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1

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities NREL's solar radiation research staff provides expertise in renewable energy measurement and instrumentation. Major capabilities include solar resource measurement,...

2

THE RADIATION PROCESSING RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

A review of various ways in which nuclear energy can be used in the chemical process industry is presented. Data are included on aspects of radioinduced polymerization of ethylene. Flowsheets are included for radiochemonuclear, thermochemonuclear, electrochemonuclear, and photochemonuclear reactors. Other information is included on irradiation loops. (J.R.D.)

Steinberg, M.; Manowitz, B.

1963-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Radiation Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Radiation Research: Outreach and Resources Authors: Antone L. Brooks and Lezlie A. Couch Institution: Washington State University Tri-Cities, Richland, Washington The...

4

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Institutions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Institutions Institutions Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute Biological Bases for Radiation Adaptive Responses in the Lung-Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM USA Contact: Dr. Bobby R. Scott Program Objective Our research focuses on elucidating the biological bases for radiation adaptive responses in the lung and for suppressing lung cancer, and to use the knowledge gained to produce an improved systems-biology-based, risk model for lung cancer induction by low-dose, low linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation. Research was initiated in October 2009. This research should help foster a new era of low-dose radiation risk/benefit assessment. It will have important implications for possible use of low-dose diagnostic radiation (e.g., X-rays) in cancer therapy. It

5

Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility was established in 1990 to improve...

6

Low Dose Radiation Program: Radiation Biology and the Radiation Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and the Radiation Research Program Biology and the Radiation Research Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), always have been concerned about the health effects of ionizing radiation. Extensive research has been conducted under their sponsorship at all levels of biological organization from molecules to man. Over the past 60 years, studies using every type of radiation source have included exposure to both external radiation sources and to internally deposited radioactive materials. These exposures used different dose patterns and distributions delivered over a wide range of experimental times. This extensive research provided the basis for the new Low Dose Radiation Research Program, linking

7

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Photo of two researchers standing on a platform near a solar tracker at the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory gathers solar radiation and meteorological data on South Table Mountain. NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) has been collecting continuous measurements of basic solar radiation components since 1981. Since then, it has expanded its expertise to include integrated metrology, optics, electronics, and data acquisition capabilities. In addition, the SRRL provides facilities for outdoor performance testing of new research instrumentation and energy conversion devices such as photovoltaic modules. The SRRL is located on NREL's South Table Mountain site in Golden, Colorado, where it has excellent solar access because of its unrestricted

8

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Solar Radiation Research Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Radiation Research Laboratory Photographs Solar Radiation Research Laboratory Photographs The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) houses more than 70 instruments to analyze and record solar radiation and surface meteorology data. Learn more about this equipment by exploring the photographs below. Click on a thumbnail to view the full image. Photo of researcher working on an instrument platform in front of the SRRL building. The SRRL is located on South Table Mountain in Golden, Colorado, at 39.74° N, 105.18° W, and 1,829 m AMSL. Photo of four researchers working on equipment atop the SRRL instrument deck. The SRRL's instrument deck is 96 ft long and 16 feet wide. Photo of two pyrheliometers mounted to an automatic sun-tracking base. These two SRRL pyrheliometers are mounted to automatically track the sun

9

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Research Foundations: Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Rings of Saturn, Sandia's workhorse pulsed-power machine. The Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Research Foundation seeks to advance science and engineering in the areas of radiation effects sciences, high energy density science, and pulsed-power science and technology to address critical national security issues. Why our work matters We address several issues key to nuclear security and maintaining a safe, secure, and effective nuclear stockpile. For example, radiation effects science ensures that engineered systems are able to operate as intended in the radiation environments they encounter. In addition, high energy density science validates models that are used to certify the performance of the

10

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Research Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Staff Research Staff NREL's resource assessment and forecasting research staff provides expertise in renewable energy measurement and instrumentation through NREL's Power Systems Engineering Center. Photo of Mary Anderberg Mary Anderberg - Scientist M.S. Physics, University of Denver B.S. Physics, Auburn University Mary performs solar radiometric data quality analysis for the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program and provides programming support for the resource integration section. She also contributed to the National Solar Radiation Database update. In addition, Mary is the Web administrator of the Renewable Resource Data Center, for which she provides UNIX, C, Perl, and HTML support. Photo of Afshín Andreas Afshín Andreas - Senior Scientist

11

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Highlights - Ionizing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy Low Dose Radiation Research Program, and the Department of Defense Breast Cancer Research program and Prostate Cancer Research program. Researchers include Eva...

12

Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Laboratory Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) Instrument Calibrations Weather Observations Measurement Research Support Measurements & Instrumentation Team Center for Electric & Hydrogen Technologies & Systems http://www.nrel.gov/srrl NREL * * * * 1617 Cole Boulevard * * * * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 * * * * (303) 275-3000 Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Midwest Research Institute * * * * Battelle * * * * Bechtel Mission Provide a unique outdoor research facility for supporting renewable energy conversion technologies and climate change studies for the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE). Objectives * Provide Improved Methods for Radiometer Calibrations * Develop a Solar Resource Climate Database for Golden, Colorado

13

Research priorities for occupational radiation protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subpanel on Occupational Radiation Protection Research concludes that the most urgently needed research is that leading to the resolution of the potential effects of low-level ionizing radiation. This is the primary driving force in setting appropriate radiation protection standards and in directing the emphasis of radiation protection efforts. Much has already been done in collecting data that represents a compendium of knowledge that should be fully reviewed and understood. It is imperative that health physics researchers more effectively use that data and apply the findings to enhance understanding of the potential health effects of low-level ionizing radiation and improve the risk estimates upon which current occupational radiation protection procedures and requirements depend. Research must be focused to best serve needs in the immediate years ahead. Only then will we get the most out of what is accomplished. Beyond the above fundamental need, a number of applied research areas also have been identified as national priority issues. If effective governmental focus is achieved on several of the most important national priority issues, important occupational radiation protection research will be enhanced, more effectively coordinated, and more quickly applied to the work environment. Response in the near term will be enhanced and costs will be reduced by: developing microprocessor-aided {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes} instruments to simplify the use and processing of radiation data; developing more sensitive, energy-independent, and tissue-equivalent dosimeters to more accurately quantify personnel dose; and developing an improved risk assessment technology base. This can lead to savings of millions of dollars in current efforts needed to ensure personnel safety and to meet new, more stringent occupational guidelines.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Metrology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metrology Laboratory Photo of Solar Radiation Research Laboratory researchers inspecting radiometers mounted to calibration tables at the outside test site. Researchers at the...

15

NREL: Solar Radiation Research Home Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL's solar radiation research supports industry, government, and academia by providing solar radiation measurements, models, maps, and support services. These resources are used...

16

BNL Center for Radiation Chemistry Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department | Photo- and Radiation Chemistry | Group Members Welcome to the Brookhaven National Laboratory Center for Radiation Chemistry Research LEAF Logo CRCR Logo Graphic Pop-up...

17

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Original Research Program Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Original Research Program Plan Original Research Program Plan Biological Effects of Low Dose and Dose Rate Radiation Prepared for the Office of Biological and Environmental Research by The Low Dose Radiation Research Program Plan Subcommittee of the Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee. II. Table of Contents Face Page Table of Contents Executive Summary Introduction Program Outline Low Dose Radiation vs. Endogenous Oxidative Damage - The Same or Different? Key Question Description Decision Making Value Recommendations and Costs Understanding Biological Responses to Radiation And Endogenous Damage Key Question Description Decision Making Value Recommendations and Costs Thresholds for Low Dose Radiation - Fact or Fiction? Key Question Description Decision Making Value Recommendations and Costs

18

Solar radiation management: the governance of research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar radiation management: the governance of research #12;convening organisations The cover image, which solar geoengineering interventions would seek to address if ever deemed safe and desirable to deploy. #12;Solar radiation management: the governance of research #12;The Solar Radiation Management

Rambaut, Andrew

19

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Research Societies with Radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Societies with Radiation Concerns Academy of Radiology Research American Association of Physicists in Medicine American Nuclear Society American Roentgen Ray Society American...

20

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Data and Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data and Resources NREL solar radiation research information is available from the following sources. Measurement Measurement and Instrumentation Data Center (MIDC) Provides...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Working with Us  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

solar technologies into the clean energy market. There are many ways to work with NREL's solar radiation research program. Developing Technology Partnerships NREL offers a variety...

22

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2010 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of...

23

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1-June 30, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work...

24

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

energy, are the surrounding unirradiated cells also at an increased risk of cancer? Latest Research, Response to Fukushima, Integrating Low Dose into Policy-All Featured at...

25

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Image Gallery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Image Gallery Image Gallery These are images, photographs, and charts presented or developed for Low Dose Radiation Research Investigators’ Meetings. They may be used for presentations or reports. To save, right click on the picture, then choose "Save picture as." U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from various sources for 1980. various sources 1980 Enlarge Image. U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from various sources for 2006. various sources 2006 Enlarge Image. U.S. annual per-capita effective radiation dose from man-made sources in the United States for 2006. man-made 2006 Enlarge Image. Ionizing Radiation Dose Ranges showing the wide range of radiation doses that humans experience (Rem) Enlarge Image. Ionizing Radiation Dose Ranges showing the wide range of radiation doses that humans experience

26

Physics as an element of radiation research.  

SciTech Connect

Since its inception in 1954, Radiation Research has published an estimated total of about 8700 scientific articles up to August 2001, about 520, or roughly 6%, of which are primarily related to physics. This average of about 11 articles per year indicates steadily continuing contributions by physicists, though there are appreciable fluctuations from year to year. These works of physicists concern radiation sources, dosimetry, instrumentation for measurements of radiation effects, fundamentals of radiation physics, mechanisms of radiation actions, and applications. In this review, we have selected some notable accomplishments for discussion and present an outlook for the future.

Inokuti, M.; Seltzer, S.; Physics; National Inst. of Standards and Technology

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Earlier Events  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earlier Events Earlier Events 2000 | 2001 | 2002 | 2003 | 2004 April 2000 Ionizing Radiation Science and Protection in the 21st Century, NCRP, April 5-6, Arlington, VA. RADIATION RESEARCH 2000, Association for Radiation Research, April 10-12, Bristol, UK. Florida Chapter of the Health Physics Society Spring 2000 Meeting, Gainesville, FL, April 13-14. 47th Annual Meeting of the Radiation Research Society, April 29-May 3, Albuquerque, NM. May 2000 IRPA-10 International Congress 2000, May 14-19, Hiroshima, Japan. IRPA-10 Secretariat, c/o Japan Convention Services, Inc., Nippon Press Center Building, 2-2-1, Uchisaiwai-cho, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 100, Japan. Phone: 81-3-3508-1214. Fax: 81-3-3508-0820. irpa10@convention.jp. 4th International Non-Ionizing Radiation Workshop, May 22-25, Kyoto,

28

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Program Workshop I Abstracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation William F. Morgan and John H.J. Petrini Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland at Baltimore, Baltimore, MD Summary: The goal of our application is to improve the scientific basis for understanding potential risks to the population from low dose radiation exposure based on potential genetic differences that may modulate an individual's sensitivity to low doses of radiation. Abstract: The goal of this application is to improve the scientific basis for understanding potential risks to the population from low dose radiation exposure. We propose to address specific genetic factors that affect individual susceptibility to low dose radiation and ask the question do genetic differences exist that make some individuals more sensitive to

29

Low Dose Radiation Program: 2010 Low Dose Radiation Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Radiation Research Program Investigators' Workshop Low Dose Radiation Research Program Investigators' Workshop »» Event Slide Show More than 150 people attended this year's workshop, held April 12-14 at the Renaissance M Street Hotel in Washington, D.C. In addition to 34 plenary talks and more than 70 poster presentations made by the program investigators, participants heard guest speakers from the National Cancer Institute and from sister low-dose programs in Europe and Japan. Remarks from DOE Dr. Anna Palmisano, Associate Director, Office of Science, Director for Biological and Environmental Research (BER), welcomed the meeting participants, thanked Low Dose Radiation Research Program Manager Dr. Noelle Metting for her leadership, and acknowledged the importance of the Low Dose Program to DOE because of its unique focus and important role. She

30

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: National Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Laboratories National Laboratories The Low Dose Radiation Program funding encompasses several Scientific Focus Areas (SFAs). The SFAs fund merit-reviewed research at DOE national laboratories. This management approach was created in 2008 by the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Science. PNNL's Low Dose Radiation Research Program Scientific Focus Area Linear and Nonlinear Tissue-Signaling Mechanisms in Response to Low Dose and Low Dose-Rate Radiation This program is funded as a U.S. Department of Energy Scientific Focus Area (SFA), and is an integrated cooperative program to understand low dose radiation effects in a complex model system. Coordinating Multidisciplinary Expertise The SFAs are designed to take advantage of the multidisciplinary,

31

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Background. Extensive research on the health effects of radiation using standard epidemiological and toxicological approaches has been done for decades to characterize responses of populations and individuals to high radiation doses, and to set exposure standards to protect both the public and the workforce. These standards were set using models that extrapolated from the cancers observed following exposure to high doses of radiation to predicted, but not measurable, changes in cancer frequency at low radiation doses. The use of models was necessary because of our inability to detect changes in cancer incidence following low doses of radiation. Historically, the predominant approach has been the Linear-no-Threshold model (see Wikipedia entry) and collective dose concept that assumes each unit of radiation, no

32

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Argonne scientists study climate change 1 of 22 Argonne scientists study climate change The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science provided $60 million in ARRA funding for climate research to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a DOE national user facility that has been operating climate observing sites around the world for nearly two decades. These sites help scientists study clouds and their influence on the sun's radiant energy, which heats our planet. Above is one of the purchases: the Vaisala Present Weather Detector. It optically measures visibility, present weather, precipitation intensity, and precipitation type. It provides a measure of current weather conditions by combining measurements from three

33

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee CHARTER June 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

34

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Radiation Effects in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Effects in Differentiating Human Lens Cells Radiation Effects in Differentiating Human Lens Cells E.A. Blakely1, M.P. McNamara1, P.Y. Chang1, K.A. Bjornstad1, D. Sudar1, and A.C. Thompson2 1Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California; 2Advanced Light Source Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California. Introduction The human lens is one of the most radiosensitive organs of the body. Cataract, the opacification of the lens, is a late-appearing response to radiation damage. There are few data available on the late radiation effects of exposure in space flight to charged particle beams, the most prevalent of which are protons. Basic research in this area is needed to integrate the responses of both critical and other representative tissues

35

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DOE Lowdose Radiation Program Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Authors: William F. Morgan1 and Marianne B. Sowa2 Institutions: 1Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland, Baltimore MD 21201 2 Chemical Structure and Dynamics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 We have recently installed a low LET electron microbeam that generates energetic electrons to mimic radiation damage from gamma and x-ray sources. It has been designed such that high-energy electrons deposit energy in a pre-selected subset of cells leaving neighboring cells unirradiated (Figure 1). In this way it is possible to examine non-targeted effects associated with low dose radiation exposure including induced genomic instability and

36

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Frequencies of Radiation-Induced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequencies of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Interchanges and Frequencies of Radiation-Induced Chromosome Interchanges and Randomness of Chromosome Territory Locations Relative to One Another. Authors: RK Sachs,§ MN Cornforth,‡ KM Greulich-Bode,* L Hlatky, and DJ Brenner|| Institutions: §Department of Mathematics, University of California, ‡University of Texas Medical Branch, *Department of Skin Carcinogenesis, German Cancer Research Center DFCI, Harvard Medical School, ||Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University. Leukemogenesis, and perhaps carcinogenesis in general, often involves specific chromosome translocations. Radiation-induced chromosome translocation frequencies are strongly influenced by how close participating chromosomes are to one another in an interphase cell nucleus. We sought to determine whether chromosomes in human peripheral blood

37

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Highlights - Health Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health Physics Special Issue Features Contributions by Low Dose Health Physics Special Issue Features Contributions by Low Dose Investigators Health Physics The March 2011 special issue of Health Physics highlights the Victor Bond Workshop held May 2-5, 2010, in Richland, Wash. The workshop honored the late Dr. Victor (Vic) Bond for his lifetime achievement in the radiation sciences. Dr. Bond's research resulted in numerous influential scientific papers that contributed greatly to the understanding of radiation effects in biological systems. The workshop attracted internationally recognized experts in biophysics, experimental radiation biology, epidemiology, and risk assessment to discuss issues of low-dose risk. Participants included current and previously funded U.S. Department of Energy Low Dose Radiation Research

38

Opportunities in Catalysis Research Using Synchrotron Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Catalysis Research Using Synchrotron Radiation in Catalysis Research Using Synchrotron Radiation Tuesday 10/8/02 Chair: Lars Pettersson 1:30-1:40 Anders Nilsson Welcome 1:40-2:30 Gabor Somorjai University of California, Berkeley and LBLN Need for New Directions of Research at the Frontiers of Catalysis Science 2:30-3:00 Geoff Thornton University of Manchester Influence of defects on the reactivity of ZnO 3:00-3:30 Anders Nilsson Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory Soft X-ray Spectroscopy of Surfaces and Reactions 3:30-3:45 Break Chair: Anders Nilsson 3:45-4:15 Lars Pettersson Stockholm University Adsorbate-Substrate Bonding: An Experimental and Theoretical MO Picture 4:15-4:45 Miquel Salmeron Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Photoelectron Spectroscopy studies of surfaces in high pressure gas

39

Committee on Radiation Epidemiological Research Programs  

SciTech Connect

The Committee on DoE Radiation Epidemiological Research Programs was originally established in response to the needs of the Office of Health and Envirorunental Research, Office of Energy Research in the Department of Energy (DoE). Following a reorganization of DoE health related programs in 1990, the committee now advises the Office of Epidemiology and Health Surveillance which is under the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health. These administrative changes have not altered the committee concerns but have served to focus the committee's attention on helping DoE plan for an effective system of worker health surveillance as well as an epidemiologic research program.

Mahlum, D.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Committee on Radiation Epidemiological Research Programs  

SciTech Connect

The Committee on DoE Radiation Epidemiological Research Programs was originally established in response to the needs of the Office of Health and Envirorunental Research, Office of Energy Research in the Department of Energy (DoE). Following a reorganization of DoE health related programs in 1990, the committee now advises the Office of Epidemiology and Health Surveillance which is under the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health. These administrative changes have not altered the committee concerns but have served to focus the committee's attention on helping DoE plan for an effective system of worker health surveillance as well as an epidemiologic research program.

Mahlum, D.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Radiative processes: Potentials or Fields?  

SciTech Connect

In this work we prove that the transition amplitudes of processes involving the emission of one or more real photons is gauge invariant through terms that are always proportional to the electromagnetic field tensor.

Moreno, Matias [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. 04510 (Mexico); Lopez Castro, Gabriel [Departamento de Fisica, Centro de Investigacion y Estudios Avanzados, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

2010-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

42

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Slide Shows  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dose Health Effects of Radiation Health Effects of Radiation Adaptive Response to Low Dose Radiation PDF Background Radiation PDF Bystander Effects PDF Dirty Bombs PDF DNA Damage...

43

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Universities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Universities Universities | Duke University | Loma Linda University | Northwestern University | University of Chicago | University of California Davis | Northwestern University University of Chicago University of California Davis Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on NF-κB Signaling Networks and Mitochondria Principal Investigator: Dr. Gayle Woloschak DOE Low Dose Research Program Projects Low dose-low dose rate irradiation leads to long term changes in numbers of mitochondria and mitochondrial genomes - Principal Investigator: Gayle Woloschak, Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, Northwestern University, Chicago, IL, USA NF-κB-mediated pro-survival network in low dose radiation-induced adaptive protection - Principal Investigator: Jian Jian Li, Professor, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Davis,

44

Low Dose Radiation Research Program Website ?? Highlighting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Website Highlighting Low Dose Research Bill Morgan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Abstract The Low Dose Radiation Research Programs website is found at http:...

45

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Assessing Biological Function...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-ENG-48 and funded by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Biological and Environmental Research (BER), U.S....

46

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Optical Metrology Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optical Metrology Laboratory Optical Metrology Laboratory Photo of a laser and a spectral irradiance calibration system used to create lamp-detector alignment. Researchers use a spectral irradiance calibration alignment jig and a laser beam to align a calibration source and test unit. The NREL Optical Metrology Laboratory ensures that optical radiation resource measurement equipment is calibrated to national or international standards to ensure the quality and traceability of data. NREL considers optical radiation to range from 250 nm to 2,500 nm and to include the ultraviolet (250-400 nm), visible (400-750 nm), near infrared (750-1,100 nm), and shortwave infrared (1,100-2,500 nm) ranges. Activities The Optical Metrology Laboratory provides National Institute of Standards and Technology-traceable measurements for:

47

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Highlights - Real-time  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-time imaging of repair processes possible with Nickel-63 Real-time imaging of repair processes possible with Nickel-63 microirradiator Microscope Microscope stage-mounted microirradiation system. (A) Overall system shown mounted on a micromanipulator housed within a heated, humidified, environmental chamber of a microscope. (B) Close-up showing attachment of device to the micromanipulator. (C) Detail showing the bend in the enclosing capillary, which allows positioning of the active surface directly above the target cell. (D) Microirradiator tip in dissecting microscope. (E) Close-up view through microscope optics (scale bar, 10 microns.) Background: Scientists know that mammalian cells begin a nucleoplasmic repair process within seconds after being exposed to ionizing radiation. Real-time imaging of this process could further understanding of the

48

Computer aided research in managing educational process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the process of action research are trying to gather quantitative facts, as well as other empirical research. This, however, is basic and primary goal of action research. Action research is largely based on qualitative factors. Paradigm of action research ... Keywords: eduacation, informaiional technology, internet, management, physical education, research

Danimir Mandic; Veljko Bandjur; Nenad Lalic; Dragan Martinovic

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

50

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

51

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

52

DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy  

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DOE Research Contributions to Radiation and Cancer Therapy Resources with Additional Information Planned radiation treatment Peregrine calculation from Mission Possible: DOE Advanced Biomedical Technology Research, page 10 Over the time span of many years, DOE's research has made many contributions to radiation and cancer therapy, including PEREGRINE and Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). 'PEREGRINE, a hardware and software system that addresses the problem of radiation therapy dosage using fundamental physics principles, is a revolutionary new tool for analyzing and planning radiation treatment for cancer patients. About 90 percent of radiation treatment patients receive photon therapy, which is PEREGRINE's principal application. PEREGRINE may also be applied to the less frequently used electron-beam therapy and to brachytherapy, which is radiation therapy from an internally planted radiation source. It is effective for radiography, which predicts the pattern of radiation that is transmitted through a patient or other object.'1

53

Basic Research of Metallurgical Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 13, 2012... process can be acquired and used for estimate of production status. ... Within the efforts of replacing the full water quench in gasification...

54

Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility  

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Style Guide Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility March 2013 Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility March 2013 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research March 2013 ii Contents 1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................................................................................... 1 2.1 Usage ............................................................................................................................................ 1

55

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Radiation Response in Normal...  

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genes. Using rigorous computational methods, we characterized the dose-dependent, radiation-induced gene expression of HSF-42, a primary cell culture. Our preliminary results...

56

Radiation Research Society 2005 Annual Meeting, Denver, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Abstracts and proceedings of the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Radiation Research Society held in Denver, Colorado on October 16-19, 2005.

Robert Ullrich, PhD

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

57

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Walter E. Wilson  

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Monte Carlo simulation of the spatial distribution of energy deposition for an electron microbeam. Radiation Research: 163(4):468472. Mainardi, E., Donahue, R.J.,...

58

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Gene Expression Profiles...  

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of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48 with funding from the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program...

59

Third Radiation Effects Research Foundation Board of Councilors Meeting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Third Radiation Effects Research Foundation Board of Councilors Third Radiation Effects Research Foundation Board of Councilors Meeting Held in Hiroshima Third Radiation Effects Research Foundation Board of Councilors Meeting Held in Hiroshima July 22, 2013 - 4:54pm Addthis Third Radiation Effects Research Foundation Board of Councilors Meeting Held in Hiroshima The third Board of Councilors (BOC) meeting was held on June 18-19 at the Hiroshima Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), a bi-national U.S.-Japan research organization. The BOC is the highest decision-making body at RERF, consisting of eight Councilors elected from the United States and Japan. A total of 23 participants, including 8 Councilors from the United States and Japan and officials from the U.S. and Japanese Governments, were present at the meeting. The Office of Health, Safety and

60

User Research Administration | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation...  

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Research Administration LCLS and SSRL User Research Administration Cathy Knotts User Research Administration Manager Tel: (650) 926-3191 Fax: (650) 926-3600 LCLS and SSRL User...

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61

11th International Conference of Radiation Research  

SciTech Connect

Topics discussed in the conference included the following: Radiation Physics, Radiation Chemistry and modelling--Radiation physics and dosimetry; Electron transfer in biological media; Radiation chemistry; Biophysical and biochemical modelling; Mechanisms of DNA damage; Assays of DNA damage; Energy deposition in micro volumes; Photo-effects; Special techniques and technologies; Oxidative damage. Molecular and cellular effects-- Photobiology; Cell cycle effects; DNA damage: Strand breaks; DNA damage: Bases; DNA damage Non-targeted; DNA damage: other; Chromosome aberrations: clonal; Chromosomal aberrations: non-clonal; Interactions: Heat/Radiation/Drugs; Biochemical effects; Protein expression; Gene induction; Co-operative effects; ``Bystander'' effects; Oxidative stress effects; Recovery from radiation damage. DNA damage and repair -- DNA repair genes; DNA repair deficient diseases; DNA repair enzymology; Epigenetic effects on repair; and Ataxia and ATM.

NONE

1999-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

62

Highlights in Radiation Research - A Timeline  

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survivors. 1947 Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission (ABCC) created to study the biological effects of radiation on Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Brookhaven National Laboratory...

63

Low Dose Radiation Research Program Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for medical exposures. Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis 53(4): 247259 Lynn Hlatky ( 2012) Double-Strand Break Motions Shift Radiation Risk Notions?. PNAS...

64

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Charles Limoli  

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Radiation Biology, University of California, Irvine Funded Project Radiobiology of Neural Cancer Stem Cells Publications Elmore, E., Lao, X.Y., Kapadia, R., Giedzinski, E., Limoli,...

65

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Characterizing Bystander...  

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To order to investigate these variables for low-linear transfer (LET) radiation, an electron microbeam irradiation system has been developed. An electron source provides a beam...

66

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Katherine Vallis  

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Margaret Hospital Newly Funded Project The Characterization of Genetic Responses to Low Dose Radiation Using a Genome-Wide Insertional Mutagensis Approach Technical Abstracts 2005...

67

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Aloke Chatterjee  

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Chatterjee, A. and Holley, W.R. 1999 Workshop: Biological Effects of Low-Dose and Low-Dose-Rate Radiation Exposures: An Integrated Theoretical and Experimental Approach....

68

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mohan Natarajan  

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of Survival Advantage, Bystander Effect, and Genomic Instability after Low-LET Low Dose Radiation Exposure Funded Project Real-Time Molecular Study of Bystander Effect Using...

69

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Multidimensional Analysis...  

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Multidimensional Analysis of Human Epithelial Cell Response to Low Dose Radiation Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA. (Jointly funded by...

70

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Alec Moreley  

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Alec Moreley Technical Abstracts 1999 Workshop: Development of PCR-Based Methods for the Detection of Mutagenic Effects of Ionizing Radiation Morley, A., Turner, D., and Sykes, P....

71

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Melvyn Folkard  

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Melvyn Folkard Melvyn Folkard Gray Cancer Institute About this Project Currently Funded Projects A Variable Energy Soft X-ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect Technical Abstracts 2005 Workshop: A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray Microprobe to Investiage Mechanisms of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect Folkard, M., Vojnovic, B., Schettiono, G., Atkinson, K., Prise, K.M., Michael, B.D. 2003 Workshop: A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation -Induced Bystander Effect. Folkard, M., Vojnovic, B., Schettino, G., Atkinson, K., Prise, K.M., Michael, B.D. 2002 Workshop: A Variable-Energy Soft X-ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect. Folkard, M., Vojnovic, B., Schettino,

72

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Thomas Weber  

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2005 Workshop: A Paracrine Signal Mediates The Cell Transformation Response To Low Dose Gamma Radiation in JB6 Cells. Weber, T.J., Siegel, R.W., Markillie, L.M., Chrisler,...

73

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Characterization...  

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the Role of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation Chaun-Yuan Li Duke University Medical Center Durham, NC Why this Project? To evaluate the roles...

74

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Micronutrient Deficiency...  

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DNA damage is appreciable and increases with age,3;4 Our aim is to compare low dose radiation with micronutrient deficiency, and endogenous damage by a variety of measures...

75

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Radiation Research Related...  

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Research Related Databases Comprehensive Epidemiologic Data Resource (CEDR) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) The European Radiobiology Archives Genomics: GTL - Systems Biology for...

76

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status and Analysis Results: 1998 Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes...

77

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Characterization of the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Authors: Chuan-Yuan Li, Zhanjun Guo, Zhonghui Yang, and Eric Chuang Institutions: Dept of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC Advanced Technology Center, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland Background The potential risks of exposure to low dose radiation are of major concerns to the DOE/OBER Low Dose Radiation Research Program. It has been long recognized that much of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Therefore internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying

78

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 2003 Molecular Characterization of the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Authors: Chuan-Yuan Li,1 Eric Chuang2 Institutions: 1Dept of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, 2Advanced Technology Center, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland The potential risks of exposure to low dose radiation are of major concerns to the DOE/OBER Low Dose Radiation Research Program. It has been long recognized that much of the radiation-induced genetic damage to cells are caused by secondary oxidative species. Therefore, internal cellular defense systems against oxidative stress play significant roles in countering genetic damage induced by ionizing radiation. The role of the detoxifying

79

Proprietary Research | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

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Proprietary Research Proprietary Research Proprietary Research is defined as that for which users request confidentiality of proposal, data and results for a certain period of time. This research follows the guidelines for implementation by the Stanford University Faculty Senate and is executed through a Proprietary User Agreement. Proprietary Research is subject to the Department of Energy's full-cost recovery requirement for facility charges for the use of user facilities and advance payment of those charges. The facility charges are established as a dollar rate for each shift of beam time. Experimenters interested in conducting Proprietary Research should contact the User Research Administration Manager well in advance of the anticipated need for beam time as the legal and financial procedures involved may take

80

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: William F. Morgan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

William F. Morgan William F. Morgan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory PO Box 999 Richland, Washington About this Project Projects Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory, and Societal Impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program A Mechanistic Study of the Radiation Quality Dependence of Bystander Effects in Human Cells. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation Mechanisms of Adaptive Responses and Genomic Instability Induced by Low Dose/ Low Dose Rate Radiation Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: Using a Low-LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation Sowa, M.B., Goetz, W., Baulch, J., and Morgan, W.F. Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation

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81

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Highlights - Ionizing  

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Affects Cancer Frequency and Characteristics by Acting Affects Cancer Frequency and Characteristics by Acting on the Microenvironment Background: For more than a quarter century the scientific rationale for extrapolating radiation health effects has been underpinned by biophysical target theory. Fundamental to target theory is that the effect (e.g., DNA damage, mutation, cancer) is proportional to dose based on interaction of energy with biological targets, specifically DNA. However, the biology following ionizing radiation is more than just DNA damage, repair, or misrepair. Cellular responses to ionizing radiation can affect phenotype, cell interactions, lineage commitment, differentiation and genomic stability, all of which have been widely documented in cultured cells and many observed in vivo. This class of non-targeted effects induced

82

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Highlights - Collateral  

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Collateral Damage Collateral Damage Using targeted irradiation to understand radiation-induced effects in bystander cells chromosomal A typical example of chromosomal instability induction measured by chromosome-type aberrations in primary human lymphocytes at delay time post-irradiation of a fraction of the cell population. Similar types of aberrations were observed in whole irradiated population but were not observed in untreated cells. Munira Kadhim Background: It has long been understood that radiation exposure can influence cellular changes. Studies indicate that even very low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) alpha-particle irradiation, such as that from environmental radon, can affect cells. Radiation-induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells and as a

83

Reference Radiation for Cosmic Rays in RBE Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When astronauts travel in space, they are exposed to high energy cosmic radiations. The cosmic ray spectrum contains very high energy particles, generally up to several GeV per nucleon. Currently NASA is funding research on the effects, such as acute radiation sickness, of cosmic radiation. Animal models are used to conduct the studies of radiation effects of particles in the range of several MeV/nucleon to about 1000 MeV/nucleon. In order to compare different radiations, the biological effectiveness relative to a specific radiation is usually used. For low energy heavy ions and neutrons 250 keV photons are usually used for the reference radiation but their depth dose distribution is very different from that for cosmic rays. In this research, the advantages of using high energy electrons as the reference radiation for research on cosmic radiation were demonstrated. The conclusion is based on the evaluation of the dose distributions and microdosimetric spectra of the electrons and high energy protons as a function of depth in a tissue equivalent absorber as determined by Geant4 simulation.

