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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Instrumentation Overview ARM Climate Research Facility 18th Annual...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview ARM Climate Research Facility 18th Annual ARM Science Team Meeting Jimmy Voyles Voyles STM.2008 Presentation Outline Voyles STM.2008 Presentation Outline * Program Science...

2

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2006  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the ARM Climate Research Facility and ARM Science programs and presents key accomplishments in 2006. Noteworthy scientific and infrastructure accomplishments in 2006 include: Collaborating with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to lead the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment, a major international field campaign held in Darwin, Australia Successfully deploying the ARM Mobile Facility in Niger, Africa Developing the new ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) to provide airborne measurements Publishing a new finding on the impacts of aerosols on surface energy budget in polar latitudes Mitigating a long-standing double-Intertropical Convergence Zone problem in climate models using ARM data and a new cumulus parameterization scheme.

LR Roeder

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

3

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility - annual report 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ER-ARM-0403 ER-ARM-0403 3 Table of Contents Program Overview ............................................................................................................................................................ 4 The Role of Clouds in Climate .................................................................................................................................... 4 ARM Science Goals ..................................................................................................................................................... 4 ARM Climate Research Facility: Successful Science Program Leads to User Facility Designation ................................ 5 Sites Around the World Enable Real Observations .......................................................................................................

4

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008  

SciTech Connect

The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earths surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earths energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

LR Roeder

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FLEX lab image, windows testing lab, scientist inside a lab, Research Facilities EETD maintains advanced research and test facilities for buildings, energy technologies, air...

6

DOE/SC-ARM-12-023 ARM Climate Research Facility AnnuAl RepoRt - 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2-023 2-023 ARM Climate Research Facility AnnuAl RepoRt - 2012 New Climate Measurement Sites h ?QOPQK?* ? * - " ?q " *"- ?l *?G qlH?b " * ?q ?e " "* ? ? - " ?*"-? "?- *"- ? "* Y? ? "? ql?l- " ?e " "* ? - ? ? * ? - *? *?n " *- K? K? ? ? "? ? "* ?- ?f "- ?h ? " ?* ? - M?? ? "? "* ? ? ?*-? ?- *"- ? ?* ? ?- ?QOPRK? ?* ?"" ? -" ? ql ? " *" ? "* ?- ? *? " * ?- *"- ? " "*" ? - ?* ?"- M??o - - ?" * * *"- ? - ?* ?*"-? "* ?" Y

7

DOE/SC-ARM-11-024 ARM Climate Research Facility ANNUAL REPORT...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2011 Recovery Act HIGHLIGHTS October 2010 * Doppler lidars tested at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. *...

8

DOE/SC-ARM-10-032 ARM Climate Research Facility AnnuAl RepoRt - 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10-032 10-032 ARM Climate Research Facility AnnuAl RepoRt - 2010 Recovery Act HigHligHts September 2009 * One hundred percent of allocated funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 released to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. October 2009 * Preliminary design reviews successfully completed for new solar spectrometer and Data Management Facility (DMF) upgrades. December 2009 * Preliminary design reviews successfully completed for 18 new radars and upgrades to existing radars. January 2010 * Design reviews completed for DMF, radars, and shipborne radar wind profiler. * Installation and integration of new equipment in process for the ARM Data Archive and aircraft infrastructure, data systems, and

9

Research Facility,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Collecting and Delivering the Data Collecting and Delivering the Data As a general condition for use of the ARM Climate Research Facility, users are required to include their data in the ARM Data Archive. All data acquired must be of sufficient quality to be useful and must be documented such that users will be able to clearly understand the meaning and organization of the data. Final, quality-assured data sets are stored in the Data Archive and are freely accessible to the general scientific community. Preliminary data may be shared among field campaign participants during and shortly following the campaign. To facilitate sharing of preliminary data, the ARM Data Archive establishes restricted access capability, limited to participants and data managers.

10

Research Facilities and Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

WEB RESOURCES: Magnesium Research Facilities and Programs ... to universities, corporations, and other facilities involved in magnesium research, 0, 1025...

11

Chemistry Dept. Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Facilities As a research organization within a National Laboratory, the Chemistry Department operates research facilities that are available to other researchers as...

12

NREL: Biomass Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities At NREL's state-of-the-art biomass research facilities, researchers design and optimize processes to convert renewable biomass feedstocks into transportation fuels and...

13

Guide to research facilities  

SciTech Connect

This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

NREL: Buildings Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities NREL provides industry, government, and university researchers with access to state-of-the-art and unique equipment for analyzing a wide spectrum of building energy efficiency technologies and innovations. NREL engineers and researchers work closely with industry partners to research and develop advanced technologies. NREL's existing facilities have been used to test and develop many award-winning building technologies and innovations that deliver significant energy savings in buildings, and the new facilities further extend those capabilities. In addition, the NREL campus includes living laboratories, buildings that researchers and other NREL staff use every day. Researchers monitor real-time building performance data in these facilities to study energy use

15

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities NREL's world-class research facilities provide the venue for innovative advances in photovoltaic technologies and applications. These facilities within the National Center for Photovoltaics (NCPV) serve both multi-use and dedicated-use functions. We encourage our research colleagues in industry, universities, and other laboratories to pursue opportunities in working with our staff in these facilities. Dedicated-Use Facilities Photo of a red-hot coil glowing inside a round machine. Research within these facilities focuses on targeted areas of interest that require specific tools, techniques, or unique capabilities. Our two main dedicated-use facilities are the following: Outdoor Test Facility (OTF) OTF researchers study and evaluate advanced or emerging PV technologies

16

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

banner banner Home | People | Site Index Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility US Department of Energy About Science Campaigns Sites Instruments Measurements Data News Publications Education Become a User Recovery Act Mission FAQ Outreach Displays History Organization Participants Facility Statistics Forms Contacts Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) ARM Science Team Meetings Propose a Campaign Submitting Proposals: Guidelines Featured Campaigns Campaign Data List of Campaigns Aerial Facility Eastern North Atlantic Mobile Facilities North Slope of Alaska Southern Great Plains Tropical Western Pacific Location Table Contacts Instrument Datastreams Value-Added Products PI Data Products Field Campaign Data Related Data

17

Superalloy Research Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 8, 2007 ... This directory provides a list of links to superalloy research facilities and programs around the world. Two formats of the information are...

18

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TR-081.2 iii Abstract This report provides a short description of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility microwave radiometer (MWR) Retrieval...

19

NREL: Wind Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Our facilities are designed to meet the wind industry's critical research needs with state-of-the-art design and testing facilities. NREL's unique and highly versatile facilities at the National Wind Technology Center offer research and analysis of wind turbine components and prototypes rated from 400 watts to 3 megawatts. Satellite facilities support the growth of wind energy development across the United States. National Wind Technology Center Facilities Our facilities are contained within a 305-acre area that comprises field test sites, test laboratories, industrial high-bay work areas, machine shops, electronics and instrumentation laboratories, and office areas. In addition, there are hundreds of test articles and supporting components such as turbines, meteorological towers, custom test apparatus, test sheds,

20

BNL | Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brookhaven's Research Facilities Brookhaven's Research Facilities Tools of Discovery Brookhaven National Lab excels at the design, construction, and operation of large-scale, cutting-edge research facilities-some available nowhere else in the world. Each year, thousands of scientists from laboratories, universities, and industries around the world use these facilities to delve into the basic mysteries of physics, chemistry, biology, materials science, energy, and the environment-and develop innovative applications that arise, sometimes at the intersections of these disciplines. construction Brookhaven Lab is noted for the design, construction and operation of large-scale, cutting-edge research facilities that support thousands of scientists worldwide. RHIC tunnel Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report Chitra Sivaraman August 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S....

22

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report Chitra Sivaraman June 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S....

23

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report C Sivaraman May 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S....

24

NREL: Technology Transfer - Research Facilities  

NREL's Solar Energy Research Facility is one of many world-class facilities available to public and private agencies.

25

Mound Facility. 1978 annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For Mound Facility, the year 1978 was one of progress marked by enhanced mission assignments and significant milestones. The thirtieth anniversary of the site was celebrated, and Monsanto Research Corporation began a new 5 year contract to operate the Mound Facility. Long-standing production assignments were strengthened, and were were given a new responsibility: to develop and produce all ceramic parts used in Mound-build products. progress toward US energy objectives was bolstered by Mound programs supporting the development of nuclear fusion poser, unlocking previously us attainable fossil fuels, ensuring the safety and security of nuclear material handling operations, and exploring the real promise of energy form the sun. In 1978, we focused our attention on many efforts aimed at a brighter, more secure future.

NONE

1979-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

26

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility 2010 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the 2010 ATR National Scientific User Facility Annual Report. This report provides an overview of the program for 2010, along with individual project reports from each of the university principal investigators. The report also describes the capabilities offered to university researchers here at INL and at the ATR NSUF partner facilities.

Mary Catherine Thelen; Todd R. Allen

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

METC Combustion Research Facility  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) high pressure combustion facility is to provide a mid-scale facility for combustion and cleanup research to support DOE`s advanced gas turbine, pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion, and hot gas cleanup programs. The facility is intended to fill a gap between lab scale facilities typical of universities and large scale combustion/turbine test facilities typical of turbine manufacturers. The facility is now available to industry and university partners through cooperative programs with METC. High pressure combustion research is also important to other DOE programs. Integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems and second-generation, pressurized, fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) systems use gas turbines/electric generators as primary power generators. The turbine combustors play an important role in achieving high efficiency and low emissions in these novel systems. These systems use a coal-derived fuel gas as fuel for the turbine combustor. The METC facility is designed to support coal fuel gas-fired combustors as well as the natural gas fired combustor used in the advanced turbine program.

Halow, J.S.; Maloney, D.J.; Richards, G.A.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Facility Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance on AddThis.com... Requirements by Subject

29

NREL: Research Facilities - Test and User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and User Facilities Test and User Facilities NREL has test and user facilities available to industry and other organizations for researching, developing, and evaluating renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. Here you'll find an alphabetical listing and brief descriptions of NREL's test and user facilities. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Advanced Research Turbines At our wind testing facilities, we have turbines available to test new control schemes and equipment for reducing loads on wind turbine components. Learn more about the Advanced Research Turbines on our Wind Research website. Back to Top D Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility This facility was designed to assist the distributed power industry in the

30

Lighting Research Group: Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Lighting Research Facilities at LBNL gonio-photometer Gonio-photometer We use this device to measure the intensity and direction of the light from a lamp or fixture. integrating sphere Integrating sphere This instrument allows us to get a fast and accurate measurement of the total light output of a lamp. We are not able to determine the direction of the light, only the intensity. power analyzer Power analyzer We use our power analyzer with the lamps in the gonio-photometer to measure input power, harmonic distortion, power factor, and many other signals that tell us how well a lamp is performing. spectro-radiometer Spectro-radiometer This device measures not only the intensity of a light source but also the intensity of the light at each wavelength.

31

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recovery Act Recovery Act Learn about ARM's efforts. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility is a U.S. Department of Energy scientific user facility, providing data from strategically located in situ and remote sensing observatories around the world. [ Live Data Displays ] Featured Data 09.19.2013 New ARM Best Estimate Land Product Contains Critical Soil Quantities for Describing Land Properties 09.12.2013 Value-Added Product Estimates Planetary Boundary Layer Height from Radiosondes 08.29.2013 New Data Available for Precipitation Value-Added Product Feature12.30.2013 Pole Position: New Field Campaigns Explore Arctic and Antarctic Atmosphere Pole Position: New Field Campaigns Explore Arctic and Antarctic Atmosphere For the first time, ARM ventures to Antarctica for one of several newly

32

NREL: Technology Transfer - Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Facilities Research Facilities Photo of Solar Energy Research Facility building at NREL. NREL's Solar Energy Research Facility is one of many world-class facilities available to public and private agencies. For developing commercially viable energy products, organizations may partner with NREL to use our state-of-the-art laboratories, and testing and user facilities. Visit NREL's Research Facilities Web site to learn more about them. We typically develop technology partnership agreements for using our facilities and/or working with our researchers. Printable Version Technology Transfer Home About Technology Transfer Technology Partnership Agreements Licensing Agreements Nondisclosure Agreements Research Facilities Commercialization Programs Success Stories News Contacts Did you find what you needed?

33

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report Chitra Sivaraman October 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

34

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report C Sivaraman October 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and

35

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report C Sivaraman January 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and

36

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report C Sivaraman July 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and

37

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report C Sivaraman February 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and

38

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 ARM Climate Research Facility Spectral Surface Albedo Value-Added Product (VAP) Report S McFarlane K Gaustad C Long E Mlawer July 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

39

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report C Sivaraman November 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and

40

ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Value-Added Product Report Chitra Sivaraman June 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the U.S. Government or any agency thereof. The views and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Mobile Facility Records Annual Climate Cycle in Niger, Africa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Records Annual Facility Records Annual Climate Cycle in Niger, Africa Because dust can block incoming solar energy, and because solar energy drives weather and climate, scientists around the world are looking for ways to better understand these natural phenomena. In 2006, scientists sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility conducted a year-long field campaign in Niamey, Niger, to provide key information for the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses, or AMMA, project. During the 12-month experiment at the airport in Niamey, researchers used a portable atmospheric laboratory, airplanes, and satellites to collect information about clouds, aerosols, and solar and terrestrial energy in the skies above the site. Measurements obtained

42

NETL: Research Capabilities and Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Capabilities and Facilities Research Capabilities and Facilities Onsite Research Research Capabilities and Facilities Lab Worker As the lead field center for the DOE Office of Fossil Energy's research and development program, NETL has established a strong onsite research program conducted by Federal scientists and engineers. Onsite R&D – managed by NETL's Office of Research and Development – makes important contributions to NETL's mission of implementing a research, development, and demonstration program to resolve the environmental, supply, and reliability constraints of producing and using fossil resources. With its expert research staff and state-of-the-art facilities, NETL has extensive experience in working with the technical issues related to fossil resources. Onsite researchers also participate with NETL's industrial partners to solve problems that become barriers to commercialization of power systems, fuels, and environmental and waste management. Onsite research capabilities are strengthened by collaborations with well-known research universities.

43

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Solar Energy Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Energy Research Facility Solar Energy Research Facility Photo of the Solar Energy Research Facility. The exterior stepped clerestory of the Solar Energy Research Facility. Photovoltaics (PV) and basic energy sciences are two major research areas conducted in the Solar Energy Research Facility (SERF). The building incorporates a multitude of energy saving features that make it one of the government's most energy efficient buildings with 40 percent lower energy costs than similar buildings designed to meet federal energy standards. The SERF houses three adjoining modules each containing a laboratory pod and an office pod. Laboratories in the west module are used to develop semiconductor material for high-efficiency crystalline solar cells. Laboratories in the center module are used to fabricate prototype solar

44

2012 Annual Report Research Reactor Infrastructure Program  

SciTech Connect

The content of this report is the 2012 Annual Report for the Research Reactor Infrastructure Program.

Douglas Morrell

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Advanced Powertrain Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

95F 95F Vehicle Setup Information Vehicle architecture PHEV Test cell location Front Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Document date 10/18/2013 Vehicle dynamometer Input Revision Number 1 Test weight [lb] 3518 Notes: Target A [lb] 21.47 Target B [lb/mph] 0.21588 Target C [lb/mph^2] 0.012508 Test Fuel Information Revision Number 1 Test weight [lb] 3518 Test Fuel Information Fuel type EPA Tier II EEE HF0437 Fuel density [g/ml] 0.742 Fuel Net HV [BTU/lbm] 18475 Fuel type EPA Tier II EEE HF0437 T e s t I D [ # ] C y c l e C o l d s t a r t ( C S t ) H o t s t a r t [ H S t ] D a t e T e s t C e l l T e m p [ C ] T e s t C e l l R H [ % ] T e s t C e l l B a r o [ i n / H g ] V e h i c l e c o o l i n g f a n s p e e d : S p e e d M a t c h [ S M ] o r c o n s t a n t s p e e d [ C S ] S o l a r L a m p s [ W / m 2 ] V e i c l e C l i m a t e C o n t r o l s e t t i n g s H o o d P o s i t i o n [ U p ] o r [ C l o s e d ] W i n d o w P o s i t i o n [ C l o s e d ] o r [ D o w n ] C y

46

University Research Consortium annual review meeting program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This brochure presents the program for the first annual review meeting of the University Research Consortium (URC) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). INEL is a multiprogram laboratory with a distinctive role in applied engineering. It also conducts basic science research and development, and complex facility operations. The URC program consists of a portfolio of research projects funded by INEL and conducted at universities in the United States. In this program, summaries and participant lists for each project are presented as received from the principal investigators.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laws & Regulations » Facility Reporting » Federal Facility Annual Laws & Regulations » Facility Reporting » Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports and Performance October 8, 2013 - 2:09pm Addthis Agencies are required to report annual progress made toward energy- and water-reduction goals. Agencies are required to report annual progress made toward energy- and water-reduction goals. The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) offers information and data sets illustrating Federal agencies' annual progress in meeting facility energy goals. Additional detail about each agency's performance can be found in their Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans on the Performance.Gov website. Federal Facility Efficiency Investment and Progress toward Sustainability Goals: Get an overview of Federal progress made in facility energy

48

FY 91 Annual Research Plan  

SciTech Connect

In line with the Federal Oil Research Program to maximize the economic producibility of the domestic oil resource, the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) presents this FY91 Annual Research Plan. NIPER is organized into two research departments -- Energy Production Research (EPR) and Fuels Research (FR). Projects in EPR deal with various aspects of enhanced oil recovery and include reservoir characterization, chemical flooding, gas injection, steam injection, microbial enhanced oil recovery, and the environmental concerns related to these processes. Projects in FR consider the impact of heavy oil and alternative fuels on the processing and end-use of fuels. Projects are briefly described.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Annular Core...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annular Core Research Reactor facility Nuclear science photo At the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) facility, Sandia researchers can subject various test objects to a mixed...

50

NREL: Research Facilities - Laboratories  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

used to research and develop advanced heat-transfer fluids for the next generation of parabolic trough solar systems. Learn more about the Advanced Thermal Storage Materials...

51

1997 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees Last Name First Office Location Phone E-Mail Anderson Mike ID CFATAN (208) 526-7418 andersmr@id.doe.gov Bell Bill AL LAAO (505) 665-6324 bbell@doeal.gov Biro Brian RL LABS (509) 376-7660 brian_a_biro@rl.gov Brown Mark RL TANKS (509) 373-9150 mark_c_brown@rl.gov Charboneau Briant RL 324/327 (509) 373-6137 briant_L_charboneau@rl.gov Daniels Rick OR HFIR (423) 574-9143 e29@ornl.gov Dennis Jack AL AAO (806) 477-3176 jdennis@pantex.com Dikeakos Maria CH BHG (516) 344-3950 dikeako@bnl.gov Duey Don AL AAO (806) 477-6987 dduey@pantex.com Earley Larry RL WRAP (509) 373-9388 larry_d_earley@rl.gov Eddy Doug OAK LLNL (925) 422-3379 doug.eddy@oak.doe.gov Edwards Robert SR NMSD (803) 208-2645 robert-e.edwards@srs.gov

52

1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees 8 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees Last Name First Office Location Phone Fax E-Mail Alvord Bob OAK LLNL (925) 422-0830 (925) 422-0832 robert.alvord@oak.doe.gov Barnes John SR SRTC (803) 208-2628 (803) 208-1123 johnc.barnes@srs.gov Bell Fred AL LAAO (505) 665-4856 (505) 665-9230 fbell@doeal.gov Bell Bill AL LAAO (505) 665-6324 (505) 665-9230 bbell@doeal.gov Bennett Rick RF DOE (303) 966-8155 (303) 966-7447 rick.bennett@rfets.gov Biro Brian RL LABS (509) 376-7660 (509) 376-9837 brian_a_biro@rl.gov Blanco Jose SR DWPF (803) 208-7022 (803) 557-8223 jose.blanco@srs.gov Charboneau Briant RL 324/327 (509) 373-6137 (509) 373-9839 briant_L_charboneau@rl.gov Christensen Debbie AL OMD (505) 845-5239 dschristensen@doeal.gov Clifton Gary OR ORNL (423) 576-6810 (423) 574-9275 g7y@ornl.gov

53

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Validation Facility Radiation Detection Materials Characterization Laboratory Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility (STAR) Weapon and Force Protection Center...

54

NREL: Electricity Integration Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities NREL's electricity integration research is conducted in state-of-the-art facilities. These facilities assist industry in the development of power systems and address the operational challenges of full system integration. The Energy Systems Integration Facility can be used to design, test, and analyze components and systems to enable economic, reliable integration of renewable electricity, fuel production, storage, and building efficiency technologies with the U.S. electricity delivery infrastructure. New grid integration capabilities at the National Wind Technology Center will allow testing of many grid integration aspects of multi-megawatt, utility-scale variable renewable generation and storage technologies. The Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility can be used to characterize,

55

NREL: Solar Radiation Research - Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Photo of two researchers standing on a platform near a solar tracker at the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The Solar Radiation Research Laboratory gathers solar radiation and meteorological data on South Table Mountain. NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) has been collecting continuous measurements of basic solar radiation components since 1981. Since then, it has expanded its expertise to include integrated metrology, optics, electronics, and data acquisition capabilities. In addition, the SRRL provides facilities for outdoor performance testing of new research instrumentation and energy conversion devices such as photovoltaic modules. The SRRL is located on NREL's South Table Mountain site in Golden, Colorado, where it has excellent solar access because of its unrestricted

56

Federal Facility Consolidated Annual Reporting Requirements | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Reporting » Federal Facility Facility Reporting » Federal Facility Consolidated Annual Reporting Requirements Federal Facility Consolidated Annual Reporting Requirements October 8, 2013 - 2:07pm Addthis Section 548(a) of National Energy Conservation Policy Act (NEPCA, 42 U.S.C. 8258(a)) requires each Federal agency to submit to the U.S. Department of Energy an annual report describing activities to meet the energy management requirements of Section 543 of NECPA (42 U.S.C. 8253). Information and data collected from the agencies will be used to develop DOE's Annual Report to Congress on Federal Government Energy Management. Annual GHG and Sustainability Data Report for FY 2013 Reporting The Federal Energy Management Program's (FEMP) Annual GHG and Sustainability Data Report, Version 4.2 is to be used by top-tier Federal

57

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

sitesallmodulescontribredisredis.autoload.inc). You are here Home International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report 2005 International Nuclear Energy...

58

2012 Facility EMS Annual Report Data (DOE-LM) | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility EMS Annual Report Data (DOE-LM) 2012 Facility EMS Annual Report Data (DOE-LM) 2012 Facility EMS Annual Report Data (DOE-LM) 2012 More Documents & Publications 2011...

59

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Facility Annual Energy Reports  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Energy Reports and Performance Annual Energy Reports and Performance Published Annual Reports Visit the FEMP Library to search for read FEMP Annual Reports to Congress on Federal Government Energy Management. For more information, contact Chris Tremper. The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) offers information and data sets illustrating Federal agencies' annual progress in meeting facility energy goals. Additional detail about each agency's performance can be found in their Strategic Sustainability Performance Plans on the Performance.Gov website. Federal Facility Efficiency Investment and Progress toward Sustainability Goals: Get an overview of Federal progress made in facility energy management and sustainability based on preliminary fiscal year (FY) 2012 reported findings. (For facility-level data reported under Section 432 of EISA, see EISA CTS Reports and Data.)

60

2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Advanced Research Projects...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Annual Planning Summary for the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy 2013 Annual Planning Summary for the Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy 2013 Annual Planning...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Facilities Scientists, engineers, and analysts develop hydrogen and fuel cell technologies at NREL's extensive research facilities in Golden, Colorado. Fuel Cell...

62

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility (STAR) The STAR facility, within Sandia's Solid Dynamic Physics Department, is one of a few institutions in the world with a major...

63

Building America Systems Integration Research Annual Report:...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Integration Research Annual Report: FY 2012 Prepared for: Building America Building Technologies Program Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S....

64

FOURTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON FIRE RESEARCH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NOTE: The Annual Conference on Fire Research held October 22-24 ... We are now replacing the laser with a high intensity black ... Program Objectives ...

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

65

DOE Designated User Facilities Multiple Laboratories * ARM Climate Research Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Designated User Facilities Designated User Facilities Multiple Laboratories * ARM Climate Research Facility Argonne National Laboratory * Advanced Photon Source (APS) * Electron Microscopy Center for Materials Research * Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) * Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) * Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) * Brookhaven National Laboratory * National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) * Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) * Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) * Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) * National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II ) (under construction) Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory * Fermilab Accelerator Complex Idaho National Laboratory * Advanced Test Reactor ** * Wireless National User Facility (WNUF)

66

Research Facilities & Centers | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Clean Energy Clean Energy Research Areas Research Highlights Facilities and Centers BioEnergy Science Center Building Technologies Research and Integration Center Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Center For Structural Molecular Biology Climate Change Science Institute Joint Institute for Biological Sciences Manufacturing Demonstration Facility National Transportation Research Center Tools & Resources News and Awards Supporting Organizations Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Facilities and Centers SHARE Facilities, Centers Welcome Industry, Academia Oak Ridge National Laboratory facilities and capabilities together provide a unique environment for Clean Energy research. For example, as the lead institution for DOE's BioEnergy Science Center, ORNL is pioneering

67

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology Deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) Technology Deployment Centers Advanced Power Sources Laboratory Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) Trisonic Wind Tunnel Hypersonic Wind Tunnel High Altitude Chamber Explosive Components Facility Ion Beam Laboratory Materials Science and Engineering Center Pulsed Power and Systems Validation Facility Radiation Detection Materials Characterization Laboratory Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility (STAR) Weapon and Force Protection Center Design, Evaluation and Test Technology Facility Research Engineering Sciences Experimental Facilities (ESEF) The ESEF complex contains several independent laboratories for experiments and advanced diagnostics in the fields of thermodynamics, heat transfer,

68

SunShot Initiative: Photovoltaic Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Initiative: Photovoltaic Research Facilities on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Photovoltaics Research & Development Competitive Awards Systems Integration Balance of...

69

Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Research Facility  

LIBS Research User Facility is focused on collaborative research in laser spark spectroscopy, laser ablation, and the development of techniques for application to ...

70

Research facility access & science education  

SciTech Connect

As Congress voted to terminate the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Laboratory in October of 1993, the Department of Energy was encouraged to maximize the benefits to the nation of approximately $2 billion which had already been expended to date on its evolution. Having been recruited to Texas from other intellectually challenging enclaves around the world, many regional scientists, especially physicists, of course, also began to look for viable ways to preserve some of the potentially short-lived gains made by Texas higher education in anticipation of {open_quotes}the SSC era.{close_quotes} In fact, by November, 1993, approximately 150 physicists and engineers from thirteen Texas universities and the SSC itself, had gathered on the SMU campus to discuss possible re-uses of the SSC assets. Participants at that meeting drew up a petition addressed to the state and federal governments requesting the creation of a joint Texas Facility for Science Education and Research. The idea was to create a facility, open to universities and industry alike, which would preserve the research and development infrastructure and continue the educational mission of the SSC.

Rosen, S.P. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States); Teplitz, V.L. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Physics Dept.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

NIST Launches New Competition for Research Facility ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... non-profit research institutions have always been essential to the ... have the state-of-art facilities needed to ... of the proposed use of the facility and the ...

2013-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

72

NREL: Sustainable NREL - Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility A photo of a grey, three-story research facility on a large campus. The Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility The Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) incorporates a large number of energy efficiency and sustainability practices into its cutting-edge design. This facility received a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) Gold-level certification from the U.S. Green Building Council and supports a variety of advanced biofuels projects and enables researchers and industry partners to develop, test, evaluate, and demonstrate processes for the production of bio-based products and fuels. Fast Facts Cost: $33.5M Square feet: 27,000 Occupants: 32 Labs/Equipment: high-bay biochemical conversion pilot plant that

73

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Other Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Other Research Facilities Other Research Facilities In addition to the laboratories dedicated to hydrogen and fuel cell research, other facilities at NREL provide space for scientists developing hydrogen and fuel cell technologies along with other renewable energy technologies. Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility NREL's Distributed Energy Resources (DER) Test Facility is a working laboratory to test and improve interconnections among renewable energy generation technologies, energy storage systems, and electrical conversion equipment. Research being conducted includes improving the system efficiency of hydrogen production by electrolysis using wind or other renewable energy. This research highlights a promising option for encouraging higher penetrations of renewable energy generation as well as

74

Scenes from Argonne's Materials Engineering Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Share Description B-roll for the Materials Engineering Research Facility Topic Energy Energy usage Energy storage Batteries Lithium-air batteries Lithium-ion batteries Programs...

75

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2010 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of...

76

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1-June 30, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work...

77

Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement - Nuclear Facility...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement - Nuclear Facility (CMRR-NF SEIS) | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

78

Research Facilities | BNL Technology Commercialization and ...  

One of the worlds most widely used scientific light source facilities for research in diverse fields such as biology and medicine, chemistry and ...

79

Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report Calendar Year 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hanford CY 2002 dangerous waste generation and management forms. The Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report (ADWR) is prepared to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative Code Sections 173-303-220, Generator Reporting, and 173-303-390, Facility Reporting. In addition, the ADWR is required to meet Hanford Facility RCRA Permit Condition I.E.22, Annual Reporting. The ADWR provides summary information on dangerous waste generation and management activities for the Calendar Year for the Hanford Facility EPA ID number assigned to the Department of Energy for RCRA regulated waste, as well as Washington State only designated waste and radioactive mixed waste. The Solid Waste Information and Tracking System (SWITS) database is utilized to collect and compile the large array of data needed for preparation of this report. Information includes details of waste generated on the Hanford Facility, waste generated offsite and sent to Hanford for management, and other waste management activities conducted at Hanford, including treatment, storage, and disposal. Report details consist of waste descriptions and weights, waste codes and designations, and waste handling codes. In addition, for waste shipped to Hanford for treatment and/or disposal, information on manifest numbers, the waste transporter, the waste receiving facility, and the original waste generators are included. In addition to paper copies, electronic copies of the report are also transmitted to the regulatory agency.

FREEMAN, D.A.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

HANFORD FACILITY ANNUAL DANGEROUS WASTE REPORT CY2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report (ADWR) is prepared to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative Code Sections 173-303-220, Generator Reporting, and 173-303-390, Facility Reporting. In addition, the ADWR is required to meet Hanford Facility RCR4 Permit Condition I.E.22, Annual Reporting. The ADWR provides summary information on dangerous waste generation and management activities for the Calendar Year for the Hanford Facility EPA ID number assigned to the Department of Energy for RCRA regulated waste, as well as Washington State only designated waste and radioactive mixed waste. An electronic database is utilized to collect and compile the large array of data needed for preparation of this report. Information includes details of waste generated on the Hanford Facility, waste generated offsite and sent to Hanford for management, and other waste management activities conducted at Hanford, including treatment, storage, and disposal. Report details consist of waste descriptions and weights, waste codes and designations, and waste handling codes, In addition, for waste shipped to Hanford for treatment and/or disposal, information on manifest numbers, the waste transporter, the waste receiving facility, and the original waste generators are included. In addition to paper copies, the report is also transmitted electronically to a web site maintained by the Washington State Department of Ecology.

SKOLRUD, J.O.

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

NREL's Research Support Facility: An Operations Update - December 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL's Research Support Facility: NREL's Research Support Facility: An Energy Performance Update Shanti Pless- Senior Research Engineer Chad Lobato - Research Engineer Joe Drexler - Chief Engineer for Site Operations and Maintenance Paul Torcellini - Group Manager Ron Judkoff - Principal Program Manager Commercial Buildings Research Group December 2011 Innovation for Our Energy Future Innovation for Our Energy Future 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 Old NREL/DOE Leased Office Space Typical Denver Office Building ENERGY STAR 75 Office Building Average LEED Office Building ENERGY STAR 90 Office Building EPA Region 8 Office Denver, CO RSF RSF Renewable Production Annual EUI (kBtu/ft 2 ) Site Mounted PV Roof Mounted PV Data Center Whole Building Energy Efficiency Design Requirements

82

ATR National Scientific User Facility 2009 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes activities of the ATR NSUF from FY-2008 through FY-2009 and includes information on partner facilities, calls for proposals, users week and education programs. The report also contains project information on university research projects that were awarded by ATR NSUF in the fiscal years 2008 & 2009. This research is university-proposed researcher under a user facility agreement. All intellectual property from these experiments belongs to the university per the user agreement.

Todd R. Allen; Mitchell K. Meyer; Frances Marshall; Mary Catherine Thelen; Jeff Benson

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Science and Technology Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science and Technology Facility Science and Technology Facility Photo of the Science and Technology Facility (S&TF) at NREL. NREL's Science and Technology Facility (S&TF) has a sustainable and energy efficient design and will support solar cell, thin film, and nanostructure research. Solar cell, thin film, and nanostructure research are conducted in our Science and Technology Facility (S&TF) with the benefits of a forty percent reduction in energy use compared to standard laboratory buildings; energy recovery for ventilation in laboratories; and functional and flexible laboratory space. Designed specifically to reduce time delays associated with transferring technology to industry, the S&TF's 71,000 square feet is a multi-level facility of laboratory space, office space, and lobby connected by an

84

Intake research facilities manual. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the project was to assemble descriptive information on testing facilities that could be used for future investigations of technologies designed to reduce losses of aquatic organisms at cooling water intakes. The manual is intended for use by utilities and their contractors to determine when existing test facilities can be utilized for future research. A list of 34 facilities was developed, and descriptive information on the environment, physical layout, and capabilities of each facility was collected for presentation on standardized sheets. Reference lists of the facilities, sorted into groups based on waterbody type, geographic location, intake type, available fish species, and intake technology, are presented to facilitate identification of groups of facilities with similar characteristics. The reference lists and descriptive information will allow efficient preliminary site evaluation by utilities interested in future intake technology research. 11 refs., 66 figs., 8 tabs.

McGroddy, P.M.; Pease, T.E.; Matousek, J.A.; Edson, R.B.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Environmental research program: FY 1987, annual report  

SciTech Connect

This multidisciplinary research program includes fundamental and applied research in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology, as well as research on the development of advanced methods of measurement and analysis. The Program's Annual Report contains summaries of research performed during FY 1987 in the areas of atmospheric aerosols, flue gas chemistry, combustion, membrane bioenergetics, and analytical chemistry. The main research interests of the Atmospheric Aerosol Research group concern the chemical and physical processes that occur in haze, clouds, and fogs. For their studies, the group is developing novel analytical and research methods for characterizing aerosol species. Aerosol research is performed in the laboratory and in the field. Studies of smoke emissions from fires and their possible effects on climatic change, especially as related to nuclear winter, are an example of the collaboration between the Atmospheric Aerosol Research and Combustion Research Groups.

