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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research design testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Design, construction, and testing of the direct absorption receiver panel research experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A panel research experiment (PRE) was designed, built, and tested as a scaled-down model of a direct absorption receiver (DAR). The PRE is a 3-MW{sub t}DAR experiment that will allow flow testing with molten nitrate salt and provide a test bed for DAR testing with actual solar heating. In a solar central receiver system DAR, the heat absorbing fluid (a blackened molten nitrate salt) flows in a thin film down a vertical panel (rather than through tubes as in conventional receiver designs) and absorbs the concentrated solar flux directly. The ability of the flowing salt film to absorb flux directly. The ability of the flowing salt film to absorb the incident solar flux depends on the panel design, hydraulic and thermal fluid flow characteristics, and fluid blackener properties. Testing of the PRE is being conducted to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of the DAR concept. The DAR concept is being investigated because it offers numerous potential performance and economic advantages for production of electricity when compared to other solar receiver designs. The PRE utilized a 1-m wide by 6-m long absorber panel. The salt flow tests are being used to investigate component performance, panel deformations, and fluid stability. Salt flow testing has demonstrated that all the DAR components work as designed and that there are fluid stability issues that need to be addressed. Future solar testing will include steady-state and transient experiments, thermal loss measurements, responses to severe flux and temperature gradients and determination of peak flux capability, and optimized operation. In this paper, we describe the design, construction, and some preliminary flow test results of the Panel Research Experiment. 11 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Chavez, J.M.; Rush, E.E.; Matthews, C.W.; Stomp, J.M.; Imboden, J.; Dunkin, S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Designing and Testing Contols to Mitigate Dynamic Loads in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is designing, implementing, and testing advanced controls to maximize energy extraction and reduce structural dynamic loads of wind turbines. These control designs are based on a linear model of the turbine that is generated by specialized modeling software. In this paper, we show the design and simulation testing of a control algorithm to mitigate blade, tower, and drivetrain loads using advanced state-space control design methods.

Wright, A.D.; Stol, K.A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Designing and Testing Controls to Mitigate Tower Dynamic Loads in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes NREL's efforts to design, implement, and test advanced controls for maximizing energy extraction and reducing structural dynamic loads in wind turbines.

Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.; Stol, K. A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Design, fabrication, and testing of a scalable series augmented railgun research platform .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The design and material properties of rails and projectiles are critical to the success of the Navy railgun. This thesis addresses the design, fabrication, and… (more)

Black, Brian C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Design, construction, and performance test of a six-tesla superconducting dipole magnet system for magnetohydrodynamic energy conversion research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A six-tesla superconducting dipole magnet for use in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) energy conversion research at either the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) at the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) or the Component Development and Integration Facility at the Montana Energy and MHD Research and Development Institute has been designed, fabricated, and tested by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The magnet, SCMS-2, provides a 6-T tapered transverse field in a 1.0-m-diameter bore 5 meters long. The overall magnet and cryostat weigh 172 metric tons, and at full excitation, the magnetic field stores 210 MJ of electromagnetic energy. The magnet constitutes a unique research tool of unprecedented size and power for the study of open-cycle MHD generator performance. This document describes the detailed design considerations and supporting calculations for the CFFF magnet system, the development of the magnet fabrication facility, the process of fabrication and assembly of the superconducting coils and the magnet cryostat, and the magnet performance tests at ANL. The 5-T US superconducting magnet system, SCMS-1, designed and fabricated at ANL for tests in the US/USSR cooperative MHD program using the U-25 MHD facility in Moscow, USSR, is the direct predecessor to the SCMS-2 magnet described in this report. This magnet, however, demonstrates the scalability of key design concepts of the two magnet systems for application to larger magnets that will be required for larger systems needed for the steps in the development of commercial scale, MHD electrical power plants.

Not Available

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Animal Testing Medical Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Animal Testing In Medical Research Past, present and future. Marte Thomassen Ellen Trolid Tonje Arondsen Marit GystÞl #12;ZO-8091 ForsÞksdyrlÊre Animal experiments in medical research NTNU ­ Norges ................................................................................................................................................ 9 7. THE FUTURE OF ANIMALS IN MEDICAL RESEARCH.21

Bech, Claus

7

Market Design Test Environments  

SciTech Connect

Power industry restructuring continues to evolve at multiple levels of system operations. At the bulk electricity level, several organizations charged with regional system operation are implementing versions of a Wholesale Power Market Platform (WPMP) in response to U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission initiatives. Recently the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and several regional initiatives have been pressing the integration of demand response as a resource for system operations. These policy and regulatory pressures are driving the exploration of new market designs at the wholesale and retail levels. The complex interplay among structural conditions, market protocols, and learning behaviors in relation to short-term and longer-term market performance demand a flexible computational environment where designs can be tested and sensitivities to power system and market rule changes can be explored. This paper presents the use of agent-based computational methods in the study of electricity markets at the wholesale and retail levels, and distinctions in problem formulation between these levels.