Feng, Shaoyong

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Antone (Tony) L. Brooks  

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A.L. and Couch, L.A. 2002 Workshop: Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory and Social Impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program Brooks, A.L., Bull, R.J., and...

85

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: John S. Wassom  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Science of the Low Dose Radiation Research Program. Wassom, J.S., Owens, E.T., Martin, S.A., Wolfe, A.K., Lyday, M.K., and Dimmick, S.L. 2001 Workshop: Communicating the...

86

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Cytogenetic tests of Radiobiologi...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

relevant low-dose range (less than 0.1 Gy). Relate chromosome damage to radiation-induced cancer. Research Approach By studying molecular mechanisms relevant to low doses and low...

87

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 2011 Calendar of Upcoming...  

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Ann. Mtg. of the American Roentgen Ray Society, Chicago, IL, USA. May 9-11, 2011 Low Dose Radiation Research Investigators' Workshop, Bethesda, MD, USA. May 16-20, 2011...

88

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research July 1-September 30, 2010, DOESC-ARM-10-029 iii Contents 1.0 Data Availability......

89

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research July 1-September 30, 2011, DOESC-ARM-11-022 iii Contents 1.0 Data Availability......

90

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: What's New Archive  

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What's New What's New Tony Brooks Chosen As Lauriston S. Taylor Lecturer Congratulations to radiation biologist Dr. Antone "Tony" Brooks, a consultant to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Low Dose Radiation Research Program, on his selection to give the 36th Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture at the Annual Meeting of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). Brooks is former chief scientist for the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Dose Radiation Research Program. His lecture, titled "From the Field to the Laboratory and Back: The What Ifs, Wows, and Who Cares of Radiation Biology," will be a featured presentation at the meeting, which will be held March 12 and 13, 2012, at the Hyatt Regency Bethesda, Bethesda, Maryland.

91

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Allan Balmain  

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of genomic instability and epithelial tumor development by the p53-Fbxw7Cdc4 pathway. Cancer Research 65:6488-6492. Perez-Losada, J., Wu, D., DelRosario, R., Balmain, A., and...

92

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: David Schild  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cells. Nucleic Acids Research 30:1001-1008. Takata, M., Sasaki, M.S., Tachiiri, S., Fukushima, T., Sonoda, E., Schild, D., Thompson, L.H., and Takeda, S. (2001). Chromosome...

93

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Bruce E. Lehnert  

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E. Lehnert E. Lehnert Los Alamos National Laboratory Past Project Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Unirradiated Cells: Pathways Analysis in Support of Risk Assessment. Technical Abstracts 2002 Workshop: Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Unirradiated cells: Pathways Analysis in Support of Risk Assessment. Lehnert, B.E., Cary, R., Gadbois, D. and Gupta G. 2001 Workshop: Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Effects of Ionizing Radiation in Irradiated and Unirradiated Cells. Lehnert, B.E. 1999 Workshop: Low Dose, Low Dose Rate Effects of Ionizing Radiation in Irradiated and Unirradiated Cells. Lehnert, B.E. Publications Lehnert, B.E., Radiation bystander effects. U.S.Department of Energy Research News (March 6 issue) Goldberg, Z. and Lehnert, B.E. (2002). Radiation-induced effects in

94

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Michael Weil  

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Dubrova, Y., Weil, M., and Brenner, D. H2AX Foci after Low Dose-Rate Irradiation Reveal a Defect in DNA DSB Processing in Cells from Unaffected Parents of...

95

Japan Program - Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF)  

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Safety Safety Home Sub Offices › Worker Safety & Health Policy › Worker Safety & Health Assistance › Illness & Injury Prevention Programs › International Health Studies › Office of Worker Screening and Compensation Support Mission & Functions › Health & Safety › Worker Safety & Health Policy › Worker Safety & Health Assistance › Illness & Injury Prevention Programs › International Health Studies › Worker Screening and Compensation Support Federal Line Management Oversight of DOE Nuclear Facilities Integrated Safety Management (ISM) A-Z Index Directory OSH Regulatory and Policy Response Line Health Resources Policy and Standards Worker Safety Beryllium Chemical Safety Biological Safety Radiation Safety Rules 10 CFR 707 10 CFR 835

96

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Glossary  

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Glossary Glossary A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z We welcome updates to the glossary. Please send them to Low Dose. A α=β Ratio: A measure of the curvature of the cell survival curve and a measure of the sensitivity of a tissue or tumor to dose fractionation. The dose at which the linear and quadratic components of cell killing are equal. Abscopal Effect: The radiation response in tissue at a distance from the irradiated site invoked by local irradiation. Absorbed Dose Rate: Absorbed dose divided by the time it takes to deliver that dose. High dose rates are usually more damaging to humans and animals than low-dose rates. This is because repair of damage is more efficient when the dose rate is low. Absorbed Dose: The amount of energy deposited in any substance by ionizing

97

DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Workshop I November 1999  

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Low Dose Radiation Research Program Low Dose Radiation Research Program U.S. Department of Energy Office of Biological and Environmental Research David G. Thomassen, Ph.D. Program Coordinator Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy, SC-72 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, MD 20874-1290 Phone: 301-903-9817 Fax: 301-903-8521 Email: david.thomassen@science.doe.gov Arthur Katz, Ph.D. Life Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy, SC-72 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, MD 20874-1290 Phone: 301-903-4932 Fax: 301-903-8521 Email: arthur.katz@science.doe.gov Marvin E. Frazier, Ph.D. Director, Life Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy, SC-72 19901 Germantown Road

98

The Research Program | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Research Program The Research Program What is the chemical and physical form of uranium in reduced aquifers? Uranium behavior in the Rifle, CO, aquifer. In order to directly interrogate the chemical and physical form of reduced uranium (U(IV)) in bioremediated sediments within the contaminated aquifer at the Rifle site, a novel technique was developed based on reactors installed in wells (center right). U(IV) was found to be bound to biomass (structural model shown in upper left-hand) within thin (microns) sulfide-rich coatings on mineral grains (bottom left). Uranium in its oxidized (U(VI)) form, is one of the most common, abundant, and problematic subsurface contaminants at legacy nuclear sites. In contrast, the tetravalent form of uranium (U(IV) ) is relatively insoluble

99

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1September 30, 2012  

SciTech Connect

Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

100

Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project: Solar Radiation Research annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report gives an overview of the fiscal year 1990 research activities and results under the Solar Radiation Research Task of the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the Solar Energy Research Institute. The activities under this task include developing and applying measurement techniques, instrumentation, and data and models to understand and quantify the response of photovoltaic devices to variations in broadband and spectra solar radiation. The information presented in this report was presented at the SERI Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project 10th Review Meeting, October 1990, and will be published in a special issue of Solar Cells dedicated to the meeting.

Riordan, C.; Hulstrom, R.; Cannon, T.; Myers, D.; Stoffel, T.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DOE / NASA Joint Funded Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE/NASA Joint Funded Projects DOE/NASA Joint Funded Projects NASA Source Photo Space explorers are subject to exposure to low dose ionizing radiation. Research that helps determine health risks from this exposure is funded by NASA and DOE. Source: NASA DOE's Low Dose Program and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) jointly fund new research to develop a better scientific basis for understanding risks to humans from exposures to low doses or low fluences of ionizing radiation. Research must focus on elucidating molecular mechanisms and pathways involved in normal radiobiological responses to low dose exposure, and must have the potential to ultimately increase understanding of health outcomes from radiation exposures that are at or near current workplace exposure

102

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Highlights - 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Capacities Before and After Exposure to Low DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Capacities Before and After Exposure to Low Dose Radiation Immunochemical detection of DSB foci in the nuclei of human fibroblasts. (A) γ-H2AX phospho-serine 139 foci (chromatin marker of DSBs; green). (B) ataxia-telangiectasia mutated phospho-serine 1981 foci (ATM, DNA damage-responsive kinase; red). (C) Merge of images A and B. (White arrows mark large γ-H2AX foci and coincident γ-H2AX/pATM foci that were positively scored; yellow arrows mark small γ-H2AX foci that lack corresponding pATM foci that were not scored.) Enlarge Image Immunochemical detection of DSB foci in the nuclei of human fibroblasts. (A) γ-H2AX phospho-serine 139 foci (chromatin marker of DSBs; green). (B) ataxia-telangiectasia mutated phospho-serine 1981 foci (ATM,

103

Committee on Radiation Epidemiological Research Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The full committee had three meetings during this reporting period. The first meeting was devoted to hearing views from other agencies on sharing health data and using social security records in epidemiology. Preliminary plans for the design of the Comprehensive Epidemiological Data Resource (CEDR) were discussed at a subcommittee meeting. Drafts of the first scientific report to DOE were discussed at the second committee meeting. This report was published on December 28, 1990, and about 200 copies have been distributed. Four new committee members were added on January 9, 1991, and a listing of the current committee membership is provided. The first committee meeting to be held after transfer of epidemiological studies from DOE to DHHS was held on February 15, 1991. In the next funding period, the committee will address problems of public access to CEDR while maintaining data security. The committee will also advise DOE on research priorities for the epidemiological studies transferred to DHHS.

Ellett, W.H.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory, and Societal Impact of the DOE Low Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory, and Societal Impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program Antone L. Brooks Why This Project? For maximum benefit, state-of-the-art research and new data from the Low Dose Radiation Research Program must be available to other scientists, regulatory agencies, and the public. This project stays abreast of scientific advances in the field, gathers, integrates, and summarizes the research within the program, and disseminates this information to appropriate scientific, regulatory, and public venues. Project Goals Provides a focal point for distribution of information generated in the program, to scientific committees, other governmental and regulatory agencies, and to the public Provides scientific support for the Low Dose Program website

105

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory and Social Impact of the DOE Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory and Social Impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program. Authors: Antone L.Brooks, Richard J. Bull, Lezlie A. Couch. Institutions: Washington State University Tri-Cities The purpose of this project is to provide scientific, technical, and organizational support to optimize the impact of the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program. This project will serve as a focal point for collection and dissemination of scientific information from the scientists funded in the Program to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the regulatory agencies, and the public. The project will be responsible for analysis of the scientific information in the broader context of biomedical research and will provide this information to the Office of Biological Research

106

Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term...

107

Magnetic fields and radiative feedback in the star formation process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Star formation is a complex process involving the interplay of many physical effects, including gravity, turbulent gas dynamics, magnetic fields and radiation. Our understanding of the process has improved substantially in recent years, primarily as a result of our increased ability to incorporate the relevant physics in numerical calculations of the star formation process. In this contribution we present an overview of our recent studies of star cluster formation in turbulent, magnetised clouds using self-gravitating radiation-magnetohydrodynamics calculations (Price and Bate 2008, 2009). Our incorporation of magnetic fields and radiative transfer into the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method are discussed. We highlight how magnetic fields and radiative heating of the gas around newborn stars can solve several of the key puzzles in star formation, including an explanation for why star formation is such a slow and inefficient process. However, the presence of magnetic fields at observed strengths in collaps...

Price, Daniel J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Howard L. Liber  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Howard L. Liber Howard L. Liber Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences Colorado State University Currently Funded Projects Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells Technical Abstracts 2003 Workshop: Delayed genomic instability in human lymphoblasts exposed to 137Cs y-rays radiation Schwartz, J.L., Jordan, R., Lenarczyk, M. and Liber, H.L. 2002 Workshop: Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells. Liber, H.L. and Schwartz, J.L. Publications Zhang, Y., Zhou, J., Held, K.D., Redmond, R.W., Prise, K.M., and Liber, H.L. (2008). Deficiencies of double-strand break repair factors and effects on mutagenesis in directly [gamma]-irradiated and medium-mediated bystander human lymphoblastoid cells. Radiation Research 169(2):197-206.

109

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Chaun-Yuan Li  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chaun-Yuan Li Chaun-Yuan Li Radiation Biology Research, Duke University Medical Center Funded Projects Molecular Characterization of the Role of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Ionizing, abstract, description. Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: The Roles of Superoxide Dismutage (SOD) in Low Dose Radiation Induced Adaptive Response Yang, Z., Chuang, E., Batinic-Haberle, I., and Li, C.-Y. 2005 Workshop: Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Li, C.-Y., Guo, Z., Yang, Z., and Chuang, E. 2003 Workshop: Molecular Characterization of the Roles of SOD Genes in Mammalian Cellular Response to Low Dose Radiation Li, C.-Y. and Chuang, E. Publications Li, F., Sonveaux, P., Rabbani, Z.N., Liu, S., Yan, B., Huang, Q.,

110

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earths surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earths energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

LR Roeder

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

United States Department of Energy Low Dose Radiation Research Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History of the History of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 1998-2008 Dr. Antone L. Brooks tbrooks@tricity.wsu.edu September 2012 Review Draft i Contents Preface............................................................................................................................................. v Summary ........................................................................................................................................ vi Acronyms and Initialisms ............................................................................................................. vii Chapter 1 Introduction ................................................................................................................... 1

112

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Mechanisms of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells. Authors: Howard L. Liber1 and Jeffrey L. Schwartz2. Institutions: 1Colorado State University and 2University of Washington. Knowledge of the signal and target through which radiation induces genomic instability, which we propose to investigate herein, will allow us to model effects at low doses. Such knowledge will aid in understanding variations in the induction of this genomic instability, both among cells and among individuals. This information could also lead to more sensitive measures of instability that could yield accurate measures of instability induction at low doses. We have developed an in-vitro cell model, in which radiation-induced chromosome instability develops in a two-stage process.

113

Summary of research on microbiological processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Storage of thermal energy in aquifers has obvious benefits of saving energy and decreasing the consumption of fossil fuels. However, aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES), which involves groundwater aquifers as the storage medium for heat or chill, impinges on the environment. A literature review of pertinent microbiology publications (Hicks and Stewart, 1988) identified the potential for the interaction of ATES systems and microbiological processes to create a source of infectious diseases and the potential for damage to the environment. In addition, the review identified a potential for microbiological processes to develop conditions that would interfere with the operation of an ATES system. As a result of this research effort, investigators from Finland, Germany, Switzerland, and the United States have examined several ATES systems in operation and have observed that the ATES systems studied do not contribute to infectious disease transmission, do not adversely affect the environment, and do not contribute significantly to biofouling or biocorrosion.

Winters, A.L.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

COLUMBIA RADIATION LABORATORY RESEARCH INVESTIGATION DIRECTED TOWARD EXTENDING  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

iVP-^"^^? iVP-^"^^? COLUMBIA RADIATION LABORATORY RESEARCH INVESTIGATION DIRECTED TOWARD EXTENDING THE USEFUL RANGE OF THE ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM Special Technical Report Signal Corps Contract DA-36-039 SC-64630 DA Project No. 3-99-10-022 SC Project No. 102B U. S. Army Laboratory Procurement Office Signal Corps Supply Agency Fort Monmouth, New Jersey The Trustees of Columbia University in the City of New York Box 6, Low Memorial Library New York 27, New York March 1, 1956 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. COLUMBIA RADIATION LABORATORY Collected Papers on the AAASER (Microwave Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) Special Technical Report

115

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory and Societal Impact of the DOE Optimizing the Scientific, Regulatory and Societal Impact of the DOE Low Dose Research Program Authors: Antone L. Brooks Institution: Washington State University Tri-Cities Richland, Washington The purpose of this project is to provide a focal point for communication of the research results from the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program. The major communication tool provided by this project is a Website at Washington State University. The website is being maintained to provide communication between the scientific advances generated by the research program and scientists both in and outside the program, policy makers, regulators and the public. The website also contains a number of presentations and illustrations that are written so that they will be easy

116

Gordon Research Conference on Radiation & Climate in 2009, July 5 -10  

SciTech Connect

The 2009 Gordon Research Conference on Radiation and Climate will present cutting-edge research on the outstanding issues in global climate change with focus on the radiative forcing and sensitivity of the climate system and associated physical processes. The Conference will feature a wide range of topics, including grand challenges in radiation and climate, radiative forcing, climate feedbacks, cloud processes in climate system, hydrological cycle in changing climate, absorbing aerosols and Asian monsoon, recent climate changes, and geo-engineering. The invited speakers will present the recent most important advances and future challenges in these areas. The Conference will bring together a collection of leading investigators who are at the forefront of their field, and will provide opportunities for scientists especially junior scientists and graduate students to present their work in poster format and exchange ideas with leaders in the field. The collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with programmed discussion sessions as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, provides an avenue for scientists from different disciplines to brainstorm and promotes cross-disciplinary collaborations in the various research areas represented.

Quiang Fu

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

117

Final Conference Papers/Proceedings for the 12th International Congress on Radiation Research, Brisbane, Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proceedings of the 12th International Congress of Radiation Research, Brisbane, Australia, August 17-22, 20003

None

2003-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

118

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Computational Modeling of Biochemical  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computational Modeling of Biochemical Pathways Linking Ionizing Computational Modeling of Biochemical Pathways Linking Ionizing Radiation to Cell Cycle Arrest, Apoptosis, and Tumor Incidence Authors: Yuchao Maggie Zhao and Rory Conolly Institutions: Center for Computational Systems Biology CIIT Centers for Health Research Long-Range Goal: To develop an integrated, computational framework for the prediction of low-dose-response to ionizing radiation (IR) in people. Methodology: To provide a flexible framework to evaluate mechanisms of cellular adaptive responses after exposure to IR, three progressively more complicated descriptions of biochemical pathways linking DNA damage with cell-cycle checkpoint control and apoptosis were developed. These descriptions focus on p53-dependent checkpoint arrest and apoptosis, p73-dependent apoptosis, and Chk2-dependent checkpoint arrest,

119

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Mechanisms of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation-Induced Genomic Instability in Human Cells Howard L. Liber Department of Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences Colorado State University Why This Project This research will be to investigate the condition known as genomic instability. This can be defined as a state in which genetic alterations, including chromosome aberrations and gene mutations, occur at rates that are much higher than normal. In fact, genomic instability is what allows a normal cell to accumulate the multiple genetic alterations that are required to convert it into a cancer cell. The chromosomes of human cells have structures at their ends called telomeres. Telomeres normally function to prevent chromosomes from fusing together end-to-end. An important

120

Process for radiation grafting hydrogels onto organic polymeric substrates  

SciTech Connect

An improved process for radiation grafting of hydrogels onto organic polymeric substrates is provided comprising the steps of incorporating an effective amount of cupric or ferric ions in an aqueous graft solution consisting of N-vinyl-2 - pyrrolidone or mixture of N-vinyl-2 - pyrrolidone and other monomers, e.g., 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate, 2-hydroxyethyl acrylate, propylene glycol acrylate, acrylamide, methacrylic acid and methacrylamide, immersing an organic polymeric substrate in the aqueous graft solution and thereafter subjecting the contacted substrate with ionizing radiation.

Ratner, Buddy D. (Seattle, WA); Hoffman, Allan S. (Seattle, WA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Characterizing Bystander Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiation. Irradiation. Authors: L.A. Braby and J.R. Ford. Institutions: Texas A&M University. Bystander effects, which are typically seen as in increase in the cellular concentration of specific repair related molecules or as cytogenetic changes which appear to be the consequence of DNA damage, may be a significant factor in the risk of long-term health effects of low doses of radiation. These effects clearly increase the effective size of the target for radiation response, from the diameter of a single cell or cell nucleus to something significantly larger, by bringing additional cells into the process. It is unclear whether this larger target will result in an increase or a decrease in the probability of inducing a change which would be detrimental to the health of the organism, but it clearly reduces the

122

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Cooperation Between Homologous  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cooperation Between Homologous Recombination and the Fanconi Anemia Cooperation Between Homologous Recombination and the Fanconi Anemia Cancer Suppressor Proteins in Minimizing Spontaneous and Radiation-Induced Chromosomal Instability Authors: Larry H. Thompson, John M. Hinz, Robert S. Tebbs, and N. Alice Yamada Institutions: Biosciences Directorate, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California Purpose and experimental approach. This study addresses the genetic basis of spontaneous mutagenesis as a means of understanding the DNA damage-response pathways that maintain chromosome stability. It is our view that knowledge of these processes is fundamental to understanding how low dose ionizing radiation (IR) produces chromosomal rearrangements that lead to carcinogenesis. Endogenous oxidative DNA damage is presumed to be a

123

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Use of Computational Modeling to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Use of Computational Modeling to Evaluate Hypotheses about the Use of Computational Modeling to Evaluate Hypotheses about the Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms of Bystander Effects Authors: Yuchao “Maggie” Zhao and Rory Conolly Institutions: CIIT Centers for Health Research, 6 Davis Drive, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina A detailed understanding of the biological mechanisms of radiation-induced damage at the molecular and cellular levels is needed for accurate assessment of the shape of the dose-response curve for radiationinduced health effects in the intact organism. Computational models can contribute to the improved understanding of mechanisms through integration of data and quantitative evaluation of hypotheses. We propose to develop a novel computational model of bystander effects elicited by oxidative stress and a

124

2012 RADIATION CHEMISTRY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE AND GORDON RESEARCH SEMINAR, JULY 28, - AUGUST 3, 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overarching objective of this conference is to catalyze the interchange of new ideas and recent discoveries within the basic radiation sciences of physics, chemistry, and biology, and to facilitate translating this knowledge to applications in medicine and industry. The 9 topics for the GRC are: "?From Energy Absorption to Disease", "?Biodosimetry after a Radiological Incident," "?Track Structure and Low Energy Electrons," "Free Radical Processes in DNA and Proteins," "Irradiated Polymers for Industrial/ Medical Applications," "Space Radiation Chemistry/Biology," "Nuclear Power and Waste Management," "Nanoparticles and Surface Interfaces", and the "Young Investigator" session.

y LaVerne

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

125

CHEMICAL PROCESS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the fermentation and distillation processes have beensteam production. The distillation energy requirement islow energy costs to distillation column pressure. A second

Authors, Various

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

DOE/SC-ARM-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

20 20 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

127

DOE/SC-ARM-12-021 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

128

DOE/SC-ARM-13-020 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1-September 30, 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

129

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Induction of Genomic Instability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brook Why This Project Genomic instability is an important step in radiation-induced cancer. We will investigate one potential repair mechanism involved in radiation-induced...

130

A Coordinated Effort to Improve Parameterization of High-Latitude Cloud and Radiation Processes  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is the development and evaluation of improved parameterization of arctic cloud and radiation processes and implementation of the parameterizations into a climate model. Our research focuses specifically on the following issues: (1) continued development and evaluation of cloud microphysical parameterizations, focusing on issues of particular relevance for mixed phase clouds; and (2) evaluation of the mesoscale simulation of arctic cloud system life cycles.

J. O. Pinto, A.H. Lynch

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

131

CHEMICAL PROCESS RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Dept. of Energy. Chemical Marketing Reporter, JanuaryUniv. of Calif. Dept. of Chemical Engineering (March 1977).Ergun et aL, "Analysis of Chemical Coal Cleaning Processes,"

Authors, Various

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1March 31, 2012  

SciTech Connect

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2012-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

133

EM Marks Milestone at Separations Process Research Unit | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marks Milestone at Separations Process Research Unit Marks Milestone at Separations Process Research Unit EM Marks Milestone at Separations Process Research Unit March 7, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers construct an enclosure for Building H2 at the Separations Process Research Unit Workers construct an enclosure for Building H2 at the Separations Process Research Unit NISKAYUNA, N.Y. - EM met a major regulatory milestone at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) by completing construction of enclosures and ventilation systems required for cleanup. The SPRU project at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory reached the milestone last week in a consent order between DOE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued pursuant to the Clean Air Act. The Department has now accomplished all the requirements of the consent order.

134

Errors and Uncertainties in Dose Reconstruction for Radiation Effects Research  

SciTech Connect

Dose reconstruction for studies of the health effects of ionizing radiation have been carried out for many decades. Major studies have included Japanese bomb survivors, atomic veterans, downwinders of the Nevada Test Site and Hanford, underground uranium miners, and populations of nuclear workers. For such studies to be credible, significant effort must be put into applying the best science to reconstructing unbiased absorbed doses to tissues and organs as a function of time. In many cases, more and more sophisticated dose reconstruction methods have been developed as studies progressed. For the example of the Japanese bomb survivors, the dose surrogate distance from the hypocenter was replaced by slant range, and then by TD65 doses, DS86 doses, and more recently DS02 doses. Over the years, it has become increasingly clear that an equal level of effort must be expended on the quantitative assessment of uncertainty in such doses, and to reducing and managing uncertainty. In this context, this paper reviews difficulties in terminology, explores the nature of Berkson and classical uncertainties in dose reconstruction through examples, and proposes a path forward for Joint Coordinating Committee for Radiation Effects Research (JCCRER) Project 2.4 that requires a reasonably small level of effort for DOSES-2008.

Strom, Daniel J.

2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

135

Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC)  

SciTech Connect

Enclosed are proceedings of the workshop on Internal Dosimetry held on Atlanta, Georgia in April 1992. The recommendations from the Workshop were considered by the CIRRPC Subpanel on Occupational Radiation Protection Research in identifying those areas to be undertaken by individual Federal Agencies or in cooperative efforts. This document presents summaries of the following sessions: A.1 Applications and limitations of ICRP and other metabolic models, A.2 Applications and implementation of proposed ICRP lung model, A.3 Estimates of intake from repetitive bioassay data, A.4 Chelation models for plutonium urinalysis data, B.1 Transuranium/uranium registry data, B.2 Autopsy tissue analysis, B.3 Bioassay / Whole body counting, B.4 Data base formatting and availability, C.1 An overview of calculational techniques in use today, C.2 The perfect code, C.3 Dose calculations based on individuals instead of averages, C.4 From macro dosimetry to micro dosimetry.

Not Available

1994-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

136

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Factors Affecting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation William F. Morgan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why This Project The short-term effects of high doses of ionizing radiation on cellular responses are relatively well understood. Less clear are the long-term consequences of exposure to low dose/low dose-rate radiation and the effects of radiation exposure on the progeny of surviving cells. If a cell survives radiation, it is generally thought to have repaired all the radiation-induced insults and be capable of a "normal healthy life". At a certain frequency, however, we have found that some cells surviving radiation grow normally, but will rearrange their genetic material during time in culture. We call this radiation-induced genomic instability. Many

137

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Thermochemical Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Printable Version Printable Version Thermochemical Processes Photo of a researcher wearing a hardhat and examining a catalytic steam reformer. Catalytic steam reforming increases the overall yield of fuel gas from biomass. NREL's researchers have investigated the thermochemical conversion of renewable energy feedstocks since the lab's inception. Researchers are developing gasification and pyrolysis processes to convert biomass and its residues to hydrogen, fuels, chemicals, and power. Building on past successes, biomass is increasingly one of the best near-term options for renewable hydrogen production. Thermochemical Process R&D Research and development at NREL provides a fundamental understanding of the chemistry of biomass pyrolysis. This R&D includes stabilizing and

138

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Separations Process Research Unit -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Separations Process Research Unit - Separations Process Research Unit - 024 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Separations Process Research Unit (024) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This facility was constructed and operated by the Atomic Energy Commission as a pilot plant for developing and testing the chemical processes to extract both uranium and plutonium from irradiated fuel. Through Fiscal Year 1999 the Department of Energy's Office of Naval Reactors performed surveillance and maintenance activities. In Fiscal Year 2000, a contract was initiated to begin the characterization of the facilities. This will be

139

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1December 31, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

140

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1September 30, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1March 31, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Sisterson, DL

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

142

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1June 30, 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

143

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report: October 1 - December 31, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Sisterson, DL

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

144

Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Process Research Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies » Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Emerging Technologies » Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Process Research Project Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Process Research Project The Department of Energy is currently researching the development of building superinsulation through a carbon dioxide (CO2) foaming process. Project Description This project seeks to develop building super insulation through a carbon dioxide foaming process that does not use hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), and which produces insulation with a high R-value. Project Partners Research is being undertaken between the Department of Energy and The Industrial Science & Technology Network. Project Goals The goal of this project is to develop advanced insulation without HFC, and to achieve a competitive processing cost for CO2 foaming technology.

145

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Identification of Mouse Genetic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mouse Genetic Susceptibility to Radiation Carcinogenesis Mouse Genetic Susceptibility to Radiation Carcinogenesis Allan Balmain University of California, San Francisco San Francisco, CA. (Jointly funded by NASA and DOE) Why this Project? To identify pathways that control genetic susceptibility to radiation-induced DNA damage and tumor development using novel developments in genomics together with mouse genetics. Project Goals To identify genetic loci that trigger rapid tumor development of mice after radiation. To characterize new genes at these loci that act as tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes. Experimental Approach New candidate-radiation susceptibility genes will be identified using a unique haplotyping approach. Using DNA from radiation-induced lymphoma, changes in the gene copy number can be detected using BAC microarrays. The

146

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Proteomic and Biochemical...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

proteomic changes including protein expression levels and post-translational modification due to low dose-rate ionizing radiation Expected Outcomes Increased differentiation...

147

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 2011 Current Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Investigation of non-targeted effects of low dose ionizing radiation on the mammary gland utilizing three-dimensional culture models of mammary cells derived from mouse strains...

148

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: James E. Morris  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Northwest National Laboratories Past Funded Project Sensitivity to radiation-induced cancer in hemachromatosis. Publications Stevens, R.G., Morris, J.E., and Anderson, L.E....

149

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Depletion of the Vertebrate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory, Berkeley, California To better understand the responses to low dose ionizing radiation, we proposed in Aim 1 of our Low Dose grant to use dominant-negative...

150

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genomic Instability and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genomic Instability and Low Dose Low Dose Rate Radiation. Authors: Lei Huang, Suzanne Grim, William F. Morgan Institutions: University of Maryland. Humans will always receive...

151

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Variation in Tissue...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variation in Tissue Responses to Low-dose Radiation Eugene Rinchik Oak Ridge National Laboratory Why this Project? To address how individual genetic background affects tissue...

152

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Bruce N. Ames  

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University of California, Berkeley Technical Abstracts 2002 Workshop: Comparison of Low-Dose Radiation, Endogenous Oxidants, and Micronutrient Deficiencies through Analyses of DNA...

153

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Susan S. Wallace  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Susan S. Wallace University of Vermont Past Funded Project Free Radical DNA Damage Produced Endogenously and by Low Dose Radiation in Human Cells: Quantitation, Consequences, and...

154

Research Programs on Low-Level Radiation Health Effects Supported by FEPCO  

SciTech Connect

The federation of Electric Power Companies (FEPCO) of Japan has been supporting several research projects on low-level radiation health effects for the purpose of the following: 1. to assist in the establishment of a reasonable system of radiation protection; 2. to release the public from unnecessary fear of ionizing radiation. We present some of the findings and current research programs funded or supported by FEPCO.

Kaneko, Masahito

1999-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

155

Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination 10th anniversary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ten years ago, on April 9, 1984, the Science Advisor to the President, and Director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy, established the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC) to meet the need for an interagency committee to address Congressionally mandated and agency-identified issues related to radiation research and policy. CIRRPC replaced the Committee on Interagency Radiation Policy, a committee of the Federal Coordinating Council for Science, Engineering and Technology, and assumed the responsibilities of the Interagency Radiation Research Committee and the Radiation Policy Council, whose charters had expired. Since then, CIRRPC has been recognized as an effective and respected mechanism for coordinating radiation policy among Federal agencies and as an efficient coordinator and evaluator of Federal efforts on designated radiation research projects. In the last 10 years, CIRRPC has established various Policy and Science Subpanels to undertake the oftentimes difficult task of resolving and coordinating agency policies and responses to issues dealing with radiation. These subpanels addressed such issues as the metrication of radiation units, the policy impact of the radioepidemiological tables, naturally occurring and accelerator-produced radioactive materials, radon protection and health effects, predisaster planning for human health effects research, and ionizing radiation risk assessment. These subpanels and their work represent CIRRPC`s continuing effort to seek a common position on issues of national significance and interest.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and validation of a black carbon mixing state resolved three-dimensional model: Aging processes and radiative impact." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, ,...

157

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Factors Affecting  

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Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Doses of Ionizing Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Doses of Ionizing Radiation. Authors: William F. Morgan, Pat Concannon & John H.J. Petrini The goal of this program is to test the hypothesis that mice heterozygous for the NBS1 gene are genetically susceptible to low doses of ionizing radiation. Patients with Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS) are radiation sensitive, because of defects in cellular responses to radiation induced genetic damage. It is unclear whether humans heterozygous for the mutations associated with NBS are radiation sensitive and results from cell culture experiments give conflicting results. In collaboration with John Petrini at the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York City we developed a mouse model of this disorder and are directly testing the hypothesis

158

Low Dose Radiation Research Program Website ? Highlighting Low...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Program Website - Highlighting Low Dose Research Bill Morgan, Principal Investigator; Julie Wiley, Website Content Manager; Christine Novak, Webmaster The Low Dose...

159

Radiative Processes in Upper Tropospheric Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diffusional mass evolution of hydrometeors in upper tropospheric clouds for various radiative conditions in the cloud and for varying ambient moisture Supply is simulated using a time dependent microphysical model. Radiation can play an ...