Not Available

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Flood Fighting Research Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fighting Research Facility Fighting Research Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Flood Fighting Research Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 45.7 Beam(m) 30.5 Depth(m) 1.2 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking No Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras Yes Number of Color Cameras 1

87

Breakwater Research Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Breakwater Research Facility Breakwater Research Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Breakwater Research Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 121.9 Beam(m) 55.5 Depth(m) 0.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking No Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

88

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Argonne scientists study climate change 1 of 22 Argonne scientists study climate change The U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science provided $60 million in ARRA funding for climate research to the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility, a DOE national user facility that has been operating climate observing sites around the world for nearly two decades. These sites help scientists study clouds and their influence on the sun's radiant energy, which heats our planet. Above is one of the purchases: the Vaisala Present Weather Detector. It optically measures visibility, present weather, precipitation intensity, and precipitation type. It provides a measure of current weather conditions by combining measurements from three

89

PNNL: Research Aircraft Facility (RAF) - FCSD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Aircraft Facility (RAF) Research Aircraft Facility (RAF) It is in the mixed layer and free troposphere that most chemical reactions, gas-to-particle transformations, cloud processes, and transport of materials occur. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory operates the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Research Aircraft Facility (RAF) performing airborne research in these areas to serve atmospheric scientists at DOE and other federal, state, and industrial entities. The RAF is dedicated to fulfilling important DOE and national goals in understanding atmospheric processes as they relate to the DOE's environmental missions and the global environment. Central to this facility are the PNNL Grumman Gulfstream 159 (G-1) aircraft, its flight crew, science and engineering technical staff,

90

FY 90 annual research plan  

SciTech Connect

The National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) was established by the DOE to perform contract research for government and industrial clients. The emphasis of the DOE program is immediate near- and mid-term concerns of domestic oil and gas producibility. Its primary purpose is to improve the fundamental understanding of domestic oil and gas resources and the chemical, physical, and biological phenomena that govern the occurrence and recovery of these resources in addition to their associated environmental issues. The near-term objective of the DOE program is to maintain access to resources presently being produced in domestic oil and gas fields, and to decrease the rate of decline of domestic production. NIPER projects in chemical flooding, gas injection, steam injection, and microbial EOR address near-term concerns of domestic oil production. Further, problems associated with the utilization of heavier fossil feedstocks are being addressed. The mid-term objective of the DOE program is to maximize the recovery efficiency of discovered oil and gas through improved understanding of the resource and to develop advanced extraction and instrumentation techniques. The objective also emphasizes an expanded understanding of the environment. NIPER projects dealing with the quantification of reservoir heterogeneities, pore structure analysis, and fluid flow in porous media are designed to improve extraction technologies. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

NREL: Research Facilities - Working with Us  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working with Us Working with Us For developing commercially viable energy products, organizations may partner with NREL to use our state-of-the-art laboratories, testing and user facilities. We typically develop technology partnership agreements for using our facilities and/or working with our researchers. Learn more about technology partnership agreements on the NREL Technology Transfer Web site. Printable Version Research Facilities Home Laboratories Test & User Facilities Laboratories & Facilities by Technology Working with Us Did you find what you needed? Yes 1 No 0 Thank you for your feedback. Would you like to take a moment to tell us how we can improve this page? Submit We value your feedback. Thanks! We've received your feedback. Something went wrong. Please try again later.

92

Geothermal research at the Puna Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report consists of two research papers: (1) Isotopic and Mineralogical Analyses of Samples from the HGP-A Well; (2) Report on Kapoho Geothermal Reservoir Study at the Puna Facility. These papers contain results of recent research and outline future activities.

Chen, B.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Gamma Irradiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Irradiation Facility Gamma Irradiation Facility Photo of Gamma Irradiation Facility The Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) provides high-fidelity simulation of nuclear radiation environments for materials and component testing. The low-dose irradiation facility also offers an environment for long-duration testing of materials and electronic components. Such testing may take place over a number of months or even years. Research and other activities The single-structure GIF can house a wide variety of gamma irradiation experiments with various test configurations and at different dose and dose rate levels. Radiation fields at the GIF are produced by high-intensity gamma-ray sources. To induce ionizing radiation effects and damage in test objects, the objects are subjected to high-energy photons from gamma-source

94

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology Deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility (STAR) Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility (STAR) The STAR facility, within Sandia's Solid Dynamic Physics Department, is one of a few institutions in the world with a major shock-physics program. This is the only experimental test facility in the world that can cover the full range of pressure (bars to multi-Mbar) for material property study utilizing gas/propellant launchers, ramp-loading pulsers, and ballistic applications. Material Characterization Shock wave experiments are an established technique to determine the equation of state at high pressures and temperature, which can be applied to virtually all materials. This technique allows the probing of the internal structure of the material as it undergoes deformation. This provides a better understanding of the material properties for development

95

NREL: Sustainable NREL - Research Support Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Support Facility Research Support Facility Take a Closer Look RSF Brochure Design-Build Process Booklet Photos Videos Media Contacts Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player Text Version An artist's rendering of an H-shaped building. The rendering includes a key at the bottom with letters A-K that correspond with letters on the building. Each letter, when selected, provides additional information about the building feature. Use the interactive rendering to learn more about the RSF's renewable energy and energy efficiency features and design. The Research Support Facility (RSF) is the laboratory's newest sustainable green building. This 360,000 ft2 Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) Platinum office building is a showcase for energy

96

Highlighting High Performance: The Solar Energy Research Facility, Golden, Colorado  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Energy Research Facility in Golden, Colorado, uses a stair-step configuration to allow daylight and heat into the office areas, while the laboratories in the back of the building are in a more controlled environment where tight levels of ventilation, humidity, temperature, and light are critical. A unique mechanical system makes the most of the natural environment and the building's design to efficiently heat and cool the building at an annual utility bill savings of almost $200,000 per year.

Torcellini, P.; Epstein, K.

2001-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

97

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT 1975-76  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this room ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH -RECEIVED I.AWSSKCEDIVISION ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORTMass and Composition of Aerosol as a Function of Time,

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Field Campaign Guidelines (ARM Climate Research Facility)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to establish a common set of guidelines for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for planning, executing, and closing out field campaigns. The steps that guide individual field campaigns are described in the Field Campaign Tracking database tool and are tailored to meet the scope of each specific field campaign.

Voyles, JW

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

99

2011 ANNUAL PLANNING SUMMARY FOR ADVANCED RESEARCH AND PROJECTS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for each NEPA review identified. APS-2011-WAPA.xls More Documents & Publications 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) 2011 Annual...

100

Molecular Science Research Center 1992 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Molecular Science Research Center is a designated national user facility, available to scientists from universities, industry, and other national laboratories. After an opening section, which includes conferences hosted, appointments, and projects, this document presents progress in the following fields: chemical structure and dynamics; environmental dynamics and simulation; macromolecular structure and dynamics; materials and interfaces; theory, modeling, and simulation; and computing and information sciences. Appendices are included: MSRC staff and associates, 1992 publications and presentations, activities, and acronyms and abbreviations.

Knotek, M.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology Deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Deployment Centers Technology Deployment Centers CRF Many of Sandia's unique research centers are available for use by U.S. industry, universities, academia, other laboratories, state and local governments, and the scientific community in general. Technology deployment centers are a unique set of scientific research capabilities and resources. The primary function of technology deployment centers is to satisfy Department of Energy programmatic needs, while remaining accessible to outside users. Contact For more information about Sandia technology deployment centers or for help in selecting a center to meet your needs, contact Mary Monson at mamonso@sandia.gov, (505) 844-3289. Advanced Power Sources Laboratory Combustion Research Facility Design, Evaluation, and Test Technology Facility

102

Sandia combustion research program: Annual report, 1987  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

More than a decade ago, in response to a national energy crisis, Sandia proposed to the US Department of Energy a new, ambitious program in combustion research. Our strategy was to apply the rapidly increasing capabilities in lasers and computers to combustion science and technology. Shortly thereafter, the Combustion Research Facility (CRF) was established at Sandia's Livermore location. Designated a ''User Facility,'' the charter of the CRF was to develop and maintain special-purpose resources to support a nationwide initiative--involving US universities, industry, and national laboratories--to improve our understanding and control of combustion. This report includes descriptions of several research projects which have been stimulated by Working Groups and involve the on-site participation of industry scientists. DOE's Industry Technology Fellowship Program has been instrumental in the success of some of the joint efforts. The remainder of this report presents research results of calendar year 1987, separated thematically into nine categories. Refereed journal articles appearing in print during 1987, along with selected other publications, are included at the end of Section 10. In addition to our ''traditional'' research--chemistry, reacting flow, diagnostics, engine combustion, and coal combustion--you will note continued progress in somewhat recent themes: pulse combustion, high temperature materials, and energetic materials, for example. Moreover, we have just started a small, new effort to understand combustion-related issues in the management of toxic and hazardous materials.

Palmer, R.E.; Sanders, B.R.; Ivanetich, C.A. (eds.)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility Ames, Iowa  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

,, *' ; . Final Radiological Condition of the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility Ames, Iowa _, . AGENCY: Office of Operational Safety, Department of Energy ' ACTION: Notice of Availability of Archival Information Package SUMMARY: The'Office of Operational Safety of the Department O i Energy (DOE) has reviewed documentation relating to the decontamination and decommissioning operations conducted at the Ames Laboratory Research Reactor Facility, Ames, Iowa and has prepared an archival informati0.n package to permanently document the results of the action and the site conditions and use restriction placed on the . site at the tim e of release. This review is based on post-decontamination survey data and other pertinent documentation referenced in and included in the archival package. The material and

104

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Outdoor Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outdoor Test Facility Aerial photo of the Outdoor Test Facility. The Outdoor Test Facility at NREL is used to evaluate prototype, precommercial, and commercial modules. Outdoor...

105

Radiation Research Society 2005 Annual Meeting, Denver, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Abstracts and proceedings of the 2005 Annual Meeting of the Radiation Research Society held in Denver, Colorado on October 16-19, 2005.

Robert Ullrich, PhD

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

106

Lawrence Livermore research highlighted at AAAS annual meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lawrence Livermore research highlighted at AAAS annual meeting Breanna Bishop, LLNL, (925) 423-9802, bishop33@llnl.gov Printer-friendly Mike Dunne, Debbie Callahan and...

107

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH, ANNUAL REPORT 1976-77  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIVISION ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORTLow-Z Elements in Atmospheric Aerosol Particles by Nuclearof sulfur dioxide by aerosols of manganese sulfate," Ind.

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

NIST Launches New Competition for Research Facility ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Candidate projects could include laboratories, test facilities, measurement facilities ... which must be institutions of higher education and nonprofit ...

2013-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

109

Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SOLAR ENERGY RESEARCH CENTER INSTRUMENTATION FACILITY The mission of the Solar Energy Research Center (UNC SERC) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) is to establish a world leading effort in solar fuels research and to develop the materials and methods needed to fabricate the next generation of solar energy devices. We are addressing the fundamental issues that will drive new strategies for solar energy conversion and the engineering challenges that must be met in order to convert discoveries made in the laboratory into commercially available devices. The development of a photoelectrosynthesis cell (PEC) for solar fuels production faces daunting requirements: (1) Absorb a large fraction of sunlight; (2) Carry out artificial photosynthesis which involves multiple complex reaction steps; (3) Avoid competitive and deleterious side and reverse reactions; (4) Perform 13 million catalytic cycles per year with minimal degradation; (5) Use non-toxic materials; (6) Cost-effectiveness. PEC efficiency is directly determined by the kinetics of each reaction step. The UNC SERC is addressing this challenge by taking a broad interdisciplinary approach in a highly collaborative setting, drawing on expertise across a broad range of disciplines in chemistry, physics and materials science. By taking a systematic approach toward a fundamental understanding of the mechanism of each step, we will be able to gain unique insight and optimize PEC design. Access to cutting-edge spectroscopic tools is critical to this research effort. We have built professionally-staffed facilities equipped with the state-of the-art instrumentation funded by this award. The combination of staff, facilities, and instrumentation specifically tailored for solar fuels research establishes the UNC Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility as a unique, world-class capability. This congressionally directed project funded the development of two user facilities: TASK 1: SOLAR DEVICE FABRICATION LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT The space allocated for this laboratory was ?¢????shell space?¢??? that required an upfit in order to accommodate nano-fabrication equipment in a quasi-clean room environment. This construction project (cost $279,736) met the non-federal cost share requirement of $250,000 for this award. The central element of the fabrication laboratory is a new $400,000+ stand-alone system, funded by other sources, for fabricating and characterizing photovoltaic devices, in a state-of-the-art nanofabrication environment. This congressionally directed project also included the purchase of an energy dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX) detector for a pre-existing transmission electron microscope (TEM). This detector allows elemental analysis and elemental mapping of materials used to fabricate solar energy devices which is a key priority for our research center. TASK 2: SOLAR ENERGY SPECTROSCOPY LABORATORY DEVELOPMENT (INSTRUMENTATION) This laboratory provides access to modern spectroscopy and photolysis instrumentation for characterizing devices, materials and components on time scales ranging from femtoseconds to seconds and for elucidating mechanisms. The goals of this congressionally directed project included the purchase and installation of spectroscopy and photolysis instrumentation that would substantially and meaningfully enhance the capabilities of this laboratory. Some changes were made to the list of equipment proposed in the original budget. These changes did not represent a change in scope, approach or aims of this project. All of the capabilities and experiments represented in the original budget were maintained. The outcome of this Congressionally Directed Project has been the development of world-class fabrication and spectroscopy user facilities for solar fuels research at UNC-CH. This award has provided a significant augmentation of our pre-existing instrumentation capabilities which were funded by earlier UNC SERC projects, including the Energy Frontier

Meyer, Thomas, J.; Papanikolas, John, P.

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

110

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2008 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab or LBNL) is a multi-program national research facility operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy (DOE). As an integral element of DOE's National Laboratory System, Berkeley Lab supports DOE's missions in fundamental science, energy resources, and environmental quality. Berkeley Lab programs advance four distinct goals for DOE and the nation: (1) To perform leading multidisciplinary research in the computing sciences, physical sciences, energy sciences, biosciences, and general sciences in a manner that ensures employee and public safety and protection of the environment. (2) To develop and operate unique national experimental facilities for qualified investigators. (3) To educate and train future generations of scientists and engineers to promote national science and education goals. (4) To transfer knowledge and technological innovations and to foster productive relationships among Berkeley Lab's research programs, universities, and industry in order to promote national economic competitiveness. Berkeley Lab's research and the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program support DOE's Strategic Themes that are codified in DOE's 2006 Strategic Plan (DOE/CF-0010), with a primary focus on Scientific Discovery and Innovation. For that strategic theme, the Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 LDRD projects support each one of the three goals through multiple strategies described in the plan. In addition, LDRD efforts support the four goals of Energy Security, the two goals of Environmental Responsibility, and Nuclear Security (unclassified fundamental research that supports stockpile safety and nonproliferation programs). The LDRD program supports Office of Science strategic plans, including the 20-year Scientific Facilities Plan and the Office of Science Strategic Plan. The research also supports the strategic directions periodically under consideration and review by the Office of Science Program Offices, such as LDRD projects germane to new research facility concepts and new fundamental science directions. Berkeley Lab LDRD program also play an important role in leveraging DOE capabilities for national needs. The fundamental scientific research and development conducted in the program advances the skills and technologies of importance to our Work For Others (WFO) sponsors. Among many directions, these include a broad range of health-related science and technology of interest to the National Institutes of Health, breast cancer and accelerator research supported by the Department of Defense, detector technologies that should be useful to the Department of Homeland Security, and particle detection that will be valuable to the Environmental Protection Agency. The Berkeley Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY2008 report is compiled from annual reports submitted by principal investigators following the close of the fiscal year. This report describes the supported projects and summarizes their accomplishments. It constitutes a part of the LDRD program planning and documentation process that includes an annual planning cycle, project selection, implementation, and review.

editor, Todd C Hansen

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

111

2009 Annual Reports Issued for Nuclear Energy Research Initiative and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2009 Annual Reports Issued for Nuclear Energy Research Initiative 2009 Annual Reports Issued for Nuclear Energy Research Initiative and International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative 2009 Annual Reports Issued for Nuclear Energy Research Initiative and International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative July 2, 2010 - 11:49am Addthis On July 2, 2010, the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) issued annual reports for its Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) andInternational Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI), describing accomplishments achieved in 2009. The NERI and I-NERI programs have furthered DOE goals for the past decade, conducting research into many of the key technical issues that impact the expanded use of advanced nuclear energy systems. Researchers have fostered innovative ideas

112

Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug 2011 Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF I-II) (Post CD-4), EERE, Aug 2011 000521 & 000519...

113

Solar Energy Research Institute 1979 annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general description of the SERI organization, facilities, programs, and progress in 1979 is presented. (WHK)

None

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

25th Annual Transportation Research Conference May 2122, 2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

25th Annual Transportation Research Conference May 21­22, 2014 Saint Paul RiverCentre, Saint Paul, Minnesota Call for Presentations The Center for Transportation Studies invites interested individuals and groups to submit abstracts for presentation at its 25th Annual Transportation Research Conference

Levinson, David M.

115

24th Annual Transportation Research Conference May 2223, 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

24th Annual Transportation Research Conference May 22­23, 2013 Saint Paul RiverCentre, Saint Paul, Minnesota Call for Presentations The Center for Transportation Studies invites interested individuals and groups to submit abstracts for presentation at its 24th Annual Transportation Research Conference

Minnesota, University of

116

20th Annual Transportation Research Conference May 1920, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

20th Annual Transportation Research Conference May 19­20, 2009 Sheraton Hotel, Bloomington, Minnesota Call for Presentations The Center for Transportation Studies invites interested individuals and groups to submit abstracts for presentation at the Center's 20th Annual Transportation Research

Minnesota, University of

117

Sandia Combustion Research Program: Annual report, 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents research results of the past year, divided thematically into some ten categories. Publications and presentations arising from this work are included in the appendix. Our highlighted accomplishment of the year is the announcement of the discovery and demonstration of the RAPRENOx process. This new mechanism for the elimination of nitrogen oxides from essentially all kinds of combustion exhausts shows promise for commercialization, and may eventually make a significant contribution to our nation's ability to control smog and acid rain. The sections of this volume describe the facility's laser and computer system, laser diagnostics of flames, combustion chemistry, reacting flows, liquid and solid propellant combustion, mathematical models of combustion, high-temperature material interfaces, studies of engine/furnace combustion, coal combustion, and the means of encouraging technology transfer. 182 refs., 170 figs., 12 tabs.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility: Advancing Biofuels Technology (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) expands NREL's cellulosic ethanol research and development and collaboration capabilities.

Not Available

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Solar Energy Research Center Instrumentation Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This laboratory provides access to modern spectroscopy and photolysis instrumentation for characterizing devices, materials and components on time scales ranging from femtoseconds to seconds and for elucidating mechanisms. The goals of this congressionally directed project included the purchase and installation of spectroscopy and photolysis instrumentation that would substantially and meaningfully enhance the capabilities of this laboratory. Some changes were made to the list of equipment proposed in the original budget. These changes did not represent a change in scope, approach or aims of this project. All of the capabilities and experiments represented in the original budget were maintained. The outcome of this Congressionally Directed Project has been the development of world-class fabrication and spectroscopy user facilities for solar fuels research at UNC-CH. This award has provided a significant augmentation of our pre-existing instrumentation capabilities which were funded by earlier UNC SERC projects, including the Energy Frontier

Meyer, Thomas, J.; Papanikolas, John, P.

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

120

The NCAR Atmosphere-Surface Turbulent Exchange Research (ASTER) Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmosphere-Surface Turbulent Exchange Research (ASTER) facility developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) will support observational research on the structure of the atmospheric surface layer. ASTER will provide state-...

J. A. Businger; W. F. Dabberdt; A. C. Delany; T. W. Horst; C. L. Martin; S. P. Oncley; S. R. Semmer

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

59th Annual Device Research Conference: Hertz Rent-a-Car  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TMS Logo. 59th Annual Device Research Conference: Hertz Rent-a-Car. 59th ANNUAL DEVICE RESEARCH CONFERENCE June 2527, 2001 University of ...

122

ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH FY-1979, CHAPTER IN THE ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT ANNUAL REPORT, 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California atmospheric aerosols," Environ. Sci. Technol. llsuspensions," in Atmospheric Aerosol Research Annual Report,formation," in Atmospheric Aerosol Research Annual Report,

Authors, Various

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This Annual Report provides an overview of the FY2000 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and presents a summary of the results achieved by each project during the year.

Al-Ayat, R

2001-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

124

DOE Announces Winners of Annual University Coal Research Grants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Winners of Annual University Coal Research Grants Winners of Annual University Coal Research Grants DOE Announces Winners of Annual University Coal Research Grants July 7, 2005 - 2:06pm Addthis Funding to Support Continued Research in Clean Coal Technology MORGANTOWN, WV -- Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman today announced $3 million in funding under the University Coal Research Program (UCR), the department's longest-running student-teacher research grant initiative. Secretary Bodman made the announcement while visiting West Virginia University, a $200,000 awardee. "Coal is our most abundant source of energy and the University Coal Research Program helps us identify new ways to utilize coal in a more efficient and environmentally responsible way by tapping into the creativity and ambition of America's young scientists," Secretary Bodman

125

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2007 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2007 Annual International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2007 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2007 Annual Report The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) supports the National Energy Policy by pursuing international collaborations to conduct research that will advance the state of nuclear science and technology in the United States. I-NERI promotes bilateral and multilateral scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) with other nations. Innovative research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses key issues affecting the future of nuclear energy and its global deployment by improving cost performance, enhancing safety, and increasing proliferation resistance of future nuclear energy systems. Information on the program

126

DOE Announces Winners of Annual University Coal Research Grants |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Announces Winners of Annual University Coal Research Grants DOE Announces Winners of Annual University Coal Research Grants DOE Announces Winners of Annual University Coal Research Grants July 7, 2005 - 2:06pm Addthis Funding to Support Continued Research in Clean Coal Technology MORGANTOWN, WV -- Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman today announced $3 million in funding under the University Coal Research Program (UCR), the department's longest-running student-teacher research grant initiative. Secretary Bodman made the announcement while visiting West Virginia University, a $200,000 awardee. "Coal is our most abundant source of energy and the University Coal Research Program helps us identify new ways to utilize coal in a more efficient and environmentally responsible way by tapping into the creativity and ambition of America's young scientists," Secretary Bodman

127

Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Style Guide Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility March 2013 Style Guide Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility March 2013 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research March 2013 ii Contents 1.0 Introduction .......................................................................................................................................... 1 2.0 Acronyms and Abbreviations ............................................................................................................... 1 2.1 Usage ............................................................................................................................................ 1

128

Argonne Transportation Technology R&D Center - Research Facilities - APRF,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Research Facilities Transportation Research Facilities Argonne provides a wide range of facilities and laboratories for conducting cutting-edge transportation research and testing. The facilities offer state-of-the-art equipment and capabilities. APRF Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Battery Post-Test Facility Battery Post-Test Facility Battery testing at the EADL Electrochemical Analysis and Diagnostics Laboratory Engine Research Facility Engine Research Facility Fuel cell research Fuel Cell Test Facility Materials Engineering Research Facility Materials Engineering Research Facility Transportation APS Beamline Transportation Beamline at Argonne's Advanced Photon Source tribology lab Tribology Laboratory TRACC Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center

129

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative 2010 Annual Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2010 I-NERI Annual Report 2010 I-NERI Annual Report  | i Foreword The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), established the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) in fiscal year (FY) 2001 to conduct advanced nuclear energy systems research in collaboration with international partners. This annual report provides an update on research and development (R&D) accomplishments which the I-NERI program achieved during FY 2010. I-NERI supports bilateral scientific and engineering collaboration in advanced reactor systems and the nuclear fuel cycle and is linked to two of DOE-NE's primary research programs: Reactor Concepts Research, Development and Demonstration and the Fuel Cycle Research and Development program. I-NERI is designed to foster international partnerships to address key issues

130

Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2011 annual report : Shaping future supercomputing.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ALCF's Early Science Program aims to prepare key applications for the architecture and scale of Mira and to solidify libraries and infrastructure that will pave the way for other future production applications. Two billion core-hours have been allocated to 16 Early Science projects on Mira. The projects, in addition to promising delivery of exciting new science, are all based on state-of-the-art, petascale, parallel applications. The project teams, in collaboration with ALCF staff and IBM, have undertaken intensive efforts to adapt their software to take advantage of Mira's Blue Gene/Q architecture, which, in a number of ways, is a precursor to future high-performance-computing architecture. The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) enables transformative science that solves some of the most difficult challenges in biology, chemistry, energy, climate, materials, physics, and other scientific realms. Users partnering with ALCF staff have reached research milestones previously unattainable, due to the ALCF's world-class supercomputing resources and expertise in computation science. In 2011, the ALCF's commitment to providing outstanding science and leadership-class resources was honored with several prestigious awards. Research on multiscale brain blood flow simulations was named a Gordon Bell Prize finalist. Intrepid, the ALCF's BG/P system, ranked No. 1 on the Graph 500 list for the second consecutive year. The next-generation BG/Q prototype again topped the Green500 list. Skilled experts at the ALCF enable researchers to conduct breakthrough science on the Blue Gene system in key ways. The Catalyst Team matches project PIs with experienced computational scientists to maximize and accelerate research in their specific scientific domains. The Performance Engineering Team facilitates the effective use of applications on the Blue Gene system by assessing and improving the algorithms used by applications and the techniques used to implement those algorithms. The Data Analytics and Visualization Team lends expertise in tools and methods for high-performance, post-processing of large datasets, interactive data exploration, batch visualization, and production visualization. The Operations Team ensures that system hardware and software work reliably and optimally; system tools are matched to the unique system architectures and scale of ALCF resources; the entire system software stack works smoothly together; and I/O performance issues, bug fixes, and requests for system software are addressed. The User Services and Outreach Team offers frontline services and support to existing and potential ALCF users. The team also provides marketing and outreach to users, DOE, and the broader community.

Papka, M.; Messina, P.; Coffey, R.; Drugan, C. (LCF)

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

131

Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Document Date  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10/18/2013 10/18/2013 Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle Dynamometer Input 2013 Volkswagen Jetta TDI Test Cell Location Front Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Document Date 10/18/2013 Revision Number 1 Vehicle Dynamometer Input Test weight [lb] 3516 Test Fuel Information Revision Number 1 Notes: Test weight [lb] Target A [lb] 3516 30.1456 Target B [lb/mph] Target C [lb/mph^2] 0.37653 0.015662 Test Fuel Information Fuel type 2007 Certification Diesel HF0583 Fuel density [g/ml] Fuel Net HV [BTU/lbm] 0.855 18355 Fuel type 2007 Certification Diesel HF0583 T e s t I D [ # ] C y c l e C o l d s t a r t ( C S t ) H o t s t a r t [ H S t ] D a t e T e s t C e l l T e m p [ C ] T e s t C e l l R H [ % ] T e s t C e l l B a r o [ i n / H g ] V e h i c l e c o o l i n g f a n s p e e d : S p e e d M a t

132

Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Document Date  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7/30/2013 7/30/2013 Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Alt Fuel- CNG Vehicle Dynamometer Input 2012 Honda Civic GX Test Cell Location Front Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Document Date 7/30/2013 Revision Number 1 Vehicle Dynamometer Input Test weight [lb] 3192 Test Fuel Information MPGe derived by EPA calculation methods Revision Number 1 Notes: Test weight [lb] Target A [lb] 3192 22.2037 Target B [lb/mph] Target C [lb/mph^2] 0.45855 0.01263 Test Fuel Information MPGe derived by EPA calculation methods Fuel type Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) MPGe derived by EPA calculation methods Fuel density [g/ml] Fuel Net HV [BTU/lbm] 0.5872 905.3 Fuel type Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) T e s t I D [ # ] C y c l e C o l d s t a r t ( C S t ) H o t s t a r t

133

Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility Restart...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility Restart Operational Readiness...

134

Maintaining History of the ARM Climate Research Facility Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maintaining History of the ARM Climate Research Facility Data Koontz, Annette Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Sivaraman, Chitra Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Martin,...

135

NREL: News - NREL's Research Support Facility Certified LEED...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

411 NREL's Research Support Facility Certified LEED Platinum NREL's second LEED Platinum building is a replicable model of energy efficient commercial office design June 29, 2011...

136

TYPE OF OPERATION R Research & Development T& Facility Type  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-- R Research & Development T& Facility Type 0 Production scale testing a Pilat scale Y-. Bench Scale Process i Theoretical Studies Sample & Analysis 0 Productian 0 Disposal...

137

Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility Restart...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research Facility Restart Operational Readiness Review Pre- Visit Dates...

138

North Slope of Alaska ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Emergency Response Plan June 2010 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility North Slope of AlaskaAdjacent Arctic Ocean Emergency Response Plan Purpose The...

139

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology Deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Explosive Components Facility Explosive Components Facility The 98,000 square foot Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is a state-of-the-art facility that provides a full-range of chemical, material, and performance analysis capabilities for energetic materials and explosive components: advanced design of energetic devices and subsystems optical ordnance energetic materials testing of explosives and explosive components and subsystems advanced explosives diagnostics reliability analyses failure modes evaluation safety evaluation The ECF has the full-range of capabilities necessary to support the understanding of energetic materials and components: Optical and Semiconductor Bridge (SCB) Initiation Laboratories Characterization Laboratories thermal properties gas analyses powder characterization

140

NREL: Research Facilities - Laboratories and Facilities by Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

We can research and test a variety of concentrating solar power technologies, such as parabolic troughs, and their system components, which include receivers, collectors, and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2010 annual report.  

SciTech Connect

Researchers found more ways than ever to conduct transformative science at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) in 2010. Both familiar initiatives and innovative new programs at the ALCF are now serving a growing, global user community with a wide range of computing needs. The Department of Energy's (DOE) INCITE Program remained vital in providing scientists with major allocations of leadership-class computing resources at the ALCF. For calendar year 2011, 35 projects were awarded 732 million supercomputer processor-hours for computationally intensive, large-scale research projects with the potential to significantly advance key areas in science and engineering. Argonne also continued to provide Director's Discretionary allocations - 'start up' awards - for potential future INCITE projects. And DOE's new ASCR Leadership Computing (ALCC) Program allocated resources to 10 ALCF projects, with an emphasis on high-risk, high-payoff simulations directly related to the Department's energy mission, national emergencies, or for broadening the research community capable of using leadership computing resources. While delivering more science today, we've also been laying a solid foundation for high performance computing in the future. After a successful DOE Lehman review, a contract was signed to deliver Mira, the next-generation Blue Gene/Q system, to the ALCF in 2012. The ALCF is working with the 16 projects that were selected for the Early Science Program (ESP) to enable them to be productive as soon as Mira is operational. Preproduction access to Mira will enable ESP projects to adapt their codes to its architecture and collaborate with ALCF staff in shaking down the new system. We expect the 10-petaflops system to stoke economic growth and improve U.S. competitiveness in key areas such as advancing clean energy and addressing global climate change. Ultimately, we envision Mira as a stepping-stone to exascale-class computers that will be faster than petascale-class computers by a factor of a thousand. Pete Beckman, who served as the ALCF's Director for the past few years, has been named director of the newly created Exascale Technology and Computing Institute (ETCi). The institute will focus on developing exascale computing to extend scientific discovery and solve critical science and engineering problems. Just as Pete's leadership propelled the ALCF to great success, we know that that ETCi will benefit immensely from his expertise and experience. Without question, the future of supercomputing is certainly in good hands. I would like to thank Pete for all his effort over the past two years, during which he oversaw the establishing of ALCF2, the deployment of the Magellan project, increases in utilization, availability, and number of projects using ALCF1. He managed the rapid growth of ALCF staff and made the facility what it is today. All the staff and users are better for Pete's efforts.

Drugan, C. (LCF)

2011-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

142

THE RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ACCELERATOR FACILITY RARAF -Table of Contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of alpha particle radiation in depleted uranium- induced cellular effects 0.2 114 M. Suzuki (H. Zhou) NIRP;CENTER FOR RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT 2008 121 Exposure to depleted uranium (DU) during

143

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2010 Annual...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I-NERI promotes bilateral scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) with other nations. U.S. researchers partner with international organizations,...

144

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2008 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8 Annual 8 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2008 Annual Report The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) is an international, research-oriented initiative that supports the advancement of nuclear science and technology in the United States and the world. I-NERI promotes bilateral scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) with other nations. Innovative research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses key issues affecting the future use of nuclear energy and its global deployment by improving cost performance, enhancing safety, and increasing proliferation resistance of future nuclear energy systems. A link to the program can be found at the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) website:

145

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2009 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 Annual 9 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2009 Annual Report The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) is an international, research-oriented collaboration that supports advancement of nuclear science and technology in the United States and the world. I-NERI promotes bilateral scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) with other nations. Innovative research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses key issues affecting the future use of nuclear energy and its global deployment by improving cost performance, enhancing safety, and increasing proliferation resistance of future nuclear energy systems. A link to the program can be found at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy website.

146

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report Nuclear energy represents the single largest carbon-free baseload source of energy in the United States, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low-carbon production. Worldwide, nuclear power generates 14 percent of global electricity. Continually increasing demand for clean energy both domestically and across the globe, combined with research designed to make nuclear power ever-safer and more cost-effective, will keep nuclear in the energy mix for the foreseeable future. U.S. researchers are collaborating with nuclear scientists and engineers around the world to develop new technologies that will lower costs,

147

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2010 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 Annual 10 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2010 Annual Report The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) is a research-oriented collaborative program that supports the advancement of nuclear science and technology in the United States and the world. Innovative research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses key issues affecting the future use of nuclear energy and its global deployment. The 2010 Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap issued by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), identifies these issues as high capital costs, safety, high-level nuclear waste management, and non-proliferation. Projects under the I-NERI program investigate ways to address these challenges and support future nuclear

148

The Data Assimilation Research Testbed: A Community Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Data Assimilation Research Testbed (DART) is an open-source community facility for data assimilation education, research, and development. DART's ensemble data assimilation algorithms, careful software engineering, and diagnostic tools allow ...

Jeffrey Anderson; Tim Hoar; Kevin Raeder; Hui Liu; Nancy Collins; Ryan Torn; Avelino Avellano

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Federal Facility Agreement Annual Progress Report for FY 1998  

SciTech Connect

This FFA Annual Progress Report has been developed to summarize the information for activities performed during the Fiscal Year 1998 (October 1, 1997, to September 30, 1998) and activities planned for Fiscal Year 1999 by U.S. EPA, SCDHEC, and SRS at those units and areas identified for remediation in the Agreement.

Palmer, E.