Widergren, Steven E.; Sun, Junjie; Tesfatsion, Leigh

2006-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

8

NEHRP - Earthquake Resistant Design Research Needs ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Library. Research Needs Reports Earthquake Resistant Design. Earthquake Resistant Design. 2011. Research Plan for the ...

9

NREL: Wind Research - Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Photo of a large wind turbine blade sticking out of the structural testing laboratory; it is perpendicular to a building at the National Wind Technology Center. A...

10

NREL: Research Facilities - Test and User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test and User Facilities Test and User Facilities NREL has test and user facilities available to industry and other organizations for researching, developing, and evaluating renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. Here you'll find an alphabetical listing and brief descriptions of NREL's test and user facilities. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Advanced Research Turbines At our wind testing facilities, we have turbines available to test new control schemes and equipment for reducing loads on wind turbine components. Learn more about the Advanced Research Turbines on our Wind Research website. Back to Top D Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility This facility was designed to assist the distributed power industry in the

11

Credible Research Designs for Minimum Wage Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Credible Research Designs for Minimum Wage Studies SylviaWe assess alternative research designs for minimum wageAllegretto: Institute for Research on Labor and Employment,

Allegretto, Sylvia; Dube, Arindrajit; Reich, Michael; Zipperer, Ben

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

On-Chip Test Infrastructure Design for Optimal Multi-Site Testing of System Chips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On-Chip Test Infrastructure Design for Optimal Multi-Site Testing of System Chips Sandeep Kumar Goel Erik Jan Marinissen Philips Research Laboratories IC Design ­ Digital Design & Test Prof.Jan.Marinissen¥ @philips.com Abstract Multi-site testing is a popular and effective way to increase test throughput

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

13

Designing, testing, and analyzing coupled, flux transformer heat.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The proposed research involves designing, testing, and ics. analyzing a coupled, flux transformer heat pipe system following the patent of Oktay and Peterson (1997). Experiments… (more)

Renzi, Kimberly Irene

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Software testing research and practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper attempts to provide a comprehensive view of the field of software testing. The objective is to put all the relevant issues into a unified context, although admittedly the overview is biased towards my own research and expertise. In view of ...

Antonia Bertolino

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

NREL: Water Power Research - Testing and Standards  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing and Standards Testing and Standards NREL's marine and hydrokinetics (MHK) testing activities provide industry partners with essential operational data on a wide variety of systems and components. This data helps researchers establish baseline cost and performance metrics and advance the technology readiness of those systems that demonstrate the greatest potential for successful commercial deployment. The development of standards leads to accelerated development, reduced risks, and increased access to capital. Examples of testing and standards activities include: Verdant Rotor Blade Development Test Center Support IEC Standards Verdant Rotor Blade Development NREL applied its more than three decades of experience in designing and testing horizontal-axis wind turbine rotors to the development and testing

16

BENCHMARK TESTING A.1 Benchmark Testing Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­and­bound search module first. * Enter the number of system­suggested terms or `0' to quit ?? 30 --* User supplied search process. * Enter the number of system­suggested terms or `0' to quit ?? 10 --* Notice Processing) and different numbers of search terms. We tested 5 cases each for queries with 1 term, 2 terms, 3

17

Research experiments detailed design review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The illustrations for the detailed design review of the heliostats for a solar thermal pilot plant are presented. Also included are the program schedule, meeting agenda, and component design features. (MHR)

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

NREL: Wind Research - Structural Testing Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structural Testing Laboratory Structural Testing Laboratory Photo of NREL's Wind Research User Facility. Shown in front are several test bays that protect proprietary information while companies disassemble turbines to analyze, test, and modify individual components. NREL's Structural Testing Laboratory includes office space for industry researchers, houses experimental laboratories, computer facilities, space for assembling turbines, components, and blades for testing. Credit: Patrick Corkery. NREL's Structural Testing Laboratory at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) provides office space for industry researchers, experimental laboratories, computer facilities for analytical work, and space for assembling components and turbines for atmospheric testing. The facility also houses two blade stands equipped with overhead cranes and

19

Decontamination systems information and research program -- Literature review in support of development of standard test protocols and barrier design models for in situ formed barriers project  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is responsible for approximately 3,000 sites in which contaminants such as carbon tetrachloride, trichlorethylene, perchlorethylene, non-volatile and soluble organic and insoluble organics (PCBs and pesticides) are encountered. In specific areas of these sites radioactive contaminants are stored in underground storage tanks which were originally designed and constructed with a 30-year projected life. Many of these tanks are now 10 years beyond the design life and failures have occurred allowing the basic liquids (ph of 8 to 9) to leak into the unconsolidated soils below. Nearly one half of the storage tanks located at the Hanford Washington Reservation are suspected of leaking and contaminating the soils beneath them. The Hanford site is located in a semi-arid climate region with rainfall of less than 6 inches annually, and studies have indicated that very little of this water finds its way to the groundwater to move the water down gradient toward the Columbia River. This provides the government with time to develop a barrier system to prevent further contamination of the groundwater, and to develop and test remediation systems to stabilize or remove the contaminant materials. In parallel to remediation efforts, confinement and containment technologies are needed to retard or prevent the advancement of contamination plumes through the environment until the implementation of remediation technology efforts are completed. This project examines the various confinement and containment technologies and protocols for testing the materials in relation to their function in-situ.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