Douglas A. Wesley; Stephen K. Cox

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 - September 30, 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 September 30, 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

DL Sisterson

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Processes Research Inc - OH 44  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Processes Research Inc - OH 44 Processes Research Inc - OH 44 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: PROCESSES RESEARCH, INC (OH.44) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 2905 Vernon Place , Cincinnati , Ohio OH.44-1 Evaluation Year: 1991 OH.44-2 OH.44-3 Site Operations: Research and development of machining methods during the early 1950s; no indication of involvement with radioactive materials. OH.44-1 OH.44-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote based on nature of operations at the site OH.44-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None OH.44-3 Radiological Survey(s): No Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP

163

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - New Materials, Devices, and Processes for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Materials, Devices, and Processes for Advanced Concepts New Materials, Devices, and Processes for Advanced Concepts Computational Science and Theory We can use high-performance computing tools in modeling and simulation studies of semiconductor and other solar materials. We also determine the performance of solar devices. Theoretical studies can help us understand underlying physical principles or predict useful chemical compositions and crystalline structures. Scientific Computing Experimental Materials Science Solid-State Theory. NREL has strong complementary research capabilities in organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells, transparent conducting oxides (TCOs), combinatorial (combi) methods, and atmospheric processing. From fundamental physical studies to applied research relating to solar industry needs, we are developing the

164

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Marianne B. Sowa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marianne B. Sowa Marianne B. Sowa PNNL - Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Funded Projects A Mechanistic Study of the Radiation Quality Dependence of Bystander Effects in Human Cells Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: Using a Low-LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Sowa, M.B., Goetz, W., Baulch, J., and Morgan, W.F. Morphological Changes in a 3D Mammary Model Following Exposure to Low Dose, Low-LET Radiation Opresko, L.K., Chrisler, W., Emory, K., Arthurs, B., and Sowa, M.B. 2005 Workshops: Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation Morgan, W.F. and Sowa, M.B. Publications Perrine, K.A., Lamarche, B.L., Hopkins, D.F., Budge, S.E., Opresko, L.K., Wiley, H.S., and Sowa, M.B. (2007). High speed method for in situ

165

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Gregory A. Kimmel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gregory A. Kimmel Gregory A. Kimmel Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Past Project A Novel Spatially Resolved Cell Irradiator to Study Bystander and Adaptive Responses to Low-LET Radiation. Technical Abstracts 2002 Workshop: Spatially Resolved Single Cell Irradiator to Study Bystander Responses to Low LET Radiation. Resat, M.S., Kimmel, G.A., Miller, J.H., McDonald, J.C., Murphy, M.K., Strom, D.J., Thrall, B.D., and Colson, S.D. 2001 Workshop: Spatially Resolved Single Cell Irradiator to Study Bystander Responses to Low LET Radiation. Resat, M.S., Kimmel, G.A., Miller, J.H., McDonald, J.C., Murphy, M.K., Strom, D.J., Thrall, B.D., Metting, N.F., and Colson, S.D 1999 Workshop: A Novel, Spatially Resolved Cell Irradiator to Study Bystander and Adaptive Responses to Low-LET Radiation.

166

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: Induction of NF-κB, MnSOD, 14-3-3ζ and Cyclin B1 Authors: Jian Jian Li, Kazi M. Ahmed, Ming Fan, Shaozhong Dong, Douglas R. Spitz, and Cheng-Rong Yu Institutions: Division of Molecular Radiobiology, Purdue University School of Health Sciences, West Lafayette, Indiana; Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa; Molecular Immunology Section, Laboratory of Immunology, National Eye Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland Gene expression profiles demonstrate that a group of key stress-responsive genes are associated with radiation exposure and may contribute to cellular

167

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Induction of Genomic Instability in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Induction of Genomic Instability in vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs y Induction of Genomic Instability in vivo by Low Doses of 137Cs y rays, Authors: K. Rithidech1, E.B. Whorton2, M. Tungjai1, E. Ar-Bab1, S.R. Simon1, M. Tawde3 and C.W. Anderson3. Institutions: 1Pathology Department, Stony Brook University, NY 11794-8691, USA, 2University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, TX 77550-1047,3Biology Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973-5000. Information on potential health hazards of radiation at doses below or equal to the level traditionally requiring human radiation protection (less than or equal to 10 cGy) is currently lacking. It is therefore important to characterize early and subsequent in vivo biological response induced by low doses of ionizing radiation because such data should provide information that can help determine whether radiation at this dose level

168

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Molecular Characterization of Survival  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Survival Advantage, Bystander Effect, and Survival Advantage, Bystander Effect, and Genomic Instability after Low-LET Low Dose Radiation Exposure Mohan Natarajan University of Texas Health Science Center Why this Project? To understand the molecular link between the activation of NF-kB and cellular outcomes such as better cell survival after low-LET radiation and to determine whether low dose radiation-induced NF-kB signaling can mediate telomerase activation and thus confer enhanced cell survival of normal aortic endothelial cells. Project Goals To determine whether low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can cause a positive feedback signal initiated by the activation of the NF-kB. To examine one of the mechanisms involving TNF-a as a signaling mediator, which could mediate the bystander effect through the generation

169

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Linking Molecular Events to Cellular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Linking Molecular Events to Cellular Responses at Low Dose Exposures Linking Molecular Events to Cellular Responses at Low Dose Exposures Thomas Weber Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why This Project It currently costs billions of dollars to protect workers and the public from exposure to man-made radiation, despite exposure levels lower than the natural background levels of radiation. If it could be demonstrated that there is no increased cancer risk associated with these low dose exposures, these resources could be directed toward more critical societal issues. Defining low dose radiation cancer risks is limited by our ability to measure and directly correlate relevant cellular and molecular responses occurring at the low radiation dose and dose rate with tumor formation. This deficiency has led to conservative risk assessments based on low dose

170

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Current Funded Project Descriptions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Funded Project Descriptions Funded Project Descriptions Effects Of Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair Jointly funded by NASA and DOE Eric J Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA 99352 Dr. Ackerman will study the effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on the repair of different types of damage to DNA, including damage from ionizing radiation and that produced by the normal internal operation of the cell. Using a very sensitive technique called host cell reactivation assay (HCR), he will quantitatively measure the repair of each type of DNA damage and thereby measure if the cellular repair system itself has been damaged. He will also determine if unique forms of DNA repair system damage are induced by low doses of cosmic radiation exposure present during space

171

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mechanisms of Tissue Response...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

whole body exposure to doses of 0.1 Gy to 5 Gy 60Co-g radiation in liver and mammary gland, which indicate that remodeling is a general and rapid consequence of irradiation but...

172

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Delayed Genomic Instability...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lymphoblasts Exposed to 137Cs y-rays Radiation Authors: Jeffrey L. Schwartzb, Robert Jordan,b, Marek Lenarczyk,a and Howard L. Libera Institutions: a Department of Environmental...

173

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Suresh H. Moolgavkar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cohort with low-LET low-dose radiation exposure, and comparison with Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Hazelton, W.D., Krewski, D., Moolgavkar, S.H. 2001 Workshop:...

174

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Variation in Tissue...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Variation in Tissue Responses to Low-Dose Radiation Authors: E. M. Rinchik,1,2 P. Hoyt,3 L. Branstetter,1 R. Olszewski,1 K. T. Cain,1 and B. Voy1,3 Institutions: 1Life...

175

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Monte Carlo Track Structure...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monte Carlo Track Structure Simulations for Low-LET Selected Cell Radiation Studies Walt Wilson Washington State University Tri-Cities Why This Project There are many types of...

176

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: The Characterization of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Characterization of Genetic Responses to Low Dose Radiation using a Genome-Wide Insertional Mutagenesis Approach Authors: Katherine A Vallis,1,2,3 William L Stanford,4 Zhuo...

177

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Comparison of DNA Damage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from Low-Dose Radiation and Folate Deficiency Arnold C. Huang,1,2 Chantal Courtemanche,1,2 Nicole Kerry,1,2 Susan T. Mashiyama,1,2 Michael Fenech,3...

178

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mechanistic Modeling of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Why This Project? Cells that are directly exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation may experience DNA damage. Cells which happen to be in the vicinity of the exposed...

179

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Are Animals Heterozygous...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lymphocytes from animals of known genotypes. Radiation-induced foci occur in a time and dose dependent manner in the nuclei of normal cells, NBS cells on the other hand, do not...

180

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Kenneth T. Bogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

T. Bogen Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Technical Abstracts 2002 Workshop: Low-dose dose-response of proliferating human cells exposed to low dose rate g-radiation. Enns,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: James D. Tucker  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of the Adaptive Response in determining health risks from in vivo exposures to low dose of ionizing radiation Tucker, J. Publications Christian, A.T., Patte, M.S., Attix,...

182

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: The Characterization of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

acts as a tag for identification of the gene, by cloning the fusion mRNA and using RT-PCR techniques. We have conducted such a screen using moderate dose radiation (2 to 4 Gy,...

183

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Janet E. Baulch  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Janet E. Baulch Janet E. Baulch University of California, Davis Currently Funded Projects Impact of Genetic Factors on the Heritable Effects of Paternal Exposure to Low-Dose Radiation Technical Abstracts 2003 Workshop: DNA damage in acutely irradiated F2 mice with a history of paternal F0 germline irradiation Baulch, J.E. and Raabe, O G. 2002 Workshop Impact of Genetic Factors on the Heritable Effects of Paternal Exposure to Low-Dose Radiation, Baulch, J.E., Ph.D. and Raabe, O.G., Ph.D. Publications Kovalchuk, O. and Baulch, J.E. (2008). Epigenetic changes and nontargeted radiation effects - Is there a link? Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis 49(1):16-25 Laiakis, E.C., Baulch, J.E., and Morgan, W.F. (2008). Interleukin 8 exhibits a pro-mitogenic and pro-survival role in radiation induced

184

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Project Descriptions-Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Descriptions-Archive Project Descriptions-Archive Effects Of Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair Eric J Ackerman (former PNNL) (Jointly funded by NASA and DOE) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA Dr. Ackerman will study the effect of low doses of ionizing radiation on the repair of different types of damage to DNA, including damage from ionizing radiation and that produced by the normal internal operation of the cell. Using a very sensitive technique called host cell reactivation assay (HCR), he will quantitatively measure the repair of each type of DNA damage and thereby measure if the cellular repair system itself has been damaged. He will also determine if unique forms of DNA repair system damage are induced by low doses of cosmic radiation exposure present during space

185

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects in Integrated Biorefinery Processes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects in Integrated Biorefinery Processes Projects in Integrated Biorefinery Processes A photo of a control room with four large computer screens. A man and a woman are looking at the screens. The Thermochemical Process Development Unit is equipped with sophisticated process monitoring and operation control systems. NREL is focused on integrating all the biomass conversion unit operations. With extensive knowledge of the individual unit operations, NREL is well-positioned to link these operations together at the mini-pilot and pilot scales. Among the integrated biorefinery projects are: Sorghum to Ethanol Research Initiative Sorghum shows promising characteristics as a feedstock for biofuel production. However, little basic research data exists. NREL is performing integrated research on sorghum by studying it at every step along the

186

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

Speight, J.G.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Modeling Intercellular Interactions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Intercellular Interactions During Radiation Carcinogenesis Modeling Intercellular Interactions During Radiation Carcinogenesis Authors: Rainer K Sachs,1 Michael Chan,2 Lynn Hlatky,3 Philip Hahnfeldt3 Institutions: 1Departments of Mathematics and Physics, University of California Berkeley California; 2School of Medicine, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla California; 3Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston Massachusetts Abstract By modulating the microenvironment of malignant or pre-malignant epithelial cells, inhibitory or stimulatory signals from nearby cells, including those in stromal and vascular tissues, can play a key role in carcinogenesis; cancer is ultimately a disease of a whole-cell community, not just of a single cell, clone, or cell lineage. However, current commonly used

188

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Do Heritable Differences in an  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Do Heritable Differences in an Individual's Immune System Predict Do Heritable Differences in an Individual's Immune System Predict Differential Sensitivity to Low Dose Radiation Exposure? Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping Enlarge Image Quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping identifies two strong candidate genes, Ptprk (Chr 10) and Acp1 (Chr 12) that are linked to genetic variation in the relative abundance of peripheral Th and Tc cells, two cell populations that are sensitive to radiation exposure at low doses. Expression of each gene is significantly altered by exposure to low dose radiation in vivo. Genome-wide scans for the ratio of %CD4+ (Th) to %CD8+ (Tc) lymphocytes were performed using genenetwork.org. The solid horizontal line represents genome-wide significance at P < 0.05, based on 1,000 permutations. LOD indicates logarithm of odds scores.

189

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Robert L. Ullrich  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Robert L. Ullrich Robert L. Ullrich Colorado State University Currently Funded Projects Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates (NSCOR) Genetic Mechanisms of Induced Chromosomal Instability and their Relationships with Radiation Tumorigenesis Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: The Role of Telomere Dysfunction in Driving Genomic Instability Bailey, S.M., Williams, E.S., and Ullrich, R.L. 2005 Workshop: Dsyfunctional Mammalian Telomeres in DNA-PKcs Deficient Backgrounds Bailey, S.M., Williams, E., Hagelstrom, T., and Ullrich, R.L. 2003 Workshop: Dysfunctional Mammalian Telomeres Join to Double-Strand Breaks Bailey, S.M., Goodwin, E.H., Williams, E., and Ullrich, R.L. 2002 Workshop: Dysfunctional Telomeres, Radiation-Induced Instability and Tumorigenesis Bailey, S.M., Goodwin, E.H., Cornforth, M.N., and Ullrich, R.L.

190

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Interaction between Tissue and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

between Tissue and Cellular Stress Responses: Effect of between Tissue and Cellular Stress Responses: Effect of TGF-ß Depletion on Radiation-Induced p53 Response M.H. Barcellos-Hoff, S.A. Ravani, R.L. Henshall, K.B. Ewan, R.L. Warters,* B. Parvin Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory *University of Utah One of the most widely studied cellular responses to radiation is the activation of the transcription factor, p53, whose abundance and action dictates individual cellular fate decisions regarding proliferation, differentiation and death. A cell's response to damage needs to be rapid. Thus, it is not surprising that the activation of the p53 stress response primarily involves post-translational changes in the p53 protein. Whereas intracellular radiation-induced mediators of p53 stability have been the subject of intense study, little is known about the extracellular factors

191

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Rainer K. Sachs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rainer K. Sachs Rainer K. Sachs University of California, Berkeley Funded Projects BIO-BASED RISK MODELING 03-20: Modeling the Interrelations Among Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects, Genomic Instability and Cancer Cytogenetic Tests of Radiobiological Models Relating Epidemiologically Measurable Risks to Low-Dose Risks Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop The Bystander Effect in Normal Human 3-D Tissue: Experiments, Models, and Implications Brenner, D., Ponnaiya, B., Shuryak, I., Sachs, R., and Geard, D. Radiation Carcinogenesis Risk as Influenced by Intercellular Interaction Hahnfeldt, P., Hlatky, L., and Sachs, R.K. 2005 Workshop: Modelling Intercellular Interactions During Radiation Carcinogenesis Sachs, R.K., Chan, M., Hlatky, L., and Hahnfeldt, P. 2003 Workshop: Chromosome Spatial Clustering Uncovered Through Radiogenic Aberrations

192

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the quarter are presented for the following areas of research: oil shale, tar sand, coal, advanced exploratory process technology, and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research includes; oil shale process studies, environmental base studies for oil shale, and miscellaneous basic concept studies. Tar sand research covers process development. Coal research includes; underground coal gasification, coal combustion, integrated coal processing concepts, and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes; advanced process concepts, advanced mitigation concepts, and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesa Verde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced recovery techniques; and menu driven access to the WDEQ Hydrologic Data Management Systems.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

NREL: Biomass Research - Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Projects in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Researchers at NREL use biomass process and sustainability analyses to understand the economic, technical, and global impacts of biomass conversion technologies. These analyses reveal the economic feasibility and environmental benefits of biomass technologies and are useful for government, regulators, and the private sector. NREL's Energy Analysis Office integrates and supports the energy analysis functions at NREL. Among NREL's projects in biomass process and sustainability analyses are: Life Cycle Assessment of Energy Independence and Security Act for Ethanol NREL is determining the life cycle environmental impacts of the ethanol portion of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA). EISA mandates

194

An Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Update on Radiative Transfer Model Development at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. J. S. Delamere, S. A. Clough, E. J. Mlawer, Sid-Ahmed Boukabara, K. Cady-Pereira, and M. Shepard Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Lexington, Maine Introduction Over the last decade, a suite of radiative transfer models has been developed at Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. (AER) with support from the Atmospheric and Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. These models span the full spectral regime from the microwave to the ultraviolet, and range from monochromatic to band calculations. Each model combines the latest spectroscopic advancements with radiative transfer algorithms to efficiently compute radiances, fluxes, and cooling

195

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Interaction of Genome and Cellular  

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of Genome and Cellular Micronenvioronment of Genome and Cellular Micronenvioronment Mina Bissell Life Sciences Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Why this Project While normal stoma can delay or prevent tumorigenesis, abnormal stromal components can promote tumor growth. Acquired or inherited mutations that alter stromal cell function can release the context-suppressed malignant cells. Literature spanning more than a century has shown that inflammation associated with tissue wounding can produce tunors. Radiation produces changes in reactive oxygen that are similar to inflammation and may represent a mechanism for radiation-induced damage. Project Goals To determine the underlying role of stromal alterations in controling genomic instability accompanying epithelial-mesenchyumal transformation.

196

Final report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination, 1984-1995  

SciTech Connect

This document is the final report of the Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC). The committee was established to address national and international issues involving ionizing and nonionizing radiation. Three sections are included in the report: a summary of CIRRPC`s history structure, and operations; CIRRPC`s most significant activities, findings and recommendations on national radiation issues of sufficient importance and scope to require interagency attention; topics for future consideration by Federal agencies.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Influence of Microwave Radiation on Phosphorus-removal Process ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microwave radiation on the ore fines was carried out using MW-HS ... A Pilot- plant Scale Test on DRI Preparation from High-alumina Limonite Ore by...

198

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB  

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Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB mediates survival advantage by Radiation-Induced Nuclear Factor kB mediates survival advantage by Telomerase Activation. Authors: Natarajan M.,1 Mohan S.,2 Pandeswara, S.L.,1 and Herman T.S.1 Institutions: Departments of 1Radiation Oncology and 2Pathology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas Activation of NF-kB in response to low doses of ionizing radiation was first shown in our laboratory. Although studies have shown that NF-kB plays an important role in anti-apoptotic function, little has been done to understand the molecular link between the activation of NF-kB and cellular outcome such as enhanced cell survival after low dose low-linear transfer (LET) radiation. Because upregulation of telomerase activity is associated with longevity and allows cells to escape from senescence, we hypothesize

199

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Oxidative Stress Signaling...  

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Medical Research Council, Harwell, Oxford, United Kingdom. Cells initially surviving irradiation and capable of proliferation may produce descendants with de-nova chromosome...

200

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: An Expression Array Strategy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mouse Strain Specific DNA Damage Response Pathways in Mammary Tissue Allan Balmain Cancer Research Institute, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco CA...

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Low Dose Research in Japan...  

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Low Dose Research in Japan-Institutes and Facilities Atomic Bomb Disease Institute, Nagasaki University Institute for Environmental Sciences (IES) National Institute of...

202

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Biologically Based Analysis of Lung  

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Biologically Based Analysis of Lung Cancer Incidence in a Large Biologically Based Analysis of Lung Cancer Incidence in a Large Canadian Occupational Cohort with Low-LET Low-dose Radiation Exposure, and Comparison with Japanese Atomic Bomb Survivors. Authors: W.D. Hazelton, D. Krewski, S.H. Moolgavkar Lung cancer incidence is analyzed in a large Canadian National Dose Registry (CNDR) cohort with individual annual dosimetry for low-dose occupational exposure to gamma and tritium radiation using several types of multistage models. The primary analysis utilizes the two-stage clonal expansion model (TSCE), with sensitivity analyses using extensions of this model incorporating additional stages. Characteristic and distinct temporal patterns of risk are found for dose-response affecting early, middle, or late stages of carcinogenesis, e.g., initiation with one or more stages,

203

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: The Progeny of Irradiated Mammary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progeny of Irradiated Mammary Epithelial Cells Exhibit a Phenotype Progeny of Irradiated Mammary Epithelial Cells Exhibit a Phenotype Characteristic of Malignancy Mary H. Barcellos-Hoff, R.L. Henshall-Powell, M.J. Bissell, and B. Parvin Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Life Sciences Division We have proposed that the ability of radiation to induce altered microenvironments affects the frequency and features of neoplastic progression. Thus, we have sought to characterize the irradiated microenvironment and determine how these events contribute to mammary carcinogenesis. By using imaging bioinformatics to analyze mouse and human models of breast cancer we have now examined cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) critical for tissue-specific organization and function. We found that 1) radiation-induced microenvironments can contribute to neoplastic potential

204

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Mechanisms of Induced  

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Mechanisms of Induced Chromosomal Instability and their Mechanisms of Induced Chromosomal Instability and their Relationships with Radiation Tumorigenesis Robert Ullrich Colorado State University Why This Project A combination of epidemiological, experimental, animal, and cellular molecular data is used in the estimation of tumor risk after low doses of low-LET radiation. Uncertainties are recognized in the interpretation of all these data sets, and recent findings concerning genomic instability in irradiated cells challenge the conventional view that induced DNA damage is expressed during the immediate post-irradiation cell cycle. These data on genomic instability are based largely upon studies of cell cultures the mechanisms involved and implications for tumor formation in living organisms remain unclear. Nevertheless, if induced genomic instability were

205

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Jian Jian Li  

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Jian Jian Li Jian Jian Li School of Health Sciences, Purdue University Newly Funded Projects Regulation of NF-kB and Mn SOD in Low Dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive Responses in Mouse and Human Skin Cells, abstract, description. Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshops: NF-kB Mediated Signaling Network in Low Dose X-Ray Induced Adaptive Protection on Mouse and Human Skin Epithelial Cells Ahmed, K.M., Fan, M., Spitz, and Li, J.J. 2005 Workshops: Adaptive Response of Mouse Skin Epithelial Cells to Low Dose Ionizing Radiation: Induction of NF-κB, MnSOD, 14-3-3ζ and Cyclin B1. Li, J.J., Ahmed, K.M., Fan, M., Dong, S., Spitz, D.R., and Yu, C.-R. 2003 Workshops: Gene Expression Profiles of Human Skin Keratinocytes Exposed to Acute and Chronic Ionizing Radiation Li, J.J., Ozeki, M., Wang, T., Tamae, D., Nelson, D., Wyrobek, A., and

206

What is the radiative process of the prompt phase of Gamma Ray Bursts?  

SciTech Connect

Despite the dramatic improvement of our knowledge of the phenomenology of Gamma Ray Bursts, we still do not know several fundamental aspects of their physics. One of the puzzles concerns the nature of the radiative process originating the prompt phase radiation. Although the synchrotron process qualifies itself as a natural candidate, it faces severe problems, and many efforts have been done looking for alternatives. These, however, suffer from other problems, and there is no general consensus yet on a specific radiation mechanism.

Ghisellini, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Via Bianchi 46 I-23807 Merate (Italy)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Radiation Imaging Detectors for Plant Photosynthesis Research | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

» Radiation Imaging Detectors for Plant Photosynthesis Research » Radiation Imaging Detectors for Plant Photosynthesis Research Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » June 2012 Radiation Imaging Detectors for Plant Photosynthesis Research Imaging tools aid research in global climate change, plant genetics, biofuels, agriculture, and carbon sequestration. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of Jefferson Lab The PhytoPET plant imaging system.

208

NREL: Biomass Research - Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses Capabilities in Biomass Process and Sustainability Analyses A photo of a woman and four men, all wearing hard hats and looking into a large square bin of dried corn stover. One man is using a white scoop to pick up some of the material and another man holds some in his hand. Members of Congress visit NREL's cellulosic ethanol pilot plant. A team of NREL researchers uses biomass process and sustainability analyses to bridge the gap between research and commercial operations, which is critical for the scale-up of biomass conversion technology. Among NREL's biomass analysis capabilities are: Life cycle assessments Technoeconomic analysis Sensitivity analysis Strategic analysis. Life Cycle Assessments Conducting full life cycle assessments is important for determining the

209

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Communicating the Science of the Low  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Communicating the Science of the Low Dose Radiation Research Program Communicating the Science of the Low Dose Radiation Research Program Authors: John S. Wassom, Elizabeth T. Owens, Sheryl A. Martin, Amy K. Wolfe, Margaret K. Lyday,* and Susan L. Dimmick** Institutions: Oak Ridge National Laboratory, *Keener Communications, and the **University of Tennessee Graduate School of Medicine. Summary The project team developed a communications plan based on an explicit communications strategy. The plan presents a set of strategic goals, identifies categories of stakeholders relevant to the program, and suggests methods that can be used to achieve strategic goals and reach targeted stakeholders. Context is key to the communication plan. Providing contextual information about low dose radiation, radiation biology, and Low Dose Radiation

210

Third Radiation Effects Research Foundation Board of Councilors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

acknowledged the need to continue the research activities at RERF as related to the atomic-bomb survivors, and reiterated its intention to work closely with the U.S. Government...

211

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Barry D. Michael  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B.D. (2006). Bystander-induced differentiation: A major response to targeted irradiation of a urothelial explant model. Mutation Research 597(1-2):43-49. Prise, K.M.,...

212

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Impact of Genetic Factors on the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Factors on the Heritable Effects of Paternal Exposure to Genetic Factors on the Heritable Effects of Paternal Exposure to Low-Dose Radiation Janet E. Baulch University of California, Davis Why This Project? There is concern about the possible genetic effects of low dose radiation exposure. As a result, much effort has gone towards understanding mutation of cells due to radiation exposure. While recognition of the potential for mutation from exposure to ionizing radiation has led to extensive research, less effort has been given to the possible delayed risk of radiation exposure transmitted to the offspring of the exposed parent. Data from animal models show that parental exposures to DNA-damaging agents, such as ionizing radiation, predispose the offspring to serious health effects, including cancer offspring. Additionally, data from both humans and animal

213

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: X-ray Microbeam Bystander...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

experiments, cultures grown in microwell slide chambers were irradiated with precise stripes of dose up to 100m wide. Samples were processed for the expression of...

214

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Effects of Low Doses of Radiation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abstract Abstract Title: Effects of Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair (PNNL Project # 42699) Authors: Eric J. Ackerman, Ph.D. Institutions: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA We developed a functional assay to measure the effects of LDR on repair of many different lesions representative of those found in cells as consequences of normal oxidative metabolism, as well as those caused by radiation. Currently only 1/10th attomole =105 damaged molecules/cell and 3000 cells/measurement are required. We have found that even low doses (10 rad) exert measurable effects on DNA repair. Interestingly, the amount of DNA repair increases at 10-50 rads, plateaus, and then increases even further at higher doses well below doses where radiation-induced lethality

215

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Effects of Low Doses of Radiation on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair Low Doses of Radiation on DNA Repair Eric Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why this Project? Even low doses (0.1 Gy) exert measurable effects on DNA repair. The first-known oxidative lesion repaired only by nucleotide excision repair found in normal cells is cyclo-dA. This lesion is found in normal cells and thought to be a byproduct of oxidative metabolism. When this lesion occurs, it stimulates repair. If repair is stimulated by low dose radiation, there are some implications for human health. For example, do some individuals exhibit a greater, lower, or no stimulation to certain DNA lesions? If there are population polymorphism that influence DNA repair, then it would be possible to use our assay for screening individuals for repair sensitivity.

216

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Low Dose Ionizing Radiation-Induced Effects in Irradiated and Unirradiated cells: Pathways Analysis in Support of Risk Assessment. Authors: B.E. Lehnert, R. Cary, D. Gadbois, and G. Gupta. Institutions: Bioscience Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The scientific literature presents a confusing picture concerning health risks due to low dose ionizing radiation (LDIR), e.g., <1-10 cGy. Some effects of LDIR such as enhanced rates of cell proliferation and the induction of radioadaptation may be benign under some circumstances. Other evidence suggests LDIR can be hazardous and that a threshold for potentially detrimental responses, e.g., increases in intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), increases in sister chromatid exchanges (SCE), alterations in gene or protein expression profiles, and increased

217

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Quantitative Analysis of Connexin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantitative Analysis of Connexin Expression in Cultured Colonies Quantitative Analysis of Connexin Expression in Cultured Colonies Authors: B. Parvin, Q. Yang, R. L. Henshall-Powell and M.H. Barcellos Hoff We are studying the effects of ionizing radiation on the signaling between human mammary epithelial cells and the extracellular microenvironment. To do so we use an assay based on the ability of the cells to organize into three-dimensional acini when embedded into an extracellular matrix. Although tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells are nearly indistinguishable when cultured as monolayers, their biological character readily diverge when tissue-specific morphogenesis is analyzed. Non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) cultured within a reconstituted basement membrane organize into acinar-like structures with

218

Research in radiation monitoring survey instrumentation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Two low-power solid-state prototype readout units were developed, an LED display and a LCD display. This display output was in a bar-graph format, covering four-decades of information, with 10-segments per decade. The displays accept a frequency input, which is standardly available from several portable radiation-survey instruments. Both readout units will operate on two D-cell batteries (3.0 Volt), with a typical current drain requirement of 0.3 MA for the LED display and 30..mu..A for the LCD display. A wide-range electrometer circuit was also developed. The circuit covers an input current range from 10/sup -13/ A to 10/sup -8/ A. The output signal is a pulse whose frequency is directly proportional to input current. The circuit requires no high-megohm resistors, and is autoranging. Several candidate input amplifiers were analyzed and evaluated for use with the electrometer circuit.

Blalock, T.V.; Kennedy, E.J.; Phillips, R.G.; Walker, E.W. Jr.

1978-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

219

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Assessing Biological Function of DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessing Biological Function of DNA Damage Response Genes Assessing Biological Function of DNA Damage Response Genes Larry H. Thompson Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Why This Project To understand the relative importance of individual DNA repair and DNA-damage response pathways to the recovery of mammalian cells after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR). This understanding may lead to better ways of setting limits on human exposure to IR. In spite of the discovery of many mammalian DNA repair genes, our current knowledge of how many of these genes contribute to cellular recovery from IR exposure is quite limited. Project Goals Measure cellular responses at doses in the 5-100 cGy range, which generally cause changes too small to detect in normal, repair-proficient cells Focus on DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and DNA oxidative base

220

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Quantification of Repair of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Quantification of Repair of Low-Dose-Induced DNA Double-Strand Quantification of Repair of Low-Dose-Induced DNA Double-Strand Breaks in Diploid Human Cells Authors: David Schild,1 and Larry H. Thompson,2 Institutions: 1Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; and 2BBR Program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Double-strand breaks (DSBs) are the biochemical lesions of primary concern in radiation related health effects. Compelling evidence from rodent and chicken model systems indicates that homologous recombinational repair (HRR) plays an essential role for cell viability in the repair of spontaneous DSBs arising during DNA replication and an important role in the repair of IR-induced DSBs. IR-induced DSBs are also repaired by error-prone nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ). Using hTERT-immortalized

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility - annual report 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ER-ARM-0403 ER-ARM-0403 3 Table of Contents Program Overview ............................................................................................................................................................ 4 The Role of Clouds in Climate .................................................................................................................................... 4 ARM Science Goals ..................................................................................................................................................... 4 ARM Climate Research Facility: Successful Science Program Leads to User Facility Designation ................................ 5 Sites Around the World Enable Real Observations .......................................................................................................

