., Prise, K.M., Michael, B.D. 2002 Workshop: A Variable-Energy Soft X-ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect. Folkard, M., Vojnovic, B., Schettino,

46

Japan Program: Radiation Effects Research Foundation | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The Life Span Study is the major RERF epidemiologic study that generates data on cancer incidence, cancer mortality, and non-cancer effects in relation to radiation dose. The...

47

Electrical Analogs of Atomic Radiative Decay Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Simple electrical circuits are analyzed, and the results show that for high frequencies they have frequency and time responses identical to the spontaneous radiative decays of atoms. As an illustration of the analogy a ...

Fontana, Peter R.; Srivastava, Rajendra P.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 2003 Molecular Characterization of the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Authors: Chuan-Yuan Li,1 Eric Chuang2 Institutions: 1Dept of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 2Advanced Technology Center, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland The potential risks of exposure to low dose radiation are of major concerns to the DOE/OBER Low Dose Radiation Research Program. It has been long recognized that much of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Therefore, internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying

49

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Characterization of the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Authors: Chuan-Yuan Li, Zhanjun Guo, Zhonghui Yang, and Eric Chuang Institutions: Dept of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC Advanced Technology Center, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland Background The potential risks of exposure to low dose radiation are of major concerns to the DOE/OBER Low Dose Radiation Research Program. It has been long recognized that much of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Therefore internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying

50

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: William F. Morgan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

William F. Morgan William F. Morgan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PO Box 999 Richland, Washington About this Project Projects Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory, and Societal Impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program A Mechanistic Study of the Radiation Quality Dependence of Bystander Effects in Human Cells. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation Mechanisms of Adaptive Responses and Genomic Instability Induced by Low Dose/ Low Dose Rate Radiation Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: Using a Low-LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation Sowa, M.B., Goetz, W., Baulch, J., and Morgan, W.F. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation

51

Research Reactors and Radiation Facilities for Joint Use Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observatory, a facility of the Graduate School of Science of Kyoto University, was constructed in 1968's current main research target is to unveil the origin of the solar magnetic activities that govern science and technology, material science, radiation life science, and radiation medical science

Takada, Shoji

52

Reference Radiation for Cosmic Rays in RBE Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When astronauts travel in space, they are exposed to high energy cosmic radiations. The cosmic ray spectrum contains very high energy particles, generally up to several GeV per nucleon. Currently NASA is funding research on the effects...

Feng, Shaoyong

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

53

Proprietary Research | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proprietary Research Proprietary Research Proprietary Research is defined as that for which users request confidentiality of proposal, data and results for a certain period of time. This research follows the guidelines for implementation by the Stanford University Faculty Senate and is executed through a Proprietary User Agreement. Proprietary Research is subject to the Department of Energy's full-cost recovery requirement for facility charges for the use of user facilities and advance payment of those charges. The facility charges are established as a dollar rate for each shift of beam time. Experimenters interested in conducting Proprietary Research should contact the User Research Administration Manager well in advance of the anticipated need for beam time as the legal and financial procedures involved may take

54

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: What's New Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What's New What's New Tony Brooks Chosen As Lauriston S. Taylor Lecturer Congratulations to radiation biologist Dr. Antone "Tony" Brooks, a consultant to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Low Dose Radiation Research Program, on his selection to give the 36th Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture at the Annual Meeting of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). Brooks is former chief scientist for the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Dose Radiation Research Program. His lecture, titled "From the Field to the Laboratory and Back: The What Ifs, Wows, and Who Cares of Radiation Biology," will be a featured presentation at the meeting, which will be held March 12 and 13, 2012, at the Hyatt Regency Bethesda, Bethesda, Maryland.

55

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Highlights - Ionizing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Affects Cancer Frequency and Characteristics by Acting Affects Cancer Frequency and Characteristics by Acting on the Microenvironment Background: For more than a quarter century the scientific rationale for extrapolating radiation health effects has been underpinned by biophysical target theory. Fundamental to target theory is that the effect (e.g., DNA damage, mutation, cancer) is proportional to dose based on interaction of energy with biological targets, specifically DNA. However, the biology following ionizing radiation is more than just DNA damage, repair, or misrepair. Cellular responses to ionizing radiation can affect phenotype, cell interactions, lineage commitment, differentiation and genomic stability, all of which have been widely documented in cultured cells and many observed in vivo. This class of non-targeted effects induced

56

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Highlights - Collateral  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collateral Damage Collateral Damage Using targeted irradiation to understand radiation-induced effects in bystander cells chromosomal A typical example of chromosomal instability induction measured by chromosome-type aberrations in primary human lymphocytes at delay time post-irradiation of a fraction of the cell population. Similar types of aberrations were observed in whole irradiated population but were not observed in untreated cells. Munira Kadhim Background: It has long been understood that radiation exposure can influence cellular changes. Studies indicate that even very low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) alpha-particle irradiation, such as that from environmental radon, can affect cells. Radiation-induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells and as a

57

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Bruce E. Lehnert  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

E. Lehnert E. Lehnert Los Alamos National Laboratory Past Project Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Unirradiated Cells: Pathways Analysis in Support of Risk Assessment. Technical Abstracts 2002 Workshop: Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Unirradiated cells: Pathways Analysis in Support of Risk Assessment. Lehnert, B.E., Cary, R., Gadbois, D. and Gupta G. 2001 Workshop: Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Effects of Ionizing Radiation in Irradiated and Unirradiated Cells. Lehnert, B.E. 1999 Workshop: Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Effects of Ionizing Radiation in Irradiated and Unirradiated Cells. Lehnert, B.E. Publications Lehnert, B.E., Radiation bystander effects. U.S.Department of Energy Research News (March 6 issue) Goldberg, Z. and Lehnert, B.E. (2002). Radiation-induced effects in

58

RESEARCH Open Access Spatial variation of net radiation and its  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH Open Access Spatial variation of net radiation and its contribution to energy balance the uncertainties of carbon, water, and energy measurements and has thus hampered the urgent research of scaling up closures in grassland ecosystems Changliang Shao1,2 , Linghao Li2 , Gang Dong3 and Jiquan Chen1,2* Abstract

Chen, Jiquan

59

DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Workshop I November 1999  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Radiation Research Program Low Dose Radiation Research Program U.S. Department of Energy Office of Biological and Environmental Research David G. Thomassen, Ph.D. Program Coordinator Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy, SC-72 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, MD 20874-1290 Phone: 301-903-9817 Fax: 301-903-8521 Email: david.thomassen@science.doe.gov Arthur Katz, Ph.D. Life Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy, SC-72 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, MD 20874-1290 Phone: 301-903-4932 Fax: 301-903-8521 Email: arthur.katz@science.doe.gov Marvin E. Frazier, Ph.D. Director, Life Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy, SC-72 19901 Germantown Road

60

Japan Program - Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety Safety Home Sub Offices › Worker Safety & Health Policy › Worker Safety & Health Assistance › Illness & Injury Prevention Programs › International Health Studies › Office of Worker Screening and Compensation Support Mission & Functions › Health & Safety › Worker Safety & Health Policy › Worker Safety & Health Assistance › Illness & Injury Prevention Programs › International Health Studies › Worker Screening and Compensation Support Federal Line Management Oversight of DOE Nuclear Facilities Integrated Safety Management (ISM) A-Z Index Directory OSH Regulatory and Policy Response Line Health Resources Policy and Standards Worker Safety Beryllium Chemical Safety Biological Safety Radiation Safety Rules 10 CFR 707 10 CFR 835

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Glossary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary Glossary A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z We welcome updates to the glossary. Please send them to Low Dose. A α=β Ratio: A measure of the curvature of the cell survival curve and a measure of the sensitivity of a tissue or tumor to dose fractionation. The dose at which the linear and quadratic components of cell killing are equal. Abscopal Effect: The radiation response in tissue at a distance from the irradiated site invoked by local irradiation. Absorbed Dose Rate: Absorbed dose divided by the time it takes to deliver that dose. High dose rates are usually more damaging to humans and animals than low-dose rates. This is because repair of damage is more efficient when the dose rate is low. Absorbed Dose: The amount of energy deposited in any substance by ionizing

62

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DOE / NASA Joint Funded Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE/NASA Joint Funded Projects DOE/NASA Joint Funded Projects NASA Source Photo Space explorers are subject to exposure to low dose ionizing radiation. Research that helps determine health risks from this exposure is funded by NASA and DOE. Source: NASA DOE's Low Dose Program and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) jointly fund new research to develop a better scientific basis for understanding risks to humans from exposures to low doses or low fluences of ionizing radiation. Research must focus on elucidating molecular mechanisms and pathways involved in normal radiobiological responses to low dose exposure, and must have the potential to ultimately increase understanding of health outcomes from radiation exposures that are at or near current workplace exposure

63

The Research Program | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Research Program The Research Program What is the chemical and physical form of uranium in reduced aquifers? Uranium behavior in the Rifle, CO, aquifer. In order to directly interrogate the chemical and physical form of reduced uranium (U(IV)) in bioremediated sediments within the contaminated aquifer at the Rifle site, a novel technique was developed based on reactors installed in wells (center right). U(IV) was found to be bound to biomass (structural model shown in upper left-hand) within thin (microns) sulfide-rich coatings on mineral grains (bottom left). Uranium in its oxidized (U(VI)) form, is one of the most common, abundant, and problematic subsurface contaminants at legacy nuclear sites. In contrast, the tetravalent form of uranium (U(IV) ) is relatively insoluble

64

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory and Social Impact of the DOE Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory and Social Impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program. Authors: Antone L.Brooks, Richard J. Bull, Lezlie A. Couch. Institutions: Washington State University Tri-Cities The purpose of this project is to provide scientific, technical, and organizational support to optimize the impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program. This project will serve as a focal point for collection and dissemination of scientific information from the scientists funded in the Program to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the regulatory agencies, and the public. The project will be responsible for analysis of the scientific information in the broader context of biomedical research and will provide this information to the Office of Biological Research

65

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory, and Societal Impact of the DOE Low Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory, and Societal Impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program Antone L. Brooks Why This Project? For maximum benefit, state-of-the-art research and new data from the Low Dose Radiation Research Program must be available to other scientists, regulatory agencies, and the public. This project stays abreast of scientific advances in the field, gathers, integrates, and summarizes the research within the program, and disseminates this information to appropriate scientific, regulatory, and public venues. Project Goals Provides a focal point for distribution of information generated in the program, to scientific committees, other governmental and regulatory agencies, and to the public Provides scientific support for the Low Dose Program website

66

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Chaun-Yuan Li  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chaun-Yuan Li Chaun-Yuan Li Radiation Biology Research, Duke University Medical Center Funded Projects Molecular Characterization of the Role of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Ionizing, abstract, description. Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: The Roles of Superoxide Dismutage (SOD) in Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Response Yang, Z., Chuang, E., Batinic-Haberle, I., and Li, C.-Y. 2005 Workshop: Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Li, C.-Y., Guo, Z., Yang, Z., and Chuang, E. 2003 Workshop: Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Li, C.-Y. and Chuang, E. Publications Li, F., Sonveaux, P., Rabbani, Z.N., Liu, S., Yan, B., Huang, Q.,

67

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Howard L. Liber  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Howard L. Liber Howard L. Liber Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences Colorado State University Currently Funded Projects Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells Technical Abstracts 2003 Workshop: Delayed genomic instability in human lymphoblasts exposed to 137Cs y-rays radiation Schwartz, J.L., Jordan, R., Lenarczyk, M. and Liber, H.L. 2002 Workshop: Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells. Liber, H.L. and Schwartz, J.L. Publications Zhang, Y., Zhou, J., Held, K.D., Redmond, R.W., Prise, K.M., and Liber, H.L. (2008). Deficiencies of double-strand break repair factors and effects on mutagenesis in directly [gamma]-irradiated and medium-mediated bystander human lymphoblastoid cells. Radiation Research 169(2):197-206.

68

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earths surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earths energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

LR Roeder

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Highlights - 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Capacities Before and After Exposure to Low DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Capacities Before and After Exposure to Low Dose Radiation Immunochemical detection of DSB foci in the nuclei of human fibroblasts. (A) γ-H2AX phospho-serine 139 foci (chromatin marker of DSBs; green). (B) ataxia-telangiectasia mutated phospho-serine 1981 foci (ATM, DNA damage-responsive kinase; red). (C) Merge of images A and B. (White arrows mark large γ-H2AX foci and coincident γ-H2AX/pATM foci that were positively scored; yellow arrows mark small γ-H2AX foci that lack corresponding pATM foci that were not scored.) Enlarge Image Immunochemical detection of DSB foci in the nuclei of human fibroblasts. (A) γ-H2AX phospho-serine 139 foci (chromatin marker of DSBs; green). (B) ataxia-telangiectasia mutated phospho-serine 1981 foci (ATM,

70

United States Department of Energy Low Dose Radiation Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History of the History of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 1998-2008 Dr. Antone L. Brooks tbrooks@tricity.wsu.edu September 2012 Review Draft i Contents Preface............................................................................................................................................. v Summary ........................................................................................................................................ vi Acronyms and Initialisms ............................................................................................................. vii Chapter 1 Introduction ................................................................................................................... 1

71

RADIATION RESEARCH 155, 397401 (2001) 0033-7587/01 $5.00  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for risk estimation for low-dose radiation. 2001 by Radiation Research Society INTRODUCTION It has been to low doses of particles, biological effects occur in a larger proportion of cells than are estimated397 RADIATION RESEARCH 155, 397­401 (2001) 0033-7587/01 $5.00 2001 by Radiation Research Society

72

Doppler effect in the oscillator radiation process in the medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the radiation process of the charged particle passing through an external periodic field in a dispersive medium. In the optical range of spectrum we will consider two cases: first, the source has not eigenfrequency, and second, the source has eigenfrequency. In the first case, when the Cherenkov radiation occurs, the non-zero eigenfrequency produces a paradox for Doppler effect. It is shown that the absence of the eigenfrequency solves the paradox known in the literature. The question whether the process is normal (i.e. hard photons are being radiated under the small angles) or anomalous depends on the law of the medium dispersion. When the source has an eigenfrequency the Doppler effects can be either normal or anomalous. In the X-ray range of the oscillator radiation spectrum we have two photons radiated under the same angle- soft and hard. In this case the radiation obeys to so-called complicated Doppler effect, i.e. in the soft photon region we have anomalous Doppler effect and in the hard photon region we have normal Doppler effect.

Lekdar Gevorgian; Valeri Vardanyan

2011-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

73

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Mechanisms of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells. Authors: Howard L. Liber1 and Jeffrey L. Schwartz2. Institutions: 1Colorado State University and 2University of Washington. Knowledge of the signal and target through which radiation induces genomic instability, which we propose to investigate herein, will allow us to model effects at low doses. Such knowledge will aid in understanding variations in the induction of this genomic instability, both among cells and among individuals. This information could also lead to more sensitive measures of instability that could yield accurate measures of instability induction at low doses. We have developed an in-vitro cell model, in which radiation-induced chromosome instability develops in a two-stage process.

74

Image processing pipeline for synchrotron-radiation-based tomographic microscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A software environment has been developed for processing and reconstructing online the large amount of data generated at TOMCAT, a synchrotron-radiation-based tomographic microscopy beamline of the Swiss Light Source at Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. It has been designed to minimize user interaction and maximize the reconstruction speed and therefore optimize beam time usage.

Hintermller, C.

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

75

Incorporation of 3D Shortwave Radiative Effects within the Weather Research and Forecasting Model  

SciTech Connect

A principal goal of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to understand the 3D cloud-radiation problem from scales ranging from the local to the size of global climate model (GCM) grid squares. For climate models using typical cloud overlap schemes, 3D radiative effects are minimal for all but the most complicated cloud fields. However, with the introduction of ''superparameterization'' methods, where sub-grid cloud processes are accounted for by embedding high resolution 2D cloud system resolving models within a GCM grid cell, the impact of 3D radiative effects on the local scale becomes increasingly relevant (Randall et al. 2003). In a recent study, we examined this issue by comparing the heating rates produced from a 3D and 1D shortwave radiative transfer model for a variety of radar derived cloud fields (O'Hirok and Gautier 2005). As demonstrated in Figure 1, the heating rate differences for a large convective field can be significant where 3D effects produce areas o f intense local heating. This finding, however, does not address the more important question of whether 3D radiative effects can alter the dynamics and structure of a cloud field. To investigate that issue we have incorporated a 3D radiative transfer algorithm into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Here, we present very preliminary findings of a comparison between cloud fields generated from a high resolution non-hydrostatic mesoscale numerical weather model using 1D and 3D radiative transfer codes.

O'Hirok, W.; Ricchiazzi, P.; Gautier, C.

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

76

COLUMBIA RADIATION LABORATORY RESEARCH INVESTIGATION DIRECTED TOWARD EXTENDING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

iVP-^"^^? iVP-^"^^? COLUMBIA RADIATION LABORATORY RESEARCH INVESTIGATION DIRECTED TOWARD EXTENDING THE USEFUL RANGE OF THE ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM Special Technical Report Signal Corps Contract DA-36-039 SC-64630 DA Project No. 3-99-10-022 SC Project No. 102B U. S. Army Laboratory Procurement Office Signal Corps Supply Agency Fort Monmouth, New Jersey The Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York Box 6, Low Memorial Library New York 27, New York March 1, 1956 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. COLUMBIA RADIATION LABORATORY Collected Papers on the AAASER (Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) Special Technical Report

77

Research towards a systematic signature discovery process  

SciTech Connect

In its most general form, a signature is a unique or distinguishing measurement, pattern, or collection of data that identifies a phenomenon (object, action, or behavior) of interest. The discovery of signatures is an important aspect of a wide range of disciplines from basic science to national security for the rapid and efficient detection and/or prediction of phenomena. Current practice in signature discovery is typically accomplished by asking domain experts to characterize and/or model individual phenomena to identify what might compose a useful signature. What is lacking is an approach that can be applied across a broad spectrum of domains and information sources to efficiently and robustly construct candidate signatures, validate their reliability, measure their quality, and overcome the challenge of detection -- all in the face of dynamic conditions, measurement obfuscation and noisy data environments. Our research has focused on the identification of common elements of signature discovery across application domains and the synthesis of those elements into a systematic process for more robust and efficient signature development. In this way, a systematic signature discovery process lays the groundwork for leveraging knowledge obtained from signatures to a particular domain or problem area, and, more generally, to problems outside that domain. This paper presents the initial results of this research by discussing a mathematical framework for representing signatures and placing that framework in the context of a systematic signature discovery process. Additionally, the basic steps of this process are described with details about the methods available to support the different stages of signature discovery, development, and deployment.

Baker, Nathan A.; Barr, Jonathan L.; Bonheyo, George T.; Joslyn, Cliff A.; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Oxley, Mark; Quadrel, Richard W.; Sego, Landon H.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Wynne, Adam S.

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

78

RADIATION RESEARCH 162, 264269 (2004) 0033-7587/04 $15.00  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation Laboratory, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Chiba 263-8555, Japan; e264 RADIATION RESEARCH 162, 264­269 (2004) 0033-7587/04 $15.00 2004 by Radiation Research Society. Radiat. Res. 162, 264­269 (2004). In the present study, we examined the potential contribu- tion

79

RADIATION RESEARCH 162, 257263 (2004) 0033-7587/04 $15.00  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and could possibly be used as a biodosimeter to estimate both the dose and type of radiation exposure. The existence of a stable biomarker in the genome that is dose-dependent and radiation quality-specific would257 RADIATION RESEARCH 162, 257­263 (2004) 0033-7587/04 $15.00 2004 by Radiation Research Society

80

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory and Societal Impact of the DOE Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory and Societal Impact of the DOE Low Dose Research Program Authors: Antone L. Brooks Institution: Washington State University Tri-Cities Richland, Washington The purpose of this project is to provide a focal point for communication of the research results from the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program. The major communication tool provided by this project is a Website at Washington State University. The website is being maintained to provide communication between the scientific advances generated by the research program and scientists both in and outside the program, policy makers, regulators and the public. The website also contains a number of presentations and illustrations that are written so that they will be easy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Gordon Research Conference on Radiation & Climate in 2009, July 5 -10  

SciTech Connect

The 2009 Gordon Research Conference on Radiation and Climate will present cutting-edge research on the outstanding issues in global climate change with focus on the radiative forcing and sensitivity of the climate system and associated physical processes. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics, including grand challenges in radiation and climate, radiative forcing, climate feedbacks, cloud processes in climate system, hydrological cycle in changing climate, absorbing aerosols and Asian monsoon, recent climate changes, and geo-engineering. The invited speakers will present the recent most important advances and future challenges in these areas. The Conference will bring together a collection of leading investigators who are at the forefront of their field, and will provide opportunities for scientists especially junior scientists and graduate students to present their work in poster format and exchange ideas with leaders in the field. The collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with programmed discussion sessions as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, provides an avenue for scientists from different disciplines to brainstorm and promotes cross-disciplinary collaborations in the various research areas represented.

Quiang Fu

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

82

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Computational Modeling of Biochemical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Modeling of Biochemical Pathways Linking Ionizing Computational Modeling of Biochemical Pathways Linking Ionizing Radiation to Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis, and Tumor Incidence Authors: Yuchao Maggie Zhao and Rory Conolly Institutions: Center for Computational Systems Biology CIIT Centers for Health Research Long-Range Goal: To develop an integrated, computational framework for the prediction of low-dose-response to ionizing radiation (IR) in people. Methodology: To provide a flexible framework to evaluate mechanisms of cellular adaptive responses after exposure to IR, three progressively more complicated descriptions of biochemical pathways linking DNA damage with cell-cycle checkpoint control and apoptosis were developed. These descriptions focus on p53-dependent checkpoint arrest and apoptosis, p73-dependent apoptosis, and Chk2-dependent checkpoint arrest,

83

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Mechanisms of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells Howard L. Liber Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences Colorado State University Why This Project This research will be to investigate the condition known as genomic instability. This can be defined as a state in which genetic alterations, including chromosome aberrations and gene mutations, occur at rates that are much higher than normal. In fact, genomic instability is what allows a normal cell to accumulate the multiple genetic alterations that are required to convert it into a cancer cell. The chromosomes of human cells have structures at their ends called telomeres. Telomeres normally function to prevent chromosomes from fusing together end-to-end. An important

84

Responsible Science: Ensuring the Integrity of the Research Process  

SciTech Connect

This is the final technical report for DE-SC0005916 Responsible Science: Ensuring the Integrity of the Research Process.

Arrison, Thomas Samuel

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Characterizing Bystander Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation. Irradiation. Authors: L.A. Braby and J.R. Ford. Institutions: Texas A&M University. Bystander effects, which are typically seen as in increase in the cellular concentration of specific repair related molecules or as cytogenetic changes which appear to be the consequence of DNA damage, may be a significant factor in the risk of long-term health effects of low doses of radiation. These effects clearly increase the effective size of the target for radiation response, from the diameter of a single cell or cell nucleus to something significantly larger, by bringing additional cells into the process. It is unclear whether this larger target will result in an increase or a decrease in the probability of inducing a change which would be detrimental to the health of the organism, but it clearly reduces the

86

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Cooperation Between Homologous  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooperation Between Homologous Recombination and the Fanconi Anemia Cooperation Between Homologous Recombination and the Fanconi Anemia Cancer Suppressor Proteins in Minimizing Spontaneous and Radiation-Induced Chromosomal Instability Authors: Larry H. Thompson, John M. Hinz, Robert S. Tebbs, and N. Alice Yamada Institutions: Biosciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California Purpose and experimental approach. This study addresses the genetic basis of spontaneous mutagenesis as a means of understanding the DNA damage-response pathways that maintain chromosome stability. It is our view that knowledge of these processes is fundamental to understanding how low dose ionizing radiation (IR) produces chromosomal rearrangements that lead to carcinogenesis. Endogenous oxidative DNA damage is presumed to be a

87

DOE/SC-ARM-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20 20 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

88

DOE/SC-ARM-12-021 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

89

DOE/SC-ARM-13-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

90

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Use of Computational Modeling to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Computational Modeling to Evaluate Hypotheses about the Use of Computational Modeling to Evaluate Hypotheses about the Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Bystander Effects Authors: Yuchao “Maggie” Zhao and Rory Conolly Institutions: CIIT Centers for Health Research, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina A detailed understanding of the biological mechanisms of radiation-induced damage at the molecular and cellular levels is needed for accurate assessment of the shape of the dose-response curve for radiationinduced health effects in the intact organism. Computational models can contribute to the improved understanding of mechanisms through integration of data and quantitative evaluation of hypotheses. We propose to develop a novel computational model of bystander effects elicited by oxidative stress and a

91

Review of research on use of radiation-induced mutations in crop breeding in Japan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Japan, the research on radiation-induced mutation has been conducted as one...32P, we now have various kinds of radiation facilities available for mutation breeding. The fundamental...

Takane Matsuo; Hikoyuki Yamaguchi

1962-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

10 DESIGN SCIENCE RESEARCH FOR BUSINESS PROCESS DESIGN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10 DESIGN SCIENCE RESEARCH FOR BUSINESS PROCESS DESIGN: Organizational Transition at Intersport strategies. This paper elaborates on experiences from a business process design effort in an action research for taking the retail chain Intersport into a new organizational state where the new process design

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

93

Errors and Uncertainties in Dose Reconstruction for Radiation Effects Research  

SciTech Connect

Dose reconstruction for studies of the health effects of ionizing radiation have been carried out for many decades. Major studies have included Japanese bomb survivors, atomic veterans, downwinders of the Nevada Test Site and Hanford, underground uranium miners, and populations of nuclear workers. For such studies to be credible, significant effort must be put into applying the best science to reconstructing unbiased absorbed doses to tissues and organs as a function of time. In many cases, more and more sophisticated dose reconstruction methods have been developed as studies progressed. For the example of the Japanese bomb survivors, the dose surrogate distance from the hypocenter was replaced by slant range, and then by TD65 doses, DS86 doses, and more recently DS02 doses. Over the years, it has become increasingly clear that an equal level of effort must be expended on the quantitative assessment of uncertainty in such doses, and to reducing and managing uncertainty. In this context, this paper reviews difficulties in terminology, explores the nature of Berkson and classical uncertainties in dose reconstruction through examples, and proposes a path forward for Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) Project 2.4 that requires a reasonably small level of effort for DOSES-2008.

Strom, Daniel J.

2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

94

EM Marks Milestone at Separations Process Research Unit | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marks Milestone at Separations Process Research Unit Marks Milestone at Separations Process Research Unit EM Marks Milestone at Separations Process Research Unit March 7, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers construct an enclosure for Building H2 at the Separations Process Research Unit Workers construct an enclosure for Building H2 at the Separations Process Research Unit NISKAYUNA, N.Y. - EM met a major regulatory milestone at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) by completing construction of enclosures and ventilation systems required for cleanup. The SPRU project at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory reached the milestone last week in a consent order between DOE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act. The Department has now accomplished all the requirements of the consent order.

95

DOE/SC-ARM-13-007 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the...

96

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Factors Affecting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation William F. Morgan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why This Project The short-term effects of high doses of ionizing radiation on cellular responses are relatively well understood. Less clear are the long-term consequences of exposure to low dose/low dose-rate radiation and the effects of radiation exposure on the progeny of surviving cells. If a cell survives radiation, it is generally thought to have repaired all the radiation-induced insults and be capable of a "normal healthy life". At a certain frequency, however, we have found that some cells surviving radiation grow normally, but will rearrange their genetic material during time in culture. We call this radiation-induced genomic instability. Many

97

Purchase Requisition & Purchase Order Approval Process Office of Research Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Purchase Requisition & Purchase Order Approval Process Office of Research Administration Purchase are sent to the Office of Research Administration as part of the approval for setting up a Purchase Order Requisition & Purchase Order Approval Process 1. Overview Purchase Requisitions and Field Purchase orders

98

Third Radiation Effects Research Foundation Board of Councilors Meeting Held in Hiroshima  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The third Board of Councilors (BOC) meeting was held on June 18-19 at the Hiroshima Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), a bi-national U.S.-Japan research organization.

99

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Thermochemical Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Printable Version Printable Version Thermochemical Processes Photo of a researcher wearing a hardhat and examining a catalytic steam reformer. Catalytic steam reforming increases the overall yield of fuel gas from biomass. NREL's researchers have investigated the thermochemical conversion of renewable energy feedstocks since the lab's inception. Researchers are developing gasification and pyrolysis processes to convert biomass and its residues to hydrogen, fuels, chemicals, and power. Building on past successes, biomass is increasingly one of the best near-term options for renewable hydrogen production. Thermochemical Process R&D Research and development at NREL provides a fundamental understanding of the chemistry of biomass pyrolysis. This R&D includes stabilizing and

100

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Separations Process Research Unit -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Separations Process Research Unit - Separations Process Research Unit - 024 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Separations Process Research Unit (024) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This facility was constructed and operated by the Atomic Energy Commission as a pilot plant for developing and testing the chemical processes to extract both uranium and plutonium from irradiated fuel. Through Fiscal Year 1999 the Department of Energy's Office of Naval Reactors performed surveillance and maintenance activities. In Fiscal Year 2000, a contract was initiated to begin the characterization of the facilities. This will be

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Radiation Research Department Paper: www.risoe.dk/rispubl/art/2007_333.pdf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and released to the environment by human nuclear activity, including nuclear weapons testing, operation of Radionuclides in Environmental, Biological and Nuclear Waste Samples Xiaolin Hou and Per Roos Radiation Research in Environmental, Biological and Nuclear Waste Samples Xiaolin Hou* Per Roos Radiation Research Department, Risø

102

Edinburgh Research Explorer Processivity and Coupling in Messenger RNA Transcription  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Edinburgh Research Explorer Processivity and Coupling in Messenger RNA Transcription Citation and processing that is not captured in the model. Methodology: In this paper, we explore the impact on the m, 'Processivity and Coupling in Messenger RNA Transcription' PLoS One, vol 5, no. 1, e8845, pp. 1-12., 10

Millar, Andrew J.

103

Ionizing Radiation Effects on CMOS Imagers Manufactured in Deep Submicron Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, ionizing radiation, total dose, dark current, STI, hardening by design, RHDB 1. INTRODUCTION IonizingIonizing Radiation Effects on CMOS Imagers Manufactured in Deep Submicron Process Vincent Goiffona a large dynamic range. This can significantly impact the radiation hardness of "in-pixel" devices which

Mailhes, Corinne

104

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Identification of Mouse Genetic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mouse Genetic Susceptibility to Radiation Carcinogenesis Mouse Genetic Susceptibility to Radiation Carcinogenesis Allan Balmain University of California, San Francisco San Francisco, CA. (Jointly funded by NASA and DOE) Why this Project? To identify pathways that control genetic susceptibility to radiation-induced DNA damage and tumor development using novel developments in genomics together with mouse genetics. Project Goals To identify genetic loci that trigger rapid tumor development of mice after radiation. To characterize new genes at these loci that act as tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. Experimental Approach New candidate-radiation susceptibility genes will be identified using a unique haplotyping approach. Using DNA from radiation-induced lymphoma, changes in the gene copy number can be detected using BAC microarrays. The

105

Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Process Research Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies » Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Emerging Technologies » Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Process Research Project Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Process Research Project The Department of Energy is currently researching the development of building superinsulation through a carbon dioxide (CO2) foaming process. Project Description This project seeks to develop building super insulation through a carbon dioxide foaming process that does not use hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), and which produces insulation with a high R-value. Project Partners Research is being undertaken between the Department of Energy and The Industrial Science & Technology Network. Project Goals The goal of this project is to develop advanced insulation without HFC, and to achieve a competitive processing cost for CO2 foaming technology.

106

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Factors Affecting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Doses of Ionizing Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Doses of Ionizing Radiation. Authors: William F. Morgan, Pat Concannon & John H.J. Petrini The goal of this program is to test the hypothesis that mice heterozygous for the NBS1 gene are genetically susceptible to low doses of ionizing radiation. Patients with Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS) are radiation sensitive, because of defects in cellular responses to radiation induced genetic damage. It is unclear whether humans heterozygous for the mutations associated with NBS are radiation sensitive and results from cell culture experiments give conflicting results. In collaboration with John Petrini at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City we developed a mouse model of this disorder and are directly testing the hypothesis

107

What is the radiative process of the prompt phase of Gamma Ray Bursts?  