NREL: Wind Research - Accredited Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accredited Testing Accredited Testing NREL has testing capabilities that are accredited by the American Association of Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA). Currently, NREL is one of only two facilities in the United States that are A2LA accredited. Small and large wind turbines are given a suite of tests that test acoustic noise emissions, duration, load, power performance, power quality, and safety and function. Each of the tests is briefly described below. Tests are performed to International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standards and in compliance with NREL's A2LA-accredited Quality Assurance (QA) system. Duration, load, power performance, and safety and function test data are collected using a National Instruments-based data acquisition system and compiled through custom LabVIEW software.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research design testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Solar Energy Research Institute Validation Test House Site Handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Validation Test House at the Solar Energy Research Institute in Golden, Colorado, is being used to collect performance data for analysis/design tool validation as part of the DOE Passive Solar Class A Performance Evaluation Program.

Burch, J.; Wortman, D.; Judkoff, R.; Hunn, B.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project: United Technologies Research Center. Design guidelines for solar heating/cooling/power generation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the methodology, design guidelines and analytical tools for the preliminary technical/economic evaluation of solar heating/cooling/power generation systems. In particular, it provides the theoretical framework, data bases and software tools for: determining the preliminary economic feasibility of solar-powered configurations compared with grid-supplied electric power and/or competing fossil fuels; selecting the optimum system configuration with respect to solar collector area and ''solar-side'' thermal storage capacity. Implementation of the methodology described in this report can be facilitated by the use of the accompanying IBM PC-compatible computer program ''SOLERAS''. This report represents the final task of the multi-year SOLERAS Program -- jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology -- which involved the development and field-testing of a solar-powered cooling system in Phoenix, AZ. 11 refs., 37 figs.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

NREL: Wind Research - Design Review and Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computer-Aided Engineering Systems Engineering Controls Analysis Testing Utility Grid Integration Assessment Wind Resource Assessment Projects Facilities Research Staff Working...

24

Insights Gained from Testing Alternate Cell Designs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cell for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900șC. The INL has been testing various solid oxide cell designs to characterize their electrolytic performance operating in the electrolysis mode for hydrogen production. Some results presented in this report were obtained from cells, initially developed by the Forschungszentrum Jülich and now manufactured by the French ceramics firm St. Gobain. These cells have an active area of 16 cm2 per cell. They were initially developed as fuel cells, but are being tested as electrolytic cells in the INL test stands. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with ~10 ”m thick yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes, ~1400 ”m thick nickel-YSZ steam-hydrogen electrodes, and manganite (LSM) air-oxygen electrodes. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 to 0.6), gas flow rates, and current densities (0 to 0.6 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. On a molar basis, the steam consumption rate is equal to the hydrogen production rate. Cell performance was evaluated by performing DC potential sweeps at 800, 850, and 900°C. The voltage-current characteristics are presented, along with values of area-specific resistance as a function of current density. Long-term cell performance is also assessed to evaluate cell degradation. Details of the custom single-cell test apparatus developed for these experiments are also presented. NASA, in conjunction with the University of Toledo, has developed another fuel cell concept with the goals of reduced weight and high power density. The NASA cell is structurally symmetrical, with both electrodes supporting the thin electrolyte and containing micro-channels for gas diffusion. This configuration is called a bi-electrode supported cell or BSC. The electrodes are made by freeze-casting, a modified tape casting technique which creates the many micro-channels in the YSZ electrode green tape. This report presents results of the INL’s testing of this new solid oxide cell design as an electrolyzer. Gas composition, operating voltage, and other parameters were varied during testing. Results to date show the NASA cell to be a promising design for both high power-to-weight fuel cell and electrolyzer applications.

J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; G. K. Housley; M. S. Sohal; D. G. Milobar; Thomas Cable

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH BOARD Testing and Inspection Levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH BOARD Testing and Inspection Levels for Hot-Mix Asphaltic Concrete Overlays, Editorial AssistantCHRISTOPHER HEDGES, Senior Program Officer TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH BOARD EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 2000 OFFICERS Chair: Martin Wachs, Director, Institute of Transportation Studies, University

Sheridan, Jennifer

26

MITG test assembly design and fabrication  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design, analysis, and evaluation of the Modular Isotopic Thermoelectric Generator (MITG), described in an earlier paper, led to a program to build and test prototypical, modules of that generator. Each test module duplicates the thermoelectric converters, thermal insulation, housing and radiator fins of a typical generator slice, and simulates its isotope heat source module by means of an electrical heater encased in a prototypical graphite box. Once the approx. 20-watt MITG module has been developed, it can be assembled in appropriate number to form a generator design yielding the desired power output. The present paper describes the design and fabrication of the MITG test assembly, which confirmed the fabricability of the multicouples and interleaved multifoil insulation called for by the design. Test plans, procedures, instrumentation, results, and post-test analyses, as well as revised designs, fabrication procedures, and performance estimates, are described in subsequent papers in these proceedings.