222

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research  

SciTech Connect

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO[sub 2] HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Dual Regulation of JB6 Transformation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dual Regulation of JB6 Transformation by Low Dose Gamma Radiation. Dual Regulation of JB6 Transformation by Low Dose Gamma Radiation. Authors: Thomas J. Weber,1 Lye M. Markillie,1 William B. Chrisler,1 Xingye C. Lei,1 and Nancy H. Colburn2 Institutions: 1Molecular Biosciences, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. 2Gene Regulation Section, Basic Research Laboratory, National Cancer Institute JB6 mouse epidermal cells have been instrumental in defining the molecular mechanisms associated with neoplastic transformation in response to known tumor promoters. JB6 cells exhibit a clonal growth response to oxygen free radicals suggesting this model may also be useful for radiation research. Treatment of JB6 cells with 2 and 20 cGy gamma radiation resulted in a weak, but dose-dependent increase in anchorage-independent growth observed

224

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Multi-cellular Crosstalk in Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About this Project About this Project Multi-cellular Crosstalk in Radiation Damage Technical Abstracts 2006 Workshop: Low-LET Bystander Effects in Cells In Vitro Are Significantly Less Than Published For High-LET Radiation Blakely, E.A., Thompson, A.C., Chang, P., Schwarz, R.I., Bjornstad, K., Rosen, C., Wisnewski, C., and Mocherla, D. 2005 Workshop: X-ray Microbeam Bystander Studies with Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Blakely, E.A., Schwarz, R.I., Thompson, A.C., Bjornstad, K.A., Chang, P.Y., Rosen, C.J., Sudar, D., Romano, R., and Parvin, B. 2003 Workshop: 12.5 keV X-ray Microbeam Bystander Studies with Human Mammary Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Blakely, E.A., Schwarz, R.I., Thompson, A.C., Bjornstad, K.A., Chang, P.Y., Rosen, C.J., and Sudar, D. 2001 Workshop:

225

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from Low-Dose Radiation and Folate Comparison of DNA Damage Risk from Low-Dose Radiation and Folate Deficiency. Authors: Chantal Courtemanche, Arnold C. Huang, Nicole Kerry, Bernice Ng, and Bruce N. Ames. Institutions: Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, California. Our overall goal is to understand and quantify the real effects of low-dose radiation by measuring direct and specific cellular changes. However, since the background dose of radiation to which most individuals are exposed is well below the levels where significant biological effects, such as mutation or tumor induction, are observed, our novel approach is to compare the consequences of radiation to those of specific nutritional deficiencies. By determining which of these two common stresses at physiologically relevant doses leads to a greater amount of DNA damage, we

226

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation William F. Morgan Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why this Project? To examine genomic instability and bystander effects as non-targeted effects associated with low dose radiation exposure. Project Goals To provides a robust, reliable, highly sensitive assay for detecting delayed events occurring in cells exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation. Experimental Approach To mimic radiation damage from gamma and x-ray sources, a low-LET electron microbeam that generates energetic electrons has been designed such that high-energy electrons deposit energy in a pre-selected subset of cells leaving neighboring cells unirradiated. Using a novel green fluorescence gene (GFP) reporter assay, a high through

227

Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (March 2012) Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance (March 2012)

228

Implementing initial state radiation for lepton induced processes in AMEGIC++.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algorithm 15 B. Program Parameters 17 1. Introduction Initial State Radiation (ISR) is the most important QED correction to the Born cross section. For instance, in the case of electron positron annihilations at energies beyond the Zthreshold it leads... . In this way, the correction term becomes several times as large as the Born term at the initial center of mass energy. Evidently, the effect of ISR is of great significance for the interpretation of experimental results. However, since initial state photons...

Schalicke, A; Krauss, F; Kuhn, R; Soff, G

229

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2006  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the ARM Climate Research Facility and ARM Science programs and presents key accomplishments in 2006. Noteworthy scientific and infrastructure accomplishments in 2006 include: Collaborating with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to lead the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment, a major international field campaign held in Darwin, Australia Successfully deploying the ARM Mobile Facility in Niger, Africa Developing the new ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) to provide airborne measurements Publishing a new finding on the impacts of aerosols on surface energy budget in polar latitudes Mitigating a long-standing double-Intertropical Convergence Zone problem in climate models using ARM data and a new cumulus parameterization scheme.

LR Roeder

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

Advanced computational research in materials processing for design and manufacturing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The computational requirements for design and manufacture of automotive components have seen dramatic increases for producing automobiles with three times the mileage. Automotive component design systems are becoming increasingly reliant on structural analysis requiring both overall larger analysis and more complex analyses, more three-dimensional analyses, larger model sizes, and routine consideration of transient and non-linear effects. Such analyses must be performed rapidly to minimize delays in the design and development process, which drives the need for parallel computing. This paper briefly describes advanced computational research in superplastic forming and automotive crash worthiness.

Zacharia, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mating-Type Regulation of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mating-Type Regulation of Non-homologous End Joining in Mating-Type Regulation of Non-homologous End Joining in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Authors: Maria Valencia,* Marc Bentele,^ Moreshwar B. Vaze,* Gernot Herrmann, Ellayhu Kraus, Sang Eun Lee, Primo Schar,^ and James E. Haber* Institutions: *Rosenstiel Center and Department of Biology, Brandeis University ^Institute of Medical Radiobiology, University of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland. In the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, broken DNA ends can be ligated, either in a precise or an error-prone manner by a process known as Non-Homologous End Joining (NHEJ). Several proteins have been identified that play a role in NHEJ: the yKu70/80 heterodimer, DNA ligase IV and its associated protein Lif1/Xrcc4, the Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2 complex, as well as the silencing proteins Sir 2, 3, 4. Recent studies suggest that SIR genes may

232

The Response of a Spectral General Circulation Model to Refinements in Radiative Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present here results and analyses of a series of numerical experiments performed with a spectral general circulation model (GCM). The purpose of the GCM experiments is to examine the role of radiation/cloud processes in the general circulation ...

V. Ramanathan; Eric J. Pitcher; Robert C. Malone; Maurice L. Blackmon

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

2004 research briefs :Materials and Process Sciences Center.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the latest in a continuing series that highlights the recent technical accomplishments associated with the work being performed within the Materials and Process Sciences Center. Our research and development activities primarily address the materials-engineering needs of Sandia's Nuclear-Weapons (NW) program. In addition, we have significant efforts that support programs managed by the other laboratory business units. Our wide range of activities occurs within six thematic areas: Materials Aging and Reliability, Scientifically Engineered Materials, Materials Processing, Materials Characterization, Materials for Microsystems, and Materials Modeling and Simulation. We believe these highlights collectively demonstrate the importance that a strong materials-science base has on the ultimate success of the NW program and the overall DOE technology portfolio.

Cieslak, Michael J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Committee on Radiation Epidemiological Research Programs. Progress report, April 1, 1991--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The Committee on DoE Radiation Epidemiological Research Programs was originally established in response to the needs of the Office of Health and Envirorunental Research, Office of Energy Research in the Department of Energy (DoE). Following a reorganization of DoE health related programs in 1990, the committee now advises the Office of Epidemiology and Health Surveillance which is under the Assistant Secretary for Environment, Safety and Health. These administrative changes have not altered the committee concerns but have served to focus the committee`s attention on helping DoE plan for an effective system of worker health surveillance as well as an epidemiologic research program.

Mahlum, D.D.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Evaluation of Radiometers in Full-Time Use at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory Solar Radiation Research Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the evaluation of the relative performance of the complement of solar radiometers deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL).

Wilcox, S. M.; Myers, D. R.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Uniform bulk Material Processing using Multimode Microwave Radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for generating uniform heating in material contained in a cylindrical vessel is described. TE{sub 10}-mode microwave radiation is coupled into a cylindrical microwave transition such that microwave radiation having TE{sub 11}-, TE{sub 01}- and TM{sub 01}-cylindrical modes is excited therein. By adjusting the intensities of these modes, substantially uniform heating of materials contained in a cylindrical drum which is coupled to the microwave transition through a rotatable choke can be achieved. The use of a poor microwave absorbing insulating cylindrical insert, such as aluminum oxide, for separating the material in the container from the container walls and for providing a volume through which air is circulated is expected to maintain the container walls at room temperature. The use of layer of highly microwave absorbing material, such as SiC, inside of the insulating insert and facing the material to be heated is calculated to improve the heating pattern of the present apparatus.

Varma, Ravi; Vaughan, Worth E.

1999-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

237

Uniform bulk material processing using multimode microwave radiation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for generating uniform heating in material contained in a cylindrical vessel is described. TE.sub.10 -mode microwave radiation is coupled into a cylindrical microwave transition such that microwave radiation having TE.sub.11 -, TE.sub.01 - and TM.sub.01 -cylindrical modes is excited therein. By adjusting the intensities of these modes, substantially uniform heating of materials contained in a cylindrical drum which is coupled to the microwave transition through a rotatable choke can be achieved. The use of a poor microwave absorbing insulating cylindrical insert, such as aluminum oxide, for separating the material in the container from the container walls and for providing a volume through which air is circulated is expected to maintain the container walls at room temperature. The use of layer of highly microwave absorbing material, such as SiC, inside of the insulating insert and facing the material to be heated is calculated to improve the heating pattern of the present apparatus.

Varma, Ravi (Los Alamos, NM); Vaughn, Worth E. (Madison, WI)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

An overview of NREL's PV solar radiation research task activities and results  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an overview of the recent activities and results of the Photovoltaics (PV) Solar Radiation Research task of NREL's PV Advanced Research and Development (PVAR D) Project. Topics covered include the Atmospheric Optical Calibration System (AOCS) and instrumentation systems for monitoring and characterizing the solar irradiance available to PV systems. Both types of instrumentation systems and activities are required for a thorough understanding of PV device performance and design.

Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.; Stoffel, T.; Riordan, C.J. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 1617 Cole Blvd., Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States))

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation Authors: William F. Morgan1 and Marianne B. Sowa2 Institutions: 1Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland; 2Chemical Structure and Dynamics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland Washington We have recently installed a low-linear energy transfer (LET) electron microbeam that generates energetic electrons to mimic radiation damage from gamma- and x-ray sources. It has been designed such that high-energy electrons deposit energy in a pre-selected subset of cells, leaving neighboring cells unirradiated (Figure 1). In this way it is possible to examine non-targeted effects associated with low dose radiation exposure,

240

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Role of TNF-α as a Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of TNF-α as a Potential Signaling Mediator of Role of TNF-α as a Potential Signaling Mediator of Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect in Human Vascular Cells. Authors: Mohan Natarajan, Sumathy Mohan, Catherine Gibbons, Yan Bo and Munira A. Kadhim Institutions: Departments of Radiation Oncology and Pathology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas; Environmental Toxicology Graduate Program, University of California, Riverside; Radiation and Genomic Stability Unit, Medical research Council, Oxford, United Kingdom Identifying reliable and sensitive signaling pathways that are implicated in adverse health effects after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation would allow us to understand the scientific basis of low dose-induced signaling pathways and their downstream phenotypic expression. This

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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241

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Response of Respiratory Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Response of Respiratory Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Response of Respiratory Cells in Intact Tissues and Reconstituted Tissue Constructs Authors: John Ford, Amy Maslowski, Alex Redd and Les Braby Institutions: Texas A&M University, College Station, TX We are developing a model of respiratory tissue using a perfusion culture system. We are using this system to quantify the effects of normal tissue architecture, and the interaction of epithelial cells with other cell types, on radiation-induced bystander effects. Tracheal tissue taken from young adult Fischer 344 rats is imbedded in a growth factor enriched agarose matrix. The chamber is designed to allow growth medium to periodically wash the epithelial surface of the tracheal lumen while maintaining the air-interface that is necessary for the normal

242

Process for making solid-state radiation-emitting composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a process for loading an aerogel substrate with tritium and the resultant compositions. According to the process, an aerogel substrate is hydrolyzed so that surface OH groups are formed. The hydrolyzed aerogel is then subjected to tritium exchange employing, for example, a tritium-containing gas, whereby tritium atoms replace H atoms of surface OH groups. OH and/or CH groups of residual alcohol present in the aerogel may also undergo tritium exchange.

Ashley, C.S.; Brinker, C.J.; Reed, S.; Walko, R.J.

1993-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

Process for making solid-state radiation-emitting composition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a process for loading an aerogel substrate with tritium and the resultant compositions. According to the process, an aerogel substrate is hydrolyzed so that surface OH groups are formed. The hydrolyzed aerogel is then subjected to tritium exchange employing, for example, a tritium-containing gas, whereby tritium atoms replace H atoms of surface OH groups. OH and/or CH groups of residual alcohol present in the aerogel may also undergo tritium exchange.

Ashley, Carol S. (14316 Bauer Rd., N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87123); Brinker, C. Jeffrey (14 Eagle Nest Dr., N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Reed, Scott (10308 Leymon Court, N.W., Albuquerque, NM 87114); Walko, Robert J. (3215 Blume, N.E., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development project: Solar radiation research annual report, 1 October 1990--30 September 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the year 1991 research activities and results under the Solar Radiation Research task of the Photovoltaic (PV) Advanced Research and Development project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). This task directly supports the characterization, testing, and design of PV cells modules, and systems. The development of a scientific and engineering understanding of incident (i.e., available to PV devices) solar irradiance and the appropriate instrumentation systems and measurement methods are the activities and results of this project. Activities described in this report include the completion of the Atmospheric Optical Calibration Systems (AOCS) and the comparison of instrumentation systems that collect site-specific measurements of solar irradiance for the purpose of PV system feasibility studies and/or design.

Hulstrom, R.; Cannon, T.; Stoffel, T.; Riordan, C.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

BREN Tower: A Monument to the Material Culture of Radiation Dosimetry Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With a height of more than 1,500 feet, the BREN (Bare Reactor Experiment, Nevada) Tower dominates the surrounding desert landscape of the Nevada Test Site. Associated with the nuclear research and atmospheric testing programs carried out during the 1950s and 1960s, the tower was a vital component in a series of experiments aimed at characterizing radiation fields from nuclear detonations. Research programs conducted at the tower provided the data for the baseline dosimetry studies crucial to determining the radiation dose rates received by the atomic bomb survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Today, BREN Tower stands as a monument to early dosimetry research and one of the legacies of the Cold War.

Susan Edwards

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

246

DISSERTATION THE EFFECTS OF RADIATIVE AND MICROPHYSICAL PROCESSES ON  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model is coupled in a consistent fashion to the bulk microphysical parameterization of Walko et al. (1995), an explicit liquid bin microphysical model (e.g. Feingold et al. 1996a) and a mixed­phase that boundary layer stability is strongly dependent upon ice processes, illustrating that the rapid reduction

Harrington, Jerry Y.

247

Process for producing radiation-induced self-terminating protective coatings on a substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas and radiation are used to produce a protective coating that is substantially void-free on the molecular scale, self-terminating, and degradation resistant. The process can be used to deposit very thin (.apprxeq.5-20 .ANG.) coatings on critical surfaces needing protection from degradative processes including, corrosion and contamination.

Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Thermochemical Process Development Unit: Researching Fuels from Biomass, Bioenergy Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique facility dedicated to researching thermochemical processes to produce fuels from biomass.

Not Available

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Simulating acceleration and radiation processes in X-ray binaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The high energy emission of microquasars is thought to originate from high energy particles. Depending on the spectral state, the distribution of these particles can be thermal with a high temperature (typically 100 keV) or non-thermal and extending to even higher energy. The properties of high energy plasmas are governed by a rich microphysics involving particle-particle collisions and particles-photons interactions. We present a new code developed to address the evolution of relativistic plasmas. This one-zone code focuses on the microphysics and solves the coupled kinetic equations for particles and photons, including Compton scattering, synchrotron emission and absorption, pair production and annihilation, bremsstrahlung emission and absorption, Coulomb interactions, and prescriptions for additional particle acceleration and heating. It can in particular describe mechanisms such a thermalisation by synchrotron self-absorption and Coulomb collisions. Using the code, we investigate whether various acceleration processes, namely thermal heating, non-thermal acceleration and stochastic acceleration, can reproduce the different spectral states of microquasars. Premilinary results are presented.

R. Belmont; J. Malzac; A. Marcowith

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Collisional processes of interest in MFE plasma research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research on this grant is devoted to the calculation of heavy particle collision cross sections needed for diagnostic studies of magnetic fusion plasmas. This work requires the development and testing of new theoretical methods, with the implementation of benchmarked techniques to collisions pertinent to fusion reactors. Within the last context, we have provided charge-exchange-recombination cross sections to specific n,l-levels for diagnostic studies on TFTR and for major compilations for the IAEA. We have also completed a cross section study related to the planned neutral beam current drive for ITER. In addition, calculations were made to assess the use of He neutral atom angular scattering measurements for JT-60. Also, new theoretical methods have been developed to more accurately calculate cross sections involving either He or H{sub 2} targets and partially stripped multiply-charged ions. Our most recent work concentrates on alpha particle diagnostics and collision processes of helium ash'' in burning reactors. Here, we are providing atomic cross section data for the carbon pellet alpha particle diagnostic work at General Atomics and the neutral He beam alpha particle diagnostic under study by the IAEA.

Olson, R.E.

1991-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

251

RESEARCH ON CARBON PRODUCTS FROM COAL USING AN EXTRACTIVE PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a one-year effort directed at the exploration of the use of coal as a feedstock for a variety of industrially-relevant carbon products. The work was basically divided into three focus areas. The first area dealt with the acquisition of laboratory equipment to aid in the analysis and characterization of both the raw coal and the coal-derived feedstocks. Improvements were also made on the coal-extraction pilot plant which will now allow larger quantities of feedstock to be produced. Mass and energy balances were also performed on the pilot plant in an attempt to evaluate the scale-up potential of the process. The second focus area dealt with exploring hydrogenation conditions specifically aimed at testing several less-expensive candidate hydrogen-donor solvents. Through a process of filtration and vacuum distillation, viable pitch products were produced and evaluated. Moreover, a recycle solvent was also isolated so that the overall solvent balance in the system could be maintained. The effect of variables such as gas pressure and gas atmosphere were evaluated. The pitch product was analyzed and showed low ash content, reasonable yield, good coking value and a coke with anisotropic optical texture. A unique plot of coke yield vs. pitch softening point was discovered to be independent of reaction conditions or hydrogen-donor solvent. The third area of research centered on the investigation of alternate extraction solvents and processing conditions for the solvent extraction step. A wide variety of solvents, co-solvents and enhancement additives were tested with varying degrees of success. For the extraction of raw coal, the efficacy of the alternate solvents when compared to the benchmark solvent, N-methyl pyrrolidone, was not good. However when the same coal was partially hydrogenated prior to solvent extraction, all solvents showed excellent results even for extractions performed at room temperature. Standard analyses of the extraction products indicated that they had the requisite properties of viable carbon-product precursors.

Peter G. Stansberry; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo; Chong Chen; Brian Bland; David Fenton

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Demonstrating the Potential for First-Class Research in Underdeveloped Countries: Research on Stratospheric Aerosols and Cirrus Clouds Optical Properties, and Radiative Effects in Cuba (19882010)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical properties of stratospheric aerosols and cirrus clouds and their radiative effects are currently important subjects of research worldwide. Those investigations are typical of developed countries, conducted by several highly specialized groups ...

Juan Carlos Antua Marrero; Ren Estevan Arredondo; Boris Barja Gonzlez

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Coupling Aerosol-Cloud-Radiative Processes in the WRF-Chem Model: Investigating the Radiative Impact of Elevated Point Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The local and regional influence of elevated point sources on summertime aerosol forcing and cloud-aerosol interactions in northeastern North America was investigated using the WRF-Chem community model. The direct effects of aerosols on incoming solar radiation were simulated using existing modules to relate aerosol sizes and chemical composition to aerosol optical properties. Indirect effects were simulated by adding a prognostic treatment of cloud droplet number and adding modules that activate aerosol particles to form cloud droplets, simulate aqueous phase chemistry, and tie a two-moment treatment of cloud water (cloud water mass and cloud droplet number) to an existing radiation scheme. Fully interactive feedbacks thus were created within the modified model, with aerosols affecting cloud droplet number and cloud radiative properties, and clouds altering aerosol size and composition via aqueous processes, wet scavenging, and gas-phase-related photolytic processes. Comparisons of a baseline simulation with observations show that the model captured the general temporal cycle of aerosol optical depths (AODs) and produced clouds of comparable thickness to observations at approximately the proper times and places. The model slightly overpredicted SO2 mixing ratios and PM2.5 mass, but reproduced the range of observed SO2 to sulfate aerosol ratios, suggesting that atmospheric oxidation processes leading to aerosol sulfate formation are captured in the model. The baseline simulation was compared to a sensitivity simulation in which all emissions at model levels above the surface layer were set to zero, thus removing stack emissions. Instantaneous, site-specific differences for aerosol and cloud related properties between the two simulations could be quite large, as removing above-surface emission sources influenced when and where clouds formed within the modeling domain. When summed spatially over the finest resolution model domain (the extent of which corresponds to the typical size of a single GCM grid cell) and temporally over a three day analysis period, total rainfall in the sensitivity simulation increased by 31% over that in the baseline simulation. Fewer optically thin clouds, arbitrarily defined as a cloud exhibiting an optical depth less than 1, formed in the sensitivity simulation. Domain-averaged AODs dropped from 0.46 in the baseline simulation to 0.38 in the sensitivity simulation. The overall net effect of additional aerosols attributable to primary particulates and aerosol precursors from point source emissions above the surface was a domain-averaged reduction of 5 W m-2 in mean daytime downwelling shortwave radiation.

Chapman, Elaine G.; Gustafson, William I.; Easter, Richard C.; Barnard, James C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Fast, Jerome D.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Activities of the National Academy of Sciences in relation to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activities of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), in relation to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), has a long history and the specific time period supported by this contract is but a small piece of the long-term continuing program. As a background, in August 1945, atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima (6 August) and Nagasaki (9 August). Shortly after the bombings, US medical teams joined forces with their Japanese counterparts to form a Joint Commission for the Investigation of the Effects of the Atomic Bombs. As a result of the Joint Commission's investigations, it was determined that consideration should be given to the establishment of a long-term study of the potential late health effects of exposure of the survivors to radiation from the bombs. The results obtained from RERF studies contribute the vast majority of information that provides a better understanding of radiation effects on humans. This information has been used extensively by national organizations and international committees for estimating risks associated with radiation exposures. The estimated risks developed by these independent organizations are used by government agencies around the world to establish standards for protection of individuals exposed in the occupational, medical, and general environment. Some of these results are described briefly in this report.

Edington, C.W.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Research Highlights Sorted by Research Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Area Research Area Radiation Processes | Cloud Distributions/Characterizations | Surface Properties | General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations | Aerosol Properties | Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures | Clouds with Low Optical [Water] Depths (CLOWD) | Vertical Velocity | Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) | Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions | Cloud Processes | Aerosol Processes Radiation Processes Alexandrov, M. D. Optical Depth Measurements by Shadowband Radiometers and Their Uncertainties ARM Berg, L. Surface Summertime Radiative Forcing by Shallow Cumuli at the ARM SGP ARM Bergmann, D. The Influence of Regional Anthropogenic Emission Reductions on Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing ASR Bhattacharya, A. Burning on the Prairies ARM

256

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2010.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 x 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 x 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continued through this quarter, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) began deployment this quarter to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The experiment officially began November 15, but most of the instruments were up and running by November 1. Therefore, the OPSMAX time for the AMF2 was 1390.80 hours (.95 x 1464 hours) for November and December (61 days). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Summary. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1-December 31, 2010, for the fixed sites. Because the AMFs operate episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. This first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 possible hours for the fixed sites and the AMF1 and 1,464 possible hours for the AMF2. The average of the fixed sites exceeded our goal this quarter. The AMF1 has essentially completed its mission and is shutting down to pack up for its next deployment to India. Although all the raw data from the operational instruments are in the Archive for the AMF2, only the processed data are tabulated. Approximately half of the AMF2 instruments have data that was fully processed, resulting in the 46% of all possible data made available to users through the Archive for this first quarter. Typically, raw data is not made available to users unless specifically requested.

Sisterson, D. L.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Comparisons of IR and ROS for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comparisons of IR and ROS for Induction of Damage to Cells Comparisons of IR and ROS for Induction of Damage to Cells Kathryn D. Held1, Yvonne L. McCarey1, Laurence Tartier1, Elena V. Rusyn1, Giuseppe Schettino2, Melvyn Folkard2, Kevin M. Prise2, and Barry D. Michael2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114; 2Gray Laboratory Cancer Research Trust, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, HA6 2JR, UK Accurate evaluation of the risks associated with exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation (IR) is a major challenge for environmental sciences. Studies on the mechanisms of the actions of low doses of IR are needed to help understand possible risks. IR exerts its effects on cells through production of reactive oxidizing species (ROS) such as ·OH, H2O2 and

258

Measurements of the flame emissivity and radiative properties of particulate medium in pulverized-coal-fired boiler furnaces by image processing of visible radiation  

SciTech Connect

Due to the complicated processes for coal particles burning in industrial furnaces, their radiative properties, such as the absorption and scattering coefficients, which are essential to make reliable calculation of radiative transfer in combustion computation, are hard to be given exactly by the existing methods. In this paper, multiple color image detectors were used to capture approximately red, green, and blue monochromatic radiative intensity images in the visible wavelength region, and the flame emissivity and the radiative properties of the particulate media in three pulverized-coal-fired boiler furnaces were got from the flame images. It was shown that as the load increased, the flame emissivity and the radiative properties increased too; these radiative parameters had the largest values near the burner zone, and decreased along the combustion process. Compared with the combustion medium with a low-volatile anthracite coal burning in a 670 t/h boiler, the emissivity and the absorption coefficient of the medium with a high-volatile bituminous coal burning in a 1025 t/h boiler were smaller near the outlet zone, but were larger near the burner zone of the furnace, due to the significant contribution of soot to the radiation. This work will be of practical importance in modeling and calculating the radiative heat transfer in combustion processes, and improving the technology for in situ, multi-dimensional visualization of large-scale combustion processes in coal-fired furnaces of power plants. 18 refs., 10 figs., 8 tabs.

Chun Lou; Huai-Chun Zhou; Peng-Feng Yu; Zhi-Wei Jiang [Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China). State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Data refinement in a market research applications' data production process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this contribution, we will show how empirically collected field data for a market research application are refined in a stepwise manner and enriched into end-user market reports and charts. The collected data are treated by selections, transformations, ...

Thomas Ruf; Thomas Kirsche

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Coal liquefaction process research, Mobil M-Gasoline process. R and D interim report No. 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the projected economic potential for the methanol-to-gasoline (M-Gasoline) process under development by Mobil Research and Development Corporation. The potential was reviewed by developing a preliminary economic estimation of the design, construction, and operation of a commercial-sized facility to produce 50,000 barrels per day (BPD) of gasoline. The review included a preliminary definition of facilities and projected economics for the production of methanol utilizing synthesis gas produced by the gasification of coal. The limited time and effort allotted for completion of the study permitted moderate, but not exhaustive, optimization of the conceptual industrial complex. A summary of more recent data was received following completion of the study. Preliminary analysis of this more recent information indicated that it would not significantly alter the preliminary economic conclusions. At the direction of the Department of Energy, therefore, the conceptual design and economic evaluations were not revised to incorporate this later information. The primary objective of the study was to project the economic potential of the process. A secondary objective was to develop recommendations for improvements. Preliminary engineering was performed as required to define the basis for plant design and economic estimates.

Not Available

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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261

Increased radiation dose at mammography due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening  

SciTech Connect

Four single-emulsion films introduced over the past 2 years--Du Pont Microvision, Fuji MiMa, Konica CM, and Eastman Kodak OM--were compared with Eastman Kodak OM SO-177 (Min-RE) film to evaluate their varying effects on mean glandular dose of reciprocity law failure due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening as a result of increased radiation exposure to improve penetration of glandular tissue. Exposures over 1.3 seconds led to increased radiation doses of 20%-30%. Delays in processing of 6 hours decreased processing speed by 11%-32% for all films except Du Pont Microvision. Optical density increases of 0.40 required 20%-30% more skin exposure for all five films. Optimal viewing densities were also evaluated and found to be different for each of the five films. Mammographers need to be aware of these differences in mammographic films to achieve maximum contrast at mammography.

Kimme-Smith, C.; Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Chow, S. (UCLA Medical Center (USA))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Vale-Cytec-University Research Consortium on Processing Low ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Incremental Scale Up of Isasmelt - The Key to Its Success Keynote: Implementing New Technology in Metallurgical Processes: Building Plants that Work.

263

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

An Affordable, Flexible, and More Accurate Method for Computing Radiative An Affordable, Flexible, and More Accurate Method for Computing Radiative Transfer Submitter: Pincus, R., NOAA - CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Pincus, R., H.W. Barker, J.J. Morcrette, A fast, flexible approximate technique for computing radiative transfer in inhomogenous cloud fields, J. Geophys. Res., Vol. 108, No. D13, 4376, doi:10.1029/2002JD003322, 2003 Key Contributors: H.W. Barker, J.J. Morcrette Cloud radiative feedback-the amount of solar radiation that is absorbed by clouds before it reaches the earth and bounces back into the atmosphere-is the single most important effect determining the magnitude of possible climate responses to human activity. However, cloud properties

264

An overview of an illuminator of opportunity passive radar research project and its signal processing research directions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an overview of an Illuminator Of Opportunity (IOO) passive radar research project being conducted at DSTO is presented, with a specific focus on the signal processing research directions that are being investigated. The overview provides ... Keywords: Bistatic radar, Passive coherent location

J. Palmer; S. Palumbo; A. Summers; D. Merrett; S. Searle; S. Howard

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Cancer risk among atomic bomb survivors. The RERF Life Span Study. Radiation Effects Research Foundation  

SciTech Connect

This article summarizes the risk of cancer among the survivors of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. We focus primarily on the risk of death from cancer among individuals in the Life Span Study sample of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation from 1950 through 1985 based on recently revised dosimetry procedures. We report the risk of cancer other than leukemia among the atomic bomb survivors. We note that the number of excess deaths of radiation-induced malignant tumors other than leukemia increases with age. Survivors who were exposed in the first or second decade of life have just entered the cancer-prone age and have so far exhibited a high relative risk in association with radiation dose. Whether the elevated risk will continue or will fall with time is not yet clear, although some evidence suggests that the risk may be declining. It is important to continue long-term follow-up of this cohort to document the changes with time since exposure and to provide direct rather than projected risks over the lifetime of an exposed individual.

Shimizu, Y.; Schull, W.J.; Kato, H. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Activities of the National Academy of Sciences in relation to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation  

SciTech Connect

This progress report relates progress in the various research projects evaluating the late health effects, both somatic and genetic, resulting from radiation exposure of the survivors of the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Considerable progress has been made in the collection and utilization of the various epidemiological data bases. These include the Life Span Study, (LSS) cohort, the Adult Health Study (AHS) cohort, the In Utero cohort, the leukemia registry and the F-1 Study population. Important progress has been made in using RERF Tumor and Tissue Registry records for evaluation of cancer incidence and radiation risk estimates for comparison with cancer mortality and risk in the LSS cohort. At the present time, a manuscript on the incidence of solid tumors (1950-1987) is undergoing internal and external review for publication as an RERF Technical report (TR) and for publication in a peer-reviewed scientific journal. In addition, manuscripts are in preparation on (1) a comprehensive report on the incidence of hematological cancers, including analysis of leukemia by cell type (1950-1987), (2) a general description of Tumor Registry operations and (3) a comparison of incidence- and mortality-based estimates of radiation risk in the LSS cohort.

Edington, C.W.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Research & Development Opportunities in Electrosynthesis and Electrochemical Manufacturing Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This scoping study is a follow-up to the Electrochemical Synthesis Workshop cosponsored by EPRI and the National Science Foundation (NSF) to identify areas of research and development (R&D) that fit EPRI's charter. Participants identified several R&D opportunities. This report discusses some of those opportunities.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Emerging Methods in Research Participation and Empowerment Processes in Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rise in oil prices. The prioritisation of the ecological dimension also promoted examination of value systems and thus, the cultural dimension of development (Cameron, 1994:76). According to Cameron, these concerns altered the agenda for North... as there was little local, academic resources upon which to draw. As late as the mid-1970's, sociological research in Nepal was often described as "patchy and sketchy" (Bista, 1972). Speaking at a conference in 1973, Bista remarked that up to the mid-1970's...

Tanner, Philip

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Crowdsourcing research opportunities: lessons from natural language processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although the field has led to promising early results, the use of crowdsourcing as an integral part of science projects is still regarded with skepticism by some, largely due to a lack of awareness of the opportunities and implications of utilizing these ... Keywords: crowdsourcing, games with a purpose, natural language processing, resource acquisition

Marta Sabou; Kalina Bontcheva; Arno Scharl

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Measurements Help to Evaluate Radiation Codes Used in Global Modeling ARM Measurements Help to Evaluate Radiation Codes Used in Global Modeling Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Oreopoulos L, E Mlawer, J Delamere, T Shippert, J Cole, B Fomin, M Iacono, Z Jin, J Li, J Manners, P Raisanen, F Rose, Y Zhang, MJ Wilson, and WB Rossow. 2012. "The Continual Intercomparison of Radiation Codes: results from Phase I." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 117, doi:10.1029/2011JD016821. The total error of each participating radiation code for all LW (left) and SW (right) cases in the CIRC intercomparison. The identity of each participating code can be found in the paper; codes built due to ARM

271

Final Report - Independent Verification Survey Activities at the Seperations Process Research Unit Sites, Niskayuna, New York  

SciTech Connect

The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

Evan Harpenau

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

272

Estimation of Radiative Corrections to the Process of Muon-Electron Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In detection of electrons from $\\mu \\to e $ conversion process the monochromatic electron spectrum is transformed due to a photon emission and fluctuations of energy loss in a target. The selection criterion of $\\mu \\to e (\\gamma)$ conversion events is an electron momentum above the threshold momentum of 103.5 MeV/c, which corresponds to the maximum energy loss of 1.5 MeV. Radiative corrections including a virtual photon correction and soft photon emission below 1.5 MeV lead to a reduction by about 10% in the probability of $\\mu \\to e $ conversion process calculated without radiative corrections. The soft photons emission below 1.5 MeV contributes to a change of electron spectrum from monoenergetic one at 105 MeV to a spectrum with a low energy tail for the process of $\\mu \\to e (\\gamma)$ conversion. However the effect of smearing of the initial momentum distribution due to the soft photon emission is small in comparison with a smearing due to energy loss fluctuations in a target. The average energy of soft photons emitted below 1.5 MeV is found to be 40 keV. The soft photon approximation is a good description for $\\mu \\to e (\\gamma)$ conversion process with photons emitted below 1.5 MeV.