SciTech Connect

Despite the dramatic improvement of our knowledge of the phenomenology of Gamma Ray Bursts, we still do not know several fundamental aspects of their physics. One of the puzzles concerns the nature of the radiative process originating the prompt phase radiation. Although the synchrotron process qualifies itself as a natural candidate, it faces severe problems, and many efforts have been done looking for alternatives. These, however, suffer from other problems, and there is no general consensus yet on a specific radiation mechanism.

Ghisellini, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Bianchi 46 I-23807 Merate (Italy)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Atomic Collision Processes in Magnetic Confinement Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This NATO Advanced Study Institute is concerned with atomic and molecular processes in controlled thermonuclear fusion research. Most of our attention will be ... and planned tokamaks, since this approach to fusion

M. R. C. McDowell

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Northwestern University Facility for Clean Catalytic Process Research  

SciTech Connect

Northwestern University with DOE support created a Facility for Clean Catalytic Process Research. This facility is designed to further strengthen our already strong catalysis research capabilities and thus to address these National challenges. Thus, state-of-the art instrumentation and experimentation facility was commissioned to add far greater breadth, depth, and throughput to our ability to invent, test, and understand catalysts and catalytic processes, hence to improve them via knowledge-based design and evaluation approaches.

Marks, Tobin Jay [Northwestern University

2013-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

110

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Gregory A. Kimmel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gregory A. Kimmel Gregory A. Kimmel Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Past Project A Novel Spatially Resolved Cell Irradiator to Study Bystander and Adaptive Responses to Low-LET Radiation. Technical Abstracts 2002 Workshop: Spatially Resolved Single Cell Irradiator to Study Bystander Responses to Low LET Radiation. Resat, M.S., Kimmel, G.A., Miller, J.H., McDonald, J.C., Murphy, M.K., Strom, D.J., Thrall, B.D., and Colson, S.D. 2001 Workshop: Spatially Resolved Single Cell Irradiator to Study Bystander Responses to Low LET Radiation. Resat, M.S., Kimmel, G.A., Miller, J.H., McDonald, J.C., Murphy, M.K., Strom, D.J., Thrall, B.D., Metting, N.F., and Colson, S.D 1999 Workshop: A Novel, Spatially Resolved Cell Irradiator to Study Bystander and Adaptive Responses to Low-LET Radiation.

111

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: Induction of NF-κB, MnSOD, 14-3-3ζ and Cyclin B1 Authors: Jian Jian Li, Kazi M. Ahmed, Ming Fan, Shaozhong Dong, Douglas R. Spitz, and Cheng-Rong Yu Institutions: Division of Molecular Radiobiology, Purdue University School of Health Sciences, West Lafayette, Indiana; Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; Molecular Immunology Section, Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Gene expression profiles demonstrate that a group of key stress-responsive genes are associated with radiation exposure and may contribute to cellular

112

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Induction of Genomic Instability in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Induction of Genomic Instability in vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs y Induction of Genomic Instability in vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs y rays, Authors: K. Rithidech1, E.B. Whorton2, M. Tungjai1, E. Ar-Bab1, S.R. Simon1, M. Tawde3 and C.W. Anderson3. Institutions: 1Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, NY 11794-8691, USA, 2University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, TX 77550-1047,3Biology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000. Information on potential health hazards of radiation at doses below or equal to the level traditionally requiring human radiation protection (less than or equal to 10 cGy) is currently lacking. It is therefore important to characterize early and subsequent in vivo biological response induced by low doses of ionizing radiation because such data should provide information that can help determine whether radiation at this dose level

113

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Characterization of Survival  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Survival Advantage, Bystander Effect, and Survival Advantage, Bystander Effect, and Genomic Instability after Low-LET Low Dose Radiation Exposure Mohan Natarajan University of Texas Health Science Center Why this Project? To understand the molecular link between the activation of NF-kB and cellular outcomes such as better cell survival after low-LET radiation and to determine whether low dose radiation-induced NF-kB signaling can mediate telomerase activation and thus confer enhanced cell survival of normal aortic endothelial cells. Project Goals To determine whether low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can cause a positive feedback signal initiated by the activation of the NF-kB. To examine one of the mechanisms involving TNF-a as a signaling mediator, which could mediate the bystander effect through the generation

114

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Linking Molecular Events to Cellular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Linking Molecular Events to Cellular Responses at Low Dose Exposures Linking Molecular Events to Cellular Responses at Low Dose Exposures Thomas Weber Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why This Project It currently costs billions of dollars to protect workers and the public from exposure to man-made radiation, despite exposure levels lower than the natural background levels of radiation. If it could be demonstrated that there is no increased cancer risk associated with these low dose exposures, these resources could be directed toward more critical societal issues. Defining low dose radiation cancer risks is limited by our ability to measure and directly correlate relevant cellular and molecular responses occurring at the low radiation dose and dose rate with tumor formation. This deficiency has led to conservative risk assessments based on low dose

115

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Current Funded Project Descriptions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Funded Project Descriptions Funded Project Descriptions Effects Of Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair Jointly funded by NASA and DOE Eric J Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA 99352 Dr. Ackerman will study the effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on the repair of different types of damage to DNA, including damage from ionizing radiation and that produced by the normal internal operation of the cell. Using a very sensitive technique called host cell reactivation assay (HCR), he will quantitatively measure the repair of each type of DNA damage and thereby measure if the cellular repair system itself has been damaged. He will also determine if unique forms of DNA repair system damage are induced by low doses of cosmic radiation exposure present during space

116

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Marianne B. Sowa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marianne B. Sowa Marianne B. Sowa PNNL - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Funded Projects A Mechanistic Study of the Radiation Quality Dependence of Bystander Effects in Human Cells Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: Using a Low-LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Sowa, M.B., Goetz, W., Baulch, J., and Morgan, W.F. Morphological Changes in a 3D Mammary Model Following Exposure to Low Dose, Low-LET Radiation Opresko, L.K., Chrisler, W., Emory, K., Arthurs, B., and Sowa, M.B. 2005 Workshops: Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation Morgan, W.F. and Sowa, M.B. Publications Perrine, K.A., Lamarche, B.L., Hopkins, D.F., Budge, S.E., Opresko, L.K., Wiley, H.S., and Sowa, M.B. (2007). High speed method for in situ

117

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Janet E. Baulch  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Janet E. Baulch Janet E. Baulch University of California, Davis Currently Funded Projects Impact of Genetic Factors on the Heritable Effects of Paternal Exposure to Low-Dose Radiation Technical Abstracts 2003 Workshop: DNA damage in acutely irradiated F2 mice with a history of paternal F0 germline irradiation Baulch, J.E. and Raabe, O G. 2002 Workshop Impact of Genetic Factors on the Heritable Effects of Paternal Exposure to Low-Dose Radiation, Baulch, J.E., Ph.D. and Raabe, O.G., Ph.D. Publications Kovalchuk, O. and Baulch, J.E. (2008). Epigenetic changes and nontargeted radiation effects - Is there a link? Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis 49(1):16-25 Laiakis, E.C., Baulch, J.E., and Morgan, W.F. (2008). Interleukin 8 exhibits a pro-mitogenic and pro-survival role in radiation induced

118

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Project Descriptions-Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Descriptions-Archive Project Descriptions-Archive Effects Of Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair Eric J Ackerman (former PNNL) (Jointly funded by NASA and DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA Dr. Ackerman will study the effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on the repair of different types of damage to DNA, including damage from ionizing radiation and that produced by the normal internal operation of the cell. Using a very sensitive technique called host cell reactivation assay (HCR), he will quantitatively measure the repair of each type of DNA damage and thereby measure if the cellular repair system itself has been damaged. He will also determine if unique forms of DNA repair system damage are induced by low doses of cosmic radiation exposure present during space

119

Commemoration of the 60th Annniversary of The Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission/Radiation Effects Research Foundation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Commemoration of the 60th Annniversary of The Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission/Radiation Effects Research Foundation (ABCC/RERF)

120

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Processes Research Inc - OH 44  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Processes Research Inc - OH 44 Processes Research Inc - OH 44 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PROCESSES RESEARCH, INC (OH.44) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 2905 Vernon Place , Cincinnati , Ohio OH.44-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 OH.44-2 OH.44-3 Site Operations: Research and development of machining methods during the early 1950s; no indication of involvement with radioactive materials. OH.44-1 OH.44-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on nature of operations at the site OH.44-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None OH.44-3 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - New Materials, Devices, and Processes for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Materials, Devices, and Processes for Advanced Concepts New Materials, Devices, and Processes for Advanced Concepts Computational Science and Theory We can use high-performance computing tools in modeling and simulation studies of semiconductor and other solar materials. We also determine the performance of solar devices. Theoretical studies can help us understand underlying physical principles or predict useful chemical compositions and crystalline structures. Scientific Computing Experimental Materials Science Solid-State Theory. NREL has strong complementary research capabilities in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, transparent conducting oxides (TCOs), combinatorial (combi) methods, and atmospheric processing. From fundamental physical studies to applied research relating to solar industry needs, we are developing the

122

An Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. J. S. Delamere, S. A. Clough, E. J. Mlawer, Sid-Ahmed Boukabara, K. Cady-Pereira, and M. Shepard Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Maine Introduction Over the last decade, a suite of radiative transfer models has been developed at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) with support from the Atmospheric and Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. These models span the full spectral regime from the microwave to the ultraviolet, and range from monochromatic to band calculations. Each model combines the latest spectroscopic advancements with radiative transfer algorithms to efficiently compute radiances, fluxes, and cooling

123

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects in Integrated Biorefinery Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects in Integrated Biorefinery Processes Projects in Integrated Biorefinery Processes A photo of a control room with four large computer screens. A man and a woman are looking at the screens. The Thermochemical Process Development Unit is equipped with sophisticated process monitoring and operation control systems. NREL is focused on integrating all the biomass conversion unit operations. With extensive knowledge of the individual unit operations, NREL is well-positioned to link these operations together at the mini-pilot and pilot scales. Among the integrated biorefinery projects are: Sorghum to Ethanol Research Initiative Sorghum shows promising characteristics as a feedstock for biofuel production. However, little basic research data exists. NREL is performing integrated research on sorghum by studying it at every step along the

124

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB mediates survival advantage by Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB mediates survival advantage by Telomerase Activation. Authors: Natarajan M.,1 Mohan S.,2 Pandeswara, S.L.,1 and Herman T.S.1 Institutions: Departments of 1Radiation Oncology and 2Pathology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas Activation of NF-kB in response to low doses of ionizing radiation was first shown in our laboratory. Although studies have shown that NF-kB plays an important role in anti-apoptotic function, little has been done to understand the molecular link between the activation of NF-kB and cellular outcome such as enhanced cell survival after low dose low-linear transfer (LET) radiation. Because upregulation of telomerase activity is associated with longevity and allows cells to escape from senescence, we hypothesize

125

Mutation Research 504 (2002) 91100 Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mutation Research 504 (2002) 91­100 Bystander effects in radiation-induced genomic instability recombination and other phenotypes associated with genomic instability. © 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Bystander effects; Genomic instability; Ionizing radiation 1. Introduction Exposure

126

SURFRADA National Surface Radiation Budget Network for Atmospheric Research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A surface radiation budget observing network (SURFRAD) has been established for the United States to support satellite retrieval validation, modeling, and climate, hydrology, and weather research. The primary measurements are the downwelling ...

John A. Augustine; John J. DeLuisi; Charles N. Long

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Do Heritable Differences in an  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Do Heritable Differences in an Individual's Immune System Predict Do Heritable Differences in an Individual's Immune System Predict Differential Sensitivity to Low Dose Radiation Exposure? Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping Enlarge Image Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping identifies two strong candidate genes, Ptprk (Chr 10) and Acp1 (Chr 12) that are linked to genetic variation in the relative abundance of peripheral Th and Tc cells, two cell populations that are sensitive to radiation exposure at low doses. Expression of each gene is significantly altered by exposure to low dose radiation in vivo. Genome-wide scans for the ratio of %CD4+ (Th) to %CD8+ (Tc) lymphocytes were performed using genenetwork.org. The solid horizontal line represents genome-wide significance at P < 0.05, based on 1,000 permutations. LOD indicates logarithm of odds scores.

128

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Robert L. Ullrich  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Robert L. Ullrich Robert L. Ullrich Colorado State University Currently Funded Projects Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates (NSCOR) Genetic Mechanisms of Induced Chromosomal Instability and their Relationships with Radiation Tumorigenesis Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: The Role of Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability Bailey, S.M., Williams, E.S., and Ullrich, R.L. 2005 Workshop: Dsyfunctional Mammalian Telomeres in DNA-PKcs Deficient Backgrounds Bailey, S.M., Williams, E., Hagelstrom, T., and Ullrich, R.L. 2003 Workshop: Dysfunctional Mammalian Telomeres Join to Double-Strand Breaks Bailey, S.M., Goodwin, E.H., Williams, E., and Ullrich, R.L. 2002 Workshop: Dysfunctional Telomeres, Radiation-Induced Instability and Tumorigenesis Bailey, S.M., Goodwin, E.H., Cornforth, M.N., and Ullrich, R.L.

129

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Interaction between Tissue and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

between Tissue and Cellular Stress Responses: Effect of between Tissue and Cellular Stress Responses: Effect of TGF-ß Depletion on Radiation-Induced p53 Response M.H. Barcellos-Hoff, S.A. Ravani, R.L. Henshall, K.B. Ewan, R.L. Warters,* B. Parvin Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory *University of Utah One of the most widely studied cellular responses to radiation is the activation of the transcription factor, p53, whose abundance and action dictates individual cellular fate decisions regarding proliferation, differentiation and death. A cell's response to damage needs to be rapid. Thus, it is not surprising that the activation of the p53 stress response primarily involves post-translational changes in the p53 protein. Whereas intracellular radiation-induced mediators of p53 stability have been the subject of intense study, little is known about the extracellular factors

130

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Rainer K. Sachs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rainer K. Sachs Rainer K. Sachs University of California, Berkeley Funded Projects BIO-BASED RISK MODELING 03-20: Modeling the Interrelations Among Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects, Genomic Instability and Cancer Cytogenetic Tests of Radiobiological Models Relating Epidemiologically Measurable Risks to Low-Dose Risks Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop The Bystander Effect in Normal Human 3-D Tissue: Experiments, Models, and Implications Brenner, D., Ponnaiya, B., Shuryak, I., Sachs, R., and Geard, D. Radiation Carcinogenesis Risk as Influenced by Intercellular Interaction Hahnfeldt, P., Hlatky, L., and Sachs, R.K. 2005 Workshop: Modelling Intercellular Interactions During Radiation Carcinogenesis Sachs, R.K., Chan, M., Hlatky, L., and Hahnfeldt, P. 2003 Workshop: Chromosome Spatial Clustering Uncovered Through Radiogenic Aberrations

131

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Modeling Intercellular Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Intercellular Interactions During Radiation Carcinogenesis Modeling Intercellular Interactions During Radiation Carcinogenesis Authors: Rainer K Sachs,1 Michael Chan,2 Lynn Hlatky,3 Philip Hahnfeldt3 Institutions: 1Departments of Mathematics and Physics, University of California Berkeley California; 2School of Medicine, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla California; 3Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston Massachusetts Abstract By modulating the microenvironment of malignant or pre-malignant epithelial cells, inhibitory or stimulatory signals from nearby cells, including those in stromal and vascular tissues, can play a key role in carcinogenesis; cancer is ultimately a disease of a whole-cell community, not just of a single cell, clone, or cell lineage. However, current commonly used

132

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Interaction of Genome and Cellular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Genome and Cellular Micronenvioronment of Genome and Cellular Micronenvioronment Mina Bissell Life Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Why this Project While normal stoma can delay or prevent tumorigenesis, abnormal stromal components can promote tumor growth. Acquired or inherited mutations that alter stromal cell function can release the context-suppressed malignant cells. Literature spanning more than a century has shown that inflammation associated with tissue wounding can produce tunors. Radiation produces changes in reactive oxygen that are similar to inflammation and may represent a mechanism for radiation-induced damage. Project Goals To determine the underlying role of stromal alterations in controling genomic instability accompanying epithelial-mesenchyumal transformation.

133

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Researchers at NREL use biomass process and sustainability analyses to understand the economic, technical, and global impacts of biomass conversion technologies. These analyses reveal the economic feasibility and environmental benefits of biomass technologies and are useful for government, regulators, and the private sector. NREL's Energy Analysis Office integrates and supports the energy analysis functions at NREL. Among NREL's projects in biomass process and sustainability analyses are: Life Cycle Assessment of Energy Independence and Security Act for Ethanol NREL is determining the life cycle environmental impacts of the ethanol portion of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA). EISA mandates

134

Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (March 2012) Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (March 2012)

135

Radiation Imaging Detectors for Plant Photosynthesis Research | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

» Radiation Imaging Detectors for Plant Photosynthesis Research » Radiation Imaging Detectors for Plant Photosynthesis Research Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » June 2012 Radiation Imaging Detectors for Plant Photosynthesis Research Imaging tools aid research in global climate change, plant genetics, biofuels, agriculture, and carbon sequestration. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of Jefferson Lab The PhytoPET plant imaging system.

136

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Communicating the Science of the Low  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Communicating the Science of the Low Dose Radiation Research Program Communicating the Science of the Low Dose Radiation Research Program Authors: John S. Wassom, Elizabeth T. Owens, Sheryl A. Martin, Amy K. Wolfe, Margaret K. Lyday,* and Susan L. Dimmick** Institutions: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, *Keener Communications, and the **University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine. Summary The project team developed a communications plan based on an explicit communications strategy. The plan presents a set of strategic goals, identifies categories of stakeholders relevant to the program, and suggests methods that can be used to achieve strategic goals and reach targeted stakeholders. Context is key to the communication plan. Providing contextual information about low dose radiation, radiation biology, and Low Dose Radiation

137

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Biologically Based Analysis of Lung  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biologically Based Analysis of Lung Cancer Incidence in a Large Biologically Based Analysis of Lung Cancer Incidence in a Large Canadian Occupational Cohort with Low-LET Low-dose Radiation Exposure, and Comparison with Japanese Atomic Bomb Survivors. Authors: W.D. Hazelton, D. Krewski, S.H. Moolgavkar Lung cancer incidence is analyzed in a large Canadian National Dose Registry (CNDR) cohort with individual annual dosimetry for low-dose occupational exposure to gamma and tritium radiation using several types of multistage models. The primary analysis utilizes the two-stage clonal expansion model (TSCE), with sensitivity analyses using extensions of this model incorporating additional stages. Characteristic and distinct temporal patterns of risk are found for dose-response affecting early, middle, or late stages of carcinogenesis, e.g., initiation with one or more stages,

138

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: The Progeny of Irradiated Mammary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progeny of Irradiated Mammary Epithelial Cells Exhibit a Phenotype Progeny of Irradiated Mammary Epithelial Cells Exhibit a Phenotype Characteristic of Malignancy Mary H. Barcellos-Hoff, R.L. Henshall-Powell, M.J. Bissell, and B. Parvin Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Life Sciences Division We have proposed that the ability of radiation to induce altered microenvironments affects the frequency and features of neoplastic progression. Thus, we have sought to characterize the irradiated microenvironment and determine how these events contribute to mammary carcinogenesis. By using imaging bioinformatics to analyze mouse and human models of breast cancer we have now examined cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) critical for tissue-specific organization and function. We found that 1) radiation-induced microenvironments can contribute to neoplastic potential

139

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Mechanisms of Induced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanisms of Induced Chromosomal Instability and their Mechanisms of Induced Chromosomal Instability and their Relationships with Radiation Tumorigenesis Robert Ullrich Colorado State University Why This Project A combination of epidemiological, experimental, animal, and cellular molecular data is used in the estimation of tumor risk after low doses of low-LET radiation. Uncertainties are recognized in the interpretation of all these data sets, and recent findings concerning genomic instability in irradiated cells challenge the conventional view that induced DNA damage is expressed during the immediate post-irradiation cell cycle. These data on genomic instability are based largely upon studies of cell cultures the mechanisms involved and implications for tumor formation in living organisms remain unclear. Nevertheless, if induced genomic instability were

140

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Impact of Genetic Factors on the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Factors on the Heritable Effects of Paternal Exposure to Genetic Factors on the Heritable Effects of Paternal Exposure to Low-Dose Radiation Janet E. Baulch University of California, Davis Why This Project? There is concern about the possible genetic effects of low dose radiation exposure. As a result, much effort has gone towards understanding mutation of cells due to radiation exposure. While recognition of the potential for mutation from exposure to ionizing radiation has led to extensive research, less effort has been given to the possible delayed risk of radiation exposure transmitted to the offspring of the exposed parent. Data from animal models show that parental exposures to DNA-damaging agents, such as ionizing radiation, predispose the offspring to serious health effects, including cancer offspring. Additionally, data from both humans and animal

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141

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Jian Jian Li  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jian Jian Li Jian Jian Li School of Health Sciences, Purdue University Newly Funded Projects Regulation of NF-kB and Mn SOD in Low Dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive Responses in Mouse and Human Skin Cells, abstract, description. Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshops: NF-kB Mediated Signaling Network in Low Dose X-Ray Induced Adaptive Protection on Mouse and Human Skin Epithelial Cells Ahmed, K.M., Fan, M., Spitz, and Li, J.J. 2005 Workshops: Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: Induction of NF-κB, MnSOD, 14-3-3ζ and Cyclin B1. Li, J.J., Ahmed, K.M., Fan, M., Dong, S., Spitz, D.R., and Yu, C.-R. 2003 Workshops: Gene Expression Profiles of Human Skin Keratinocytes Exposed to Acute and Chronic Ionizing Radiation Li, J.J., Ozeki, M., Wang, T., Tamae, D., Nelson, D., Wyrobek, A., and

142

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE RADIATION SURVEY AND SITE INVESTIGATION PROCESS, THE CERCLA REMEDIAL OR REMOVAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assessment Site Inspection Remedial Investigation Feasibility Study Remedial Design/ Remedial Action PassAPPENDIX F THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE RADIATION SURVEY AND SITE INVESTIGATION PROCESS, THE CERCLA REMEDIAL OR REMOVAL PROCESS, AND THE RCRA CORRECTIVE ACTION PROCESS This appendix presents a discussion

143

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Effects of Low Doses of Radiation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair Eric Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why this Project? Even low doses (0.1 Gy) exert measurable effects on DNA repair. The first-known oxidative lesion repaired only by nucleotide excision repair found in normal cells is cyclo-dA. This lesion is found in normal cells and thought to be a byproduct of oxidative metabolism. When this lesion occurs, it stimulates repair. If repair is stimulated by low dose radiation, there are some implications for human health. For example, do some individuals exhibit a greater, lower, or no stimulation to certain DNA lesions? If there are population polymorphism that influence DNA repair, then it would be possible to use our assay for screening individuals for repair sensitivity.

144

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Unirradiated cells: Pathways Analysis in Support of Risk Assessment. Authors: B.E. Lehnert, R. Cary, D. Gadbois, and G. Gupta. Institutions: Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The scientific literature presents a confusing picture concerning health risks due to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR), e.g., <1-10 cGy. Some effects of LDIR such as enhanced rates of cell proliferation and the induction of radioadaptation may be benign under some circumstances. Other evidence suggests LDIR can be hazardous and that a threshold for potentially detrimental responses, e.g., increases in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), increases in sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), alterations in gene or protein expression profiles, and increased

145

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Effects of Low Doses of Radiation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abstract Abstract Title: Effects of Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair (PNNL Project # 42699) Authors: Eric J. Ackerman, Ph.D. Institutions: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA We developed a functional assay to measure the effects of LDR on repair of many different lesions representative of those found in cells as consequences of normal oxidative metabolism, as well as those caused by radiation. Currently only 1/10th attomole =105 damaged molecules/cell and 3000 cells/measurement are required. We have found that even low doses (10 rad) exert measurable effects on DNA repair. Interestingly, the amount of DNA repair increases at 10-50 rads, plateaus, and then increases even further at higher doses well below doses where radiation-induced lethality

146

The Wool Industries Research Association: New Laboratories for Worsted Processing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE new Worsted Processing Block at Torridon, the Leeds headquarters of the Wool Industries Research Association, was opened by the Right Hon. R. G. Menzies, ... been very active in the Association's affairs since 1929, particularly in the field of scouring and combing, and also in that of finance-an impor tant aspect when new ...

H. LEMON

1961-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

147

Research Activities Using Indus-1 Synchrotron Radiation Source  

SciTech Connect

Indus-1 is an efficient SR source in the soft x-ray / vacuum ultra violet region of the electromagnetic spectrum. For Indus-1, the higher order energy contamination in soft x-ray region, heat load and radiation safety problems are also significantly low. At present, soft x-ray-VUV reflectivity, angle integrated and angle resolved photo electron spectroscopy (ARPES), photo physics and high resolution vacuum ultra violet spectroscopy, beamlines are operational. The paper presents some of the recent studies carried out using In-dus-1.

Lodha, G. S.; Deb, S. K. [ISU Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology(RRCAT), Indore 452013 (India)

2010-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

148

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses A photo of a woman and four men, all wearing hard hats and looking into a large square bin of dried corn stover. One man is using a white scoop to pick up some of the material and another man holds some in his hand. Members of Congress visit NREL's cellulosic ethanol pilot plant. A team of NREL researchers uses biomass process and sustainability analyses to bridge the gap between research and commercial operations, which is critical for the scale-up of biomass conversion technology. Among NREL's biomass analysis capabilities are: Life cycle assessments Technoeconomic analysis Sensitivity analysis Strategic analysis. Life Cycle Assessments Conducting full life cycle assessments is important for determining the

149

Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop  

SciTech Connect

This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe[sub 2] and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop  

SciTech Connect

This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe{sub 2} and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Molecular Environmental Science: An Assessment of Research Accomplishments, Available Synchrotron Radiation Facilities, and Needs  

SciTech Connect

Synchrotron-based techniques are fundamental to research in ''Molecular Environmental Science'' (MES), an emerging field that involves molecular-level studies of chemical and biological processes affecting the speciation, properties, and behavior of contaminants, pollutants, and nutrients in the ecosphere. These techniques enable the study of aqueous solute complexes, poorly crystalline materials, solid-liquid interfaces, mineral-aqueous solution interactions, microbial biofilm-heavy metal interactions, heavy metal-plant interactions, complex material microstructures, and nanomaterials, all of which are important components or processes in the environment. Basic understanding of environmental materials and processes at the molecular scale is essential for risk assessment and management, and reduction of environmental pollutants at field, landscape, and global scales. One of the main purposes of this report is to illustrate the role of synchrotron radiation (SR)-based studies in environmental science and related fields and their impact on environmental problems of importance to society. A major driving force for MES research is the need to characterize, treat, and/or dispose of vast quantities of contaminated materials, including groundwater, sediments, and soils, and to process wastes, at an estimated cost exceeding 150 billion dollars through 2070. A major component of this problem derives from high-level nuclear waste. Other significant components come from mining and industrial wastes, atmospheric pollutants derived from fossil fuel consumption, agricultural pesticides and fertilizers, and the pollution problems associated with animal waste run-off, all of which have major impacts on human health and welfare. Addressing these problems requires the development of new characterization and processing technologies--efforts that require information on the chemical speciation of heavy metals, radionuclides, and xenobiotic organic compounds and their reactions with environmental materials. To achieve this goal, both fundamental and targeted studies of complex environmental systems at a molecular level are needed, and examples of both types of studies are presented herein. These examples illustrate the fact that MES SR studies have led to a revolution in our understanding of the fundamental physical and chemical aspects of natural systems. The MES SR user community has continued to experience strong growth at U.S. SR laboratories, with MES researchers comprising up to 15% of the total user base. Further growth and development of the MES community is being hindered by insufficient resources, including support personnel, materials preparation facilities, and available beam time at U.S. SR laboratories. ''EnviroSync'' recommends the following actions, in cooperation with U.S. SR laboratory directors, to meet the MES community's needs.

Brown, G

2004-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

152

Molecular environmental science : an assessment of research accomplishments, available synchrotron radiation facilities, and needs.  

SciTech Connect

Synchrotron-based techniques are fundamental to research in ''Molecular Environmental Science'' (MES), an emerging field that involves molecular-level studies of chemical and biological processes affecting the speciation, properties, and behavior of contaminants, pollutants, and nutrients in the ecosphere. These techniques enable the study of aqueous solute complexes, poorly crystalline materials, solid-liquid interfaces, mineral-aqueous solution interactions, microbial biofilm-heavy metal interactions, heavy metal-plant interactions, complex material microstructures, and nanomaterials, all of which are important components or processes in the environment. Basic understanding of environmental materials and processes at the molecular scale is essential for risk assessment and management, and reduction of environmental pollutants at field, landscape, and global scales. One of the main purposes of this report is to illustrate the role of synchrotron radiation (SR)-based studies in environmental science and related fields and their impact on environmental problems of importance to society. A major driving force for MES research is the need to characterize, treat, and/or dispose of vast quantities of contaminated materials, including groundwater, sediments, and soils, and to process wastes, at an estimated cost exceeding 150 billion dollars through 2070. A major component of this problem derives from high-level nuclear waste. Other significant components come from mining and industrial wastes, atmospheric pollutants derived from fossil fuel consumption, agricultural pesticides and fertilizers, and the pollution problems associated with animal waste run-off, all of which have major impacts on human health and welfare. Addressing these problems requires the development of new characterization and processing technologies--efforts that require information on the chemical speciation of heavy metals, radionuclides, and xenobiotic organic compounds and their reactions with environmental materials. To achieve this goal, both fundamental and targeted studies of complex environmental systems at a molecular level are needed, and examples of both types of studies are presented herein. These examples illustrate the fact that MES SR studies have led to a revolution in our understanding of the fundamental physical and chemical aspects of natural systems. The MES SR user community has continued to experience strong growth at U.S. SR laboratories, with MES researchers comprising up to 15% of the total user base. Further growth and development of the MES community is being hindered by insufficient resources, including support personnel, materials preparation facilities, and available beam time at U.S. SR laboratories. EnviroSync* recommends the following actions, in cooperation with U.S. SR laboratory directors, to meet the MES community's needs.

Brown, G. E., Jr.; Sutton, S. R.; Bargar, J. R.; Shuh, D. K.; Fenter, P. A.; Kemner, K. M.

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

153

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Dual Regulation of JB6 Transformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dual Regulation of JB6 Transformation by Low Dose Gamma Radiation. Dual Regulation of JB6 Transformation by Low Dose Gamma Radiation. Authors: Thomas J. Weber,1 Lye M. Markillie,1 William B. Chrisler,1 Xingye C. Lei,1 and Nancy H. Colburn2 Institutions: 1Molecular Biosciences, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. 2Gene Regulation Section, Basic Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute JB6 mouse epidermal cells have been instrumental in defining the molecular mechanisms associated with neoplastic transformation in response to known tumor promoters. JB6 cells exhibit a clonal growth response to oxygen free radicals suggesting this model may also be useful for radiation research. Treatment of JB6 cells with 2 and 20 cGy gamma radiation resulted in a weak, but dose-dependent increase in anchorage-independent growth observed

154

Process for making solid-state radiation-emitting composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a process for loading an aerogel substrate with tritium and the resultant compositions. According to the process, an aerogel substrate is hydrolyzed so that surface OH groups are formed. The hydrolyzed aerogel is then subjected to tritium exchange employing, for example, a tritium-containing gas, whereby tritium atoms replace H atoms of surface OH groups. OH and/or CH groups of residual alcohol present in the aerogel may also undergo tritium exchange.

Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.; Reed, S.; Walko, R.J.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Assessing Biological Function of DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing Biological Function of DNA Damage Response Genes Assessing Biological Function of DNA Damage Response Genes Larry H. Thompson Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Why This Project To understand the relative importance of individual DNA repair and DNA-damage response pathways to the recovery of mammalian cells after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR). This understanding may lead to better ways of setting limits on human exposure to IR. In spite of the discovery of many mammalian DNA repair genes, our current knowledge of how many of these genes contribute to cellular recovery from IR exposure is quite limited. Project Goals Measure cellular responses at doses in the 5-100 cGy range, which generally cause changes too small to detect in normal, repair-proficient cells Focus on DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA oxidative base

156

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Quantification of Repair of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantification of Repair of Low-Dose-Induced DNA Double-Strand Quantification of Repair of Low-Dose-Induced DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Diploid Human Cells Authors: David Schild,1 and Larry H. Thompson,2 Institutions: 1Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; and 2BBR Program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the biochemical lesions of primary concern in radiation related health effects. Compelling evidence from rodent and chicken model systems indicates that homologous recombinational repair (HRR) plays an essential role for cell viability in the repair of spontaneous DSBs arising during DNA replication and an important role in the repair of IR-induced DSBs. IR-induced DSBs are also repaired by error-prone nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Using hTERT-immortalized

157

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Quantitative Analysis of Connexin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantitative Analysis of Connexin Expression in Cultured Colonies Quantitative Analysis of Connexin Expression in Cultured Colonies Authors: B. Parvin, Q. Yang, R. L. Henshall-Powell and M.H. Barcellos Hoff We are studying the effects of ionizing radiation on the signaling between human mammary epithelial cells and the extracellular microenvironment. To do so we use an assay based on the ability of the cells to organize into three-dimensional acini when embedded into an extracellular matrix. Although tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells are nearly indistinguishable when cultured as monolayers, their biological character readily diverge when tissue-specific morphogenesis is analyzed. Non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane organize into acinar-like structures with

158

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Multi-cellular Crosstalk in Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About this Project About this Project Multi-cellular Crosstalk in Radiation Damage Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: Low-LET Bystander Effects in Cells In Vitro Are Significantly Less Than Published For High-LET Radiation Blakely, E.A., Thompson, A.C., Chang, P., Schwarz, R.I., Bjornstad, K., Rosen, C., Wisnewski, C., and Mocherla, D. 2005 Workshop: X-ray Microbeam Bystander Studies with Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Blakely, E.A., Schwarz, R.I., Thompson, A.C., Bjornstad, K.A., Chang, P.Y., Rosen, C.J., Sudar, D., Romano, R., and Parvin, B. 2003 Workshop: 12.5 keV X-ray Microbeam Bystander Studies with Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Blakely, E.A., Schwarz, R.I., Thompson, A.C., Bjornstad, K.A., Chang, P.Y., Rosen, C.J., and Sudar, D. 2001 Workshop:

159

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from Low-Dose Radiation and Folate Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from Low-Dose Radiation and Folate Deficiency. Authors: Chantal Courtemanche, Arnold C. Huang, Nicole Kerry, Bernice Ng, and Bruce N. Ames. Institutions: Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, California. Our overall goal is to understand and quantify the real effects of low-dose radiation by measuring direct and specific cellular changes. However, since the background dose of radiation to which most individuals are exposed is well below the levels where significant biological effects, such as mutation or tumor induction, are observed, our novel approach is to compare the consequences of radiation to those of specific nutritional deficiencies. By determining which of these two common stresses at physiologically relevant doses leads to a greater amount of DNA damage, we

160

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation William F. Morgan Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why this Project? To examine genomic instability and bystander effects as non-targeted effects associated with low dose radiation exposure. Project Goals To provides a robust, reliable, highly sensitive assay for detecting delayed events occurring in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. Experimental Approach To mimic radiation damage from gamma and x-ray sources, a low-LET electron microbeam that generates energetic electrons has been designed such that high-energy electrons deposit energy in a pre-selected subset of cells leaving neighboring cells unirradiated. Using a novel green fluorescence gene (GFP) reporter assay, a high through

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility - annual report 2004  

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ER-ARM-0403 ER-ARM-0403 3 Table of Contents Program Overview ............................................................................................................................................................ 4 The Role of Clouds in Climate .................................................................................................................................... 4 ARM Science Goals ..................................................................................................................................................... 4 ARM Climate Research Facility: Successful Science Program Leads to User Facility Designation ................................ 5 Sites Around the World Enable Real Observations .......................................................................................................

162

Coal liquefaction process research quarterly report, October-December 1979  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly report summarizes the activities of Sandia's continuing program in coal liquefaction process research. The overall objectives are to: (1) provide a fundamental understanding of the chemistry of coal liquefaction; (2) determine the role of catalysts in coal liquefaction; and (3) determine the mechanism(s) of catalyst deactivation. The program is composed of three major projects: short-contact-time coal liquefaction, mineral effects, and catalyst studies. These projects are interdependent and overlap significantly.

Bickel, T.C.; Curlee, R.M.; Granoff, B.; Stohl, F.V.; Thomas, M.G.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

First Author Research Productivity of United States Radiation Oncology Residents: 2002-2007  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Participation in investigative research is a required element of radiation oncology residency in the United States. Our purpose was to quantify the first author research productivity of recent U.S. radiation oncology residents during their residency training. Methods and Materials: We performed a computer-based search of PubMed and a manual review of the proceedings of the annual meetings of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology to identify all publications and presented abstracts with a radiation oncology resident as the first author between 2002 and 2007. Results: Of 1,098 residents trained at 81 programs, 50% published {>=}1 article (range, 0-9), and 53% presented {>=}1 abstract (range, 0-3) at an American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology annual meeting. The national average was 1.01 articles published and 1.09 abstracts presented per resident during 4 years of training. Of 678 articles published, 82% represented original research and 18% were review articles. Residents contributed 15% of all abstracts at American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology annual meetings, and the resident contribution to orally presented abstracts increased from 12% to 21% during the study period. Individuals training at programs with >6 residents produced roughly twice as many articles and abstracts. Holman Research Pathway residents produced double the national average of articles and abstracts. Conclusion: Although variability exists among individuals and among training programs, U.S. radiation oncology residents routinely participate in investigative research suitable for publication or presentation at a scientific meeting. These data provide national research benchmarks that can assist current and future radiation oncology residents and training programs in their self-assessment and research planning.

Morgan, Peter B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)], E-mail: peter.morgan@fccc.edu; Sopka, Dennis M. [Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kathpal, Madeera [Division of Neurosurgery, Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Haynes, Jeffrey C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospital of University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Lally, Brian E.; Li, Linna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mating-Type Regulation of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mating-Type Regulation of Non-homologous End Joining in Mating-Type Regulation of Non-homologous End Joining in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Authors: Maria Valencia,* Marc Bentele,^ Moreshwar B. Vaze,* Gernot Herrmann, Ellayhu Kraus, Sang Eun Lee, Primo Schar,^ and James E. Haber* Institutions: *Rosenstiel Center and Department of Biology, Brandeis University ^Institute of Medical Radiobiology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. In the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, broken DNA ends can be ligated, either in a precise or an error-prone manner by a process known as Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ). Several proteins have been identified that play a role in NHEJ: the yKu70/80 heterodimer, DNA ligase IV and its associated protein Lif1/Xrcc4, the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex, as well as the silencing proteins Sir 2, 3, 4. Recent studies suggest that SIR genes may

166

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Role of TNF-α as a Potential  

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Role of TNF-α as a Potential Signaling Mediator of Role of TNF-α as a Potential Signaling Mediator of Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect in Human Vascular Cells. Authors: Mohan Natarajan, Sumathy Mohan, Catherine Gibbons, Yan Bo and Munira A. Kadhim Institutions: Departments of Radiation Oncology and Pathology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas; Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, University of California, Riverside; Radiation and Genomic Stability Unit, Medical research Council, Oxford, United Kingdom Identifying reliable and sensitive signaling pathways that are implicated in adverse health effects after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation would allow us to understand the scientific basis of low dose-induced signaling pathways and their downstream phenotypic expression. This

167

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to  

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Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation Authors: William F. Morgan1 and Marianne B. Sowa2 Institutions: 1Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland; 2Chemical Structure and Dynamics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington We have recently installed a low-linear energy transfer (LET) electron microbeam that generates energetic electrons to mimic radiation damage from gamma- and x-ray sources. It has been designed such that high-energy electrons deposit energy in a pre-selected subset of cells, leaving neighboring cells unirradiated (Figure 1). In this way it is possible to examine non-targeted effects associated with low dose radiation exposure,

168

High pressure--high temperature research using high energy synchrotron radiation at the TRISTAN accumulation ring  

SciTech Connect

High energy synchrotron radiation emitted from the bending magnet of the TRISTAN accumulation ring (6.5 GeV) at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics has been used for the high pressure--high temperature diffraction experiments using a multianvil press system, MAX80. Owing to the specific features of high energy synchroton radiation, significant improvements have been brought to the high pressure research. The wide energy range of diffraction spectrum leads to an increase in the number of observable diffraction peaks in an energy-dispersive method, resulting in an increase in the accuracy of the measurements of the lattice and thermal parameters. Due to the high penetrating power of radiation, diffraction patterns can be taken in a short time from materials containing heavy elements or materials surrounded by a metal foil. Typical examples of high pressure--high temperature experiments with high energy synchrotron radiation are also described.

Kikegawa, T.; Shimomura, O.; Iwasaki, H.; Sato, S.; Mikuni, A.; Iida, A.; Kamiya, N.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Response of Respiratory Cells  

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Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Response of Respiratory Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Response of Respiratory Cells in Intact Tissues and Reconstituted Tissue Constructs Authors: John Ford, Amy Maslowski, Alex Redd and Les Braby Institutions: Texas A&M University, College Station, TX We are developing a model of respiratory tissue using a perfusion culture system. We are using this system to quantify the effects of normal tissue architecture, and the interaction of epithelial cells with other cell types, on radiation-induced bystander effects. Tracheal tissue taken from young adult Fischer 344 rats is imbedded in a growth factor enriched agarose matrix. The chamber is designed to allow growth medium to periodically wash the epithelial surface of the tracheal lumen while maintaining the air-interface that is necessary for the normal

170

Revisiting the interplay between ablation, collisional, and radiative processes during ns-laser ablation  

SciTech Connect

A study of ns-laser ablation is presented, which focuses on the transient behavior of the physical processes that act in and above a copper sample. A dimensionless multiphase collisional radiative model describes the interplay between the ablation, collisional, and radiative mechanisms. Calculations are done for a 6 ns-Nd:YAG laser pulse operating at 532 nm and fluences up to 15 J/cm{sup 2}. Temporal intensity profiles as well as transmissivities are in good agreement with experimental results. It is found that volumetric ablation mechanisms and photo-processes both play an essential role in the onset of ns-laser induced breakdown.

Autrique, D. [Department of Physics and OPTIMAS Research Center, TU Kaiserslautern, 67653 Kaiserslautern (Germany) [Department of Physics and OPTIMAS Research Center, TU Kaiserslautern, 67653 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Gornushkin, I. [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing - BAM, 12489 Berlin (Germany)] [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing - BAM, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Alexiades, V. [Department of Mathematics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1320 (United States)] [Department of Mathematics, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-1320 (United States); Chen, Z.; Bogaerts, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Rethfeld, B. [Department of Physics and OPTIMAS Research Center, TU Kaiserslautern, 67653 Kaiserslautern (Germany)] [Department of Physics and OPTIMAS Research Center, TU Kaiserslautern, 67653 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

171

Collaborative Research: The Influence of Cloud Microphysics and Radiation on the Response of Water Vapor and Clouds to Climate Change  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainties in representing the atmospheric water cycle are major obstacles to an accurate prediction of future climate. This project focused on addressing some of these uncertainties by implementing new physics for convection and radiation into the NCAR climate model. To better understand and eventually better represent these processes, we modified CAM3.5 to use the convection and cloud schemes developed by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the RRTMG rapid radiation code for global models developed by Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER). The impact of the new physics on the CAM3.5 simulation of convection on diurnal and intra-seasonal scales, intra-seasonal oscillations and the distribution of water vapor has been investigated. The effect of the MIT and AER physics also has been tested in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) regional forecast model. It has been found that the application of the AER radiation and MIT convection produces significant improvements in the modeled diurnal cycle of convection, especially over land, in the NCAR climate model. However, both the standard CAM3.5 (hereinafter STD) and the modified CAM3.5 with the new physics (hereinafter MOD) are still unable to capture the proper spectrum and propagating characteristics of the intra-seasonal oscillations (ISOs). The new physics methods modify, but do not substantially improve, the distribution of upper tropospheric water vapor relative to satellite measurements.

Dr. Kerry Emanuel; Michael J. Iacono

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

172

2004 research briefs :Materials and Process Sciences Center.  

SciTech Connect

This report is the latest in a continuing series that highlights the recent technical accomplishments associated with the work being performed within the Materials and Process Sciences Center. Our research and development activities primarily address the materials-engineering needs of Sandia's Nuclear-Weapons (NW) program. In addition, we have significant efforts that support programs managed by the other laboratory business units. Our wide range of activities occurs within six thematic areas: Materials Aging and Reliability, Scientifically Engineered Materials, Materials Processing, Materials Characterization, Materials for Microsystems, and Materials Modeling and Simulation. We believe these highlights collectively demonstrate the importance that a strong materials-science base has on the ultimate success of the NW program and the overall DOE technology portfolio.

Cieslak, Michael J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Record of the first meeting of the Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research  

SciTech Connect

This conference was held July 27--28, 1994 in Moscow. The main purpose of the meeting was to implement an agreement between the Russian Federation and the US to facilitate cooperative research on health and environmental effects of radiation. It was hoped that the exchange of information would provide a good basis for employing new scientific knowledge to implement practical measures to facilitate the rehabilitation of radioactively contaminated areas and to treat radiation illnesses. The Russian Federation suggested five main scientific areas for cooperative research. They will prepare proposals on 4--5 projects within the scope of the scientific areas discussed and forward them to the US delegation for consideration of the possibility to facilitate joint research.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

PROJECT SUMMARY Longwave Radiation Processes and Surface Energy Budget on the Antarctic Plateau  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A-1 PROJECT SUMMARY Longwave Radiation Processes and Surface Energy Budget on the Antarctic Plateau on several projects: near-surface atmospheric temperature profiles, radiosonde performance at low images, and improvement of calibration procedures for interferometers. In the proposed work, analyses

Walden, Von P.

175

Radiation processes of impurities in detached divertor plasmas of JT-60U  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation processes of impurities in detached divertor plasmas of JT-60U T. Nakano, H. Kubo, N. Asakura, K. Shimizu, S. Konoshima, K. Fujimoto, H. Kawashima and S. Higashijima Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki, Japan. 21/5/2007 1st NIFS-CRC International Symposium 1st Korea-Japan Workshop @NIFS #12;Roles

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

176

On the link between Hadley circulation changes and radiative feedback processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the link between Hadley circulation changes and radiative feedback processes Masakazu Yoshimori1 and changes in the Hadley circulation accompany interhemispherically asymmetric surface temperature changes transport and Hadley circulation change. On the other hand, cloud feedback plays a relatively minor role

Broccoli, Anthony J.

177

Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development project: Solar radiation research annual report, 1 October 1990--30 September 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the year 1991 research activities and results under the Solar Radiation Research task of the Photovoltaic (PV) Advanced Research and Development project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This task directly supports the characterization, testing, and design of PV cells modules, and systems. The development of a scientific and engineering understanding of incident (i.e., available to PV devices) solar irradiance and the appropriate instrumentation systems and measurement methods are the activities and results of this project. Activities described in this report include the completion of the Atmospheric Optical Calibration Systems (AOCS) and the comparison of instrumentation systems that collect site-specific measurements of solar irradiance for the purpose of PV system feasibility studies and/or design.

Hulstrom, R.; Cannon, T.; Stoffel, T.; Riordan, C.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced process research Sample Search...  

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computer science, education and scientific research aimed at helping... of the research process. Microsoft ... Source: Narasayya, Vivek - Data Management, Exploration and Mining...

179

Improvement of Moist and Radiative Processes in Highly Parallel Atmospheric General Circulation Models: Validation and Development  

SciTech Connect

Research on designing an integrated moist process parameterization package was carried. This work began with a study that coupled an ensemble of cloud models to a boundary layer model to examine the feasibility of such a methodology for linking boundary layer and cumulus parameterization schemes. The approach proved feasible, prompting research to design and evaluate a coupled parameterization package for GCMS. This research contributed to the development of an Integrated Cumulus Ensemble-Turbulence (ICET) parameterization package. This package incorporates a higher-order turbulence boundary layer that feeds information concerning updraft properties and the variances of temperature and water vapor to the cloud parameterizations. The cumulus ensemble model has been developed, and initial sensitivity tests have been performed in the single column model (SCM) version of CCM2. It is currently being coupled to a convective wake/gust front model. The major function of the convective wake/gust front model is to simulate the partitioning of the boundary layer into disturbed and undisturbed regions. A second function of this model is to predict the nonlinear enhancement of surface to air sensible heat and moisture fluxes that occur in convective regimes due to correlations between winds and anomalously cold, dry air from downdrafts in the gust front region. The third function of the convective wake/gust front model is to predict the amount of undisturbed boundary layer air lifted by the leading edge of the wake and the height to which this air is lifted. The development of the wake/gust front model has been completed, and it has done well in initial testing as a stand-alone component. The current task, to be completed by the end of the funding period, is to tie the wake model to a cumulus ensemble model and to install both components into the single column model version of CCM3 for evaluation. Another area of parametrization research has been focused on the representation of cloud radiative properties. An examination of the CCM2 simulation characteristics indicated that many surface temperature and warm land precipitation problems were linked to deficiencies in the specification of cloud optical properties, which allowed too much shortwave radiation to reach the surface. In-cloud liquid water path was statically specified in the CCM2 using a "prescribed, meridionally and height varying, but time independent, cloud liquid water density profile, which was analytically determined from a meridionally specified liquid water scale height. Single-column model integrations were conducted to explore alternative formulations for the cloud liquid water path diagnostic, converging on an approach that employs a similar, but state-dependent technique for determining in-cloud liquid water concentration. The new formulation, results in significant improvements to both the top-of- atmosphere and surface energy budgets. In particular, when this scheme is incorporated in the three-dimensional GCM, simulated July surface temperature biases are substantially reduced, where summer precipitation over the northern hemisphere continents, as well as precipitation rates over most all warm land areas, is more consistent with observations". This improved parameterization has been incorporated in the CCM3.

Frank, William M.; Hack, James J.; Kiehl, Jeffrey T.

1997-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

180

PhotoPhoto--and Radiation Induced Processesand Radiation Induced Processes ** Research Focus in PhotochemistryResearch Focus in Photochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

--term storage of solar energy as fuels or valuable chemicalsterm storage of solar energy as fuels or valuable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Research Highlights Sorted by Research Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Area Research Area Radiation Processes | Cloud Distributions/Characterizations | Surface Properties | General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations | Aerosol Properties | Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures | Clouds with Low Optical [Water] Depths (CLOWD) | Vertical Velocity | Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) | Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions | Cloud Processes | Aerosol Processes Radiation Processes Alexandrov, M. D. Optical Depth Measurements by Shadowband Radiometers and Their Uncertainties ARM Berg, L. Surface Summertime Radiative Forcing by Shallow Cumuli at the ARM SGP ARM Bergmann, D. The Influence of Regional Anthropogenic Emission Reductions on Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing ASR Bhattacharya, A. Burning on the Prairies ARM

182

Developing Quality Assurance Processes for Image-Guided Adaptive Radiation Therapy  

SciTech Connect

Quality assurance has long been implemented in radiation treatment as systematic actions necessary to provide adequate confidence that the radiation oncology service will satisfy the given requirements for quality care. The existing reports from the American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Groups 40 and 53 have provided highly detailed QA guidelines for conventional radiotherapy and treatment planning. However, advanced treatment processes recently developed with emerging high technology have introduced new QA requirements that have not been addressed previously in the conventional QA program. Therefore, it is necessary to expand the existing QA guidelines to also include new considerations. Image-guided adaptive radiation therapy (IGART) is a closed-loop treatment process that is designed to include the individual treatment information, such as patient-specific anatomic variation and delivered dose assessed during the therapy course in treatment evaluation and planning optimization. Clinical implementation of IGART requires high levels of automation in image acquisition, registration, segmentation, treatment dose construction, and adaptive planning optimization, which brings new challenges to the conventional QA program. In this article, clinical QA procedures for IGART are outlined. The discussion focuses on the dynamic or four-dimensional aspects of the IGART process, avoiding overlap with conventional QA guidelines.

Yan Di [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)], E-mail: dyan@beaumont.edu

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

RESEARCH ON CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL USING AN EXTRACTIVE PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a one-year effort directed at the exploration of the use of coal as a feedstock for a variety of industrially-relevant carbon products. The work was basically divided into three focus areas. The first area dealt with the acquisition of laboratory equipment to aid in the analysis and characterization of both the raw coal and the coal-derived feedstocks. Improvements were also made on the coal-extraction pilot plant which will now allow larger quantities of feedstock to be produced. Mass and energy balances were also performed on the pilot plant in an attempt to evaluate the scale-up potential of the process. The second focus area dealt with exploring hydrogenation conditions specifically aimed at testing several less-expensive candidate hydrogen-donor solvents. Through a process of filtration and vacuum distillation, viable pitch products were produced and evaluated. Moreover, a recycle solvent was also isolated so that the overall solvent balance in the system could be maintained. The effect of variables such as gas pressure and gas atmosphere were evaluated. The pitch product was analyzed and showed low ash content, reasonable yield, good coking value and a coke with anisotropic optical texture. A unique plot of coke yield vs. pitch softening point was discovered to be independent of reaction conditions or hydrogen-donor solvent. The third area of research centered on the investigation of alternate extraction solvents and processing conditions for the solvent extraction step. A wide variety of solvents, co-solvents and enhancement additives were tested with varying degrees of success. For the extraction of raw coal, the efficacy of the alternate solvents when compared to the benchmark solvent, N-methyl pyrrolidone, was not good. However when the same coal was partially hydrogenated prior to solvent extraction, all solvents showed excellent results even for extractions performed at room temperature. Standard analyses of the extraction products indicated that they had the requisite properties of viable carbon-product precursors.

Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo; Chong Chen; Brian Bland; David Fenton

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Current Status and Recommendations for the Future of Research, Teaching, and Testing in the Biological Sciences of Radiation Oncology: Report of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force, Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect

In early 2011, a dialogue was initiated within the Board of Directors (BOD) of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) regarding the future of the basic sciences of the specialty, primarily focused on the current state and potential future direction of basic research within radiation oncology. After consideration of the complexity of the issues involved and the precise nature of the undertaking, in August 2011, the BOD empanelled a Cancer Biology/Radiation Biology Task Force (TF). The TF was charged with developing an accurate snapshot of the current state of basic (preclinical) research in radiation oncology from the perspective of relevance to the modern clinical practice of radiation oncology as well as the education of our trainees and attending physicians in the biological sciences. The TF was further charged with making suggestions as to critical areas of biological basic research investigation that might be most likely to maintain and build further the scientific foundation and vitality of radiation oncology as an independent and vibrant medical specialty. It was not within the scope of service of the TF to consider the quality of ongoing research efforts within the broader radiation oncology space, to presume to consider their future potential, or to discourage in any way the investigators committed to areas of interest other than those targeted. The TF charge specifically precluded consideration of research issues related to technology, physics, or clinical investigations. This document represents an Executive Summary of the Task Force report.

Wallner, Paul E., E-mail: pwallner@theabr.org [21st Century Oncology, LLC, and the American Board of Radiology, Bethesda, Maryland (United States); Anscher, Mitchell S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Barker, Christopher A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bassetti, Michael [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bristow, Robert G. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Medical Biophysics, Princess Margaret Cancer Center/University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Cha, Yong I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Norton Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Dicker, Adam P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Formenti, Silvia C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University, New York, New York (United States); Graves, Edward E. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania (United States); Hei, Tom K. [Center for Radiation Research, Columbia University, New York, New York (United States); Kimmelman, Alec C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kozak, Kevin R. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan (United States); Marples, Brian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University, Oakland, California (United States); and others

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Comparisons of IR and ROS for  

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Comparisons of IR and ROS for Induction of Damage to Cells Comparisons of IR and ROS for Induction of Damage to Cells Kathryn D. Held1, Yvonne L. McCarey1, Laurence Tartier1, Elena V. Rusyn1, Giuseppe Schettino2, Melvyn Folkard2, Kevin M. Prise2, and Barry D. Michael2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114; 2Gray Laboratory Cancer Research Trust, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, HA6 2JR, UK Accurate evaluation of the risks associated with exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) is a major challenge for environmental sciences. Studies on the mechanisms of the actions of low doses of IR are needed to help understand possible risks. IR exerts its effects on cells through production of reactive oxidizing species (ROS) such as ·OH, H2O2 and

186

Perturbative Analysis of Two-Temperature Radiative Shocks with Multiple Cooling Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The structure of the hot downstream region below a radiative accretion shock, such as that of an accreting compact object, may oscillate due to a global thermal instability. The oscillatory behaviour depends on the functional forms of the cooling processes, the energy exchanges of electrons and ions in the shock-heated matter, and the boundary conditions. We analyse the stability of a shock with unequal electron and ion temperatures, where the cooling consists of thermal bremsstrahlung radiation which promotes instability, plus a competing process which tends to stabilize the shock. The effect of transverse perturbations is considered also. As an illustration, we study the special case in which the stabilizing cooling process is of order 3/20 in density and 5/2 in temperature, which is an approximation for the effects of cyclotron cooling in magnetic cataclysmic variables. We vary the efficiency of the second cooling process, the strength of the electron-ion exchange and the ratio of electron and ion pressures at the shock, to examine particular effects on the stability properties and frequencies of oscillation modes.

Curtis J. Saxton; Kinwah Wu

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

187

Evaluation of Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances. These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband radiometers, and a pyranometer with fixed internal shading and are all deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. Data from 32 global horizontal irradiance and 19 direct normal irradiance radiometers are presented. The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances.

Habte, A.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing, Vol. 12, No.4, 1992 Infrared Radiation from an Arc Plasma and Its  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an atmospheric-pressure arc plasma are described from the viewpoint of continuorts radiation tlieory of the atmospheric arc plasma column is very sensitive to the electron density in the near infrared frequency rangeB ) Plasma Chemistry and Plasma Processing, Vol. 12, No.4, 1992 Infrared Radiation from an Arc

Eagar, Thomas W.

189

Empirical research in business process management: introduction to the special issue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of BPM lies in its promise to create sustainable high-performing processes that demonstrate strategicEDITORIAL Empirical research in business process management: introduction to the special issue Jan with an introduction to Business Process Management and the challenges of empirical research in this field. We

Wieringa, Roel

190

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Affordable, Flexible, and More Accurate Method for Computing Radiative An Affordable, Flexible, and More Accurate Method for Computing Radiative Transfer Submitter: Pincus, R., NOAA - CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Pincus, R., H.W. Barker, J.J. Morcrette, A fast, flexible approximate technique for computing radiative transfer in inhomogenous cloud fields, J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 108, No. D13, 4376, doi:10.1029/2002JD003322, 2003 Key Contributors: H.W. Barker, J.J. Morcrette Cloud radiative feedback-the amount of solar radiation that is absorbed by clouds before it reaches the earth and bounces back into the atmosphere-is the single most important effect determining the magnitude of possible climate responses to human activity. However, cloud properties

191

Patterns of Care Study of radiation therapy for uterine cervix cancer in Japan: The influence of age on the process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background. To improve the quality of radiation oncology in Japan, a Patterns of Care Study (PCS) ... in the United States, was introduced to Japan. In this study, the process, including...

T. Teshima; Hiroshi Ikeda; Mitsuyuki Abe

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Research Needs and Priorities for Textile Process Electrification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

," Final Report for RP1275-10, Electric Power Research Institute, Energy Management and Utilization Division, Industrial Applications Program, August, 1982. (5) Brandon, C. A. and Samfield, M., "Application of High-Temperature Hyperfiltration to Unit...

Hendrix, W. A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

SciTech Connect

This project focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general three-dimensional cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. The proposal has two main parts. Part one exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also take advantage of the SWS high sampling resolution to study the twilight zone around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part two involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARMs 2-channel narrow vield-of-view radiometer and sunphotometer instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the ARM Mobile Facility deployments, and second, making our algorithms part of ARMs operational data processing.

Chiu, Jui-Yuan Christine [University of Reading] [University of Reading

2014-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

194

A STATIONARY STATE APPROACH TO RADIATIONLESS TRANSITIONS: RADIATION BANDWIDTH EFFECT ON EXCITATION PROCESSES IN POLYATOMIC MOLECULES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bandwidth of the incident radiation. The conditions of...sufficiently narrow radiation bandwidths, it is demonstrated...should be regarded as occuring to molecular stationary...RADIATIONLESS TRANSITIONS: RADIATION BANDWIDTH EFFECT ON...usual approach, are naturally taken into account...

William Rhodes; Bryan R. Henry; Michael Kasha

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

System of laser pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate optical recording process  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a system of laser-pump and synchrotron radiation probe microdiffraction to investigate the phase-change process on a nanosecond time scale of Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} film embedded in multi-layer structures, which corresponds to real optical recording media. The measurements were achieved by combining (i) the pump-laser system with a pulse width of 300 ps, (ii) a highly brilliant focused microbeam with wide peak-energy width ({Delta}E/E {approx} 2%) made by focusing helical undulator radiation without monochromatization, and (iii) a precise sample rotation stage to make repetitive measurements. We successfully detected a very weak time-resolved diffraction signal by using this system from 100-nm-thick Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} phase-change layers. This enabled us to find the dependence of the crystal-amorphous phase change process of the Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} layers on laser power.

Yasuda, Nobuhiro; Fukuyama, Yoshimitsu; Osawa, Hitoshi [Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Kimura, Shigeru [Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, 5 Sanbancho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Ito, Kiminori; Tanaka, Yoshihito [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, RIKEN, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Matsunaga, Toshiyuki; Kojima, Rie; Hisada, Kazuya; Tsuchino, Akio; Birukawa, Masahiro [R and D Division, Panasonic Corporation, 3-4 Hikaridai, Seika-cho, Soraku-gun, Kyoto 619-0237 (Japan); Yamada, Noboru [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Koji; Fujiie, Kazuhiko; Kawakubo, Osamu [Advanced Optical Storage Development Department, Advanced Device Technology Platform, Sony Corporation, 4-14-1 Asahi-cho, Atsugi, Kanagawa 243-0014 (Japan); Takata, Masaki [Research and Utilization Division, Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); RIKEN SPring-8 Center, RIKEN, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Department of Advanced Materials Science, School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Radiation Exposures Associated with Shipments of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Experience has shown that the analyses of marine transport of spent fuel in the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) were conservative. It is anticipated that for most shipments. The external dose rate for the loaded transportation cask will be more in line with recent shipments. At the radiation levels associated with these shipments, we would not expect any personnel to exceed radiation exposure limits for the public. Package dose rates usually well below the regulatory limits and personnel work practices following ALARA principles are keeping human exposures to minimal levels. However, the potential for Mure shipments with external dose rates closer to the exclusive-use regulatory limit suggests that DOE should continue to provide a means to assure that individual crew members do not receive doses in excess of the public dose limits. As a minimum, the program will monitor cask dose rates and continue to implement administrative procedures that will maintain records of the dose rates associated with each shipment, the vessel used, and the crew list for the vessel. DOE will continue to include a clause in the contract for shipment of the foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel requiring that the Mitigation Action Plan be followed.

MASSEY,CHARLES D.; MESSICK,C.E.; MUSTIN,T.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Edinburgh Research Explorer Quantifying the implicit process flow abstraction in SBGN-PD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Edinburgh Research Explorer Quantifying the implicit process flow abstraction in SBGN-PD diagrams the implicit process flow abstraction in SBGN-PD diagrams with Bio-PEPA'. in Proceedings of COMPMOD 2009. ETPCS to publication record in Edinburgh Research Explorer Published In: Proceedings of COMPMOD 2009 General rights

Millar, Andrew J.

198

Aid to Education: House Group Cites Need for More Technicians, Research on Learning Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...technical training facilities and basic research into the learning process...least until very recently, basic research in the learning process...Universitetets Institut for Teore-tisk Fysik, Blegdamsvej 17, Copen-hagen...program in steroid biochemistry theory and tech-niques, offered...