Schock, A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials July 20, 2011 - 3:58pm Addthis Scientists conducted compression tests of copper specimens irradiated with high-energy protons, designed to model how damage from radiation affects the mechanical properties of copper. By using a specialized in situ mechanical testing device in a transmission electron microscope at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, the team could examine ñ€” with nanoscale resolution ñ€” the localized nature of this deformation. | Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Scientists conducted compression tests of copper specimens irradiated with high-energy protons, designed to model how damage from radiation affects

28

Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials July 20, 2011 - 3:58pm Addthis Scientists conducted compression tests of copper specimens irradiated with high-energy protons, designed to model how damage from radiation affects the mechanical properties of copper. By using a specialized in situ mechanical testing device in a transmission electron microscope at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, the team could examine ñ€” with nanoscale resolution ñ€” the localized nature of this deformation. | Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Scientists conducted compression tests of copper specimens irradiated with high-energy protons, designed to model how damage from radiation affects

29

Research and design : methods for integration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study investigates the major factors which inhibit and foster the integration and application of research knowledge with design practice. The results are presented in two parts: Part I, a generic user handbook, and ...

Ness, Richard E

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Research Commentary---Designing Smart Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electronic markets have been a core topic of information systems (IS) research for last three decades. We focus on a more recent phenomenon: smart markets. This phenomenon is starting to draw considerable interdisciplinary attention from the researchers ... Keywords: auctions, decision support systems, design, experimentation, platforms, preferences, smart markets, software agents, trading agent competition

Martin Bichler; Alok Gupta; Wolfgang Ketter

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Prototype spent-fuel canister design, analysis, and test  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories was asked by the US Energy Research and Development Administration (now US Department of Energy) to design the spent fuel shipping cask system for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP). As a part of this task, a canister which holds liquid sodium and the spent fuel assembly was designed, analyzed, and tested. The canister body survived the regulatory Type-B 9.1-m (30-ft) drop test with no apparent leakage. However, the commercially available metal seal used in this design leaked after the tests. This report describes the design approach, analysis, and prototype canister testing. Recommended work for completing the design, when funding is available, is included.

Leisher, W.B.; Eakes, R.G.; Duffey, T.A.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Advanced Burner Test Reactor - Preconceptual Design Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Burner Test Reactor Preconceptual Design Report ANL-ABR-1 (ANL-AFCI-173) Nuclear Engineering Division Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an...

33

Department of Energy Designates the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Designates the Idaho National Laboratory Designates the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor as a National Scientific User Facility Department of Energy Designates the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor as a National Scientific User Facility April 23, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today designated the Idaho National Laboratory's (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility. Establishing the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility will help assert U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology, and will attract new users - universities, laboratories and industry - to conduct research at the ATR. This facility will support basic and applied nuclear research and development (R&D), furthering

34

DOE Designated User Facilities Multiple Laboratories * ARM Climate Research Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Designated User Facilities Designated User Facilities Multiple Laboratories * ARM Climate Research Facility Argonne National Laboratory * Advanced Photon Source (APS) * Electron Microscopy Center for Materials Research * Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) * Center for Nanoscale Materials (CNM) * Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) * Brookhaven National Laboratory * National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) * Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) * Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) * Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) * National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II ) (under construction) Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory * Fermilab Accelerator Complex Idaho National Laboratory * Advanced Test Reactor ** * Wireless National User Facility (WNUF)

35

Design requirements for the supercritical water oxidation test bed  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the design requirements for the supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) test bed that will be located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The test bed will process a maximum of 50 gph of waste plus the required volume of cooling water. The test bed will evaluate the performance of a number of SCWO reactor designs. The goal of the project is to select a reactor that can be scaled up for use in a full-size waste treatment facility to process US Department of Energy mixed wastes. EG&G Idaho, Inc. will design and construct the SCWO test bed at the Water Reactor Research Test Facility (WRRTF), located in the northern region of the INEL. Private industry partners will develop and provide SCWO reactors to interface with the test bed. A number of reactor designs will be tested, including a transpiring wall, tube, and vessel-type reactor. The initial SCWO reactor evaluated will be a transpiring wall design. This design requirements report identifies parameters needed to proceed with preliminary and final design work for the SCWO test bed. A flow sheet and Process and Instrumentation Diagrams define the overall process and conditions of service and delineate equipment, piping, and instrumentation sizes and configuration Codes and standards that govern the safe engineering and design of systems and guidance that locates and interfaces test bed hardware are provided. Detailed technical requirements are addressed for design of piping, valves, instrumentation and control, vessels, tanks, pumps, electrical systems, and structural steel. The approach for conducting the preliminary and final designs and environmental and quality issues influencing the design are provided.