Rashid M. Djilkibaev; Rostislav V. Konoplich

2009-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

273

Perturbative Analysis of Two-Temperature Radiative Shocks with Multiple Cooling Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The structure of the hot downstream region below a radiative accretion shock, such as that of an accreting compact object, may oscillate due to a global thermal instability. The oscillatory behaviour depends on the functional forms of the cooling processes, the energy exchanges of electrons and ions in the shock-heated matter, and the boundary conditions. We analyse the stability of a shock with unequal electron and ion temperatures, where the cooling consists of thermal bremsstrahlung radiation which promotes instability, plus a competing process which tends to stabilize the shock. The effect of transverse perturbations is considered also. As an illustration, we study the special case in which the stabilizing cooling process is of order 3/20 in density and 5/2 in temperature, which is an approximation for the effects of cyclotron cooling in magnetic cataclysmic variables. We vary the efficiency of the second cooling process, the strength of the electron-ion exchange and the ratio of electron and ion pressure...

Saxton, C J; Saxton, Curtis J.; Wu, Kinwah

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Perturbative Analysis of Two-Temperature Radiative Shocks with Multiple Cooling Processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The structure of the hot downstream region below a radiative accretion shock, such as that of an accreting compact object, may oscillate due to a global thermal instability. The oscillatory behaviour depends on the functional forms of the cooling processes, the energy exchanges of electrons and ions in the shock-heated matter, and the boundary conditions. We analyse the stability of a shock with unequal electron and ion temperatures, where the cooling consists of thermal bremsstrahlung radiation which promotes instability, plus a competing process which tends to stabilize the shock. The effect of transverse perturbations is considered also. As an illustration, we study the special case in which the stabilizing cooling process is of order 3/20 in density and 5/2 in temperature, which is an approximation for the effects of cyclotron cooling in magnetic cataclysmic variables. We vary the efficiency of the second cooling process, the strength of the electron-ion exchange and the ratio of electron and ion pressures at the shock, to examine particular effects on the stability properties and frequencies of oscillation modes.

Curtis J. Saxton; Kinwah Wu

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

275

Review and Evaluation of Updated Research on the Health Effects Associated with Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potential health effects of low levels of radiation have predominantly been based on those effects observed at high levels of radiation. The authors have reviewed more than 200 percent publications in radiobiology and epidermiology related to low dose radiation and concluded that recent radiobiological studies at low-doses; that doses low dose radiation research should to holistic, systems-based approaches to develop models that define the shape of the dose-response relationships at low doses; and that these results should be combined with the latest epidermiology to produce a comprehensive understanding of radiation effects that addresses both damage, likely with a linear effect, and response, possibly with non-linear consequences.

Dauer, Lawrence T.; Brooks, Antone L.; Hoel, David G.; Morgan, William F.; Stram, Daniel; Tran, Phung

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation -Induced Bystander Effect. Authors: Melvyn Folkard, Borivoj Vojnovic, Giuseppe Schettino, Kirk Atkinson, Kevin M Prise, Barry D Michael Institutes: Gray Cancer Institute, PO Box 100, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, HA6 2JR, UK For over a decade, the Gray Cancer Institute (GCI) has been actively engaged in the development and use of micro-irradiation techniques applied to radiobiological research. Our initial investigations made use of a charged-particle microbeam capable of irradiating individual cells with collimated energetic protons or 3He ions. By the end of the 1990's, a second facility had been constructed, which uses diffractive X-ray optics to focus ultrasoft X-rays to a sub-micron spot. The X-ray microprobe was

277

EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Nonlinear Radiation Response and Transport Properties in Scintillating Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Figure 1. Time-of-Flight (TOF) versus light Figure 1. Time-of-Flight (TOF) versus light output (L) of CsI:Tl to He + ions. The inset is an example where L=263 is determined for particles with certainty energy (TOF=840). The energy resolution can be determined by ∆L/L = 45/263. The light-energy dependence and energy resolution can be observed as the difference in curvature and dispersive of the data. EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Nonlinear Radiation Response and Transport Properties in Scintillating Materials Project start date: Spring 2007 EMSL Lead Investigator: Yanwen Zhang Deposition and Microfabrication, EMSL, PNNL Co-investigators: Vaithiyalingam Shutthanandan Deposition and Microfabrication, EMSL, PNNL Scintillation response has wide applications in the field of astronomy, medical physics, high-energy

278

Support of Activities of the NAS in Relation to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Academies (NA) provides support for the activities related to the long-term follow up of the health of the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki being conducted by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) laboratories in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The NA serves as scientific and administrative liaison between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and RERF, and performs tasks in the areas of scientific oversight, information/public interface, fiscal oversight, and personnel management. The project includes recruitment and support of approximately 10 NA employees who work at RERF in Japan. Specific activities are performed consistent with the cooperative agreements Statement of Work between DOE and NA and consistent with an Annual Work Plan developed by DOE and NA.

Douple, Evan B.

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Cellular and molecular research to reduce uncertainties in estimates of health effects from low-level radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was undertaken by five radiation scientists to examine the feasibility of reducing the uncertainties in the estimation of risk due to protracted low doses of ionizing radiation. In addressing the question of feasibility, a review was made by the study group: of the cellular, molecular, and mammalian radiation data that are available; of the way in which altered oncogene properties could be involved in the loss of growth control that culminates in tumorigenesis; and of the progress that had been made in the genetic characterizations of several human and animal neoplasms. On the basis of this analysis, the study group concluded that, at the present time, it is feasible to mount a program of radiation research directed at the mechanism(s) of radiation-induced cancer with special reference to risk of neoplasia due to protracted, low doses of sparsely ionizing radiation. To implement a program of research, a review was made of the methods, techniques, and instruments that would be needed. This review was followed by a survey of the laboratories and institutions where scientific personnel and facilities are known to be available. A research agenda of the principal and broad objectives of the program is also discussed. 489 refs., 21 figs., 14 tabs.

Elkind, M.M.; Bedford, J.; Benjamin, S.A.; Waldren, C.A. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (USA)); Gotchy, R.L. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Radiators  

SciTech Connect

A heat-exchange radiator is connected to a fluid flow circuit by a connector which provides one member of an interengageable spigot and socket pair for push-fit, fluid-tight, engagement between the connector and the radiator, with latching formations at least one of which is resilient. Preferably the connector carries the spigot which tapers and engages with a socket of corresponding shape, the spigot carrying an O-ring seal and either latching fingers or a resilient latching circlip.

Webster, D. M.

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Island-Induced Cloud Plumes Influence Tropical Atmospheric Measurements, Island-Induced Cloud Plumes Influence Tropical Atmospheric Measurements, Surface Radiation Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: McFarlane, S.A., Long, C.N., and Flynn, D., Nauru Island Effect Study, Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting, March 22 to 26, 2004, Albuquerque, New Mexico. Nauru Island, about 1,200 miles northeast of Papua New Guinea in the western South Pacific, is one of three instrumented island sites that comprise ARM's Tropical Western Pacific locale. A key objective of the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is to identify interactions between the processes that determine the radiative properties of an atmospheric column, including

282

Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 1 -- Base program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993  

SciTech Connect

Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

Smith, V.E.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Application of an Apple-II Computer in Real-Time Data Processing of Microwave Radiation Attenuation by Rain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using an Apple-II microcomputer, real-time data acquisition, processing, staring and display of 12 GHz microwave radiation attenuation by rain have been implemented. The computer-radiometer interface consists of an address decoder, two three-...

Song Qian

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Real-time Study of Signal Transduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Real-time Study of Signal Transduction Pathways Involving in Real-time Study of Signal Transduction Pathways Involving in Bystander Effects Using Single Nanoparticle Optics and Single Living Cell Imaging Authors: Prakash D. Nallathamby, X. Nancy Xu, Mohan Natarajan Institutions: Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia and Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, Texas The mechanisms of bystander effects remain largely unknown. Bystander responses are thought to depend on activation of cellular communication processes. Recent studies have speculated that several crucial signal transduction pathways could play a major role in bystander effects. These crucial signal transduction pathways are controlled by a coordinated

285

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Water Vapor Continuum Absorption and Its Impact on a GCM Improving Water Vapor Continuum Absorption and Its Impact on a GCM Simulation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Turner DD, A Merrelli, D Vimont, and EJ Mlawer. 2012. "Impact of modifying the longwave water vapor continuum absorption model on community Earth system model simulations." Journal of Geophysical Research, 117, D04106, doi:10.1029/2011JD016440. The mean difference profiles (experiment minus control) for clear-sky longwave radiative heating (QRLC); shortwave clear-sky radiative heating (QRSC); the longwave cloud radiative forcing (QRLCF); the precipitation

286

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Method for Satellite/Surface Comparisons A New Method for Satellite/Surface Comparisons Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Properties, Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Zhang Y, CN Long, WB Rossow, and EG Dutton. 2010. "Exploiting diurnal variations to evaluate the ISCCP-FD flux calculations and radiative-flux-analysis-processed surface observations from BSRN, ARM, and SURFRAD." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 115, D00K11, 10.1029/2009JD012812. Figure 1: Scatter plot for the column aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550 nm, measured at the surface (PSO) and used as input for the ISCCP-FD calculations (FD) at 10 ARM/SURFRAD/BSRN stations. The robust linear regression line is also shown.

287

COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH:USING ARM OBSERVATIONS & ADVANCED STATISTICAL TECHNIQUES TO EVALUATE CAM3 CLOUDS FOR DEVELOPMENT OF STOCHASTIC CLOUD-RADIATION  

SciTech Connect

The long-range goal of several past and current projects in our DOE-supported research has been the development of new and improved parameterizations of cloud-radiation effects and related processes, using ARM data, and the implementation and testing of these parameterizations in global models. The main objective of the present project being reported on here has been to develop and apply advanced statistical techniques, including Bayesian posterior estimates, to diagnose and evaluate features of both observed and simulated clouds. The research carried out under this project has been novel in two important ways. The first is that it is a key step in the development of practical stochastic cloud-radiation parameterizations, a new category of parameterizations that offers great promise for overcoming many shortcomings of conventional schemes. The second is that this work has brought powerful new tools to bear on the problem, because it has been a collaboration between a meteorologist with long experience in ARM research (Somerville) and a mathematician who is an expert on a class of advanced statistical techniques that are well-suited for diagnosing model cloud simulations using ARM observations (Shen).

Somerville, Richard

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

288

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: A Variable Energy Soft X-ray  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variable Energy Soft X-ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Variable Energy Soft X-ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect Melvyn Folkard Gray Cancer Institute Why This Project The aim of this project is to determine the effects of low radiation doses using a machine that makes it possible to radiate one cell at a time. Our soft X-ray microprobe can irradiate individual cells, or locations within cells with defined doses and with sub-micron precision. We can use low doses approaching that of a single electron track, which is of relevance to environmental level exposures. Much of our work is concentrating on irradiating specified individual cells within cell populations to identify "bystander responses" where non-radiated cells respond to signals from nearby radiated cells. Higher energy x-rays are being generated to extend

289

Thermochemical Process Development Unit: Researching Fuels from Biomass, Bioenergy Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Thermochemical conversion technologies convert biomass and its residues to fuels and chemicals using gasification and pyrolysis. Gasification entails heating biomass and results in a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, known as syngas. Pyrolysis, which is heating biomass in the absence of oxygen, produces liquid pyrolysis oil. Both syngas and pyrolysis oil can be chemically converted into clean, renewable transportation fuels and chemicals. The Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique facility dedicated to researching thermochemical processes to produce fuels from biomass. Thermochemical processes include gasification and pyrolysis-processes used to convert

290

United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries: Researching radiation protection. USTUR annual report for February 1, 1999 through January 31, 2000  

SciTech Connect

The United States Transuranium and Uranium Registries (USTUR) comprise a human tissue research program studying the deposition, biokinetics and dosimetry of the actinide elements in humans with the primary goals of providing data fundamental to the verification, refinement, or future development of radiation protection standards for these and other radionuclides, and of determining possible bioeffects on both a macro and subcellular level attributable to exposure to the actinides. This report covers USTUR activities during the year from February 1999 through January 2000.

Ehrhart, Susan M. (ed.); Filipy, Ronald E. (ed.)

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving the Treatment of Radiation in Climate Models Improving the Treatment of Radiation in Climate Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Delamere, J. S., Tech-X Corporation Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Delamere JS, SA Clough, VH Payne, EJ Mlawer, DD Turner, and RR Gamache. 2010. "A far-infrared radiative closure study in the Arctic: Application to water vapor." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 115, D17106, 10.1029/2009JD012968. The mean AERI-ER radiances for a select set of cloud-free cases at NSA in 2007 are presented in the top panel. The bottom panel presents mean spectral differences between the measurements and model calculations. The red line demonstrates the differences when using the pre-RHUBC version of

292

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Experiments to Improve the Treatment of Radiation in the Mid-to-Upper Field Experiments to Improve the Treatment of Radiation in the Mid-to-Upper Troposphere Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Turner DD and EJ Mlawer. 2010. "The Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaigns (RHUBC)." Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society, 91, doi:10.1175/2010BAMS2904.1. (a) Atmospheric transmittance at 1 cm-1 resolution in the far-infrared for three atmospheres that are representative of the ARM SGP site, NSA site, and RHUBC-II site in the Chajnantor plateau (CJC). (b) The transmittance

293

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud Susceptibility Measures Potential Cloud Sensitivity to First Aerosol Cloud Susceptibility Measures Potential Cloud Sensitivity to First Aerosol Indirect Effect Download a printable PDF Submitter: Oreopoulos, L., NASA Platnick, S., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Platnick, S, and L Oreopoulos. 2008. "Radiative susceptibility of cloudy atmospheres to droplet number perturbations: 1. Theoretical analysis and examples from MODIS." Journal of Geophysical Research doi:10.1029/2007JD009654, in press. Oreopoulos, L., and S. Platnick. 2008. Radiative susceptibility of cloudy atmospheres to droplet number perturbations: 2. Global analysis from MODIS, J. Geophys. Res., doi:10.1029/2007JD009655, in press. Theoretical calculations with a shortwave broadband radiative transfer

294

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Invisible" Giants in the Sky "Invisible" Giants in the Sky Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kassianov E, M Pekour, and J Barnard. 2012. "Aerosols in central California: Unexpectedly large contribution of coarse mode to aerosol radiative forcing." Geophysical Research Letters, 39, L20806, doi:10.1029/2012GL053469. Daily averaged values of (a, b) the direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF) and (c, d) aerosol radiative forcing efficiency at the top-of-atmosphere calculated for the "original" aerosol optical properties (blue) and their PM1.0 (red) and PM2.5 (green) counterparts at the CARES (left) T0 and (right) T1 sites.

295

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measured Radiative Cooling from Reflective Roofs in India Measured Radiative Cooling from Reflective Roofs in India Download a printable PDF Submitter: Fischer, M. L., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle, Cloud Life Cycle, Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Salamanca F, S Tonse, S Menon, V Garg, KP Singh, M Naja, and ML Fischer. 2012. "Top-of-atmosphere radiative cooling with white roofs: Experimental verification and model-based evaluation." Environmental Research Letters, 7(4), 044007, doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/044007. True color image of light (PW1, PW2) and unpainted tar (PD1), and concrete (PD2) roofs at the Pantnagar, India site taken on October 21, 2011. We note that the concrete roof is considerably more reflective than the tar roof

296

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Summertime Radiative Forcing by Shallow Cumuli at the ARM SGP Surface Summertime Radiative Forcing by Shallow Cumuli at the ARM SGP Download a printable PDF Submitter: Berg, L., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Berg LK, EI Kassianov, CN Long, and DL Mills. 2011. "Surface summertime radiative forcing by shallow cumuli at the ARM SGP." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D01202, 10.1029/2010JD014593. Histogram of hourly average shortwave CRF (black) and longwave CRF (red) for all periods with shallow cumuli. (a) Hourly average shortwave CRF (circles), binned shortwave CRF (squares); (b) total number of hourly averages for each sky cover bin; and (c) the change in shortwave TED as a function of sky cover for all hours with

297

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff - 2003  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Low Dose Radiation Program Workshop IV DOE Low Dose Radiation Program Workshop IV Abstract Title: TGF-β Protects Human Mammary Epithelial Cells from Radiation-Induced Centrosome Amplification Authors: Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff, Bahram Parvin, Anna C. Erickson and Rishi Gupta Institutions: Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, Life Sciences Division, Ernest Orlando Lawrence, Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California In recent studies we have shown that ionizing radiation (IR), a known carcinogen of human and murine mammary gland, compromises human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) polarity and multicellular organization in a manner characteristic of neoplastic progression through a heritable, non-mutational mechanism (1). Thus, when all cells are irradiated with a significant dose (2 Gy), the daughters of irradiated cells lose their

298

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Wide Expression of LLIR and the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wide Expression of LLIR and the Biological Consequences Wide Expression of LLIR and the Biological Consequences David J. Chen Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Why This Project It is known that changes in gene expression alter biological effects. It is necessary to identify the specific genes that demonstrate altered expression after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation and to determine pathways involved in DNA damage recognition, signaling, and repair that are associated with radiation-induced adaptive and bystander effects. Project Goals Identification of genes whose transcription is regulated in response to low levels of ionizing radiation Identification of the genes and communication pathways that control these responses to low dose radiation Identification of the cellular and molecular targets that influence

299

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research ARM Program Achieves Milestone in Global Cloud Properties Research Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Knuteson, R.O., Best, F.A., Dedecker, R.G., Feltz, W.F., Revercomb, H.E., and Tobin, D.C., 2004: "10 Years of AERI Data from the DOE ARM Southern Great Plains Site," In Proceedings from the Fourteenth ARM Science Team Meeting, U.S. Department of Energy,Washington, D.C. Figure 1 Figure 2 From the unassuming farmlands of north-central Oklahoma comes a milestone for the global climate research community. March 2004 marked the 10-year anniversary for an instrument that now holds the prestigious distinction of providing the longest set of continuous atmospheric interferometer data

300

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Proposed Measurement Standard for Diffuse Radiation Flux A Proposed Measurement Standard for Diffuse Radiation Flux Download a printable PDF Submitter: Michalsky, J. J., DOC/NOAA/OAR/ESRL Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Michalsky, J. J., C. Gueymard, P. Kiedron, L. J. B. McArthur, R. Philipona, and T. Stoffel, 2007: A proposed working standard for the measurement of diffuse horizontal shortwave irradiance, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D16112, doi:10.1029/2007JD008651. The three pyranometers proposed for the international standard for diffuse flux are shown here in action during the 2006 campaign at the ACRF SGP site. Of note are the shadows of the blocking balls on the domes of each pyranometer. The blocking balls are moved by a solar tracker to continuously shade the pyranometers.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving Water Vapor Absorption in Microwave Radiative Transfer Models Improving Water Vapor Absorption in Microwave Radiative Transfer Models Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Loehnert, U., University of Cologne Cadeddu, M. P., Argonne National Laboratory Crewell, S., University of Cologne Vogelmann, A. M., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Turner DD, MP Cadeddu, U Loehnert, S Crewell, and A Vogelmann. 2009. "Modifications to the water vapor continuum in the microwave suggested by ground-based 150 GHz observations." IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, 47(10), 3326-3337. Figure 1: The top panel shows downwelling microwave brightness temperature

302

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continuous Clear-Sky Longwave from Surface Measurements Continuous Clear-Sky Longwave from Surface Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Long, CN, and DD Turner. 2008. "A method for continuous estimation of clear-sky downwelling longwave radiative flux developed using ARM surface measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D18206, doi:10.1029/2008JD009936. Comparison of clear-sky RT model calculations (black) and our estimates (gray) with detected LW effective clear-sky measurements from the ACRF SGP site from 1 March through 31 May 2003, showing that our LW estimates do as well as detailed model calculations in comparison with actual LW

303

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Downward Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty Under Arctic Atmospheres: Downward Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty Under Arctic Atmospheres: Measurements and Modeling Submitter: Marty, C., Swiss Federal Institute of Snow and Avalanche Research Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marty, C., R. Philipona, J. Delamere, E.G. Dutton, J. Michalsky, K. Stamnes, R. Storvold, T. Stoffel, S.A. Clough, and E.J. Mlawr, Downward longwave irradiance uncertainty under arctic atmospheres: Measurements and modeling, J. Geophys. Res., 108(D12), 4358, doi:10.1029/2002JD002937, 2003. IPASRC-II instruments deployed at ARM's Barrow Station. Members of 11 international institutions converged at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site in Barrow, Alaska, to conduct the Second International Pyrgeometer and

304

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Dimming and Brightening: an Update Beyond 2000 Global Dimming and Brightening: an Update Beyond 2000 Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Wild, M., Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science - ETH Zurich Truessel, B., Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Science - ETH Zurich Ohmura, A., Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Koenig-Langlo, G., Alfred Wegener Institute Dutton, E. G., NOAA/OAR/ESRL Tsvetkov, A. V., World Radiation Data Centre Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Wild M, B Trüssel, A Ohmura, CN Long, G König-Langlo, EG Dutton, and A Tsvetkov. 2009. "Global dimming and brightening: An update beyond 2000." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, D00D13, 10.1029/2008JD011382.

305

Marketing research for EE G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes research conducted by ITI to evaluate the commercialization potential of EG G Mound Applied Technologies' heat treatment process of high strength materials. The remainder of the report describes the nature of demand for maraging steel, extent of demand, competitors, environmental trends, technology life cycle, industry structure, and conclusion. (JL)

Shackson, R.H.

1991-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

306

Savannah River Site Salt Processing Project: FY2002 Research and Development Program Plan, Rev. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Plan describes the technology development program for alpha/strontium removal and Caustic Side Solvent Extraction cesium removal in FY2002. Crystalline Silicotitanate and Small Tank Tetratphenylborate Precipitation are discussed as possible backup technologies. Previous results are summarized in the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Project Research and Development Summary Report.

Harmon, Harry D.; Leugemors, Robert K.; Schlahta, Stephan N.; Fink, Samuel D.; Thompson, Major C.; Walker, Darrell D.

2001-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

307

Savannah River Site Salt Processing Project: FY2002 Research and Development Program Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Plan describes the technology development program for alpha/strontium removal and Caustic Side Solvent Extraction cesium removal in FY2002. Crystalline Silicotitanate and Small Tank Tetratphenylborate Precipitation are discussed as possible backup technologies. Previous results are summarized in the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Project Research and Development Summary Report

Harmon, Harry D.; Leugemors, Robert K.; Schlahta, Stephan N.; Fink, Samuel D.; Thompson, Major C.; Walker, Darrell D.

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Program Research Improves Longwave Radiative Transfer Models ARM Program Research Improves Longwave Radiative Transfer Models Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: The QME AERI LBLRTM: A closure experiment for downwelling high spectral resolution infrared radiance. D.D. Turner, D.C. Tobin, S.A. Clough, P.D. Brown, R.G. Ellingson, E.J. Mlawer, R.O. Knuteson, H.E. Revercomb, T.R. Shippert, and W.L. Smith. 2004. Journal of Atmospheric Science, 61, 2657-2675. Top panels: Examples of downwelling infrared radiance observed by the AERI for two different clear sky cases with different amounts of water vapor. Bottom panels: Differences between the AERI observations and calculations

309

Research prioritization using the Analytic Hierarchy Process: basic methods. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a systematic approach for prioritizing research needs and research programs. The approach is formally called the Analytic Hierarchy Process which was developed by T.L. Saaty and is described in several of his texts referenced in the report. The Analytic Hierarchy Process, or AHP for short, has been applied to a wide variety of prioritization problems and has a good record of success as documented in Saaty's texts. The report develops specific guidelines for constructing the hierarchy and for prioritizing the research programs. Specific examples are given to illustrate the steps in the AHP. As part of the work, a computer code has been developed and the use of the code is described. The code allows the prioritizations to be done in a codified and efficient manner; sensitivity and parametric studies can also be straightforwardly performed to gain a better understanding of the prioritization results. Finally, as an important part of the work, an approach is developed which utilizes probabilistic risk analyses (PRAs) to systematically identify and prioritize research needs and research programs. When utilized in an AHP framework, the PRA's which have been performed to date provide a powerful information source for focusing research on those areas most impacting risk and risk uncertainty.

Vesely, W.E.; Shafaghi, A.; Gary, I. Jr.; Rasmuson, D.M.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

NREL Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL): Baseline Measurement System (BMS); Golden, Colorado (Data)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The SRRL was established at the Solar Energy Research Institute (now NREL) in 1981 to provide continuous measurements of the solar resources, outdoor calibrations of pyranometers and pyrheliometers, and to characterize commercially available instrumentation. The SRRL is an outdoor laboratory located on South Table Mountain, a mesa providing excellent solar access throughout the year, overlooking Denver. Beginning with the basic measurements of global horizontal irradiance, direct normal irradiance and diffuse horizontal irradiance at 5-minute intervals, the SRRL Baseline Measurement System now produces more than 130 data elements at 1-min intervals that are available from the Measurement & Instrumentation Data Center Web site. Data sources include global horizontal, direct normal, diffuse horizontal (from shadowband and tracking disk), global on tilted surfaces, reflected solar irradiance, ultraviolet, infrared (upwelling and downwelling), photometric and spectral radiometers, sky imagery, and surface meteorological conditions (temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure, precipitation, snow cover, wind speed and direction at multiple levels). Data quality control and assessment include daily instrument maintenance (M-F) with automated data quality control based on real-time examinations of redundant instrumentation and internal consistency checks using NREL's SERI-QC methodology. Operators are notified of equipment problems by automatic e-mail messages generated by the data acquisition and processing system. Radiometers are recalibrated at least annually with reference instruments traceable to the World Radiometric Reference (WRR).

Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

311

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mechanisms of Tissue Response to Low  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tissue Response to Low Dose Radiation Tissue Response to Low Dose Radiation Mary Helen Barcellos-Hoff Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Why This Project? In the past, the effects of ionizing radiation on humans has been attributed in great part to its ability to damage DNA, which transmits information from cell to cell, and generation to generation. Damaged DNA can lead to cell death or perpetuate the damage to daughter cells and to future generations. In addition to the information contained with the genome (i.e., DNA sequence), information directing cell behavior and tissue function is also stored outside the DNA. The success in cloning sheep from the DNA contained in the nucleus of an adult cell shows how important signals from the outside are in defining how the genome is expressed. This

312

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DNA Damage in Acutely Irradiated F2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DNA Damage in Acutely Irradiated F2 Mice with a History of Paternal DNA Damage in Acutely Irradiated F2 Mice with a History of Paternal F0 Germline Irradiation Authors: J.E. Baulch and O.G. Raabe Institutions: Center for Health and the Environment, University of California, Davis, CA. The main goal of this grant is to evaluate heritable, transgenerational effects of low dose, low-linear-energy-transfer (LET) radiation (0.1 Gy attenuated 137Cs gamma rays) on Type B spermatogonia in 129SVE mice; wild-type and heterozygous for Ataxia-telangiectasia (AT). The ATM heterozygotes are carriers for a genetic mutation (AT mutated, ATM) that is thought to predispose both humans and mice to radiation sensitivity. Experiments conducted in our laboratory have demonstrated heritable effects of paternal germline exposure to ionizing radiation in mice using 1.0 Gy of

313

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: The Role of the Number and Spacing of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Workshop I Program Workshop I November 10-12, 1999, Washington, D.C. The Role of the Number and Spacing of Electron Tracks on the Consequences of Low Dose Irradiation Leslie A. Braby and J. R. Ford Nuclear Engineering, Texas A&M University, 129 Zachry, College Station, Texas. Summary: Biological mechanisms, which may influence the health risks resulting from very low dose radiation exposures, will be investigated using a collimated beam of electrons to simulate the irradiation patterns occurring with low dose exposures. Abstract: Ionizing radiation produces a variety of free radicals and chemical products that react to produce the same types of oxidative damage in a mammalian cell as produced by the normal metabolic activity of the cell. However, the damage produced by radiation is distributed differently

314

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster Formation in a Cellular Environment Modeling the Physics of Damage Cluster Formation in a Cellular Environment Larry Toburen East Carolina University Why This Project Modern tools of radiobiology are leading to many new discoveries regarding how cells and tissues respond to radiation exposure. We can now irradiate single cells and observe responses in adjacent cells. We can also measure clusters of radiation damage produced in DNA. The primary tools available to describe the initial spatial pattern of damage formed by the absorption of ionizing radiation are based on (MC) Monte Carlo simulations of the structure of charged particle tracks. Although many MC codes exist and considerable progress is being made in the incorporation of detailed macromolecular target structures into these codes, much of the interaction

315

RADIATION RESEARCH 159, 154160 (2003) 0033-7587/03 $5.00  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Methods in Physics Research A 452 (2000) 192}204 Laboratory tests on neutron shields for gamma. Neutrons J. Hong et al. / Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 452 (2000) 192}204 193 #12-eV neutron energies due to the high 194 J. Hong et al. / Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research

316

Neutron and gamma radiation shielding material, structure, and process of making structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a novel neutron and gamma radiation shielding material consisting of 95 to 97% by weight SiO/sub 2/ and 5 to 3% by weight sodium silicate. In addition, the method of using this composition to provide a continuous neutron and gamma radiation shielding structure is disclosed.

Hondorp, H.L.

1981-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

317

Neutron and gamma radiation shielding material, structure, and process of making structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a novel neutron and gamma radiation elding material consisting of 95 to 97 percent by weight SiO.sub.2 and 5 to 3 percent by weight sodium silicate. In addition, the method of using this composition to provide a continuous neutron and gamma radiation shielding structure is disclosed.

Hondorp, Hugh L. (Princeton Junction, NJ)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

TH?E?500?01: Formal Radiation Therapy Safety Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern radiation therapy has become increasingly complex. In order to maintain a high level of safety medical physicists are shifting their approach to safety from historical to formal. Quality assurance (QA) is not a unique challenge to radiation therapy let alone medicine. Every industry has an approach to measuring

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Overview of Fiscal Year 2002 Research and Development for Savannah River Site's Salt Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of high-level waste for disposal. The Salt Processing Program (SPP) is the salt (soluble) waste treatment portion of the SRS high-level waste effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction and operation of treatment technologies to prepare the salt waste feed material for the site's grout facility (Saltstone) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to Defense Waste Processing Facility include actinides, strontium, cesium, and entrained sludge. In fiscal year 2002 (FY02), research and development (R&D) on the actinide and strontium removal and Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) processes transitioned from technology development for baseline process selection to providing input for conceptual design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility. The SPP R&D focused on advancing the technical maturity, risk reduction, engineering development, and design support for DOE's engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractors for the Salt Waste Processing Facility. Thus, R&D in FY02 addressed the areas of actual waste performance, process chemistry, engineering tests of equipment, and chemical and physical properties relevant to safety. All of the testing, studies, and reports were summarized and provided to the DOE to support the Salt Waste Processing Facility, which began conceptual design in September 2002.

H. D. Harmon, R. Leugemors, PNNL; S. Fink, M. Thompson, D. Walker, WSRC; P. Suggs, W. D. Clark, Jr

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

320

RADIATION RESEARCH 145,501-507 (1996) 0033-7587196 $5.00  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Significant Neutron Dose to Survivors of the HiroshimaAtomic Bomb David J. Brenner Centerfor Radiological Biological Evidence for a Significant Neutron Dose to Survivors of the Hiroshima Atomic Bomb. Radiat. Res. 145,501-507 (1996). In the past few years much physical evidence has accumu- lated that the A-bomb

Brenner, David Jonathan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

RADIATION RESEARCH 156, 434445 (2001) 0033-7587/01 $5.00  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Lee, N. P. Carter and T. C. Freeman, Expression profiling of single cells using three prime end be implemented. Planned facility developments include replacement of the collimation system with electrostatic individual cells to high-energy radiation was recognized many years ago by Zirkle and Bloom (1) as having

322

Underwater radiated noise measurements of a noise?reduced research vessel: Comparison between a U.S. Navy noise range and a simple hydrophone mooring.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

[A feasibility study was undertaken to characterize underwater radiated noise for a new class of noise?reduced fisheries research vessels using a field?deployable hydrophone system. Recent studies have demonstrated that vessel?radiated noise can impact the behavior of fish

Alex De Robertis; Christopher D. Wilson; Peter H. Dahl

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Underwater radiated noise measurements of a noise-reduced research vessel: comparison between a US Navy noise range and a simple hydrophone mooring.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A feasibility study was undertaken to characterize underwater radiated noise for a new class of noise-reduced fisheries research vessels using a field-deployable hydrophone system. Recent studies have demonstrated that vessel-radiated noise can impact the behavior of fish

Alex De Robertis; Christopher Wilson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Collisional processes of interest in MFE plasma research. Progress report No. 3, February 1, 1981-March 31, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research on our contract can be divided into two general topics: (1) H/sup -/formation collision processes, and (2) the determination of scattering cross sections used to diagnose plasma properties. Research progress during the last two months is presented.