D. S. G.

1962-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

199

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation -Induced Bystander Effect. Authors: Melvyn Folkard, Borivoj Vojnovic, Giuseppe Schettino, Kirk Atkinson, Kevin M Prise, Barry D Michael Institutes: Gray Cancer Institute, PO Box 100, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, HA6 2JR, UK For over a decade, the Gray Cancer Institute (GCI) has been actively engaged in the development and use of micro-irradiation techniques applied to radiobiological research. Our initial investigations made use of a charged-particle microbeam capable of irradiating individual cells with collimated energetic protons or 3He ions. By the end of the 1990's, a second facility had been constructed, which uses diffractive X-ray optics to focus ultrasoft X-rays to a sub-micron spot. The X-ray microprobe was

200

EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Nonlinear Radiation Response and Transport Properties in Scintillating Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Figure 1. Time-of-Flight (TOF) versus light Figure 1. Time-of-Flight (TOF) versus light output (L) of CsI:Tl to He + ions. The inset is an example where L=263 is determined for particles with certainty energy (TOF=840). The energy resolution can be determined by ∆L/L = 45/263. The light-energy dependence and energy resolution can be observed as the difference in curvature and dispersive of the data. EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Nonlinear Radiation Response and Transport Properties in Scintillating Materials Project start date: Spring 2007 EMSL Lead Investigator: Yanwen Zhang Deposition and Microfabrication, EMSL, PNNL Co-investigators: Vaithiyalingam Shutthanandan Deposition and Microfabrication, EMSL, PNNL Scintillation response has wide applications in the field of astronomy, medical physics, high-energy

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201

Final Report - Independent Verification Survey Activities at the Seperations Process Research Unit Sites, Niskayuna, New York  

SciTech Connect

The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

Evan Harpenau

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Measurements Help to Evaluate Radiation Codes Used in Global Modeling ARM Measurements Help to Evaluate Radiation Codes Used in Global Modeling Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Oreopoulos L, E Mlawer, J Delamere, T Shippert, J Cole, B Fomin, M Iacono, Z Jin, J Li, J Manners, P Raisanen, F Rose, Y Zhang, MJ Wilson, and WB Rossow. 2012. "The Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes: results from Phase I." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117, doi:10.1029/2011JD016821. The total error of each participating radiation code for all LW (left) and SW (right) cases in the CIRC intercomparison. The identity of each participating code can be found in the paper; codes built due to ARM

203

Wind Program Manufacturing Research Advances Processes and Reduces Costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Knowing that reducing the overall cost of wind energy begins on the factory floor, the Wind Program supports R&D efforts and funding opportunities that integrate new designs, materials, and advanced techniques into the manufacturing process, making wind a more affordable source of renewable energy for communities nationwide.

204

Signal and Image Processing Research at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a large, multidisciplinary institution that conducts fundamental and applied research in the physical sciences. Research programs at the Laboratory run the gamut from theoretical investigations, to modeling and simulation, to validation through experiment. Over the years, the Laboratory has developed a substantial research component in the areas of signal and image processing to support these activities. This paper surveys some of the current research in signal and image processing at the Laboratory. Of necessity, the paper does not delve deeply into any one research area, but an extensive citation list is provided for further study of the topics presented.

Roberts, R S; Poyneer, L A; Kegelmeyer, L M; Carrano, C J; Chambers, D H; Candy, J V

2009-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

205

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Real-time Study of Signal Transduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-time Study of Signal Transduction Pathways Involving in Real-time Study of Signal Transduction Pathways Involving in Bystander Effects Using Single Nanoparticle Optics and Single Living Cell Imaging Authors: Prakash D. Nallathamby, X. Nancy Xu, Mohan Natarajan Institutions: Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia and Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas The mechanisms of bystander effects remain largely unknown. Bystander responses are thought to depend on activation of cellular communication processes. Recent studies have speculated that several crucial signal transduction pathways could play a major role in bystander effects. These crucial signal transduction pathways are controlled by a coordinated

206

Radiation from a uniformly accelerated particle detector: Energy, particles, and the quantum measurement process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We comment on the controversy whether a uniformly accelerated particle detector radiates. We stress the particular importance of the built-up correlations and of the quantum measurement process in this connection. We give the question the following form: We assume that the initial state of the quantum field is the Minkowski vacuum and that there is a uniformly accelerated two-level system which is initially in its ground state. What will in this case be found in the different regions of asymptotic future null infinity for the mean value of the field energy density on one hand and of the Minkowski particle number on the other if in the out region (a) no measurement is made on the two-level system, (b) the measurement finds the two-level system in its upper state, or (c) in its lower state? To obtain localized statements, we base the calculations on wave packet states. The different cases show essential differences.

Jrgen Audretsch and Rainer Mller

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Island-Induced Cloud Plumes Influence Tropical Atmospheric Measurements, Island-Induced Cloud Plumes Influence Tropical Atmospheric Measurements, Surface Radiation Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: McFarlane, S.A., Long, C.N., and Flynn, D., Nauru Island Effect Study, Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting, March 22 to 26, 2004, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Nauru Island, about 1,200 miles northeast of Papua New Guinea in the western South Pacific, is one of three instrumented island sites that comprise ARM's Tropical Western Pacific locale. A key objective of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to identify interactions between the processes that determine the radiative properties of an atmospheric column, including

208

Knowledge Mobilization Processes During the Research Process in Two Projects: Lessons for the Leslie Harris Centre of Regional Policy and Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge Mobilization Processes During the Research Process in Two Projects: Lessons......................................................................................................... 7 SECTION IV: FRAMEWORK FOR KNOWLEDGE MOBILIZATION ASSESSMENT... 10 Theoretical Framework for KMb

deYoung, Brad

209

ASA conference on radiation and health: Health effects of electric and magnetic fields: Statistical support for research strategies. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report is a collection of papers documenting presentations made at the VIII ASA (American Statistical Association) Conference on Radiation and Health entitled Health Effects of Electric and Magnetic Fields: Statistical Support for Research Strategies. Individual papers are abstracted and indexed for the database.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

RADIATION RESEARCH 145,501-507 (1996) 0033-7587196 $5.00  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

range of most interest for risk estimation for low-dose radiation (-900-1,450 m), predictions Biological Evidence for a Significant Neutron Dose to Survivors of the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb. Radiat. Res-bomb survivor cohorts in radiation risk estimation, dosimetry for the sur- vivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Brenner, David Jonathan

211

Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 1 -- Base program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993  

SciTech Connect

Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

Smith, V.E.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

QED radiative effects in the processes of exclusive photon electroproduction from polarized protons with the next-to-leading accuracy  

SciTech Connect

Radiative effects in the electroproduction of photons in polarized ep-scattering are calculated with the next-to-leading (NLO) accuracy. The contributions of loops and two photon emission were presented in analytical form. The covariant approach of Bardin and Shumeiko was used to extract the infrared divergence. All contributions to the radiative correction were presented in the form of the correction to the leptonic tensor thus allowing for further applications in other experiments, e.g., deep inelastic scattering. The radiative corrections (RC) to the cross sections and polarization asymmetries were analyzed numerically for kinematical conditions of the current measurement at Jefferson Lab. Specific attention was paid on analyzing kinematical conditions for the process with large radiative effect when momenta of two photons in the final state are collinear to momenta of initial and final electrons, respectively.

Akushevich, Igor V. [Duke University, JLAB; Ilyichev, Alexander [Byelorussian State University; Shumeiko, Nikolai M [Byelorussian State University

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Water Vapor Continuum Absorption and Its Impact on a GCM Improving Water Vapor Continuum Absorption and Its Impact on a GCM Simulation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Turner DD, A Merrelli, D Vimont, and EJ Mlawer. 2012. "Impact of modifying the longwave water vapor continuum absorption model on community Earth system model simulations." Journal of Geophysical Research, 117, D04106, doi:10.1029/2011JD016440. The mean difference profiles (experiment minus control) for clear-sky longwave radiative heating (QRLC); shortwave clear-sky radiative heating (QRSC); the longwave cloud radiative forcing (QRLCF); the precipitation

214

RADIATION RESEARCH 151, 225-229 (1999) 0033-7587199 $5.00  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

site, estimates of the dose-rate effec- tiveness factor (DDREF) generated by comparing the results Society INTRODUCTION One of the most important issues in radiation protection is the effect of dose protraction. Specifically, while most of the data from which we derive risk estimates for low-LET radiation

Brenner, David Jonathan

215

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Method for Satellite/Surface Comparisons A New Method for Satellite/Surface Comparisons Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Properties, Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Zhang Y, CN Long, WB Rossow, and EG Dutton. 2010. "Exploiting diurnal variations to evaluate the ISCCP-FD flux calculations and radiative-flux-analysis-processed surface observations from BSRN, ARM, and SURFRAD." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 115, D00K11, 10.1029/2009JD012812. Figure 1: Scatter plot for the column aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm, measured at the surface (PSO) and used as input for the ISCCP-FD calculations (FD) at 10 ARM/SURFRAD/BSRN stations. The robust linear regression line is also shown.

216

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: A Variable Energy Soft X-ray  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variable Energy Soft X-ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Variable Energy Soft X-ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect Melvyn Folkard Gray Cancer Institute Why This Project The aim of this project is to determine the effects of low radiation doses using a machine that makes it possible to radiate one cell at a time. Our soft X-ray microprobe can irradiate individual cells, or locations within cells with defined doses and with sub-micron precision. We can use low doses approaching that of a single electron track, which is of relevance to environmental level exposures. Much of our work is concentrating on irradiating specified individual cells within cell populations to identify "bystander responses" where non-radiated cells respond to signals from nearby radiated cells. Higher energy x-rays are being generated to extend

217

United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries: Researching radiation protection. USTUR annual report for February 1, 1999 through January 31, 2000  

SciTech Connect

The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) comprise a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This report covers USTUR activities during the year from February 1999 through January 2000.

Ehrhart, Susan M. (ed.); Filipy, Ronald E. (ed.)

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

A new highly automated sputter equipment for in situ investigation of deposition processes with synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

HASE (Highly Automated Sputter Equipment) is a new mobile setup developed to investigate deposition processes with synchrotron radiation. HASE is based on an ultra-high vacuum sputter deposition chamber equipped with an in-vacuum sample pick-and-place robot. This enables a fast and reliable sample change without breaking the vacuum conditions and helps to save valuable measurement time, which is required for experiments at synchrotron sources like PETRA III at DESY. An advantageous arrangement of several sputter guns, mounted on a rotative flange, gives the possibility to sputter under different deposition angles or to sputter different materials on the same substrate. The chamber is also equipped with a modular sample stage, which allows for the integration of different sample environments, such as a sample heating and cooling device. The design of HASE is unique in the flexibility. The combination of several different sputtering methods like standard deposition, glancing angle deposition, and high pressure sputter deposition combined with heating and cooling possibil-ities of the sample, the large exit windows, and the degree of automation facilitate many different grazing incidence X-ray scattering experiments, such as grazing incidence small and wide angle X-ray scattering, in one setup. In this paper we describe in detail the design and the performance of the new equipment and present the installation of the HASE apparatus at the Micro and Nano focus X-ray Scattering beamline (MiNaXS) at PETRA III. Furthermore, we describe the measurement options and present some selected results. The HASE setup has been successfully commissioned and is now available for users.

Doehrmann, Ralph; Botta, Stephan; Buffet, Adeline; Santoro, Gonzalo; Schlage, Kai; Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Risch, Johannes F. H.; Mannweiler, Roman; Roth, Stephan V. [DESY, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Bommel, Sebastian [DESY, Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstr. 15, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Brunner, Simon; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Mueller-Buschbaum, Peter [Lehrstuhl fuer Funktionelle Materialien, Physik-Department, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, James-Franck-Str. 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Thermochemical Process Development Unit: Researching Fuels from Biomass, Bioenergy Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Thermochemical conversion technologies convert biomass and its residues to fuels and chemicals using gasification and pyrolysis. Gasification entails heating biomass and results in a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, known as syngas. Pyrolysis, which is heating biomass in the absence of oxygen, produces liquid pyrolysis oil. Both syngas and pyrolysis oil can be chemically converted into clean, renewable transportation fuels and chemicals. The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique facility dedicated to researching thermochemical processes to produce fuels from biomass. Thermochemical processes include gasification and pyrolysis-processes used to convert

220

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Wide Expression of LLIR and the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wide Expression of LLIR and the Biological Consequences Wide Expression of LLIR and the Biological Consequences David J. Chen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Why This Project It is known that changes in gene expression alter biological effects. It is necessary to identify the specific genes that demonstrate altered expression after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and to determine pathways involved in DNA damage recognition, signaling, and repair that are associated with radiation-induced adaptive and bystander effects. Project Goals Identification of genes whose transcription is regulated in response to low levels of ionizing radiation Identification of the genes and communication pathways that control these responses to low dose radiation Identification of the cellular and molecular targets that influence

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff - 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Low Dose Radiation Program Workshop IV DOE Low Dose Radiation Program Workshop IV Abstract Title: TGF-β Protects Human Mammary Epithelial Cells from Radiation-Induced Centrosome Amplification Authors: Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Bahram Parvin, Anna C. Erickson and Rishi Gupta Institutions: Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Life Sciences Division, Ernest Orlando Lawrence, Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California In recent studies we have shown that ionizing radiation (IR), a known carcinogen of human and murine mammary gland, compromises human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) polarity and multicellular organization in a manner characteristic of neoplastic progression through a heritable, non-mutational mechanism (1). Thus, when all cells are irradiated with a significant dose (2 Gy), the daughters of irradiated cells lose their

222

Radiative reverse shock laser experiments relevant to accretion processes in cataclysmic variables  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the production of radiative reverse shocks in experiments at the Omega-60 laser facility. The ability of this high-intensity laser to impart large energy densities on micron-thin foils makes it feasible to create supersonic plasma flows. Obtaining a radiative reverse shock in the laboratory requires a sufficiently fast flow (?100 km/s) of a material whose opacity is large enough to produce energetically significant emission from experimentally achievable shocked layers. The reverse shock forms in the flow once it is impeded. This paper presents the first radiographic data of normal incidence, reverse shockwaves. These experiments are primarily motivated by the contribution of radiative reverse shock waves to the evolving dynamics of the cataclysmic variable (CV) system in which they reside. We show similarity properties to suggest that the experimental production of radiative reserve shocks in the laboratory may be scalable to such astrophysical systems.

Krauland, C. M.; Drake, R. P.; Kuranz, C. C.; Sweeney, R.; Grosskopf, M.; Klein, S.; Gillespie, R.; Keiter, P. A. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2143 (United States)] [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2143 (United States); Loupias, B.; Falize, E. [CEA-DAM-DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)] [CEA-DAM-DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving the Treatment of Radiation in Climate Models Improving the Treatment of Radiation in Climate Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Delamere, J. S., Tech-X Corporation Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Delamere JS, SA Clough, VH Payne, EJ Mlawer, DD Turner, and RR Gamache. 2010. "A far-infrared radiative closure study in the Arctic: Application to water vapor." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 115, D17106, 10.1029/2009JD012968. The mean AERI-ER radiances for a select set of cloud-free cases at NSA in 2007 are presented in the top panel. The bottom panel presents mean spectral differences between the measurements and model calculations. The red line demonstrates the differences when using the pre-RHUBC version of

224

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Experiments to Improve the Treatment of Radiation in the Mid-to-Upper Field Experiments to Improve the Treatment of Radiation in the Mid-to-Upper Troposphere Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Turner DD and EJ Mlawer. 2010. "The Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaigns (RHUBC)." Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 91, doi:10.1175/2010BAMS2904.1. (a) Atmospheric transmittance at 1 cm-1 resolution in the far-infrared for three atmospheres that are representative of the ARM SGP site, NSA site, and RHUBC-II site in the Chajnantor plateau (CJC). (b) The transmittance

225

Research Highlight  

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Cloud Susceptibility Measures Potential Cloud Sensitivity to First Aerosol Cloud Susceptibility Measures Potential Cloud Sensitivity to First Aerosol Indirect Effect Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Platnick, S., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Platnick, S, and L Oreopoulos. 2008. "Radiative susceptibility of cloudy atmospheres to droplet number perturbations: 1. Theoretical analysis and examples from MODIS." Journal of Geophysical Research doi:10.1029/2007JD009654, in press. Oreopoulos, L., and S. Platnick. 2008. Radiative susceptibility of cloudy atmospheres to droplet number perturbations: 2. Global analysis from MODIS, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2007JD009655, in press. Theoretical calculations with a shortwave broadband radiative transfer

226

Research Highlight  

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"Invisible" Giants in the Sky "Invisible" Giants in the Sky Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kassianov E, M Pekour, and J Barnard. 2012. "Aerosols in central California: Unexpectedly large contribution of coarse mode to aerosol radiative forcing." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L20806, doi:10.1029/2012GL053469. Daily averaged values of (a, b) the direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) and (c, d) aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the top-of-atmosphere calculated for the "original" aerosol optical properties (blue) and their PM1.0 (red) and PM2.5 (green) counterparts at the CARES (left) T0 and (right) T1 sites.

227

Research Highlight  

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Measured Radiative Cooling from Reflective Roofs in India Measured Radiative Cooling from Reflective Roofs in India Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fischer, M. L., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Salamanca F, S Tonse, S Menon, V Garg, KP Singh, M Naja, and ML Fischer. 2012. "Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: Experimental verification and model-based evaluation." Environmental Research Letters, 7(4), 044007, doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044007. True color image of light (PW1, PW2) and unpainted tar (PD1), and concrete (PD2) roofs at the Pantnagar, India site taken on October 21, 2011. We note that the concrete roof is considerably more reflective than the tar roof

228

Research Highlight  

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Surface Summertime Radiative Forcing by Shallow Cumuli at the ARM SGP Surface Summertime Radiative Forcing by Shallow Cumuli at the ARM SGP Download a printable PDF Submitter: Berg, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Berg LK, EI Kassianov, CN Long, and DL Mills. 2011. "Surface summertime radiative forcing by shallow cumuli at the ARM SGP." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D01202, 10.1029/2010JD014593. Histogram of hourly average shortwave CRF (black) and longwave CRF (red) for all periods with shallow cumuli. (a) Hourly average shortwave CRF (circles), binned shortwave CRF (squares); (b) total number of hourly averages for each sky cover bin; and (c) the change in shortwave TED as a function of sky cover for all hours with

229

Research Highlight  

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ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Knuteson, R.O., Best, F.A., Dedecker, R.G., Feltz, W.F., Revercomb, H.E., and Tobin, D.C., 2004: "10 Years of AERI Data from the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains Site," In Proceedings from the Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting, U.S. Department of Energy,Washington, D.C. Figure 1 Figure 2 From the unassuming farmlands of north-central Oklahoma comes a milestone for the global climate research community. March 2004 marked the 10-year anniversary for an instrument that now holds the prestigious distinction of providing the longest set of continuous atmospheric interferometer data

230

NREL Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL): Baseline Measurement System (BMS); Golden, Colorado (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The SRRL was established at the Solar Energy Research Institute (now NREL) in 1981 to provide continuous measurements of the solar resources, outdoor calibrations of pyranometers and pyrheliometers, and to characterize commercially available instrumentation. The SRRL is an outdoor laboratory located on South Table Mountain, a mesa providing excellent solar access throughout the year, overlooking Denver. Beginning with the basic measurements of global horizontal irradiance, direct normal irradiance and diffuse horizontal irradiance at 5-minute intervals, the SRRL Baseline Measurement System now produces more than 130 data elements at 1-min intervals that are available from the Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center Web site. Data sources include global horizontal, direct normal, diffuse horizontal (from shadowband and tracking disk), global on tilted surfaces, reflected solar irradiance, ultraviolet, infrared (upwelling and downwelling), photometric and spectral radiometers, sky imagery, and surface meteorological conditions (temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, precipitation, snow cover, wind speed and direction at multiple levels). Data quality control and assessment include daily instrument maintenance (M-F) with automated data quality control based on real-time examinations of redundant instrumentation and internal consistency checks using NREL's SERI-QC methodology. Operators are notified of equipment problems by automatic e-mail messages generated by the data acquisition and processing system. Radiometers are recalibrated at least annually with reference instruments traceable to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR).

Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

231

Dose reconstruction for the Urals population. Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research, Project 1.1 -- Final report  

SciTech Connect

This work is being carried out as a feasibility study to determine if a long-term course of work can be implemented to assess the long-term risks of radiation exposure delivered at low to moderate dose rates to the populations living in the vicinity of the Mayak Industrial Association (MIA). This work was authorized and conducted under the auspices of the US-Russian Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) and its Executive Committee (EC). The MIA was the first Russian site for the production and separation of plutonium. This plant began operation in 1948, and during its early days there were technological failures that resulted in the release of large amounts of waste into the rather small Techa River. There were also gaseous releases of radioiodines and other radionuclides during the early days of operation. In addition, there was an accidental explosion in a waste storage tank in 1957 that resulted in a significant release. The Techa River Cohort has been studied for several years by scientists from the Urals Research Centre for Radiation Medicine and an increase in both leukemia and solid tumors has been noted.

Degteva, M.O. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation)] [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Drozhko, E. [Branch 1 of Moscow Biophysics Inst., Ozersk (Russian Federation)] [Branch 1 of Moscow Biophysics Inst., Ozersk (Russian Federation); Anspaugh, L.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Napier, B.A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Bouville, A.C. [National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States)] [National Cancer Inst., Bethesda, MD (United States); Miller, C.W. [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Proposed Measurement Standard for Diffuse Radiation Flux A Proposed Measurement Standard for Diffuse Radiation Flux Download a printable PDF Submitter: Michalsky, J. J., DOC/NOAA/OAR/ESRL Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Michalsky, J. J., C. Gueymard, P. Kiedron, L. J. B. McArthur, R. Philipona, and T. Stoffel, 2007: A proposed working standard for the measurement of diffuse horizontal shortwave irradiance, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D16112, doi:10.1029/2007JD008651. The three pyranometers proposed for the international standard for diffuse flux are shown here in action during the 2006 campaign at the ACRF SGP site. Of note are the shadows of the blocking balls on the domes of each pyranometer. The blocking balls are moved by a solar tracker to continuously shade the pyranometers.

233

Research Highlight  

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Improving Water Vapor Absorption in Microwave Radiative Transfer Models Improving Water Vapor Absorption in Microwave Radiative Transfer Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Loehnert, U., University of Cologne Cadeddu, M. P., Argonne National Laboratory Crewell, S., University of Cologne Vogelmann, A. M., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Turner DD, MP Cadeddu, U Loehnert, S Crewell, and A Vogelmann. 2009. "Modifications to the water vapor continuum in the microwave suggested by ground-based 150 GHz observations." IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 47(10), 3326-3337. Figure 1: The top panel shows downwelling microwave brightness temperature

234

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Downward Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty Under Arctic Atmospheres: Downward Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty Under Arctic Atmospheres: Measurements and Modeling Submitter: Marty, C., Swiss Federal Institute of Snow and Avalanche Research Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marty, C., R. Philipona, J. Delamere, E.G. Dutton, J. Michalsky, K. Stamnes, R. Storvold, T. Stoffel, S.A. Clough, and E.J. Mlawr, Downward longwave irradiance uncertainty under arctic atmospheres: Measurements and modeling, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D12), 4358, doi:10.1029/2002JD002937, 2003. IPASRC-II instruments deployed at ARM's Barrow Station. Members of 11 international institutions converged at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site in Barrow, Alaska, to conduct the Second International Pyrgeometer and

235

Research Highlight  

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Global Dimming and Brightening: an Update Beyond 2000 Global Dimming and Brightening: an Update Beyond 2000 Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Wild, M., Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science - ETH Zurich Truessel, B., Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science - ETH Zurich Ohmura, A., Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Koenig-Langlo, G., Alfred Wegener Institute Dutton, E. G., NOAA/OAR/ESRL Tsvetkov, A. V., World Radiation Data Centre Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Wild M, B Trüssel, A Ohmura, CN Long, G König-Langlo, EG Dutton, and A Tsvetkov. 2009. "Global dimming and brightening: An update beyond 2000." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, D00D13, 10.1029/2008JD011382.

236

Research Highlight  

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Continuous Clear-Sky Longwave from Surface Measurements Continuous Clear-Sky Longwave from Surface Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Long, CN, and DD Turner. 2008. "A method for continuous estimation of clear-sky downwelling longwave radiative flux developed using ARM surface measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D18206, doi:10.1029/2008JD009936. Comparison of clear-sky RT model calculations (black) and our estimates (gray) with detected LW effective clear-sky measurements from the ACRF SGP site from 1 March through 31 May 2003, showing that our LW estimates do as well as detailed model calculations in comparison with actual LW

237

NDE research focuses on questions such as: How do fabrication, growth, andlor processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NDE research focuses on questions such as: How do fabrication, growth, andlor processing contribute-structural properties affect overall thermal, mechanical, electrical, and optical behavior? WILLIAM & MARY NDE Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) is an interdisciplinary field of study that is concerned with the development

Lewis, Robert Michael

238

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DNA Damage in Acutely Irradiated F2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DNA Damage in Acutely Irradiated F2 Mice with a History of Paternal DNA Damage in Acutely Irradiated F2 Mice with a History of Paternal F0 Germline Irradiation Authors: J.E. Baulch and O.G. Raabe Institutions: Center for Health and the Environment, University of California, Davis, CA. The main goal of this grant is to evaluate heritable, transgenerational effects of low dose, low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation (0.1 Gy attenuated 137Cs gamma rays) on Type B spermatogonia in 129SVE mice; wild-type and heterozygous for Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT). The ATM heterozygotes are carriers for a genetic mutation (AT mutated, ATM) that is thought to predispose both humans and mice to radiation sensitivity. Experiments conducted in our laboratory have demonstrated heritable effects of paternal germline exposure to ionizing radiation in mice using 1.0 Gy of

239

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: The Role of the Number and Spacing of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Workshop I Program Workshop I November 10-12, 1999, Washington, D.C. The Role of the Number and Spacing of Electron Tracks on the Consequences of Low Dose Irradiation Leslie A. Braby and J. R. Ford Nuclear Engineering, Texas A&M University, 129 Zachry, College Station, Texas. Summary: Biological mechanisms, which may influence the health risks resulting from very low dose radiation exposures, will be investigated using a collimated beam of electrons to simulate the irradiation patterns occurring with low dose exposures. Abstract: Ionizing radiation produces a variety of free radicals and chemical products that react to produce the same types of oxidative damage in a mammalian cell as produced by the normal metabolic activity of the cell. However, the damage produced by radiation is distributed differently

240

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster Formation in a Cellular Environment Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster Formation in a Cellular Environment Larry Toburen East Carolina University Why This Project Modern tools of radiobiology are leading to many new discoveries regarding how cells and tissues respond to radiation exposure. We can now irradiate single cells and observe responses in adjacent cells. We can also measure clusters of radiation damage produced in DNA. The primary tools available to describe the initial spatial pattern of damage formed by the absorption of ionizing radiation are based on (MC) Monte Carlo simulations of the structure of charged particle tracks. Although many MC codes exist and considerable progress is being made in the incorporation of detailed macromolecular target structures into these codes, much of the interaction

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241

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mechanisms of Tissue Response to Low  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tissue Response to Low Dose Radiation Tissue Response to Low Dose Radiation Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Why This Project? In the past, the effects of ionizing radiation on humans has been attributed in great part to its ability to damage DNA, which transmits information from cell to cell, and generation to generation. Damaged DNA can lead to cell death or perpetuate the damage to daughter cells and to future generations. In addition to the information contained with the genome (i.e., DNA sequence), information directing cell behavior and tissue function is also stored outside the DNA. The success in cloning sheep from the DNA contained in the nucleus of an adult cell shows how important signals from the outside are in defining how the genome is expressed. This

242

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Program Research Improves Longwave Radiative Transfer Models ARM Program Research Improves Longwave Radiative Transfer Models Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: The QME AERI LBLRTM: A closure experiment for downwelling high spectral resolution infrared radiance. D.D. Turner, D.C. Tobin, S.A. Clough, P.D. Brown, R.G. Ellingson, E.J. Mlawer, R.O. Knuteson, H.E. Revercomb, T.R. Shippert, and W.L. Smith. 2004. Journal of Atmospheric Science, 61, 2657-2675. Top panels: Examples of downwelling infrared radiance observed by the AERI for two different clear sky cases with different amounts of water vapor. Bottom panels: Differences between the AERI observations and calculations

243

The Larger Opportunities for Research on the Relations of Solar and Terrestrial Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the so-called "solar constant of radiation...an insuperable obstacle to the highest...distribution of energy along the diameter of the solar image. These measurements...quantitative in terms of energy. Something can...reflecting the solar beam by means of...

C. G. Abbot

1920-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

RADIATION RESEARCH 168, 741749 (2007) 0033-7587/08 $15.00  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

these effects may improve cancer risk estimation at radiation doses below the epidemiological detec- tion) These signals can convert cells to a long-lived epigenetically activated state, e.g. a state of oxida- tive. The molecular identities of the signals have not yet been deter- mined, but it is known that propagation

Brenner, David Jonathan

245

Hard synchroton radiation and gas desorption processes at a copper absorber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Developments with high energy synchrotron radiation machines such as the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) under construction at Grenoble present the particular problem of the absorption of radiation at localities in the region of bending magnets where the power density can attain levels of around 400 W/mm2 at a critical energy of about 20 keV. In the present article we describe an investigation of the gas desorption and of photocurrent generation in a test facility at the Wiggler beam line at LURE Orsay which was designed to simulate and explore the conditions of operation at the local absorber sites in the ESRF. The experiment allowed in particular for varying angles of incidence of the radiation on an absorber and for surveys of photocurrents both from the absorber and over the surface of the vacuum enclosure. The observations of gas desorption are shown to follow most closely a model of photon induced desorption in which a significant role is assigned to fluorescenceradiation from the absorber.

B. A. Trickett; D. Schmied; E. M. Williams

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Overview of Fiscal Year 2002 Research and Development for Savannah River Site's Salt Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of high-level waste for disposal. The Salt Processing Program (SPP) is the salt (soluble) waste treatment portion of the SRS high-level waste effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction and operation of treatment technologies to prepare the salt waste feed material for the site's grout facility (Saltstone) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to Defense Waste Processing Facility include actinides, strontium, cesium, and entrained sludge. In fiscal year 2002 (FY02), research and development (R&D) on the actinide and strontium removal and Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) processes transitioned from technology development for baseline process selection to providing input for conceptual design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility. The SPP R&D focused on advancing the technical maturity, risk reduction, engineering development, and design support for DOE's engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractors for the Salt Waste Processing Facility. Thus, R&D in FY02 addressed the areas of actual waste performance, process chemistry, engineering tests of equipment, and chemical and physical properties relevant to safety. All of the testing, studies, and reports were summarized and provided to the DOE to support the Salt Waste Processing Facility, which began conceptual design in September 2002.

H. D. Harmon, R. Leugemors, PNNL; S. Fink, M. Thompson, D. Walker, WSRC; P. Suggs, W. D. Clark, Jr

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

247

Vacuum performance of the Synchroton Radiation Research Center 1.3 GeV synchrotron light source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The operation of the Synchrotron Radiation Research Center 1.3 GeV synchrotron light source vacuum system shows good features of quick beam self?cleaning low carbonaceous gas desorption and less dust. The phenomenon of the photon induced desorption (PID) has been studied. Recently a set of new vacuum chambers for wiggler were installed and the commissioning of the storage ring was restarted. The pressure rise and the PID coefficients during the beam running both in the straight and bending chambers were compared. The performance of the overall vacuum system is to be described.

G. Y. Hsiung; J. R. Huang; J. G. Shyy; D. J. Wang; J. R. Chen; Y. C. Liu

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Automated solar cell assembly teamed process research. Semiannual subcontract report, December 6, 1993--June 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This is the second Semiannual Technical Progress Report for the program titled `Automated Solar Cell Assembly Teamed Process Research` funded under National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract No. ZAG-3-11219-01. This report describes the work done on Phase II of the program in the period from December 6, 1993 to June 30, 1994. Spire`s objective in this program is to develop high throughput (5 MW/yr) automated processes for interconnecting thin (200 {mu}m) silicon solar cells. High yield will be achieved with these fragile cells through the development of low mechanical stress and low thermal stress processes. For example, a machine vision system is being developed for cell alignment without mechanically contacting the cell edges, while a new soldering process is being developed to solder metal interconnect ribbons simultaneously to a cells` front and back contacts, eliminating one of the two heating steps normally used for soldering each cell.