1999-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

150

Charter for the ARM Climate Research Facility Science Board  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the ARM Science Board is to promote the Nations scientific enterprise by ensuring that the best quality science is conducted at the DOEs User Facility known as the ARM Climate Research Facility. The goal of the User Facility is to serve scientific researchers by providing unique data and tools to facilitate scientific applications for improving understanding and prediction of climate science.

Ferrell, W

2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

151

NREL: Biomass Research - Thermochemical Users Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Users Facility Users Facility Text version The state-of-the-art Thermochemical Users Facility (TCUF) consists of several complementary unit operations that can be configured to accommodate the testing and development of various reactors, filters, catalysts, and other unit operations. The TCUF offers clients the capability to test new processes and feedstocks in a timely and cost-effective manner and to quickly and safely obtain extensive performance data on their processes or equipment. The Thermochemical Users Facility contains the following equipment: Thermochemical Process Development Unit The heart of the TCUF is the 0.5-metric-ton-per-day Thermochemical Process Development Unit (TCPDU), which can be operated in either a pyrolysis or gasification mode. The main unit operations in the TCPDU include 8-inch

152

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation International Nuclear Energy Policy and Cooperation » Bilateral Cooperation » International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) Annual Reports August 13, 2013 International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report Nuclear energy represents the single largest carbon-free baseload source of energy in the United States, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low-carbon production. Worldwide, nuclear power generates 14 percent of global electricity. Continually increasing demand for clean energy both domestically and across the globe, combined with research designed to make nuclear power ever-safer and more cost-effective, will keep nuclear in the energy mix for the

153

ANNOUNCEMENT OF OPPORTUNITY AIRBORNE RESEARCH & SURVEY FACILITY (ARSF)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

channel 8-12 microns, 320 spatial pixels. Large-format RC-10 aerial survey camera with images beingANNOUNCEMENT OF OPPORTUNITY AIRBORNE RESEARCH & SURVEY FACILITY (ARSF) http://arsf.nerc.ac.uk 2010 OCTOBER 2009 The Airborne Research & Survey Facility (ARSF) invites direct access applications for UK

154

Nuclear Science Research Facilities Nuclear Science User Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LANSCE User Guide Nuclear Science Research Facilities #12;#12;Nuclear Science User Guide Table of Contents Introduction 3 Nuclear Science Research Facilities 3 The LANSCE Accelerator 4 Time structure techniques 8 Nuclear Science User Program 11 Proposal Process 13 Information for Prospective Users 14

155

Annual Report 2003 Plant Research Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for this programme. Research Conversion of Lignocellulose to Bioethanol The use of bioethanol in fuel is a way to re

156

Biomass Gasification Research Facility Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While thermochemical syngas production facilities for biomass utilization are already employed worldwide, exploitation of their potential has been inhibited by technical limitations encountered when attempting to obtain real-time syngas compositional data required for process optimization, reliability, and syngas quality assurance. To address these limitations, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) carried out two companion projects (under US DOE Cooperative Agreements DE-FC36-02GO12024 and DE-FC36-03GO13175) to develop and demonstrate the equipment and methods required to reliably and continuously obtain accurate and representative on-line syngas compositional data. These objectives were proven through a stepwise series of field tests of biomass and coal gasification process streams. GTI developed the methods and hardware for extractive syngas sample stream delivery and distribution, necessary to make use of state-of-the-art on-line analyzers to evaluate and optimize syngas cleanup and conditioning. The primary objectives of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-02GO12024 were the selection, acquisition, and application of a suite of gas analyzers capable of providing near real-time gas analyses to suitably conditioned syngas streams. A review was conducted of sampling options, available analysis technologies, and commercially available analyzers, that could be successfully applied to the challenging task of on-line syngas characterization. The majority of thermochemical process streams comprise multicomponent gas mixtures that, prior to crucial, sequential cleanup procedures, include high concentrations of condensable species, multiple contaminants, and are often produced at high temperatures and pressures. Consequently, GTI engaged in a concurrent effort under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-03GO13175 to develop the means to deliver suitably prepared, continuous streams of extracted syngas to a variety of on-line gas analyzers. The review of candidate analysis technology also addressed safety concerns associated with thermochemical process operation that constrain the location and configuration of potential gas analysis equipment. Initial analyzer costs, reliability, accuracy, and operating and maintenance costs were also considered prior to the assembly of suitable analyzers for this work. Initial tests at GTIs Flex-Fuel Test Facility (FFTF) in late 2004 and early 2005 successfully demonstrated the transport and subsequent analysis of a single depressurized, heat-traced syngas stream to a single analyzer (an Industrial Machine and Control Corporation (IMACC) Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR)) provided by GTI. In March 2005, our sampling approach was significantly expanded when this project participated in the U.S. DOEs Novel Gas Cleaning (NGC) project. Syngas sample streams from three process locations were transported to a distribution manifold for selectable analysis by the IMACC FT-IR, a Stanford Research Systems QMS300 Mass Spectrometer (SRS MS) obtained under this Cooperative Agreement, and a Varian micro gas chromatograph with thermal conductivity detector (?GC) provided by GTI. A syngas stream from a fourth process location was transported to an Agilent Model 5890 Series II gas chromatograph for highly sensitive gas analyses. The on-line analyses made possible by this sampling system verified the syngas cleaning achieved by the NGC process. In June 2005, GTI collaborated with Weyerhaeuser to characterize the ChemrecTM black liquor gasifier at Weyerhaeusers New Bern, North Carolina pulp mill. Over a ten-day period, a broad range of process operating conditions were characterized with the IMACC FT-IR, the SRS MS, the Varian ?GC, and an integrated Gas Chromatograph, Mass Selective Detector, Flame Ionization Detector and Sulfur Chemiluminescence Detector (GC/MSD/FID/SCD) system acquired under this Cooperative Agreement from Wasson-ECE. In this field application, a single sample stream was extracted from this low-pressure, low-temperature process and successfully analyzed by these devices. In late 2005,

Snyder, Todd R.; Bush, Vann; Felix, Larry G.; Farthing, William E.; Irvin, James H.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

13th Annual Transportation Engineering and Road Research Alliance (TERRA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

13th Annual Sponsor: Transportation Engineering and Road Research Alliance (TERRA) Cosponsors: Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT) Minnesota Local Technical Assistance Program (LTAP Association State Aid for Local Transportation, Mn/DOT Minnesota Local Road Research Board (LRRB) Pavement

Minnesota, University of

158

61st ANNUAL DEVICE RESEARCH CONFERENCE (DRC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Univ of Sheffield. Shibasaki Ichiro. Chief Research Fellow. Asahikasei Corp. Yoshihiro Irokawa. Toyota Central R&D Labs Inc. Syed S. Islam. Assistant Professor.

159

Energy Storage Research & Development -- 2004 Annual Progress...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ENERGY STORAGE RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program Acknowledgement We would like to thank all our program participants for their contributions to the...

160

Laboratory Directed Research Development (LDRD) Annual Reports | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory Directed Research Development (LDRD) Annual Reports Laboratory Directed Research Development (LDRD) Annual Reports Laboratory Directed Research Development (LDRD) Annual Reports Formally, these Reports respond to the Conference Report (H.R. Rep. No. 106-988 (Conf. Rep.)) accompanying the Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, which requested the DOE Chief Financial Officer "develop and execute a financial accounting report of LDRD expenditures by laboratory and weapons production plant." They also respond to the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1997 (Pub. L. No. 104-201), which requires submission each year of "a report on the funds expended during the preceding fiscal year on [LDRD] activities [...] to permit an assessment of the extent to which such activities

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 Annual 2 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2012 Annual Report Nuclear energy represents the single largest carbon-free baseload source of energy in the United States, accounting for nearly 20 percent of the electricity generated and over 60 percent of our low-carbon production. Worldwide, nuclear power generates 14 percent of global electricity. Continually increasing demand for clean energy both domestically and across the globe, combined with research designed to make nuclear power ever-safer and more cost-effective, will keep nuclear in the energy mix for the foreseeable future. U.S. researchers are collaborating with nuclear scientists and engineers around the world to develop new technologies that will lower costs, maximize safety, minimize proliferation risk, and handle used fuel and

162

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Reports | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Reports Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Reports Formally, these Reports respond to the Conference Report (H.R. Rep. No. 106-988 (Conf. Rep.)) accompanying the Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, which requested the DOE Chief Financial Officer "develop and execute a financial accounting report of LDRD expenditures by laboratory and weapons production plant." They also respond to the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1997 (Pub. L. No. 104-201), which requires submission each year of "a report on the funds expended during the preceding fiscal year on [LDRD] activities [...] to permit an assessment of the extent to which such activities

163

Experimental geothermal research facilities study (Phase 0). Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The study comprises Phase 0 of a project for Experimental Geothermal Research Facilities. The study focuses on identification of a representative liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir of moderate temperature and salinity, preliminary engineering design of an appropriate energy conversion system, identification of critical technology, and planning for implementation of experimental facilities. The objectives included development of liaison with the industrial sector, to ensure responsiveness to their views in facility requirements and planning, and incorporation of environmental and socioeconomic factors. This Phase 0 report covers problem definition and systems requirements. Facilities will incorporate capability for research in component, system, and materials technology and a nominal 10 MWe experimental, binary cycle, power generating plant.

Not Available

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report 2006 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 6 International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report 2006 The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) supports the National Energy Policy by conducting research to advance the state of nuclear science and technology in the United States. I-NERI sponsors innovative scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) in cooperation with participating countries. The research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses key issues affecting the future of nuclear energy and its global deployment. A link to the program can be found at the NE website. This I-NERI 2006 Annual Report serves to inform interested parties about the program's organization, progress of collaborative research projects undertaken since FY 2003, and future plans for the program. Following is an

165

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report 2005 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 5 International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: Annual Report 2005 The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) supports the National Energy Policy by conducting research to advance the state of nuclear science and technology in the United States. I-NERI sponsors innovative scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) in cooperation with participating countries. The research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses the key issues affecting the future of nuclear energy and its global deployment. I-NERI research is directed towards improving cost performance, increasing proliferation resistance, enhancing safety, and improving the waste management of future nuclear energy systems. This I-NERI 2005 Annual Report serves to inform interested parties about

166

CENTER FOR RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT 2011 Research Using RARAF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) continued studies using 125 keV/m 4 He ions from the Track Segment Facility to evalu- ate depleted uranium in depleted uranium-induced cellular effects 0.5 133 S. Ghandhi S. Amundson CRR Biology Bystander effects

167

Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance; 1996 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs, Imeques C-mem-ini-kem and Thornhollow satellite facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O. kisutch). Minthorn is also used for holding and spawning adult summer steelhead and Three Mile Dam is used for holding and spawning adult fall chinook and coho salmon. Bonifer, Minthorn, Imeques and Thornhollow facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and summer steelhead. The main goal of acclimation is to reduce stress from trucking prior to release and improve imprinting of juvenile salmonids in the Umatilla River Basin. Juveniles are transported to the acclimation facilities primarily from Umatilla and Bonneville Hatcheries. This report details activities associated with operation and maintenance of the Bonifer, Minthorn, Imeques, Thornhollow and Three Mile Dam facilities in 1996.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Biological and chemical technologies research. FY 1995 annual summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1995 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program. This BCTR program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1995 (ASR 95) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1995; detailed descriptions of individual projects; a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work; patents; and awards arising from work supported by the BCTR.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Environmental Systems Research FY-99 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Systems Research (ESR) Program, a part of the Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) Program, was implemented to enhance and augment the technical capabilities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The purpose for strengthening technical capabilities of the INEEL is to provide the technical base to serve effectively as the Environmental Management Laboratory for the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM). The original portfolio of research activities was assembled after an analysis of the EM technology development and science needs as gathered by the Site Technology Coordination Groups (STCGs) complex-wide. Current EM investments in science and technology throughout the research community were also included in this analysis to avoid duplication of efforts. This is a progress report for the second year of the ESR Program (Fiscal Year 99). A report of activities is presented for the five ESR research investment areas: (a) Transport Aspects of Selective Mass Transport Agents, (b) Chemistry of Environmental Surfaces, (c) Materials Dynamics, (d) Characterization Science, and (e) Computational Simulation of Mechanical and Chemical Systems. In addition to the five technical areas, activities in the Science and Technology Foundations element of the program, e.g., interfaces between ESR and the EM Science Program (EMSP) and the EM Focus Areas, are described.

Miller, D.L.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Environmental Systems Research, FY-99 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Systems Research (ESR) Program, a part of the Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) Program, was implemented to enhance and augment the technical capabilities of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The purpose for strengthening technical capabilities of the INEEL is to provide the technical base to serve effectively as the Environmental Management Laboratory for the Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management (EM). The original portfolio of research activities was assembled after an analysis of the EM technology development and science needs as gathered by the Site Technology Coordination Groups (STCGs) complex-wide. Current EM investments in science and technology throughout the research community were also included in this analysis to avoid duplication of efforts. This is a progress report for the second year of the ESR Program (Fiscal Year 99). A report of activities is presented for the five ESR research investment areas: (a) Transport Aspects of Selective Mass Transport Agents, (b) Chemistry of Environmental Surfaces, (c) Materials Dynamics, (d) Characterization Science, and (e) Computational Simulation of Mechanical and Chemical Systems. In addition to the five technical areas, activities in the Science and Technology Foundations element of the program, e.g., interfaces between ESR and the EM Science Program (EMSP) and the EM Focus Areas, are described.

Miller, David Lynn

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology Deployment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Detection Materials Characterization Laboratory Radiation Detection Materials Characterization Laboratory This facility provides assistance to users from federal laboratories, U.S. industry and academia in the following areas: (1) testing and characterizing radiation detector materials and devices; and (2) determining the relationships between the physical properties of the detector materials and the device response. Systems of interest include scintillators and room-temperature semiconductors for detection arrays of x-rays, gamma rays and neutrons. User Support The facility's special capabilities include: low-noise environment to test solid-state detectors for x-ray, gamma-ray, and neutron response mass spectrometry to quantify contaminants in detectors and detector-grade materials photoluminescence and thermally-stimulated current to measure

172

International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2011 Annual Report |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 Annual 1 Annual Report International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative: 2011 Annual Report Fiscal year (FY) 2011 marks the ten-year anniversary of the founding of the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative, or I-NERI. Designed to foster international partnerships that address key issues affecting the future global use of nuclear energy, I-NERI is perhaps even more relevant today than at its establishment. In the face of increasing energy demands coupled with clean energy imperatives, we must clear the hurdles to expanding the role of nuclear power in our energy portfolio. And in an increasingly global society, the importance of international cooperation in these efforts has escalated. For ten years, I-NERI has been a vehicle for establishing bilateral

173

Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY-10 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The FY 2010 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support the future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to the INL -- it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enhances technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development.

Dena Tomchak

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Demonstration of the reactivity constraint approach on SNL's annual core research reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the initial demonstration of the reactivity constraint approach and its implementing algorithm, the MIT-CSDL Non-Linear Digital Controller, on the annual core research reactor (ACCR) that is operated by the Sandia National Laboratories. This demonstration constituted the first use of reactivity constraints for the closed-loop, digital control of reactor power on a facility other than the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT's) research reactor (MITR-II). Also, because the ACRR and the MITR-II are of very different design, these trials established the generic nature of the reactivity constraint approach.

Bernard, J.A.; Kwok, K.S.; Wyant, F.J.; Thome, F.V.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

NREL: Sustainable NREL - Research Support Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by NREL's Commercial Buildings Research Group to see predicted versus actual data for lighting, plug loads, heating and cooling use, rooftop PV production, and more. Construction...

176

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research July 1-September 30, 2010, DOESC-ARM-10-029 iii Contents 1.0 Data Availability......

177

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research July 1-September 30, 2011, DOESC-ARM-11-022 iii Contents 1.0 Data Availability......

178

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and advanced diagnostics in the fields of thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, multiphase flows, aerosols, and material decomposition. Our experimental research...

179

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to unique equipment to support specialized research, along with the expertise to address complex problems dealing with radiation effects. User Support The knowledgeable staff...

180

INEL BNCT Research Program annual report, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the progress and research produced for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) Research Program for calendar year 1992. Contributions from all the principal investigators about their individual projects are included, specifically, chemistry (pituitary tumor targeting compounds, boron drug development including liposomes, lipoproteins, and carboranylalanine derivatives), pharmacology (murine screenings, toxicity testing, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis of biological samples), physics (radiation dosimetry software, neutron beam and filter design, neutron beam measurement dosimetry), and radiation biology (small and large animal models tissue studies and efficacy studies). Information on the potential toxicity of borocaptate sodium and boronophenylalanine is presented, results of 21 spontaneous-tumor-bearing dogs that have been treated with BNCT at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) are discussed, and predictions for an epithermal-neutron beam at the Georgia Tech Research Reactor (GTRR) are shown. Cellular-level boron detection and localization by secondary ion mass spectrometry, sputter-initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy, low atomization resonance ionization spectroscopy, and alpha track are presented. Boron detection by ICP-AES is discussed in detail. Several boron carrying drugs exhibiting good tumor uptake are described. Significant progress in the potential of treating pituitary tumors with BNCT is presented. Measurement of the epithermal-neutron flux at BNL and comparison to predictions are shown. Calculations comparing the GTRR and BMRR epithermal-neutron beams are also presented. Individual progress reports described herein are separately abstracted and indexed for the database.

Venhuizen, J.R. [ed.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The research bench meets industry: New facility scales up production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

data in his notebook. Argonne material engineer YoungHo Shin prepares a coin cell battery in a glovebox in the Materials Engineering Research Facility. Once it is prepared,...

182

ORGANIZATIONAL CULTURE, SAFETY CULTURE, AND SAFETY PERFORMANCE AT RESEARCH FACILITIES.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organizational culture surveys of research facilities conducted several years ago and archival occupational injury reports were used to determine whether differences in safety performance are related to general organizational factors or to ''safety culture'' as reflected in specific safety-related dimensions. From among the organizations surveyed, a pair of facilities was chosen that were similar in size and scientific mission while differing on indices of work-related injuries. There were reliable differences in organizational style between the facilities, especially among workers in environment, safety, and health functions; differences between the facilities (and among job categories) on the safety scale were more modest and less regular.

BROWN,W.S.

2000-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

Ocean energy conversion systems annual research report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alternative power cycle concepts to the closed-cycle Rankine are evaluated and those that show potential for delivering power in a cost-effective and environmentally acceptable fashion are explored. Concepts are classified according to the ocean energy resource: thermal, waves, currents, and salinity gradient. Research projects have been funded and reported in each of these areas. The lift of seawater entrained in a vertical steam flow can provide potential energy for a conventional hydraulic turbine conversion system. Quantification of the process and assessment of potential costs must be completed to support concept evaluation. Exploratory development is being completed in thermoelectricity and 2-phase nozzles for other thermal concepts. Wave energy concepts are being evaluated by analysis and model testing with present emphasis on pneumatic turbines and wave focussing. Likewise, several conversion approaches to ocean current energy are being evaluated. The use of salinity resources requires further research in membranes or the development of membraneless processes. Using the thermal resource in a Claude cycle process as a power converter is promising, and a program of R and D and subsystem development has been initiated to provide confirmation of the preliminary conclusion.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Molecular Science Research Center, 1991 annual report  

SciTech Connect

During 1991, the Molecular Science Research Center (MSRC) experienced solid growth and accomplishment and the Environmental, and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) construction project moved forward. We began with strong programs in chemical structure and dynamics and theory, modeling, and simulation, and both these programs continued to thrive. We also made significant advances in the development of programs in materials and interfaces and macromolecular structure and dynamics, largely as a result of the key staff recruited to lead these efforts. If there was one pervasive activity for the past year, however, it was to strengthen the role of the EMSL in the overall environmental restoration and waste management (ER/WM) mission at Hanford. These extended activities involved not only MSRC and EMSL staff but all PNL scientific and technical staff engaged in ER/WM programs.

Knotek, M.L.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities Operation and Maintenance; 1995 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservoir (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs, Imeques C-mem-ini-kem and Thornhollow facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O. kisutch). Minthorn is also used for holding and spawning adult summer steelhead, fall chinook and coho salmon. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and coho salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes. Coded-wire tag recovery information was accessed to determine the contribution of Umatilla river releases to ocean, Columbia River and Umatilla River fisheries.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

HANFORD FACILITY ANNUAL DANGEROUS WASTE REPORT CY2003 [SEC 1 & 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Facility Annual Dangerous Waste Report (ADWR) is prepared to meet the requirements of Washington Administrative Code Sections 173-303-220, Generator Reporting, and 173-303-390, Facility Reporting. In addition, the ADWR is required to meet Hanford Facility RCRA Permit Condition I.E.22, Annual Reporting. The ADWR provides summary information on dangerous waste generation and management activities for the Calendar Year for the Hanford Facility EPA ID number assigned to the Department of Energy for RCRA regulated waste, as well as Washington State only designated waste and radioactive mixed waste. The Solid Waste Information and Tracking System (SWITS) database is utilized to collect and compile the large array of data needed for preparation of this report. Information includes details of waste generated on the Hanford Facility, waste generated offsite and sent to Hanford for management, and other waste management activities conducted at Hanford, including treatment, storage, and disposal. Report details consist of waste descriptions and weights, waste codes and designations, and waste handling codes. In addition, for waste shipped to Hanford for treatment and or disposal, information on manifest numbers, the waste transporter, the waste receiving facility, and the original waste generators are included. In addition to paper copies, the report is also transmitted electronically to a web site maintained by the Washington State Department of Ecology.

FREEMAN, D.A.

2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

187

Biomass Gasification Research Facility Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While thermochemical syngas production facilities for biomass utilization are already employed worldwide, exploitation of their potential has been inhibited by technical limitations encountered when attempting to obtain real-time syngas compositional data required for process optimization, reliability, and syngas quality assurance. To address these limitations, the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) carried out two companion projects (under US DOE Cooperative Agreements DE-FC36-03GO13175 and DE-FC36-02GO12024) to develop and demonstrate the equipment and methods required to reliably and continuously obtain accurate and representative on-line syngas compositional data. These objectives were proven through a stepwise series of field tests of biomass and coal gasification process streams. GTI developed the methods and hardware for extractive syngas sample stream delivery and distribution, necessary to make use of state-of-the-art on-line analyzers to evaluate and optimize syngas cleanup and conditioning. This multi-year effort to develop methods to effectively monitor gaseous species produced in thermochemical process streams resulted in a sampling and analysis approach that is continuous, sensitive, comprehensive, accurate, reliable, economical, and safe. The improved approach for sampling thermochemical processes that GTI developed and demonstrated in its series of field demonstrations successfully provides continuous transport of vapor-phase syngas streams extracted from the main gasification process stream to multiple, commercially available analyzers. The syngas stream is carefully managed through multiple steps to successfully convey it to the analyzers, while at the same time bringing the stream to temperature and pressure conditions that are compatible with the analyzers. The primary principle that guides the sample transport is that throughout the entire sampling train, the temperature of the syngas stream is maintained above the maximum condensation temperature of the vapor phase components of the conveyed sample gas. In addition, to minimize adsorption or chemical changes in the syngas components prior to analysis, the temperature of the transported stream is maintained as hot as is practical, while still being cooled only as much necessary prior to entering the analyzer(s). The successful transport of the sample gas stream to the analyzer(s) is accomplished through the managed combination of four basic gas conditioning methods that are applied as specifically called for by the process conditions, the gas constituent concentrations, the analyzer requirements, and the objectives of the syngas analyses: 1) removing entrained particulate matter from the sample stream; 2) maintaining the temperature of the sample gas stream; 3) lowering the pressure of the sample gas stream to decrease the vapor pressures of all the component vapor species in the sample stream; and 4) diluting the gas stream with a metered, inert gas, such as nitrogen. Proof-of-concept field demonstrations of the sampling approach were conducted for gasification process streams from a black liquor gasifier, and from the gasification of biomass and coal feedstocks at GTIs Flex-Fuel Test Facility. In addition to the descriptions and data included in this Final Report, GTI produced a Special Topical Report, Design and Protocol for Monitoring Gaseous Species in Thermochemical Processes, that explains and describes in detail the objectives, principles, design, hardware, installation, operation and representative data produced during this successful developmental effort. Although the specific analyzers used under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC36-02GO12024 were referenced in the Topical Report and this Final Report, the sampling interface design they present is generic enough to adapt to other analyzers that may be more appropriate to alternate process streams or facilities.

Snyder, Todd R.; Bush, Vann; Felix, Larry G.; Farthing, William E.; Irvin, James H.

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2006  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, (BSA) under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,500 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 413.2B, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' April 19, 2006, and the Roles, Responsibilities, and Guidelines for Laboratory Directed Research and Development at the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Laboratories dated June 13, 2006. In accordance this is our Annual Report in which we describe the Purpose, Approach, Technical Progress and Results, and Specific Accomplishments of all LDRD projects that received funding during Fiscal Year 2006.

FOX, K.J.

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

Umatilla Hatchery Satellite Facilities; Operations and Maintenance, Annual Report 2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs, Imeques C-mem-ini-kem, Thornhollow and Pendleton satellite facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O. kisutch). Minthorn is also used for holding and spawning adult summer steelhead and Three Mile Dam and South Fork Walla Walla facilities are used for holding and spawning chinook salmon. In some years, Three Mile Dam may also be used for holding and spawning coho salmon. In the spring of 2002, summer steelhead were acclimated and released at Bonifer Pond (54,917), Minthorn Springs (47,521), and Pendleton (54,366). Yearling coho (1,621,857) were also acclimated and released at Pendleton. Yearling spring chinook salmon (876,121) were acclimated and released at Imeques C-mem-ini-kem. At Thornhollow, 520,564 yearling fall chinook and 307,194 subyearling fall chinook were acclimated. In addition, 104,908 spring chinook were transported to Imeques C-mem-ini-kem in November for release in the spring of 2003. CTUIR and ODFW personnel monitored the progress of outmigration for juvenile releases at the Westland Canal juvenile facility. Nearly all juveniles released in the spring migrated downstream prior to the trap being opened in early July. A total of 100 unmarked and 10 marked summer steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from September 21, 2001, through April 2, 2002. An estimated 180,955 green eggs were taken from 36 females and were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation and rearing. A total of 560 adult and 26 jack spring chinook salmon were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from April 22 through June 12, 2002, and were transported to South Fork Walla Walla. An estimated 1,017,113 green eggs were taken from 266 females and were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery. Excess unmarked broodstock (seven adult males, five jacks, and 34 females) were released into the South Fork Walla Walla River at the end of spawning. A total of 168 adult and eight jack spring chinook salmon were transferred from Three Mile Dam to South Fork Walla Walla between June 6 and June 23 for temporary holding. On August 8, 154 adults and eight jacks were released into the South Fork Walla Walla River to spawn naturally. A total of 214 adult spring chinook salmon were transferred from Ringold Hatchery to South Fork Walla Walla between June 7 and June 20 for temporary holding. On August 8, 171 were released into natural production areas in the Walla Walla River basin to spawn naturally. A total of 525 adult and 34 jack fall chinook salmon were collected and held for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from September 16 to November 17, 2002. An estimated 678,122 green eggs were taken from 183 females. The eggs were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery. Coho salmon broodstock were not collected in 2002. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and spring and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) was detected in five of 68 spawned summer steelhead. Summer steelhead were not examined for bacterial kidney disease (Renibacterium salmoninarum; BKD) in 2002. Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus was detected in 27 of 78 spawned spring chinook females. Two hundred sixty-six spawned spring chinook females were sampled for BKD and two had low to moderate levels of Rs antigen (ELISA OD{sub 405} readings of 0.260 and 0.365). All others had low to negative levels of Rs antigen (ELISA OD{sub 405} readings of 0.00 to 0.099). Twenty-one spring chinook mortalities were examined for culturable bacteria and enteric redmouth disease

Rowan, Gerald

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Facilities: Sandia Pulsed Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments Sandia scientist John Ford places fuel rods in the Seven Percent Critical Experiment (7uPCX) at the Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility Critical Experiments (SPRF/CX) test reactor - a reactor stripped down to its simplest form. The Sandia Pulsed Reactor Facility - Critical Experiments (SPRF/CX) provides a flexible, shielded location for performing critical experiments that employ different reactor core configurations and fuel types. The facility is also available for hands-on nuclear criticality safety training. Research and other activities The 7% series, an evaluation of various core characteristics for higher commercial-fuel enrichment, is currently under way at the SPRF/CX. Past critical experiments at the SPRF/CX have included the Burnup Credit

191

BCTR: Biological and Chemical Technologies Research 1994 annual summary report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1994 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). Although the OIT was reorganized in 1991 and AICD no longer exists, this document reports on efforts conducted under the former structure. The annual summary report for 1994 (ASR 94) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1994; detailed descriptions of individual projects; a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work; patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

Petersen, G.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Division of Biological and Medical Research annual research summary, 1983  

SciTech Connect

This research summary contains brief descriptions of research in the following areas: (1) mechanisms of hepatocarcinogenesis; (2) role of metals in cocarcinogenesis and the use of liposomes for metal mobilization; (3) control of mutagenesis and cell differentiation in cultured cells by tumor promoters; (4) radiation effects in mammalian cells; (5) radiation carcinogenesis and radioprotectors; (6) life shortening, tumor induction, and tissue dose for fission-neutron and gamma-ray irradiations; (7) mammalian genetics and biostatistics; (8) radiation toxicity studies; (9) hematopoiesis in chronic toxicity; (10) molecular biology studies; (11) chemical toxicology; (12) carcinogen identification and metabolism; (13) metal metabolism and toxicity; and (14) neurobehavioral chronobiology. (ACR)

Barr, S.H. (ed.)

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Lighting Research Group: Facilities: Power Analyzer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Analyzer Power Analyzer Power Analyzer power analyzer Gonio-photometer | Integrating sphere | Power analyzer | Spectro-radiometer A power analyzer is a very necessary tool for lighting research. With the power analyzer we are able to monitor the input voltage to the lamp as well as the input power and current. The amount of power a lamp or a lamp-ballast combination uses is very important when determining its efficiency. It is also important to monitor the input voltage to make sure it doesn't vary. This can affect the light output of a lamp greatly. With the power analyzer we can also measure things like the power factor, harmonic distortion, and current crest factor of some lamps. These measurements tell us how well a lamp is working. For example, a high power

194

Energy Storage Research and Development 2006 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EnErgy StoragE rESEarch EnErgy StoragE rESEarch and dEvElopmEnt U.S. Department of Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 FY 2006 Progress Report for Energy Storage Research and Development Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Approved by: David Howell Manager, Energy Storage R&D January 2007 Energy Storage Research and Development FY 2006 Annual Progress Report TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 1 I.A FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program Overview .................................. 1 I.B Energy Storage Research & Development Overview ............................................... 1

195

INL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2004  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities and major accomplishments for the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2004. Topics covered include boron analysis in biological samples, computational dosimetry and treatment planning software development, medical neutron source development and characterization, and collaborative dosimetry studies at the RA-1 facility in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

James Venhuizen

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

ARM - ARM Climate Research Facility Contributions to International Polar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Support International Polar Year Begins at ACRF with 3-week Campaign in Barrow Aerosol Affects on Clouds To Be Studied Yearlong Study to Improve Polar Measurements of Radiative Energy Education Efforts Educational Kiosk CD Available at No Cost-Request Yours Today! POLAR-PALOOZA: Climate science goes on tour! Partnership Extends Support for National Science Teacher Conference Teacher's Domain Combines Culture and Climate Other Links ACRF IPY Home U.S. IPY Home ARM Climate Research Facility Contributions to International Polar Year (IPY) The Department of Energy's International Polar Year (IPY) contributions will be conducted at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ARM) located in the North Slope of Alaska. This DOE user facility

197

Major Facilities for Materials Research and Related Disciplines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities for Materials Research and Related Disciplines Major Materials Facilities Committee Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, DC 1984 NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance. This report has been reviewed by a group other than the authors according to procedures approved by a Report Review Committee con- sisting of members of the National Academy of Sciences, the National

198

NREL: Sustainable NREL - Media Contacts for the Research Support Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Media Contacts for the Research Support Facility Media Contacts for the Research Support Facility Please refer to these media contacts if you are a member of the media and have questions about the Research Support Facility (RSF). U.S. Department of Energy, Golden Field Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the owner of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), developed the vision for a super energy-efficient office building on the NREL campus that would serve as a model and showcase for what is technologically possible and commercially viable. With this building, DOE leads by example and hopes to spur innovation and replication throughout government and the commercial building sector. John Horst U.S. Department of Energy, Golden Field Office 303-275-4709 Eric Escudero U.S. Department of Energy, Golden Field Office

199

Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program : Facility Operation and Maintenance Facilities, Annual Report 2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Anadromous salmonid stocks have declined in both the Grande Ronde River Basin (Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) Status Review Symposium 1998) and in the entire Snake River Basin (Nehlsen et al. 1991), many to the point of extinction. The Grande Ronde River Basin historically supported large populations of fall and spring chinook (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye (O. nerka), and coho (O. kisutch) salmon and steelhead trout (O. mykiss) (Nehlsen et al. 1991). The decline of chinook salmon and steelhead populations and extirpation of coho and sockeye salmon in the Grande Ronde River Basin was, in part, a result of construction and operation of hydroelectric facilities, over fishing, and loss and degradation of critical spawning and rearing habitat in the Columbia and Snake River basins (Nehlsen et al. 1991). Hatcheries were built in Oregon, Washington and Idaho under the Lower Snake River Compensation Plan (LSRCP) to compensate for losses of anadromous salmonids due to the construction and operation of the lower four Snake River dams. Lookingglass Hatchery (LGH) on Lookingglass Creek, a tributary of the Grande Ronde River, was completed under LSRCP in 1982 and has served as the main incubation and rearing site for chinook salmon programs for Grande Ronde and Imnaha rivers in Oregon. Despite these hatchery programs, natural spring chinook populations continued to decline resulting in the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) listing Snake River spring/summer chinook salmon as ''threatened'' under the federal Endangered Species Act (1973) on 22 April 1992. Continuing poor escapement levels and declining population trends indicated that Grande Ronde River basin spring chinook salmon were in imminent danger of extinction. These continuing trends led fisheries co-managers in the basin to initiate the Grande Ronde Endemic Spring Chinook Salmon Supplementation Program (GRESCSSP) in order to prevent extinction and preserve options for use of endemic fish stocks in future artificial propagation programs. The GRESCSSP was implemented in three Grande Ronde River basin tributaries; the Lostine and upper Grande Ronde rivers and Catherine Creek. The GRESCSSP employs two broodstock strategies utilizing captive and conventional brood sources. The captive brood program began in 1995, with the collection of parr from the three tributary areas. The conventional broodstock component of the program began in 1997 with the collection of natural adults returning to these tributary areas. Although LGH was available as the primary production facility for spring chinook programs in the Grande Ronde Basin, there were never any adult or juvenile satellite facilities developed in the tributary areas that were to be supplemented. An essential part of the GRESCSSP was the construction of adult traps and juvenile acclimation facilities in these tributary areas. Weirs were installed in 1997 for the collection of adult broodstock for the conventional component of the program. Juvenile facilities were built in 2000 for acclimation of the smolts produced by the captive and conventional broodstock programs and as release sites within the natural production areas of their natal streams. The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) operate both the juvenile acclimation and adult trapping facilities located on Catherine Creek and the upper Grande Ronde River under this project. The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) operate the facilities on the Lostine River under a sister project. Hatcheries were also built in Oregon, Washington and Idaho under the LSRCP to compensate for losses of summer steelhead due to the construction and operation of the lowest four Snake River dams. Despite these harvest-driven hatchery programs, natural summer steelhead populations continued to decline as evidenced by declining counts at Lower Granite Dam since 1995 (Columbia River Data Access in Real Time, DART) and low steelhead redd counts on index streams in the Grande Ronde Basin. Because of low escapement the Snake River summer steelhead were listed as threat

McLean, Michael L.; Seeger, Ryan; Hewitt, Laurie (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, Department of Natural Resources, Pendleton, OR)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

MHD coal-fired flow facility. Annual technical progress report, October 1979-September 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) reports on significant activity, task status, planned research, testing, development, and conclusions for the Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) Coal-Fired Flow Faclity (CFFF) and the Energy Conversion Facility (ECF).