Olson, R.E.

1981-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

Research investigations in oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, and advanced fuels research: Volume 2 -- Jointly sponsored research program. Final report, October 1986--September 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerous studies have been conducted in five principal areas: oil shale, tar sand, underground coal gasification, advanced process technology, and advanced fuels research. In subsequent years, underground coal gasification was broadened to be coal research, under which several research activities were conducted that related to coal processing. The most significant change occurred in 1989 when the agreement was redefined as a Base Program and a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP). Investigations were conducted under the Base Program to determine the physical and chemical properties of materials suitable for conversion to liquid and gaseous fuels, to test and evaluate processes and innovative concepts for such conversions, to monitor and determine environmental impacts related to development of commercial-sized operations, and to evaluate methods for mitigation of potential environmental impacts. This report is divided into two volumes: Volume 1 consists of 28 summaries that describe the principal research efforts conducted under the Base Program in five topic areas. Volume 2 describes tasks performed within the JSRP. Research conducted under this agreement has resulted in technology transfer of a variety of energy-related research information. A listing of related publications and presentations is given at the end of each research topic summary. More specific and detailed information is provided in the topical reports referenced in the related publications listings.

Smith, V.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Automated solar cell assembly teamed process research. Semiannual subcontract report, December 6, 1993--June 30, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the second Semiannual Technical Progress Report for the program titled `Automated Solar Cell Assembly Teamed Process Research` funded under National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontract No. ZAG-3-11219-01. This report describes the work done on Phase II of the program in the period from December 6, 1993 to June 30, 1994. Spire`s objective in this program is to develop high throughput (5 MW/yr) automated processes for interconnecting thin (200 {mu}m) silicon solar cells. High yield will be achieved with these fragile cells through the development of low mechanical stress and low thermal stress processes. For example, a machine vision system is being developed for cell alignment without mechanically contacting the cell edges, while a new soldering process is being developed to solder metal interconnect ribbons simultaneously to a cells` front and back contacts, eliminating one of the two heating steps normally used for soldering each cell.

Nowlan, M. [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed Spectral Invariant Behavior of Zenith Radiance Around Cloud Edges Observed by ARM SWS Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Knyazikhin, Y., Boston University Chiu, J., University of Reading Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marshak A, Y Knyazikhin, JC Chiu, and WJ Wiscombe. 2009. "Spectral invariant behavior of zenith radiance around cloud edges observed by ARM SWS." Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L16802, doi:10.1029/2009GL039366. (top) Time-wavelength color contour plot of ARM shortwave spectrometer (SWS) spectra measured from 21:35:24 to 21:40:24 UTC on 18 May 2007 at the ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Southern Great Plains (SGP) site in

328

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Fbxw7/Cdc4 is a p53-Dependent...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fbxw7Cdc4 is a p53-Dependent Haploinsufficient Tumour Suppressor Gene Allan Balmain Cancer Research Institute, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. Why...

329

The DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials: Research briefs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication is designed to inform present and potential customers and partners of the DOE Center of Excellence for the Synthesis and Processing of Advanced Materials about significant advances resulting from Center-coordinated research. The format is an easy-to-read, not highly technical, concise presentation of the accomplishments. Selected accomplishments from each of the Center`s seven initial focused projects are presented. The seven projects are: (1) conventional and superplastic forming; (2) materials joining; (3) nanoscale materials for energy applications; (4) microstructural engineering with polymers; (5) tailored microstructures in hard magnets; (6) processing for surface hardness; and (7) mechanically reliable surface oxides for high-temperature corrosion resistance.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low-Dose Dose-Response of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Dose Dose-Response of Proliferating Human Cells Exposed to Low Low-Dose Dose-Response of Proliferating Human Cells Exposed to Low Dose Rate g-Radiation. Authors: Louise Enns,1 Michael Weinfeld,1 Albert Murtha,1 and Kenneth Bogen2 Institutions: 1Cross Cancer Institute and 2Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Clinical and environmental exposure to ionizing radiation rarely exceeds 200 cGy. To examine cell proliferation at early times (up to 5 days) post-irradiation, we are utilizing an assay in which single cells encapsulated within ~30- to 70-µm-diameter agarose gel microdrops (GMDs) are exposed and cultured for 4 days at 37°C, then analyzed by flow cytometry (FC). Clonogenic proliferation is measured as the fraction of occupied GMDs containing multicellular microcolonies after 4 days in culture. This assay was applied to human A549 lung cells exposed to gamma

331

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of A Variable-Energy Soft X-Ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation-Induced Bystander Effect. Authors: Melvyn Folkard, Borivoj Vojnovic, Giuseppe Schettino, Kirk Atkinson, Kevin M Prise, Barry D Michael Institutions: Gray Cancer Institute, PO BO Box100, Mount Vernon Hospital, Northwood, HA6 2JR, UK The Gray Cancer Institute (GCI) has pioneered the use of X-ray focussing techniques to develop systems for micro-irradiating individual cells and sub-cellular targets. Our prototype X-ray microprobe was developed alongside our existing charged-particle microbeam to address problems specific to low LET radiations, or where very precise targeting accuracy and dose delivery are required. This facility was optimised for focusing 278 eV CK X-rays; however there are a number of reasons for extending the

332

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: A Paracrine Signal Mediates The Cell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Paracrine Signal Mediates The Cell Transformation Response To Low A Paracrine Signal Mediates The Cell Transformation Response To Low Dose Gamma Radiation in JB6 Cells. Authors: Thomas J. Weber,1 Robert W. Siegel,2 Lye M. Markillie,1 William B. Chrisler,1 Xingye C. Lei,3 and Nancy H. Colburn4 Institutions: 1Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington. 2Protein Function, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington. 3Statistical and Mathematical Sciences, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington. 4Gene Regulation Section, Laboratory of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, Maryland. The carcinogenic response to radiation is complex and may involve adaptive cellular responses as well as a bystander effect mediated by paracrine or

333

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Response of Respiratory Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Response of Respiratory Cells in Intact Tissues and Reconstituted Response of Respiratory Cells in Intact Tissues and Reconstituted Tissue John Ford Department of Nuclear Engineering Texas A & M University Why this Project? Using the well-established rat trachea model to test the hypothesis that normal respiratory epithelial cells transmit signals to neighboring cells in response to very low dose radiation exposure. Project Goals By comparing the responses shown by cells in these normal rodent respiratory tissues to those seen for human respiratory epithelial cells in reconstituted tissue constructs, it will be possible to better understand the responds in human respiratory cells in vivo. These studies will characterize responses after exposure to a variety of radiation types and dose distributions. Experimental Approach

334

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Control of Repair and Adaptive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Repair and Adaptive Responses to Low-level DNA Damage Repair and Adaptive Responses to Low-level DNA Damage James E. Haber Brandeis University Why This Project In order to fully understand mechanisms resulting in effects of low dose, whole system rather than cells must be examined. Although not identical to mammalian systems, simple systems usually have many similarities and give direction for further study of more complex systems. We use the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as a model system because it is easy to manipulate and its genome is simple and well characterized. Project Goals Examine mechanisms and effects of low dose radiation response for: Genetic recombination mechanisms that lead to genomic instability Genetic factors that affect individual susceptibility to low-dose radiation The adaptive response

335

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1992  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the past quarter are presented for the following five tasks: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research covers oil shale process studies. Tar sand research is on process development of Recycle Oil Pyrolysis and Extraction (ROPE) Process. Coal research covers: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts;advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; and solid state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens.

Speight, J.G.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Cloud Profiling Radars: An Evaluation of Signal Processing and Sampling Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program operates millimeter-wavelength cloud radars (MMCRs) in several specific locations within different climatological regimes. These vertically pointing cloud ...

Pavlos Kollias; Bruce A. Albrecht; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Mark A. Miller; Karen L. Johnson; Kenneth P. Moran

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Effects of Moist Convection and Water Vapor Radiative Processes on Climate Sensitivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary interest of the present study is to examine the sensitivity of climate to radiative perturbations such as increases in CO2 and solar insolation for surface temperatures warmer than present day global averaged values (Ts> 290 K). The ...

M. Lal; V. Ramanathan

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Study of Radiative and Turbulent Processes in the Stable Boundary Layer under Weak Wind Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of radiation and turbulence was studied in a weak wind nocturnal inversion layer using a one-dimensional model. In contrast to a strong wind stable boundary layer where cooling within the surface inversion layer is dominated by ...

S. G. Gopalakrishnan; Maithili Sharan; R. T. McNider; M. P. Singh

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Research Article Effect of Microwave Radiation on Enzymatic and Chemical Peptide Bond Synthesis on Solid Phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peptide bond synthesis was performed on PEGA beads under microwave radiations. Classical chemical coupling as well as thermolysin catalyzed synthesis was studied, and the effect of microwave radiations on reaction kinetics, beads integrity, and enzyme activity was assessed. Results demonstrate that microwave radiations can be profitably exploited to improve reaction kinetics in solid phase peptide synthesis when both chemical and biocatalytic strategies are used. Copyright 2009 Alessandra Basso et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The use of microwave (MW) heating has found successful applications in solid phase organic synthesis (SPOS) [17]. As far back as 1992, Wang described the use of a single-mode microwave as a heating source to accelerate the chemical coupling [8] of many amino acids. Reactions on SP often suffer from unsatisfactory reaction kinetics due to slow diffusion. Since microwave energy activates any molecule with dipole moment, a rapid heating at a molecular level is

Ra Basso; Loris Sinigoi; Lucia Gardossi; Sabine Flitsch

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Development of a second-generation regional climate model (RegCM2). Part I: Boundary-layer and radiative transfer processes  

SciTech Connect

During the last few years the development of a second-generation regional climate modeling system (RegCM2) has been completed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Based upon the National Center for Atmospheric Research-Pennsylvania State University Mesoscale Model (MM4), RegCM2 includes improved formulations of boundary layer, radiative transfer, surface physics, cumulus convection, and time integration technique, which make it more physically comprehensive and more computationally efficient than the previous regional climate model version. This paper discusses a number of month-long simulations over the European region that were conducted to test the new RegCM2 boundary-layer parameterization (the scheme developed by Holtsag et al.) and radiative transfer formulation [the package developed for the NCAR Community Climate Model 2 (CCM2)]. Both schemes significantly affect the model precipitation, temperature, moisture, and cloudiness climatology, leading to overall more realistic results, while they do not substantially modify the model performance in simulating the aggregated characteristics of synoptic patterns. Description of the convective processes and procedures of boundary condition assimilation included in RegCM2 is presented in companion paper by Giorgi et al. 26 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs.

Giorgi, F.; Marinucci, M.R.; Bates, G.T. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States))

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectrally Invariant Approximation Within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Spectrally Invariant Approximation Within Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Marshak A, Y Knyazikhin, JC Chiu, and WJ Wiscombe. 2011. "Spectrally-invariant approximation within atmospheric radiative transfer." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 68(12), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-11-060.1. Ratio of reflectance Rλ plus transmittance Tλ over single scattering albedo ω0λ plotted against the sum Rλ+Tλ for two cloud optical depths: 5 and 10. The aerosol optical depth at 0.55 μm is 0.2 (rural type of aerosol). Different dots correspond to different wavelengths from 0.4 to

342

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Properties from M-PACE Microphysical Retrievals Mixed-Phase Cloud Radiative Properties from M-PACE Microphysical Retrievals Download a printable PDF Submitter: de Boer, G., University of Colorado, Boulder/CIRES Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: de Boer G, WD Collins, S Menon, and CN Long. 2011. "Using surface remote sensors to derive radiative characteristics of mixed-phase clouds: An example from M-PACE." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 11, doi: 10.5194/acp-11-11937-2011. Measured and retrieved cloud properties on 10 October 2004. Included are (top to bottom) AHSRL bacscatter cross-section, AHSRL depolarization ratio, MMCR reflectivity, and profiles of liquid water content (LWC), ice water content (IWC), and liquid (r_{e,liq}) and ice (r$_{e,ice}$) effective

343

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1993  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the past quarter are briefly described for the following areas of research: oil shale; tar sand; coal; advanced exploratory process technology; and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale and tar sand researches cover processing studies. Coal research includes: coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology covers: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW{sup TM} field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid-state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin tight gas sands; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process; oil field waste cleanup using tank bottom recovery process; remote chemical sensor development; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; solid-state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; and development of an effective method for the clean-up of natural gas.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TOA Radiation Budget of Convective Core/Stratiform Rain/Anvil Clouds from TOA Radiation Budget of Convective Core/Stratiform Rain/Anvil Clouds from Deep Convection Download a printable PDF Submitter: Feng, Z., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Feng Z, XQ Dong, BK Xi, C Schumacher, P Minnis, and M Khaiyer. 2011. "Top-of-atmosphere radiation budget of convective core/stratiform rain and anvil clouds from deep convective systems." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D23202, doi:10.1029/2011JD016451. An example of the hybrid classification process. (a) GOES IR temperature, (b) NEXRAD radar reflectivity at 2.5 km MSL, (c) cloud patch segmentation from GOES IR temperature (the color patches are identified as deep

345

Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect

In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA) to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

Harmon, Harry D.

2000-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

346

Tanks Focus Area Alternative Salt Processing Research and Development Program Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In March 2000, DOE-Headquarters (HQ) requested the Tanks Focus Area (TFA)to assume management responsibility for the Salt Processing Project technology development program at Savannah River Site. The TFA was requested to conduct several activities, including review and revision of the technology development roadmaps, development of down-selection criteria, and preparation of a comprehensive Research and Development (R&D) Program Plan for three candidate cesium removal technologies, as well as the Alpha and strontium removal processes that must also be carried out. The three cesium removal candidate technologies are Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Non-Elutable Ion Exchange, Caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX), and Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). This plan describes the technology development needs for each process that must be satisfied in order to reach a down-selection decision, as well as continuing technology development required to support conceptual design activities.

Harmon, Harry D.

2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1992  

SciTech Connect

Accomplishments for the quarter are presented for the following areas of research: oil shale, tar sand, coal, advanced exploratory process technology, and jointly sponsored research. Oil shale research includes; oil shale process studies, environmental base studies for oil shale, and miscellaneous basic concept studies. Tar sand research covers process development. Coal research includes; underground coal gasification, coal combustion, integrated coal processing concepts, and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes; advanced process concepts, advanced mitigation concepts, and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesa Verde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; characterization of petroleum residue; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced recovery techniques; and menu driven access to the WDEQ Hydrologic Data Management Systems.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Interim report: Manipulation of natural subsurface processes: Field research and validation.  

SciTech Connect

Often the only alternative for treating deep subsurface contamination is in situ manipulation of natural processes to change the mobility or form of contaminants. However, the complex interactions of natural subsurface physical, chemical, and microbial processes limit the predictability of the system-wide impact of manipulation based on current knowledge. This report is a summary of research conducted to examine the feasibility of controlling the oxidation-reduction (redox) potential of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State by introducing chemical reagents and microbial nutrients. The experiment would allow the testing of concepts and hypotheses developed from fundamental research in the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Subsurface Science Program. Furthermore, the achievement of such control is expected to have implications for in situ remediation of dispersed aqueous contaminants in the subsurface environment at DOE sites nationwide, and particularly at the Hanford Site. This interim report summarizes initial research that was conducted between July 1990 and October 1991.

Fruchter, J.S.; Spane, F.A.; Amonette, J.E. [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data from Saharan Dust Storm Reveal Model Deficiencies Data from Saharan Dust Storm Reveal Model Deficiencies Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Slingo, A., T.P. Ackerman, R.P. Allan, E.I. Kassianov, S.A. McFarlane, G.J. Robinson, J.C. Barnard, M.A. Miller, J.E. Harries, J.E. Russell , S. Dewitte, 2006: Observations of the impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the Earth's radiation budget. Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L24817, doi:10.1029/2006GL027869. In March 2006, the ARM Mobile Facility recorded the strongest Saharan dust storm to reach the Niamey area in two years. The storm lasted several days, and visibility was reduced to 15 percent of normal. Observations (solid lines and star symbols) and results from two models

350

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Roobik" Is Part of the Answer, Not a Puzzle "Roobik" Is Part of the Answer, Not a Puzzle Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: N/A Taking place during the arid Arctic winter, the RHUBC will obtain measurements in the far-infrared (15-40 microns), when the so-called "Arctic" infrared window between 16 and 40 microns is semi-transparent. Between February and March 2007 at the ACRF North Slope of Alaska site in Barrow, high-spectral-resolution observations will be collected by three state-of-the-art Fourier Transform Spectrometers sampling at different bands in the far-infrared. The Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign, or RHUBC (pronounced "roobik"), will make detailed observations

351

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using the ACRF Shortwave Spectrometer to Study the Transition Between Clear Using the ACRF Shortwave Spectrometer to Study the Transition Between Clear and Cloudy Regions Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Chiu, J., University of Reading Knyazikhin, Y., Boston University Pilewskie, P., University of Colorado Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Chiu C, A Marshak, Y Knyazikhin, P Pilewskie, and W Wiscombe. 2009. "Physical interpretation of the spectral radiative signature in the transition zone between cloud-free and cloudy regions." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9(4), 1419-1430. (a) Total sky images on 18 May 2007, and (b) plot of SWS normalized zenith radiances. In (b), arrows pointed at the time axis correspond to the times

352

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Consistency Analysis of ARESE Aircraft Measurements A Consistency Analysis of ARESE Aircraft Measurements Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Li, Z., A.P. Trishchenko, H.W. Barker, G.L. Stephens, and P. Partain, 1999: "Analyses of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program's Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) multiple data sets for studying cloud absorption," J. of Geophys. Res. 104(D16):19127-19134 Figure 1. Comparisons of TOA albedos inferred from measurements made by TSBR, GOES-8, and SSP. Two sets of GOES-based estimates are shown for an aircraft along the Egrett's flight path: one for an aircraft skimming the cloud tops (dotted lines); and another for one at 14 km (thin solid lines).

353

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: U.S. Department of Energy -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Publications Search Publications Year of Publication: Any 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 1981 1980 1979 1978 1973 1970 1968 1956 Source: Select a Source... Journal of Mammary Gland Biology and Neoplasia 27th Annual CNS Conference and 30th CNS/CAN Student Conference, Toronto, Ontario, Canada Accounts of Chemical Research Acta Histochemica Acta Med. Nagasaki Advances in Medical Physics 2006 Advances in Space Research AJR, American J. of Roentgenology American Assoc. for Cancer Research American J. of Clinical Nutrition American J. of Epidemiology American J. of Human Genetics American J. of Pathology American Journal of Industrial Medicine American Journal of Physiology-Cell Physiology American Scientist

354

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect

Progress made in five areas of research is described briefly. The subtask in oil shale research is on oil shale process studies. For tar sand the subtask reported is on process development. Coal research includes the following subtasks: Coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and solid waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes the following: Advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research includes: Organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW{sup TM} field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; operation and evaluation of the CO{sup 2} HUFF-N-PUFF Process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid-state NMR analysis of Mesaverde Group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; characterization of petroleum residua; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; surface process study for oil recovery using a thermal extraction process;NMR analysis of samples from the ocean drilling program; oil field waste cleanup using tank bottom recovery process; remote chemical sensor development; in situ treatment of manufactured gas plant contaminated soils demonstration program; solid-state NMR analysis of Mowry formation shale from different sedimentary basins; solid-state NMR analysis of naturally and artificially matured kerogens; and development of effective method for the clean-up of natural gas.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosols Help Clouds Warm Up Arctic Aerosols Help Clouds Warm Up Arctic Submitter: Lubin, D., National Science Foundation Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Lubin, D., and A.M. Vogelmann, 2006: A climatologically significant aerosol longwave indirect effect in the Arctic, Nature, 439, 26 January, 453-456, doi:10.1038/nature04449 In a process known as the first aerosol indirect effect, enhanced aerosol concentrations cause the droplets in a cloud to be smaller and more numerous within a cloud of fixed water amount. This study found that this process can make many clouds more opaque and emit more thermal energy to the surface. The warming of the Arctic climate and decreases in sea ice area and thickness observed over recent decades are believed to result from

356

Proceedings of the workshop on applications of synchrotron radiation to trace impurity analysis for advanced silicon processing  

SciTech Connect

Wafer surface trace impurity analysis is essential for development of competitive Si circuit technologies. Today's grazing incidence x-ray fluorescence techniques with rotating anodes fall short of requirements for the future. Hewlett Packard/Toshiba experiments indicate that with second generation synchrotron sources such as SSRL, the techniques can be extended sufficiently to meet important needs of the leading edge Si circuit industry through nearly all of the 1990's. This workshop was held to identify people interested in use of synchrotron radiation-based methods and to document needs and concerns for further development. Viewgraphs are included for the following presentations: microcontamination needs in silicon technology (M. Liehr), analytical methods for wafer surface contamination (A. Schimazaki), trace impurity analysis of liquid drops using synchrotron radiation (D. Wherry), TRXRF using synchrotron sources (S. Laderman), potential role of synchrotron radiation TRXRF in Si process R D (M. Scott), potenital development of synchrotron radiation facilities (S. Brennan), and identification of goals, needs and concerns (M. Garner).

Laderman, S. (Integrated Circuits Business Div., Hewlett Packard Co., Palo Alto, CA (United States)); Pianetta, P. (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

DOE/SC-ARM-12-015 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

all data are in final processing at the Archive. The AMF1 system is now deployed at Cape Cod, Massachusetts, to support the Two-Column Aerosol Campaign (TCAP). The TCAP campaign...

358

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: A Variable Energy Soft X-ray  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variable Energy Soft X-ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of Variable Energy Soft X-ray Microprobe to Investigate Mechanisms of the Radiation Induced Bystander Effect. Authors: Melvyn Folkard, Borivoj Vojnovic, Giuseppe Schettino, Kevin M Prise and Barry D Michael. Institutions: Gray Cancer Institute. We are currently engaged on two projects in the Low-dose Program: "Low dose studies with focused X-rays in cell and tissue models: mechanisms of bystander and genomic instability responses" (DE-FG07-99ER62877) and "Mechanistic modeling of bystander effects: An integrated theoretical and experimental approach" (DE-FG02-02ER63305). Central to both of these studies is a unique micro irradiation facility that uses ultrasoft X-rays focused to a sub micron beam for individual cell and sub cellular targeting. This facility allows us to selectively irradiate individual

359

THE EFFECTS OF RADIATION AND RADIOISOTOPES ON THE LIFE PROCESSES. An Annotated Bibliography  

SciTech Connect

Issued in two books and an Index. A total of 11,944 annotated references is presented to report and published literature concerning the effects of radiation on biological systems. Abstracts are included for many references. Author and subject indexes are included. (C.H.)

Pierce, C.M. comp.

1963-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Research on the pyrolysis of hardwood in an entrained bed process development unit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An atmospheric flash pyrolysis process, the Georgia Tech Entrained Flow Pyrolysis Process, for the production of liquid biofuels from oak hardwood is described. The development of the process began with bench-scale studies and a conceptual design in the 1978--1981 timeframe. Its development and successful demonstration through research on the pyrolysis of hardwood in an entrained bed process development unit (PDU), in the period of 1982--1989, is presented. Oil yields (dry basis) up to 60% were achieved in the 1.5 ton-per-day PDU, far exceeding the initial target/forecast of 40% oil yields. Experimental data, based on over forty runs under steady-state conditions, supported by material and energy balances of near-100% closures, have been used to establish a process model which indicates that oil yields well in excess of 60% (dry basis) can be achieved in a commercial reactor. Experimental results demonstrate a gross product thermal efficiency of 94% and a net product thermal efficiency of 72% or more; the highest values yet achieved with a large-scale biomass liquefaction process. A conceptual manufacturing process and an economic analysis for liquid biofuel production at 60% oil yield from a 200-TPD commercial plant is reported. The plant appears to be profitable at contemporary fuel costs of $21/barrel oil-equivalent. Total capital investment is estimated at under $2.5 million. A rate-of-return on investment of 39.4% and a pay-out period of 2.1 years has been estimated. The manufacturing cost of the combustible pyrolysis oil is $2.70 per gigajoule. 20 figs., 87 tabs.

Kovac, R.J.; Gorton, C.W.; Knight, J.A.; Newman, C.J.; O'Neil, D.J. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Research Inst.)

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Research Home  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer & Radiation Radiochemistry & Instrumentation Genome Dynamics BioenergyGTL Technology Centers Resources Research Research in the Life Sciences Division contributes to...

362

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effective Diameter in Ice Clouds and Its Application to Terrestrial Radiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Area of Research:...

363

Summary of research on microbiological processes. International Energy Agency Subtask D, final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Storage of thermal energy in aquifers has obvious benefits of saving energy and decreasing the consumption of fossil fuels. However, aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES), which involves groundwater aquifers as the storage medium for heat or chill, impinges on the environment. A literature review of pertinent microbiology publications (Hicks and Stewart, 1988) identified the potential for the interaction of ATES systems and microbiological processes to create a source of infectious diseases and the potential for damage to the environment. In addition, the review identified a potential for microbiological processes to develop conditions that would interfere with the operation of an ATES system. As a result of this research effort, investigators from Finland, Germany, Switzerland, and the United States have examined several ATES systems in operation and have observed that the ATES systems studied do not contribute to infectious disease transmission, do not adversely affect the environment, and do not contribute significantly to biofouling or biocorrosion.

Winters, A.L.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variations of Meridional Aerosol Distribution and Solar Dimming Variations of Meridional Aerosol Distribution and Solar Dimming Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Kishcha, P., Tel-Aviv University Starobinets, B., Tel-Aviv University Kalashnikova, O., Jet Propulsion Laboratory Alpert, P., Tel-Aviv University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol, Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Kishcha P, B Starobinets, O Kalashnikova, CN Long, and P Alpert. 2009. "Variations of meridional aerosol distribution and solar dimming." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, D00D14, 10.1029/2008JD010975. The distribution of four-year aerosol differences (δAOT/δFAOT) between the last four years (March 2004 - February 2008) and the first four years

365

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Apparent Bluing of Aerosols Near Clouds The Apparent Bluing of Aerosols Near Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marshak, A, G Wen, JA Coakley, LA Remer, NG Loeb, and RF Cahalan. 2008. "A simple model of the cloud adjacency effect and the apparent bluing of aerosols near clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research 113, D14S17, doi: 10.1029/2007JD009196. (upper panel) A schematic two-layer model of a broken cloud field and Rayleigh scatterers. (lower panel) An example of the Poisson distribution of broken cloud fields with cloud fraction Ac = 0.3 for a 10 by 10 km area. For a cloud vertical thickness of 1 km, the left lower panel has cloud

366

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clouds Brighten Up the Sky Near Them Clouds Brighten Up the Sky Near Them Download a printable PDF Submitter: Varnai, T., University of Maryland, Baltimore County/JCEST Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Varnai T and A Marshak. 2009. "MODIS observations of enhanced clear sky reflectance near clouds." Geophysical Research Letters, 36, L06807, doi:10.1029/2008GL037089. Figure 1. Illustration of clouds enhancing the brightness of sky in nearby clear areas. In cloud-free areas light is scattered mainly by air molecules, but aerosols also contribute. Figure 2. Top: Average increase in MODIS clear-sky reflectivity (R) near clouds. The difference between areas near illuminated and shadowy cloud

367

Process for producing an aggregate suitable for inclusion into a radiation shielding product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to methods for converting depleted uranium hexafluoride to a stable depleted uranium silicide in a one-step reaction. Uranium silicide provides a stable aggregate material that can be added to concrete to increase the density of the concrete and, consequently, shield gamma radiation. As used herein, the term "uranium silicide" is defined as a compound generically having the formula U.sub.x Si.sub.y, wherein the x represents the molecules of uranium and the y represent the molecules of silicon. In accordance with the present invention, uranium hexafluoride is converted to a uranium silicide by contacting the uranium hexafluoride with a silicon-containing material at a temperature in a range between about 1450.degree. C. and about 1750.degree. C. The stable depleted uranium silicide is included as an aggregate in a radiation shielding product, such as a concrete product.

Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

A Radiation tolerant acquisition system and signal processing for LVDT sensors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis work aims at designing a new electronic board which wants to be a generic acquisition card with numerical processor capabilities for reading LVDT or other position sensors. The board is based on commercial parts and is designed to be radiation tolerant . That means that the electronics works properly up a given limit of radiation levels. A flash based FPGA, known to be latch-up free, is selected to perform the Sine Fit algorithm in fixed point precision to retrieve the sensor position. The Sine Fit algorithm is deeply analyzed and 3 different implementations in fixed point representation are investigated in order to achieve a numerical precision that can assure the target requirements. The third algorithm makes use of the CORDIC functions. The tests are done on a proof demonstrator board with ADC and FPGA.

Danzeca, Salvatore

369

Cancer risk among children of atomic bomb survivors. A review of RERF epidemiologic studies. Radiation Effects Research Foundation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article summarizes recent epidemiologic studies of cancer risk among the children of atomic bomb survivors conducted at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. These children include two groups: (1) the in utero-exposed children (ie, those born to mothers who had been pregnant at the time of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki) and (2) the F1 population, which was conceived after the atomic-bombings and born to parents of whom one or both were atomic bomb survivors. Although from 1950 to 1984 only 18 cancer cases were identified among the in utero sample, cancer risk did appear to significantly increase as maternal uterine dose increased. However, since the observed cases are too few in number to allow a site-specific review, the increased cancer risk cannot be definitively attributed to atomic bomb radiation, as yet. For those members of the F1 population who were less than 20 years old between 1946 and 1982, cancer risk did not appear to increase significantly as parental gonadal dose increased. Follow-up of this population will continue to determine if the patterns of adult-onset cancer are altered.

Yoshimoto, Y. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Research Foundations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geoscience Materials Science Nanodevices and Microsystems Radiation Effects and High Energy Density Science Research Geoscience Geoscience photo The Geoscience Research...

371

The Interaction of Radiative and Dynamical Processes during a Simulated Sudden Stratospheric Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of a spontaneous sudden stratospheric warming that occurred during a 2-year integration of the Langley Research Center Atmospheric Simulation Model is presented. The simulated warming resembles observed wave 1&rdquo warmings in the ...

R. B. Pierce; W. T. Blackshear; W. L. Grose; R. E. Turner; T. D. Fairlie

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power in the Vertical: Using Wind Profiler Data to Study Precipitation Power in the Vertical: Using Wind Profiler Data to Study Precipitation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kollias, P., McGill University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Tridon F, A Battaglia, P Kollias, E Luke, and C Williams. 2013. "Signal post-processing and reflectivity calibration of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program 915 MHz wind profilers." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology, 30(6), doi:10.1175/JTECH-D-12-00146.1. Because ARM's wind profilers (foreground) can take vertical as well as horizontal measurements, the instruments can be used with appropriate processing and calibration to help study rainfall. For more than two decades, radar wind profilers of the U.S. Department of

373

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: The Risk of Cancer Induction Due to  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 10-12, 1999, Washington, D.C. November 10-12, 1999, Washington, D.C. The Risk of Cancer Induction Due to Routine Mammographic Screening Featured Project Description David J. Brenner, Steve Marino, and Charles Geard, Center for Radiological Research, Columbia University, 630 West 168th Street, New York Summary: To obtain realistic and credible risk estimates for breast-cancer mortality due to clinical mammographic imaging examinations. Abstract: The aim of this work is to obtain realistic and credible risk estimates for breast-cancer mortality due to clinical mammographic imaging examinations. Given the increasing emphasis on clinical mammographic screening for breast cancer, it is of societal importance to provide realistic risk estimates with realistic confidence bounds for breast cancer

374

DIII-D Edge Plasma, Disruptions, and Radiative Processes. Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scientific goal of the UCSD-DIII-D Collaboration during this period was to understand the coupling of the core plasma to the plasma-facing components through the plasma boundary (edge and scrape-off layer). To achieve this goal, UCSD scientists studied the transport of particles, momentum, energy, and radiation from the plasma core to the plasma-facing components under normal (e.g., L-mode, H-mode, and ELMs), and off-normal (e.g., disruptions) operating conditions.