Nowlan, M. [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect. Authors: Melvyn Folkard, Borivoj Vojnovic, Giuseppe Schettino, Kirk Atkinson, Kevin M Prise, Barry D Michael Institutions: Gray Cancer Institute, PO BO Box100, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, HA6 2JR, UK The Gray Cancer Institute (GCI) has pioneered the use of X-ray focussing techniques to develop systems for micro-irradiating individual cells and sub-cellular targets. Our prototype X-ray microprobe was developed alongside our existing charged-particle microbeam to address problems specific to low LET radiations, or where very precise targeting accuracy and dose delivery are required. This facility was optimised for focusing 278 eV CK X-rays; however there are a number of reasons for extending the

250

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: A Paracrine Signal Mediates The Cell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Paracrine Signal Mediates The Cell Transformation Response To Low A Paracrine Signal Mediates The Cell Transformation Response To Low Dose Gamma Radiation in JB6 Cells. Authors: Thomas J. Weber,1 Robert W. Siegel,2 Lye M. Markillie,1 William B. Chrisler,1 Xingye C. Lei,3 and Nancy H. Colburn4 Institutions: 1Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington. 2Protein Function, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington. 3Statistical and Mathematical Sciences, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington. 4Gene Regulation Section, Laboratory of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, Maryland. The carcinogenic response to radiation is complex and may involve adaptive cellular responses as well as a bystander effect mediated by paracrine or

251

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Response of Respiratory Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response of Respiratory Cells in Intact Tissues and Reconstituted Response of Respiratory Cells in Intact Tissues and Reconstituted Tissue John Ford Department of Nuclear Engineering Texas A & M University Why this Project? Using the well-established rat trachea model to test the hypothesis that normal respiratory epithelial cells transmit signals to neighboring cells in response to very low dose radiation exposure. Project Goals By comparing the responses shown by cells in these normal rodent respiratory tissues to those seen for human respiratory epithelial cells in reconstituted tissue constructs, it will be possible to better understand the responds in human respiratory cells in vivo. These studies will characterize responses after exposure to a variety of radiation types and dose distributions. Experimental Approach

252

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low-Dose Dose-Response of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Dose Dose-Response of Proliferating Human Cells Exposed to Low Low-Dose Dose-Response of Proliferating Human Cells Exposed to Low Dose Rate g-Radiation. Authors: Louise Enns,1 Michael Weinfeld,1 Albert Murtha,1 and Kenneth Bogen2 Institutions: 1Cross Cancer Institute and 2Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Clinical and environmental exposure to ionizing radiation rarely exceeds 200 cGy. To examine cell proliferation at early times (up to 5 days) post-irradiation, we are utilizing an assay in which single cells encapsulated within ~30- to 70-µm-diameter agarose gel microdrops (GMDs) are exposed and cultured for 4 days at 37°C, then analyzed by flow cytometry (FC). Clonogenic proliferation is measured as the fraction of occupied GMDs containing multicellular microcolonies after 4 days in culture. This assay was applied to human A549 lung cells exposed to gamma

253

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Control of Repair and Adaptive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Repair and Adaptive Responses to Low-level DNA Damage Repair and Adaptive Responses to Low-level DNA Damage James E. Haber Brandeis University Why This Project In order to fully understand mechanisms resulting in effects of low dose, whole system rather than cells must be examined. Although not identical to mammalian systems, simple systems usually have many similarities and give direction for further study of more complex systems. We use the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as a model system because it is easy to manipulate and its genome is simple and well characterized. Project Goals Examine mechanisms and effects of low dose radiation response for: Genetic recombination mechanisms that lead to genomic instability Genetic factors that affect individual susceptibility to low-dose radiation The adaptive response

254

Process for producing an aggregate suitable for inclusion into a radiation shielding product  

SciTech Connect

The present invention is directed to methods for converting depleted uranium hexafluoride to a stable depleted uranium silicide in a one-step reaction. Uranium silicide provides a stable aggregate material that can be added to concrete to increase the density of the concrete and, consequently, shield gamma radiation. As used herein, the term "uranium silicide" is defined as a compound generically having the formula U.sub.x Si.sub.y, wherein the x represents the molecules of uranium and the y represent the molecules of silicon. In accordance with the present invention, uranium hexafluoride is converted to a uranium silicide by contacting the uranium hexafluoride with a silicon-containing material at a temperature in a range between about 1450.degree. C. and about 1750.degree. C. The stable depleted uranium silicide is included as an aggregate in a radiation shielding product, such as a concrete product.

Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Use of the ARM Measurements of Spectral Zenith Radiance for Better Understanding of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes & Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

SciTech Connect

We proposed a variety of tasks centered on the following question: what can we learn about 3D cloud-radiation processes and aerosol-cloud interaction from rapid-sampling ARM measurements of spectral zenith radiance? These ARM measurements offer spectacular new and largely unexploited capabilities in both the temporal and spectral domains. Unlike most other ARM instruments, which average over many seconds or take samples many seconds apart, the new spectral zenith radiance measurements are fast enough to resolve natural time scales of cloud change and cloud boundaries as well as the transition zone between cloudy and clear areas. In the case of the shortwave spectrometer, the measurements offer high time resolution and high spectral resolution, allowing new discovery-oriented science which we intend to pursue vigorously. Research objectives are, for convenience, grouped under three themes: ? Understand radiative signature of the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy areas using data from ARM shortwave radiometers, which has major climatic consequences in both aerosol direct and indirect effect studies. ? Provide cloud property retrievals from the ARM sites and the ARM Mobile Facility for studies of aerosol-cloud interactions. ? Assess impact of 3D cloud structures on aerosol properties using passive and active remote sensing techniques from both ARM and satellite measurements.

Alexander Marshak; Warren Wiscombe; Yuri Knyazikhin; Christine Chiu

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

256

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed by ARM SWS Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Knyazikhin, Y., Boston University Chiu, J., University of Reading Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marshak A, Y Knyazikhin, JC Chiu, and WJ Wiscombe. 2009. "Spectral invariant behavior of zenith radiance around cloud edges observed by ARM SWS." Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L16802, doi:10.1029/2009GL039366. (top) Time-wavelength color contour plot of ARM shortwave spectrometer (SWS) spectra measured from 21:35:24 to 21:40:24 UTC on 18 May 2007 at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in

257

TH?D?AUD A?09: An Error Reporting and Tracking Database Tool for Process Improvement in Radiation Oncology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Patient and employee safety is a critical concern in radiation therapy (RT). Current QA practices and operation processes in RT are typically developed based on rather prescriptive task group reports and regulatory agency requirements. Typically these programs are not developed with the goal of process optimization and safety but are brute?force efforts to prevent catastrophic errors. Other industries have been developing processes to improve quality and safety of their operations and products since the 1940s. These processes have become quite sophisticated and the result is that numerous industries have much better performance records than healthcare and RT. Recently the National Academy of Engineering and the Institute of Medicine recommended the systematic application of systems engineering approaches for reforming our health care delivery system. The AAPM subsequently formed a task group charged with developing a structured systematic QA program approach for RT based on industrial principles and practices. Optimization of RT processes and implementation of industrial techniques requires the acquisition of data regarding performance statistics and failure or error rates of individual departments. Most facilities do not have the infrastructure to effectively collect and analyze such data. We have developed an efficient and effective process for collecting storing and analyzing the failure rate data in individual RT facilities that will support process improvement in patient care and safety. The process is based on a web?based tool for reporting events. The tool is designed so individual events can be reported in as little as two minutes. Events are categorized based on function area type and severity of failure. All events are systematically processed using web?based tools and stored for future analysis and evaluation of failure methods and process improvement and prioritization of efforts in an individual RT facility.

S Mutic; P Parikh; E Klein; R Drzymala; J Michalski; D Low

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

DIII-D Edge Plasma, Disruptions, and Radiative Processes. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The scientific goal of the UCSD-DIII-D Collaboration during this period was to understand the coupling of the core plasma to the plasma-facing components through the plasma boundary (edge and scrape-off layer). To achieve this goal, UCSD scientists studied the transport of particles, momentum, energy, and radiation from the plasma core to the plasma-facing components under normal (e.g., L-mode, H-mode, and ELMs), and off-normal (e.g., disruptions) operating conditions.

Boedo, J. A.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Moyer, R. A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Research Highlight  

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Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Properties from M-PACE Microphysical Retrievals Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Properties from M-PACE Microphysical Retrievals Download a printable PDF Submitter: de Boer, G., University of Colorado, Boulder/CIRES Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: de Boer G, WD Collins, S Menon, and CN Long. 2011. "Using surface remote sensors to derive radiative characteristics of mixed-phase clouds: An example from M-PACE." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 11, doi: 10.5194/acp-11-11937-2011. Measured and retrieved cloud properties on 10 October 2004. Included are (top to bottom) AHSRL bacscatter cross-section, AHSRL depolarization ratio, MMCR reflectivity, and profiles of liquid water content (LWC), ice water content (IWC), and liquid (r_{e,liq}) and ice (r$_{e,ice}$) effective

260

Research Highlight  

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Spectrally Invariant Approximation Within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Spectrally Invariant Approximation Within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Marshak A, Y Knyazikhin, JC Chiu, and WJ Wiscombe. 2011. "Spectrally-invariant approximation within atmospheric radiative transfer." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 68(12), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-11-060.1. Ratio of reflectance Rλ plus transmittance Tλ over single scattering albedo ω0λ plotted against the sum Rλ+Tλ for two cloud optical depths: 5 and 10. The aerosol optical depth at 0.55 μm is 0.2 (rural type of aerosol). Different dots correspond to different wavelengths from 0.4 to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Exploratory Research on Novel Coal Liquefaction Concept - Task 2: Evaluation of Process Steps.  

SciTech Connect

A novel direct coal liquefaction technology is being investigated in a program being conducted by CONSOL Inc. with the University of Kentucky, Center for Applied Energy Research and LDP Associates under DOE Contract DE-AC22-95PC95050. The novel concept consists of a new approach to coal liquefaction chemistry which avoids some of the inherent limitations of current high-temperature thermal liquefaction processes. The chemistry employed is based on hydride ion donation to solubilize coal at temperatures (350-400{degrees}C) significantly lower than those typically used in conventional coal liquefaction. The process concept being explored consists of two reaction stages. In the first stage, the coal is solubilized by hydride ion donation. In the second, the products are catalytically upgraded to acceptable refinery feedstocks. The program explores not only the initial solubilization step, but integration of the subsequent processing steps, including an interstage solids-separation step, to produce distillate products. A unique feature of the process concept is that many of the individual reaction steps can be decoupled, because little recycle around the liquefaction system is expected. This allows for considerable latitude in the process design. Furthermore, this has allowed for each key element in the process to be explored independently in laboratory work conducted under Task 2 of the program.

Brandes, S.D.; Winschel, R.A.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TOA Radiation Budget of Convective Core/Stratiform Rain/Anvil Clouds from TOA Radiation Budget of Convective Core/Stratiform Rain/Anvil Clouds from Deep Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Feng, Z., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Feng Z, XQ Dong, BK Xi, C Schumacher, P Minnis, and M Khaiyer. 2011. "Top-of-atmosphere radiation budget of convective core/stratiform rain and anvil clouds from deep convective systems." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D23202, doi:10.1029/2011JD016451. An example of the hybrid classification process. (a) GOES IR temperature, (b) NEXRAD radar reflectivity at 2.5 km MSL, (c) cloud patch segmentation from GOES IR temperature (the color patches are identified as deep

263

VERIFICATION SURVEY ACTIVITIES IN FS SURVEY UNITS 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 & 14 AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT  

SciTech Connect

FINAL INTERIM REPORT VERIFICATION SURVEY ACTIVITIES IN FINAL STATUS SURVEY UNITS 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13 AND 14 AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT, Niskayuna, New York 0496-SR-03-0. The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) facilities were constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium. SPRU operated between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction/oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes that were subsequently used by the Hanford and the Savannah River sites.

M.G. JADICK

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

264

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: U.S. Department of Energy -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Publications Search Publications Year of Publication: Any 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 1981 1980 1979 1978 1973 1970 1968 1956 Source: Select a Source... Journal of Mammary Gland Biology and Neoplasia 27th Annual CNS Conference and 30th CNS/CAN Student Conference, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Accounts of Chemical Research Acta Histochemica Acta Med. Nagasaki Advances in Medical Physics 2006 Advances in Space Research AJR, American J. of Roentgenology American Assoc. for Cancer Research American J. of Clinical Nutrition American J. of Epidemiology American J. of Human Genetics American J. of Pathology American Journal of Industrial Medicine American Journal of Physiology-Cell Physiology American Scientist

265

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: A Variable Energy Soft X-ray  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variable Energy Soft X-ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of Variable Energy Soft X-ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation Induced Bystander Effect. Authors: Melvyn Folkard, Borivoj Vojnovic, Giuseppe Schettino, Kevin M Prise and Barry D Michael. Institutions: Gray Cancer Institute. We are currently engaged on two projects in the Low-dose Program: "Low dose studies with focused X-rays in cell and tissue models: mechanisms of bystander and genomic instability responses" (DE-FG07-99ER62877) and "Mechanistic modeling of bystander effects: An integrated theoretical and experimental approach" (DE-FG02-02ER63305). Central to both of these studies is a unique micro irradiation facility that uses ultrasoft X-rays focused to a sub micron beam for individual cell and sub cellular targeting. This facility allows us to selectively irradiate individual

266

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Roobik" Is Part of the Answer, Not a Puzzle "Roobik" Is Part of the Answer, Not a Puzzle Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: N/A Taking place during the arid Arctic winter, the RHUBC will obtain measurements in the far-infrared (15-40 microns), when the so-called "Arctic" infrared window between 16 and 40 microns is semi-transparent. Between February and March 2007 at the ACRF North Slope of Alaska site in Barrow, high-spectral-resolution observations will be collected by three state-of-the-art Fourier Transform Spectrometers sampling at different bands in the far-infrared. The Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign, or RHUBC (pronounced "roobik"), will make detailed observations

267

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data from Saharan Dust Storm Reveal Model Deficiencies Data from Saharan Dust Storm Reveal Model Deficiencies Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Slingo, A., T.P. Ackerman, R.P. Allan, E.I. Kassianov, S.A. McFarlane, G.J. Robinson, J.C. Barnard, M.A. Miller, J.E. Harries, J.E. Russell , S. Dewitte, 2006: Observations of the impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the Earth's radiation budget. Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L24817, doi:10.1029/2006GL027869. In March 2006, the ARM Mobile Facility recorded the strongest Saharan dust storm to reach the Niamey area in two years. The storm lasted several days, and visibility was reduced to 15 percent of normal. Observations (solid lines and star symbols) and results from two models

268

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using the ACRF Shortwave Spectrometer to Study the Transition Between Clear Using the ACRF Shortwave Spectrometer to Study the Transition Between Clear and Cloudy Regions Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Chiu, J., University of Reading Knyazikhin, Y., Boston University Pilewskie, P., University of Colorado Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Chiu C, A Marshak, Y Knyazikhin, P Pilewskie, and W Wiscombe. 2009. "Physical interpretation of the spectral radiative signature in the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy regions." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9(4), 1419-1430. (a) Total sky images on 18 May 2007, and (b) plot of SWS normalized zenith radiances. In (b), arrows pointed at the time axis correspond to the times

269

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Consistency Analysis of ARESE Aircraft Measurements A Consistency Analysis of ARESE Aircraft Measurements Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Li, Z., A.P. Trishchenko, H.W. Barker, G.L. Stephens, and P. Partain, 1999: "Analyses of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) multiple data sets for studying cloud absorption," J. of Geophys. Res. 104(D16):19127-19134 Figure 1. Comparisons of TOA albedos inferred from measurements made by TSBR, GOES-8, and SSP. Two sets of GOES-based estimates are shown for an aircraft along the Egrett's flight path: one for an aircraft skimming the cloud tops (dotted lines); and another for one at 14 km (thin solid lines).

270

Research Highlight  

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Aerosols Help Clouds Warm Up Arctic Aerosols Help Clouds Warm Up Arctic Submitter: Lubin, D., National Science Foundation Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Lubin, D., and A.M. Vogelmann, 2006: A climatologically significant aerosol longwave indirect effect in the Arctic, Nature, 439, 26 January, 453-456, doi:10.1038/nature04449 In a process known as the first aerosol indirect effect, enhanced aerosol concentrations cause the droplets in a cloud to be smaller and more numerous within a cloud of fixed water amount. This study found that this process can make many clouds more opaque and emit more thermal energy to the surface. The warming of the Arctic climate and decreases in sea ice area and thickness observed over recent decades are believed to result from

271

Use of the ARM Measurement of Spectral Zenith Radiance For Better Understanding Of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

SciTech Connect

Our proposal focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general 3D cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. We also focus on zenith radiance measurements, both active and passive. The proposal has three main parts. Part One exploits the ?¢????solar-background?¢??? mode of ARM lidars to allow them to retrieve cloud optical depth not just for thin clouds but for all clouds. This also enables the study of aerosol cloud interactions with a single instrument. Part Two exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by ARM?¢????s zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), especially during CLASIC, to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also propose to take advantage of the SWS?¢???? 1 Hz sampling to study the ?¢????twilight zone?¢??? around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part Three involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM?¢????s 2NFOV instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the AMF-COPS/CLOWD deployment, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM?¢????s operational data processing.

D. Jui-Yuan Chiu

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

272

Currently, there is a substantial research and development effort directed toward optical signal processing and electronic signal processing for fiber-optic communications. Much of the work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Currently, there is a substantial research and development effort directed toward optical signal processing and electronic signal processing for fiber-optic communications. Much of the work for telecommunication services. For optical signal proc- essing, a variety of approaches are available for implementing

Wu, Shin-Tson

273

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Apparent Bluing of Aerosols Near Clouds The Apparent Bluing of Aerosols Near Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marshak, A, G Wen, JA Coakley, LA Remer, NG Loeb, and RF Cahalan. 2008. "A simple model of the cloud adjacency effect and the apparent bluing of aerosols near clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D14S17, doi: 10.1029/2007JD009196. (upper panel) A schematic two-layer model of a broken cloud field and Rayleigh scatterers. (lower panel) An example of the Poisson distribution of broken cloud fields with cloud fraction Ac = 0.3 for a 10 by 10 km area. For a cloud vertical thickness of 1 km, the left lower panel has cloud

274

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clouds Brighten Up the Sky Near Them Clouds Brighten Up the Sky Near Them Download a printable PDF Submitter: Varnai, T., University of Maryland, Baltimore County/JCEST Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Varnai T and A Marshak. 2009. "MODIS observations of enhanced clear sky reflectance near clouds." Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L06807, doi:10.1029/2008GL037089. Figure 1. Illustration of clouds enhancing the brightness of sky in nearby clear areas. In cloud-free areas light is scattered mainly by air molecules, but aerosols also contribute. Figure 2. Top: Average increase in MODIS clear-sky reflectivity (R) near clouds. The difference between areas near illuminated and shadowy cloud

275

Research Highlight  

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Variations of Meridional Aerosol Distribution and Solar Dimming Variations of Meridional Aerosol Distribution and Solar Dimming Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kishcha, P., Tel-Aviv University Starobinets, B., Tel-Aviv University Kalashnikova, O., Jet Propulsion Laboratory Alpert, P., Tel-Aviv University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol, Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Kishcha P, B Starobinets, O Kalashnikova, CN Long, and P Alpert. 2009. "Variations of meridional aerosol distribution and solar dimming." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, D00D14, 10.1029/2008JD010975. The distribution of four-year aerosol differences (δAOT/δFAOT) between the last four years (March 2004 - February 2008) and the first four years

276

Research Highlight  

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Environmental Thermodynamics Affect Radiative Impact of Deep Convective Cloud Systems Submitter: Jensen, M., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric...

277

Correlation between radiation processes in silicon and long-time degradation of detectors for high energy physics experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this contribution, the correlation between fundamental interaction processes induced by radiation in silicon and observable effects which limit the use of silicon detectors in high energy physics experiments is investigated in the frame of a phenomenological model which includes: generation of primary defects at irradiation starting from elementary interactions in silicon; kinetics of defects, effects at the p-n junction detector level. The effects due to irradiating particles (pions, protons, neutrons), to their flux, to the anisotropy of the threshold energy in silicon, to the impurity concentrations and resistivity of the starting material are investigated as time, fluence and temperature dependences of detector characteristics. The expected degradation of the electrical parameters of detectors in the complex hadron background fields at LHC & SLHC are predicted.

Lazanu, S; Lazanu, Sorina; Lazanu, Ionel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Correlation between radiation processes in silicon and long-time degradation of detectors for high energy physics experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this contribution, the correlation between fundamental interaction processes induced by radiation in silicon and observable effects which limit the use of silicon detectors in high energy physics experiments is investigated in the frame of a phenomenological model which includes: generation of primary defects at irradiation starting from elementary interactions in silicon; kinetics of defects, effects at the p-n junction detector level. The effects due to irradiating particles (pions, protons, neutrons), to their flux, to the anisotropy of the threshold energy in silicon, to the impurity concentrations and resistivity of the starting material are investigated as time, fluence and temperature dependences of detector characteristics. The expected degradation of the electrical parameters of detectors in the complex hadron background fields at LHC & SLHC are predicted.

Sorina Lazanu; Ionel Lazanu

2006-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

279

A new scenario framework for climate change research: background, process, and future directions  

SciTech Connect

The scientific community is developing new integrated global, regional, and sectoral scenarios to facilitate interdisciplinary research and assessment to explore the range of possible future climates and related physical changes could pose to human and natural systems; how these could interact with social, economic, and environmental development pathways; the degree to which mitigation and adaptation policies can avoid and reduce those risks; the costs and benefits of various policy mixes; residual impacts under alternative pathways; and the relationship with sustainable development. This paper provides the background to, and process of, developing the conceptual framework for these scenarios, described in three other papers in this Special Issue (van Vuuren et al.; O'Neill et al.; Kriegler et al.). The paper also discusses research needs to further develop and apply this framework. The goal is to encourage climate change researchers from a broad range of perspectives and disciplines to work together to develop policy-relevant scenarios and explore the implications of different possible futures for the challenges and opportunities human and natural systems could face with increasing climate change.

Ebi, Kristie L.; Hallegatte, Stephane; Kram, Tom; Arnell, Nigel; Carter, Tim; Edmonds, James A.; Kriegler, Elmar; Mathur, Ritu; O'Neill, Brian; Riahi, Keywan; Winkler, Harald; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Zwickel, Timm

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Laser-processed three dimensional graphitic electrodes for diamond radiation detectors  

SciTech Connect

We have used an original approach for diamond detectors where three dimensional buried graphitic electrodes are processed in the bulk of a diamond substrate via laser-induced graphitization. Prototype made of polycrystalline chemical vapor deposition diamond was fabricated using a nanosecond UV laser. Its charge collection efficiency was evaluated using ?-particles emitted by a 241-Americium source. An improved charge collection efficiency was measured proving that laser micro-machining of diamond is a valid option for the future fabrication of three dimensional diamond detectors.

Caylar, Beno?-carett; Pomorski, Michal; Bergonzo, Philippe [CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France)] [CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, Gif-sur-Yvette F-91191 (France)

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: The Risk of Cancer Induction Due to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 10-12, 1999, Washington, D.C. November 10-12, 1999, Washington, D.C. The Risk of Cancer Induction Due to Routine Mammographic Screening Featured Project Description David J. Brenner, Steve Marino, and Charles Geard, Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York Summary: To obtain realistic and credible risk estimates for breast-cancer mortality due to clinical mammographic imaging examinations. Abstract: The aim of this work is to obtain realistic and credible risk estimates for breast-cancer mortality due to clinical mammographic imaging examinations. Given the increasing emphasis on clinical mammographic screening for breast cancer, it is of societal importance to provide realistic risk estimates with realistic confidence bounds for breast cancer

282

The Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility (RSF), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design-Build Process for Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility An in-depth look at how the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory used a performance-based design-build contract process to build one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world. Table of Contents The Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility | 1 Table of Contents Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Building Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Owner Roles and Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Acquisition Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Defining Performance Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

283

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power in the Vertical: Using Wind Profiler Data to Study Precipitation Power in the Vertical: Using Wind Profiler Data to Study Precipitation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kollias, P., McGill University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Tridon F, A Battaglia, P Kollias, E Luke, and C Williams. 2013. "Signal post-processing and reflectivity calibration of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program 915 MHz wind profilers." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 30(6), doi:10.1175/JTECH-D-12-00146.1. Because ARM's wind profilers (foreground) can take vertical as well as horizontal measurements, the instruments can be used with appropriate processing and calibration to help study rainfall. For more than two decades, radar wind profilers of the U.S. Department of

284

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lord of the Wings: Elevated Particles a Rising Star Lord of the Wings: Elevated Particles a Rising Star Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kassianov E, C Flynn, J Redemann, B Schmid, PB Russell, and A Sinyuk. 2012. "Initial assessment of the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR)-based aerosol retrieval: Sensitivity study." Atmosphere, 3, doi:10.3390/atmos3040495. The 4STAR instrument. The 4STAR instrument (inset) is installed through the upper hull of the PNNL G-1 research aircraft, for in-flight sun-tracking and sky light-scanning. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in collaboration with colleagues at NASA Ames Research Center, developed a next-generation

285

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Daytime Precipitable Water Vapor from Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Improved Daytime Precipitable Water Vapor from Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Sensors Download a printable PDF Submitter: Cady-Pereira, K. E., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Shephard, M. W., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Clough, S. A., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Cady-Pereira, K, M Shephard, E Mlawer, D Turner, S Clough, and T Wagner. 2008. "Improved daytime column-integrated precipitable water vapor from Vaisala radiosonde humidity sensors." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology doi: 10.1175/2007JTECHA1027.1.

286

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 476 (2002) 758764 Observation of radiation induced latchup in the readout  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to high levels of radiation resulting in an ionizing radiation dose of more than 200 krad and displacement with a radia- tion hard technology that can resist up to radiation dose levels greater than 1 Mrad. Both chips were fabricated according to almost identical designs. 2. Estimation of dose and fluence NA50

Ramello, Luciano

287

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: Study of Aerosol Sources and Processing at the GVAX Pantnagar Supersite  

SciTech Connect

This project funded the participation of scientists from seven research groups, running more than thirty instruments, in the Winter Intensive Operating Period (January-February 2012) of the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) campaign at a rural site in Detling, UK, 45 km southeast of central London. The primary science questions for the ClearfLo Winter IOP were, 1) what is the urban increment of particulate matter (PM) and other pollutants in the greater London area, and, 2) what is the contribution of solid fuel use for home heating to wintertime PM? An additional motivation for the Detling measurements was the question of whether coatings on black carbon particles enhance absorption. The following four key accomplishments have been identified so far: 1) Chemical, physical and optical characterization of PM from local and regional sources (Figures 2, 4, 5 and 6). 2) Measurement of urban increment in particulate matter and gases in London (Figure 3). 3) Measurement of optical properties and chemical composition of coatings on black carbon containing particles indicates absorption enhancement. 4) First deployment of chemical ionization instrument (MOVI-CI-TOFMS) to measure both particle-phase and gas-phase organic acids. (See final report from Joel Thornton, University of Washington, for details.) Analysis of the large dataset acquired in Detling is ongoing and will yield further key accomplishments. These measurements of urban and rural aerosol properties will contribute to improved modeling of regional aerosol emissions, and of atmospheric aging and removal. The measurement of absorption enhancement by coatings on black carbon will contribute to improved modeling of the direct radiative properties of PM.

Worsnop, Douglas R. [Principal Investigator

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

288

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Conducting Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program DoReMi Integrating Low Dose Research High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on European Low Dose Risk Research Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiation United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries Organizations Conducting other Radiation Research Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Armed Forces Radiology Research Institute (AFRRI) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Colorado State University Columbia University

289

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance of Longwave Radiative Transfer Models for 3D Cloud Fields Performance of Longwave Radiative Transfer Models for 3D Cloud Fields Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kablick III, G. P., University of Maryland Ellingson, R. G., Florida State University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kablick III GP, RG Ellingson, EE Takara, and J Gu. 2011. "Longwave 3D benchmarks for inhomogeneous clouds and comparisons with approximate methods." Journal of Climate, 24, doi:10.1175/2010JCLI3752.1. The respective flux and heating rate errors (model-3DMC) for (a),(b) ATEX and (c),(d) GATE A. The error profiles in (a) and (c) are to be interpreted as ICA, solid lines; MRO, dashed lines; RO, dotted lines. (b) and (d) also show the differences between MRO and RO. The horizontal lines are the

290

Energy in low carbon cities and social learning: A process for defining priority research questions with UK stakeholders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract City-level decision-making requires timely access to a wide range of relevant and comprehensible data and information. Although a wide range of research on energy and cities is on-going across the social, engineering and natural sciences, it cannot be taken for granted that the questions being asked and the way questions are structured reflect practitioner perspectives and requirements. This paper discusses the ways in which research questions are formed and interpreted by actors in academic research and research user communities. We also report a set of research questions produced via an initial trial of a two stage, participative process consisting of (a) a survey targeted at city-focussed practitioners in the United Kingdom (UK) with an interest in lower carbon energy futures; and (b) a workshop integrating practitioner and academic perspectives. Comparing the set of research questions identified with themes in the academic literature, we find that research and practitioner communities concur on the importance of reducing energy demand and also on a number of cross-cutting issues. However, we also find that academic research places a greater emphasis on the interfaces between the energy system and other urban systems. We conclude that the two stage, participative process followed can serve to generate and legitimate city-related research questions through collaboration between stakeholders and academic researchers.

Chris J. Martin; Peter G. Taylor; Paul Upham; Golnoush Ghiasi; Catherine S.E. Bale; Hannah James; Alice Owen; William F. Gale; Rebecca J. Slack; Simon Helmer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Membrane/distillation hybrid process research and development. Final report, phase II  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work conducted under the grant awarded to BP by DOE in late 1991 entitled {open_quotes}Membrane/Distillation Hybrid Process Research and Development.{close_quotes} The program was directed towards development and commercialization of the BP process for separation of vapor phase olefins from non-olefins via facilitated transport using an aqueous facilitator. The program has come to a very successful conclusion, with formation of a partnership between BP and Stone and Webster Engineering Corporation (SWEC) to market and commercialize the technology. The focus of this report is the final portion of the program, during which engineering re-design, facilitator optimization, economic analysis, and marketing have been the primary activities. At the end of Phase II BP was looking to partner with an engineering firm to advance the selective olefin recovery (SOR) technology from the lab/demo stage to full commercialization. In August 1995 BP and SWEC reached an agreement to advance the technology by completing additional Phase III work with DOE and beginning marketing activities.

Mazanec, T.J.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

293

Thin Film Materials and Processing Techniques for a Next Generation Photovoltaic Device: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-470  

SciTech Connect

This research extends thin film materials and processes relevant to the development and production of a next generation photovoltaic device.

van Hest, M.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program  

SciTech Connect

The Earths surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earths energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

Research Highlight  

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Development and Recent Evaluation of the MT_CKD Model of Continuum Development and Recent Evaluation of the MT_CKD Model of Continuum Absorption Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Mlawer EJ, VH Payne, J Moncet, JS Delamere, MJ Alvarado, and DD Tobin. 2012. "Development and recent evaluation of the MT_CKD model of continuum absorption." Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society A, 370, doi: 10.1098/rsta.2011.0295. For seven AERI cases with 4-6 cm PWV: (a) average AERI radiances (black) and corresponding calculations using radiation code with previous version of MT_CKD continuum model (red); (b) residuals between AERI and calculations with older model; (c) residuals after the CO2 continuum in

296

Research Highlight  

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A Downwelling Infrared Radiance Climatology for the ARM Southern Great A Downwelling Infrared Radiance Climatology for the ARM Southern Great Plains Site Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Gero, J., University of Wisconsin Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Turner DD and PJ Gero. 2011. "Downwelling infrared radiance temperature climatology for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D08212, doi:10.1029/2010JD015135. The distribution of downwelling 10-micron infrared radiance observed at the SGP site by the AERI from June 1996 to May 2010, separated into all-sky (all samples) and the three distinct sky classifications.