Alstatt, M.C.; Attig, R.C.; Brosnan, D.A.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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201

Research Support Facility (RSF): Leadership in Building Performance (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure/poster provides information on the features of the Research Support Facility including a detailed illustration of the facility with call outs of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. Imagine an office building so energy efficient that its occupants consume only the amount of energy generated by renewable power on the building site. The building, the Research Support Facility (RSF) occupied by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) employees, uses 50% less energy than if it were built to current commercial code and achieves the U.S. Green Building Council's Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED{reg_sign}) Platinum rating. With 19% of the primary energy in the U.S. consumed by commercial buildings, the RSF is changing the way commercial office buildings are designed and built.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report August 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

203

ARM Climate Research Facility Instrumentation Status and Information December 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

JW Voyles

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report September 2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following five sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) field campaigns, (3) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (4) proposed future instrumentation, and (5) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

205

Strategic Nuclear Research Collaboration - FY99 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has created the Strategic Nuclear Research Collaboration. The SNRC brings together some of America's finest laboratory and university nuclear researchers in a carefully focused research program intended to produce ''breakthrough'' solutions to the difficult issues of nuclear economics, safety, non-proliferation, and nuclear waste. This integrated program aims to address obstacles that stand in the way of nuclear power development in the US These include fuel cycle concerns related to waste and proliferation, the need for more efficient regulatory practices, and the high cost of constructing and operating nuclear power plants. Funded at an FY99 level of $2.58M, the SNRC is focusing the efforts of scientists and engineers from the INEEL and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to solve complex nuclear energy challenges in a carefully chosen, integrated portfolio of research topics. The result of this collaboration will be research that serves as a catalyst for future direct-funded nuclear research and technology development and which preserves and enhances the INEEL's role as America's leading national laboratory for nuclear power research. In its first year, the SNRC has focused on four research projects each of which address one or more of the four issues facing further nuclear power development (economics, safety, waste disposition and proliferation-resistance). This Annual Report describes technical work and accomplishments during the first year of the SNRC's existence.

T. J. Leahy

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue Universitys Interaction of Materials with Particles and Components Testing (IMPACT) facility and the Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) Radiochemistry Processing Laboratory (RPL) and PIE facilities were added. The ATR NSUF annually hosts a weeklong event called Users Week in which students and faculty from universities as well as other interested parties from regulatory agencies or industry convene in Idaho Falls, Idaho to see presentations from ATR NSUF staff as well as select researchers from the materials research field. Users week provides an overview of current materials research topics of interest and an opportunity for young researchers to understand the process of performing work through ATR NSUF. Additionally, to increase the number of researchers engaged in LWR materials issues, a series of workshops are in progress to introduce research staff to stress corrosion cracking, zirconium alloy degradation, and uranium dioxide degradation during in-reactor use.

John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY 2000 Annual Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

This is the FY00 Annual Progress report for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It gives an overview of the LDRD Program, summarizes progress on each project conducted during FY00, characterizes the projects according to their relevance to major funding sources, and provides an index to principal investigators. Project summaries are grouped by LDRD component: Directed Research and Exploratory Research. Within each component, they are further grouped into the ten technical categories: (1) atomic, molecular, optical, and plasma physics, fluids, and beams, (2) bioscience, (3) chemistry, (4) computer science and software engineering, (5) engineering science, (6) geoscience, space science, and astrophysics, (7) instrumentation and diagnostics, (8) materials science, (9) mathematics, simulation, and modeling, and (10) nuclear and particle physics.

Los Alamos National Laboratory

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

2010 Annual Planning Summary for Advanced Research Projects Agency...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Planning Summary for National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center (NNSA-SC) 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Idaho Operations Office (ID) Energy.gov Careers &...

209

DOD Facilities Energy: FY 2009 Annual Energy Report Overview and Status on NDAA 2010 Studies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facilities Energy Facilities Energy FY 2009 Annual Energy Report: Overview and Status on NDAA 2010 Studies Brian J. Lally, P.E. Deputy Director, Facilities Energy and Utilities Privatization Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Installations and Environment FUPWG: 14-15 April 2010 FY 09-08 Facilities Total Delivered Energy (Billions Btu) 2 5,000 30,000 55,000 80,000 105,000 130,000 155,000 180,000 205,000 DoD Army Air Force Dept Navy Other DoD FY 09 FY 08 FY 09 Site Delivered Energy By Type (Billions Btu) 3 0 10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 70,000 80,000 90,000 100,000 Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil Coal Purchased Steam LPG/Propane & Renewables DoD Army Air Force Dept Navy Other DoD All Facilities Site Delivered Energy By Type (BTU) Electricity 46% Natural Gas 33% Fuel Oil 9% Coal 7% Purchased Steam

210

NSTX Report on FES Joint Facilities Research Milestone 2010  

SciTech Connect

Annual Target: Conduct experiments on major fusion facilities to improve understanding of the heat transport in the tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma, strengthening the basis for projecting divertor conditions in ITER. The divertor heat flux profiles and plasma characteristics in the tokamak scrape-off layer will be measured in multiple devices to investigate the underlying thermal transport processes. The unique characteristics of C-Mod, DIII-D, and NSTX will enable collection of data over a broad range of SOL and divertor parameters (e.g., collisionality ?*, beta ?, parallel heat flux q||, and divertor geometry). Coordinated experiments using common analysis methods will generate a data set that will be compared with theory and simulation.

R. Maingi, J-W. Ahn, T.K. Gray, A.G. McLean, V.A. Soukhanovskii

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

211

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1993 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CT'UIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. This 1993 annual report details scheduled maintenance and other projects carried out during the year.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Energy Storage Research and Development 2007 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and dEvElopmEnt vEhiclE tEchnologiES program Less dependence on foreign oil today, and transition to a petroleum-free, emissions-free vehicle tomorrow. 2 0 0 7 a n n u a l p r o g r e s s r e p o r t U.S. Department of Energy Office of Vehicle Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue S.W. Washington, D.C. 20585-0121 FY 2007 Progress Report for Energy Storage Research and Development Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Vehicle Technologies David Howell Manager, Energy Storage R&D January 2008 Energy Storage Research and Development FY 2007 Annual Progress Report TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................... 1 I.A Vehicle Technologies Program ............................................................................. 1

213

Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, fiscal year 1997  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Order 413.2(a) establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 413.2, LDRD is research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. DOE Order 413.2 requires that each laboratory submit an annual report on its LDRD activities to the cognizant Secretarial Officer through the appropriate Operations Office Manager. The report provided in this document represents Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s LDRD report for FY 1997.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1992 to the DOE Office of Energy Research  

SciTech Connect

The 1992 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment and health conducted during fiscal year 1992. This report consists of four volumes oriented to particular segments of the PNL program, describing research performed for the DOE Office of Health and Environmental Research in the Office of Energy Research. The parts of the 1992 Annual Report are: Biomedical Sciences; Environmental Sciences; Atmospheric Sciences; and Physical Sciences. This Report is Part II: Environmental Sciences. Included in this report are developments in Subsurface Science, Terrestrial Science, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development, Interactions with Educational Institutions, Technology Transfer, Publications, and Presentations. The research is directed toward developing a fundamental understanding of subsurface and terrestrial systems as a basis for both managing these critical resources and addressing environmental problems such as environmental restoration and global change. The Technology Transfer section of this report describes a number of examples in which fundamental research is laying the groundwork for the technology needed to resolve important environmental problems. The Interactions with Educational Institutions section of the report illustrates the results of a long-term, proactive program to make PNL facilities available for university and preuniversity education and to involve educational institutions in research programs. The areas under investigation include the effect of geochemical and physical phenomena on the diversity and function of microorganisms in deep subsurface environments, ways to address subsurface heterogeneity, and ways to determine the key biochemical and physiological pathways (and DNA markers) that control nutrient, water, and energy dynamics in arid ecosystems and the response of these systems to disturbance and climatic change.

Grove, L.K. (ed.)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

FY2007 Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report for fiscal year 2007 (FY07) provides a summary of LDRD-funded projects for the fiscal year and consists of two parts: An introduction to the LDRD Program, the LDRD portfolio-management process, program statistics for the year, and highlights of accomplishments for the year. A summary of each project, submitted by the principal investigator. Project summaries include the scope, motivation, goals, relevance to Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) mission areas, the technical progress achieved in FY07, and a list of publications that resulted from the research in FY07. Summaries are organized in sections by research category (in alphabetical order). Within each research category, the projects are listed in order of their LDRD project category: Strategic Initiative (SI), Exploratory Research (ER), Laboratory-Wide Competition (LW), and Feasibility Study (FS). Within each project category, the individual project summaries appear in order of their project tracking code, a unique identifier that consists of three elements. The first is the fiscal year the project began, the second represents the project category, and the third identifies the serial number of the proposal for that fiscal year.

Craig, W W; Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P R

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

216

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Facilities LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Some LANL facilities are available to researchers at other laboratories, universities, and industry. Unique facilities foster experimental science, support LANL's security mission DARHT accelerator DARHT's electron accelerators use large, circular aluminum structures to create magnetic fields that focus and steer a stream of electrons down the length of the accelerator. Tremendous electrical energy is added along the way. When the stream of high-speed electrons exits the accelerator it is

217

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science and Infrastructure Steering Committee CHARTER June 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not

218

National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research: FY87 annual research plan  

SciTech Connect

The National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) will enter its fourth year of operation October 1, 1986, and this Annual Research Plan describes the work envisioned for that year. NIPER's program of research encompasses three different thrusts. The DOE funds a $5 million Base Program designed to undertake long-range, high-risk research on petroleum and similar materials that companies are generally unwilling to do. A second program, the Optional Program, cost-shares research on petroleum and substitute fossil fuels between DOE and contributing participants. For FY 87, the DOE maximum share will be $1 million and the remainder will be sponsored by other government agencies and industrial participants. The third program is a Work for Others Program which allows NIPER to solicit work from the private sector and others. This Annual Research Plan covers only the Base and Optional Programs. NIPER is organized into two research departments - Energy Production Research (EPR) and Fuels Research (FR). Projects in EPR deal with various aspects of enhanced oil recovery and include chemical flooding, gas injection processes, steam injection, and microbial enhanced oil recovery. Projects in FR are concerned with the impact of heavy oil and alternate fuels on processing and use of fuels. For Fiscal Year 1987, the Base Program will have 13 projects, eight in EPR and five in FR.

Not Available

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Annual Planning Summaries: Advanced Research and Projects Agency (ARPA-E) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research and Projects Agency Research and Projects Agency (ARPA-E) Annual Planning Summaries: Advanced Research and Projects Agency (ARPA-E) Document(s) Available For Download February 2, 2012 2012 Annual Planning Summary for Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2012 and 2013 within Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy. January 26, 2011 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Advanced Research and Projects Agency (ARPA-E) The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Advanced Research and Projects Agency (ARPA-E). February 1, 2010 2010 Annual Planning Summary for Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E) Annual Planning Summaries briefly describe the status of ongoing NEPA

220

Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2010 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A premier applied-science laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has at its core a primary national security mission - to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile without nuclear testing, and to prevent and counter the spread and use of weapons of mass destruction: nuclear, chemical, and biological. The Laboratory uses the scientific and engineering expertise and facilities developed for its primary mission to pursue advanced technologies to meet other important national security needs - homeland defense, military operations, and missile defense, for example - that evolve in response to emerging threats. For broader national needs, LLNL executes programs in energy security, climate change and long-term energy needs, environmental assessment and management, bioscience and technology to improve human health, and for breakthroughs in fundamental science and technology. With this multidisciplinary expertise, the Laboratory serves as a science and technology resource to the U.S. government and as a partner with industry and academia. This annual report discusses the following topics: (1) Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation; (2) Biological Sciences; (3) Chemistry; (4) Earth and Space Sciences; (5) Energy Supply and Use; (6) Engineering and Manufacturing Processes; (7) Materials Science and Technology; Mathematics and Computing Science; (8) Nuclear Science and Engineering; and (9) Physics.

Jackson, K J

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research: FY89 annual research plan  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth Annual Research Plan for the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER). In its program of long-range research, NIPER is preparing for the time when petroleum scarcities again plague the United States. Two general study areas are addressed: (1) The consolidation and extension of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) technology. This includes reservoir characterization, chemical flooding, gas injection, steam injection, microbial EOR, and environmental concerns. (2) The development and improvement of knowledge concerning the manufacture and use of fuels from less desirable feedstocks. This includes the study of heavy petroleum, heavy ends of petroleum, tar sands, shale oil, and coal liquids. 2 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research: FY88 annual research plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fifth Annual Research Plan for the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER). In its program of long-range research, NIPER is preparing for the time when petroleum scarcities again plague the United States. Two general study areas are addressed: (1) The consolidation and extension of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) technology. This includes reservoir characteriztion, chemical flooding, gas injection, steam injection, and microbial EOR. (2) The development and improvement of knowledge concerning the manufacture and use of fuels from less desirable feedstocks. This includes the study of heavy petroleum, heavy ends of petroleum, tar sands, shale oil, and coal liquids.

Not Available

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Environmental Systems Research Candidates Program--FY2000 Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Systems Research Candidates (ESRC) Program, which is scheduled to end September 2001, was established in April 2000 as part of the Environmental Systems Research and Analysis Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to provide key science and technology to meet the clean-up mission of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, and perform research and development that will help solve current legacy problems and enhance the INEELs scientific and technical capability for solving longer-term challenges. This report documents the progress and accomplishments of the ESRC Program from April through September 2000. The ESRC Program consists of 24 tasks subdivided within four research areas: A. Environmental Characterization Science and Technology. This research explores new data acquisition, processing, and interpretation methods that support cleanup and long-term stewardship decisions. B. Subsurface Understanding. This research expands understanding of the biology, chemistry, physics, hydrology, and geology needed to improve models of contamination problems in the earths subsurface. C. Environmental Computational Modeling. This research develops INEEL computing capability for modeling subsurface contaminants and contaminated facilities. D. Environmental Systems Science and Technology. This research explores novel processes to treat waste and decontaminate facilities. Our accomplishments during FY 2000 include the following: We determined, through analysis of samples taken in and around the INEEL site, that mercury emissions from the INEEL calciner have not raised regional off-INEEL mercury contamination levels above normal background. We have initially demonstrated the use of x-ray fluorescence to image uranium and heavy metal concentrations in soil samples. We increased our understanding of the subsurface environment; applying mathematical complexity theory to the problem of transport of subsurface contaminants. We upgraded the INEELs high-speed computer link to offsite supercomputers from T1 (1.5 MB/s) to DS3 (45 MB/s). Procurements have initiated a further upgrade to OC3 (155 MB/s) with additional onsite computational power that should put the INEEL on the Top 500 Supercomputing Sites list. We developed advanced decontamination, decommissioning, and dismantlement techniques, including the Decontamination, Decommissioning, and Remediation Optimal Planning System.

Piet, Steven James

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Division of Biological and Medical Research annual technical report, 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes research during 1981 in the Division of Biological and Medical Research, Argonne National Laboratory. Studies in Low Level Radiation include comparison of lifetime effects in mice of low level neutron and gamma irradiation, delineation of the responses of dogs to continuous low level gamma irradiation, elucidation of mechanisms of radiation damage and repair in mammalian cells, and study of the genetic effects of high LET radiations. Carcinogenesis research addresses mechanisms of tumor initiation and promotion in rat liver, chemical carcinogenesis in cultured mammalian cells, and molecular and genetic mechanisms of chemical and ultraviolet mutagenesis in bacteria. Research in Toxicology uses a variety of cellular, whole animal, and chronobiological end points, chemical separations, and statistical models to evaluate the hazards and mechanisms of actions of metals, coal gasification by products, and other energy-related pollutants. Human Protein Index studies develop two-dimensional electrophoresis systems for diagnosis and detection of cancer and other disease. Biophysics research includes fundamental structural and biophysical investigations of immunoglobulins and key biological molecules using NMR, crystallographic, and x-ray and neutron small-angle scattering techniques. The final sections cover support facilities, educational activities, seminars, staff talks, staff, and funding agencies.

Rosenthal, M.W. (ed.)

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Annual Report Nucelar Energy Research and Development Program Nuclear Energy Research Initiative  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NERI Project No.2000-0109 began in August 2000 and has three tasks. The first project year addressed Task 1, namely development of nonlinear prognostication for critical equipment in nuclear power facilities. That work is described in the first year's annual report (ORNLTM-2001/195). The current (second) project year (FY02) addresses Task 2, while the third project year will address Tasks 2-3. This report describes the work for the second project year, spanning August 2001 through August 2002, including status of the tasks, issues and concerns, cost performance, and status summary of tasks. The objective of the second project year's work is a compelling demonstration of the nonlinear prognostication algorithm using much more data. The guidance from Dr. Madeline Feltus (DOE/NE-20) is that it would be preferable to show forewarning of failure for different kinds of nuclear-grade equipment, as opposed to many different failure modes from one piece of equipment. Long-term monitoring of operational utility equipment is possible in principle, but is not practically feasible for the following reason. Time and funding constraints for this project do not allow us to monitor the many machines (thousands) that will be necessary to obtain even a few failure sequences, due to low failure rates (ORNL) to contact other researchers for additional data from other test equipment. Consequently, we have revised the work plan for Tasks 2.1-2.2, with corresponding changes to the work plan as shown in the Status Summary of NERI Tasks. The revised tasks are as follows: Task 2.1--ORNL will obtain test data from a subcontractor and other researchers for various test equipment. This task includes development of a test plan or a description of the historical testing, as appropriate: test facility, equipment to be tested, choice of failure mode(s), testing protocol, data acquisition equipment, and resulting data from the test sequence. ORNL will analyze this data for quality, and subsequently via the nonlinear paradigm for prognostication. Task 2.2--ORNL will evaluate the prognostication capability of the nonlinear paradigm. The comparison metrics for reliability of the predictions will include the true positives, true negatives, and the forewarning times. Task 2.3--ORNL will improve the nonlinear paradigm as appropriate, in accord with the results of Tasks 2.1-2.2, to maximize the rate of true positive and true negative indications of failure. Maximal forewarning time is also highly desirable. Task 2.4--ORNL will develop advanced algorithms for the phase-space distribution function (PS-DF) pattern change recognition, based on the results of Task 2.3. This implementation will provide a capability for automated prognostication, as part of the maintenance decision-making. Appendix A provides a detailed description of the analysis methods, which include conventional statistics, traditional nonlinear measures, and ORNL's patented nonlinear PSDM. The body of this report focuses on results of this analysis.

Hively, LM

2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

226

Calendar Year 2004 annual site environmental report : Tonopah Test Range, Nevada & Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2004. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004b).

Montoya, Amber L.; Wagner, Katrina; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2008 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program, authorized by Congress in 1991 and administered by the Institutional Science and Technology Office at Lawrence Livermore, is our primary means for pursuing innovative, long-term, high-risk, and potentially high-payoff research that supports the full spectrum of national security interests encompassed by the missions of the Laboratory, the Department of Energy, and National Nuclear Security Administration. The accomplishments described in this annual report demonstrate the strong alignment of the LDRD portfolio with these missions and contribute to the Laboratory's success in meeting its goals. The LDRD budget of $91.5 million for fiscal year 2008 sponsored 176 projects. These projects were selected through an extensive peer-review process to ensure the highest scientific quality and mission relevance. Each year, the number of deserving proposals far exceeds the funding available, making the selection a tough one indeed. Our ongoing investments in LDRD have reaped long-term rewards for the Laboratory and the nation. Many Laboratory programs trace their roots to research thrusts that began several years ago under LDRD sponsorship. In addition, many LDRD projects contribute to more than one mission area, leveraging the Laboratory's multidisciplinary team approach to science and technology. Safeguarding the nation from terrorist activity and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction will be an enduring mission of this Laboratory, for which LDRD will continue to play a vital role. The LDRD Program is a success story. Our projects continue to win national recognition for excellence through prestigious awards, papers published in peer-reviewed journals, and patents granted. With its reputation for sponsoring innovative projects, the LDRD Program is also a major vehicle for attracting and retaining the best and the brightest technical staff and for establishing collaborations with universities, industry, and other scientific and research institutions. By keeping the Laboratory at the forefront of science and technology, the LDRD Program enables us to meet our mission challenges, especially those of our ever-evolving national security mission. The Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report for fiscal year 2008 (FY08) provides a summary of LDRD-funded projects for the fiscal year and consists of two parts: A broad description of the LDRD Program, the LDRD portfolio-management process, program statistics for the year, and highlights of accomplishments for the year. A summary of each project, submitted by the principal investigator. Project summaries include the scope, motivation, goals, relevance to Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) mission areas, the technical progress achieved in FY08, and a list of publications that resulted from the research in FY08. Summaries are organized in sections by research category (in alphabetical order). Within each research category, the projects are listed in order of their LDRD project category: Strategic Initiative (SI), Exploratory Research (ER), Laboratory-Wide Competition (LW), and Feasibility Study (FS). Within each project category, the individual project summaries appear in order of their project tracking code, a unique identifier that consists of three elements. The first is the fiscal year the project began, the second represents the project category, and the third identifies the serial number of the proposal for that fiscal year.

Kammeraad, J E; Jackson, K J; Sketchley, J A; Kotta, P R

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

228

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2012 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

229

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1-March 31, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

230

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1-December 31, 2011 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the United States nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise, does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or

231

Particle-beam fusion research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia research in inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) is based on pulse-power capabilities that grew out of earlier developments of intense relativistic electron-beam (e-beam) radiation sources for weapon effects studies. ICF involves irradiating a deuterium-tritium pellet with either laser light or particle beams until the center of the pellet is compressed and heated to the point of nuclear fusion. This publication focuses on the use of particle beams to achieve fusion, and on the various facilities that are used in support of the particle-beam fusion (PBF) program.

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

232

Independent Oversight Review, Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility- January 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility Fire Suppression Vital Safety System

233

Laboratory Directed Research and Development 1998 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory's Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program encourages the advancement of science and the development of major new technical capabilities from which future research and development will grow. Through LDRD funding, Pacific Northwest continually replenishes its inventory of ideas that have the potential to address major national needs. The LDRD program has enabled the Laboratory to bring to bear its scientific and technical capabilities on all of DOE's missions, particularly in the arena of environmental problems. Many of the concepts related to environmental cleanup originally developed with LDRD funds are now receiving programmatic support from DOE, LDRD-funded work in atmospheric sciences is now being applied to DOE's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program. We also have used concepts initially explored through LDRD to develop several winning proposals in the Environmental Management Science Program. The success of our LDRD program is founded on good management practices that ensure funding is allocated and projects are conducted in compliance with DOE requirements. We thoroughly evaluate the LDRD proposals based on their scientific and technical merit, as well as their relevance to DOE's programmatic needs. After a proposal is funded, we assess progress annually using external peer reviews. This year, as in years past, the LDRD program has once again proven to be the major enabling vehicle for our staff to formulate new ideas, advance scientific capability, and develop potential applications for DOE's most significant challenges.

Pam Hughes; Sheila Bennett eds.

1999-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

234

Director's Discretionary Research and Development Program: Annual Report, Fiscal Year 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Director's Discretionary Research and Development Program, Annual Report Fiscal Year 2006 is an annual management report that summarizes research projects funded by the DDRD program. The NREL DDRD program comprises projects that strengthen NREL's four technical competencies: Integrated Systems, Renewable Electricity, Renewable Fuels, and Strategic Analysis.

Not Available

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Annual Report for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

As a condition to the Disposal Authorization Statement issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) on March 17, 2010, a comprehensive performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program must be implemented for the Technical Area 54, Area G disposal facility. Annual determinations of the adequacy of the performance assessment and composite analysis are to be conducted under the maintenance program to ensure that the conclusions reached by those analyses continue to be valid. This report summarizes the results of the fiscal year 2011 annual review for Area G. Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis was issued in 2008 and formally approved in 2009. These analyses are expected to provide reasonable estimates of the long-term performance of Area G and, hence, the disposal facility's ability to comply with Department of Energy (DOE) performance objectives. Annual disposal receipt reviews indicate that smaller volumes of waste will require disposal in the pits and shafts at Area G relative to what was projected for the performance assessment and composite analysis. The future inventories are projected to decrease modestly for the pits but increase substantially for the shafts due to an increase in the amount of tritium that is projected to require disposal. Overall, however, changes in the projected future inventories of waste are not expected to compromise the ability of Area G to satisfy DOE performance objectives. The Area G composite analysis addresses potential impacts from all waste disposed of at the facility, as well as other sources of radioactive material that may interact with releases from Area G. The level of knowledge about the other sources included in the composite analysis has not changed sufficiently to call into question the validity of that analysis. Ongoing environmental surveillance activities are conducted at, and in the vicinity of, Area G. However, the information generated by many of these activities cannot be used to evaluate the validity of the performance assessment and composite analysis models because the monitoring data collected are specific to operational releases or address receptors that are outside the domain of the performance assessment and composite analysis. In general, applicable monitoring data are supportive of some aspects of the performance assessment and composite analysis. Several research and development (R and D) efforts have been initiated under the performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program. These investigations are designed to improve the current understanding of the disposal facility and site, thereby reducing the uncertainty associated with the projections of the long-term performance of Area G. The status and results of R and D activities that were undertaken in fiscal year 2011 are discussed in this report. Special analyses have been conducted to determine the feasibility of disposing of specific waste streams, to address proposed changes in disposal operations, and to consider the impacts of changes to the models used to conduct the performance assessment and composite analysis. These analyses are described and the results of the evaluations are summarized in this report. The Area G disposal facility consists of Material Disposal Area (MDA) G and the Zone 4 expansion area. To date, all disposal operations at Area G have been confined to MDA G. Material Disposal Area G is scheduled to undergo final closure in 2015; disposal of waste in the pits and shafts is scheduled to end in 2013. In anticipation of the closure of MDA G, plans are being made to ship the majority of the waste generated at LANL to off-site locations for disposal. It is not clear at this time if waste that will be disposed of at LANL will be placed in Zone 4 or if disposal operations will move to a new location at the Laboratory. Separately, efforts to optimize the final cover used in the closure of MDA G are underway; a final cover design different than that adopted for the performance assessment and composite analy

French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Rob [WPS: WASTE PROJECTS AND SERVICES

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

236

Implementation Plans for a Systems Microbiology and Extremophile Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9073 9073 Implementation Plans for a Systems Microbiology and Extremophile Research Facility Summary of a workshop held March 26 th , 2008 Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory Richland, WA April 2009 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research under Contract DE-AC05- 76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor Battelle Memorial Institute, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

237

Desiccant contamination research: Report on the desiccant contamination test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activity in the cooling systems research involves research on high performance dehumidifiers and chillers that can operate efficiently with the variable thermal outputs and delivery temperatures associated with solar collectors. It also includes work on advanced passive cooling techniques. This report describes the work conducted to improve the durability of solid desiccant dehumidifiers by investigating the causes of degradation of desiccant materials from airborne contaminants and thermal cycling. The performance of a dehumidifier strongly depends on the physical properties and durability of the desiccant material. To make durable and reliable dehumidifiers, an understanding is needed of how and to what degree the performance of a dehumidifier is affected by desiccant degradation. This report, an account of work under Cooling Systems Research, documents the efforts to design and fabricate a test facility to investigate desiccant contamination based on industry and academia recommendations. It also discusses the experimental techniques needed for obtaining high-quality data and presents plans for next year. Researchers of the Mechanical and Industrial Technology Division performed this work at the Solar Energy Research Institute in FY 1988 for DOE's Office of Solar Heat Technologies. 7 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Desiccant contamination research: Report on the desiccant contamination test facility  

SciTech Connect

The activity in the cooling systems research involves research on high performance dehumidifiers and chillers that can operate efficiently with the variable thermal outputs and delivery temperatures associated with solar collectors. It also includes work on advanced passive cooling techniques. This report describes the work conducted to improve the durability of solid desiccant dehumidifiers by investigating the causes of degradation of desiccant materials from airborne contaminants and thermal cycling. The performance of a dehumidifier strongly depends on the physical properties and durability of the desiccant material. To make durable and reliable dehumidifiers, an understanding is needed of how and to what degree the performance of a dehumidifier is affected by desiccant degradation. This report, an account of work under Cooling Systems Research, documents the efforts to design and fabricate a test facility to investigate desiccant contamination based on industry and academia recommendations. It also discusses the experimental techniques needed for obtaining high-quality data and presents plans for next year. Researchers of the Mechanical and Industrial Technology Division performed this work at the Solar Energy Research Institute in FY 1988 for DOE's Office of Solar Heat Technologies. 7 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

(National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research): 1986 annual report  

SciTech Connect

Significant research accomplishments were made by the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) during its third year of operation. Some of the achievements of the FY86 program are: (1) extrapolation of energy supply trends was used to develop a research plan for improving the energy capability of the United States; (2) the finding of correlations between outcrop core samples and reservoir core samples will enable better predictions of heterogeneity in the reservoir and the application of these properties to prediction and planning of EOR projects; (3) the development of hydrocarbon reaction paths under hydrotreating or catalytic cracking is being approached by calculation of thermodynamic functions (Gibbs Energy); (4) micromodel studies were used to elucidate the mechanisms of oil mobilization by microbes and results were found to correlate with coreflooding results; (5) degradation and compatibility problems have been identified in utility fuel oils, jet fuels, and diesel fuels; (6) a new surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding method that results in less reaction with reservoir minerals has been developed; (7) the effect on farm equipment of the phase-out of lead in gasoline was studied; (8) a thermophysical property prediction package has been developed for gas injection EOR projects using nitrogen; (9) a survey of applicable information on groundwater pollution by refinery operations was made; (10) the construction and testing of an apparatus to measure three-phase relative permeabilities based on x-ray and microwave measurements were completed. These reports on ten of NIPER's 35 projects serve to show some of the more important achievements. A more complete discussion of these and the other projects is given in this annual report. These reports have been processed for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Not Available

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Magma Energy Research Project, FY 1979 annual progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Magma Energy Research Project is to define the scientific feasibility of extracting energy from magma bodies. Activities to accomplish the objective are divided into five tasks: resource location and identification; source tapping; magma characterization; materials compatibility; and energy extraction. The program activities of FY 1979 are summarized here according to the individual tasks. Major emphasis of the program in the last year was on field experimentation with the United States Geological Survey in geoscience and technological studies at the Kilauea Iki lava lake. Other major efforts included installation of the magma simulation facility and magma-metal compatibility studies. The Magma Energy Advisory Panel also met during this period. Efforts and results are summarized.

Colp, J.L.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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241

Quality Assurance of ARM Program Climate Research Facility Data  

SciTech Connect

This report documents key aspects of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) data quality assurance program as it existed in 2008. The performance of ACRF instruments, sites, and data systems is measured in terms of the availability, usability, and accessibility of the data to a user. First, the data must be available to users; that is, the data must be collected by instrument systems, processed, and delivered to a central repository in a timely manner. Second, the data must be usable; that is, the data must be inspected and deemed of sufficient quality for scientific research purposes, and data users must be able to readily tell where there are known problems in the data. Finally, the data must be accessible; that is, data users must be able to easily find, obtain, and work with the data from the central repository. The processes described in this report include instrument deployment and calibration; instrument and facility maintenance; data collection and processing infrastructure; data stream inspection and assessment; the roles of value-added data processing and field campaigns in specifying data quality and haracterizing the basic measurement; data archival, display, and distribution; data stream reprocessing; and engineering and operations management processes and procedures. Future directions in ACRF data quality assurance also are presented.

RA Peppler; KE Kehoe; KL Sonntag; CP Bahrmann; SJ Richardson; SW Christensen; RA McCord; DJ Doty; R Wagener; RC Eagan; JC Lijegren; BW Orr; DL Sisterson; TD Halter; NN Keck; CN Long; MC Macduff; JH Mather; RC Perez; JW Voyles; MD Ivey; ST Moore; DL Nitschke; BD Perkins; DD Turner

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $460 million. There are about 2,800 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 13.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Annual Report contains summaries of all research activities funded during Fiscal Year 2004. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, the LDRD activities have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums. All FY 2004 projects are listed and tabulated in the Project Funding Table. Also included in this Annual Report in Appendix A is a summary of the proposed projects for FY 2005. The BNL LDRD budget authority by DOE in FY 2004 was $9.5 million. The actual allocation totaled $8.5 million. The following sections in this report contain the management processes, peer review, and the portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission, initiatives and strategic plans. Also included is a metric of success indicators and Self Assessment.

FOX,K.J.

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DOE - DECEMBER 2001.  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 4 13.2, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' March 5, 1997, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 4 13.2. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Annual Report contains summaries of all research activities funded during Fiscal Year 2001. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, the LDRD activities have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums. All FY 2001 projects are listed and tabulated in the Project Funding Table. Also included in this Annual Report in Appendix A is a summary of the proposed projects for FY 2002. The BNL LDRD budget authority by DOE in FY 2001 was $6 million. The actual allocation totaled $5.3 million. The following sections in this report contain the management processes, peer review, and the portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission, initiatives and strategic plans. Also included is a metric of success indicators.