Boedo, J. A.; Luckhardt, S.C.; Moyer, R. A.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in coal-fired boiler furnaces by a portable image processing system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presented an experimental investigation on the estimation of radiative properties and temperature distributions in a 670 t/h coal-fired boiler furnace by a portable imaging processing system. The portable system has been calibrated by a blackbody furnace. Flame temperatures and emissivities were measured by the portable system and equivalent blackbody temperatures were deduced. Comparing the equivalent blackbody temperatures measured by the portable system and the infrared pyrometer, the relative difference is less than 4%. The reconstructed pseudo-instantaneous 2-D temperature distributions in two cross-sections can disclose the combustion status inside the furnace. The measured radiative properties of particles in the furnace proved there is significant scattering in coal-fired boiler furnaces and it can provide useful information for the calculation of radiative heat transfer and numerical simulation of combustion in coal-fired boiler furnaces. The preliminary experimental results show this technology will be helpful for the combustion diagnosis in coal-fired boiler furnaces. (author)

Li, Wenhao; Lou, Chun; Sun, Yipeng; Zhou, Huaichun [State Key Laboratory of Coal Combustion, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan, 430074 Hubei (China)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lord of the Wings: Elevated Particles a Rising Star Lord of the Wings: Elevated Particles a Rising Star Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kassianov, E., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kassianov E, C Flynn, J Redemann, B Schmid, PB Russell, and A Sinyuk. 2012. "Initial assessment of the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR)-based aerosol retrieval: Sensitivity study." Atmosphere, 3, doi:10.3390/atmos3040495. The 4STAR instrument. The 4STAR instrument (inset) is installed through the upper hull of the PNNL G-1 research aircraft, for in-flight sun-tracking and sky light-scanning. Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in collaboration with colleagues at NASA Ames Research Center, developed a next-generation

377

Research Highlight  

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Improved Daytime Precipitable Water Vapor from Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Improved Daytime Precipitable Water Vapor from Vaisala Radiosonde Humidity Sensors Download a printable PDF Submitter: Cady-Pereira, K. E., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Shephard, M. W., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Clough, S. A., Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Cady-Pereira, K, M Shephard, E Mlawer, D Turner, S Clough, and T Wagner. 2008. "Improved daytime column-integrated precipitable water vapor from Vaisala radiosonde humidity sensors." Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology doi: 10.1175/2007JTECHA1027.1.

378

The Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility (RSF), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design-Build Process for Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility An in-depth look at how the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory used a performance-based design-build contract process to build one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world. Table of Contents The Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility | 1 Table of Contents Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Building Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Owner Roles and Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Acquisition Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Defining Performance Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

379

Collisional processes of interest in MFE plasma research. Annual report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research on this contract can be divided into two general topics: (1) D/sup -/ formation collision processes, and (2) the determination of scattering cross sections used to diagnose properties of magnetically-confined plasmas. For topic (1) during last year, we completed theoretical calculations on the differential (angular) scattering of H/sup 0/ and D/sup 0/ on Cs, and determined the mechanisms and trends in the electron detachment cross sections for collisions of H/sup -/ and D/sup -/ on He, Ne, and the alkali and heavy alkaline earth atom systems. On topic (2) a major accomplishment was the determination of the electron capture and ionization cross sections for the C/sup 5 +/, N/sup 5 +/, and O/sup 6 +/ + H systems in the energy range from 13 eV/amu to 2.1 MeV/amu.

Olson, R.E.

1981-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Research and Engineering Division semiannual report. KK process development and technology, November 1, 1974--April 30, 1975  

SciTech Connect

Research and engineering activities with the goal of improving the performance of the plutonium processing and waste management programs being operated by the Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company are reported. (auth)

Fox, R.D. (ed.)

1975-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Making winners for both education and research: Verification and validation process improvement practice in a software engineering course  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An empirical study is provided on teaching Verification & Validation (V&V) process practice in a real-client graduate level software engineering course which makes students and researchers mutual winners. From our observation and experiences during the ...

Qi Li; Barry W. Boehm

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance of Longwave Radiative Transfer Models for 3D Cloud Fields Performance of Longwave Radiative Transfer Models for 3D Cloud Fields Download a printable PDF Submitter: Kablick III, G. P., University of Maryland Ellingson, R. G., Florida State University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Kablick III GP, RG Ellingson, EE Takara, and J Gu. 2011. "Longwave 3D benchmarks for inhomogeneous clouds and comparisons with approximate methods." Journal of Climate, 24, doi:10.1175/2010JCLI3752.1. The respective flux and heating rate errors (model-3DMC) for (a),(b) ATEX and (c),(d) GATE A. The error profiles in (a) and (c) are to be interpreted as ICA, solid lines; MRO, dashed lines; RO, dotted lines. (b) and (d) also show the differences between MRO and RO. The horizontal lines are the

383

Assessment of the radiative processes impact on surface fluxes and temperature forecast  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the study is estimating the impact of improvements in the physical parameterization scheme on forecast quality in the T169L31 model (Hydrometeorological Research CentreHMRCof Russia). Surface temperature is one determinative element for boundary layer computational characteristics

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Oil shale, tar sand, coal research, advanced exploratory process technology, jointly sponsored research. Quarterly technical progress report, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

Progress made in five research programs is described. The subtasks in oil shale study include oil shale process studies and unconventional applications and markets for western oil shale.The tar sand study is on recycle oil pyrolysis and extraction (ROPE) process. Four tasks are described in coal research: underground coal gasification; coal combustion; integrated coal processing concepts; and sold waste management. Advanced exploratory process technology includes: advanced process concepts; advanced mitigation concepts; and oil and gas technology. Jointly sponsored research covers: organic and inorganic hazardous waste stabilization; CROW field demonstration with Bell Lumber and Pole; development and validation of a standard test method for sequential batch extraction fluid; PGI demonstration project; operation and evaluation of the CO{sub 2} HUFF-N-PUFF process; fly ash binder for unsurfaced road aggregates; solid state NMR analysis of Mesaverde group, Greater Green River Basin, tight gas sands; flow-loop testing of double-wall pipe for thermal applications; shallow oil production using horizontal wells with enhanced oil recovery techniques; NMR analysis of sample from the ocean drilling program; and menu driven access to the WDEQ hydrologic data management system.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing and Comparing the Modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation Testing and Comparing the Modified Anomalous Diffraction Approximation Submitter: Mitchell, D. L., Desert Research Institute Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Mitchell, D.L., A.J. Baran, W.P. Arnott, C. Schmitt, 2006: Testing and comparing the anomalous diffraction approximation. J. Atmos. Sci., 63, 2948-2962. Comparison of MADA and T-matrix with measured Qext. Regions without data were contaminated by water vapor or CO2 absorption. MADA and T-matrix calculations are based on the measured PSD of hexagonal columns having an effective diameter of 14 microns. Comparison of the PSD weighted Qabs predicted by FDTD and MADA for a tunneling efficiency corresponding to aggregates. Cirrus clouds play a large role in the Earth's radiation budget and the way

386

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development and Recent Evaluation of the MT_CKD Model of Continuum Development and Recent Evaluation of the MT_CKD Model of Continuum Absorption Download a printable PDF Submitter: Mlawer, E. J., Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Mlawer EJ, VH Payne, J Moncet, JS Delamere, MJ Alvarado, and DD Tobin. 2012. "Development and recent evaluation of the MT_CKD model of continuum absorption." Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society A, 370, doi: 10.1098/rsta.2011.0295. For seven AERI cases with 4-6 cm PWV: (a) average AERI radiances (black) and corresponding calculations using radiation code with previous version of MT_CKD continuum model (red); (b) residuals between AERI and calculations with older model; (c) residuals after the CO2 continuum in

387

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Downwelling Infrared Radiance Climatology for the ARM Southern Great A Downwelling Infrared Radiance Climatology for the ARM Southern Great Plains Site Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Gero, J., University of Wisconsin Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Turner DD and PJ Gero. 2011. "Downwelling infrared radiance temperature climatology for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D08212, doi:10.1029/2010JD015135. The distribution of downwelling 10-micron infrared radiance observed at the SGP site by the AERI from June 1996 to May 2010, separated into all-sky (all samples) and the three distinct sky classifications.

388

Use of the ARM Measurement of Spectral Zenith Radiance For Better Understanding Of 3D Cloud-Radiation Processes and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our proposal focuses on cloud-radiation processes in a general 3D cloud situation, with particular emphasis on cloud optical depth and effective particle size. We also focus on zenith radiance measurements, both active and passive. The proposal has three main parts. Part One exploits the ?¢????solar-background?¢??? mode of ARM lidars to allow them to retrieve cloud optical depth not just for thin clouds but for all clouds. This also enables the study of aerosol cloud interactions with a single instrument. Part Two exploits the large number of new wavelengths offered by ARM?¢????s zenith-pointing ShortWave Spectrometer (SWS), especially during CLASIC, to develop better retrievals not only of cloud optical depth but also of cloud particle size. We also propose to take advantage of the SWS?¢???? 1 Hz sampling to study the ?¢????twilight zone?¢??? around clouds where strong aerosol-cloud interactions are taking place. Part Three involves continuing our cloud optical depth and cloud fraction retrieval research with ARM?¢????s 2NFOV instrument by, first, analyzing its data from the AMF-COPS/CLOWD deployment, and second, making our algorithms part of ARM?¢????s operational data processing.

D. Jui-Yuan Chiu

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

389

Research Highlight  

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Biases in Column Absorption for Fractal Clouds Biases in Column Absorption for Fractal Clouds Submitter: Wiscombe, W. J., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Marshak, Alexander; Davis, Anthony; Wiscombe, Warren; Ridgway, William; Cahalan, Robert; 1998: "Biases in Shortwave Column Absorption in the Presence of Fractal Clouds," J. Climate 11(3):431-446. Figure 1: Water vapor transmission spectra for solar zenith angle of 60 degree. From the top: from TOA to 5 km, from TOA to 1 km, from TOA to 0.5 km and, finally, from TOA to surface. Figure 2: Fractional cloudiness N = 0.777. (a) Horizontal distribution of optical depth, the same for both models. (b) Horizontal distribution of cloud height for optical model. Constant cloud top and cloud base; thus

390

Research Highlight  

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Modeled Vs. Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance Modeled Vs. Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance Submitter: Schwartz, S. E., Brookhaven National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Halthore R. N., Schwartz, S. E., Michalsky, J. J., Anderson, G. P., Ferrare R. A., Holben B. N., and ten Brink H. M. 1997. "Comparison of Model Estimated and Measured Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance," J. Geophys. Res. 102(D25): 29991-30002 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Direct-normal solar irradiance (DNSI), the total energy in the solar spectrum incident in unit time on a unit area at the earth's surface perpendicular to the direction to the Sun, Figure 1, depends only on atmospheric extinction of solar energy without regard to the details of the

391

Effects of the Mt. Pinatubo eruption on the radiative and chemical processes in the troposphere and stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The LLNL 2-D zonally averaged chemical-radiative transport model of the global atmosphere was used to study the effects of the June 15, 1991 eruption of the Mt. Pinatubo volcano on stratospheric processes. SAGE-11 time-dependent aerosol surface area density and optical extinction data were used as input into the model. By the winter solstice, 1991, a maximum change in column ozone was observed in the equatorial region of {minus}2% (with heterogeneous chemical reactions on sulfuric acid aerosols) and {minus}5.5% (including heterogeneous reactions plus radiative feedbacks). Maximum local ozone decreases of 12% were derived in the equatorial region, at 25 km, for winter solstice 1991. Column NO{sub 2} peaked ({minus}14%) at 30 S in October 1991. Local concentrations of NO{sub x}, Cl{sub x}, and HO{sub x}, in the lower stratosphere, were calculated to have changed between 30 S and 30 N by {minus}40%, +80%, and +60% respectively.

Kinnison, D.E.; Grant, K.E.; Connell, P.S.; Wuebbles, D.J.

1992-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

392

Thin Film Materials and Processing Techniques for a Next Generation Photovoltaic Device: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-12-470  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research extends thin film materials and processes relevant to the development and production of a next generation photovoltaic device.

van Hest, M.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program  

SciTech Connect

The Earths surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earths energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

394

Enhanced Geothermal Systems Research and Development: Models of Subsurface Chemical Processes Affecting Fluid Flow  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With funding from past grants from the DOE geothermal program and other agencies, we successfully developed advanced equation of state (EOS) and simulation technologies that accurately describe the chemistry of geothermal reservoirs and energy production processes via their free energies for wide XTP ranges. Using the specific interaction equations of Pitzer, we showed that our TEQUIL chemical models can correctly simulate behavior (e.g., mineral scaling and saturation ratios, gas break out, brine mixing effects, down hole temperatures and fluid chemical composition, spent brine incompatibilities) within the compositional range (Na-K-Ca-Cl-SO4-CO3-H2O-SiO2-CO2(g)) and temperature range (T < 350C) associated with many current geothermal energy production sites that produce brines with temperatures below the critical point of water. The goal of research carried out under DOE grant DE-FG36-04GO14300 (10/1/2004-12/31/2007) was to expand the compositional range of our Pitzer-based TEQUIL fluid/rock interaction models to include the important aluminum and silica interactions (T < 350C). Aluminum is the third most abundant element in the earths crust; and, as a constituent of aluminosilicate minerals, it is found in two thirds of the minerals in the earths crust. The ability to accurately characterize effects of temperature, fluid mixing and interactions between major rock-forming minerals and hydrothermal and/or injected fluids is critical to predict important chemical behaviors affecting fluid flow, such as mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions. We successfully achieved the project goal and objectives by demonstrating the ability of our modeling technology to correctly predict the complex pH dependent solution chemistry of the Al3+ cation and its hydrolysis species: Al(OH)2+, Al(OH)2+, Al(OH)30, and Al(OH)4- as well as the solubility of common aluminum hydroxide and aluminosilicate minerals in aqueous brines containing components (Na, K, Cl) commonly dominating hydrothermal fluids. In the sodium chloride system, where experimental data for model parameterization are most plentiful, the model extends to 300C. Determining the stability fields of aluminum species that control the solubility of aluminum-containing minerals as a function of temperature and composition has been a major objective of research in hydrothermal chemistry.

Moller, Nancy; Weare J. H.

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

395

Low Cost Solar Array Project cell and module formation research area. Process research of non-CZ silicon material. Final report, November 26, 1980-September 30, 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of the work reported was to investigate high-risk, high-payoff research areas associated with the Westinghouse process for producing photovoltaic modules using non-Czochralski sheet material. These tasks were addressed: technical feasibility study of forming front and back junctions using liquid dopant techniques, liquid diffusion mask feasibility study, application studies of antireflective material using a meniscus coater, ion implantation compatibility/feasibility study, and cost analysis. (LEW)

Campbell, R.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Novel, Magnetically Fluidized-Bed Reactor Development for the Looping Process: Coal to Hydrogen Production Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel, Magnetically Fluidized-Bed Novel, Magnetically Fluidized-Bed Reactor Development for the Looping Process: Coal to Hydrogen Production Research and Development Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is committed to improving methods for co-producing power and chemicals, fuels, and hydrogen (H2). Gasification is a process by which fuels such as coal can be used to produce synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of H2, carbon monoxide (CO), and carbon

397

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Into Radiative Transfer in Cloudy Conditions Submitter: Min, Q., State University of New York, Albany Area of Research: Cloud DistributionsCharacterizations Working Group(s):...

398

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) UV-B Monitoring and Research Program, National Oceanic and Atmospheric...

399

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

K-Distribution Method for a SW Radiative Transfer Model Submitter: Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models...

400

Research Highlight  

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Mexico City Carbon-Containing Particle Composition Simulated Download a printable PDF Submitter: Zaveri, R., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Millimeter Wave Scattering from Ice Crystals and Their Aggregates Millimeter Wave Scattering from Ice Crystals and Their Aggregates Download a printable PDF Submitter: Botta, G., Pennsylvania State University Verlinde, J., Pennsylvania State University Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Botta G, K Aydin, J Verlinde, A Avramov, A Ackerman, A Fridlind, M Wolde, and G McFarquhar. 2011. "Millimeter wave scattering from ice crystals and their aggregates: Comparing cloud model simulations with X- and Ka-band radar measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 116, D00T04, doi:10.1029/2011JD015909. Observational data sets are needed to drive and evaluate results from cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations in order to improve parameterizations of the physical processes. Radar is one of the few

402

Research Input Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HighlightsSubmit HighlightsSubmit Form Submit a New Research Highlight Sort Highlights Submitter Title Research Area Working Group Submission Date DOE Progress Reports Notable Research Findings for 2001-2006 Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database Research Highlights Summaries Research Highlight Submittal Form Tell us about your research! This form is designed to collect summary information about working group research results. If you have any questions or comments, please contact the administrators. Journal or Book Reference(s) (if applicable): Look Up Your reference from the Publications Database. Limit two references. If you have not submitted the references, please Add it now. Area of Research: Radiation Processes Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Surface Properties General Circulation and Single Column

403

Program on Technology Innovation: Evaluation of Updated Research on the Health Effects and Risks Associated with Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has performed a systematic review of recently published, peer-reviewed scientific studies in the fields of epidemiology and radiobiology that discuss health risks associated with exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. As a result of this study, the EPRI team concludes that there is a need to re-evaluate the magnitude of dose and dose-rate effectiveness factors (DDREF), including the significant body of radiobiology data that suggests non-linear risks at...

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

404

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Conducting Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research Conducting Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program DoReMi Integrating Low Dose Research High Level Expert Group (HLEG) on European Low Dose Risk Research Multidisciplinary European Low Dose Initiative (MELODI) RISC-RAD Radiosensitivity of Individuals and Susceptibility to Cancer induced by Ionizing Radiation United States Transuranium & Uranium Registries Organizations Conducting other Radiation Research Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Armed Forces Radiology Research Institute (AFRRI) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) Colorado State University Columbia University

405

Shale Gas Production Theory and Case Analysis We researched the process of oil recovery and shale gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shale Gas Production Theory and Case Analysis (Siemens) We researched the process of oil recovery and shale gas recovery and compare the difference between conventional and unconventional gas reservoir and recovery technologies. Then we did theoretical analysis on the shale gas production. According

Ge, Zigang

406

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Regulation of NF-kB and MnSOD in Low  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NF-kB and MnSOD in Low Dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive NF-kB and MnSOD in Low Dose Radiation-Induced Adaptive Responses in Mouse and Human Skin Cells Jian Jian Li School of Health Sciences, Purdue University West Lafayette, Indiana Why this Project? To determine if low dose ionizing radiation-induced adaptive responses in skin cells are mediated by activation of signaling networks. Project Goals To evaluate the signaling networks involving transcription factor NF-kB and the mitochondrial antioxidant protein MnSOD. To determine if NF-kB is activated by low dose radiation in vivo. To determine if NF-kB activation is critical in the pathways that produce adaptive responses. Experimental Approach Cells transfected with NF-kB luciferase responder genes will be used to define a dose-response relationship for activation of the NF-kB gene. NF-kB

407

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectral Invariant Properties of Single-Scattering Albedo for Water Spectral Invariant Properties of Single-Scattering Albedo for Water Droplets and Ice Crystals Download a printable PDF Submitter: Marshak, A., NASA - Goddard Space Flight Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Marshak A, Y Knyazikhin, JC Chiu, and WJ Wiscombe. 2012. "On spectral invariance of single scattering albedo for water droplets and ice crystals at weakly absorbing wavelengths." Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer, 113, 715-720. The ratio of ω0λ(r)/ω0λ(r0) plotted against ω0λ(r) for four wavelengths, λ=0.86, 1.65, 2.13 and 3.75 um. An example for the aggregates ice crystal habits is shown (see Yang et al. 2000. "Parameterization of

408

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Self-Regulation Strikes a Balance Between Hydrological Cycle, Radiation Self-Regulation Strikes a Balance Between Hydrological Cycle, Radiation Processes, and Intraseasonal Dynamic Variations Submitter: Stephens, G. L., Colorado State University Area of Research: Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Vertical Structures Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Stephens, Graeme L., Webster, Peter J., Johnson, Richard H., Engelen, Richard, L'Ecuyer, Tristan. 2004: Observational Evidence for the Mutual Regulation of the Tropical Hydrological Cycle and Tropical Sea Surface Temperatures. Journal of Climate: Vol. 17, No. 11, pp. 2213-2224. The "humidistat" feedback mechanism suggests that the hydrological cycle and sea surface temperatures mutually regulate each other in phases: the destabilization phase, the convective phase, and the restoring phase. These

409

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of a New Method for Estimating Evapotranspiration Using ARM Development of a New Method for Estimating Evapotranspiration Using ARM Measurements Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Surface Properties Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Wang, K., P. Wang, Z. Li, M. Cribb, and M. Sparrow (2007). A simple method to estimate actual evapotranspiration from a combination of net radiation, vegetation index, and temperature, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D15107, doi:10.1029/2006JD008351. Wang, K., Z. Li, and M. Cribb (2006). Estimation of evaporative fraction from a combination of day and night land surface temperature and NDVI: A new method to determine the Priestley-Taylor parameter. Remote Sensing of Environment, 102, 293-305. Time series of the measured (dot) and predicted ET (line) using equation

410

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Study Aerosol Humidity Effects Using the ARM Measurements Study Aerosol Humidity Effects Using the ARM Measurements Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Jeong, M.-J., Z. Li, E. Andrews, and S.-C. Tsay (2007). Effect of aerosol humidification on the column aerosol optical thickness over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains site, J. Geophys. Res., 112, D10202, doi:10.1029/2006JD007176. (a)-(j) Column-mean aerosol humidification factor as functions of the weighted column mean RH, . The ambient RH at one of the ten level-legs of the In-situ Aerosol Profile (IAP) measurements is replaced with RH equals 99%. Comparison of estimated column R(RH) following six different methods (M1~M6). Gray solid lines and black dashed lines are linear fit and

411

Research Highlight  

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Optimal Method to Determine Orientation Average of Scattering Properties of Optimal Method to Determine Orientation Average of Scattering Properties of Ice Crystals Download a printable PDF Submitter: Um, J., University of Illinois, Urbana McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Um J and GM McFarquhar. 2013. "Optimal numerical methods for determining the orientation averages of single-scattering properties of atmospheric ice crystals." Journal of Quantitative Spectroscopy & Radiative Transfer, 127, doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2013.05.020. Fig.1. Idealized shapes of ice crystals used in this study: (a) Gaussian random sphere (GS), (b) droxtal (DX), (c) budding Bucky ball (3B), and (d) column (COL). All models are visualized with dipoles. For (b), (c), and (d)

412

Research Highlight  

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Looking at the Full Spectrum for Water Vapor Looking at the Full Spectrum for Water Vapor Download a printable PDF Submitter: Turner, D. D., National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Mlawer EJ, VH Payne, J Moncet, JS Delamere, MJ Alvarado, and DD Tobin. 2012. "Development and recent evaluation of the MT_CKD model of continuum absorption." Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society A, 370, doi: 10.1098/rsta.2011.0295. Radiative cooling across the full infrared spectrum: The far-infrared (the left half of the figure, from 15 to 1000 microns) plays a key role in heat transfer in the atmosphere, but scientists could not measure it, and model calculations were consequently very uncertain. Field observations from

413

Research on Stability Criterion of Furnace Flame Combustion Based on Image Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes and analyzes the stability criterion of furnace flame combustion based on image processing, which uses the maximum criterion of gray scale difference, the distance criterion of gravity center and mass center in the high temperature ... Keywords: image processing, stability, flame detection, boiler safety

Rongbao Chen, Wuting Fan, Jingci Bian, Fanhui Meng

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Radiative Processes Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5.3 Stratocumulus (0.12) -13.2 7.3 Stratus (0.02) -2.6 1.2 Cloud Optical Thickness Passive remote sensing : ISCCP Chen et al. 2000 Pressure 0 3.6 23 379 50 440 680 1000...

415

Workshop Report on Atomic Bomb Dosimetry--Residual Radiation Exposure: Recent Research and Suggestions for Future Studies  

SciTech Connect

There is a need for accurate dosimetry for studies of health effects in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors because of the important role that these studies play in worldwide radiation protection standards. International experts have developed dosimetry systems, such as the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02), which assess the initial radiation exposure to gamma rays and neutrons but only briefly consider the possibility of some minimal contribution to the total body dose by residual radiation exposure. In recognition of the need for an up-to-date review of the topic of residual radiation exposure in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, recently reported studies were reviewed at a technical session at the 57th Annual Meeting of the Health Physics Society in Sacramento, California, 22-26 July 2012. A one-day workshop was also held to provide time for detailed discussion of these newer studies and to evaluate their potential use in clarifying the residual radiation exposures to the atomic-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Suggestions for possible future studies are also included in this workshop report.

none,

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

416

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Organizations Funding Radiation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Funding Radiation Research Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Centers for Medical Countermeasures Against Radiological and...

417

BNL | Atmospheric Systems Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program Atmospheric System Research is a DOE observation-based research program created to advance process-level understanding of the key interactions among aerosols, clouds, precipitation, radiation, dynamics, and thermodynamics, with the ultimate goal of reducing the uncertainty in global and regional climate simulations and projections. General areas of research at BNL under this program include studies of aerosol and cloud lifecycles, and cloud-aerosol-precipitation interactions. Contact Robert McGraw, 631.344.3086 aerosols Aerosol Life Cycle The strategic focus of the Aerosol Life Cycle research is observation-based process science-examining the properties and evolution of atmospheric aerosols. Observations come from both long-term studies conducted by the

418

The Tornado Warning Process: A Review of Current Research, Challenges, and Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the unusually violent tornado season of 2011, there has been a renewed national interest, through such programs as NOAA's Weather Ready Nation initiative, to reevaluate and improve our tornado warning process. This literature review provides an ...

J. Brotzge; W. Donner

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRAL SEPARATOR FOR A CENTRIFUGAL GAS PROCESSING FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A COMPACT GAS PROCESSING DEVICE WAS INVESTIGATED TO INCREASE GAS PRODUCTION FROM REMOTE, PREVIOUSLY UN-ECONOMIC RESOURCES. THE UNIT WAS TESTED ON AIR AND WATER AND WITH NATURAL GAS AND LIQUID. RESULTS ARE REPORTED WITH RECOMMENDATIONS FOR FUTURE WORK.

LANCE HAYS

2007-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

420

Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility (RSF) (Book)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An in-depth look at how the U.S. DOE and NREL used a performance-based design-build contract to build the Research Support Facility (RSF); one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world.

Not Available

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Progress report on the development of Triad Research Incorporated's H-E Process  

SciTech Connect

The development of a high yield shale conversion technology - the Hydrogenation-Extraction (H-E) Process is described. Development of this technology stems from the long-term interest and involvement in shale oil development. Subsequently, a contract was let to develop an economically viable conversion process. Currently the program to develop this technology is in the pilot plant construction phase. Start-up of a one-barrel per day plant is scheduled for June, 1985. Laboratory work indicates that the H-E Process can efficiently provide 200 to 250% of currently obtainable liquid yields with significantly lower capital requirements than required by conventional retort technologies. Preliminary discussions directed toward marketing H-E Process technology with some state, federal and private organizations were conducted, and a high yield of interest was shown. These discussions indicate that a great potential exists to sub-license the technology on a world-wide basis. Supported by a preliminary survey, it is intended to market commercial test programs required to sub-license use of the H-E Process.

Addington, R.R.; Damukaitis, J.B.; Wilmot, D.A.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

An investigation of how researchers in data intensive scientific fields use, process and curate data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, usability, interoperability, reward structures, and preservation and sustainability. Comment [JN1]: Strictly speaking, Moores Law stipulates a doubling every 18 months/ Comment [y2]: I defer: should I leave it in for now, or find another example... , which I know I have come across? Comment [JN3]: Wow! Comment [JN4]: This point is also made in Hey, Tansley and Tolle (Eds), The Fourth Paradigm: Data-Intensive Scientific Discovery, Microsoft Research, 2009. Comment [y5]: Added this in as good...

Nobis, Yvonne

423

Validation of aerosol extinction and water vapor profiles from routine Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy with which vertical profiles of aerosol extinction ?ep(?) can be retrieved from ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) routine measurements was assessed using data from two airborne field campaigns, the ARM Aerosol Intensive Operation Period (AIOP, May 2003), and the Aerosol Lidar Validation Experiment (ALIVE, September 2005). This assessment pertains to the aerosol at its ambient concentration and thermodynamic state (i.e. ?ep(?) either free of or corrected for sampling artifacts) and includes the following ACRF routine methods: Raman Lidar, Micro Pulse Lidar (MPL) and in-situ aerosol profiles (IAP) with a small aircraft. Profiles of aerosol optical depth ?p(???, from which the profiles of ?ep(???are derived through vertical differentiation, were measured by the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking 14-channel Sunphotometer (AATS-14); these data were used as truth in this evaluation. The ACRF IAP ?ep(550 nm) were lower by 16% (during AIOP) and higher by 10% (during ALIVE) when compared to AATS-14. The ACRF MPL ?ep(523 nm) were higher by 24% (AIOP) and 19%-21% (ALIVE) compared to AATS-14 but the correlation improved significantly during ALIVE. In the AIOP a second MPL operated by NASA showed a smaller positive bias (13%) with respect to AATS-14. The ACRF Raman Lidar ?ep(355 nm) were higher by 54% (AIOP) and higher by 6% (ALIVE) compared to AATS-14. The large bias in AIOP stemmed from a gradual loss of the sensitivity of the Raman Lidar starting about the end of 2001 going unnoticed until after AIOP. A major refurbishment and upgrade of the instrument and improvements to a data-processing algorithm led to the significant improvement and very small bias in ALIVE. Finally we find that during ALIVE the Raman Lidar water vapor densities ?w are higher by 8% when compared to AATS-14, whereas comparisons between AATS-14 and in-situ measured ?w aboard two different aircraft showed small negative biases (0 to -3%).

Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Newsom, Rob K.; Turner, David D.; Ferrare, Richard; Clayton, Marian F.; Andrews, Elisabeth; Ogren, John A.; Johnson, Roy R.; Russell, P. B.; Gore, W.; Dominguez, Roseanne

2009-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

424

A Speech Processing Research Platform for Android Based Smart Phones and Tablets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Acoustics, Speech, and Signal Process. (ICASSP), vol. 4, Washington, DC, USA, Apr 1979, pp. 632­637. [15] K, · Analysis window and · Synthesis window. The analysis and synthesis windows available in this version of SEA include the Rectangular, Hamming, Hanning and Black- man windows. SEA allows the user to observe the role

425

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements Submitter: Smith, W. L., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: DeSlover, D. H. 1996. Analysis of Visible and Infrared Cirrus Cloud Optical Properties Using High Spectral Resolution Remote Sensing, M.S. Thesis, University of Wisconsin - Madison. Ho, S.-P. 1997. Atmospheric Profiles From Simultaneous Observations of Upwelling and Downwelling Spectral Radiance, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Wisconsin - Madison. Knuteson, R. O., F. A. Best, H. B. Howell, P. Minnett, H. E. Revercomb, W. L. Smith. 1997. "High Spectral Resolution Infrared Observations at the Ocean-Atmosphere Interface in the Tropical Western Pacific using a Marine

426

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shortwave Absorption in Tropical Clouds Shortwave Absorption in Tropical Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: McFarlane, S. A., U.S. Department of Energy Mather, J. H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Ackerman, T. P., University of Washington Liu, Z., University of Washington Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: McFarlane, SA, JH Mather, TP Ackerman, and Z Liu. 2008. "Effect of clouds on the vertical distribution of SW absorption in the Tropics." Journal of Geophysical Research, in press. Daily average all-sky and clear-sky calculated SW column absorption at Manus and Nauru. On average, there is little difference in absorption between the all-sky and clear-sky conditions because of the compensating

427

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements: 1997 Progress ARM Science Applications of AERI Measurements: 1997 Progress Submitter: Smith, W. L., NASA - Langley Research Center Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: N/A Figure 1. Figs. 1a and 1b contain rms differences from 72 radiosondes for AERI retrievals (blue), GOES retrievals (black), and AERI+GOES retrievals (red) for temperature and mixing ratio respectively during the 1997 Water Vapor IOP. A measure of meteorological the variability of the temperature and water vapor is indicated by the green line. Figs. 1c and 1d show the TPW for the same cases from GOES, AERI+GOES, radiosonde, and the ARM SGP CART microwave radiometer and relative percent differences in TPW amounts. Figure 2. Four consecutive radiosonde, GOES, and AERI+GOES comparisons from

428

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Critical Role of Cloud Drop Effective Radius >14 Micron Radius in Rain Critical Role of Cloud Drop Effective Radius >14 Micron Radius in Rain Initiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Rosenfeld, D., The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Wang, H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Rosenfeld D, H Wang, and PJ Rasch. 2012. "The roles of cloud drop effective radius and LWP in determining rain properties in marine stratocumulus." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 39, doi:10.1029/2012GL052028. The dependence of rain rate on cloud drop effective radius (re) near cloud top. The color scale is for the median value of column maximum rain rate in each joint bin of CWP-re (cloud liquid water path and cloud-top re).