297

Research Highlight  

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Testing and Comparing the Modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation Testing and Comparing the Modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Mitchell, D.L., A.J. Baran, W.P. Arnott, C. Schmitt, 2006: Testing and comparing the anomalous diffraction approximation. J. Atmos. Sci., 63, 2948-2962. Comparison of MADA and T-matrix with measured Qext. Regions without data were contaminated by water vapor or CO2 absorption. MADA and T-matrix calculations are based on the measured PSD of hexagonal columns having an effective diameter of 14 microns. Comparison of the PSD weighted Qabs predicted by FDTD and MADA for a tunneling efficiency corresponding to aggregates. Cirrus clouds play a large role in the Earth's radiation budget and the way

298

Research Highlight  

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Biases in Column Absorption for Fractal Clouds Biases in Column Absorption for Fractal Clouds Submitter: Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marshak, Alexander; Davis, Anthony; Wiscombe, Warren; Ridgway, William; Cahalan, Robert; 1998: "Biases in Shortwave Column Absorption in the Presence of Fractal Clouds," J. Climate 11(3):431-446. Figure 1: Water vapor transmission spectra for solar zenith angle of 60 degree. From the top: from TOA to 5 km, from TOA to 1 km, from TOA to 0.5 km and, finally, from TOA to surface. Figure 2: Fractional cloudiness N = 0.777. (a) Horizontal distribution of optical depth, the same for both models. (b) Horizontal distribution of cloud height for optical model. Constant cloud top and cloud base; thus

299

Research Highlight  

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Modeled Vs. Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance Modeled Vs. Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance Submitter: Schwartz, S. E., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Halthore R. N., Schwartz, S. E., Michalsky, J. J., Anderson, G. P., Ferrare R. A., Holben B. N., and ten Brink H. M. 1997. "Comparison of Model Estimated and Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance," J. Geophys. Res. 102(D25): 29991-30002 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Direct-normal solar irradiance (DNSI), the total energy in the solar spectrum incident in unit time on a unit area at the earth's surface perpendicular to the direction to the Sun, Figure 1, depends only on atmospheric extinction of solar energy without regard to the details of the

300

RESEARCH SAFETY RADIATION SAFETY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Communications Manager (951) 827-6303 janette.ducut@ucr.edu Beiwei Tu, MS, CIH, CSP Safety and Industrial Hygiene, CSP Laboratory Safety Compliance Specialist (951) 827-2528 sarah.meyer@ucr.edu (vacant) Integrated

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Review and evaluation of updated research on the health effects associated with low-dose ionising radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......studies of radiation workers, such as the Rocketdyne(149), Mayak(150, 151) and National...occupational studies is not known. Rocketdyne study-other studies of radiation workers...in the 15-country study include the Rocketdyne study(149). By itself, this study......

Lawrence T. Dauer; Antone L. Brooks; David G. Hoel; William F. Morgan; Daniel Stram; Phung Tran

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Research Foundations...  

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pulsed-power machine. The Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Research Foundation seeks to advance science and engineering in the areas of radiation effects sciences,...

303

Novel, Magnetically Fluidized-Bed Reactor Development for the Looping Process: Coal to Hydrogen Production Research and Development  

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Novel, Magnetically Fluidized-Bed Novel, Magnetically Fluidized-Bed Reactor Development for the Looping Process: Coal to Hydrogen Production Research and Development Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is committed to improving methods for co-producing power and chemicals, fuels, and hydrogen (H2). Gasification is a process by which fuels such as coal can be used to produce synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of H2, carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon

304

Research Input Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HighlightsSubmit HighlightsSubmit Form Submit a New Research Highlight Sort Highlights Submitter Title Research Area Working Group Submission Date DOE Progress Reports Notable Research Findings for 2001-2006 Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database Research Highlights Summaries Research Highlight Submittal Form Tell us about your research! This form is designed to collect summary information about working group research results. If you have any questions or comments, please contact the administrators. Journal or Book Reference(s) (if applicable): Look Up Your reference from the Publications Database. Limit two references. If you have not submitted the references, please Add it now. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Surface Properties General Circulation and Single Column

305

Low Cost Solar Array Project cell and module formation research area. Process research of non-CZ silicon material. Final report, November 26, 1980-September 30, 1983  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the work reported was to investigate high-risk, high-payoff research areas associated with the Westinghouse process for producing photovoltaic modules using non-Czochralski sheet material. These tasks were addressed: technical feasibility study of forming front and back junctions using liquid dopant techniques, liquid diffusion mask feasibility study, application studies of antireflective material using a meniscus coater, ion implantation compatibility/feasibility study, and cost analysis. (LEW)

Campbell, R.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Regulation of NF-kB and MnSOD in Low  

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NF-kB and MnSOD in Low Dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive NF-kB and MnSOD in Low Dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive Responses in Mouse and Human Skin Cells Jian Jian Li School of Health Sciences, Purdue University West Lafayette, Indiana Why this Project? To determine if low dose ionizing radiation-induced adaptive responses in skin cells are mediated by activation of signaling networks. Project Goals To evaluate the signaling networks involving transcription factor NF-kB and the mitochondrial antioxidant protein MnSOD. To determine if NF-kB is activated by low dose radiation in vivo. To determine if NF-kB activation is critical in the pathways that produce adaptive responses. Experimental Approach Cells transfected with NF-kB luciferase responder genes will be used to define a dose-response relationship for activation of the NF-kB gene. NF-kB

307

Review and evaluation of updated research on the health effects associated with low-dose ionising radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......reaction exon analyses of HPRT-mutations induced by radon and radon progeny. Radiat. Res. (1994) 137:371-379...from Soviet atmospheric nuclear weapons testing in Kazakhstan: solid cancer mortality in the Semipalatinsk historical......

Lawrence T. Dauer; Antone L. Brooks; David G. Hoel; William F. Morgan; Daniel Stram; Phung Tran

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Millimeter Wave Scattering from Ice Crystals and Their Aggregates Millimeter Wave Scattering from Ice Crystals and Their Aggregates Download a printable PDF Submitter: Botta, G., Pennsylvania State University Verlinde, J., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Botta G, K Aydin, J Verlinde, A Avramov, A Ackerman, A Fridlind, M Wolde, and G McFarquhar. 2011. "Millimeter wave scattering from ice crystals and their aggregates: Comparing cloud model simulations with X- and Ka-band radar measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T04, doi:10.1029/2011JD015909. Observational data sets are needed to drive and evaluate results from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations in order to improve parameterizations of the physical processes. Radar is one of the few

309

Research Highlight  

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Optical Depth Measurements by Shadowband Radiometers and Their Uncertainties Download a printable PDF Submitter: Alexandrov, M. D., Columbia University Area of Research: Radiation...

310

Fundamental Processes of Coupled Radiation Damage and Mechanical Behavior in Nuclear Fuel Materials for High Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work has been to elucidate the relationship among microstructure, radiation damage and mechanical properties for nuclear fuel materials. As representative nuclear materials, we have taken an hcp metal (Mg as a generic metal, and Ti alloys for fast reactors) and UO2 (representing fuel). The degradation of the thermo-mechanical behavior of nuclear fuels under irradiation, both the fissionable material itself and its cladding, is a longstanding issue of critical importance to the nuclear industry. There are experimental indications that nanocrystalline metals and ceramics may be more resistant to radiation damage than their coarse-grained counterparts. The objective of this project look at the effect of microstructure on radiation damage and mechanical behavior in these materials. The approach to be taken was state-of-the-art, large-scale atomic-level simulation. This systematic simulation program of the effects of irradiation on the structure and mechanical properties of polycrystalline Ti and UO2 identified radiation damage mechanisms. Moreover, it will provided important insights into behavior that can be expected in nanocrystalline microstructures and, by extension, nanocomposites. The fundamental insights from this work can be expected to help in the design microstructures that are less susceptible to radiation damage and thermomechanical degradation.

Simon Phillpot; James Tulenko

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

311

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimal Method to Determine Orientation Average of Scattering Properties of Optimal Method to Determine Orientation Average of Scattering Properties of Ice Crystals Download a printable PDF Submitter: Um, J., University of Illinois, Urbana McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Um J and GM McFarquhar. 2013. "Optimal numerical methods for determining the orientation averages of single-scattering properties of atmospheric ice crystals." Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer, 127, doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2013.05.020. Fig.1. Idealized shapes of ice crystals used in this study: (a) Gaussian random sphere (GS), (b) droxtal (DX), (c) budding Bucky ball (3B), and (d) column (COL). All models are visualized with dipoles. For (b), (c), and (d)

312

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Looking at the Full Spectrum for Water Vapor Looking at the Full Spectrum for Water Vapor Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mlawer EJ, VH Payne, J Moncet, JS Delamere, MJ Alvarado, and DD Tobin. 2012. "Development and recent evaluation of the MT_CKD model of continuum absorption." Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society A, 370, doi: 10.1098/rsta.2011.0295. Radiative cooling across the full infrared spectrum: The far-infrared (the left half of the figure, from 15 to 1000 microns) plays a key role in heat transfer in the atmosphere, but scientists could not measure it, and model calculations were consequently very uncertain. Field observations from

313

Research Highlight  

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Spectral Invariant Properties of Single-Scattering Albedo for Water Spectral Invariant Properties of Single-Scattering Albedo for Water Droplets and Ice Crystals Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Marshak A, Y Knyazikhin, JC Chiu, and WJ Wiscombe. 2012. "On spectral invariance of single scattering albedo for water droplets and ice crystals at weakly absorbing wavelengths." Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer, 113, 715-720. The ratio of ω0λ(r)/ω0λ(r0) plotted against ω0λ(r) for four wavelengths, λ=0.86, 1.65, 2.13 and 3.75 um. An example for the aggregates ice crystal habits is shown (see Yang et al. 2000. "Parameterization of

314

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Self-Regulation Strikes a Balance Between Hydrological Cycle, Radiation Self-Regulation Strikes a Balance Between Hydrological Cycle, Radiation Processes, and Intraseasonal Dynamic Variations Submitter: Stephens, G. L., Colorado State University Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Stephens, Graeme L., Webster, Peter J., Johnson, Richard H., Engelen, Richard, L'Ecuyer, Tristan. 2004: Observational Evidence for the Mutual Regulation of the Tropical Hydrological Cycle and Tropical Sea Surface Temperatures. Journal of Climate: Vol. 17, No. 11, pp. 2213-2224. The "humidistat" feedback mechanism suggests that the hydrological cycle and sea surface temperatures mutually regulate each other in phases: the destabilization phase, the convective phase, and the restoring phase. These

315

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a New Method for Estimating Evapotranspiration Using ARM Development of a New Method for Estimating Evapotranspiration Using ARM Measurements Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Wang, K., P. Wang, Z. Li, M. Cribb, and M. Sparrow (2007). A simple method to estimate actual evapotranspiration from a combination of net radiation, vegetation index, and temperature, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D15107, doi:10.1029/2006JD008351. Wang, K., Z. Li, and M. Cribb (2006). Estimation of evaporative fraction from a combination of day and night land surface temperature and NDVI: A new method to determine the Priestley-Taylor parameter. Remote Sensing of Environment, 102, 293-305. Time series of the measured (dot) and predicted ET (line) using equation

316

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Study Aerosol Humidity Effects Using the ARM Measurements Study Aerosol Humidity Effects Using the ARM Measurements Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Jeong, M.-J., Z. Li, E. Andrews, and S.-C. Tsay (2007). Effect of aerosol humidification on the column aerosol optical thickness over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D10202, doi:10.1029/2006JD007176. (a)-(j) Column-mean aerosol humidification factor as functions of the weighted column mean RH, . The ambient RH at one of the ten level-legs of the In-situ Aerosol Profile (IAP) measurements is replaced with RH equals 99%. Comparison of estimated column R(RH) following six different methods (M1~M6). Gray solid lines and black dashed lines are linear fit and

317

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric processes research Sample Search...  

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Roundtable Summary: , Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes Colorado State University John Dunne, Ph... Exler Director, Office of Communications for...

318

BNL | Atmospheric Systems Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program created to advance process-level understanding of the key interactions among aerosols, clouds, precipitation, radiation, dynamics, and thermodynamics, with the ultimate goal of reducing the uncertainty in global and regional climate simulations and projections. General areas of research at BNL under this program include studies of aerosol and cloud lifecycles, and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions. Contact Robert McGraw, 631.344.3086 aerosols Aerosol Life Cycle The strategic focus of the Aerosol Life Cycle research is observation-based process science-examining the properties and evolution of atmospheric aerosols. Observations come from both long-term studies conducted by the

319

Engineering aesthetics and aesthetic ergonomics: Theoretical foundations and a dual-process research methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering aesthetics and aesthetic ergonomics: Theoretical foundations and a dual, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109-2117, USA Keywords: Engineering aesthetics; Aesthetic ergonomics; Aesthetic human judgments and `educated guesses'. Whilst ergonomics and human factors researchers have made great

Liu, Yili

320

E-Print Network 3.0 - area process research Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 2011 Together with teaching and community service, research is one of the three pillars of the University of Summary: themes and eight sub-themes that reflect areas of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

NCCR Digital Fabrication Innovative Building Processes in Architecture A new national research initiative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NCCR Digital Fabrication ­Innovative Building Processes in Architecture 14.05.2014 A new national and a resulting enhancement in the quality and sustainability of our built environment. To address the use) to investigate Digital Fabrication ­ Innovative Building Processes in Architecture. Global Challenges The rapidly

Lygeros, John

322

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors: sensitivity of decommissioning radiation exposure and costs to selected parameters  

SciTech Connect

Additional analyses of decommissioning at the reference research and test (R and T) reactors and analyses of five recent reactor decommissionings are made that examine some parameters not covered in the initial study report (NUREG/CR-1756). The parameters examined for decommissioning are: (1) the effect on costs and radiation exposure of plant size and/or type; (2) the effects on costs of increasing disposal charges and of unavailability of waste disposal capacity at licensed waste disposal facilities; and (3) the costs of and the available alternatives for the disposal of nuclear R and T reactor fuel assemblies.

Konzek, G.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRAL SEPARATOR FOR A CENTRIFUGAL GAS PROCESSING FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

A COMPACT GAS PROCESSING DEVICE WAS INVESTIGATED TO INCREASE GAS PRODUCTION FROM REMOTE, PREVIOUSLY UN-ECONOMIC RESOURCES. THE UNIT WAS TESTED ON AIR AND WATER AND WITH NATURAL GAS AND LIQUID. RESULTS ARE REPORTED WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE WORK.

LANCE HAYS

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

324

Research on the evolvement of morphology of coking coal during the coking process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The evolvement of morphology and structure of the coal with different metamorphic degrees during coking process in the vertical furnace was investigated by infrared Image detector. Moreover, the temperature distribution in the radial direction and the crack formation were also studied in heating process. The results show that the amount of crack and the shrinkage level of char decrease with the coal rank rising. In addition, the initial temperature of crack formation for char increases with the coal rank rising.

Xiangyun Zhong; Shiyong Wu; Yang Liu; Zhenning Zhao; Yaru Zhang; Jinfeng Bai; Jun Xu; Bai Xi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site: Results of Technology Down-Selection and Research and Development to Support New Salt Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste (HLW) program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of HLW for disposal. The Salt Processing Project (SPP) is the salt waste (water-soluble) treatment portion of this effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction, and operation of technologies to prepare the salt-waste feed material for immobilization at the site's Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility [DWPF]). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to DWPF include cesium (Cs), strontium (Sr), and actinides. In April 2000, the DOE Deputy Secretary for Project Completion (EM-40) established the SRS Salt Processing Project Technical Working Group (TWG) to manage technology development of treatment alternatives for SRS high-level salt wastes. The separation alternatives investigated included three candidate Cs-removal processes selected, as well as actinide and Sr removal that are also required as a part of each process. The candidate Cs-removal processes are: crystalline Silicotitanate Non-Elutable Ion Exchange (CST); caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX); and small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). The Tanks Focus Area was asked to assist DOE by managing the SPP research and development (R&D), revising roadmaps, and developing down-selection criteria. The down-selection decision process focused its analysis on three levels: (a) identification of goals that the selected technology should achieve, (b) selection criteria that are a measure of performance of the goal, and (c) criteria scoring and weighting for each technology alternative. After identifying the goals and criteria, the TWG analyzed R&D results and engineering data and scored the technology alternatives versus the criteria. Based their analysis and scoring, the TWG recommended CSSX as the preferred alternative. This recommendation was formalized in July 2001 when DOE published the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and was finalized in the DOE Record of Decision issued in October 2001.

Lang, K.; Gerdes, K.; Picha, K.; Spader, W.; McCullough, J.; Reynolds, J.; Morin, J. P.; Harmon, H. D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

326

REVISED FINAL REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY ACTIVITIES AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT SITES, NISKAYUNA, NEW YORK DCN 0496-SR-06-1  

SciTech Connect

The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

Evan Harpenau

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

327

Research Highlight  

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ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements: 1997 Progress ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements: 1997 Progress Submitter: Smith, W. L., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1. Figs. 1a and 1b contain rms differences from 72 radiosondes for AERI retrievals (blue), GOES retrievals (black), and AERI+GOES retrievals (red) for temperature and mixing ratio respectively during the 1997 Water Vapor IOP. A measure of meteorological the variability of the temperature and water vapor is indicated by the green line. Figs. 1c and 1d show the TPW for the same cases from GOES, AERI+GOES, radiosonde, and the ARM SGP CART microwave radiometer and relative percent differences in TPW amounts. Figure 2. Four consecutive radiosonde, GOES, and AERI+GOES comparisons from

328

Research Highlight  

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Critical Role of Cloud Drop Effective Radius >14 Micron Radius in Rain Critical Role of Cloud Drop Effective Radius >14 Micron Radius in Rain Initiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Rosenfeld, D., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Wang, H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Rosenfeld D, H Wang, and PJ Rasch. 2012. "The roles of cloud drop effective radius and LWP in determining rain properties in marine stratocumulus." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 39, doi:10.1029/2012GL052028. The dependence of rain rate on cloud drop effective radius (re) near cloud top. The color scale is for the median value of column maximum rain rate in each joint bin of CWP-re (cloud liquid water path and cloud-top re).

329

Research Highlight  

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Estimating Fractional Sky Cover from Spectral Measurements Estimating Fractional Sky Cover from Spectral Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Min, Q., State University of New York, Albany Wang, T., State University of New York, Albany Duan, M., Institute of Atmospheric Physics/Chinese Academy of Science Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Min Q, T Wang, CN Long, and M Duan. 2008. "Estimating fractional sky cover from spectral measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 113, D20208, doi:10.1029/2008JD010278. Retrieved and observed cloud fractions and corresponding TSI cloud imagers on 8 July 2005 at Pt. Reyes. Scatterplot of retrieved cloud fraction from spectral ratio method and SW

330

Research Highlight  

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Burning on the Prairies Burning on the Prairies Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Fischer ML, MS Torn, DP Billesbach, G Doyle, B Northup, and SC Biraud. 2012. "Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought in a tallgrass prairie." Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 166, doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2012.07.011. Pasture burning during the beginning of the experiment at the USDA Grazing Lands Research Laboratory in March 2005. What does it mean for the carbon cycle? The deep drought in the United States that fueled wildfires and damaged crops in 2012 has now continued well into 2013. However, long before the droughts and fires wreaked havoc, a team of

331

Research Highlight  

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Remote Sensing of Mineral Dust Using AERI Remote Sensing of Mineral Dust Using AERI Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hansell, R. A., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Hansell R, KN Liou, SC Ou, SC Tsay, Q Ji, and JS Reid. 2008. "Remote sensing of mineral dust aerosol using AERI during the UAE2: A modeling and sensitivity study." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 113, D18202, doi:10.1029/2008JD010246. BT sensitivity to dust optical depth at 962 cm-1 with markers denoting locations of AERI subbands 1-17 from left to right. (a) Volz compact hexagon model spectra for four optical depths with best fit AERI spectrum. (b) Same as (a) but for a kaolinite/50% calcium carbonate mixturedust model.

332

Research Highlight  

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The Evolution and Distribution of Water Vapor and Microphysical Properties The Evolution and Distribution of Water Vapor and Microphysical Properties in Cirrus Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Comstock, J. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Comstock JM, R Lin, DO Starr, and P Yang. 2008. "Understanding ice supersaturation, particle growth, and number concentration in cirrus clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 113, D23211, doi:10.1029/2008JD010332. Vertical velocity (Vm) derived from millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) Doppler velocity measurements in cirrus clouds observed over the ACRF SGP site. Cloud model simulations of cirrus clouds using large-scale forcing (left panel) and cloud-scale forcing (right panel).

333

Research Highlight  

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ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements Submitter: Smith, W. L., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: DeSlover, D. H. 1996. Analysis of Visible and Infrared Cirrus Cloud Optical Properties Using High Spectral Resolution Remote Sensing, M.S. Thesis, University of Wisconsin - Madison. Ho, S.-P. 1997. Atmospheric Profiles From Simultaneous Observations of Upwelling and Downwelling Spectral Radiance, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Wisconsin - Madison. Knuteson, R. O., F. A. Best, H. B. Howell, P. Minnett, H. E. Revercomb, W. L. Smith. 1997. "High Spectral Resolution Infrared Observations at the Ocean-Atmosphere Interface in the Tropical Western Pacific using a Marine

334

Research Highlight  

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Shortwave Absorption in Tropical Clouds Shortwave Absorption in Tropical Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Mather, J. H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Liu, Z., University of Washington Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: McFarlane, SA, JH Mather, TP Ackerman, and Z Liu. 2008. "Effect of clouds on the vertical distribution of SW absorption in the Tropics." Journal of Geophysical Research, in press. Daily average all-sky and clear-sky calculated SW column absorption at Manus and Nauru. On average, there is little difference in absorption between the all-sky and clear-sky conditions because of the compensating

335

Radiation shielding and dosimetry experiments updates in the SINBAD database  

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......characterisation of the radiation source, it describes...National Laboratory, Radiation Safety Information Computational...Internet Nuclear Physics Radiation Protection instrumentation Radiometry Research Software Validation...

I. Kodeli; H. Hunter; E. Sartori

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

336

Enhancing the heat transfer in a heat treatment furnace through improving the combustion process in the radiation tubes  

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......energy efficiency in the heating processes. The heat...chamber and lead to shorter heating time to achieve the objective...chamber as a part of oil quenching heat treatment...energy efficiency in the heating processes. The heat...The rising of fuel prices and the increasing requirements......

E. M. Elmabrouk; Y. Wu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Research Highlight  

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Cloud-Radiation Effects on Sea Ice Loss Cloud-Radiation Effects on Sea Ice Loss Download a printable PDF Submitter: Stephens, G. L., Colorado State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Kay, JE, T L'Ecuyer, A Gettelman, G Stephens, and C O'Dell. "The contribution of cloud and radiation anomalies to the 2007 Arctic sea ice extent minimum." To appear in Geophysical Research Letters. Clouds and downwelling radiation 2007-2006 differences (June 15-Sept 15). a. Total cloud fraction differences based on radar and lidar data. b. Downwelling SW radiative flux difference. c. Downwelling LW radiative flux difference. The Western Arctic Ocean is outlined in brown. ARM ground-based radiation observations at Barrow, Alaska.

338

A multilayered analysis of energy security research and the energy supply process  

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Abstract After the Fukushima nuclear disaster, a reassessment of the energy system is needed in order to include such aspects as human security and resilience. More open and careful discussions are needed concerning the various risks and uncertainties of future energy options, both in Japan and globally. In this paper, we aim to offer a fundamental basis for discourse on energy security by analyzing the status and trends in academic publications on that issue. Our bibliometrics analysis indicates that research has shifted from promoting strategies for ensuring the self-sufficiency of the primary energy to diversification of the secondary energy supply chain by introducing energy networks consisting of an infrastructure established through international coordination. In the literature, the concept of energy security is ambiguous and allows for multiple interpretations. Our results illustrate the existence of highly multidisciplinary topics within energy security, which can be categorized into four perspectives: geopolitical, economic, policy related, and technological.

Eriko Kiriyama; Yuya Kajikawa

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Intensification of biodiesel production from waste goat tallow using infrared radiation: Process evaluation through response surface methodology and artificial neural network  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract For the first time, an efficient simultaneous trans/esterification process for biodiesel synthesis from waste goat tallow with considerable free fatty acids (FFAs) content has been explored employing an infrared radiation assisted reactor (IRAR). The impacts of methanol to tallow molar ratio, IRAR temperature and H2SO4 concentration on goat tallow conversion were evaluated by response surface methodology (RSM). Under optimal conditions, 96.7% FFA conversion was achieved within 2.5h at 59.93wt.% H2SO4, 69.97C IRAR temperature and 31.88:1 methanol to tallow molar ratio. The experimental results were also modeled using artificial neural network (ANN) and marginal improvement in modeling efficiency was observed in comparison with RSM. The infrared radiation strategy could significantly accelerate the conversion process as demonstrated through a substantial reduction in reaction time compared to conventionally heated reactor while providing appreciably high biodiesel yield. Moreover, the in situ water removal using silica-gel adsorbent could also facilitate achieving higher FFA conversion to fatty acid methyl ester (FAME). Owing to the occurrence of simultaneous transesterification of triglycerides present in goat tallow, overall 98.5wt.% FAME content was determined at optimal conditions in the product biodiesel which conformed to ASTM and EN biodiesel specifications.

R. Chakraborty; H. Sahu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Radioactivity and Radiation  

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Radioactivity and Radiation Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects Radioactivity and Radiation Discussion of radioactivity and radiation, uranium and radioactivity, radiological health risks of uranium isotopes and decay products. Radioactivity Radioactivity is the term used to describe the natural process by which some atoms spontaneously disintegrate, emitting both particles and energy as they transform into different, more stable atoms. This process, also called radioactive decay, occurs because unstable isotopes tend to transform into a more stable state. Radioactivity is measured in terms of disintegrations, or decays, per unit time. Common units of radioactivity

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341

Research Highlight  

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The Vertical Structure of Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ACRF SGP Revealed The Vertical Structure of Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ACRF SGP Revealed by 8 Years of Continuous Measurements Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Accepted to Journal of Climate, 2007. Figure 1. Cloud occurrence, coverage, radiative forcing, and radiation effects over a composite annual cycle that is derived by averaging all observations collected during a particular month for all years. a) cloud occurrence in 100 mb vertical bins, b) cloud coverage, c) infrared cloud radiative forcing in 100 mb vertical bins, d) solar cloud radiative forcing, e) net cloud radiative forcing, f,g,h) solar (dotted), IR (solid), and net (dashed) cloud radiative effect for TOA (f), atmosphere (g), and

342

Research Highlight  

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First Observation-Based Estimates of Cloud-Free Aerosol Radiative Forcing First Observation-Based Estimates of Cloud-Free Aerosol Radiative Forcing Across China Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Mean annual shortwave aerosol radiative forcing (SWARF) averaged across China. Spatial variation of the annual mean SW aerosol radiative forcing. Heavy loading of aerosols in China is widely known, but little is known about their impact on regional radiation budgets, which is often expressed as aerosol radiative forcing (ARF). Depending on their composition, aerosols can absorb a substantial amount of solar radiation, leading to a warming of the atmosphere and cooling of the surface. Many investigations have been made to characterize atmospheric aerosols and their radiative

343

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 507 (2003) 537540 Production of high power femtosecond terahertz radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 507 (2003) 537­540 Production of high power for Superconductor Photonics, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoko, Suita, Osaka 565-0871, Japan e Physics Department semiconductors or electro-optic crystals by high peak power lasers. For example, this was done by using an un

344

Environmental research on a modified in situ oil shale task process. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the progress of the US Department of Energy's Oil Shale Task Force in its research program at the Occidental Oil Shale, Inc. facility at Logan Wash, Colorado. More specifically, the Task Force obtained samples from Retort 3E and Retort 6 and submitted these samples to a variety of analyses. The samples collected included: crude oil (Retort 6); light oil (Retort 6); product water (Retort 6); boiler blowdown (Retort 6); makeup water (Retort 6); mine sump water; groundwater; water from Retorts 1 through 5; retort gas (Retort 6); mine air; mine dust; and spent shale core (Retort 3E). The locations of the sampling points and methods used for collection and storage are discussed in Chapter 2 (Characterization). These samples were then distributed to the various laboratories and universities participating in the Task Force. For convenience in organizing the data, it is useful to group the work into three categories: Characterization, Leaching, and Health Effects. While many samples still have not been analyzed and much of the data remains to be interpreted, there are some preliminary conclusions the Task Force feels will be helpful in defining future needs and establishing priorities. It is important to note that drilling agents other than water were used in the recovery of the core from Retort 3E. These agents have been analyzed (see Table 12 in Chapter 2) for several constituents of interest. As a result some of the analyses of this core sample and leachates must be considered tentative.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

LASER MATERIALS PROCESSING Wenwu Zhang, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

4-1 Chapter 34 LASER MATERIALS PROCESSING Wenwu Zhang, Ph.D. General Electric Global Research)34.1 OVERVIEW LASER is the acronym of light amplification by stimulated emission of radiation. Although regarded as one of the nontraditional processes, laser material processing (LMP) is not in its infancy anymore

Yao, Y. Lawrence

346

A new view of radiation-induced cancer: integrating short- and long-term processes. Part II: second cancer risk estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation dose calculations. An important goal of our model development is second cancer risk estimation

Shuryak, Igor; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Sachs, Rainer K.; Brenner, David J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Enhancing the heat transfer in a heat treatment furnace through improving the combustion process in the radiation tubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......predicted and measured data. The CFD simulations...methods to improve the heat transfer rate and provide quantitative data which can be used...important in the combustion and the heat transfer processes...models on hydrogen-hydrocarbon combustion modelling......

E. M. Elmabrouk; Y. Wu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Research Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Form Submit a New Research Highlight Sort Highlights Submitter Title Research Area Working Group Submission Date DOE Progress Reports Notable Research Findings for 2001-2006 Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database Research Highlights Summaries Research Highlights Members of ARM's science team are major contributors to radiation and cloud research. ARM investigators publish about 150 refereed journal articles per year, and ARM data are used in many studies published by other scientific organizations. These documented research efforts represent tangible evidence of ARM's contribution to advances in almost all areas of atmospheric radiation and cloud research. Below is a selection of summaries highlighting recently-published ARM research. The entire collection of ARM

349

RADIATION SENSITIVITY & PROCESSING OF DNA DAMAGE FOLLOWING LOW DOSES OF GAMMA-RAY ALPHA PARTICLES & HZE IRRADIATION OF NORMAL DSB REPAIR DEFICIENT CELLS  

SciTech Connect

Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) predominates in the repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) over homologous recombination (HR). NHEJ occurs throughout the cell cycle whereas HR occurs in late S/G2 due to the requirement of a sister chromatid (Rothkamm et al, Mol Cell Biol 23 5706-15 [2003]). To date evidence obtained with DSB repair deficient cells using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis has revealed the major pathway throughout all phases of the cell cycle for processing high dose induced DSBs is NHEJ (Wang et al, Oncogene 20 2212-24 (2001); Pluth et al, Cancer Res. 61 2649-55 [2001]). These findings however were obtained at high doses when on average >> 20-30 DSBs are formed per cell. The contribution of the repair pathways (NHEJ and HR) induced in response to DNA damage during the various phases of the cell cycle may depend upon the dose (the level of initial DSBs) especially since low levels of DSBs are induced at low dose. To date, low dose studies using NHEJ and HR deficient mutants have not been carried out to address this important question with radiations of different quality. The work presented here leads us to suggest that HR plays a relatively minor role in the repair of radiation-induced prompt DSBs. SSBs lead to the induction of DSBs which are associated specifically with S-phase cells consistent with the idea that they are formed at stalled replication forks in which HR plays a major role in repair. That DNA-PKcs is in some way involved in the repair of the precursors to replication-induced DSB remains an open question. Persistent non-DSB oxidative damage also leads to an increase in RAD51 positive DSBs. Both simple and complex non-DSB DNA damage may therefore contribute to indirect DSBs induced by ionising radiation at replication forks.

O'Neil, Peter

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The commercialization path of the Calderon technology for making a feedstock for steelmaking with assistance from DOE initially focused on making coke and work was done which proved that the Calderon technology is capable of making good coke for hard driving blast furnaces. U.S. Steel which participated in such demonstration felt that the Calderon technology would be more meaningful in lowering the costs of making steel by adapting it to the making of iron--thus obviating the need for coke. U.S. Steel and Calderon teamed up to jointly work together to demonstrate that the Calderon technology will produce in a closed system iron units from iron concentrate (ore) and coal competitively by eliminating pelletizing, sintering, coking and blast furnace operation. If such process steps could be eliminated, a huge reduction in polluting emissions and greenhouse gases (including CO{sub 2}) relating to steelmaking would ensue. Such reduction will restructure the steel industry away from the very energy-intensive steelmaking steps currently practiced and drastically reduce costs of making steel. The development of a technology to lower U.S. steelmaking costs and become globally competitive is a priority of major importance. Therefore, the development work which Calderon is conducting presently under this Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy becomes more crucial than ever. During the 3rd quarter of 2005 which the present report covers, virtually all the effort to advance the Calderon technology to make iron units was concentrated towards forming a team with a steelmaker who needs both iron units in the form of hot metal and a substitute for natural gas (SNG), both being major contributors to higher costs in steelmaking. Calderon felt that a very good candidate would be Steel Dynamics (SDI) by virtue that it operates a rotary hearth facility in Butler, Indiana that uses large amounts of natural gas to reduce briquettes made from ore and coal that they subsequently melt in a submerged arc furnace that is a large consumer of electric power. This facility is operated as a division of SDI under the name of Iron Dynamics (IDI). It is no secret that IDI has had and still has a great number of operational problems, including high cost for natural gas.