FOX,K.J.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brookhaven National (BNL) Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical, and environmental sciences, and in selected energy technologies. It is managed by Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC, under contract with the U. S. Department of Energy. BNL's total annual budget has averaged about $450 million. There are about 3,000 employees, and another 4,500 guest scientists and students who come each year to use the Laboratory's facilities and work with the staff. The BNL Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) annually in March, as required by DOE Order 41 3.2A, ''Laboratory Directed Research and Development,'' January 8, 2001, and the LDRD Annual Report guidance, updated February 12, 1999. The LDRD Program obtains its funds through the Laboratory overhead pool and operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A. The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its LDRD Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community and foster new science and technology ideas, which becomes a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Annual Report contains summaries of all research activities funded during Fiscal Year 2003. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, the LDRD activities have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums. All FY 2003 projects are listed and tabulated in the Project Funding Table. Also included in this Annual Report in Appendix A is a summary of the proposed projects for FY 2004. The BNL LDRD budget authority by DOE in FY 2003 was $8.5 million. The actual allocation totaled $7.8 million. The following sections in this report contain the management processes, peer review, and the portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission, initiatives and strategic plans. Also included is a metric of success indicators.

FOX,K.J.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Biological and Environmental Research User Facilities | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

BER User Facilities BER User Facilities User Facilities ASCR User Facilities BES User Facilities BER User Facilities FES User Facilities HEP User Facilities NP User Facilities User Facilities Frequently Asked Questions User Facility Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 BER User Facilities Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Biological & Environmental Research program supports the operation of the following national scientific user facilities: William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL): External link The mission of the EMSL at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) External link in Richland, Washington, is to provide integrated experimental and

246

Advanced Scientific Computing Research User Facilities | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

ASCR User Facilities ASCR User Facilities User Facilities ASCR User Facilities BES User Facilities BER User Facilities FES User Facilities HEP User Facilities NP User Facilities User Facilities Frequently Asked Questions User Facility Science Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 ASCR User Facilities Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page The Advanced Scientific Computing Research program supports the operation of the following national scientific user facilities: Energy Sciences Network (ESnet): External link The Energy Sciences Network, or ESnet External link , is the Department of Energy's high-speed network that provides the high-bandwidth, reliable connections that link scientists at national laboratories, universities and

247

The research bench meets industry: New facility scales up production of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Video: Scenes from Argonne's Materials Engineering Research Facility Video: Scenes from Argonne's Materials Engineering Research Facility Scenes from Argonne's Materials Engineering Research Facility Experiments can keep researchers on their feet all day long. Process R&D chemist Kris Pupek moves between fume hoods in the Materials Engineering Research Facility's process research and development lab, while lab-mate Trevor Dzwiniel records data in his notebook. Experiments can keep researchers on their feet all day long. Process R&D chemist Kris Pupek moves between fume hoods in the Materials Engineering Research Facility's process research and development lab, while lab-mate Trevor Dzwiniel records data in his notebook. Argonne material engineer YoungHo Shin prepares a coin cell battery in a glovebox in the Materials Engineering Research Facility. Once it is prepared, the battery can be tested to determine the energy output characteristics of a cathode material for lithium-ion batteries.

248

Project definition study for research facility access and science education  

SciTech Connect

This UTA/SMU project definition study describes critical customer services and research programs which draw upon SSC assets to meet regional needs in two major components: Science Education; Academic/Small Business R and D Facility Access. The location of the SSC in Texas constituted a significant stimulus to R and D activities in Texas, encouraging new initiatives in high energy physics, as well as stimulating other areas of physics and related sciences. An important aspect of maximizing the utility of the investment in the SSC should be to re-allocate SSC assets in ways that maintain that momentum. This study addresses several ways to achieve that end, extending benefits to all of physics, the sciences in general and particularly, to science education.

Rosen, S.P. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States). Coll. of Science; Teplitz, V.L. [Southern Methodist Univ., Dallas, TX (United States). Physics Dept.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

ARM Climate Research Facility | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research » Climate and Research » Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) » ARM Climate Research Facility Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER

250

NREL: Wind Research - Wind Powering America Hosts 12th Annual...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Powering America Hosts 12th Annual All-States Summit: A Wind Powering America Success Story May 21, 2013 In 2012, the wind energy industry saw great expansion in capacity as...

251

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2008 Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the conversion of biomass to value-added chemicals. ThisChemical Sciences Division LDRD FY2008 Annual Report LB07006 Conversion of Glycerol, other Carbohydrates and Aromatic Compounds from Biomass

editor, Todd C Hansen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Summary of informal workshop on state of ion beam facilities for atomic physics research  

SciTech Connect

The present state of ion beam facilities for atomic physics research in the United States is assessed by means of a questionnaire and informal workshop. Recommendations for future facilities are given. 3 refs.

Jones, K.W.; Cocke, C.L.; Datz, S.; Kostroun, V.

1984-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

253

The Arm Climate Research Facility: A Review of Structure and Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (www.arm.gov) provides atmospheric observations from diverse climatic regimes around the world. Because it is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) user facility, ARM data are freely ...

James H. Mather; Jimmy W. Voyles

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

ACCELERATOR & FUSION RESEARCH DIV. ANNUAL REPORT, OCT. 80 - SEPT. 81  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) and Exxon Corporation, LBLadd striking new capabilities to SSRL. The new facility willbending magnet sources at SSRL. Such an intensity is so far

Johnson Ed, R.K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

58th Annual Device Research Conference: Housing Accommodations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Therefore, early registration and reservations are essential. ... University of Denver residence halls and dining facilities are located within a 710 minute walk...

256

59th Annual Device Research Conference: Housing Accommodations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Therefore, early registration and reservations are essential. ... Common shower and restroom facilities are designated for men and women on each floor. Guests

257

NASA Space Radiobiology Research Takes Off at New Brookhaven Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NASA Space Radiobiology Research Takes Off NASA Space Radiobiology Research Takes Off at New Brookhaven Facility Because astronauts are spending more and more time in space, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is working with Brookhaven and others here on Earth to learn about the possible risks to human beings exposed to space radiation. To study the radiobiological effects using proton and ion beams that simulate the cosmic rays found in space, a new $34-million NASA Space Radiation Laboratory was commissioned at Brookhaven this summer. --by Karen McNulty Walsh and Marsha Belford "TO BOLDLY GO WHERE NO ONE HAS GONE BEFORE"- the motto of the science-fiction saga Star Trek - could just as easily be the motto of America's real-life space explorers. Despite the recent Columbia shuttle tragedy, officials of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have a bold vision for future manned space exploration, which includes the completion of the International Space Station now under construction, and possible future missions to build a Moon outpost, explore near-Earth asteroids, and send astronauts to Mars.

258

ACCELERATOR & FUSION RESEARCH DIV. ANNUAL REPORT, OCT. 80 - SEPT. 81  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies Neutral Beam Plasma Research Basic Plasma Theoryand tempera- NEUTRAL BEAM PLASMA RESEARCH We are conducting

Johnson Ed, R.K.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

FY2010 ANNUAL REVIEW E-AREA LOW-LEVEL WASTE FACILITY PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT AND COMPOSITE ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility (ELLWF) consists of a number of disposal units described in the Performance Assessment (PA)(WSRC, 2008b) and Composite Analysis (CA)(WSRC, 1997; WSRC, 1999): Low-Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (IL) Vault, Trenches (Slit Trenches [STs], Engineered Trenches [ETs], and Component-in-Grout [CIG] Trenches), and Naval Reactor Component Disposal Areas (NRCDAs). This annual review evaluates the adequacy of the approved 2008 ELLWF PA along with the Special Analyses (SAs) approved since the PA was issued. The review also verifies that the Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 low-level waste (LLW) disposal operations were conducted within the bounds of the PA/SA baseline, the Savannah River Site (SRS) CA, and the Department of Energy (DOE) Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS). Important factors considered in this review include waste receipts, results from monitoring and research and development (R&D) programs, and the adequacy of controls derived from the PA/SA baseline. Sections 1.0 and 2.0 of this review are a summary of the adequacy of the PA/SA and CA, respectively. An evaluation of the FY2010 waste receipts and the resultant impact on the ELLWF is summarized in Section 3.1. The results of the monitoring program, R&D program, and other relevant factors are found in Section 3.2, 3.3 and 3.4, respectively. Section 4.0 contains the CA annual determination similarly organized. SRS low-level waste management is regulated under DOE Order 435.1 (DOE, 1999a) and is authorized under a DAS as a federal permit. The original DAS was issued by the DOE-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) on September 28, 1999 (DOE, 1999b) for the operation of the ELLWF and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The 1999 DAS remains in effect for the regulation of the SDF. Those portions of that DAS applicable to the ELLWF were superseded by revision 1 of the DAS on July 15, 2008 (DOE, 2008b). The 2008 PA and DAS were officially implemented by the facility on October 31, 2008 and are the authorization documents for this FY2010 Annual Review. Department of Energy Headquarters approval of the 2008 DAS was subject to numerous conditions specified in the document. Two of those conditions are to update the ELLWF closure plan and monitoring plan to align with the conceptual model analyzed in the PA. Both of these conditions were met with the issuance of the PA Monitoring Plan (Millings, 2009a) and the Closure Plan (Phifer et al, 2009a). The PA Monitoring Plan was approved by DOE on July 22, 2009 and the Closure Plan was approved by DOE on May 21, 2009. Both will be updated as needed to remain consistent with the PA. The DAS also specifies that the maintenance plan include activities to resolve each of the secondary issues identified in the DOEHQ review of the 2008 PA that were not completely addressed either with supplemental material provided to the review team or in final revisions to the PA. These outstanding issues were originally documented in the 2008 update of the PA/CA Maintenance Plan (WSRC, 2008a) and in subsequent PA/CA Maintenance Plans (most recently SRNS, 2010a) as required and are actively being worked.

Butcher, T.; Swingle, R.; Crapse, K.; Millings, M.; Sink, D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Metals Processing Laboratory Users (MPLUS) Facility Annual Report FY 2002 (October 1, 2001-September 30, 2002)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Metals Processing Laboratory Users Facility (MPLUS) is a Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Industrial Technologies Program, user facility designated to assist researchers in key industries, universities, and federal laboratories in improving energy efficiency, improving environmental aspects, and increasing competitiveness. The goal of MPLUS is to provide access to the specialized technical expertise and equipment needed to solve metals processing issues that limit the development and implementation of emerging metals processing technologies. The scope of work can also extend to other types of materials. MPLUS has four primary user centers: (1) Processing--casting, powder metallurgy, deformation processing (including extrusion, forging, rolling), melting, thermomechanical processing, and high-density infrared processing; (2) Joining--welding, monitoring and control, solidification, brazing, and bonding; (3) Characterization--corrosion, mechanical properties, fracture mechanics, microstructure, nondestructive examination, computer-controlled dilatometry, and emissivity; and (4) Materials/Process Modeling--mathematical design and analyses, high-performance computing, process modeling, solidification/deformation, microstructure evolution, thermodynamic and kinetic, and materials databases A fully integrated approach provides researchers with unique opportunities to address technologically related issues to solve metals processing problems and probe new technologies. Access is also available to 16 additional Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) user facilities ranging from state-of-the-art materials characterization capabilities, and high-performance computing to manufacturing technologies. MPLUS can be accessed through a standardized user-submitted proposal and a user agreement. Nonproprietary (open) or proprietary proposals can be submitted. For open research and development, access to capabilities is provided free of charge, while for proprietary efforts, the user pays the entire project costs based on DOE guidelines for ORNL costs.

Angelini, P

2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video About Operational Excellence Facilities Facilities...

262

LANL highlights cutting-edge research at annual LDRD Day | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

cutting-edge research at annual LDRD Day | National Nuclear cutting-edge research at annual LDRD Day | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > LANL highlights cutting-edge research at annual LDRD Day LANL highlights cutting-edge research at annual LDRD Day Posted By Office of Public Affairs Los Alamos National Laboratory recently showcased some of its cutting-edge

263

LANL highlights cutting-edge research at annual LDRD Day | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cutting-edge research at annual LDRD Day | National Nuclear cutting-edge research at annual LDRD Day | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > LANL highlights cutting-edge research at annual LDRD Day LANL highlights cutting-edge research at annual LDRD Day Posted By Office of Public Affairs Los Alamos National Laboratory recently showcased some of its cutting-edge

264

Deep Vadose ZoneApplied Field Research Initiative Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report describes the background of the Deep Vadose Zone-Applied Field Research Initiative, and some of the programmatic approaches and transformational technologies in groundwater and deep vadose zone remediation developed during fiscal year 2012.

Wellman, Dawn M.; Truex, Michael J.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Bunn, Amoret L.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.

2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

265

2013 Annual DOE-NE Materials Research Coordination Meeting | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013 Annual DOE-NE Materials Research Coordination Meeting 2013 Annual DOE-NE Materials Research Coordination Meeting 2013 Annual DOE-NE Materials Research Coordination Meeting The Reactor Materials element of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program conducted its FY 2013 coordination meeting as a series of four web-conferences to act as a forum for the nuclear materials research community. The purpose of this meeting was to report on current and planned nuclear materials research, identify new areas of collaboration and promote greater coordination among the various Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) programs. Currently, materials research is performed in several NE programs, including NE Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS), Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD), Advanced Reactor Technologies

266

2013 Annual DOE-NE Materials Research Coordination Meeting | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2013 Annual DOE-NE Materials Research Coordination Meeting 2013 Annual DOE-NE Materials Research Coordination Meeting 2013 Annual DOE-NE Materials Research Coordination Meeting The Reactor Materials element of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program conducted its FY 2013 coordination meeting as a series of four web-conferences to act as a forum for the nuclear materials research community. The purpose of this meeting was to report on current and planned nuclear materials research, identify new areas of collaboration and promote greater coordination among the various Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) programs. Currently, materials research is performed in several NE programs, including NE Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS), Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD), Advanced Reactor Technologies

267

FY86 Annual research plan, National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research  

SciTech Connect

NIPER's program of research encompasses three different thrusts. The DOE funds a five-million-dollar Base Program designed to undertake long-range, high-risk research on petroleum and similar materials that companies are generally unwilling to do. A second five-million-dollar program, the Optional Program, cost-shares research on petroleum and substitute fossil fuels between DOE and contributing participants. For FY86, the DOE share will be two million dollars and three million dollars will be contributed by other government agencies and industrial participants. The third program is a Work for Others Program which allows NIPER to solicit work from the private sector and others. This Annual Research Plan only covers the Base and Optional Programs. NIPER is organized into two research departments - Energy Production Research (EPR) and Fuels Research (FR). Projects in EPR deal with various aspects of enhanced oil recovery and include chemical flooding, gas injection processes, steam injection, and microbial enhanced oil recovery. Projects in FR are concerned with the impact of heavy oil and alternate fuels on processing and use of fuels. This breadth of interest assures that NIPER's work will be significant in advancing petroleum technology and that NIPER will be a viable place for research by other government agencies and industrial clients. For Fiscal Year 1986, the Base Program will have 14 projects and the Optional Program will have 16. EPR has nine projects in the Base Program and six in the Optional Program while FR has five in the Base Program and ten in the Optional Program. These projects are described.

Not Available

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT 1981  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sciences and the Office of Fossil Energy Research, of theSecretary for Fossil Energy, Office of Coal Research,Secretary for Fossil Energy, Office of Coal Research,

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, whichOffice of Advanced Scientific Computing Research The primaryof the Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program

Hules, John A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

ACCELERATOR & FUSION RESEARCH DIV. ANNUAL REPORT, OCT. 79 - SEPT. 80  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

34 in Biological and Medical Research with Accelerated Heavyin Biological and Medical Research with Accelerated Heavyin Biological and Medical Research with Accelerated Heavy

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Building America Systems Integration Research Annual Report: FY 2012  

SciTech Connect

This document is the Building America FY2012 Annual Report, which includes an overview of the Building America Program activities and the work completed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Building America industry consortia (the Building America teams). The annual report summarizes major technical accomplishments and progress towards U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program's multi-year goal of developing the systems innovations that enable risk-free, cost effective, reliable and durable efficiency solutions that reduce energy use by 30%-50% in both new and existing homes.

Gestwick, M.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Building America Systems Integration Research Annual Report: FY 2012  

SciTech Connect

This document is the Building America FY2012 Annual Report, which includes an overview of the Building America Program activities and the work completed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and the Building America industry consortia (the Building America teams). The annual report summarizes major technical accomplishments and progress towards U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program's multi-year goal of developing the systems innovations that enable risk-free, cost effective, reliable and durable efficiency solutions that reduce energy use by 30%-50% in both new and existing homes.

Gestwick, M.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Columbia River: Terminal fisheries research project. 1994 Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Columbia River terminal fisheries have been conducted in Youngs Bay, Oregon, since the early 1960`s targeting coho salmon produced at the state facility on the North Fork Klaskanine River. In 1977 the Clatsop County Economic Development Council`s (CEDC) Fisheries Project began augmenting the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife production efforts. Together ODFW and CEDC smolt releases totaled 5,060,000 coho and 411,300 spring chinook in 1993 with most of the releases from the net pen acclimation program. During 1980-82 fall commercial terminal fisheries were conducted adjacent to the mouth of Big Creek in Oregon. All past terminal fisheries were successful in harvesting surplus hatchery fish with minimal impact on nonlocal weak stocks. In 1993 the Northwest Power Planning Council recommended in its` Strategy for Salmon that terminal fishing sites be identified and developed. The Council called on the Bonneville Power Administration to fund a 10-year study to investigate the feasibility of creating and expanding terminal known stock fisheries in the Columbia River Basin. The findings of the initial year of the study are included in this report. The geographic area considered for study extends from Bonneville Dam to the river mouth. The initial year`s work is the beginning of a 2-year research stage to investigate potential sites, salmon stocks, and methodologies; a second 3-year stage will focus on expansion in Youngs Bay and experimental releases into sites with greatest potential; and a final 5-year phase establishing programs at full capacity at all acceptable sites. After ranking all possible sites using five harvest and five rearing criteria, four sites in Oregon (Tongue Point, Blind Slough, Clifton Channel and Wallace Slough) and three in Washington (Deep River, Steamboat Slough and Cathlamet Channel) were chosen for study.

Hirose, P.; Miller, M.; Hill, J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration : Annual Report 1996.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The once abundant stocks of Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) above Bonneville Dam are currently depressed (Close et al. 1995). It is likely that many of the same factors that led to the decline of wild stocks of Columbia River Pacific salmon and steelhead have impacted Pacific lamprey populations. The Pacific lamprey is an important part of the food web of North Pacific ecosystems, both as predator and prey. Lamprey (a.k.a. eels) are also a valuable food and culture resource for American Indian Tribes of the Pacific Northwest. Depressed Pacific lamprey runs have impacted treaty secured fishing opportunities by forcing tribal members to gather this traditional food in lower Columbia River locations. The Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project, funded by Bonneville Power Administration, is a cooperative effort between the Confederated Tribes of The Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Columbia River Intertribal Fish Commission, and Oregon State University with the goal to increase Pacific lamprey stocks above Bonneville Dam. The initial objectives of the project are to determine the past and current abundance of Pacific lamprey stocks in major mid Columbia tributaries and at various hydroelectric facilities, and to determine factors limiting Pacific lamprey abundance and distribution. Ultimately, Pacific lamprey restoration plans will be developed and implemented. Part (A)-CTUIR: (1) determine past and present abundance and distribution in NE Oregon and SE Washington tributaries; and (2) determine limiting habitat factors. Part (B)-CRITFC: (1) adult abundance monitoring at Columbia and Snake River dams; (2) juvenile abundance monitoring at Columbia and Snake River dams; and (3) juvenile passage impediments and needed improvements at Columbia and Snake River dams. Part (C)- OSU: (1) adult passage impediments and needed improvements at Columbia and Snake River dams; and (2) juvenile passage impediments and needed improvements at Columbia and Snake River dams.

Jackson, Aaron D.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Proceedings of the eighth annual symposium on explosives and blasting research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This edition of the proceedings of the annual symposium on Explosives and Blasting Research held concurrent with the 18th Annual Conference on Explosives and Blasting Technique is the eighth in a series published by the International Society of Explosives Engineers. A variety of laboratory and field research is presented on explosives, mining, detonators, and shock waves. Seventeen papers are selected for the energy data base.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

ACCELERATOR & FUSION RESEARCH DIV. ANNUAL REPORT, OCT. 79 - SEPT. 80  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iizI/-l4. Neutral team Plasma Research K. F. Schoenberg, "Studies Neutral Beam Plasma Research Neutral Beam Theory25%). Neutral Beam Plasma Research W are conducting research

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

NIST to Host Third Annual Maryland Stem Cell Research ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... feature research supported by the Maryland Stem Cell Research Fund ... topics of hematopoietic and mesenchymal stem cells, induced pluripotent ...

2013-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

278

Argonne National Laboratory annual report of Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program Activities FY 2009.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

I am pleased to submit Argonne National Laboratory's Annual Report on its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) activities for fiscal year 2009. Fiscal year 2009 saw a heightened focus by DOE and the nation on the need to develop new sources of energy. Argonne scientists are investigating many different sources of energy, including nuclear, solar, and biofuels, as well as ways to store, use, and transmit energy more safely, cleanly, and efficiently. DOE selected Argonne as the site for two new Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) - the Institute for Atom-Efficient Chemical Transformations and the Center for Electrical Energy Storage - and funded two other EFRCs to which Argonne is a major partner. The award of at least two of the EFRCs can be directly linked to early LDRD-funded efforts. LDRD has historically seeded important programs and facilities at the lab. Two of these facilities, the Advanced Photon Source and the Center for Nanoscale Materials, are now vital contributors to today's LDRD Program. New and enhanced capabilities, many of which relied on LDRD in their early stages, now help the laboratory pursue its evolving strategic goals. LDRD has, since its inception, been an invaluable resource for positioning the Laboratory to anticipate, and thus be prepared to contribute to, the future science and technology needs of DOE and the nation. During times of change, LDRD becomes all the more vital for facilitating the necessary adjustments while maintaining and enhancing the capabilities of our staff and facilities. Although I am new to the role of Laboratory Director, my immediate prior service as Deputy Laboratory Director for Programs afforded me continuous involvement in the LDRD program and its management. Therefore, I can attest that Argonne's program adhered closely to the requirements of DOE Order 413.2b and associated guidelines governing LDRD. Our LDRD program management continually strives to be more efficient. In addition to meeting all reporting requirements during fiscal year 2009, our LDRD Office continues to enhance its electronic systems to streamline the LDRD management process. You will see from the following individual project reports that Argonne's researchers have once again done a superb job pursuing projects at the forefront of their respective fields and have contributed significantly to the advancement of Argonne's strategic thrusts. This work has not only attracted follow-on sponsorship in many cases, but is also proving to be a valuable basis upon which to continue realignment of our strategic portfolio to better match the Laboratory's Strategic Plan.

Office of the Director

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

279

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT 1978  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proceedings, 5th Annual SSRL User's ~~eting, 1978. 4. R. 1.by H. Winick and G. Bro~~ (SSRL Rept. No. 78/09), p. VIII-of Noble Gases at SSRL, American Physical Society, San

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

DOE/SC-ARM-11-001 ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Instrument...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Facility Quarterly Instrument Report Fourth Quarter: October 1-December 30, 2010 JW Voyles January 2011 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Partnering with Industry to Advance Biofuels, NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fact sheet describing NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility and its availability to biofuels' industry partners who want to operate, test, and develop biorefining technology and equipment.

Not Available

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Texas AgriLife Research Rule 34.05.99.A1 Smoking in Texas AgriLife Research Facilities and Vehicles Page 1 of 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas AgriLife Research Rule 34.05.99.A1 Smoking in Texas AgriLife Research Facilities and Vehicles Page 1 of 1 Texas AgriLife Research Rules 34.05.99.A1 SMOKING IN TEXAS AGRILIFE RESEARCH FACILITIES To provide guidelines concerning smoking in Texas AgriLife Research (AgriLife Research) facilities

283

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT 1981  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science of Alloy Oesign," EXXON Colloquia in Metallurgy,Research Dr. W. C. Baird Exxon Research Dr. T. P. WilsonLiquid-Solid Particle Erosion," Exxon Corporate Research Lab

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research is presented concerning materials science including metallurgy and ceramics; solid state physics; and materials chemistry; chemical sciences covering radiation science, chemical physics, and chemical energy; nuclear science; coal research; solar energy; magnetic fusion, conservation; and environmental research. (FS)

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION Annual Report 1977.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEVELOPMENT 1. Photovoltaic Energy Conversion a. Research onof CuxS(Cd-Zn)S Photovoltaic Solar Energy Converters. PapersResearch on Photovoltaic Solar Energy Converters. Professor

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

2000 TMS Annual Meeting Exhibitor: ALBANY RESEARCH CENTER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Albany Research Center is a U.S. government materials research and ... provide solutions to service-life problems through new materials technology, and ...

287

Implementation Plans for a Systems Microbiology and Extremophile Research Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Introduction Biological organisms long ago solved many problems for which scientists and engineers seek solutions. Microbes in particular offer an astonishingly diverse set of capabilities that can help revolutionize our approach to solving many important DOE problems. For example, photosynthetic organisms can generate hydrogen from light while simultaneously sequestering carbon. Others can produce enzymes that break down cellulose and other biomass to produce liquid fuels. Microbes in water and soil can capture carbon and store it in the earth and ocean depths. Understanding the dynamic interaction between living organisms and the environment is critical to predicting and mitigating the impacts of energy-production-related activities on the environment and human health. Collectively, microorganisms contain most of the biochemical diversity on Earth and they comprise nearly one-half of its biomass. They primary impact the planet by acting as catalysts of biogeochemical cycles; they capture light energy and fix CO2 in the worlds oceans, they degrade plant polymers and convert them to humus in soils, they weather rocks and facilitate mineral precipitation. Although the ability of selected microorganisms to participate in these processes is known, they rarely live in monoculture but rather function within communities. In spite of this, little is known about the composition of microbial communities and how individual species function within them. We lack an understanding of the nature of the individual organisms and their genes, how they interact to perform complex functions such as energy and materials exchange, how they sense and respond to their environment and how they evolve and adapt to environmental change. Understanding these aspects of microbes and their communities would be transformational with far-reaching impacts on climate, energy and human health. This knowledge would create a foundation for predicting their behavior and, ultimately, manipulating them to solve DOE problems. Recent advances in whole-genome sequencing for a variety of organisms and improvements in high-throughput instrumentation have contributed to a rapid transition of the biological research paradigm towards understanding biology at a systems level. As a result, biology is evolving from a descriptive to a quantitative, ultimately predictive science where the ability to collect and productively use large amounts of biological data is crucial. Understanding how the ensemble of proteins in cells gives rise to biological outcomes is fundamental to systems biology. These advances will require new technologies and approaches to measure and track the temporal and spatial disposition of proteins in cells and how networks of proteins and other regulatory molecules give rise to specific activities. The DOE has a strong interest in promoting the application of systems biology to understanding microbial function and this comprises a major focus of its Genomics:GTL program. A major problem in pursuing what has been termed systems microbiology is the lack of the facilities and infrastructure for conducting this new style of research. To solve this problem, the Genomics:GTL program has funded a number of large-scale research centers focused on either mission-oriented outcomes, such as bioenergy, or basic technologies, such as gene sequencing, high-throughput proteomics or the identification of protein complexes. Although these centers generate data that will be useful to the research community, their scientific goals are relatively narrow and are not designed to accommodate the general community need for advanced capabilities for systems microbiology research.

Wiley, H. S.

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

288

Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1992; Twenty-fifth annual report, Volume 14  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC`s Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1992. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10CFR20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10CFR20.408. The 1992 annual reports submitted by about 364 licensees indicated that approximately 204,365 individuals were monitored, 183,927 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.16 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of about 0.30 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 74,566 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 364 covered licensees during 1992. Some 71,846 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 9,724 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.50 rem (cSv).

Raddatz, C.T. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Division of Regulatory Applications; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Ground Broken for New Job-Creating Accelerator Research Facility at DOE's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ground Broken for New Job-Creating Accelerator Research Facility at Ground Broken for New Job-Creating Accelerator Research Facility at DOE's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois Ground Broken for New Job-Creating Accelerator Research Facility at DOE's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Illinois December 16, 2011 - 11:49am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, ground was broken for a new accelerator research facility being built at the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) in Batavia, Illinois. Supported jointly by the state of Illinois and DOE, the construction of the Illinois Accelerator Research Center (IARC) will provide a state-of-the-art facility for research, development and industrialization of particle accelerator technology, and create about 200 high-tech jobs. DOE's Office

290

A Facility for Low-energy Antiproton and Ion Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The future accelerator facility for beams of ions and antiprotons at Darmstadt will provide antiproton beams of intensities that are two orders of magnitude higher than currently available. Within the foreseen scheme, antiprotons can be decelerated to 30 MeV. The low-energy antiproton community has recently formed a users group to make use of this opportunity to create a next-generation low-energy antiproton facility called FLAIR, which will be able to provide cooled antiproton beams well below 100 keV kinetic energy. This talk gives an overview of the layout and physics program of the proposed facility.

E. Widmann

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

291

SuperHILAC: Heavy-ion linear accelerator: Summary of capabilities, facilities, operations, and research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report consists of a description of the accelerator facilities and a review of research programs being conducted there. Lists of SuperHILAC researchers and publications are also given.

McDonald, R.J. (ed.)

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

NREL: Wind Research - Five Megawatt Dynamometer Test Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy's National Wind Technology Center. We're here today in the new 5 megawatt drive train testing facility that has been developed over the last few years. This terrific new...

293

YALINA facility a sub-critical Accelerator- Driven System (ADS) for nuclear energy research facility description and an overview of the research program (1997-2008).  

SciTech Connect

The YALINA facility is a zero-power, sub-critical assembly driven by a conventional neutron generator. It was conceived, constructed, and put into operation at the Radiation Physics and Chemistry Problems Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Belarus located in Minsk-Sosny, Belarus. This facility was conceived for the purpose of investigating the static and dynamic neutronics properties of accelerator driven sub-critical systems, and to serve as a neutron source for investigating the properties of nuclear reactions, in particular transmutation reactions involving minor-actinide nuclei. This report provides a detailed description of this facility and documents the progress of research carried out there during a period of approximately a decade since the facility was conceived and built until the end of 2008. During its history of development and operation to date (1997-2008), the YALINA facility has hosted several foreign groups that worked with the resident staff as collaborators. The participation of Argonne National Laboratory in the YALINA research programs commenced in 2005. For obvious reasons, special emphasis is placed in this report on the work at YALINA facility that has involved Argonne's participation. Attention is given here to the experimental program at YALINA facility as well as to analytical investigations aimed at validating codes and computational procedures and at providing a better understanding of the physics and operational behavior of the YALINA facility in particular, and ADS systems in general, during the period 1997-2008.

Gohar, Y.; Smith, D. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

294

AIRBORNE RESEARCH & SURVEY FACILITY (ARSF) http://arsf.nerc.ac.uk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

instruments can be made available for special applications: Large-format RC-10 aerial survey cameraAIRBORNE RESEARCH & SURVEY FACILITY (ARSF) http://arsf.nerc.ac.uk ANNOUNCEMENT OF OPPORTUNITY 2009 OCTOBER 2008 The Airborne Research & Survey Facility (ARSF) invites direct access applications for UK

295

NERC AIRBORNE RESEARCH & SURVEY FACILITY (ARSF) http://www.nerc.ac.uk/arsf/home.htm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-12 microns, 320 spatial pixels) Large-format RC-10 aerial survey camera, with images being suppliedNERC AIRBORNE RESEARCH & SURVEY FACILITY (ARSF) http://www.nerc.ac.uk/arsf/home.htm SPECIAL OF PROPOSALS: FRIDAY 9 OCTOBER 2009 The Airborne Research & Survey Facility (ARSF) invites applications

296

Relevance of international research facilities to international stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International Facilities have played an important play in expanding and keeping open a dialogue between east and west. The advent of glasnost has dramatically reduced inhibitions on communications and opened new opportunities for international facilities to facilitate the understanding and appreciation of common goals and common threats. This is accomplished through frank discussions in which real problems are identified and assessed while fictitious ones are laid to rest.

Rosen, L.

1989-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

297

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9, 2013 [Facility News] 9, 2013 [Facility News] ARM Facility Shares Return on Science Investments Bookmark and Share The Bolger Center-a former U.S. Postal Service training center-hosted the fourth annual ASR Science Team Meeting in March. The Bolger Center-a former U.S. Postal Service training center-hosted the fourth annual ASR Science Team Meeting in March. To quote Ben Franklin, "If a man empties his purse into his head, no man can take it away from him. An investment in knowledge always pays the best interest." ARM Climate Research Facility staff who attended the fourth annual Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science Team Meeting in April received a healthy dose of interest in March! With over 350 attendees presenting nearly 250 posters, the wealth of atmospheric climate science knowledge

298

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1992 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2, Environmental sciences  

SciTech Connect

The 1992 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment and health conducted during fiscal year 1992. This report consists of four volumes oriented to particular segments of the PNL program, describing research performed for the DOE Office of Health and Environmental Research in the Office of Energy Research. The parts of the 1992 Annual Report are: Biomedical Sciences; Environmental Sciences; Atmospheric Sciences; and Physical Sciences. This Report is Part 2: Environmental Sciences. Included in this report are developments in Subsurface Science, Terrestrial Science, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development, Interactions with Educational Institutions, Technology Transfer, Publications, and Presentations. The research is directed toward developing a fundamental understanding of subsurface and terrestrial systems as a basis for both managing these critical resources and addressing environmental problems such as environmental restoration and global change. The Technology Transfer section of this report describes a number of examples in which fundamental research is laying the groundwork for the technology needed to resolve important environmental problems. The Interactions with Educational Institutions section of the report illustrates the results of a long-term, proactive program to make PNL facilities available for university and preuniversity education and to involve educational institutions in research programs. The areas under investigation include the effect of geochemical and physical phenomena on the diversity and function of microorganisms in deep subsurface environments, ways to address subsurface heterogeneity, and ways to determine the key biochemical and physiological pathways (and DNA markers) that control nutrient, water, and energy dynamics in arid ecosystems and the response of these systems to disturbance and climatic change.

Grove, L.K. [ed.; Wildung, R.E.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Jointly sponsored research program. Annual report, January 1995--December 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document provides a brief summary of research, carried out by the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center, in areas pertaining to coal, pollution control, petroleum wastes, and gasoline.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

current research projects are problems that demand scientific attention by virtue of their considerable technological significance in the energy

Authors, Various

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A PACIFIC-WIDE GEOTHERMAL RESEARCH LABORATORY: THE PUNA GEOTHERMAL RESEARCH FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

The Hawaii Geothermal Project (HGP-A) well, located in the Kilauea volcano east rift zone, was drilled to a depth of 6450 feet in 1976. It is considered to be one of the hot-test producing geothermal wells in the world. This single well provides 52,800 pounds per hour of 371 F and 160 pounds per square inch-absolute (psia) steam to a 3-megawatt power plant, while the separated brine is discharged in percolating ponds. About 50,000 pounds per hour of 368 F and 155 psia brine is discharged. Geothermal energy development has increased steadily in Hawaii since the completion of HGP-A in 1976: (1) a 3 megawatt power plant at HGP-A was completed and has been operating since 1981; (2) Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) has requested that their next increment in power production be from geothermal steam; (3) three development consortia are actively, or in the process of, drilling geothermal exploration wells on the Big Island; and (4) engineering work on the development of a 400 megawatt undersea cable for energy transmission is continuing, with exploratory discussions being initiated on other alternatives such as hydrogen. The purpose for establishing the Puna Geothermal Research Facility (PGRF) is multifold. PGRF provides a facility in Puna for high technology research, development, and demonstration in geothermal and related activities; initiate an industrial park development; and examine multi-purpose dehydration and biomass applications related to geothermal energy utilization.