Svoboda, J.M.; Valentich, D.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Primary Piping Static Test Design Request  

SciTech Connect

It is requested that a design be initiated for the primary piping static test. This test is necessary to provide information as to the reliability of the pipe subjected to reactor operating conditions. The test conditions are as follows: temperature - 2000 F (isothermal), pressure effective - 42 psi, and test time - 10,000 hours. It will be necessary to test two sizes of pipe as shown on the preliminary piping layout (2.250-inch O.D. x .095-inch wall and 3 1/2 SCH. 10 pipe). The test specimens shall be jacketed in an inconel containment vessel. The test rig should be similar to the design of the 4-inch pressure vessels (T-1030244). In addition an outer containment vessel constructed of stainless steel must be provided around the clam shell heaters and the inconel containment vessel. This is to provide an inert atmosphere for the inconel vessel. Provisions should be made in the design for a 1/4-inch clad thermocouple. It is planned to use the pipe test as a vehicle for studying experimental Tc's (Cb-Mo and W-W.26% Re).

O' Brien, R.W.

1961-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Proceedings of the Conference on Design, Automation and Test in Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 17th DATE conference and exhibition is the main European event bringing together designers and design automation users, researchers and vendors, as well as specialists in the hardware and software design, test and manufacturing of electronic circuits ...

Enrico Macii

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Advanced burner test reactor preconceptual design report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand, to address nuclear waste management concerns and to promote non-proliferation. Implementation of the GNEP requires development and demonstration of three major technologies: (1) Light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel separations technologies that will recover transuranics to be recycled for fuel but not separate plutonium from other transuranics, thereby providing proliferation-resistance; (2) Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) based on a fast spectrum that transmute the recycled transuranics to produce energy while also reducing the long term radiotoxicity and decay heat loading in the repository; and (3) Fast reactor fuel recycling technologies to recover and refabricate the transuranics for repeated recycling in the fast reactor system. The primary mission of the ABR Program is to demonstrate the transmutation of transuranics recovered from the LWR spent fuel, and hence the benefits of the fuel cycle closure to nuclear waste management. The transmutation, or burning of the transuranics is accomplished by fissioning and this is most effectively done in a fast spectrum. In the thermal spectrum of commercial LWRs, some transuranics capture neutrons and become even heavier transuranics rather than being fissioned. Even with repeated recycling, only about 30% can be transmuted, which is an intrinsic limitation of all thermal spectrum reactors. Only in a fast spectrum can all transuranics be effectively fissioned to eliminate their long-term radiotoxicity and decay heat. The Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) is the first step in demonstrating the transmutation technologies. It directly supports development of a prototype full-scale Advanced Burner Reactor, which would be followed by commercial deployment of ABRs. The primary objectives of the ABTR are: (1) To demonstrate reactor-based transmutation of transuranics as part of an advanced fuel cycle; (2) To qualify the transuranics-containing fuels and advanced structural materials needed for a full-scale ABR; and (3) To support the research, development and demonstration required for certification of an ABR standard design by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The ABTR should also address the following additional objectives: (1) To incorporate and demonstrate innovative design concepts and features that may lead to significant improvements in cost, safety, efficiency, reliability, or other favorable characteristics that could promote public acceptance and future private sector investment in ABRs; (2) To demonstrate improved technologies for safeguards and security; and (3) To support development of the U.S. infrastructure for design, fabrication and construction, testing and deployment of systems, structures and components for the ABRs. Based on these objectives, a pre-conceptual design of a 250 MWt ABTR has been developed; it is documented in this report. In addition to meeting the primary and additional objectives listed above, the lessons learned from fast reactor programs in the U.S. and worldwide and the operating experience of more than a dozen fast reactors around the world, in particular the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II have been incorporated into the design of the ABTR to the extent possible.

Chang, Y. I.; Finck, P. J.; Grandy, C.; Cahalan, J.; Deitrich, L.; Dunn, F.; Fallin, D.; Farmer, M.; Fanning, T.; Kim, T.; Krajtl, L.; Lomperski, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Momozaki, Y.; Sienicki, J.; Park, Y.; Tang, Y.; Reed, C.; Tzanos, C; Wiedmeyer, S.; Yang, W.; Chikazawa, Y.; JAEA

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

39

HVAC Water Heater Field Tests Research Project | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HVAC Water Heater Field Tests Research Project HVAC Water Heater Field Tests Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into heating,...