Albert Calderon

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

351

Research Highlight  

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AERI-ER at the SHEBA Ice Station: Far Infrared H2O Continuum AERI-ER at the SHEBA Ice Station: Far Infrared H2O Continuum Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Tobin, D.C., F.A. Best, P.D. Brown, S.A. Clough, R.G. Dedecker, R.G. Ellingson, R.K. Garcia, H.B. Howell, R.O. Knuteson, E.J. Mlawer, H.E. Revercomb, J.F. Short, P.F.W. van Delst, and V.P. Walden, 1999. "Downwelling spectral radiance observations at the SHEBA ice station: Water vapor continuum measurements from 17 to 26μm," JGR 104(D2): 2081-2092 Figure 1. Comparison of clear sky downwelling radiance spectra measured with the University of Wisconsin AERI system at the SGP CART site near Lamont, Oklahoma and with the extended range AERI at the SHEBA Ice Station,

352

Research Gallery  

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Research Gallery Research Gallery Inside the Museum Exhibitions Norris Bradbury Museum Lobby Defense Gallery Research Gallery History Gallery TechLab Virtual Exhibits invisible utility element Research Gallery Science serving society The Laboratory conducts leading-edge research in many areas of science and technology to help solve national problems related to energy, the environment, infrastructure, and health. Basic research conducted here enhances national defense and economic security. Exhibits you'll find in this gallery: Understanding Radiation LANSCE: Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Space Science Research Viewspace Environmental Monitoring and Research Nanotechnology: The Science of the Small Algae to Biofuels: Squeezing Power from Pond Scum Living with Wildfire: A Shared Community Experience

353

Molecular Pathways: Targeted ?-Particle Radiation Therapy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and profibrotic cytokines. Radiation-induced malignancy can...1-5 Gy). Kyoji Furukawa (Radiation Effect Research Foundation, Hiroshima, Japan) reviewed the Japanese atomic...late effects of ionizing radiation exposure at low/moderate...

Kwamena E. Baidoo; Kwon Yong; and Martin W. Brechbiel

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observational Evidence of Changes in Water Vapor, Clouds, and Radiation Observational Evidence of Changes in Water Vapor, Clouds, and Radiation Submitter: Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Dong, X., B. Xi, and P. Minnis, 2006: Observational Evidence of Changes in Water vapor, Clouds, and Radiation at the ARM SGP site. Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L19818,doi:10.1029/2006GL027132. Figure 1. This plot shows that atmospheric precipitable water vapor and downwelling infrared radiation decreased, but solar radiation increased at the SGP site from 1997 to 2004. The amount of water vapor, the dominant greenhouse gas, has a greater effect on infrared radiation than on solar. Figure 2. This plot shows that solar radiation at the surface increased

355

ANTARCTIC SEA ICE BIOLOGICAL PROCESSES, INTERACTIONS, AND VARIABILITY ANTARCTIC RESEARCH SERIES, VOLUME 73, PAGES 45-83  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effects of incoming UV radiation. In vivo DNA damage, solely attributable to recent ex- posure to UVB effects in a given aquatic plant community are rare. Lack of such knowledge presently hampers abilities SERIES, VOLUME 73, PAGES 45-83 , . : , i ICECOLORS '93: SPECTRAL UV RADIATION EFFECTS ON ANTARCTIC FRAZIL

Moline, Mark

356

Instrument Development F.P.J. Valero P. Pilewskie NASA Ames Research...  

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F.P.J. Valero P. Pilewskie NASA Ames Research Center Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 Radiative proces,ses in the atmosphere are at the heart of anthropogenically induced climatic...

357

Studies of acute and chronic radiation injury at the Biological and Medical Research Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 1970-1992: The JANUS Program Survival and Pathology Data  

SciTech Connect

A research reactor for exclusive use in experimental radiobiology was designed and built at Argonne National Laboratory in the 1960`s. It was located in a special addition to Building 202, which housed the Division of Biological and Medical Research. Its location assured easy access for all users to the animal facilities, and it was also near the existing gamma-irradiation facilities. The water-cooled, heterogeneous 200-kW(th) reactor, named JANUS, became the focal point for a range of radiobiological studies gathered under the rubic of {open_quotes}the JANUS program{close_quotes}. The program ran from about 1969 to 1992 and included research at all levels of biological organization, from subcellular to organism. More than a dozen moderate- to large-scale studies with the B6CF{sub 1} mouse were carried out; these focused on the late effects of whole-body exposure to gamma rays or fission neutrons, in matching exposure regimes. In broad terms, these studies collected data on survival and on the pathology observed at death. A deliberate effort was made to establish the cause of death. This archieve describes these late-effects studies and their general findings. The database includes exposure parameters, time of death, and the gross pathology and histopathology in codified form. A series of appendices describes all pathology procedures and codes, treatment or irradiation codes, and the manner in which the data can be accessed in the ORACLE database management system. A series of tables also presents summaries of the individual experiments in terms of radiation quality, sample sizes at entry, mean survival times by sex, and number of gross pathology and histopathology records.

Grahn, D.; Wright, B.J.; Carnes, B.A.; Williamson, F.S.; Fox, C.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation  

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Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Exposures Review of phenomenon appears in Radiation Research Pamela Sykes and Benjamin Blyth One concern of radiobiologists is the effect radiation exposure might have on nearby unirradiated cells. For example, when only a small fraction of cells are directly hit by radiation energy, are the surrounding unirradiated cells also at an increased risk of cancer? The term "radiation-induced bystander effect" is used to describe radiation-induced biological changes that occur in unirradiated cells within an irradiated cell population. Radiation-induced bystander effects have become established in the vernacular and are considered as an authentic radiation response. However, there is still no consensus on a precise definition of the term, which

359

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulating Mixed-Phase Clouds: Sensitivity to Ice Initiation Simulating Mixed-Phase Clouds: Sensitivity to Ice Initiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Sednev, I., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Menon, S., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: I Sednev, S Menon, and G McFarquhar. 2008. "Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussion 8: 11755-11819. The vertical structure and radiative properties of persistent low-level Arctic clouds depend on their microphysics, and thus, estimation of the relative significance of the microphysical processes that occur in these

360

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Method Simulates 3D Ice Crystal Growth Within Clouds New Method Simulates 3D Ice Crystal Growth Within Clouds Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Harrington JY, K Sulia, and H Morrison. 2013. "A method for adaptive habit prediction in bulk microphysical models. Part I: theoretical development." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(2), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-040.1. Harrington JY, K Sulia, and H Morrison. 2013. "A method for adaptive habit prediction in bulk microphysical models. Part II: parcel model corroboration." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(2), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-0152.1. A close-up of ice crystals. Ever noticed the different shapes of snowflakes sticking on the windowpane

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heating Up the Arctic: Most Complete Data Set Ever Collected Helps Heating Up the Arctic: Most Complete Data Set Ever Collected Helps Scientists Understand Aerosol Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ghan, S. J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: McFarquhar GM, S Ghan, J Verlinde, A Korolev, JW Strapp, B Schmid, JM Tomlinson, M Wolde, SD Brooks, D Cziczo, MK Dubey, JW Fan, C Flynn, I Gultepe, J Hubbe, MK Gilles, A Laskin, P Lawson, WR Leaitch, P Liu, XH Liu, D Lubin, C Mazzoleni, AM Macdonald, RC Moffet, H Morrison, M Ovchinnikov, MD Shupe, DD Turner, SC Xie, A Zelenyuk, K Bae, M Freer, and A Glen. 2011. "Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign: the impact of Arctic aerosols on clouds." Bulletin of the American Meteorological

362

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

All Mixed Up-Probing Large and Small Scale Turbulence Structures in All Mixed Up-Probing Large and Small Scale Turbulence Structures in Continental Stratocumulus Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fang, M., University of Miami Albrecht, B. A., University of Miami Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Fang M, BA Albrecht, VP Ghate, and P Kollias. 2013. "Turbulence in continental stratocumulus, Part I: External forcings and turbulence structures." Boundary-Layer Meteorology, 149(454), doi:10.1007/s10546-013-9873-3. Coherent structures of the vertical velocity (left panels) and the energy dissipation rate (right panels) in updraft region during the day (a, b), night (c, d), and for entire 16 hours (e, f) of continental stratocumulus. Continental stratocumulus clouds are frequently observed in the cold side

363

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Single-Scattering Properties of Aggregates of Plates Single-Scattering Properties of Aggregates of Plates Download a printable PDF Submitter: Um, J., University of Illinois, Urbana McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Um J and GM McFarquhar. 2009. "Single-scattering properties of aggregates of plates." Quarterly Journal Royal Meteorological Society, 135(639), 10.1002/qj.378. Aggregates of plates imaged by Cloud Particle Imager (left panel) and idealized geometry of aggregates of plates with AI=0.61 (right panel). Asymmetry parameter (g) at λ=0.55 μm of 80 different aggregates of seven 100 μm plates attached together, as functions of (a) AI, (b) 1-AR, and (c) An. The correlation coefficient and constants for a fitting equation,

364

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shallow Clouds Make the Case for Remote Sensing Instrumentation Shallow Clouds Make the Case for Remote Sensing Instrumentation Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: McFarlane, S. A., and W. W. Grabowski (2007). Optical properties of shallow tropical cumuli derived from ARM ground-based remote sensing, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, L06808, doi:10.1029/2006GL028767. In this figure, the lines indicate theoretical calculations of cloud droplet size for clouds with various droplet concentrations in which no mixing occurs. The cloud droplet size shows significant variability with height. Traditionally, observations of air mixing and cloud droplet size come from in situ aircraft probes, which collect data at very high horizontal

365

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Accuracy in Liquid Water Path Retrievals Improved Accuracy in Liquid Water Path Retrievals Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Clouds with Low Optical [Water] Depths (CLOWD) Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Turner, D.D., 2007: Improved ground-based liquid water path retrievals using a combined infrared and microwave approach. J. Geophys. Res., 112, D15204, doi:10.1029/2007JD008530. Turner, D.D., A.M. Vogelmann, R. Austin, J.C. Barnard, K. Cady-Pereira, C. Chiu, S.A. Clough, C.J. Flynn, M.M. Khaiyer, J.C. Liljegren, K. Johnson, B. Lin, C.N. Long, A. Marshak, S.Y. Matrosov, S.A. McFarlane, M.A. Miller, Q. Min, P. Minnis, W. O'Hirok, Z. Wang, and W. Wiscombe, 2007: Thin liquid water clouds: Their importance and our challenge. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc.,

366

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Survey over West Africa Reveals Climate Impact of Mid-Level Clouds Cloud Survey over West Africa Reveals Climate Impact of Mid-Level Clouds Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Bouniol D, F Couvreux, PH Kamsu-Tamo, M Leplay, F Guichard, F Favot, and EJ O'Connor. 2012. "Diurnal and seasonal cycles of cloud occurrences, types, and radiative impact over West Africa." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 51(3), doi:10.1175/JAMC-D-11-051.1. Clouds occurring at different levels in the sky have varying impacts on Earth's energy budget. Clouds with bases between five and seven kilometers above the Earth's surface, also known as mid-level clouds, occur over West Africa all year-round and may have major impacts on the Earth's energy budget,

367

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Carbon Reduction of Snow Albedo Black Carbon Reduction of Snow Albedo Submitter: Kirchstetter, T. W., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Hadley OL and TW Kirchstetter. 2012. "Black carbon reduction of snow albedo." Nature Climate Change, , doi:10.1038/nclimate1433. Spectrally weighted snow albedo over the 300-2,500 nm solar spectrum: derived from our experiments (dots, 1 standard deviation) and modelled using SNICAR (shaded bands). Upper and lower boundaries of the shaded bands correspond to modelled albedo assuming BC mass absorption cross-sections, at 550 nm, of 7.5 and 15 m2/g, respectively. Climate models indicate that the reduction of surface albedo caused by black carbon contamination of snow contributes to global warming and

368

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modification of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer by a Small Island: Modification of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer by a Small Island: Observations from Nauru Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Matthews, S., J. M. Hacker, J. Cole, J. Hare, C. N. Long, and R. M. Reynolds, (2007): Modification of the atmospheric boundary layer by a small island: observations from Nauru, MWR, Vol. 135, No. 3, pages 891–905. Figure 1. Illustration of daytime heating producing a thermal internal boundary layer effect over Nauru, which in turn produces cumulous clouds above the boundary layer. Figure 2. Illustration of Nauru heat-island produced by convective rolls forming cloud streets. Figure 3. Satellite images of Nauru on December 13, 2000 showing the cloud

369

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

When It Rains, It Doesn't Always Pour When It Rains, It Doesn't Always Pour Download a printable PDF Submitter: Penide, G., Laboratoire d\\\'Optique Atmospherique Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Penide G, V Kumar, A Protat, and P May. 2013. "Statistics of drop size distribution parameters and rain rates for stratiform and convective precipitation during the North Australian wet season." Monthly Weather Review, 141(9), 10.1175 /mwr-d-12-00262.1. Measurements from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement facility at Darwin, Australia, helped scientists determine how drop size distribution and rain rates are affected by larger-scale weather patterns. Rainfall comes in a variety of forms: mist, drizzle, showers, downpours. The type and frequency of rainfall usually depends on the season and

370

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantifying the Number of Independent Pieces of Information in Profiles Quantifying the Number of Independent Pieces of Information in Profiles Download a printable PDF Submitter: Crewell, S., University of Cologne Loehnert, U., University of Cologne Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Ebell, K., University of Cologne Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Lohnert U, DD Turner, and S Crewell. 2009. "Ground-based temperature and humidity profiling using spectral infrared and microwave observations. Part I: Simulated retrieval performance in clear-sky conditions." Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 48(5), 1017-1032. Crewell S, K Ebell, U Loehnert, and DD Turner. 2009. "Can liquid water profiles be retrieved from passive microwave zenith observations?"

371

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detangling Convective Oscillations at ARM Tropical Western Pacific Site: Detangling Convective Oscillations at ARM Tropical Western Pacific Site: Manus Submitter: Wang, Y., Department of Geography Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Mather, J. H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Liu, X., Institute of Earth Environment Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Wang Y, C Long, J Mather, and X Liu. 2010. "Convective signals from surface measurements at ARM Tropical Western Pacific site: Manus." Climate Dynamics, , doi:10.1007/s00382-009-0736-z. Figure 1: (A) The time series includes the clear-sky shortwave (SW) flux (blue) and the all-sky SW flux (black) over Manus. The green line indicates a 60-day running mean. (B) Wavelet power (WP) of CRF (color shading) with

372

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparisons Between Radiosondes and Remote Sensors During the 2004 NSA Comparisons Between Radiosondes and Remote Sensors During the 2004 NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment Submitter: Westwater, E. R., University of Colorado Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Mattioli, V, ER Westwater, D Cimini, JS Liljegren, BM Lesht, SI Gutman, and FJ Schmidlin. 2007. "Analysis of radiosonde and ground-based remotely sensed PWV data from the 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology 243: 415-431. Description of radiosondes launched during the 2004 NSA Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment. Dual-radiosonde launch of the Vaisala RS90 and Chilled Mirror radiosondes is pictured here.

373

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Microwave Radiometer Performance in Alaska Evaluation of Microwave Radiometer Performance in Alaska Submitter: Liljegren, J. C., Argonne National Laboratory Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties, Radiative Processes Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 In order to determine the extent to which the ARM microwave radiometers would need to be modified to accommodate Arctic operations, an instrument designed for the Tropical Western Pacific was deployed at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks and continuously operated from 14 December 1995 through 20 June 1996 with the assistance of North Slope Site Scientist Knut Stamnes and Deputy Site Scientist Abdul Alkezweeny. Time series plots of the data are presented in Figure 1.

374

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Simple Stochastic Model for Generating Broken Cloud Optical Depth and A Simple Stochastic Model for Generating Broken Cloud Optical Depth and Cloud Top Height Fields Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Prigarin, S, and A Marshak. 2008. "A simple stochastic model for generating broken cloud optical depth and cloud top height fields." Journal of Atmospheric Sciences, in press. Fig. 1. A 68-km by 68-km region in Brazil centered at 17o S and 42o W collected on August 9, 2001, at 1015 local time. The solar zenith angle 410; the solar azimuth angle 23o (from the top). (a) moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) true color red, green, blue (RGB) 1-km

375

RHOBOT: Radiation hardened robotics  

SciTech Connect

A survey of robotic applications in radioactive environments has been conducted, and analysis of robotic system components and their response to the varying types and strengths of radiation has been completed. Two specific robotic systems for accident recovery and nuclear fuel movement have been analyzed in detail for radiation hardness. Finally, a general design approach for radiation-hardened robotics systems has been developed and is presented. This report completes this project which was funded under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program.

Bennett, P.C.; Posey, L.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Protecting Vulnerable Research Subjects in Critical Care Trials: Enhancing the Informed Consent Process and Recommendations for Safeguards  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although critically ill patients represent a vulnerable group of individuals, guidelines in research ethics assert that ethically acceptable research may proceed with such vulnerable subjects if additional safeguards

Henry Silverman

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cumuli Impact on Solar Radiation at Surface: Spectral Changes Cumuli Impact on Solar Radiation at Surface: Spectral Changes Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Kassianov E, J Barnard, LK Berg, CN Long, and C Flynn. 2011. "Shortwave spectral radiative forcing of cumulus clouds from surface observations." Geophysical Research Letters, 38, L07801, doi:10.1029/2010GL046282. Figure 1. Normalized total cloud radiative forcing and its direct and diffuse components as a function of wavelength. Typically, under cloudy conditions, radiative transfer parameterizations in climate models have been evaluated by calculating the total cloud impact on

378

Publication of New Atomic Bomb Radiation Dosimetry System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Atomic bomb dosimetry studies. The Radiation Effects Research Foundation Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02)

379

Research Directed at Developing a Classical Theory to Describe Isotope Separation of Polyatomic Molecules Illuminated by Intense Infrared Radiation. Final Report for period May 7, 1979 to September 30, 1979; Extension December 31, 1997  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This final report describes research on the theory of isotope separation produced by the illumination of polyatomic molecules by intense infrared laser radiation. This process is investigated by treating the molecule, sulfur hexafluoride, as a system of seven classical particles that obey the Newtonian equations of motion. A minicomputer is used to integrate these differential equations. The particles are acted on by interatomic forces, and by the time-dependent electric field of the laser. We have a very satisfactory expression for the interaction of the laser and the molecule which is compatible with infrared absorption and spectroscopic data. The interatomic potential is capable of improvement, and progress on this problem is still being made. We have made several computer runs of the dynamical behavior of the molecule using a reasonably good model for the interatomic force law. For the laser parameters chosen, we find that typically the molecule passes quickly through the resonance region into the quasi-continuum and even well into the real continuum before dissociation actually occurs. When viewed on a display terminal, the motions are exceedingly complex. As an aid to the visualization of the process, we have made a number of 16 mm movies depicting a three-dimensional representation of the motion of the seven particles. These show even more clearly the enormous complexity of the motions, and make clear the desirability of finding ways of characterizing the motion in simple ways without giving all of the numerical detail. One of the ways to do this is to introduce statistical parameters such as a temperature associated with the distribution of kinetic energies of the single particle. We have made such an analysis of our data runs, and have found favorable indications that such methods will prove useful in keeping track of the dynamical histories.

Lamb, W. E. Jr.

1981-12-00T23:59:59.000Z

380

Alpha Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Application of Improved Radiation Modeling to General Circulation Models  

SciTech Connect

This research has accomplished its primary objectives of developing accurate and efficient radiation codes, validating them with measurements and higher resolution models, and providing these advancements to the global modeling community to enhance the treatment of cloud and radiative processes in weather and climate prediction models. A critical component of this research has been the development of the longwave and shortwave broadband radiative transfer code for general circulation model (GCM) applications, RRTMG, which is based on the single-column reference code, RRTM, also developed at AER. RRTMG is a rigorously tested radiation model that retains a considerable level of accuracy relative to higher resolution models and measurements despite the performance enhancements that have made it possible to apply this radiation code successfully to global dynamical models. This model includes the radiative effects of all significant atmospheric gases, and it treats the absorption and scattering from liquid and ice clouds and aerosols. RRTMG also includes a statistical technique for representing small-scale cloud variability, such as cloud fraction and the vertical overlap of clouds, which has been shown to improve cloud radiative forcing in global models. This development approach has provided a direct link from observations to the enhanced radiative transfer provided by RRTMG for application to GCMs. Recent comparison of existing climate model radiation codes with high resolution models has documented the improved radiative forcing capability provided by RRTMG, especially at the surface, relative to other GCM radiation models. Due to its high accuracy, its connection to observations, and its computational efficiency, RRTMG has been implemented operationally in many national and international dynamical models to provide validated radiative transfer for improving weather forecasts and enhancing the prediction of global climate change.

Michael J Iacono

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

382

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

383

Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance  

SciTech Connect

This document presents guidance for implementing the process that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) will use for assuming perpetual responsibility for a closed uranium mill tailings site. The transition process specifically addresses sites regulated under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) but is applicable in principle to the transition of sites under other regulatory structures, such as the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program.

none,

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Radiation Sterilization of Prototype Military Foods. III. Pork Loin  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Spearman-KMirber estimation of an LD5o...independent of the dose-response...with- 610 RADIATION STERILIZATION...values with radiation dose, and the fluctuating...commercial radiation process for...Werkowski. 1968. Estimation of radiation...

Abe Anellis; D. Berkowitz; C. Jarboe; H. M. El-Bisi

1969-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Spring, 2009 ACS Process Spectroscopy/Society for Applied Spectroscopy Meeting Topic: Discussion of current research into insitu chemical sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Discussion of current research into insitu chemical sensors Speaker: Dr. Karl Booksh, University in chemometrics and sensor research. He was previously the codirector of Arizona Applied Nanosensors. Abstract: The theme of the Booksh research group is the development of insitu chemical sensors

Taber, Douglass

386

Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (Poster)  

SciTech Connect

SunShot Initiative awardee posters describing the different technologies within the four subprograms of the DOE Solar Program (Photovoltaics, Concentrating Solar Power, Soft Costs, and Systems Integration).

Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.; Reda, I.; Dooraghi, M.; Habte, A.; Kutchenreiter, M.; Wilcox, S.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Research departments Materials Research Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research reactor and X- radiation from the synchrotron facilities in Hamburg and Grenoble. In this con-parameter experiments in RERAF. Systems Analysis Department The objective of the research is to de- velop and apply are systems reliability, organisation, toxi- cology, informatics, simulation methods, work studies, economics

388

JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 93, NO. All, PAGES 12,817-12,825, NOVEMBER 1, 1988 The Polarization of EscapingTerrestrial Continuum Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Polarization of EscapingTerrestrial Continuum Radiation D. A. GURNETT, W. CALVERT,AND R. L. HUFF Departmentof, Japan PlasmawavemeasurementsfromtheDE 1(DynamicsExplorer1)spacecraftareusedto determinethe polarization of an escapingterrestrialcontinuum radiation event that occurredon March 2, 1982.The sourceof the radiationwasdeterminedby

Gurnett, Donald A.

389

You are here: OUP USA Home > U.S. General Catalog > Atmospheric Science > Climatology Radiation and Cloud Processes in the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

You are here: OUP USA Home > U.S. General Catalog > Atmospheric Science > Climatology Radiation and long-range levels. The author here offers a systematic discussion of the transfer of solar and thermal important topics in atmospheric radiation, cloud physics, and thermal equilibrium. Aspects

Liou, K. N.

390

A Prototyping Environment for Research on Human-Machine Interfaces in Process Control: Use of Microsoft WPF for Microworld and Distributed Control System Development  

SciTech Connect

Operators of critical processes, such as nuclear power production, must contend with highly complex systems, procedures, and regulations. Developing human-machine interfaces (HMIs) that better support operators is a high priority for ensuring the safe and reliable operation of critical processes. Human factors engineering (HFE) provides a rich and mature set of tools for evaluating the performance of HMIs, but the set of tools for developing and designing HMIs is still in its infancy. Here we propose that Microsoft Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) is well suited for many roles in the research and development of HMIs for process control.

Roger Lew; Ronald L. Boring; Thomas A. Ulrich

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Everything in Its Place: Researchers Identify Brain Cells Used to Categorize Findings Shed Light on the Brain Processes Behind Learning and Memory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Everything in Its Place: Researchers Identify Brain Cells Used to Categorize Images Findings Shed Light on the Brain Processes Behind Learning and Memory Boston, MA-August 27,2006-Socks in the sock in youth. But what parts of the brain are used to encode such categories as socks, shirts, or any other

Freedman, David J.

392

High-School Projects at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (2011) Brandon Avila (Allendale Columbia) researched Natural Language Processing (NLP) for extracting information from LLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Columbia) researched Natural Language Processing (NLP) for extracting information from LLE documentation generator (MTG) for the OMEGA Laser System on a state-of- the-art programmable logic device as a replacement for the previous MTG that uses 20-year-old discrete-circuit technology. The MTG synchronizes all the triggers

Portman, Douglas

393

Post-genomic science: cross-disciplinary and large-scale collaborative research and its organizational and technological challenges for the scientific research process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...organizations will have to consider the reform of academic funding and reward...Proc. HealthGrid, Studies in Health Technology and Informatics 112...behalf of the Subcommittee of the Health and Environmental Research Advisory...gender and divisions of infant care. Soc. Probl. 43, 219-234...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Processing Research snd Development of Green Polymer Nanoclay Composites Containing a Polyhydroxybutyrate, Vinyl Acetates, and Modified Montmorillonite Clay.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this research was to determine the feasibility of direct melt-blending (intercalation) montmorillonite nanoclay to polyhydroxybutyrate along with vinyl acetate, at different weight (more)

McKirahan, James N. Jr.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

The flying radiation case  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos foil implosion program has the goal of producing an intense, high-energy density x-ray source by converting the energy of a magnetically imploded plasma into radiation and material energy. One of the methods for converting the plasma energy into thermal energy and radiation and utilizing it for experiments is called the flying radiation case (FRC). In this paper the authors shall model the FRC and provide a physical description of the processes involved. An analytic model of a planar FRC in the hydrodynamic approximation is used to describe the assembly and shock heating of a central cushion by a conducting liner driver. The results are also used to benchmark a hydrodynamics code for modeling an FRC. They then use a radiation-hydrodynamics computational model to explore the effects of radiation production and transport when a gold plasma assembles on a CH cushion. Results are presented for the structure and evolution of the radiation hohlraum.

Brownell, J.H.; Bowers, R.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Applied Theoretical and Computational Physics Div.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Proceedings of the 2009 Industrial Engineering Research Conference Technology Assessment for an Inventory Management Process in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, short shelf lives, and a large number of stock keeping units (SKUs). The processes used to track for an Inventory Management Process in a Hospital Unit Angelica Burbano, Behlul Saka, Ronald Rardin, Manuel process in a hospital unit. In particular we will refer to implantable devices within a catheterization

Rossetti, Manuel D.

397

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Wednesday, 25 April 2007 00:00 Researchers at...

398

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Seeding Yields High-Power Coherent Terahertz Radiation Print Researchers at Berkeley Lab have been exploring the ways coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) is generated in...

399

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect

The following research programs from the Center for Radiological Research of Columbia University are described: Design and development of a new wall-less ultra miniature proportional counter for nanodosimetry; some recent measurements of ionization distributions for heavy ions at nanometer site sizes with a wall-less proportional counter; a calculation of exciton energies in periodic systems with helical symmetry: application to a hydrogen fluoride chain; electron energy-loss function in polynucleotide and the question of plasmon excitation; a non-parametric, microdosimetric-based approach to the evaluation of the biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation; high-LET radiation risk assessment at medium doses; high-LET radiobiological effects: increased lesion severity or increased lesion proximity; photoneutrons generated by high energy medical linacs; the biological effectiveness of neutrons; implications for radiation protection; molecular characterization of oncogenes induced by neutrons; and the inverse dose-rate effect for oncogenic transformation by charged particles is LET dependent.

Hall, E.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology  

SciTech Connect

Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a multidisciplenary blend of physics, chemistry and biology aimed at understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. The focus is increased on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights of the program from the past year are described. A mathematical model describing the production of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA as a function radiation quality has been completed. For the first time Monte Carlo techniques have been used to obtain directly the spatial distribution of DNA moieties altered by radiation. This information was obtained by including the transport codes a realistic description of the electronic structure of DNA. We have investigated structure activity relationships for the potential oncogenicity of a new generation of bioreductive drugs that function as hypoxic cytotoxins. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the inverse dose rate effect, whereby medium LET radiations actually produce an c effect when the dose is protracted, is now at a point where the basic mechanisms are reasonably understood and the complex interplay between dose, dose rate and radiation quality which is necessary for the effect to be present can now be predicted at least in vitro. In terms of early radiobiological damage, a quantitative link has been established between basic energy deposition and locally multiply damaged sites, the radiochemical precursor of DNA double strand breaks; specifically, the spatial and energy deposition requirements necessary to form LMDs have been evaluated. For the first time, a mechanically understood biological fingerprint'' of high-LET radiation has been established. Specifically measurement of the ratio of inter-to intra-chromosomal aberrations produces a unique signature from alpha-particles or neutrons.

Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Feasibility of Ceramic Membranes in Lignocellulosic Processing: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA number CRD-06-00198  

SciTech Connect

NREL will conduct field trials in their biomass process pilot plant using CeraMem developmental membranes and system supplied by CeraMem.

Schell, D. J.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cotton-Ball Clouds Contained Download a printable PDF Submitter: Berg, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life...

403

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Modified Scheme for Shallow Convection with CuP Download a printable PDF Submitter: Berg, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working...

404

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MBL Cloud Properties Derived from the Azores-AMF Observations Submitter: Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working Group(s):...

405

Proposal Process  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testbed Results Current Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and Conditions Dark Fiber Testbed Performance (perfSONAR) Software & Tools Development Partnerships...

406

Reducing Plug and Process Loads for a Large Scale, Low Energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility; Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper documents the design and operational plug and process load energy efficiency measures needed to allow a large scale office building to reach ultra high efficiency building goals. The appendices of this document contain a wealth of documentation pertaining to plug and process load design in the RSF, including a list of equipment was selected for use.

Lobato, C.; Pless, S.; Sheppy, M.; Torcellini, P.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Photolytic Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Photolytic processes use the energy in sunlight to separate water into hydrogen and oxygen. These processes are in the very early stages of research but offer long-term potential for sustainable...

408

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from naturally occurring radioactive materials such as uranium, thorium, radon, and certain forms of potassium and carbon. The air we breathe contains radon, the food we eat contains uranium and thorium from the soil, and our bodies contain radioactive forms of potassium and carbon. Cosmic radiation from the sun also contributes to our natural radiation dose. We also receive radiation doses from man-made sources such as X-rays, nuclear medical procedures, power plants, smoke detectors and older television sets. Some people, such as nuclear plant operators, flight crews, and nuclear medicine staff may also receive an occupational radiation dose.

409

ARM Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2004  

SciTech Connect

Like a rock that slowly wears away beneath the pressure of a waterfall, planet earth?s climate is almost imperceptibly changing. Glaciers are getting smaller, droughts are lasting longer, and extreme weather events like fires, floods, and tornadoes are occurring with greater frequency. Why? Part of the answer is clouds and the amount of solar radiation they reflect or absorb. These two factors clouds and radiative transfer represent the greatest source of error and uncertainty in the current generation of general circulation models used for climate research and simulation. The U.S. Global Change Research Act of 1990 established an interagency program within the Executive Office of the President to coordinate U.S. agency-sponsored scientific research designed to monitor, understand, and predict changes in the global environment. To address the need for new research on clouds and radiation, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) established the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. As part of the DOE?s overall Climate Change Science Program, a primary objective of the ARM Program is improved scientific understanding of the fundamental physics related to interactions between clouds and radiative feedback processes in the atmosphere.

Voyles, J.