429

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimating Fractional Sky Cover from Spectral Measurements Estimating Fractional Sky Cover from Spectral Measurements Download a printable PDF Submitter: Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Min, Q., State University of New York, Albany Wang, T., State University of New York, Albany Duan, M., Institute of Atmospheric Physics/Chinese Academy of Science Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Min Q, T Wang, CN Long, and M Duan. 2008. "Estimating fractional sky cover from spectral measurements." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 113, D20208, doi:10.1029/2008JD010278. Retrieved and observed cloud fractions and corresponding TSI cloud imagers on 8 July 2005 at Pt. Reyes. Scatterplot of retrieved cloud fraction from spectral ratio method and SW

430

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burning on the Prairies Burning on the Prairies Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud-Aerosol-Precipitation Interactions Journal Reference: Fischer ML, MS Torn, DP Billesbach, G Doyle, B Northup, and SC Biraud. 2012. "Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought in a tallgrass prairie." Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 166, doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2012.07.011. Pasture burning during the beginning of the experiment at the USDA Grazing Lands Research Laboratory in March 2005. What does it mean for the carbon cycle? The deep drought in the United States that fueled wildfires and damaged crops in 2012 has now continued well into 2013. However, long before the droughts and fires wreaked havoc, a team of

431

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remote Sensing of Mineral Dust Using AERI Remote Sensing of Mineral Dust Using AERI Download a printable PDF Submitter: Hansell, R. A., University of California, Los Angeles Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Aerosol Journal Reference: Hansell R, KN Liou, SC Ou, SC Tsay, Q Ji, and JS Reid. 2008. "Remote sensing of mineral dust aerosol using AERI during the UAE2: A modeling and sensitivity study." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 113, D18202, doi:10.1029/2008JD010246. BT sensitivity to dust optical depth at 962 cm-1 with markers denoting locations of AERI subbands 1-17 from left to right. (a) Volz compact hexagon model spectra for four optical depths with best fit AERI spectrum. (b) Same as (a) but for a kaolinite/50% calcium carbonate mixturedust model.

432

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Evolution and Distribution of Water Vapor and Microphysical Properties The Evolution and Distribution of Water Vapor and Microphysical Properties in Cirrus Clouds Download a printable PDF Submitter: Comstock, J. M., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Comstock JM, R Lin, DO Starr, and P Yang. 2008. "Understanding ice supersaturation, particle growth, and number concentration in cirrus clouds." Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 113, D23211, doi:10.1029/2008JD010332. Vertical velocity (Vm) derived from millimeter cloud radar (MMCR) Doppler velocity measurements in cirrus clouds observed over the ACRF SGP site. Cloud model simulations of cirrus clouds using large-scale forcing (left panel) and cloud-scale forcing (right panel).

433

Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Digital Single Event Transients in a 180-nm Fully Depleted SOI Process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of ionizing radiation on single event transients are reported for Fully Depleted SOI (FDSOI) technology using experiments and simulations. Logic circuits, i.e. CMOS inverter chains, were irradiated with cobalt-60 ...

Keast, Craig L.

434

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Cloud Profiling Radars: Second-Generation Sampling Strategies, Processing, and Cloud Data Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program operates millimeter-wavelength cloud radars in several climatologically distinct regions. The digital signal processors for these radars were recently upgraded and ...

Pavlos Kollias; Mark A. Miller; Edward P. Luke; Karen L. Johnson; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Kenneth P. Moran; Kevin B. Widener; Bruce A. Albrecht

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors: sensitivity of decommissioning radiation exposure and costs to selected parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Additional analyses of decommissioning at the reference research and test (R and T) reactors and analyses of five recent reactor decommissionings are made that examine some parameters not covered in the initial study report (NUREG/CR-1756). The parameters examined for decommissioning are: (1) the effect on costs and radiation exposure of plant size and/or type; (2) the effects on costs of increasing disposal charges and of unavailability of waste disposal capacity at licensed waste disposal facilities; and (3) the costs of and the available alternatives for the disposal of nuclear R and T reactor fuel assemblies.

Konzek, G.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cloud-Radiation Effects on Sea Ice Loss Cloud-Radiation Effects on Sea Ice Loss Download a printable PDF Submitter: Stephens, G. L., Colorado State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Kay, JE, T L'Ecuyer, A Gettelman, G Stephens, and C O'Dell. "The contribution of cloud and radiation anomalies to the 2007 Arctic sea ice extent minimum." To appear in Geophysical Research Letters. Clouds and downwelling radiation 2007-2006 differences (June 15-Sept 15). a. Total cloud fraction differences based on radar and lidar data. b. Downwelling SW radiative flux difference. c. Downwelling LW radiative flux difference. The Western Arctic Ocean is outlined in brown. ARM ground-based radiation observations at Barrow, Alaska.

437

Salt Processing at the Savannah River Site: Results of Technology Down-Selection and Research and Development to Support New Salt Waste Processing Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste (HLW) program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of HLW for disposal. The Salt Processing Project (SPP) is the salt waste (water-soluble) treatment portion of this effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction, and operation of technologies to prepare the salt-waste feed material for immobilization at the site's Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility [DWPF]). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to DWPF include cesium (Cs), strontium (Sr), and actinides. In April 2000, the DOE Deputy Secretary for Project Completion (EM-40) established the SRS Salt Processing Project Technical Working Group (TWG) to manage technology development of treatment alternatives for SRS high-level salt wastes. The separation alternatives investigated included three candidate Cs-removal processes selected, as well as actinide and Sr removal that are also required as a part of each process. The candidate Cs-removal processes are: crystalline Silicotitanate Non-Elutable Ion Exchange (CST); caustic Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX); and small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation (STTP). The Tanks Focus Area was asked to assist DOE by managing the SPP research and development (R&D), revising roadmaps, and developing down-selection criteria. The down-selection decision process focused its analysis on three levels: (a) identification of goals that the selected technology should achieve, (b) selection criteria that are a measure of performance of the goal, and (c) criteria scoring and weighting for each technology alternative. After identifying the goals and criteria, the TWG analyzed R&D results and engineering data and scored the technology alternatives versus the criteria. Based their analysis and scoring, the TWG recommended CSSX as the preferred alternative. This recommendation was formalized in July 2001 when DOE published the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Alternatives Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and was finalized in the DOE Record of Decision issued in October 2001.

Lang, K.; Gerdes, K.; Picha, K.; Spader, W.; McCullough, J.; Reynolds, J.; Morin, J. P.; Harmon, H. D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

438

"Radiative Liquid Lithium (metal) Divertor" Inventor..-- Masayuki...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

"Radiative Liquid Lithium (metal) Divertor" Inventor..-- Masayuki Ono The invention utilizes liquid lithium as a radiative material. The radiative process greatly reduces the...

439

Process design and costing of bioethanol technology: A tool for determining the status and direction of research and development  

SciTech Connect

Bioethanol is a fuel-grade ethanol made from trees, grasses, and waste materials. It represents a sustainable substitute for gasoline in today's passenger cars. Modeling and design of processes for making bioethanol are critical tools used in the US Department of Energy's bioethanol research and development program. The authors use such analysis to guide new directions for research and to help them understand the level at which and the time when bioethanol will achieve commercial success. This paper provides an update on their latest estimates for current and projected costs of bioethanol. These estimates are the result of very sophisticated modeling and costing efforts undertaken in the program over the past few years. Bioethanol could cost anywhere from $1.16 to $1.44 per gallon, depending on the technology and the availability of low cost feedstocks for conversion to ethanol. While this cost range opens the door to fuel blending opportunities, in which ethanol can be used, for example, to improve the octane rating of gasoline, it is not currently competitive with gasoline as a bulk fuel. Research strategies and goals described in this paper have been translated into cost savings for ethanol. Their analysis of these goals shows that the cost of ethanol could drop by 40 cents per gallon over the next ten years by taking advantage of exciting new tools in biotechnology that will improve yield and performance in the conversion process.

Wooley, R.; Ruth, M.; Glassner, D.; Sheehan, J.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Procession  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

UEE 2008 Ziermann, Martin 2004 Macht und Architektur: ZweiP ROCESSION Martin Stadler EDITORS W ILLEKE W ENDRICHFull Citation: Stadler, Martin, 2008, Procession. In Jacco

Stadler, Martin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research radiation processes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...are processed to complex final shapes by investment casting. Iron-nickel-base superalloys are not customarily investment cast. Investment casting permits intricate internal cooling

442

Activities of the National Academy of Sciences in relation to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Annual performance report, June 1, 1991--May 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This progress report relates progress in the various research projects evaluating the late health effects, both somatic and genetic, resulting from radiation exposure of the survivors of the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Considerable progress has been made in the collection and utilization of the various epidemiological data bases. These include the Life Span Study, (LSS) cohort, the Adult Health Study (AHS) cohort, the In Utero cohort, the leukemia registry and the F-1 Study population. Important progress has been made in using RERF Tumor and Tissue Registry records for evaluation of cancer incidence and radiation risk estimates for comparison with cancer mortality and risk in the LSS cohort. At the present time, a manuscript on the incidence of solid tumors (1950-1987) is undergoing internal and external review for publication as an RERF Technical report (TR) and for publication in a peer-reviewed scientific journal. In addition, manuscripts are in preparation on (1) a comprehensive report on the incidence of hematological cancers, including analysis of leukemia by cell type (1950-1987), (2) a general description of Tumor Registry operations and (3) a comparison of incidence- and mortality-based estimates of radiation risk in the LSS cohort.

Edington, C.W.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

US/French Joint Research Program regarding the behavior of polymer base materials subjected to beta radiation. Volume 1. Phase-1 normalization results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the ongoing multi-year joint NRC/CEA international cooperative test program to investigate the dose-damage equivalence of gamma and beta radiation on polymer base materials, dosimetry and ethylene-propylene rubber (EPR) specimens were exchanged, irradiated, and evaluated for property changes at research facilities in the US (Sandia National Laboratories) and France (Compagnie ORIS Industrie). The purpose of this Phase-1 test series was to normalize and cross-correlate the results obtained by one research center to the other, in terms of exposure (1.0 MeV accelerated electrons and /sup 60/Co gammas) and postirradiation testing (ultimate elongation and tensile strength, hardness, and density) techniques. The dosimetry and material specimen results indicate good agreement between the two countries regarding the exposure conditions and postirradiation evaluation techniques employed.

Wyant, F.J.; Buckalew, W.H.; Chenion, J.; Carlin, F.; Gaussens, G.; Le Tutour, P.; Le Meur, M.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

REVISED FINAL REPORT INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY ACTIVITIES AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT SITES, NISKAYUNA, NEW YORK DCN 0496-SR-06-1  

SciTech Connect

The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

Evan Harpenau

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

445

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Vertical Structure of Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ACRF SGP Revealed The Vertical Structure of Cloud Radiative Forcing at the ACRF SGP Revealed by 8 Years of Continuous Measurements Submitter: Mace, G., Utah State University Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling, Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Accepted to Journal of Climate, 2007. Figure 1. Cloud occurrence, coverage, radiative forcing, and radiation effects over a composite annual cycle that is derived by averaging all observations collected during a particular month for all years. a) cloud occurrence in 100 mb vertical bins, b) cloud coverage, c) infrared cloud radiative forcing in 100 mb vertical bins, d) solar cloud radiative forcing, e) net cloud radiative forcing, f,g,h) solar (dotted), IR (solid), and net (dashed) cloud radiative effect for TOA (f), atmosphere (g), and

446

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First Observation-Based Estimates of Cloud-Free Aerosol Radiative Forcing First Observation-Based Estimates of Cloud-Free Aerosol Radiative Forcing Across China Download a printable PDF Submitter: Li, Z., University of Maryland Area of Research: Aerosol Properties Working Group(s): Aerosol Life Cycle Journal Reference: N/A Mean annual shortwave aerosol radiative forcing (SWARF) averaged across China. Spatial variation of the annual mean SW aerosol radiative forcing. Heavy loading of aerosols in China is widely known, but little is known about their impact on regional radiation budgets, which is often expressed as aerosol radiative forcing (ARF). Depending on their composition, aerosols can absorb a substantial amount of solar radiation, leading to a warming of the atmosphere and cooling of the surface. Many investigations have been made to characterize atmospheric aerosols and their radiative

447

Environmental research on a modified in situ oil shale task process. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress of the US Department of Energy's Oil Shale Task Force in its research program at the Occidental Oil Shale, Inc. facility at Logan Wash, Colorado. More specifically, the Task Force obtained samples from Retort 3E and Retort 6 and submitted these samples to a variety of analyses. The samples collected included: crude oil (Retort 6); light oil (Retort 6); product water (Retort 6); boiler blowdown (Retort 6); makeup water (Retort 6); mine sump water; groundwater; water from Retorts 1 through 5; retort gas (Retort 6); mine air; mine dust; and spent shale core (Retort 3E). The locations of the sampling points and methods used for collection and storage are discussed in Chapter 2 (Characterization). These samples were then distributed to the various laboratories and universities participating in the Task Force. For convenience in organizing the data, it is useful to group the work into three categories: Characterization, Leaching, and Health Effects. While many samples still have not been analyzed and much of the data remains to be interpreted, there are some preliminary conclusions the Task Force feels will be helpful in defining future needs and establishing priorities. It is important to note that drilling agents other than water were used in the recovery of the core from Retort 3E. These agents have been analyzed (see Table 12 in Chapter 2) for several constituents of interest. As a result some of the analyses of this core sample and leachates must be considered tentative.

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

High-Temperature Processing of Solids Through Solar Nebular Bow Shocks: 3D Radiation Hydrodynamics Simulations with Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A fundamental, unsolved problem in Solar System formation is explaining the melting and crystallization of chondrules found in chondritic meteorites. Theoretical models of chondrule melting in nebular shocks has been shown to be consistent with many aspects of thermal histories inferred for chondrules from laboratory experiments; but, the mechanism driving these shocks is unknown. Planetesimals and planetary embryos on eccentric orbits can produce bow shocks as they move supersonically through the disk gas, and are one possible source of chondrule-melting shocks. We investigate chondrule formation in bow shocks around planetoids through 3D radiation hydrodynamics simulations. A new radiation transport algorithm that combines elements of flux-limited diffusion and Monte Carlo methods is used to capture the complexity of radiative transport around bow shocks. An equation of state that includes the rotational, vibrational, and dissociation modes of H$_2$ is also used. Solids are followed directly in the simulati...

Boley, A C; Desch, S J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

RESEARCH ON THE RADIATION STABILITY OF ORGANIC FLUIDS. Progress Report for January 1, 1953 through September 30, 1953. Report No. 6  

SciTech Connect

Additional knowledge was gained pertaining to effects of irradiation variables, chemical components, etc., on the stability of organics. This basic program was supplemented with an applied program wherein research was undertaken of particular irterest in reactor moderator-coolart and lubricant applications. Irradiations of the capsule type in the absence of air were conducted in the MTR, BNL, and X-10 reactors under a variety of conditions in investigations of effects of temperature, flux, dosage, and organic chemical structure. The MTR gamma facility and the California Research Co/sup 60/ source were also used. With highly aromatic organics, damage measured by viscosity change was found independent of irradiation temperature up to 371 deg C. Coke formation was minor, although it was universal at 426 deg C. Many fused ring and nonfused ring aromatics were stable at 371 deg C. Viscosity changes were slight, and gassing amounted to about 2 to 5 ml gas/ml fluid. Simple molecular distillations showed biphenyl, naphthalene, and 1,3-diphenylbenzene, to be 93 to 97% distillable, of which 72 to 81% was pure starting material. The stabilities of solutions of highly viscous polymers in low viscosity alkylbenzenes were studied in the presence of air with gamma radiation. Styrene-alkene copolymer, polyalkene, and polyester solutions markedly decreased in viscosity on irradiation; whereas, polystyrene solutions merely increased slowly. Comparative stabilities of representative types of organics with combined neutron and gamma radiation allowed the tentative determination, based on viscosity change, that one fast neutron (>1 Mev) causes approximately 16 times the damage of one gamma (1.6 Mev). Thermal neutrons cause insignificant damage. As a result, it is suggested that the radiation dosage to cause damage be expressed in terms of "equivalent fast neutrons," a number obtained by adding to the number of fast neutrons the damage equivalent number each of gamma rays and epithermal neutrons. (auth)

1953-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

450

PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was initially targeted to the making of coke for blast furnaces by using proprietary technology of Calderon in a phased approach, and Phase I was completed. The project was then re-directed to the making of iron units. U.S. Steel teamed up with Calderon for a joint effort which will last 30 months to produce directly reduced iron with the potential of converting it into molten iron (hot metal) consistent with the Roadmap recommendations of 1998 prepared by the Steel Industry in cooperation with the Department of Energy. The work which is labeled as Phase II will take place at two levels; namely, the bench scale level and the process development unit (PDU) level. The bench scale work is being divided into two parts; the construction and operation of Bench Scale No.1 to make hot metal direct as one part and the construction and operation of Bench Scale No.2 to make DRI with its conversion to hot metal as the second part. The work at the PDU consists of getting the PDU which exists ready for advancing the activities from bench scale to PDU level.

Albert Calderon

2001-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

451

General-Purpose Heat Source: Research and development program: Cold-Process Verification Test Series  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Because any space mission could experience a launch abort or return from orbit, the heat source must be designed and constructed to survive credible accident environments. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions documented the response of GPHSs and individual GPHS capsules fueled with {sup 238}UO{sub 2} ({sup 235}U-depleted) to a variety of explosive overpressure and impact events. In the early 1990s, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) resumed fabrication of {sup 238}UO{sub 2} GPHS pellets. The Cold-Process Verification (CPV) Test Series was designed to compare the response of GPHS heat sources loaded with recently fabricated hot- and cold-pressed {sup 238}UO{sub 2} pellets to the response of urania pellets used in the Galileo and Ulysses performance tests. This report documents eleven bare-capsule impacts and one impact of a fully loaded GPHS module. All of the failures observed in the bare-clad impact tests were similar to failures observed in previous safety tests. No failures occurred in the module impact test.

Reimus, M.A.H.; George, T.G.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Exploratory cell research and fundamental processes study in solid state electrochemical cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Last year this program demonstrated that alternative to lithium had some merit on which to base new polymer electrolyte batteries and other electrochemical devices. We reported that Na, Zn, and Cu electrolytes have modest conductivities at 100{degree}C. Some preliminary cell cycling data were reported with V{sub 6}O{sub 13} insertion cathodes, and the successful cell cycling suggested that N{sup +}, Zn{sup +2} could be inserted and removed reversibly in the cathode material. Also, thin-film polymer cathodes were shown by impedance measurements to have three characteristic regions of behavior. Each region had different controlling processes with relaxation time constants that could be separated with careful manipulation of film thickness, morphology, and charging level. The present report gives results of the continuation of these studies. In particular, the sodium system was studied more intensively with conductivity measurements on sodium triflate in poly(ethyleneoxide)(PEO), and cell studies with V{sub 6}O{sub 13} and poly(pyrrole)(PPY) cathodes. The impedance work was concluded and several directions of new work in that area were identified. The insertion studies with single crystal V{sub 6}O{sub 13} were concluded on this program and transferred to NSF funding. 29 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

Smyrl, W.H.; Owens, B.B.; White, H.S. (Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis, MN (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science)

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Research Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Highlights Highlights Form Submit a New Research Highlight Sort Highlights Submitter Title Research Area Working Group Submission Date DOE Progress Reports Notable Research Findings for 2001-2006 Biological and Environmental Research Abstracts Database Research Highlights Summaries Research Highlights Members of ARM's science team are major contributors to radiation and cloud research. ARM investigators publish about 150 refereed journal articles per year, and ARM data are used in many studies published by other scientific organizations. These documented research efforts represent tangible evidence of ARM's contribution to advances in almost all areas of atmospheric radiation and cloud research. Below is a selection of summaries highlighting recently-published ARM research. The entire collection of ARM

454

Downscaling Aerosols and the Impact of Neglected Subgrid Processes on Direct Aerosol Radiative Forcing for a Representative Global Climate Model Grid Spacing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent improvements to many global climate models include detailed, prognostic aerosol calculations intended to better reproduce the observed climate. However, the trace gas and aerosol fields are treated at the grid-cell scale with no attempt to account for sub-grid impacts on the aerosol fields. This paper begins to quantify the error introduced by the neglected sub-grid variability for the shortwave aerosol radiative forcing for a representative climate model grid spacing of 75 km. An analysis of the value added in downscaling aerosol fields is also presented to give context to the WRF-Chem simulations used for the sub-grid analysis. We found that 1) the impact of neglected sub-grid variability on the aerosol radiative forcing is strongest in regions of complex topography and complicated flow patterns, and 2) scale-induced differences in emissions contribute strongly to the impact of neglected sub-grid processes on the aerosol radiative forcing. The two of these effects together, when simulated at 75 km vs. 3 km in WRF-Chem, result in an average daytime mean bias of over 30% error in top-of-atmosphere shortwave aerosol radiative forcing for a large percentage of central Mexico during the MILAGRO field campaign.

Gustafson, William I.; Qian, Yun; Fast, Jerome D.

2011-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

455

PHASE II CALDERON PROCESS TO PRODUCE DIRECT REDUCED IRON RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The commercialization path of the Calderon technology for making a feedstock for steelmaking with assistance from DOE initially focused on making coke and work was done which proved that the Calderon technology is capable of making good coke for hard driving blast furnaces. U.S. Steel which participated in such demonstration felt that the Calderon technology would be more meaningful in lowering the costs of making steel by adapting it to the making of iron--thus obviating the need for coke. U.S. Steel and Calderon teamed up to jointly work together to demonstrate that the Calderon technology will produce in a closed system iron units from iron concentrate (ore) and coal competitively by eliminating pelletizing, sintering, coking and blast furnace operation. If such process steps could be eliminated, a huge reduction in polluting emissions and greenhouse gases (including CO{sub 2}) relating to steelmaking would ensue. Such reduction will restructure the steel industry away from the very energy-intensive steelmaking steps currently practiced and drastically reduce costs of making steel. The development of a technology to lower U.S. steelmaking costs and become globally competitive is a priority of major importance. Therefore, the development work which Calderon is conducting presently under this Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy becomes more crucial than ever. During the 3rd quarter of 2005 which the present report covers, virtually all the effort to advance the Calderon technology to make iron units was concentrated towards forming a team with a steelmaker who needs both iron units in the form of hot metal and a substitute for natural gas (SNG), both being major contributors to higher costs in steelmaking. Calderon felt that a very good candidate would be Steel Dynamics (SDI) by virtue that it operates a rotary hearth facility in Butler, Indiana that uses large amounts of natural gas to reduce briquettes made from ore and coal that they subsequently melt in a submerged arc furnace that is a large consumer of electric power. This facility is operated as a division of SDI under the name of Iron Dynamics (IDI). It is no secret that IDI has had and still has a great number of operational problems, including high cost for natural gas.

Albert Calderon

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

456

Research Gallery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Gallery Research Gallery Inside the Museum Exhibitions Norris Bradbury Museum Lobby Defense Gallery Research Gallery History Gallery TechLab Virtual Exhibits invisible utility element Research Gallery Science serving society The Laboratory conducts leading-edge research in many areas of science and technology to help solve national problems related to energy, the environment, infrastructure, and health. Basic research conducted here enhances national defense and economic security. Exhibits you'll find in this gallery: Understanding Radiation LANSCE: Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Space Science Research Viewspace Environmental Monitoring and Research Nanotechnology: The Science of the Small Algae to Biofuels: Squeezing Power from Pond Scum Living with Wildfire: A Shared Community Experience

457

Human Radiation Experiments: Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the oral histories of researchers and others possessing firsthand knowledge of human radiation experimentation during World War II and the Cold War. Film Clips: Document...

458

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AERI-ER at the SHEBA Ice Station: Far Infrared H2O Continuum AERI-ER at the SHEBA Ice Station: Far Infrared H2O Continuum Submitter: Revercomb, H. E., University of Wisconsin, Madison Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Radiative Processes Journal Reference: Tobin, D.C., F.A. Best, P.D. Brown, S.A. Clough, R.G. Dedecker, R.G. Ellingson, R.K. Garcia, H.B. Howell, R.O. Knuteson, E.J. Mlawer, H.E. Revercomb, J.F. Short, P.F.W. van Delst, and V.P. Walden, 1999. "Downwelling spectral radiance observations at the SHEBA ice station: Water vapor continuum measurements from 17 to 26μm," JGR 104(D2): 2081-2092 Figure 1. Comparison of clear sky downwelling radiance spectra measured with the University of Wisconsin AERI system at the SGP CART site near Lamont, Oklahoma and with the extended range AERI at the SHEBA Ice Station,

459

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Observational Evidence of Changes in Water Vapor, Clouds, and Radiation Observational Evidence of Changes in Water Vapor, Clouds, and Radiation Submitter: Dong, X., University of North Dakota Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Dong, X., B. Xi, and P. Minnis, 2006: Observational Evidence of Changes in Water vapor, Clouds, and Radiation at the ARM SGP site. Geophys. Res. Lett., 33, L19818,doi:10.1029/2006GL027132. Figure 1. This plot shows that atmospheric precipitable water vapor and downwelling infrared radiation decreased, but solar radiation increased at the SGP site from 1997 to 2004. The amount of water vapor, the dominant greenhouse gas, has a greater effect on infrared radiation than on solar. Figure 2. This plot shows that solar radiation at the surface increased

460

The impact of detailed urban-scale processing on the composition, distribution, and radiative forcing of anthropogenic aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Detailed urban-scale processing has not been included in global 3D chemical transport models due to its large computational demands. Here we present a metamodel for including this processing, and compare it with the use ...

Cohen, Jason Blake

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461

Research departments Materials Research Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

research reactor and X- radiation from the synchrotron facilities in Hamburg and Grenoble. In this con- nection, work is carried out on develop- ing advanced methods, as well as theory and computer simulation numerical simulation. Nuclear Safety Research and Facilities Department The department carries out research

462

IN-SITU PROBING OF RADIATION-INDUCED PROCESSING OF ORGANICS IN ASTROPHYSICAL ICE ANALOGS-NOVEL LASER DESORPTION LASER IONIZATION TIME-OF-FLIGHT MASS SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the evolution of organic molecules in ice grains in the interstellar medium (ISM) under cosmic rays, stellar radiation, and local electrons and ions is critical to our understanding of the connection between ISM and solar systems. Our study is aimed at reaching this goal of looking directly into radiation-induced processing in these ice grains. We developed a two-color laser-desorption laser-ionization time-of-flight mass spectroscopic method (2C-MALDI-TOF), similar to matrix-assisted laser desorption and ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectroscopy. Results presented here with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) probe molecules embedded in water-ice at 5 K show for the first time that hydrogenation and oxygenation are the primary chemical reactions that occur in astrophysical ice analogs when subjected to Ly{alpha} radiation. We found that hydrogenation can occur over several unsaturated bonds and the product distribution corresponds to their stabilities. Multiple hydrogenation efficiency is found to be higher at higher temperatures (100 K) compared to 5 K-close to the interstellar ice temperatures. Hydroxylation is shown to have similar efficiencies at 5 K or 100 K, indicating that addition of O atoms or OH radicals to pre-ionized PAHs is a barrierless process. These studies-the first glimpses into interstellar ice chemistry through analog studies-show that once accreted onto ice grains PAHs lose their PAH spectroscopic signatures through radiation chemistry, which could be one of the reason for the lack of PAH detection in interstellar ice grains, particularly the outer regions of cold, dense clouds or the upper molecular layers of protoplanetary disks.

Gudipati, Murthy S.; Yang Rui, E-mail: gudipati@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: ryang73@ustc.edu [University of Maryland (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

The Fuel Processing Research Facility - A Platform for the Conduct of Synthesis Gas Technology R&D  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vision 21 is the U. S. Department of Energy's initiative to deploy high efficiency, ultraclean co-production coal conversion power plants in the twenty-first century. These plants will consist of power and co-production modules, which are integrated to meet specific power and chemical markets. A variety of fuel gas processing technology issues involving gas separations, cleanup, gas-to-liquid fuels production and chemical synthesis, to mention a few, will be addressed by the program. The overall goal is to effectively eliminate, at competitive costs, environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels for producing electricity and transportation fuels. The Fuel Processing Research Facility (FPRF) was developed as a fuel-flexible platform to address many of these technology needs. The facility utilizes a simplified syngas generator that is capable of producing 2,000 standard cubic feet per hour of 900 degree Celsius and 30 atmosphere synthesis gas that can be tailored to the gas composition of interest. It was built on a ''mid-scale'' level in an attempt to successfully branch the traditionally difficult scale-up from laboratory to pilot scale. When completed, the facility will provide a multi-faceted R&D area for the testing of fuel cells, gas separation technologies, and other gas processing unit operations.

Monahan, Michael J.; Berry, David A.; Gardner, Todd H.; Lyons, K. David

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

464

Automated Solar Cell Assembly Teamed Process Research. Final subcontract report, 6 January 1993--31 October 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the Final Technical Report for a program entitled ''Automated Solar Cell Assembly Teamed Process Research,'' funded by the US Department of Energy. This program was part of Phase 3A of the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project, which addressed the generic needs of the photovoltaic (PV) industry for improved quality, accelerated production scale-up, and substantially reduced manufacturing cost. Crystalline silicon solar cells (Czochralski monocrystalline, cast polycrystalline, and ribbon polycrystalline) are used in the great majority of PV modules produced in the US, accounting for 95% of all shipments in 1994. Spire's goal in this program was to reduce the cost of these modules by developing high throughput (5 MW per year) automated processes for interconnecting solar cells made from standard and thin silicon wafers. Spire achieved this goal by developing a completely new automated processing system, designated the SPI-ASSEMBLER{trademark} 5000, which is now offered as a commercial product to the PV industry. A discussion of the project and of the Assembler is provided.

Nowlan, M. J.; Hogan, S. J.; Breen, W. F.; Murach, J. M.; Sutherland, S. F.; Patterson, J. S.; Darkazalli, G. [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (US)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center (MNRC) TRIGA reactor: The national organization of test research and training reactors  

SciTech Connect

This year's TRTR conference is being hosted by the McClellan Nuclear Radiation Center. The conference will be held at the Red Lion Hotel in Sacramento, CA. The conference dates are scheduled for October 11-14, 1994. Deadlines for sponsorship commitment and papers have not been set, but are forthcoming. The newly remodeled Red Lion Hotel provides up-to-date conference facilities and one of the most desirable locations for dining, shopping and entertainment in the Sacramento area. While attendees are busy with the conference activities, a spouses program will be available. Although the agenda has not been set, the Sacramento area offers outings to San Francisco, Pier 39, Ghirardelli Square (famous for their chocolate), and a chance to discover 'El Dorado' in the gold country. Not to forget our own bit of history with visits to 'Old Sacramento and Old Folsom', where antiquities abound, to the world renown train museum and incredible eating establishments. (author)

Kiger, Kevin M. [SWI-ALC/TIR, 5335 Price Ave., McClellan Air Force Base Sacramento, CA 95652-2504 (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

US/French joint research program regarding the behavior of polymer base materials subjected to beta radiation: Volume 2, Phase-2a screening tests: (Final report)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the ongoing joint NRC/CEA cooperative test program to investigate the relative effectiveness of beta and gamma irradiation to produce damage in polymer base materials, ethylene propylene rubber (EPR) specimens, in slab geometry, were exposed to Cobalt-60 gamma rays and accelerator produced electron beams. Specimens were irradiated and evaluated at research facilities in the US (Sandia National Laboratories) and France (Compagnie ORIS Industrie). These tests included several electron beam energies, sample thicknesses, exposure doses, and dose rates. Based on changes in the tensile properties, of the test specimens, results of these studies suggest that material damage resulting from electron and gamma irradiations can be correlated on the basis of absorbed radiation dose.

Buckalew, W.H.; Wyant, F.J.; Chenion, J.; Carlin, F.; Gaussens, G.; Le Tutour, P.; Le Meur, M.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detangling Convective Oscillations at ARM Tropical Western Pacific Site: Detangling Convective Oscillations at ARM Tropical Western Pacific Site: Manus Submitter: Wang, Y., Department of Geography Long, C. N., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Mather, J. H., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Liu, X., Institute of Earth Environment Area of Research: Radiation Processes Working Group(s): Cloud Properties Journal Reference: Wang Y, C Long, J Mather, and X Liu. 2010. "Convective signals from surface measurements at ARM Tropical Western Pacific site: Manus." Climate Dynamics, , doi:10.1007/s00382-009-0736-z. Figure 1: (A) The time series includes the clear-sky shortwave (SW) flux (blue) and the all-sky SW flux (black) over Manus. The green line indicates a 60-day running mean. (B) Wavelet power (WP) of CRF (color shading) with

468

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulating Mixed-Phase Clouds: Sensitivity to Ice Initiation Simulating Mixed-Phase Clouds: Sensitivity to Ice Initiation Download a printable PDF Submitter: Sednev, I., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Menon, S., Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory McFarquhar, G., University of Illinois, Urbana Area of Research: General Circulation and Single Column Models/Parameterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Modeling Journal Reference: I Sednev, S Menon, and G McFarquhar. 2008. "Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms." Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussion 8: 11755-11819. The vertical structure and radiative properties of persistent low-level Arctic clouds depend on their microphysics, and thus, estimation of the relative significance of the microphysical processes that occur in these