Takahashi, P.; Seki, A.; Chen, B.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

302

CENTER FOR RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH ANNUAL REPORT 2004 RARAF -Table of Contents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CENTER FOR RADIOLOGICAL RESEARCH · ANNUAL REPORT 2004 RARAF - Table of Contents RARAF Staff of the stand-alone microbeam vacuum sys- tem and installation and testing of the quadrupole mag- nets. Research and scored directly, in other experiments unir- radiated cells are physically separated from the irradiated

303

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 31, 2008 [Facility News] January 31, 2008 [Facility News] ARM Exhibit Showcases Continuous Data at American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting Bookmark and Share During the 88th annual AMS meeting, interested participants stop by the ARM exhibit where ARM researchers answered their questions. During the 88th annual AMS meeting, interested participants stop by the ARM exhibit where ARM researchers answered their questions. In January, ARM joined nearly 100 other exhibitors at the 88th American Meteorological Society annual meeting in New Orleans. This year's meeting was organized around the broad theme of "Enhancing the Connectivity between Research and Applications for the Benefit of Society." More than 3000 attendees from academia, the private sector, and government attended

304

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT 1980  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

November 21, 1980. 15. Exxon Corporation, Baton Rouge,of the Actinide Metals," Exxon Corporation, Linden, NewUniversity F. R. Gamble Exxon Research and Engineering T.

Searcy, Alan W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION. ANNUAL REPORT 1981  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

III Nuclear Sciences IV Fossil Energy v Advanced isotopeInvestigators [See Fossil Energy Section] f. Electrochemicaland the Office of Fossil Energy Research, of the U.S.

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in research in structure of materials, mechanical, and physical properties, solid state physics, and materials chemistry, including chemical structure, high temperature and surface chemistry, is reported. (FS)

Not Available

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Laboratory directed research and development. Annual report, fiscal year 1995  

SciTech Connect

This document is a compilation of the several research and development programs having been performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the fiscal year 1995.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Environmental Systems Research Candidates FY-01 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Systems Research Candidates (ESRC) Program ran from April 2000 through September 2001 as part of the Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) Program at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). ESRA provides key science and technology to meet the cleanup mission of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (EM), and performs research and development that will help solve current legacy problems and enhance the INEELs scientific and technical capability for solving longer-term challenges. This report documents the accomplishments of the ESRC Program. The ESRC Program consisted of 25 tasks subdivided within four research areas.

Miller, David Lynn; Piet, Steven James

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Materials and Molecular Research Division: Annual report, 1986  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research activities are reported under the following headings: materials sciences, chemical sciences, nuclear sciences, fossil energy, energy storage systems, and work for others. (DLC)

Phillips, N.E.; Muller, R.H.; Peterson, C.V.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2001  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2001. Applications of supportive research and development, as well as technology deployment in the fields of chemistry, radiation physics and dosimetry, and neutron source design and demonstration are described. Contributions in the fields of physics and biophysics include development of advanced patient treatment planning software, feasibility studies of accelerator neutron source technology for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT), and completion of major modifications to the research reactor at Washington State University to produce an epithermal-neutron beam for NCT research applications.

Venhuizen, James Robert

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2001  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2001. Applications of supportive research and development, as well as technology deployment in the fields of chemistry, radiation physics and dosimetry, and neutron source design and demonstration are described. Contributions in the fields of physics and biophysics include development of advanced patient treatment planning software, feasibility studies of accelerator neutron source technology for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT), and completion of major modifications to the research reactor at Washington State University to produce an epithermal-neutron beam for NCT research applications.

Venhuizen, James R.

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

312

Annual Review of Demand-Side Planning Research: 1985 Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's demand-side planning research spans a wide range of utility activities: planning and evaluating demand-side management programs, investigating end-use forecasting techniques, and analyzing the effect of innovative rates. Reflecting efforts to develop utility applications of EPRI research products in 1985, this report focuses on computer models such as REEPS, COMMEND, HELM, and INDEPTH.

None

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Applied Science Division annual report, Environmental Research Program FY 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary concern of the Environmental Research Program is the understanding of pollutant formation, transport, and transformation and the impacts of pollutants on the environment. These impacts include global, regional, and local effects on the atmosphere and hydrosphere, and on certain aspects of human health. This multidisciplinary research program includes fundamental and applied research in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology, as well as research on the development of advanced methods of measurement and analysis. During FY 1983, research concentrated on atmospheric physics and chemistry, applied physics and laser spectroscopy, combustion theory and phenomena, environmental effects of oil shale processing, freshwater ecology and acid precipitation, trace element analysis for the investigation of present and historical environmental impacts, and a continuing survey of instrumentation for environmental monitoring.

Cairns, E.J.; Novakov, T.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report, Fiscal year 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ``research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this Order. LDRD includes activities previously defined as ER&D, as well as other discretionary research and development activities not provided for in a DOE program.`` Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our ``core competencies.`` Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process technology; energy systems research. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. A significant proportion of PNL`s LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. The projects are described in Section 2.0. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. In accordance with DOE guidelines, the report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Industrial Hygiene Group annual research report, FY 1981  

SciTech Connect

Field studies have been performed at several oil shale facilities to identify unique industrial hygiene problems and provide input to inhalation toxicology studies aimed at evaluating the hazards of materials associated with this developing technology. Aerosol physics support has also been provided to develop aerosol generation and animal exposure techniques for evaluating the toxicity of oil shale materials and manmade mineral fibers. As part of the effort to assure a safe, orderly, and timely development of various synfuels, field evaluation of indicator-sampling procedures was perfomed, and industrial hygiene work practices for two synfuel technologies are being prepared. Respirator studies are used to evaluate the performances of special devices (some of which are not in the existing government approval schedules) and of a proposed test procedures for self-contained breathing apparatus. An approval procedure is being developed for air-purifying respirators required for protection against radioiodine, evaluating the adequacy of respirator programs at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensee facilities, and developing a program for respirator use under emergency situations. A new aerosol size-characterization stack sampler has been designed, and potential instrument changes to aerosol size monitoring for filter testing are being evaluated. Material permeability tests have identified the protection afforded by protective clothing materials, and improved analytical procedures have been developed for pentachlorophenol and plutonium.

Jackson, J.O.; Ettinger, H.J. (comps.)

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Monitoring of Downstream Salmon and Steelhead at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities, 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project 84-014 has been part of the annual integrated and coordinated Columbia River Basin Smolt Monitoring Program since 1984, and currently addresses measure 5.9A.1 of the 1994 Northwest Power Planning Council's (NPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. This report presents results from the 1998 smolt monitoring at John Day and Bonneville dams and represents the fifteenth annual report under this project.

Martinson, Rick D.; Kamps, Jeffrey W.; Kovalchuk, Gregory M. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Environmental and Technical Services Division, Portland, OR)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

ACCELERATOR & FUSION RESEARCH DIV. ANNUAL REPORT, OCT. 79 - SEPT. 80  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11, 1980, p. 725. MAGNETIC FUSION ENERGY Staff W. Kunkel andsupport) Accelerator and Fusion Research Division N.Abt Y.Wong J. Zatver HEAVY ION FUSION Work continued during FY80

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Laboratory directed research development annual report. Fiscal year 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document comprises Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s report for Fiscal Year 1996 on research and development programs. The document contains 161 project summaries in 16 areas of research and development. The 16 areas of research and development reported on are: atmospheric sciences, biotechnology, chemical instrumentation and analysis, computer and information science, ecological science, electronics and sensors, health protection and dosimetry, hydrological and geologic sciences, marine sciences, materials science and engineering, molecular science, process science and engineering, risk and safety analysis, socio-technical systems analysis, statistics and applied mathematics, and thermal and energy systems. In addition, this report provides an overview of the research and development program, program management, program funding, and Fiscal Year 1997 projects.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

MATERIALS AND MOLECULAR RESEARCH DIVISION ANNUAL REPORT 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Publications and Reports d. Oil Shale Retort Components A.in Simulated In-Situ Oil Shale Retorts Research Plans forP. 1111ittle and A. V. Levy, "Oil Shale Eetort Components,"

Authors, Various

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center 2007 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents highlights of the research conducted on NERSC computers in a variety of scientific disciplines during the year 2007. It also reports on changes and upgrades to NERSC's systems and services aswell as activities of NERSC staff.

Hules, John A.; Bashor, Jon; Wang, Ucilia; Yarris, Lynn; Preuss, Paul

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Laboratory directed research and development 2006 annual report.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 2006. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 430 individual R&D projects in 17 categories.

Westrich, Henry Roger

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Proceedings: 1987 Annual Review of Demand-Side Planning Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent EPRI research in demand-side planning (DSP) has focused on forecasting, end-use technology assessment, demand-side management (DSM), and innovative pricing. These 23 papers discuss vital DSP research, including customer response to interruptible rates, personal computer forecasting tools, integrated value-based planning, customer preference and behavior studies, and a database of end-use load shapes and DSM impacts.

None

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Argonne Transportation Technology R&D Center - Engine Research Facility and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engine Research Facility Engine Research Facility GM-Fiat 1.9 liter diesel engine test cell GM-Fiat 1.9 Liter Diesel Engine Test Cell Argonne's Engine Research Facility allows scientists and engineers to study in-cylinder combustion and emissions under realistic operating conditions. The size of engines in the facility range from automobile- to locomotive-sized, as well as stationary electric power production engines. Improving Engine Performance, Emissions Argonne researchers would like to find ways to improve engine performance and reliability, increase fuel efficiency, and reduce harmful exhaust emissions. Argonne's goal is to discover and evaluate new technologies to determine their technical feasibility and commercial viability. In addition, Argonne is conducting research on sustainable renewable fuels

324

The Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable 1996 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable was created just over a decade ago to provide a unique forum for dialogue among top government, university, and industry leaders in the national science and technology enterprise. The purpose is to facilitate personal working relationships and exchange of ideas about issues, problems, and promising opportunities facing those charged with developing and deploying science and technology resources. In 1996, Council meetings focused on the following: (1) the impact of information technology on the structure of research and educational organizations; (2) ways to improve communication between the science and engineering community and the public; and (3) new approaches both to measuring the results of research investments, and to communicating those metrics to non-technical decision-makers and to the public. Significant milestones were also achieved in four major projects, representing, impart, follow-up activity from previous Council Meeting discussions: (1) facilitating the Federal Demonstration Partnership, designed to maximize the efficiency of the federal research support system; (2) compiling results of a regional workshop on experiences in industry-university collaborative organization; (3) publishing the results of a study comparing the cost structures for research performed in the industrial, academic, and government laboratory sector; and (4) catalyzing, and participating in, a series of campus-based convocations on stresses being experienced in the research university environment.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

The Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The Government-University-Industry Research Roundtable was created just over a decade ago to provide a unique forum for dialogue among top government, university, and industry leaders of the national science and technology enterprise. The purpose is to facilitate personal working relationships and exchange of ideas about issues, problems, and promising opportunities that are facing those charged with developing and deploying science and technology resources. The open dialogue and informal exchange of ideas preclude a process of making formal recommendations or offering specific advice. Instead, the Roundtable seeks to stimulate new approaches by dissemination of its discussions, and pro-active contacts with organizations that may want to build on the idea base it establishes. After introductory material on the structure and operation of the Roundtable, accomplishments on current projects are described. Projects include: Stresses on research and education at colleges and universities; Formulating US research policies within an international context; The Federal Demonstration project, designed to improve the management of federally-funded research; Analysis of the costs of research in industrial, academic, and federal labs; Industry-university research collaborations; and Public stakeholding in America`s investment in science and technology.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

326

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2013 [Facility News] 4, 2013 [Facility News] Work Cut Out for ARM Science Board Bookmark and Share With a new fixed site on the horizon in the Azores, a third ARM Mobile Facility gearing up for action in the Arctic, and more aircraft probes and sensors than scientists can shake a stick at, the ARM Facility continues to expand its considerable suite of assets for conducting climate research. Along with this impressive inventory comes the responsibility to ensure the Facility is supporting the highest-value science possible. Enter the ARM Science Board. This eleven-member group annually reviews complex proposals for use of the ARM mobile and aerial facilities. To maintain excellence and integrity in the review process, each member serves a renewable term of two years, with membership updated annually.

327

Laboratory directed research and development annual report. Fiscal year 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. This report represents Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL`s) LDRD report for FY 1994. During FY 1994, 161 LDRD projects were selected for support through PNL`s LDRD project selection process. Total funding allocated to these projects was $13.7 million. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches in research related to our {open_quotes}core competencies.{close_quotes} Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy systems development. In this report, the individual summaries of LDRD projects (presented in Section 1.0) are organized according to these core competencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. Projects within the three core competency areas were approximately 91.4 % of total LDRD project funding at PNL in FY 1994. A significant proportion of PNL`s LDRD funds are also allocated to projects within the various research centers that are proposed by individual researchers or small research teams. Funding allocated to each of these projects is typically $35K or less. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program, the management process used for the program, and project summaries for each LDRD project.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Laboratory directed research and development annual report: Fiscal year 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE`s policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is ``research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this order. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL`s Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches to research related to our ``core competencies.`` Currently, PNL`s core competencies have been identified as: integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy distribution and utilization. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these corecompetencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. The projects described in this report represent PNL`s investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL`s LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Laboratory directed research and development annual report: Fiscal year 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Order DOE 5000.4A establishes DOE's policy and guidelines regarding Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) at its multiprogram laboratories. As described in 5000.4A, LDRD is research and development of a creative and innovative nature which is selected by the Laboratory Director or his or her designee, for the purpose of maintaining the scientific and technological vitality of the Laboratory and to respond to scientific and technological opportunities in conformance with the guidelines in this order. Consistent with the Mission Statement and Strategic Plan provided in PNL's Institutional Plan, the LDRD investments are focused on developing new and innovative approaches to research related to our core competencies.'' Currently, PNL's core competencies have been identified as: integrated environmental research; process science and engineering; energy distribution and utilization. In this report, the individual summaries of Laboratory-level LDRD projects are organized according to these corecompetencies. The largest proportion of Laboratory-level LDRD funds is allocated to the core competency of integrated environmental research. The projects described in this report represent PNL's investment in its future and are vital to maintaining the ability to develop creative solutions for the scientific and technical challenges faced by DOE and the nation. The report provides an overview of PNL's LDRD program and the management process used for the program and project summaries for each LDRD project.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research 1989 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research programs on reservoir rocks petroleum, and enhanced recovery are briefly presented. Topics include: Geotechnology; reservoir assessment and characterization; TORIS Research Support; three phase relative permeability; static pore structure analysis of reservoir rocks; effects of pore structure on oil/contaminants ganglia distribution; development of improved microbial flooding methods; development of improved surfactant flooding systems; development of improved alkaline flooding methods; development of improved mobility-control methods; gas miscible displacement; development of improved immiscible gas displacement methodology; thermal processes for light oil recovery; thermal processes for heavy oil recovery; an application of natural isotopes in groundwater for solving environmental problems; processing and thermodynamics research; thermochemistry and thermophysical properties of organic nitrogen- and diheteroatom-containing compounds; in situ hydrogenation; and fuel chemistry.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the US Departmental of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2006. The associated FY 2006 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2007/2) provides financial data about the FY 2006 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process.

Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2006 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the US Departmental of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2006. The associated FY 2006 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2007/2) provides financial data about the FY 2006 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process.

Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Annual report to Congress: Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the ninth Annual Report to the Congress describing Department of Energy (Department) activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The Board, an independent executive-branch agency established in 1988, provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of energy regarding public health and safety issues at the Department`s defense nuclear facilities. The Board also reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of health and safety standards, as well as other requirements, relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Department`s defense nuclear facilities. The locations of the major Department facilities are provided. During 1998, Departmental activities resulted in the proposed closure of one Board recommendation. In addition, the Department has completed all implementation plan milestones associated with four other Board recommendations. Two new Board recommendations were received and accepted by the Department in 1998, and two new implementation plans are being developed to address these recommendations. The Department has also made significant progress with a number of broad-based initiatives to improve safety. These include expanded implementation of integrated safety management at field sites, a renewed effort to increase the technical capabilities of the federal workforce, and a revised plan for stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

NONE

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Laboratory directed research and development annual report 2003.  

SciTech Connect

Science historian James Burke is well known for his stories about how technological innovations are intertwined and embedded in the culture of the time, for example, how the steam engine led to safety matches, imitation diamonds, and the landing on the moon.1 A lesson commonly drawn from his stories is that the path of science and technology (S&T) is nonlinear and unpredictable. Viewed another way, the lesson is that the solution to one problem can lead to solutions to other problems that are not obviously linked in advance, i.e., there is a ripple effect. The motto for Sandia's approach to research and development (R&D) is 'Science with the mission in mind.' In our view, our missions contain the problems that inspire our R&D, and the resulting solutions almost always have multiple benefits. As discussed below, Sandia's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program is structured to bring problems relevant to our missions to the attention of researchers. LDRD projects are then selected on the basis of their programmatic merit as well as their technical merit. Considerable effort is made to communicate between investment areas to create the ripple effect. In recent years, attention to the ripple effect and to the performance of the LDRD Program, in general, has increased. Inside Sandia, as it is the sole source of discretionary research funding, LDRD funding is recognized as being the most precious of research dollars. Hence, there is great interest in maximizing its impact, especially through the ripple effect. Outside Sandia, there is increased scrutiny of the program's performance to be sure that it is not a 'sandbox' in which researchers play without relevance to national security needs. Let us therefore address the performance of the LDRD Program in fiscal year 2003 and then show how it is designed to maximize impact.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Computer Science Research Institute 2005 annual report of activities.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2005 to December 31, 2005. During this period, the CSRI hosted 182 visitors representing 83 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these, 60 were summer students or faculty. The CSRI partially sponsored 2 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 3 workshops. These 3 CSRI sponsored workshops had 105 participants, 78 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 27 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 12 long-term collaborative research projects and 3 Sabbaticals.

Watts, Bernadette M.; Collis, Samuel Scott; Ceballos, Deanna Rose; Womble, David Eugene

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Computer Science Research Institute 2004 annual report of activities.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2004 to December 31, 2004. During this period the CSRI hosted 166 visitors representing 81 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these 65 were summer students or faculty. The CSRI partially sponsored 2 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 4 workshops. These 4 CSRI sponsored workshops had 140 participants--74 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 66 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 14 long-term collaborative research projects and 5 Sabbaticals.

DeLap, Barbara J.; Womble, David Eugene; Ceballos, Deanna Rose

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Computer Science Research Institute 2003 annual report of activities.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities of the Computer Science Research Institute (CSRI) at Sandia National Laboratories during the period January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2003. During this period the CSRI hosted 164 visitors representing 78 universities, companies and laboratories. Of these 78 were summer students or faculty members. The CSRI partially sponsored 5 workshops and also organized and was the primary host for 3 workshops. These 3 CSRI sponsored workshops had 178 participants--137 from universities, companies and laboratories, and 41 from Sandia. Finally, the CSRI sponsored 18 long-term collaborative research projects and 5 Sabbaticals.

DeLap, Barbara J.; Womble, David Eugene; Ceballos, Deanna Rose

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

1995 Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) is a key component of the discretionary research conducted by Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (Lockheed Idaho) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The threefold purpose and goal of the LDRD program is to maintain the scientific and technical vitality of the INEL, respond to and support new technical opportunities, and enhance the agility and flexibility of the national laboratory and Lockheed Idaho to address the current and future missions of the Department of Energy.

Cauffman, D.P.; Shoaf, D.L.; Hill, D.A.; Denison, A.B.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Environmental Systems Research and Analysis FY 2000 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Systems Research (ESR) Program, a part of the Environmental Systems Research and Analysis (ESRA) Program, was implemented to enhance and augment the technical capabilities of the INEEL. Strengthening the Technical capabilities of the INEEL will provide the technical base to serve effectively as the Environmental Management Laboratory for the Office of Environmental Management (EM). This is a progress report for the third year of the ESR Program (FY 2000). A report of activities is presented for the five ESR research investment areas: (1) Transport Aspects of Selective Mass Transport Agents, (2) Chemistry of Environmental Surfaces, (3) Materials Dynamics, (4) Characterization Science, and (5) Computational Simulation of Mechanical and Chemical Systems. In addition to the five technical areas, the report describes activities in the Science and Technology Foundations element of the program, e.g., interfaces between ESR and the EM Science Program (EMSP) and the EM Focus Areas. The five research areas are subdivided into 18 research projects. FY 2000 research in these 18 projects has resulted in more than 50 technical papers that are in print, in press, in review, or in preparation. Additionally, more than 100 presentations were made at professional society meetings nationally and internationally. Work supported by this program was in part responsible for one of our researchers, Dr. Mason Harrup, receiving the Department of Energys Bright Light and Energy at 23 awards. Significant accomplishments were achieved. Non-Destructive Assay hardware and software was deployed at the INEEL, enhancing the quality and efficiency of TRU waste characterization for shipment. The advanced tensiometer has been employed at numerous sites around the complex to determine hydrologic gradients in variably saturated vadose zones. An ion trap, secondary ion mass spectrometer (IT-SIMS) was designed and fabricated to deploy at the INEEL site to measure the chemical speciation of radionuclides and toxic metals on the surfaces of environmentally significant minerals. The FY 2001 program will have a significantly different structure and research content. This report presents the final summary of projects coming to an end in FY 2000 and is a bridge to the FY 2001 program.

David L. Miller; Castle, Peter Myer; Steven J. Piet

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

1996 Laboratory directed research and development annual report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 1996. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 259 individual R&D projects in seventeen categories. The general areas of research include: engineered processes and materials; computational and information sciences; microelectronics and photonics; engineering sciences; pulsed power; advanced manufacturing technologies; biomedical engineering; energy and environmental science and technology; advanced information technologies; counterproliferation; advanced transportation; national security technology; electronics technologies; idea exploration and exploitation; production; and science at the interfaces - engineering with atoms.

Meyers, C.E.; Harvey, C.L.; Lopez-Andreas, L.M.; Chavez, D.L.; Whiddon, C.P. [comp.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Quality Improvement Inspections Take Place Annual Quality Improvement Inspections Take Place Bookmark and Share During the SGP site audit conducted in April 2005, a member of the Continuous Quality Improvement Program team is accompanied by a local jackrabbit at the Ringwood Extended Facility. During the SGP site audit conducted in April 2005, a member of the Continuous Quality Improvement Program team is accompanied by a local jackrabbit at the Ringwood Extended Facility. The Continuous Quality Improvement Program (CQIP) implemented by the ARM Program in 1998 requires annual audits and inspection visits to each of the ARM Climate Research Facility Southern Great Plains (SGP) site's 27 field facilities located in Oklahoma and Kansas. A small team of scientists and engineers conduct the inspections each year to evaluate the field

342

Berkeley Lab Breaks Ground on the Computational Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

through its operation of the Energy Department's Energy Sciences Network (ESnet), which provides high-bandwidth connections for researchers worldwide to work together...

343

Materials and Molecular Research Division annual report 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress made in the following research areas is reported: materials sciences (metallurgy and ceramics, solid state physics, materials chemistry); chemical sciences (fundamental interactions, processes and techniques); nuclear sciences; fossil energy; advanced isotope separation technology; energy storage; magnetic fusion energy; and nuclear waste management.

Not Available

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

(National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research) 1988 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following research programs from NIPER are described: jet fuel stability, entrainers in carbon dioxide floods, differential scanning calorimetry simulation of crosslinking in a chemical flood, analytical methods reservoir characterization, strategic petroleum reserve support, microbial EOR, marine diesel fuel requirements, oil mining, hydrodenitrogenation of indole and petrographic image analysis. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

Not Available

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report for 2002  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities and major accomplishments for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2002. Topics covered include computational dosimetry and treatment planning software development, medical neutron source development and characterization, and boron analytical chemistry.

J. R. Venhuizen

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2002  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities and major accomplishments for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2002. Topics covered include computational dosimetry and treatment planning software development, medical neutron source development and characterization, and boron analytical chemistry.

Venhuizen, J.R.

2003-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

347

Institute for Scientific Computing Research Fiscal Year 2002 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Institute for Scientific Computing Research (ISCR) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is jointly administered by the Computing Applications and Research Department (CAR) and the University Relations Program (URP), and this joint relationship expresses its mission. An extensively externally networked ISCR cost-effectively expands the level and scope of national computational science expertise available to the Laboratory through CAR. The URP, with its infrastructure for managing six institutes and numerous educational programs at LLNL, assumes much of the logistical burden that is unavoidable in bridging the Laboratory's internal computational research environment with that of the academic community. As large-scale simulations on the parallel platforms of DOE's Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASCI) become increasingly important to the overall mission of LLNL, the role of the ISCR expands in importance, accordingly. Relying primarily on non-permanent staffing, the ISCR complements Laboratory research in areas of the computer and information sciences that are needed at the frontier of Laboratory missions. The ISCR strives to be the ''eyes and ears'' of the Laboratory in the computer and information sciences, in keeping the Laboratory aware of and connected to important external advances. It also attempts to be ''feet and hands, in carrying those advances into the Laboratory and incorporating them into practice. In addition to conducting research, the ISCR provides continuing education opportunities to Laboratory personnel, in the form of on-site workshops taught by experts on novel software or hardware technologies. The ISCR also seeks to influence the research community external to the Laboratory to pursue Laboratory-related interests and to train the workforce that will be required by the Laboratory. Part of the performance of this function is interpreting to the external community appropriate (unclassified) aspects of the Laboratory's own contributions to the computer and information sciences--contributions that its unique mission and unique resources give it a unique opportunity and responsibility to make. Of the three principal means of packaging scientific ideas for transfer--people, papers, and software--experience suggests that the most effective means is people. The programs of the ISCR are therefore people-intensive. Finally, the ISCR, together with CAR, confers an organizational identity on the burgeoning computer and information sciences research activity at LLNL and serves as a point of contact within the Laboratory for computer and information scientists from outside.

Keyes, D E; McGraw, J R; Bodtker, L K

2003-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

348

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Annual Report for 2009  

SciTech Connect

This report documents progress made on all LDRD-funded projects during fiscal year 2009. As a US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC) national laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has an enduring mission to bring molecular and environmental sciences and engineering strengths to bear on DOE missions and national needs. Their vision is to be recognized worldwide and valued nationally for leadership in accelerating the discovery and deployment of solutions to challenges in energy, national security, and the environment. To achieve this mission and vision, they provide distinctive, world-leading science and technology in: (1) the design and scalable synthesis of materials and chemicals; (2) climate change science and emissions management; (3) efficient and secure electricity management from generation to end use; and (4) signature discovery and exploitation for threat detection and reduction. PNNL leadership also extends to operating EMSL: the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility dedicated to providing itnegrated experimental and computational resources for discovery and technological innovation in the environmental molecular sciences.

Hughes, Pamela J.

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

DOE/SC-ARM-10-006.7 ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SC-ARM-10-006.7 ARM Climate Research Facility Monthly Instrument Report JW Voyles July 2010 Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of...

350

DOE/SC-ARM-13-004 Charter for the ARM Climate Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Charter for the ARM Climate Research Facility Science Board March 2013 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the U.S. Government. Neither the...

351

Lake Pend Oreille Predation Research, Annual Report 2002-2003.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During August 2002 we conducted a hydroacoustic survey to enumerate pelagic fish >406 mm in Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho. The purpose of this survey was to determine a collective lakewide biomass estimate of pelagic bull trout Salvelinus confluentus, rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, and lake trout S. namaycush and compare it to pelagic prey (kokanee salmon O. nerka) biomass. By developing hydroacoustic techniques to determine the pelagic predator to prey ratio, we can annually monitor their balance. Hydroacoustic surveys were also performed during December 2002 and February 2003 to investigate the effectiveness of autumn and winter surveys for pelagic predators. The inherent problem associated with hydroacoustic sampling is the inability to directly identify fish species. Therefore, we utilized sonic tracking techniques to describe rainbow trout and lake trout habitat use during our winter hydroacoustic survey to help identify fish targets from the hydroacoustic echograms. During August 2002 we estimated there were 39,044 pelagic fish >406 mm in Lake Pend Oreille (1.84 f/ha). Based on temperature and depth utilization, two distinct groups of pelagic fish >406 mm were located during August; one group was located between 10 and 35 m and the other between 40 and 70 m. The biomass for pelagic fish >406 mm during August 2002 was 73 t (metric ton). This would account for a ratio of 1 kg of pelagic predator for every 2.63 kg of kokanee prey, assuming all pelagic fish >406 mm are predators. During our late fall and winter hydroacoustic surveys, pelagic fish >406 mm were observed at lake depths between 20 and 90 m. During late fall and winter, we tracked three rainbow trout (168 habitat observations) and found that they mostly occupied pelagic areas and predominantly stayed within the top 10 m of the water column. During late fall (one lake trout) and winter (four lake trout), we found that lake trout (184 habitat observations) utilized benthic-nearshore areas 65% of the time and were found in the pelagic area only 35% of the time. Lake trout were found at depths between 10 and 90 m (average was approximately 30 m). Based on hydroacoustic surveys of pelagic fish >406 mm and habitat use of sonic tagged rainbow trout and lake trout during late fall and winter, we conclude that hydroacoustic sampling during those times would be ineffective at acquiring an accurate pelagic predator population estimate and recommend conducting abundance estimates for pelagic predators when Lake Pend Oreille is thermally stratified (i.e. August).

Bassista, Thomas

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

2005 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its second annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2005. During this period, sixteen PNNL scientists hosted fourteen young scientists from eleven different universities. Of the fourteen participants, twelve were graduate students; one was a postdoctoral fellow; and one was a university faculty member.

Barlow, Stephan E.

2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Mechanical Engineering Department engineering research: Annual report, FY 1986  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information on the five areas of research interest in LLNL's Mechanical Engineering Department. In Computer Code Development, a solid geometric modeling program is described. In Dynamic Systems and Control, structure control and structure dynamics are discussed. Fabrication technology involves machine cutting, interferometry, and automated optical component manufacturing. Materials engineering reports on composite material research and measurement of molten metal surface properties. In Nondestructive Evaluation, NMR, CAT, and ultrasound machines are applied to manufacturing processes. A model for underground collapse is developed. Finally, an alternative heat exchanger is investigated for use in a fusion power plant. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 13 reports in this publication. (JDH)

Denney, R.M.; Essary, K.L.; Genin, M.S.; Highstone, H.H.; Hymer, J.D.; Taft, S.O. (eds.)

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

FY 1999 Laboratory Directed Research and Development annual report  

SciTech Connect

A short synopsis of each project is given covering the following main areas of research and development: Atmospheric sciences; Biotechnology; Chemical and instrumentation analysis; Computer and information science; Design and manufacture engineering; Ecological science; Electronics and sensors; Experimental technology; Health protection and dosimetry; Hydrologic and geologic science; Marine sciences; Materials science; Nuclear science and engineering; Process science and engineering; Sociotechnical systems analysis; Statistics and applied mathematics; and Thermal and energy systems.

PJ Hughes

2000-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

355

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

Today, new ideas and opportunities, fostering the advancement of technology, are occurring at an ever-increasing rate. It, therefore, seems appropriate that a vehicle be available which fosters the development of these new ideas and technologies, promotes the early exploration and exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and which develops new ``fundable`` R&D projects and programs. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is the major factor achieving and maintaining staff excellence, and a means to address national needs, with the overall mission of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals, and presentations at meetings and forums.

Ogeka, G.J.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Experimental Geothermal Research Facilities study (Phase 0). Final report. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Phase 0 of a project for Experimental Geothermal Research Facilities focuses on identification of a representative liquid-dominated geothermal reservoir of moderate temperature and salinity, preliminary engineering design of an appropriate energy conversion system, identification of critical technology, and planning for implementation of experimental facilities. The objectives included development of liaison with the industrial sector, to ensure responsiveness to their views in facility requirements and planning, and incorporation of environmental and socioeconomic factors. The overall project, of which the six-month Phase 0 is reported herein, is phased in accordance with RANN guidelines. This Phase 0 report covers problem definition and systems requirements. Phase 1 will involve design of the experimental facility, and testing of components. Phase 2 will comprise detailed design and construction of an experimental geothermal electrical powerplant at East Mesa, Imperial County, California. Facilities will incorporate capability for research in component, system, and materials technology and a nominal 10 MWe experimental, binary cycle, power generating plant.

Not Available

1974-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

Annual Program Review NSF EPSCoR Kansas Center for Solar Energy Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2nd Annual Program Review NSF EPSCoR Kansas Center for Solar Energy Research June 12-14, 2011 at Cornell (emc2 ) Cornell University 9:00am-9:15am Overview of the Kansas Center for Solar Energy Research for Electrical Energy Storage: Batteries and Super-Caps Héctor D. Abruña--Director of Energy Materials Center

Peterson, Blake R.

358

2007 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its fourth annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from April through September 2007. During this time, 21 PNNL scientists hosted 23 participants from 20 different universities. Of the 23 participants, 20 were graduate students, 1 was a postdoctoral fellow, and 2 were university faculty members. This report covers the essense of the program and the research the participants performed.

Beck, Kenneth M.

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

NETL: News Release - NETL Opens Fuel Cell/Turbine Hybrid Research Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 20, 2004 May 20, 2004 NETL Opens Fuel Cell/Turbine Hybrid Research Facility MORGANTOWN, WV - The Hybrid Performance Facility - called the Hyper facility - is now fully operational at the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). This one-of-a-kind facility, developed by NETL's Office of Science and Technology, will be used to develop control strategies for the reliable operation of fuel cell/turbine hybrids. - NETL's Fuel Cell/Turbine Hybrid Facility - The Hyper facility allows assessment of dynamic control and performance issues in fuel cell/turbine hybrid systems. Combined systems of turbines and fuel cells are expected to meet power efficiency targets that will help eliminate, at competitive costs, environmental concerns associated with the use of fossil fuels for

360

1997 Laboratory directed research and development. Annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 1997. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 218 individual R&D projects in eleven categories. Theses reports are grouped into the following areas: materials science and technology; computer sciences; electronics and photonics; phenomenological modeling and engineering simulation; manufacturing science and technology; life-cycle systems engineering; information systems; precision sensing and analysis; environmental sciences; risk and reliability; national grand challenges; focused technologies; and reserve.