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM`s highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM`s experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

Patrinos, A.A. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ellingson, R.G. [Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Atmospheric radiation measurement: A program for improving radiative forcing and feedback in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a key element of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) global change research strategy. ARM represents a long-term commitment to conduct comprehensive studies of the spectral atmospheric radiative energy balance profile for a wide range of cloud conditions and surface types, and to develop the knowledge necessary to improve parameterizations of radiative processes under various cloud regimes for use in general circulation models (GCMs) and related models. The importance of the ARM program is a apparent from the results of model assessments of the impact on global climate change. Recent studies suggest that radiatively active trace gas emissions caused by human activity can lead to a global warming of 1.5 to 4.5 degrees Celsius and to important changes in water availability during the next century (Cess, et al. 1989). These broad-scale changes can be even more significant at regional levels, where large shifts in temperature and precipitation patterns are shown to occur. However, these analyses also indicate that considerable uncertainty exists in these estimates, with the manner in which cloud radiative processes are parameterized among the most significant uncertainty. Thus, although the findings have significant policy implications in assessment of global and regional climate change, their uncertainties greatly influence the policy debate. ARM's highly focused observational and analytical research is intended to accelerate improvements and reduce key uncertainties associated with the way in which GCMs treat cloud cover and cloud characteristics and the resulting radiative forcing. This paper summarizes the scientific context for ARM, ARM's experimental approach, and recent activities within the ARM program.

Patrinos, A.A. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)); Renne, D.S.; Stokes, G.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Ellingson, R.G. (Maryland Univ., College Park, MD (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Proceedings of the third conference on radiation protection and dosimetry  

SciTech Connect

The Third Conference on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry was held during October 21--24, 1991, at the Sheraton Plaza Hotel in Orlando, Florida. This meeting was designed with the objectives of promoting communication among applied, research, regulatory, and standards personnel involved in radiation protection, and providing them with sufficient information to evaluate their programs. To meet these objectives, a technical program consisting of more than 75 invited and contributed oral presentations encompassing all aspects of radiation protection was prepared. General topics considered in the technical session included external dosimetry, internal dosimetry, instruments, accident dosimetry, regulations and standards, research advances, and applied program experience. In addition, special sessions were held to afford attendees the opportunity to make short presentations of recent work or to discuss topics of general interest. Individual reports are processed separately on the database.

Swaja, R.E.; Sims, C.S.; Casson, W.H. [eds.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Invisible Giants in the Sky Invisible Giants in the Sky Download a printable PDF Submitter: Ovink, J., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Kassianov E, M Pekour, and J Barnard. 2012. "Aerosols in central California: Unexpectedly large contribution of coarse mode to aerosol radiative forcing." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L20806, doi:10.1029/2012GL053469. Photo courtesy of the U.S. National Park Service Daily averaged values of (a, b) the direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) and (c, d) aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the top-of-atmosphere calculated for the "original" aerosol optical properties (blue) and

414

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Online Literature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Online Literature Online Literature Journals, Books and other Publications Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute Chornobyl Center for Nuclear Safety Radioactive Waste and Radioecology "Insight" Magazine Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) News: Aiming at an information center on low dose radiation research Health Physics International Journal of Radiation Biology Iranian Journal of Radiation Research Journal of Radiological Protection National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Radiation Research U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge Reports Animal Cancer Tests and Human Cancer Risk Assessment: A Broad Perspective Effects of Ionizing Radiation: Atomic Bomb Survivors and Their Children (1945-1995) Health Effects of Exposure to Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation: BEIR

415

Danger radiations  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Le confrencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrle des zones et les prcautions prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

416

2007 Radiation & Climate GRC ( July 29-August 3, 2007)  

SciTech Connect

The theme of the fifth Gordon Research Conference on Radiation and Climate is 'Integrating multiscale measurements and models for key climate questions'. The meeting will feature lectures, posters, and discussion regarding these issues. The meeting will focus on insights from new types of satellite and in situ data and from new approaches to modeling processes in the climate system. The program on measurements will highlight syntheses of new satellite data on cloud, aerosols, and chemistry and syntheses of satellite and sub-orbital observations from field programs. The program on modeling will address both the evaluation of cloud-resolving and regional aerosol models using new types of measurements and the evidence for processes and physics missing from global models. The Conference will focus on two key climate questions. First, what factors govern the radiative interactions of clouds and aerosols with regional and global climate? Second, how well do we understand the interaction of radiation with land surfaces and with the cryosphere?

William Collins

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Running head: PHYLOTA BROWSER The PhyLoTA Browser: Processing GenBank for Molecular Phylogenetics Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, USA; E-mail: duhong@iastate.edu (D.C.); andre@wehe.us (A the issues involved in parsing and processing this database to optimize its utility for molecular in the WGS (whole genome shotgun) sequence division stemming from 787 registered genome projects

Sanderson, Mike

418

NREL: Biomass Research - Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Staff Research Staff NREL's biomass research staff includes: Management team Technology and research areas Research support areas. Search the NREL staff directory to contact any of the research staff listed below. Management Team The biomass management team is composed of: Thomas Foust, National Bioenergy Center Director Robert Baldwin, Principal Scientist, Thermochemical Conversion Phil Pienkos, Applied Science Principal Group Manager Kim Magrini, Catalysis and Thermochemical Sciences and Engineering R&D Principal Group Manager Jim McMillan, Biochemical Process R&D Principal Group Manager Rich Bain, Principal Engineer, Thermochemical Sciences Mark Davis, Thermochemical Platform Lead Richard Elander, Biochemical Platform Lead Dan Blake, Emeritus Back to Top Technology and Research Areas

419

Examples of the use of PSA in the design process and to support modifications at two research reactors  

SciTech Connect

Many, if not most, of the world`s commercial nuclear power plants have been the subject of plant-specific probabilistic safety assessments (PSA). A growing number of other nuclear facilities as well as other types of industrial installations have been the focus of plant-specific PSAs. Such studies have provided valuable information concerning the nature of the risk of the individual facility and have been used to identify opportunities to manage that risk. This paper explores the risk management activities associated with two research reactors in the United States as a demonstration of the versatility of the use of PSA to support risk-related decision making.

Johnson, D.H.; Bley, D.C.; Lin, J.C. [PLG, Inc., Newport Beach, CA (United States); Ramsey, C.T.; Linn, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Molecular mechanisms of radiation carcinogenesis and the linear, non-threshold dose response model of radiation risk estimation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recent research in molecular radiation carcinogenesis is reviewed with the specific aim of exploring the implications this research may have on the dose response relationship of radiation-induced cancer at low...

K. R. Trott; M. Rosemann

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ARM Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2005  

SciTech Connect

Through the ARM Program, the DOE funded the development of several highly instrumented ground stations for studying cloud formation processes and their influence on radiative transfer, and for measuring other parameters that determine the radiative properties of the atmosphere. This scientific infrastructure, and resultant data archive, is a valuable national and international asset for advancing scientific knowledge of Earth systems. In fiscal year (FY) 2003, the DOE designated ARM sites as a national scientific user facility: the ARM Climate Research (ACRF). The ACRF has enormous potential to contribute to a wide range interdisciplinary science in areas such as meteorology, atmospheric aerosols, hydrology, biogeochemical cycling, and satellite validation, to name only a few.

J. Voyles

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

UNIVERSITY RESEARCH PROGRAMS IN ROBOTICS, TECHNOLOGIES FOR MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS IN DIRECTED STOCKPILE WORK RADIATION AND ENGINEERING CAMPAIGNS - 2005-06 FINAL ANNUAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The research performed by the University of Florida (UF) is directed to the development of technologies that can be utilized at a micro-scale in varied environments. Work is focused on micro-scale energy systems, visualization, and mechanical devices. This work will impact the NNSA need related to micro-assembly operations. The URPR activities are executed in a University environment, yet many applications of the resulting technologies may be classified or highly restrictive in nature. The NNSA robotics technologists apply an NNSA needs focus to the URPR research, and actively work to transition relevant research into the deployment projects in which they are involved. This provides a Research to Development to Application structure within which innovative research has maximum opportunity for impact without requiring URPR researchers to be involved in specific NNSA projects. URPR researchers need to be aware of the NNSA applications in order to ensure the research being conducted has relevance, the URPR shall rely upon the NNSA sites for direction.

James S. Tulenko; Dean Schoenfeld; David Hintenlang; Carl Crane; Shannon Ridgeway; Jose Santiago; Charles Scheer

2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

423

Radiation Source Replacement Workshop  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes a Radiation Source Replacement Workshop in Houston Texas on October 27-28, 2010, which provided a forum for industry and researchers to exchange information and to discuss the issues relating to replacement of AmBe, and potentially other isotope sources used in well logging.

Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Moran, Traci L.; Bond, Leonard J.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Radiative Effects of Cloud Inhomogeneity and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiative Effects of Cloud Inhomogeneity and Geometric Association Over the Tropical Western Pacific Warm Pool X. Wu National Center for Atmospheric Research (a) Boulder, Colorado...

425

Solar Position Algorithm for Solar Radiation Applications (Revised...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Afshin Michael Andreas afshinandreas@nrel.gov (303)384-6383 Measurement & Instrumentation Team Solar Radiation Research Laboratory National...

426

College of Health Sciences RAS Radiation Sciences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; excitation and ionization processes; selected nuclear reactions; basic radiation detection and dosimetry, and nuclear medical physics. Prereq or concur: RM/PHY 472G or consent of instructor. (Same as PHY/RM 546.) RAS 601 ADVANCED RADIATION DOSIMETRY. (2

MacAdam, Keith

427

Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

Fix, N. J.

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

428

FRANK SHI's Group at UC Irvine: Current Research Activities www.eng.uci.edu/faculty_research/profile/fgshi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.eng.uci.edu/faculty_research/profile/fgshi Optoelectronic Devices & Materials Photonic glass with strong gamma radiation resistance Photonic glass transformations & other materials processing fundamentals Optoelectronic Device Packaging Materials Epoxy for chip bonding Conductive pastes for solar cells Composite materials design modeling White LED

Mease, Kenneth D.

429

Use of phenomena identification and ranking (PIRT) process in research related to design certification of the AP600 advanced passive light water reactor (LWR)  

SciTech Connect

The AP600 LWR is a new advanced passive design that has been submitted to the USNRC for design certification. Within the certification process the USNRC will perform selected system thermal hydraulic response audit studies to help confirm parts of the vendor`s safety analysis submittal. Because of certain innovative design features of the safety systems, new experimental data and related advances in the system thermal hydraulic analysis computer code are being developed by the USNRC. The PIRT process is being used to focus the experimental and analytical work to obtain a sufficient and cost effective research effort. The objective of this paper is to describe the application and most significant results of the PIRT process, including several innovative features needed in the application to accommodate the short design certification schedule. The short design certification schedule has required that many aspects of the USNRC experimental and analytical research be performed in parallel, rather than in series as was normal for currently operating LWRS. This has required development and use of management techniques that focus and integrate the various diverse parts of the research. The original PIRTs were based on inexact knowledge of an evolving reactor design, and concentrated on the new passive features of the design. Subsequently, the PIRTs have evolved in two more stages as the design became more firm and experimental and analytical data became available. A fourth and final stage is planned and in progress to complete the PIRT development. The PIRTs existing at the end of each development stage have been used to guide the experimental program, scaling analyses and code development supporting the audit studies.

Wilson, G.E.; Fletcher, C.D. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Eltawila, F. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Web technology to support work processes in energy policy research - A case study with energy efficiency standards  

SciTech Connect

This paper focuses on a process to design and build a web-based system to assist staff in day-to-day management and contemporaneous documentation of their work. Other groups that want to use web technology to support their work could apply the approach presented here, but the design itself pertains to a particular set of issues in a unique context. Each user must apply the approach to identify their objectives and design a site to meet them. The main question that the Energy Efficiency Standards Group addressed was: ''How can we facilitate documentation of interim results and final products while conducting a complex, interdependent set of analyses by multiple authors under time pressures for delivering a final product?'' The approach to address this question includes categorization of the components of the work, discussions with staff, development of infrastructure support for documentation, implementation of the documentation process and integration with the workflow, and follow- up with staff. The search for a solution raised a number of issues such as the need for a thorough understanding of the work, consensus building by inclusion of key staff, and deliverable scheduling to allow for contemporaneous documentation. Documentation results vary among the product analyses, from extensive internal and external use to much slower adoption. Complaints include the length of the input forms and pressure from clients to deliver results. But with repeated demand for interim output, the need for thorough contemporaneous documentation still remains. Accordingly, as problems arise there is continued commitment among the staff to address them.

Benenson, Peter; McMahon, James E.; Brown, Stephen R.

2002-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

431

Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report  

SciTech Connect

The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

Not Available

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

DOE research on atmospheric aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric aerosols are the subject of a significant component of research within DOE`s environmental research activities, mainly under two programs within the Department`s Environmental Sciences Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP). Research activities conducted under these programs include laboratory experiments, field measurements, and theoretical and modeling studies. The objectives and scope of these programs are briefly summarized. The ARM Program is the Department`s major research activity focusing on atmospheric processes pertinent to understanding global climate and developing the capability of predicting global climate change in response to energy related activities. The ARM approach consists mainly of testing and improving models using long-term measurements of atmospheric radiation and controlling variables at highly instrumented sites in north central Oklahoma, in the Tropical Western Pacific, and on the North Slope of Alaska. Atmospheric chemistry research within DOE addresses primarily the issue of atmospheric response to emissions from energy-generation sources. As such this program deals with the broad topic known commonly as the atmospheric source-receptor sequence. This sequence consists of all aspects of energy-related pollutants from the time they are emitted from their sources to the time they are redeposited at the Earth`s surface.

Schwartz, S.E.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

The effective spectral irradiance of ultra-violet radiations from inert-gas-shielded welding processes in relation to the ARC current density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lamp filaments, the electrodes of an electric arc, and molten metals of high melting point. The emission of an incandescent object is due to its temperature and depends little upon the chemical nature of the radiator. The Stefan- 13 Boltzmann law... is automatically fed by the welding machine into the weld puddle. Metal is transferred through the arc plasma to the base material being welded. The wire is of the same metallic composition as the base metal, and generally the same diameter is used for most...

DeVore, Robin Kent

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Splitting the Solar Spectrum: Sometimes Less Is Better Than More Splitting the Solar Spectrum: Sometimes Less Is Better Than More Submitter: Pawlak, D. T., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Pawlak, DT, EJ Clothiaux, MF Modest, and JNS Cole. 2004. Full-Spectrum Correlated-k Distribution for Shortwave Atmospheric Radiative Transfer. Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences 61: 2588-2601. Of all the physical and dynamical calculations required in numerical weather prediction and climate modeling, radiation calculations consume the most computational time. This is because the radiation transfer physics of the atmosphere involve molecular absorption that occurs in narrowly defined absorption bands of the electromagnetic spectrum. The exact location in the

435

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intercomparison of Longwave Radiative Heating Algorithms Intercomparison of Longwave Radiative Heating Algorithms Submitter: Baer, F., University of Maryland Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Baer, F., N. Arsky, J. J. Charney, and R. G. Ellingson. 1996. "Intercomparison of Heating Rates Generated by Global Climate Model Longwave Radiation Codes." J. Geoph. Res., 101, D21, 26589-26603. 30 levels of longwave heating rates for all algorithms tested at the five locations for the high cloud Same as Figure 1 but with the clouds removed (clear sky assumption). Same as Figure 1 but a different view. Averaged heating rates and heating rates of averaged. Same as Figure 3 but with the clouds removed (clear sky assumption).

436

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity and Chromosome Instability Induction in TK6 Cells Schwartz J.L. 1 , Jordan R. 1 , Slovic J. 1 , Moruzzi A. 1 , Kimmel R. 2 , and Liber, H.L. 3 1 University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 3 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado There are a number of cell responses that can be detected after low dose radiation exposures including the adaptive response, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability. The relationship between these different phenomena is unknown. In this study, we measured adaptive responses, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability in a human B-lymphoblastoid cell model, TK6, where we could genetically modify radiation responses by either over-expression of BCL-2 or deletion of TP53. TK6

437

Chemistry Dept. Research Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Department Overview: Chemistry Department Overview: While the subjects of chemical research in the Chemistry Department are diverse, several predominant themes span traditional research fields and research groups. These themes include: artificial photosynthesis, charge transfer for energy conversion, chemistry with ionizing radiation, catalysis and surface science, nanoscience, combustion, and nuclear chemistry. Artificial Photosynthesis This program addresses major issues hindering progress in photoinduced catalytic reduction of carbon dioxide, water splitting, and small molecule activation using an integrated experimental and theoretical approach that offers fundamental insights into the underlying photochemical processes. One thrust investigates factors controlling reductive half-reactions. Among these are: (1) searching for visible-light absorbers to couple with electron transfer and/or catalytic processes; (2) avoiding high-energy intermediates through multi-electron, multi-proton processes; (3) using earth-abundant metals, or metal complexes that have bio-inspired or non-innocent ligands to achieve low-energy pathways via second-coordination sphere interactions or redox leveling; (4) adopting water as the target solvent and the source of protons and electrons; and (5) immobilizing catalysts on electrode or semiconductor surfaces for better turnover rates and frequencies. Another thrust investigates water oxidation, focusing on photoelectrolysis processes occurring in band-gap-narrowed semiconductor and catalyst components by: (i) tuning semiconductors to control their light-harvesting and charge-separation abilities; (ii) developing viable catalysts for the four-electron water oxidation process; (iii) immobilizing the homogenous catalysts and metal oxide catalysts on electrodes and/or metal-oxide nanoparticles; and (iv) exploring the interfacial water-decomposition reactions using carriers generated by visible-light irradiation with the goal of understanding semiconductorccatalystcwater charge transport.

438

Plasma Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... JUST over ten years ago the first book on plasma physics as a subject in its own right appeared; in a gradually swelling stream ... been surprisingly few monographs. One topic which has had scant coverage in any form is plasma radiation (except for spectral-line radiation which has been dealt with very fully in ...

T. J. M. BOYD

1967-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Safety Around Sources of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Keeping Exposure Low Keeping Exposure Low Working Safely Around Radioactive Contamination Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Is it safe to be around sources? Too much radiation exposure is harmful. The degree of radiation injury depends on the amount of radiation received and the time involved. In general, the higher the amount, the greater the severity of early effects (occurring within a few weeks) and the greater the possibility of late effects such as cancer. The BEIR V (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation) Committee of the National Research Council estimates that among 100,000 people exposed to a one-time dose of 10 rem (10,000 mrem) and followed over their life span, about 790 more would die of cancer than the estimated 20,000 cancer deaths that would be expected among a non-exposed group of the same size. NOTE: 10 rem = 100 millisieverts (100 mSv).

440

Research Highlight  

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Broadband Albedo Observations in the Southern Great Plains Broadband Albedo Observations in the Southern Great Plains Submitter: Lamb, P. J., University of Oklahoma Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology, Vol. 45, 2006, pp. 210-235. Figure 1 Figure 2 Because surface reflection of solar radiation plays a fundamental role in the surface energy budget, knowledge of its spatial and temporal variability is important for understanding the weather and climate of a specific region. Research instrumentation at the U.S. Southern Great Plains site-one of three locales around the world managed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program-continuously collects these types of data to help scientist investigate differences in

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Aerosol Forcing: Calculation from Observables and Sensitivities to Direct Aerosol Forcing: Calculation from Observables and Sensitivities to Inputs Download a printable PDF Submitter: McComiskey, A. C., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: McComiskey, A, SE Schwartz, B Schmid, H Guan, ER Lewis, P Ricchiazzi, and JA Ogren. 2008. "Direct aerosol forcing: Calculation from observables and sensitivities to inputs." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D09202, doi:10.1029/2007JD009170. Figure 1. The sensitivity of calculated aerosol direct radiative forcing to input parameters has been examined to determine the consequences of uncertainties in these input parameters on calculated radiative forcing and to identify areas where measurements might be most profitably improved. Input

442

Current Testbed Research  

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Current Testbed Research Previous Testbed Research Proposal Process Terms and Conditions Dark Fiber Testbed Performance (perfSONAR) Software & Tools Development Partnerships...

443

Research Highlight  

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Madden-Julian Oscillation Heating: to Tilt or Not to Tilt Download a printable PDF Submitter: Schumacher, C., Texas A&M University Area of Research: Cloud Processes Working...

444

Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation  

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Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation Persistent DNA damage foci, cellular senescence and low dose radiation Denise Munoz 1 , Albert Davalos 1 , Francis Rodier 1 , Misako Kawahara 1 , Judith Campisi 1,2 and Steven Yannone 1,3 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Mailstop 84-171, Berkeley CA 94720; 2 Buck Institute for Age Research, 8001 Redwood Boulevard, Novato CA 94945; 3 Corresponding author Ionizing radiation (IR) induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are cytologically detectable as large nuclear foci that contain phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), the adaptor protein 53BP1, and several other proteins that participate in the sensing and processing of DNA damage (DNA damage foci). In normal human cells, moderately high IR (0.5-1 Gy) doses cause the rapid appearance of these foci (acute DNA damage foci), which gradually disappear

445

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Searching the Inclusive Lepton + Photon + Missing E(T) + b-quark Signature for Radiative Top Quark Decay and Non-Standard-Model Processes  

SciTech Connect

In a search for new phenomena in a signature suppressed in the standard model of elementary particles (SM), we compare the inclusive production of events containing a lepton ({ell}), a photon ({gamma}), significant transverse momentum imbalance (E{sub T}), and a jet identified as containing a b-quark, to SM predictions. The search uses data produced in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV corresponding to 1.9 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity taken with the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. We find 28 {ell}{gamma}bE{sub T} events versus an expectation of 31.0{sub -3.5}{sup +4.1} events. If we further require events to contain at least three jets and large total transverse energy, simulations predict that the largest SM source is top-quark pair production with an additional radiated photon, t{bar t} + {gamma}. In the data we observe 16 t{bar t}{gamma} candidate events versus an expectation from non-top-quark SM sources of 11.2{sub -2.1}{sup +2.3}. Assuming the difference between the observed number and the predicted non-top-quark total is due to SM top quark production, we estimate the t{bar t} cross section to be 0.15 {+-} 0.08 pb.

Aaltonen, T.; /Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Adelman, Jahred A.; /Chicago U., EFI; Akimoto, T.; /Tsukuba U.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; /Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Amidei, Dante E.; /Michigan U.; Anastassov, A.; /Northwestern U.; Annovi, Alberto; /Frascati; Antos, Jaroslav; /Comenius U.; Apollinari, G.; /Fermilab; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Abnormal Sensitivity of Human Fibroblasts from Xeroderma Pigmentosum Variants to Transformation to Anchorage Independence by Ultraviolet Radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2-Nitroimidazole (EF5) Binding Predicts Radiation Resistance in Individual 9L s.c...Terashima,and H. Yamaguchi (eds.), Radiation Research, pp. 885 "892.Tokyo, Japan: Japanese Association for Radiation Research, 1979. 9. Franko, A...

J. Justin McCormick; Suzanne Kateley-Kohler; Masami Watanabe; and Veronica M. Maher

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation of radiation and its effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and humanAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about

Pennycook, Steve

450

Scale-Up of CdTe Photovoltaic Device Processes for Commercial Application: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-06-196  

SciTech Connect

Through this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement, NREL and PrimeStar Solar will work together to scale up the NREL CdTe photovoltaic process from the laboratory to produce photovoltaic devices in a size that is commercially viable. The work in this phase will focus on the transference of NREL CdTe device fabrication techniques to PrimeStar Solar. NREL and PrimeStar Solar will engage in a series of technical exchange meetings and laboratory training sessions to transfer the knowledge of CdTe PV film growth from NREL to PrimeStar Solar. PrimeStar Solar will grow thin films on PrimeStar Solar equipment and interleave them with NREL-grown films in an effort to develop a commercial scale process on PrimeStar Solar equipment. Select NREL film growth equipment will be upgraded either by PrimeStar Solar or at PrimeStar Solar's expense to increase equipment reliability and throughput.

Albin, D.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Radiation Minimum Temperatures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Frost resulting from cooling of vegetation by nocturnal radiation is a serious agricultural problem. Because of the number of variables involved attacks on this problem from a purely theoretical point of view have met with only moderate success. It seems logical to suppose that an instrument might be devised which would speed up the natural radiation processes and enable an observer to obtain in a few hours a measure of the cooling which occurs naturally over a period of 12 to 14 hr. Such an instrument could serve as a frost warning device. This paper describes the construction of a radiation device and presents experimental evidence to show that it can be used as a predictor of freezing temperatures at vegetation level.

Francis K. Davis Jr.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Medical applications of synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect

Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

Thomlinson, W.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

Thomlinson, W.

1991-10-00T23:59:59.000Z

454

Reducing Radiation Damage  

SciTech Connect

This talk describes the use of a modified treatment sequence, i.e., radiation dose, geometry, dwell time, etc., to mitigate some of the deleterious effects of cancer radiotherapy by utilizing natural cell repair processes. If bad side effects can be reduced, a more aggressive therapy can be put into place. Cells contain many mechanisms that repair damage of various types. If the damage can not be repaired, cells will undergo apoptosis (cell death). Data will be reviewed that support the fact that a small dose of radiation will activate damage repair genes within a cell. Once the mechanisms are fully active, they will efficiently repair the severe damage from a much larger radiation dose. The data ranges from experiments on specific cell cultures using microarray (gene chip) techniques to experiments on complete organisms. The suggested effect and treatment is consistent with the assumption that all radiation is harmful, no matter how small the dose. Nevertheless, the harm can be reduced. These mechanisms need to be further studied and characterized. In particular, their time dependence needs to be understood before the proposed treatment can be optimized. Under certain situations it is also possible that the deleterious effects of chemotherapy can be mitigated and the damage to radiation workers can be reduced.

Blankenbecler, Richard

2006-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

455

Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM).  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DREAM tool increases space weather DREAM tool increases space weather predictions April 13, 2012 Predicting space weather improved by new DREAM modeling tool Earth's radiation belts can now be studied with a new modeling tool called Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM). Researchers in LANL's Space Science and Applications (ISR-1) group are developing DREAM and described its current capabilities and applications in an article published in Space Weather, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. - 2 - Space environment and its hazards The space environment poses a number of radiation hazards to space systems and their occupants. Relativistic electrons, the dominant source of the radiation dose to spacecraft traveling in the outer radiation belts (3-7 Earth radii), have an electron flux

456

Control of Damage to Museum Objects by Optical Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control of Damage to Museum Objects by Optical Radiation Control of Damage to Museum Objects by Optical Radiation Speaker(s): Eliyahu Ne'eman Date: June 7, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 This Presentation is based on CIE Publication 157:2004 which has been recently published. It is the report of CIE Technical Committee 3-22 with the same title. Leading experts on Museum lighting from Australia, Canada, Finland, France, Japan, Germany, Great Britain, New Zealand and the USA, took part in writing this document. The two processes by which exposure to light may cause damage are photochemical action and radiant heating effect. These processes are examined and the characteristics of damage caused to museum objects are described. Recent research, which has aimed to relate the extent of exposure of materials to measures of damage

457

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

458

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Surface Albedo Data Set Enables Improved Radiative Transfer New Surface Albedo Data Set Enables Improved Radiative Transfer Calculations Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: McFarlane SA, K Gaustad, E Mlawer, C Long, and J Delamere. 2011. "Development of a high spectral resolution surface albedo product for the ARM Southern Great Plains central facility." Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, 4, 1713-1733. Time series of daily percent vegetation derived from MFR measurements for (top) 2001-2008 at 10-m tower, which is located over an unmanaged pasture; (middle) 2001-2004 at 25-m tower, which is located over a managed field; and (bottom) 2005-2008 at 25-m tower. The different seasonal cycles at the

459

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validating Single Column Models with ARM Data Validating Single Column Models with ARM Data Submitter: Somerville, R. C., Scripps Institution of Oceanography Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Iacobellis, S.F., McFarquhar, G.M., Mitchell, D.L., and Somerville, R.C.J., 2003: "The Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes to Parameterized Cloud Microphysics," J. Climate 16(18): 2979-2996. Scientists validated the results of both models by comparing them with the solar radiation as measured by the ARM instruments in the same grid cell. Scientists compared predictions of two models (red and blue lines) with measurements taken by ARM instruments (yellow line) at the same location. The models predict the amount and optical properties of clouds and the

460

Research Highlight  

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Modeling Cloud Forcing in the Tropical West Pacific Modeling Cloud Forcing in the Tropical West Pacific Submitter: Kiehl, J., NCAR Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Petch, J.C., and J.T. Kiehl, 1997: "Investigating Cloud Radiative Forcing in the Tropical West Pacific Using a Single Column Model." In Proceedings from the Seventh ARM Science Team Meeting, U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, D.C. Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Here is summary of the poster "Investigating Cloud Radiative Forcing in the Tropical West Pacific Using a Single Column Model" (Petch and Kiehl) presented at the ARM 7th Science Team Meeting in San Antonio, Texas, March 1997. SCCM3, a single-column version of CCM3, has been forced with TOGA-COARE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multifractal Analysis of Radiation in Clouds: 5000km to 50cm Multifractal Analysis of Radiation in Clouds: 5000km to 50cm Submitter: Lovejoy, S., McGill University Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Lovejoy, S., D. Schertzer, J. D. Stanway, 2001: "Direct Evidence of planetary scale atmospheric cascade dynamics," Phys. Rev. Lett. 86(22): 5200-5203. Left: Power spectrum of the 5 different aircraft measured liquid water data sets from the FIRE experiment (averaged over 10 equally logarithmically spaced points on the k-axis and vertically offset). The absolute slopes with Β = 1.45 is indicated (straight line on top of graph) for reference. The number of sets used to compute the average from top to bottom: 4, 3, 1, 2, 5. A constant aircraft speed of 100m/s has been assumed. Right: Ensemble

462

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indirect Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on an Ensemble of Deep Convective Indirect Impact of Atmospheric Aerosols on an Ensemble of Deep Convective Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Grabowski, W., NCAR Morrison, H. C., NCAR Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Grabowski WW and H Morrison. 2011. "Indirect impact of atmospheric aerosols in idealized simulations of convective-radiative quasi-equilibrium. Part II: Double-moment microphysics." Journal of Climate, 24, 1897-1912. This paper extends the previous cloud-resolving modeling study concerning the impact of cloud microphysics on convective-radiative quasi-equilibrium (CRQE) over a surface with fixed characteristics and prescribed solar input, both mimicking the mean conditions on Earth. The current study

463

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data from DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Allows Evaluation Data from DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Allows Evaluation of Surface Models Submitter: Robock, A., Rutgers University Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: Robock, A., Luo, L., Wood, E. F., Wen, F., Mitchell, K. E., Houser, P. R., Schaake, J. C., Lohmann, D., Cosgrove, B., Sheffield, J., Duan, Q., Higgins, R. W., Pinker, R. T., Tarpley, J. D., Basara, J. D., Crawford, K. C., Evaluation of the North American Land Data Assimilation System over the Southern Great Plains during the warm season, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D22), 8846, doi:10.1029/2002JD003245, 2003 An example of the model discrepancies is shown in a comparison of monthly mean diurnal cycle data from July 1999 at the ARM Southern Great Plains

464

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sub-Grid Scale Cloud Variability Affects Vertical Structure of Clouds and Sub-Grid Scale Cloud Variability Affects Vertical Structure of Clouds and Radiative Heating Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: McFarlane, S. A., J. H. Mather, and T. P. Ackerman (2007), Analysis of tropical radiative heating profiles: A comparison of models and observations, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D14218, doi:10.1029/2006JD008290. Comparison of the distributions of cloud condensate for the ACRF TWP site at Manus using a) retrievals from the ACRF remote sensors, b) the CAM, c) all MMF columns, and d) MMF columns that do not contain precipitation. Note that the ARM observations do not include precipitation. Each panel consists

465

TH?B?110?01: Informatics in Radiation Oncology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Informatics covers not only the information technology (IT) and infrastructure required to support data collection and management but also the computer science concepts that turn data into knowledge. In radiation oncology medical physicists need to be familiar with the basic IT infrastructure that makes it possible to transfer and transform data through clinical processes that ultimately control radiation treatment delivery. The application of informatics continues with patient outcomes. Typically this happens through participation in national protocols (e.g. RTOG). While they provide a framework for evidence?based medicine the data are often limited to parameters that were designed to test a pre?defined hypothesis. As the ability to acquire and distribute data increases we may be able to adopt data mining approaches to discover knowledge even without asking specific questions. While simple database queries can efficiently provide statistical information (e.g. the NCI Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results SEER) data mining seeks hidden patterns through clustering classification regression and association. These principles can be applied to large volumes of concisely described data sets similar to what can be found in clinical trials. Researchers in radiation oncologyinformatics are developing the infrastructure to acquire large data sets. The Radiation Oncology Data Alliance (RODA) initiative aims to provide online aggregate de?identified data from participating users of the MOSAIQ EMR. Borrowing from the field of astronomy researchers from Johns Hopki