40

Thermowell and Radiographic Testing Plug Design Recommendations and Typical Practices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermowells and radiographic testing (RT) plugs are used universally in power generation plants. This Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report provides recommendations and explains the design and installation practices for these products that are common to the power industry. Numerous instances of thermowell failure are addressed and examined for the purposes of optimization.The report is intended to provide design, installation, and operation recommendations for power ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research design testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Siemens SOFC Test Article and Module Design  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary design studies of the 95 kWe-class SOFC test article continue resulting in a stack architecture of that is 1/3 of 250 kWe-class SOFC advanced module. The 95 kWeclass test article is envisioned to house 20 bundles (eight cells per bundle) of Delta8 cells with an active length of 100 cm. Significant progress was made in the conceptual design of the internal recirculation loop. Flow analyses were initiated in order to optimize the bundle row length for the 250 kWeclass advanced module. A preferred stack configuration based on acceptable flow and thermal distributions was identified. Potential module design and analysis issues associated with pressurized operation were identified.

None

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Engineering design of vertical test stand cryostat  

SciTech Connect

Under Indian Institutions and Fermilab collaboration, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are jointly developing 2K Vertical Test Stand (VTS) cryostats for testing SCRF cavities at 2K. The VTS cryostat has been designed for a large testing aperture of 86.36 cm for testing of 325 MHz Spoke resonators, 650 MHz and 1.3 GHz multi-cell SCRF cavities for Fermilab's Project-X. Units will be installed at Fermilab and RRCAT and used to test cavities for Project-X. A VTS cryostat comprises of liquid helium (LHe) vessel with internal magnetic shield, top insert plate equipped with cavity support stand and radiation shield, liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) shield and vacuum vessel with external magnetic shield. The engineering design and analysis of VTS cryostat has been carried out using ASME B&PV Code and Finite Element Analysis. Design of internal and external magnetic shields was performed to limit the magnetic field inside LHe vessel at the cavity surface <1 {micro}T. Thermal analysis for LN{sub 2} shield has been performed to check the effectiveness of LN{sub 2} cooling and for compliance with ASME piping code allowable stresses.

Suhane, S.K.; Sharma, N.K.; Raghavendra, S.; Joshi, S.C.; Das, S.; Kush, P.K.; Sahni, V.C.; Gupta, P.D.; /Indore, Ctr. for Advanced Tech.; Sylvester, C.; Rabehl, R.; Ozelis, J.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY RESEARCH AND TESTING AGREEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the Project. Article 4 - Costs, Billings and Other Support 4.1 It is agreed to and understood by the parties, the research and testing project contemplated by this Agreement is of mutual interest and benefit to University have the following meanings: 1.1 "Project" shall mean the project titled

Gilchrist, James F.

44

Design and operation of an outdoor microalgae test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the project covered in this report is to establish and operate a facility in the American Southwest to test the concept of producing microalgae on a large scale. This microalgae would then be used as a feedstock for producing liquid fuels. The site chosen for this project was an existing water research station in Roswell, New Mexico; the climate and water resources are representative of those in the Southwest. For this project, researchers tested specific designs, modes of operation, and strains of microalgae; proposed and evaluated modifications to technological concepts; and assessed the progress toward meeting cost objectives.

Weissman, J.C.; Tillett, D.M.; Goebel, R.P. (Microbial Products, Inc., Vacaville, CA (USA))

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Structural Testing of 9 m Carbon Fiber Wind Turbine Research Blades: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper outlines the results of tests conducted on three 9-m carbon fiber wind turbine blades designed through a research program initiated by Sandia National Laboratories.

Paquette, J.; van Dam, J.; Hughes, S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Design and Status of RERTR Irradiation Tests in the Advanced Test Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Irradiation testing of U-Mo based fuels is the central component of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program fuel qualification plan. Several RERTR tests have recently been completed or are planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory in Idaho Falls, ID. Four mini-plate experiments in various stages of completion are described in detail, including the irradiation test design, objectives, and irradiation conditions. Observations made during and after the in-reactor RERTR-7A experiment breach are summarized. The irradiation experiment design and planned irradiation conditions for full-size plate test are described. Progress toward element testing will be reviewed.

Daniel M. Wachs; Richard G. Ambrosek; Gray Chang; Mitchell K. Meyer

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Feed-pump hydraulic performance and design improvement, Phase I: research program design. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of prior EPRI-sponsored studies, it was concluded that a research program should be designed and implemented to provide an improved basis for the design, procurement, testing, and operation of large feed pumps with increased reliability and stability over the full range of operating conditions. This two-volume report contains a research plan which is based on a review of the present state of the art and which defines the necessary R and D program and estimates the benefits and costs of the program. The recommended research program consists of 30 interrelated tasks. It is designed to perform the needed research; to verify the results; to develop improved components; and to publish computer-aided design methods, pump specification guidelines, and a troubleshooting manual. Most of the technology proposed in the research plan is applicable to nuclear power plants as well as to fossil-fired plants. This volume contains appendixes on pump design, cavitation damage, performance testing, hydraulics, two-phase flow in pumps, flow stability, and rotor dynamics.