Meyers, C.E.; Harvey, C.L.; Chavez, D.L.; Whiddon, C.P. [comps.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Campbell Creek Research Homes FY 2012 Annual Performance Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Campbell Creek project is funded and managed by the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Technology Innovation, Energy Efficiency, Power Delivery & and Utilization Office. Technical support is provided under contract by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Electric Power Research Institute.The project was designed to determine the relative energy efficiency of typical new home construction, energy efficiency retrofitting of existing homes, and high -performance new homes built from the ground up for energy efficiency. This project will compare three houses that represented the current construction practice as a base case (Builder House CC1); a modified house that could represent a major energy- efficient retrofit (Retrofit House CC2); and a house constructed from the ground up to be a high- performance home (High Performance House CC3). In order tTo enablehave a valid comparison, it was necessary to simulate occupancy in all three houses and heavily monitor the structural components and the energy usage by component. All three houses are two story, slab on grade, framed construction. CC1 and CC2 are approximately 2,400 square feet2. CC3 has a pantry option, that is primarily used as a mechanical equipment room, that adds approximately 100 square feet2. All three houses are all-electric (with the exception of a gas log fireplace that is not used during the testing), and use air-source heat pumps for heating and cooling. The three homes are located in Knoxville in the Campbell Creek Subdivision. CC1 and CC2 are next door to each other and CC3 is across the street and a couple of houses down. The energy data collected will be used to determine the benefits of retrofit packages and high -performance new home packages. There are over 300 channels of continuous energy performance and thermal comfort data collection in the houses (100 for each house). The data will also be used to evaluate the impact of energy -efficient upgrades ton the envelope, mechanical equipment, or demand -response options. Each retrofit will be evaluated incrementally, by both short -term measurements and computer modeling, using a calibrated model. This report is intended to document the comprehensive testing, data analysis, research, and findings within the January 2011 through October 2012 timeframe at the Campbell Creek research houses. The following sections will provide an in-depth assessment of the technology progression in each of the three research houses. A detailed assessment and evaluation of the energy performance of technologies tested will also be provided. Finally, lessons learned and concluding remarks will be highlighted.

Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Jackson, Roderick K [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Khowailed, Gannate A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration : Annual Report 1997.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The once abundant stocks of Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) above Bonneville Dam are currently depressed (Close et al. 1995). It is likely that many of the same factors that led to the decline of wild stocks of Columbia River Pacific salmon and steelhead have impacted Pacific lamprey populations as well. The Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project, funded by Bonneville Power Administration, is a cooperative effort between the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, and Oregon State University with the goal to increase Pacific lamprey stocks above Bonneville Dam.

Jackson, Aaron D.; Hatch, Douglas R.; Close, David A.

1998-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

363

Laboratory directed research and development annual report 2004.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes progress from the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program during fiscal year 2004. In addition to a programmatic and financial overview, the report includes progress reports from 352 individual R and D projects in 15 categories. The 15 categories are: (1) Advanced Concepts; (2) Advanced Manufacturing; (3) Biotechnology; (4) Chemical and Earth Sciences; (5) Computational and Information Sciences; (6) Differentiating Technologies; (7) Electronics and Photonics; (8) Emerging Threats; (9) Energy and Critical Infrastructures; (10) Engineering Sciences; (11) Grand Challenges; (12) Materials Science and Technology; (13) Nonproliferation and Materials Control; (14) Pulsed Power and High Energy Density Sciences; and (15) Corporate Objectives.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Report of the Ad Hoc Committee on fusion plasma research facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report surveys the need for Fusion Plasma Research Facilities (FPRF) in advancing research in several areas of plasma and atomic physics that are essential to the CTR program and describes several device options for FPRF's. The major conclusions of the report are that there is an urgent need to provide such facilities and that the most significant contributions to CTR that would be made through these facilities are in the development of plasma diagnostics and measurements of atomic processes. (auth)

1976-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

365

Evaluation of a Low-Cost Salmon Production Facility; 1988 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fiscal year 1988 study sponsored by the Bonneville Power Administration evaluates an existing, small-scale salmon production facility operated and maintained by the Clatsop County Economic Development Committee's Fisheries Project.

Hill, James M.; Olson, Todd

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Evaluation of a Low-Cost Salmon Production Facility, 1986 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fiscal year 1986 study sponsored by the Bonneville Power Administration evaluates the presently existing, low-cost salmon production facility operated and maintained by the Clatsop Economic Development Committee's Fisheries Project.

Hill, James M.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Evaluation of a Low-Cost Salmon Production Facility, 1985 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fiscal year 1985 study sponsored by the Bonneville Power Administration evaluates the presently existing low-cost salmon production facility operated and maintained by the Clatsop Economic Development Committee Fisheries Project.

Hickerson, Andrew W.; Hill, James M.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Evaluation of a Low-Cost Salmon Production Facility, 1984 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fiscal year 1984 study sponsored by the Bonneville Power Administration evaluates the presently existing low-cost salmon production facility operated and maintained by the Clatsop Economic Development Committee's Fisheries Project.

Hickerson, Andrew W.; Hill, James M.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2004 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (January 8, 2001), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report describes all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2004 and includes final reports for completed projects and shorter progress reports for projects that were active, but not completed, during this period. The FY 2004 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2005/2) provides financial data about the FY 2004 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching national security mission, which encompasses science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national nuclear security. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to the specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work For Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at . LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other multiprogram DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing the Laboratory's ability to address future DOE missions; (3) fostering creativity and stimulating exploration of forefront science and technology; (4) serving as a proving ground for new research; and (5) supporting high-risk, potentially high-value R&D. Through LDRD the Laboratory is able to improve its distinctive capabilities and enhance its ability to conduct cutting-edge R&D for its DOE and WFO sponsors. To meet the LDRD objectives and fulfill the particular needs of the Laboratory, ORNL has established a program with two components: the Director's R&D Fund and the Seed Money Fund. As outlined in Table 1, these two funds are complementary. The Director's R&D Fund develops new capabilities in support of the Laboratory initiatives, while the Seed Money Fund is open to all innovative ideas that have the potential for enhancing the Laboratory's core scientific and technical competencies. Provision for multiple routes of access to ORNL LDRD funds maximizes the likelihood that novel and seminal ideas with scientific and technological merit will be recognized and supported.

Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2004 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (January 8, 2001), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report describes all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2004 and includes final reports for completed projects and shorter progress reports for projects that were active, but not completed, during this period. The FY 2004 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2005/2) provides financial data about the FY 2004 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching national security mission, which encompasses science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national nuclear security. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to the specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work For Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at . LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other multiprogram DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing the Laboratory's ability to address future DOE missions; (3) fostering creativity and stimulating exploration of forefront science and technology; (4) serving as a proving ground for new research; and (5) supporting high-risk, potentially high-value R&D. Through LDRD the Laboratory is able to improve its distinctive capabilities and enhance its ability to conduct cutting-edge R&D for its DOE and WFO sponsors. To meet the LDRD objectives and fulfill the particular needs of the Laboratory, ORNL has established a program with two components: the Director's R&D Fund and the Seed Money Fund. As outlined in Table 1, these two funds are complementary. The Director's R&D Fund develops new capabilities in support of the Laboratory initiatives, while the Seed Money Fund is open to all innovative ideas that have the potential for enhancing the Laboratory's core scientific and technical competencies. Provision for multiple routes of access to ORNL LDRD funds maximizes the likelihood that novel and seminal ideas with scientific and technological merit will be recognized and supported.

Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2005 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (January 8, 2001), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report describes all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2005 and includes final reports for completed projects and shorter progress reports for projects that were active, but not completed, during this period. The FY 2005 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2006/2) provides financial data about the FY 2005 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching national security mission, which encompasses science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national nuclear security. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to the specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work For Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at . LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other multiprogram DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing the Laboratory's ability to address future DOE missions; (3) fostering creativity and stimulating exploration of forefront science and technology; (4) serving as a proving ground for new research; and (5) supporting high-risk, potentially high-value R&D. Through LDRD the Laboratory is able to improve its distinctive capabilities and enhance its ability to conduct cutting-edge R&D for its DOE and WFO sponsors. To meet the LDRD objectives and fulfill the particular needs of the Laboratory, ORNL has established a program with two components: the Director's R&D Fund and the Seed Money Fund. As outlined in Table 1, these two funds are complementary. The Director's R&D Fund develops new capabilities in support of the Laboratory initiatives, while the Seed Money Fund is open to all innovative ideas that have the potential for enhancing the Laboratory's core scientific and technical competencies. Provision for multiple routes of access to ORNL LDRD funds maximizes the likelihood that novel and seminal ideas with scientific and technological merit will be recognized and supported.

Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2007 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries for all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2007. The associated FY 2007 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2008/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching mission to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States and promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work for Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at http://www.ornl.gov/. LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing the Laboratory's ability to address future DOE missions; (3) fostering creativity and stimulating exploration of forefront science and technology; (4) serving as a proving ground for new research; and (5) supporting high-risk, potentially high-value R&D. Through LDRD the Laboratory is able to improve its distinctive capabilities and enhance its ability to conduct cutting-edge R&D for its DOE and WFO sponsors. To meet the LDRD objectives and fulfill the particular needs of the Laboratory, ORNL has established a program with two components: the Director's R&D Fund and the Seed Money Fund. As outlined in Table 1, these two funds are complementary. The Director's R&D Fund develops new capabilities in support of the Laboratory initiatives, while the Seed Money Fund is open to all innovative ideas that have the potential for enhancing the Laboratory's core scientific and technical competencies. Provision for multiple routes of access to ORNL LDRD funds maximizes the likelihood that novel ideas with scientific and technological merit will be recognized and supported.

Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2005 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2A, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (January 8, 2001), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report describes all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2005 and includes final reports for completed projects and shorter progress reports for projects that were active, but not completed, during this period. The FY 2005 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2006/2) provides financial data about the FY 2005 projects and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching national security mission, which encompasses science, energy resources, environmental quality, and national nuclear security. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to the specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work For Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at . LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other multiprogram DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing the Laboratory's ability to address future DOE missions; (3) fostering creativity and stimulating exploration of forefront science and technology; (4) serving as a proving ground for new research; and (5) supporting high-risk, potentially high-value R&D. Through LDRD the Laboratory is able to improve its distinctive capabilities and enhance its ability to conduct cutting-edge R&D for its DOE and WFO sponsors. To meet the LDRD objectives and fulfill the particular needs of the Laboratory, ORNL has established a program with two components: the Director's R&D Fund and the Seed Money Fund. As outlined in Table 1, these two funds are complementary. The Director's R&D Fund develops new capabilities in support of the Laboratory initiatives, while the Seed Money Fund is open to all innovative ideas that have the potential for enhancing the Laboratory's core scientific and technical competencies. Provision for multiple routes of access to ORNL LDRD funds maximizes the likelihood that novel and seminal ideas with scientific and technological merit will be recognized and supported.

Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program FY 2007 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program reports its status to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in March of each year. The program operates under the authority of DOE Order 413.2B, 'Laboratory Directed Research and Development' (April 19, 2006), which establishes DOE's requirements for the program while providing the Laboratory Director broad flexibility for program implementation. LDRD funds are obtained through a charge to all Laboratory programs. This report includes summaries for all ORNL LDRD research activities supported during FY 2007. The associated FY 2007 ORNL LDRD Self-Assessment (ORNL/PPA-2008/2) provides financial data and an internal evaluation of the program's management process. ORNL is a DOE multiprogram science, technology, and energy laboratory with distinctive capabilities in materials science and engineering, neutron science and technology, energy production and end-use technologies, biological and environmental science, and scientific computing. With these capabilities ORNL conducts basic and applied research and development (R&D) to support DOE's overarching mission to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States and promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission. As a national resource, the Laboratory also applies its capabilities and skills to specific needs of other federal agencies and customers through the DOE Work for Others (WFO) program. Information about the Laboratory and its programs is available on the Internet at http://www.ornl.gov/. LDRD is a relatively small but vital DOE program that allows ORNL, as well as other DOE laboratories, to select a limited number of R&D projects for the purpose of: (1) maintaining the scientific and technical vitality of the Laboratory; (2) enhancing the Laboratory's ability to address future DOE missions; (3) fostering creativity and stimulating exploration of forefront science and technology; (4) serving as a proving ground for new research; and (5) supporting high-risk, potentially high-value R&D. Through LDRD the Laboratory is able to improve its distinctive capabilities and enhance its ability to conduct cutting-edge R&D for its DOE and WFO sponsors. To meet the LDRD objectives and fulfill the particular needs of the Laboratory, ORNL has established a program with two components: the Director's R&D Fund and the Seed Money Fund. As outlined in Table 1, these two funds are complementary. The Director's R&D Fund develops new capabilities in support of the Laboratory initiatives, while the Seed Money Fund is open to all innovative ideas that have the potential for enhancing the Laboratory's core scientific and technical competencies. Provision for multiple routes of access to ORNL LDRD funds maximizes the likelihood that novel ideas with scientific and technological merit will be recognized and supported.

Sjoreen, Terrence P [ORNL

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project : Annual Report 2001.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) has significantly declined along the Oregon coast and in the Columbia River Basin (Downey et al. 1993; Close and Jackson 2001). Declines in adults can be partially attributed to hydroelectric dams, which have impeded passage of adult Pacific lamprey in the Columbia and Snake rivers, thus effecting larval recruitment in the basin. Adult pacific lamprey also declined in numbers in the Umatilla River, a tributary of the Columbia River. In addition to hydro power dams in the Columbia River, habitat alterations and chemical treatments have been involved in the collapse of Pacific lamprey populations in the Umatilla River. To initiate the restoration effort, CTUIR began developing a restoration plan in 1998. The goal of the lamprey research and restoration project is to restore natural production of Pacific lampreys in the Umatilla River to self-sustaining and harvestable level. This report is summarizing the studies and restoration efforts concluded in 2001.

Close, David A.

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Laboratory Directed Research and Development FY2011 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A premier applied-science laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has earned the reputation as a leader in providing science and technology solutions to the most pressing national and global security problems. The LDRD Program, established by Congress at all DOE national laboratories in 1991, is LLNL's most important single resource for fostering excellent science and technology for today's needs and tomorrow's challenges. The LDRD internally directed research and development funding at LLNL enables high-risk, potentially high-payoff projects at the forefront of science and technology. The LDRD Program at Livermore serves to: (1) Support the Laboratory's missions, strategic plan, and foundational science; (2) Maintain the Laboratory's science and technology vitality; (3) Promote recruiting and retention; (4) Pursue collaborations; (5) Generate intellectual property; and (6) Strengthen the U.S. economy. Myriad LDRD projects over the years have made important contributions to every facet of the Laboratory's mission and strategic plan, including its commitment to nuclear, global, and energy and environmental security, as well as cutting-edge science and technology and engineering in high-energy-density matter, high-performance computing and simulation, materials and chemistry at the extremes, information systems, measurements and experimental science, and energy manipulation. A summary of each project was submitted by the principal investigator. Project summaries include the scope, motivation, goals, relevance to DOE/NNSA and LLNL mission areas, the technical progress achieved in FY11, and a list of publications that resulted from the research. The projects are: (1) Nuclear Threat Reduction; (2) Biosecurity; (3) High-Performance Computing and Simulation; (4) Intelligence; (5) Cybersecurity; (6) Energy Security; (7) Carbon Capture; (8) Material Properties, Theory, and Design; (9) Radiochemistry; (10) High-Energy-Density Science; (11) Laser Inertial-Fusion Energy; (12) Advanced Laser Optical Systems and Applications; (12) Space Security; (13) Stockpile Stewardship Science; (14) National Security; (15) Alternative Energy; and (16) Climatic Change.

Craig, W; Sketchley, J; Kotta, P

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

377

Annual report to Congress: Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, Calendar Year 1999  

SciTech Connect

This is the tenth Annual Report to the Congress describing Department of Energy activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (Board). The Board, an independent executive-branch agency established in 1988, provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy regarding public health and safety issues at the Department's defense nuclear facilities. The Board also reviews and evaluates the content and implementation of health and safety standards, as well as other requirements, relating to the design, construction, operation, and decommissioning of the Department's defense nuclear facilities. During 1999, Departmental activities resulted in the closure of nine Board recommendations. In addition, the Department has completed all implementation plan milestones associated with three Board recommendations. One new Board recommendation was received and accepted by the Department in 1999, and a new implementation plan is being developed to address this recommendation. The Department has also made significant progress with a number of broad-based initiatives to improve safety. These include expanded implementation of integrated safety management at field sites, opening of a repository for long-term storage of transuranic wastes, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

None

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Calendar year 2002 annual site environmental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.  

SciTech Connect

Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, oversees TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2002. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990) and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).

Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Calendar year 2003 : annual site enviromental report for Tonopah Test Range, Nevada and Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.  

SciTech Connect

Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2003. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2003) and DOE Order 231.1 Chg 2., Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 1996).

Wagner, Katrina; Sanchez, Rebecca V.; Mayeux, Lucie; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Modular Pebble Bed Reactor Project, University Research Consortium Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project is developing a fundamental conceptual design for a gas-cooled, modular, pebble bed reactor. Key technology areas associated with this design are being investigated which intend to address issues concerning fuel performance, safety, core neutronics and proliferation resistance, economics and waste disposal. Research has been initiated in the following areas: Improved fuel particle performance Reactor physics Economics Proliferation resistance Power conversion system modeling Safety analysis Regulatory and licensing strategy Recent accomplishments include: Developed four conceptual models for fuel particle failures that are currently being evaluated by a series of ABAQUS analyses. Analytical fits to the results are being performed over a range of important parameters using statistical/factorial tools. The fits will be used in a Monte Carlo fuel performance code, which is under development. A fracture mechanics approach has been used to develop a failure probability model for the fuel particle, which has resulted in significant improvement over earlier models. Investigation of fuel particle physio-chemical behavior has been initiated which includes the development of a fission gas release model, particle temperature distributions, internal particle pressure, migration of fission products, and chemical attack of fuel particle layers. A balance of plant, steady-state thermal hydraulics model has been developed to represent all major components of a MPBR. Component models are being refined to accurately reflect transient performance. A comparison between air and helium for use in the energy-conversion cycle of the MPBR has been completed and formed the basis of a masters degree thesis. Safety issues associated with air ingress are being evaluated. Post shutdown, reactor heat removal characteristics are being evaluated by the Heating-7 code. PEBBED, a fast deterministic neutronic code package suitable for numerous repetitive calculations has been developed. Use of the code has focused on scoping studies for MPBR design features and proliferation issues. Publication of an archival journal article covering this work is being prepared. Detailed gas reactor physics calculations have also been performed with the MCNP and VSOP codes. Furthermore, studies on the proliferation resistance of the MPBR fuel cycle has been initiated using these code Issues identified during the MPBR research has resulted in a NERI proposal dealing with turbo-machinery design being approved for funding beginning in FY01. Two other NERI proposals, dealing with the development of a burnup meter and modularization techniques, were also funded in which the MIT team will be a participant. A South African MPBR fuel testing proposal is pending ($7.0M over nine years).

Petti, David Andrew

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project : Annual Report 1999.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes results of research activities conducted from 1996 through 1999. The findings in these chapters represent the efforts of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and collaborative efforts among other researchers working on Pacific lampreys (Lampetra tridentata) under this project. The findings in these chapters will help management and recovery of Pacific lampreys in the Columbia River Basin. Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) of Pacific lampreys from tribal members within the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation was useful in gaining baseline life history information. Tribal members described harvesting two types of lampreys from spring through fall, the short brown type and the long dark type. Lamprey spawning distribution was from the mouth to the headwaters in the Umatilla River. Larval lampreys were observed in the mud and sand areas of the river. Tribal members observed major declines in lampreys within the Columbia River basin. Larval Pacific lampreys were distributed throughout the John Day River basin. Larval distribution in the other subbasins was patchy and limited to the lower reaches of the streams. Larval densities were highly variable in the Middle Fork John Day and North Fork John Day rivers, as opposed to the Main stem John Day River. Larval lengths varied little in the Middle Fork John Day and North Fork John Day rivers, but were highly variable in the Main stem John Day River. Larval abundance decreased as we moved upstream in the Columbia and Snake rivers. In addition, we found strong evidence for lack of larval recruitment as distance increased from the mouth of the Columbia River. We identified clinical indicators of stress in adult Pacific lampreys. Plasma glucose became elevated soon after acute stress and remained elevated for one week. Plasma lactate also became elevated by 30 minutes; however, it decreased to resting levels by one hour after application of the stressor. Muscle lactate was shown to have an inverse relationship with glucose. Muscle lactate levels decreased by 4 hours and remained depressed for two days. Plasma chloride ions decreased by one hour, then returned to resting levels by 8 hours, decreased again at 24 hours, and then recovered by 48 hours. The steroid cortisol was not found in the plasma of Pacific lampreys. Our study suggests plasma glucose, lactate, chloride ions, and muscle lactate can be used as clinical indicators of stress in Pacific lampreys.

Close, David A.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Pacific Lamprey Research and Restoration Project, Annual Report 2002.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) has significantly declined along the Oregon coast and in the Columbia River Basin (Downey et al. 1993, Close and Jackson 2001). Declines in adults can be partially attributed to hydroelectric dams, which have impeded passage of adult Pacific lamprey in the Columbia and Snake rivers (Moser et al. 2002), thus effecting larval recruitment in the basin (Moser and Close in press). Adult Pacific lamprey also declined in numbers in the Umatilla River, a tributary of the Columbia River (Close and Jackson 2001). In addition to hydro power dams in the Columbia River, habitat alterations and chemical treatments have been involved in the collapse of Pacific lamprey populations in the Umatilla River (Close 1999). To initiate the restoration effort, CTUIR began developing a restoration plan in 1998. The goal of the lamprey research and restoration project is to restore natural production of Pacific lampreys in the Umatilla River to self-sustaining and harvestable level. This report is summarizing the studies and restoration efforts concluded in 2002.

Close, David; Aronsuu, Kimmo; Jackson, Aaron

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2012 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reports included in this report are for project activities that occurred from October 2011 through September 2012. These reports describe in detail the discoveries, achievements, and challenges encountered by our talented and enthusiastic principal investigators (PIs). Many of the reports describe R&D efforts that were successful in their pursuits and resulted in a positive outcome or technology realization. As weve stated before, and continue to stress, in some cases the result is a negative finding, for instance a technology is currently impractical or out of reach. This can often be viewed erroneously as a failure, but is actually a valid outcome in the pursuit of high-risk research, which often leads to unforeseen new paths of discovery. Either result advances our knowledge and increases our ability to identify solutions and/or likewise avoid costly paths not appropriate for the challenges presented. The SDRD program continues to provide an unfettered mechanism for innovation and development that returns multifold to the NNSS mission. Overall the program is a strong R&D innovation engine, benefited by an enhanced mission, committed resources, and sound competitiveness to yield maximum benefit. The 23 projects described exemplify the creativity and ability of a diverse scientific and engineering talent base. The efforts also showcase an impressive capability and resource that can be brought to find solutions to a broad array of technology needs and applications relevant to the NNSS mission and national security.

,

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Hanford Site near-facility environmental monitoring annual report, calendar year 1997  

SciTech Connect

Near-facility environmental monitoring provides a means to measure the impacts of operations, waste management, and remediation activities on the environment adjacent to facilities and ensure compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulations. Specifically, near-facility environmental monitoring monitors new and existing sites, processes, and facilities for potential impacts and releases; fugitive emissions and diffuse sources associated with contaminated areas, facilities (both active and those undergoing surveillance and maintenance), and environmental restoration activities. External radiation, ambient air particulates, ground and surface water, soil, sediment, and biota (plants and animals) are sampled or monitored. Parameters include, as appropriate, radionuclides; radiation fields; chemical or physical constituents, such as nitrates; pH; and water temperature. All ambient air results were below the US Department of Energy (DOE) Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs). Groundwater concentrations at the two wells at the 107-N Facility were below both the DOE DCG and US Environmental Protection Agency Interim Drinking Water Standards for gamma emitting radionuclides. Soil and vegetation results were generally within historic ranges and mostly below the Accessible Soil Concentration limits (included in HNF-PRO-454, Inactive Waste Sites) with the exception of one soil sampling location at 1 00 N Area. External radiation fields continued an overall downward trend. Surface water disposal unit samples (water, sediment, and aquatic vegetation) showed radionuclide concentrations below their respective DCG and Accessible Soil Concentration limits. The 100 N Area Columbia river shoreline springs results were below DCGs with the exception of one Sr concentration. More than 4,600 ha (11,300 acres) of radiologically controlled areas were surveyed in 1997, approximately the same as in 1996.

Perkins, C.J.

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

385

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1September 30, 2012  

SciTech Connect

Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

Voyles, JW

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

386

ARM Climate Research Facility Quarterly Instrument Report Fourth Quarter: October 1December 30, 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

Voyles, JW

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

387

[National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research] 1991 annual report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Annual Report provides research accomplishments, publications, and presentations resulting from the FY91 research conducted under the following Base Program projects: reservoir assessment and characterization; TORIS research support; three-phase relative permeability; imaging techniques applied to the study of fluids in porous media; development of improved microbial flooding methods; development of improved surfactant flooding methods; development of improved alkaline flooding methods; development of improved mobility- control methods; gas flooding; mobility control and sweep improvement in gas flooding; thermal processes for light oil recovery; thermal processes for heavy oil recovery; thermochemistry and thermophysical properties of organic nitrogen- and diheteroatom- containing compounds; and development of analytical methodology for analysis of heavy crudes.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Annual report to Congress. Department of Energy activities relating to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, calendar year 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Annual Report to the Congress describes the Department of Energy's activities in response to formal recommendations and other interactions with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. During 2000, the Department completed its implementation and proposed closure of one Board recommendation and completed all implementation plan milestones associated with two additional Board recommendations. Also in 2000, the Department formally accepted two new Board recommendations and developed implementation plans in response to those recommendations. The Department also made significant progress with a number of broad-based safety initiatives. These include initial implementation of integrated safety management at field sites and within headquarters program offices, issuance of a nuclear safety rule, and continued progress on stabilizing excess nuclear materials to achieve significant risk reduction.

None

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Annual  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19 19 th Annual Triple "E" Seminar Presented by U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory and Spectroscopy Society of Pittsburgh Thursday, January 20, 2011 8:00 a.m. Registration & Breakfast 8:30 a.m. Opening Remarks/Welcome Michael Nowak, Senior Management & Technical Advisor National Energy Technology Laboratory 8:35 a.m. Overview of Energy Issues Michael Nowak, Senior Management & Technical Advisor National Energy Technology Laboratory 8:45 a.m. Introduction of Presenters McMahan Gray National Energy Technology Laboratory 8:50 a.m. Jane Konrad, Pgh Regional Center for Science Teachers "Green - What Does it Mean" 9:45 a.m. Break 10:00 a.m. John Varine, Spectroscopy Society of Pittsburgh

390

NEPA CX Determination SS-SC-12-03 for the Stanford Research Computer Facility (SRCF)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 for the Stanford Research Computer Facility (SRCF) 3 for the Stanford Research Computer Facility (SRCF) National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determination A. SSO NEPA Control #: SS-SC-12-03 AN12038 B. Brief Description of Proposed Action: The project scope includes the construction of a new computer facility (21,500 square feet) capable of providing 3 MW of data center potential. The new two-story facility will provide infrastructure for a multitude of server racks. There are three fenced service yards outside the building, one for chillers, one for new electrical substation equipment, and one for emergency generators. The ground floor will be utilized for electrical and receiving area; the second floor will have a server room, mechanical room, conference

391

Monitoring of Downstream Salmon and Steelhead at Federal Hydroelectric Facilities, 1997 Annual Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

All juvenile fish numbers, sample, collection, and index were down almost 50% from the previous year at John Day Dam (JDA). At Bonneville Dam, sample numbers increased while collection and index numbers stayed about the same. The following report presents results from the 1997 smolt monitoring at John Day and Bonneville dams and represents the fourteenth annual report under this project. The report also contains summaries of data for all years of the program at John Day and Bonneville dams in Appendices C and D.

Martinson, Rick D.; Kamps, Jeffrey W.; Mills, Robert B. (Northwest and Alaska Fisheries Science Center, Environmental and Technical Services Division, Portland, OR)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute. Annual report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) is a Government-owned facility leased and operated by the Lovelace Biomedical and Environmental Research Institute (LBERI) as a private, nonprofit research and testing laboratory. LBERI is an operating subsidiary of the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute. Through September 30, 1996, ITRI was a Federally Funded Research and Development Center operated by Lovelace for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as a {open_quotes}Single Program Laboratory{close_quotes} within the DOE Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research. Work for DOE continues in the privatized ITRI facility under a Cooperative Agreement. At the time of publication, approximately 70% of the Institute`s research is funded by DOE, and the remainder is funded by a variety of Federal agency, trade association, individual industry, and university customers. The principal mission of ITRI is to conduct basic and applied research to improve our understanding of the nature and magnitude of the human health impacts of inhaling airborne materials in the home, workplace, and general environment. Institute research programs have a strong basic science orientation with emphasis on the nature and behavior of airborne materials, the fundamental biology of the respiratory tract, the fate of inhaled materials and the mechanisms by which they cause disease, and the means by which data produced in the laboratory can be used to estimate risks to human health. Disorders of the respiratory tract continue to be a major health concern, and inhaled toxicants are thought to contribute substantially to respiratory morbidity. As the country`s largest facility dedicated to the study of basic inhalation toxicology, ITRI provides a national resource of specialized facilities, personnel, and educational activities serving the needs of government, academia, and industry.

Bice, D.E.; Hahn, F.F.; Henderson, R.F. [eds.] [and others

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

AICD -- Advanced Industrial Concepts Division Biological and Chemical Technologies Research Program. 1993 Annual summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1993 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program of the Advanced Industrial Concepts Division (AICD). This AICD program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1993 (ASR 93) contains the following: A program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives), program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1993, detailed descriptions of individual projects, a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work, patents, and awards arising from work supported by BCTR.

Petersen, G.; Bair, K.; Ross, J. [eds.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

2006 Annual Report Summer Research Institute Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) hosted its third annual Summer Research Institute in Interfacial and Condensed Phase Chemical Physics from May through September 2006. During this period, twenty PNNL scientists hosted twenty-seven scientists from twenty-five different universities. Of the twenty-seven participants, one was a graduating senior; twenty-one were graduate students; one was a postdoctoral fellow; and four were university faculty members.

Avery, Nikki B.; Barlow, Stephan E.

2006-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

395

Umatilla Basin Fish Facilities Operation & Maintenance : Annual Report Fiscal Year 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westland Irrigation District, as contractor to Bonneville Power Administration, and West Extension Irrigation District, as subcontractor to Westland, provide labor, equipment, and material necessary for the operation, care, and maintenance of fish facilities on the Umatilla River. Westland Irrigation District is the contractor of record. Job sites that are covered: Three Mile Right, Three Mile Left, Three Mile Adult Spawning, WEID Sampling Facility, Maxwell Screen Site, Westland Screen Site/Ladder/Juvenile Sampling Facility, Feed Canal Ladder/Screen Site, Stanfield Ladder/Screen Site, Minthorn Holding Facility, Thornhollow Acclimation Site, Imeques Acclimation Site, Pendleton Acclimation Site, and South Fork Walla Walla Spawning Facility. O & M personnel coordinate with the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) personnel in performing tasks under this contract including scheduling of trap and haul, sampling, acclimation site maintenance, and other related activities as needed. The input from ODFW biologists Bill Duke and Ken Loffink, and CTUIR biologist Preston Bronson is indispensable to the success of the project, and is gratefully acknowledged. All tasks associated with the project were successfully completed during the fiscal year 2008 work period of October, 2007 through September, 2008. The project provides operations and maintenance throughout the year on five fish screen sites with a total of thirty-four rotating drum-screens, and four fish ladders in the Umatilla River Basin; additionally, periodic operations and maintenance is performed at holding, acclimation, and spawning sites in the Basin. Three people are employed full-time to perform these tasks. The FY08 budget for this project was $492,405 and actual expenditures were $490,267.01. Selected work activities and concerns: (1) Feed Dam Passage Improvement Project - A project to improve fish passage over the short term at the Feed Canal Diversion Dam site (Umatilla River mile 28.7) was implemented with local U.S. Bureau of Reclamation field office personnel coordinating project activities. Operation and Maintenance Project personnel assisted with labor, materials, and equipment to ensure the project was completed as planned. Discussions are under way to determine feasible alternatives for longer term solutions to passage issues at the site. (2) Three Mile Right (east bank) Facilities - The pump for supplying water to the fish handling facility holding pond was reconstructed successfully to achieve the desired increase in flow output necessary when increased quantities of fish are present. (3) Fish Screen Rehab at Stanfield Canal Diversion - Working with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife screen shop personnel, three rotating drum screens at the Stanfield Canal diversion site (Umatilla River mile 33.3) were serviced and overhauled with new bearings, seals, paint, and reinforcing bars. Work was completed, and screens reinstalled prior to water diversions beginning in the spring. (4) O & M personnel performed daily, weekly, and monthly operations and maintenance duties at the screen and ladder sites including, but not limited to, desilting of mud and debris, lubrication of mechanical parts, replacement of screen seals and screen motor components, adjustment of ladder gates, removal of large trees and woody debris deposited during high river flow conditions, servicing of pumps and screens for fish handling operations and sampling studies, in addition to general site clean-up, vegetative control, and security. Crew members responded as needed during evenings and after-hours according to weather conditions, river flows, and fish passage facility needs.

Wick, Mike

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

Hanford site near-facility environmental monitoring annual report, calendar year 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the results of the near-facility environmental monitoring results for 1996 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 areas of the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water, groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. The monitoring implements applicable portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 (DOE 1988a), 5400.5 (DOE 1990), and 5820.2A (DOE 1988b); Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247; and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with federal, state, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities can still be observed on the Hanford Site and radiation levels were slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

Perkins, C.J.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

397

Summary engineering description of underwater fuel storage facility for foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel  

SciTech Connect

This document is a summary description for an Underwater Fuel Storage Facility (UFSF) for foreign research reactor (FRR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF). A FRR SNF environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is being prepared and will include both wet and dry storage facilities as storage alternatives. For the UFSF presented in this document, a specific site is not chosen. This facility can be sited at any one of the five locations under consideration in the EIS. These locations are the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Nevada Test Site. Generic facility environmental impacts and emissions are provided in this report. A baseline fuel element is defined in Section 2.2, and the results of a fission product analysis are presented. Requirements for a storage facility have been researched and are summarized in Section 3. Section 4 describes three facility options: (1) the Centralized-UFSF, which would store the entire fuel element quantity in a single facility at a single location, (2) the Regionalized Large-UFSF, which would store 75% of the fuel element quantity in some region of the country, and (3) the Regionalized Small-UFSF, which would store 25% of the fuel element quantity, with the possibility of a number of these facilities in various regions throughout the country. The operational philosophy is presented in Section 5, and Section 6 contains a description of the equipment. Section 7 defines the utilities required for the facility. Cost estimates are discussed in Section 8, and detailed cost estimates are included. Impacts to worker safety, public safety, and the environment are discussed in Section 9. Accidental releases are presented in Section 10. Standard Environmental Impact Forms are included in Section 11.

Dahlke, H.J.; Johnson, D.A.; Rawlins, J.K.; Searle, D.K.; Wachs, G.W.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Environmental Science and Research Foundation, Inc. annual technical report: Calendar year 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Annual Technical Report describes work conducted for the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), by the Environmental Science and Research Foundation (Foundation). The Foundation`s mission to DOE-ID provides support in several key areas. The Foundation conducts an environmental monitoring and surveillance program over an area covering much of the upper Snake River Plain, and provides environmental education and support services related to Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) natural resource issues. Also, the Foundation, with its University Affiliates, conducts ecological and radioecological research on the Idaho National Environmental Research Park. This research benefits major DOE-ID programs including Waste Management, Environmental Restoration, Spent Nuclear Fuels, and Land Management Issues. Summaries are included of the individual research projects.

Reynolds, R.D.; Warren, R.W. [eds.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Annual research plan, 1983-84. [Organic compounds derived from fossil substances  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) resulted from efforts by the Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure the continuity of the unique energy research capabilities that had been developed at the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) over the past 65 years. This was accomplished by a Cooperative Agreement between DOE and IIT Research Institute (IITRI). The agreement to operate NIPER for the five fiscal years 1984-88 became effective October 1, 1983. The NIPER Annual Research Plan for 1983-84 consists of eight projects in the Base Program and 13 projects in the Optional Program. A sampling of potential Work for Others projects is also presented. The Base Program consists of five EOR and three Fundamental Petroleum Chemistry projects. The Optional Program has three EOR projects, one Unconventional Gas Recovery project, five APT projects, and four Advanced Utilization Research projects.

None

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

ARM Climate Research Facility Infrastructure Report for the August 2005 STEC Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Research Facility Climate Research Facility Operations Status System Upgrades & Enhancements Status Brad Perkins ARM Engineering, TWPO/AMF March 29, 2006 2 Overview ARM Science Team Meeting - March 2006 Progress Report Demonstration Discussion? 3 Background Before we go on... Who is my Audience? Do I need to explain OSS' Purpose? 4 Background OSS Meeting, July 2005 Argonne National Laboratory ECO-00432 Late 2004/Early 2005 Requirements Analysis Operations Managers, OSS Users Present Problems Reviewed & Solutions Offered Future Features/Modules Discussed Path Forward Outlined w/ Schedule Calibration Module Requirement Removed 5 Status December 2005 Target Underestimated Effort Other Issues Competing Priorities (AMF support) Post Argonne Meeting Requirements Gathering

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Research Support Facility Data Center: An Example of Best Practices Implementation (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure details the design and operations of the Research Support Facility (RSF) data center. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is world-renowned for its commitment to green building construction. To further this commitment to green building and leading by example, NREL included an ultra-energy-efficient data center in the laboratory's new Research Support Facility (RSF), which recently received a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design{reg_sign} (LEED) Platinum designation from the U.S. Green Building Council.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Clean Ferrous Casting Technology Research. Annual report, September 29, 1993--September 28, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report covers work performed in the first year of research on Clean Ferrous Casting Technology Research. During this year the causes of penetration of cast iron in sand molds were defined and a program which predicts the occurrence of penetration was written and verified in commercial foundries. Calculations were made to size a reaction chamber to remove inclusions from liquid steel using electromagnetic force and the chamber was built. Finally, significant progress was made in establishing pouring practices which avoid re-oxidation of steel during pouring application of revised pouring practices have led to reduced inclusion levels in commercially poured steel castings.

Stefanescu, D.M.; Lane, A.M.; Giese, S.R.; Pattabhi, R.; El-Kaddah, N.H.; Griffin, J.; Bates, C.E.; Piwonka, T.S.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Environmental Science and Research Foundation. Annual technical report, April 11, 1994--December 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This Annual Technical Report describes work conducted for the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office, by the Environmental Science and Research Foundation (Foundation) for work under contract DE-AC07-94ID13268. The Foundation began, on April 11, 1994, to conduct environmental surveillance near to and distant from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, provide environmental public relations and education related to INEL natural resource issues, and conduct ecological and radioecological research benefiting major DOE-ID programs including Waste Management, Environmental Restoration, Spent Nuclear Fuels, and Infrastructure.

Reynolds, T.D.; Morris, R.C.; Markham, O.D. [eds.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Overview of Fiscal Year 2002 Research and Development for Savannah River Site's Salt Waste Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of high-level waste for disposal. The Salt Processing Program (SPP) is the salt (soluble) waste treatment portion of the SRS high-level waste effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction and operation of treatment technologies to prepare the salt waste feed material for the site's grout facility (Saltstone) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to Defense Waste Processing Facility include actinides, strontium, cesium, and entrained sludge. In fiscal year 2002 (FY02), research and development (R&D) on the actinide and strontium removal and Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) processes transitioned from technology development for baseline process selection to providing input for conceptual design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility. The SPP R&D focused on advancing the technical maturity, risk reduction, engineering development, and design support for DOE's engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractors for the Salt Waste Processing Facility. Thus, R&D in FY02 addressed the areas of actual waste performance, process chemistry, engineering tests of equipment, and chemical and physical properties relevant to safety. All of the testing, studies, and reports were summarized and provided to the DOE to support the Salt Waste Processing Facility, which began conceptual design in September 2002.

H. D. Harmon, R. Leugemors, PNNL; S. Fink, M. Thompson, D. Walker, WSRC; P. Suggs, W. D. Clark, Jr

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

405

A Fisheries Evaluation of the Dryden Fish Screening Facility : Annual Report 1994.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effectivness was evaluated of the Dryden Fish Screening Facility in the Wenatchee Reclamation District Canal near Dryden in north central Washington State. In situ tests were conducted by releasing groups of hatchery reared salmonids of different ages and sizes. Spring chinook salmon smolts (110-165 mm) were not injured or descaled in passing through the canal forebay. Smolts were not delayed as they migrated in the canal. Most fish released at the canal headworks exited the screening facility in <4 h, with >99% of the test fish captured in the fish bypass in <24 h. Steelhead subyearlings 65-125 mm were not injured or descaled in traveling through the bypass flume and fish return pipe. Average time for steelhead subyearlings to travel through thebypass structure was 70 seconds. Small rainbow trout fry 23-27mm could pass through the 0.125-in. profile bar screen openings and were entrained in the irrigation canal; about 38% was lost to the canal within 48 h of release. Some fry stayed in the forebay and did not migrate during the tests. Wild chinook fry 36-42mm were also entrained. Estimated 34% of emergent wild chinook salmon fry passed through the profile bar screens and were entrained in the canal. Approach velocity at the Dryden screens was {ge}0.4 ft/s; low velocities through the first two screen panels indicated that vertical louvers installed behind each screen panel to balance flow were not totally effective.

Mueller, Robert P.; Abernethy, C.Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project: Solar Radiation Research annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report gives an overview of the fiscal year 1990 research activities and results under the Solar Radiation Research Task of the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the Solar Energy Research Institute. The activities under this task include developing and applying measurement techniques, instrumentation, and data and models to understand and quantify the response of photovoltaic devices to variations in broadband and spectra solar radiation. The information presented in this report was presented at the SERI Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project 10th Review Meeting, October 1990, and will be published in a special issue of Solar Cells dedicated to the meeting.

Riordan, C.; Hulstrom, R.; Cannon, T.; Myers, D.; Stoffel, T.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Environmental Science and Research Foundation annual technical report: Calendar year 1996  

SciTech Connect

This Annual Technical Report describes work conducted for the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), by the Environmental Science and Research Foundation (Foundation). The Foundation`s mission to DOE-ID provides support in several key areas. The authors conduct an environmental monitoring and surveillance program over an area covering much of the upper Snake River Plain, and provide environmental education and support services related to Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) natural resource issues. Also, the Foundation, with its University Affiliates, conducts ecological and radioecological research in the Idaho National Environmental Research Park. This research benefits major DOE-ID programs including Waste Management, Environmental Restoration, Spent Nuclear Fuels, and Land Management Issues. The major accomplishments of the Foundation and its University Affiliates during the calendar year 1996 are discussed.

Morris, R.C.; Blew, R.D. [eds.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Brookhaven National Laboratory is home to world-class research facilities and sc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is home to world-class research facilities and scientific is home to world-class research facilities and scientific departments which attract resident and visiting scientists in many fields. This outstanding mix of machine- and mind-power has on seven occasions produced research deemed worthy of the greatest honor in science: the Nobel Prize. 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, of the Medical Research Council Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, UK, a former employee in Brookhaven's Biology Department, and a long-time user of Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University, also a long-time NSLS user, shared the prize with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science for studying the structure and function of the ribosome.

409

Velocity Measurements at Three Fish Screening Facilities in the Yakima Basin, Washington : Summer 1989 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) measured the velocity conditions at three fish screening facilities in the Yakima River Basin: Wapato, Chandler, and Easton Screens. The measurement objectives were different at the three screens. At Wapato, approach and sweep velocities were measured to evaluate the effect of rearing pens in the screen forebay. A complete survey was performed at the Chandler Screens. At Easton, velocity was measured behind the screens to provide information for the installation of porosity boards to balance flow through the screens. Salmon-rearing pens used at the Wapato Canal had a minimal effect on the magnitude of approach and sweep velocities at the face of the drum screens, although the pens caused increased turbulence and variability in water velocities. The net pens did not appear to affect flows through the three fish bypasses. 8 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

Abernethy, C. Scott; Neitzel, Duane A.; Lusty, E. William

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 15, 2008 Facility News National User Facility Organization Meets to Discuss Progress and Ideas In late April, the ARM Technical Director attended an annual meeting of the...

411

Research Support Facility - A Model of Super Efficiency (RSF) (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet published by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory discusses the lab's newest building, the Research Support Facility (RSF). The RSF is a showcase for ultra-efficient workplaces. Various renewable energy and energy efficiency features have been employed so that the building achieves a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum rating from the U.S. Green Building Council.

Not Available

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility (RSF) (Book)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An in-depth look at how the U.S. DOE and NREL used a performance-based design-build contract to build the Research Support Facility (RSF); one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world.

Not Available

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Bus Research and Testing Program Heavy-duty Chassis Dynamometer and Emissions Testing Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bus Research and Testing Program Heavy-duty Chassis Dynamometer and Emissions Testing Facility, hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide from transit buses and heavy-duty vehicles when they are tested on simulated includes a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer, required for conducting these tests, as well as a heavy

Lee, Dongwon

414

Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Office of Defense Science Office of Defense Science Facilities Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Research and Development > Facilities Facilities Office of Research and Development, Facilities The Office of Research and Development manages and oversees the operation of an exceptional suite of science, technology, and engineering facilities that support and further the national stockpile stewardship agenda. Of varying size, scope and capabilities, the facilities work in a concert to accomplish the following activities: Annual assessment of the stockpile in the face of increasing challenges due to aging or remanufacture, Reduced response times for resolving stockpile issues, Timely and certifiable completion of Life Extension Programs,

415

Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility : Monthly Progress Report November 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

FISH PRODUCTION: Final shocking of eggs was finished in the incubation. Egg enumeration for the 2008 brood was completed and the eggs are being incubated in 38 degree Fahrenheit chilled water. Don Larsen of NOAA made a request of eggs for research purposes and was able to acquire supplemental line eggs 10,555. Estimated density at the time of ponding in Mid-March of 2009 is approximately 43,869 fry per raceway after calculating an average fry loss of 2%. The end of the month totals for the 2007 brood reports 773,807 juveniles on hand with an overall average of 31.4 fish per pound. Tagging continues on the 2007 brood and is on pace to wrap up in early December. FISH CULTURE: Ponds are cleaned as needed and due to the colder water temperatures, the feeding frequency has been changed to three days a week. All ponds are sampled at the end of the month. Growth for production fish are adjusted accordingly as temperature dictates feeding levels. Torrential rain on the 12th turned the Yakima River extremely turbid. Fish tagging operations were halted and the ensuing conditions at the facility intake screens became a concern. Water flow to the wet well became restricted so the decision was made to shut the surface water (river) pumps down and turn on well pumps No.1, No.4 and No.6 to run water to the facility head box. This operation continued for twenty-four hours at which point normal operations were optimal and fish tagging resumed, although the river didn't clear up enough to feed the fish until the 17th. WATER PRODUCTION: The current combined well and river water supply to the complex is 14,822 gallons/minute. Well No.2 is pumping water at a rate of 530 gallons per minute. All four river pumps are in operation and pumping 14,292 gallons/minute. ACCLIMATION SITES: Cle Elum staff has been working to prep the acclimation sites for the upcoming fish transfer before the snow falls. Thermographs at each site are changed weekly. AMB Tools performed routine maintenance on the compressor and Brown and Jackson pumped out the septic tank at the Jack Creek acclimation site. VEHICLE MAINTENANCE: Snow tires are now on all vehicles and snow blowers were installed on the John Deere tractor and lawn tractor. The snowplow was also installed on the Ford one ton. The four Snowmobiles were serviced by Yamaha Jacks of Ellensburg. MAINTENANCE BUILDING MAINTENANCE: Clean up occurs on Fridays of each week. HATCHERY BUILDING MAINTENANCE: Water has been turned on to vertical incubator islands one and two. After eggs were transferred to vertical stacks cleaning of troughs began. WDFW crew inventoried eggs from isolettes and then transferred them to the vertical incubators. RIVER PUMP STATION MAINTENANCE: All four pumps are in operation and supplying the facility with 14,292 gallons/minute of water to rearing ponds. WELL FIELD MAINTENANCE: Well pumps No.1, No.4 and No.6 were turned on to supplement water flow to the facility as mentioned previously. Well No.5 was powered up but a winterizing valve malfunction wouldn't allow operation, we are currently working on it at this time. Well No.2 is pumping 530 gallons per minute and supplies well water to incubation and chiller. The pumps meter is recorded weekly. Test holes are monitored weekly and results are faxed to CH2MHILL afterward. SAFETY AND TRAINING: Ice melt and sand bags are popular items at the facility this month as freezing temperatures cause ground to become slippery and hazardous. GROUNDS: Van Alden's Plumbing installed a new commode in resident house No.411 and also inspected a plumbing problem at resident No.1131. Cle Elum staff along with WDFW staff worked to locate the spawning channel building back to the position it was at to have Greg Wallace of Wallace Electric hook electricity back up to the spawning shed. MEETINGS AND TOURS: Charlie attended a policy meeting at Cle Elum on the 18th. The Internal projects annual review took place at Cle Elum on the 19th and 20th. Bill Bosch continues to visit monthly to incorporate data into the YKFP data base. PERSONNEL: IHS employees traveled to Cle

Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

416

Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility : Monthly Progress Report : December 1, 2008 - December 31, 2008.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

FISH PRODUCTION: Brood year 2008 production and experimental hatchery & supplemental crossed eggs continue to be incubated and chilled water at 380 Fahrenheit for the month. Temperature units are {approx}960 TU's at the end of the month. Hatching was observed at {approx}900 temperature units (TU's). The 2007 Brood year (BY) has approximately 773,477 juveniles on hand at the end of December, averaging 30.6 fish per pound. Fish tagging operations wrapped up on the 5th. Transportation of fish to acclimation sites is tentatively scheduled to begin January 12th. FISH CULTURE: Production pond cleaning continues on a weekly basis, and feeding continues to be performed two days per week due to the colder river water temperatures. Eggs in the incubation continue to be tempered in 38 degree water and temperature units recorded daily. On the 20th the river became too inclement for normal operations as the intake screens were covered with ice, at that time we shutdown two river pumps and turned on wells four and six to get 6,825 gallons of water. This was the operation at the facility for twenty-four hours at which point we were able to get back to normal operations. WATER PRODUCTION: The current combined well and river water supply to the complex is 14,756 gallons/min. The river pumps are supplying 13,571 gallons per minute. Well pumps No.2 and No.4 are operating and supplying 1,185 gallons/min. More on well pumps in the well field maintenance section of this report. ACCLIMATION SITES: Preparation of acclimation sites for fish transfer was the main focus for the month of December. Each week thermographs that record water temperature have the data disc changed at the acclimations sites. Ford Excavation with assistance from YKFP maintenance has started clearing snow out of the Easton acclimation site. VEHICLE MAINTENANCE: The snowmobiles were taken in to have annual maintenance performed. The full-size John Deere tractor needed and was taken to Barnet Implement in Yakima. The tractor needed a new clutch installed and was picked up on the 31st. SHOP BUILDING MAINTENANCE: On the 12th the facility domestic water hydro pneumatic tank and its system malfunctioned. The problem persisted and had to be dealt with multiple times; first it caused the tank to over flow and floods the shop. Wallace Electric was called and after extensive monitoring of the tank, compressor and electrical operations an electrical relay switch was replaced. Weekly cleaning and tool inventory continues to be a priority. The shop is home to our liberation truck along with fish transfer equipment, fish pump and seine nets. ELECTRICAL BUILDING MAINTENANCE: The large generator is located in the electrical building and is checked daily for routine inspections. HATCHERY BUILDING MAINTENANCE: The incubation building is being used to clean and repair isolation buckets, egg incubation baskets and troughs. An experiment involving remote site incubators (RSI's) continued through the month. Chad Stockton, WDFW, records flows and monitors emergence of fry on a daily basis. Chad is working with Steve S. and Curt K. on the RSI's research along with spawning channel fry emergence. RIVERWATER COOLING FACILITY: The one pump in operation in this building is checked daily during our routine inspections, the variable pump is supplying water to the artificial spawning channel. RIVER PUMP STATION MAINTENANCE: All four river pumps are in operation and pumping {approx}13,571 gallons/min to the facility. The building is cleaned monthly and the air burst system is cycled daily during the morning checks. The crew continued weekly changing of the graph paper on the river temperature thermograph throughout the month, continuing this activity as part of the daily checks routine. WELL FIELD MAINTENANCE: Wells No.1 and No.4 were in operation and supplying 1,185 gallons/minute to the facility and incubation building. Weekly test well readings are recorded and sent via fax to CH2MHILL. Also weekly well meter readings are recorded. Well No.5 had been determined to have a faulty drain valve while tryin

Cle Elum Supplementation and Research Facility

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

417

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 4: Physical sciences  

SciTech Connect

Part 4 of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Annual Report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research includes those programs funded under the title ``Physical and Technological Research.`` The Field Task Program Studies reported in this document are grouped by budget category. Attention is focused on the following subject areas: dosimetry research; and radiological and chemical physics.

Braby, L.A.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

PADS FY 2010 Annual Reports FY 2010 Obligations to Facilities Management Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

C4N - SHELTERED WORKSHOP 1 831,263 C4N - SHELTERED WORKSHOP 1 831,263 C0L - LOCAL GOVT/MUNICIPALITY 2 125,000 B22 - LARGE BUSINESS 979 2,388,060,659 C3N - NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION 24 282,357,286 I0E - EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION 9 4,970,555 A00 - SMALL BUSINESS 1,890 1,921,241,548 C0F - FEDERAL GOVERNMENT 478 388,669,688 E1N - FOREIGN CONTRACTOR 1 -16,921,324 8 UNIQUE VALUES 3,384 4,969,334,675 Geographic Distribution of FY 2010 Obligations to Non-Facilities Management Awards STATE NUMBER OF AWARDS FY 2010 OBLIGATIONS NORTH DAKOTA (ND) 28 2,832,957 ILLINOIS (IL) 68 25,598,750 ARIZONA (AZ) 96 8,732,671 WISCONSIN (WI) 6 831,049 GEORGIA (GA) 34 5,300,948 NORTH CAROLINA (NC) 17 10,995,700 RHODE ISLAND (RI) 2 660,000 DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA (DC) 770 524,559,400 PENNSYLVANIA (PA) 132 84,970,982

419

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1994 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to enhance steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. Bonifer Pond, Minthorn Springs and Imeques C-mem-ini-kem acclimation facilities are operated for acclimation and release of juvenile summer steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss), fall and spring chinook salmon (O. tshawytscha) and coho salmon (O, kisutch). Minthorn is also used for holding and spawning summer steelhead, fall chinook and coho salmon. In the spring of 1994, juvenile summer steelhead were acclimated at Bonifer and Minthorn. At Imeques C-mem-ini-kem, juvenile spring chinook were acclimated in the spring and fall. A total of 92 unmarked and 42 marked summer steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from October 1, 1993 through May 2, 1994 and held at Minthorn. An estimated 234,432 green eggs were taken from 48 females. The eggs were transferred to Irrigon Hatchery for incubation and early rearing. Fingerlings were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for final rearing and release into the Umatilla River in 1995. Fall chinook and coho salmon broodstock were not collected in 1994. Coded-wire tag recovery information was accessed to determine the contribution of Umatilla River releases to ocean, Columbia River and Umatilla River fisheries. Total estimated juvenile adult survival rates are detailed in this document.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Annual Groundwater Detection Monitoring Report for the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (2008)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the data collected for groundwater detection monitoring at the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) during calendar year 2008. The detection-monitoring program developed for the ICDF groundwater-monitoring wells is applicable to six wells completed in the uppermost portion of the Snake River Plain Aquifer ? five wells downgradient of the ICDF and one well upgradient. The ICDF detection-monitoring program was established to meet the substantive requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Parts 264.97 and 264.98, which are applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements under CERCLA. Semiannual groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for indicator parameters in March and September. The indicator parameters focus on constituents that are found in higher concentrations in ICDF leachate than in groundwater (bicarbonate alkalinity, sulfate, U-233, U-234, and U-238). The only detection monitoring limits that were exceeded were for bicarbonate alkalinity. Bicarbonate alkalinity is naturally occurring in groundwater. Bicarbonate alkalinity found in ICDF detection monitoring wells is not a result of waste migration from the ICDF landfill or the evaporation pond. The U.S. Department of Energy will continue with detection monitoring for the ICDF, which is semiannual sampling for indicator parameters.

Lorie Cahn

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research facility annual" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Annual Groundwater Detection Monitoring Report for the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (2008)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the data collected for groundwater detection monitoring at the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) during calendar year 2008. The detection-monitoring program developed for the ICDF groundwater-monitoring wells is applicable to six wells completed in the uppermost portion of the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Five wells downgradient of the ICDF and one well upgradient. The ICDF detection-monitoring program was established to meet the substantive requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Parts 264.97 and 264.98, which are applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements under CERCLA. Semiannal groundwater samples were collected and analyzed for indicator parameters in March and September. The indicator parameters focus on constituents that are found in higher concentrations in ICDF leachate than in groundwater (bicarbonate alkalinity, sulfate, U-233, and U-238). The only detection monitoring limits that were exceeded were for bicarbonate alkalinity. Bicarbonate alkalinity is naturally occuring in groundwater. Bicarbonate alkalinity found in ICDF detection monitoring wells is not a result of waste migration from the ICDF landfill or the evaporation pond. The U.S. Department of Energy will continue with detection monitoring for the ICDF, which is semiannual sampling for indicator parameters.

Lorie Cahn

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

422

NPL 1999 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 NPL 1999 Annual Report. The Nuclear Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington in Seattle pursues a broad program of nuclear physics research. Research activities are conducted locally and at remote sites. The current program includes ''in-house'' research on nuclear collisions using the local tandem Van de Graaff and superconducting linac accelerators as well as local and remote non-accelerator research on fundamental symmetries and weak interactions and user-mode research on relativistic heavy ions at large accelerator facilities around the world.

None

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Research and Education Campus Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory Research and Education Campus facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool to develop the radioactive waste management basis.

L. Harvego; Brion Bennett

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research annual report for October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This Annual Report provides research accomplishments, publications, resulting from the FY92 research conducted under the following Base Program projects: reservoir assessment and characterization; TORIS research support; three-phase relative permeability; imaging techniques applied to the study of fluids in porous media; surfactant flooding methods; development of improved alkaline flooding methods; mobility control and sweep improvement in chemical flooding; development of improved microbial flooding methods; gas flooding performance prediction improvement; mobility control, profile modification, and sweep improvement in gas flooding; thermal processes for light oil recovery; thermal processes for heavy oil recovery; thermochemistry and thermophysical properties of organic nitrogen- and diheteroatom-containing compounds; and development of analytical methodology for analysis of heavy crudes.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Reducing Data Center Loads for a Large-Scale, Low-Energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility (Book)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This publication detailing the design, implementation strategies, and continuous performance monitoring of NREL's Research Support Facility data center. Data centers are energy-intensive spaces that facilitate the transmission, receipt, processing, and storage of digital data. These spaces require redundancies in power and storage, as well as infrastructure, to cool computing equipment and manage the resulting waste heat (Tschudi, Xu, Sartor, and Stein, 2003). Data center spaces can consume more than 100 times the energy of standard office spaces (VanGeet 2011). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reported that data centers used 61 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) in 2006, which was 1.5% of the total electricity consumption in the U.S. (U.S. EPA, 2007). Worldwide, data centers now consume more energy annually than Sweden (New York Times, 2009). Given their high energy consumption and conventional operation practices, there is a potential for huge energy savings in data centers. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is world renowned for its commitment to green building construction. In June 2010, the laboratory finished construction of a 220,000-square-foot (ft{sup 2}), LEED Platinum, Research Support Facility (RSF), which included a 1,900-ft{sup 2} data center. The RSF will expand to 360,000 ft{sup 2} with the opening of an additional wing December, 2011. The project's request for proposals (RFP) set a whole-building demand-side energy use requirement of a nominal 35 kBtu/ft{sup 2} per year. On-site renewable energy generation will offset the annual energy consumption. To support the RSF's energy goals, NREL's new data center was designed to minimize its energy footprint without compromising service quality. Several implementation challenges emerged during the design, construction, and first 11 months of operation of the RSF data center. This document highlights these challenges and describes in detail how NREL successfully overcame them. The IT settings and strategies outlined in this document have been used to significantly reduce data center energy requirements in the RSF; however, these can also be used in existing buildings and retrofits.

Sheppy, M.; Lobato, C.; Van Geet, O.; Pless, S.; Donovan, K.; Powers, C.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

New Construction Jobs Begin as Argonne Builds New Energy Research Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction Jobs Begin as Argonne Builds New Energy Research Construction Jobs Begin as Argonne Builds New Energy Research Facility New Construction Jobs Begin as Argonne Builds New Energy Research Facility June 3, 2011 - 2:08pm Addthis Senator Richard Durbin, University of Chicago President Robert Zimmer, Secretary Chu, and Argonne Director Eric Isaacs break ground for the new Energy Sciences Building. | Photo Courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory Senator Richard Durbin, University of Chicago President Robert Zimmer, Secretary Chu, and Argonne Director Eric Isaacs break ground for the new Energy Sciences Building. | Photo Courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory Lindsey Geisler Lindsey Geisler Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs America has a long tradition of scientific inquiry and breakthroughs. And

427

ARM Climate Research Facilities on the North Slope of Alaska: Field Campaigns in 2007, New Facilities, and the International Polar Year  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Research Facilities on the North Slope of Alaska: Climate Research Facilities on the North Slope of Alaska: Field Campaigns in 2007, New Facilities, and the International Polar Year Radiative Heating in Underexplored Bands Campaign (RHUBC): Feb 26 - Mar 14 2007 Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Contributors: Mark Ivey, Bernie Zak, Jeff Zirzow, Sandia National Labs Dana Truffer-Moudra, University of Alaska Fairbanks Hans Verlinde, Chad Bahrmann, Scott Richardson, Penn State University Winter

428

LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY - DECEMBER 2000.  

SciTech Connect

The goals and objectives of BNL's LDRD Program can be inferred from the Program's stated purposes. These are to (1) encourage and support the development of new ideas and technology, (2) promote the early exploration and I exploitation of creative and innovative concepts, and (3) develop new ''fundable'' R&D projects and programs. The emphasis is clearly articulated by BNL to be on supporting exploratory research ''which could lead to new programs, ,projects, and directions'' for the Laboratory. As one of the premier scientific laboratories of the DOE, BNL must continuously foster groundbreaking scientific research. At Brookhaven National Laboratory one such method is through its Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program. This discretionary research and development tool is critical in maintaining the scientific excellence and long-term vitality of the Laboratory. Additionally, it is a means to stimulate the scientific community, fostering new science and technology ideas, which is a major factor in achieving and maintaining staff excellence and a means to address national needs within the overall mission of the DOE and BNL. The LDRD Annual Report contains summaries of all research activities funded during Fiscal Year 2000. The Project Summaries with their accomplishments described in this report reflect the above. Aside from leading to new fundable or promising programs and producing especially noteworthy research, they have resulted in numerous publications in various professional and scientific journals and presentations at meetings and forums. All FY 2000 projects are listed and tabulated in the Project Funding Table. Also included in this Annual Report in Appendix A is a summary of the proposed projects for FY 2001. The BNL LDRD budget authority by DOE in FY 2000 was $6 million. The.actual allocation totaled $5.5 million. The following sections in this report contain the management processes, peer review, and portfolio's relatedness to BNL's mission, initiatives, and strategic plans. Also included is a metric of success indicators.

FOX,K.J.

2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

Money for Research, Not for Energy Bills: Finding Energy and Cost Savings in High Performance Computer Facility Designs  

SciTech Connect

High-performance computing facilities in the United States consume an enormous amount of electricity, cutting into research budgets and challenging public- and private-sector efforts to reduce energy consumption and meet environmental goals. However, these facilities can greatly reduce their energy demand through energy-efficient design of the facility itself. Using a case study of a facility under design, this article discusses strategies and technologies that can be used to help achieve energy reductions.

Drewmark Communications; Sartor, Dale; Wilson, Mark

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Minthorn Springs Creek Summer Juvenile Release and Adult Collection Facility; 1992 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CT'UIR) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) are cooperating in a joint effort to supplement steelhead and re-establish salmon runs in the Umatilla River Basin. As an integral part of this program, Bonifer and Minthorn Acclimation Facilities are operated for holding and spawning adult steelhead and fall chinook salmon and acclimation and release of juvenile salmon and steelhead. Acclimation of 109,101 spring chinook salmon and 19,977 summer steelhead was completed at Bonifer in the spring of 1992. At Minthorn, 47,458 summer steelhead were acclimated and released. Control groups of spring chinook salmon were released instream concurrent with the acclimated releases to evaluate the effects of acclimation on adult returns to the Umatilla River. Acclimation studies with summer steelhead were not conducted in 1992. A total of 237 unmarked adult steelhead were collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam from October 18, 1991 through April 24, 1992 and held at Minthorn. Utilizing a 3 x 3 spawning matrix, a total of 476,871 green eggs were taken from 86 females. The eggs were transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing, and later release into the Umatilla River. A total of 211 fall chinook salmon were also collected for broodstock at Three Mile Dam and held at Minthorn. Using a 1:1 spawning ratio, a total of 195,637 green eggs were taken from 58 females. They were also transferred to Umatilla Hatchery for incubation, rearing, and later release into the Umatilla River. Personnel from the ODFW Eastern Oregon Fish Pathology Laboratory in La Grande took samples of tissues and reproductive fluids from Umatilla River summer steelhead and fall chinook salmon broodstock for monitoring and evaluation purposes. Cell culture assays for replicating agents, including IHNV virus, on all spawned fish were negative. One of 60 summer steelhead tested positive for EIBS virus, while all fall chinook tested we re negative for inclusions. One of 73 summer steelhead sampled for BKD had a high level of antigen, while all others had very low or negative antigen levels. All fall chinook tested had low or negative antigen levels. Regularly-scheduled maintenance of pumps, equipment and facilities was performed in 1992. The progress of outmigration for juvenile releases was monitored at the Westland Canal fish trapping facility by CTUIR and ODFW personnel. Coho and spring chinook yearlings were released in mid-March at Umatilla rivermile (RM) 56 and 60. The peak outmigration period past Westland (RM 27) was mid-April to early May, approximately four to seven weeks after release. Groups of summer steelhead were released from Minthorn (RM 63) and Bonifer (RM 81) in late March and into Meacham Creek near Bonifer in late April. The peak outmigration period past Westland for all groups appeared to be the first two to three weeks in May. Spring chinook yearlings released in mid-April from Bonifer and at Umatilla RM 89, migrated rapidly downriver and the peak outmigration period past Westland appeared to be within a week or two after release. Fall and spring chinook subyearlings released in mid-May at RM 42 and 60, respectively, also migrated rapidly downriver and the peak outmigration period was within days after release. Coded-wire tag recovery information was accessed to determine the contribution of Umatilla River releases to the ocean, Columbia River and Umatilla River fisheries. Total estimated summer steelhead survival have ranged from 0.03 to 0.61% for releases in which recovery information is complete. Coho survival rates have ranged from 0.15 to 4.14%, and spring chinook yearling survival rates from spring releases have ranged from 0.72 to 0.74%. Survival rates of fall chinook yearlings have ranged from 0.08 to 3.01%, while fall chinook subyearling survival rates have ranged from 0.25 to 0.87% for spring released groups.

Rowan, Gerald D.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Environmental Research Division: fundamental molecular physics and chemistry. Annual report, January-December 1983. Part I  

SciTech Connect

Research progress is reported in the following areas: (1) photoionization of radicals or excited states; (2) molecular spectroscopy by resonant multiphoton ionization; (3) studies conducted with the synchrotron radiation facility at the National Bureau of Standards; (4) theoretical studies on molecular photoabsorption; (5) analysis of photoabsorption spectra of open-shell atoms; (6) the electron energy-loss spectra of molecules; and (7) cross sections and stopping powers. Items have been individually abstracted for the data base. (ACR)

Not Available

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1992 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3, Atmospheric and climate research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Within the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs are part of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD). One of the central missions of the division is to provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. This information is vital to the definition and implementation of a sound national energy strategy. This volume reports on the progress and status of all OHER atmospheric science and climate research projects at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). PNL has had a long history of technical leadership in the atmospheric sciences research programs within OHER. Within the ESD, the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) continues DOE`s long-term commitment to study the continental and oceanic fates of energy-related air pollutants. Research through direct measurement, numerical modeling, and laboratory studies in the ACP emphasizes the long-range transport, chemical transformation, and removal of emitted pollutants, oxidant species, nitrogen-reservoir species, and aerosols. The Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) program continues to apply basic research on density-driven circulations and on turbulent mixing and dispersion in the atmospheric boundary layer to the micro- to mesoscale meteorological processes that affect air-surface exchange and to emergency preparedness at DOE and other facilities. Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM), the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics (CHAMMP), and Quantitative Links programs to form DOE`s contribution to the US Global Change Research Program.

Schrempf, R.E. [ed.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z