Brown, W.H.; Gopalakrishnan, S.; Fehlau, R.; Thompson, W.E.; Wilson, D.G.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

NIST Researchers 'All Aglow' Over New Test of Toxin Strength  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Researchers 'All Aglow' Over New Test of Toxin Strength. For Immediate Release: June 16, 2009. ...

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Test data will be used to validate advanced turbine design and analysis tools.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test data will be used to validate advanced turbine design and analysis tools. NREL signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with Alstom in 2010 to conduct certification testing certification testing in 2011. Tests to be conducted by NREL include a power quality test to finalize

50

Facility design for cyclic testing of advanced solid desiccant dehumidifiers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of high performance components is required to reach the goal of desiccant cooling system cost-competitiveness with conventional vapor compensation air conditioning systems. SERI has designed a laminar flow, parallel passage dehumidifier that has this potential. The goal of SERI's desiccant cooling research program is to fully characterize experimentally the performance of the parallel passage dehumidifier under a wide range of operating conditions, investigate improvements in design, and verify existing models of dehumidifier performance against experimental results. This report documents the design of the SERI Desiccant Cooling Test Facility for performing the above testing. With slight modifications, the testing can be used for testing other desiccant cooling system components. The dehumidifier processes and the parameters and variables needed to control and characterize its performance are presented. The physical layout of the test loop and instrumentation for monitoring the operating conditions and dehumidifer performance and the controls for maintaining the operating conditions are specified. The computerized data acquisition system conversion equations and an error analysis of measurement variables are also presented.

Schlepp, D.; Schultz, K.; Zangrando, F.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

An assessment of testing requirement impacts on nuclear thermal propulsion ground test facility design  

SciTech Connect

Programs to develop solid core nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) systems have been under way at the Department of Defense (DoD), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the Department of Energy (DOE). These programs have recognized the need for a new ground test facility to support development of NTP systems. However, the different military and civilian applications have led to different ground test facility requirements. The Department of Energy (DOE) in its role as landlord and operator of the proposed research reactor test facilities has initiated an effort to explore opportunities for a common ground test facility to meet both DoD and NASA needs. The baseline design and operating limits of the proposed DoD NTP ground test facility are described. The NASA ground test facility requirements are reviewed and their potential impact on the DoD facility baseline is discussed.

Shipers, L.R.; Ottinger, C.A.; Sanchez, L.C.

1993-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

52

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Outdoor Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outdoor Test Facility Aerial photo of the Outdoor Test Facility. The Outdoor Test Facility at NREL is used to evaluate prototype, precommercial, and commercial modules. Outdoor...

53

NREL: Water Power Research - Design Review and Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

activities include mechanical design, hydrodynamics, structural dynamics, advanced controls, model development, grid integration, and instrumentation and testing. Read about...

54

Fluidized Bed Asbestos Sampler Design and Testing  

SciTech Connect

A large number of samples are required to characterize a site contaminated with asbestos from previous mine or other industrial operations. Current methods, such as EPA Region 10’s glovebox method, or the Berman Elutriator method are time consuming and costly primarily because the equipment is difficult to decontaminate between samples. EPA desires a shorter and less costly method for characterizing soil samples for asbestos. The objective of this was to design and test a qualitative asbestos sampler that operates as a fluidized bed. The proposed sampler employs a conical spouted bed to vigorously mix the soil and separate fine particulate including asbestos fibers on filters. The filters are then analyzed using transmission electron microscopy for presence of asbestos. During initial testing of a glass prototype using ASTM 20/30 sand and clay fines as asbestos surrogates, fine particulate adhered to the sides of the glass vessel and the tubing to the collection filter – presumably due to static charge on the fine particulate. This limited the fines recovery to ~5% of the amount added to the sand surrogate. A second prototype was constructed of stainless steel, which improved fines recovery to about 10%. Fines recovery was increased to 15% by either humidifying the inlet air or introducing a voltage probe in the air space above the sample. Since this was not a substantial improvement, testing using the steel prototype proceeded without using these techniques. Final testing of the second prototype using asbestos suggests that the fluidized bed is considerably more sensitive than the Berman elutriator method. Using a sand/tremolite mixture with 0.005% tremolite, the Berman elutriator did not segregate any asbestos structures while the fluidized bed segregated an average of 11.7. The fluidized bed was also able to segregate structures in samples containing asbestos at a 0.0001% concentration, while the Berman elutriator method did not detect any fibers at this concentration. Opportunities for improvement with the fluidized bed include improving reproducibility among replicates, increasing mass recovery, improving the lid gasket seal.

Karen E. Wright; Barry H. O'Brien

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The international effort to develop new research reactor fuel materials and designs based on the use of low-enriched uranium, instead of highly-enriched uranium, has made much progress during the eight years since its inception. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialist in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the ninth of a series which began in 1978. All previous meetings of this series are listed on the facing page. The focus of this meeting was on the LEU fuel demonstration which was in progress at the Oak Ridge Research (ORR) reactor, not far from where the meeting was held. The visit to the ORR, where a silicide LEU fuel with 4.8 g A/cm/sup 3/ was by then in routine use, illustrated how far work has progressed.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Design of renewable energy powered solar cool research centre.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Solar cooling research center is being developed on CSEM-UAE outdoor research facility in RAK/UAE.  The research center is capable to test system from 1… (more)

Rathnasooriya, Prageeth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

NEHRP - Earthquake Resistant Design Research Needs ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... report summarizes the recommended tasks, approximate schedule, and order of ... Piece: Improving Seismic Design and Construction Practices (ATC ...

58

Research-scale melter test report  

SciTech Connect

The Melter Performance Assessment (MPA) activity in the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) Technology Development (PHTD) effort is intended to determine the impact of noble metals on the operational life of the reference HWVP melter. As a part of this activity, a parametric melter test was completed using a Research-Scale Melter (RSM). The RSM is a small, approximately 1/100-scale melter, 6-in.-diameter, that allows rapid changing of process conditions and subsequent re-establishment of a steady-state condition. The test matrix contained nine different segments that varied the melter operating parameters (glass and plenum temperatures) and feed properties (oxide concentration, redox potential, and noble metal concentrations) so that the effects of these parameters on noble metal agglomeration on the melter floor could be evaluated. The RSM operated for 48 days and consumed 1,300 L of feed, equating to 153 tank turnovers. The run produced 531 kg of glass. During the latter portion of the run, the resistance between the electrodes decreased. Upon destructive examination of the melter, a layer of noble metals was found on the bottom. This was surprising because the glass residence time in the RSM is only 10% of the HWVP plant melter. The noble metals layer impacted the melter significantly. Approximately 1/3 of one paddle electrode was melted or corroded off. The cause is assumed to be localized heating from short circuiting of the electrode to the noble metal layer. The metal layer also removed approximately 1/2 in. of the refractory on the bottom of the melter. The mechanism for this damage is not presently known.

Cooper, M.F.; Elliott, M.L.; Eyler, L.L.; Freeman, C.J.; Higginson, J.J.; Mahoney, L.A.; Powell, M.R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Emergent pedagogies in design research education  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent demand for applied knowledge within architectural practice has resulted in the proliferation of university based research groups. Given the role advanced degree programs play in educating architectural researchers, ...

Press, Joseph

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Fenestration System Performance Research, Testing, and Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE was and is instrumental to NFRC's beginning and its continued success. The 2005 to 2009 funding enables NFRC to continue expanding and create new, improved ratings procedures. Research funded by the US DOE enables increased fenestration energy rating accuracy. International harmonization efforts supported by the US DOE allow the US to be the global leader in fenestration energy ratings. Many other governments are working with the NFRC to share its experience and knowledge toward development of their own national fenestration rating process similar to the NFRC's. The broad and diverse membership composition of NFRC allows anyone with a fenestration interest to come forward with an idea or improvement to the entire fenestration community for consideration. The NFRC looks forward to the next several years of growth while remaining the nation's resource for fair, accurate, and credible fenestration product energy ratings. NFRC continues to improve its rating system by considering new research, methodologies, and expanding to include new fenestration products. Currently, NFRC is working towards attachment energy ratings. Attachments are blinds, shades, awnings, and overhangs. Attachments may enable a building to achieve significant energy savings. An NFRC rating will enable fair competition, a basis for code references, and a new ENERGY STAR product category. NFRC also is developing rating methods to consider non specular glazing such as fritted glass. Commercial applications frequently use fritted glazing, but no rating method exists. NFRC is testing new software that may enable this new rating and contribute further to energy conservation. Around the world, many nations are seeking new energy conservation methods and NFRC is poised to harmonize its rating system assisting these nations to better manage and conserve energy in buildings by using NFRC rated and labeled fenestration products. As this report has shown, much more work needs to be done to continues research to improve existing ratings and develop new ones. NFRC needs to continue the work it has begun in several nations to implement the NFRC rating system that has been introduced. Many nations are eager to accept the expertise NFRC can offer to achieve energy conservation goals. NFRC looks forward to a continues partnership with the US Department of Energy to cooperatively achieve both.

Jim Benney

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research design testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory: Five year retrospective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the five years since the NASA Glenn Research Center Acoustical Testing Laboratory (ATL) opened its doors in September

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Strong concepts: Intermediate-level knowledge in interaction design research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design-oriented research practices create opportunities for constructing knowledge that is more abstracted than particular instances, without aspiring to be at the scope of generalized theories. We propose an intermediate design knowledge form that we ... Keywords: Design research, bare-skin connection, seamfulness, social navigation, strong concepts

Kristina Höök; Jonas Löwgren

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HVAC and Water Heater HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: HVAC and Water Heater Field Tests Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research

64

Re-START: The second operational test of the String Thermionic Assembly Research Testbed  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The second operational test of the String Thermionic Assembly Research Testbed -- Re-START -- was carried out from June 9 to June 14, 1997. This test series was designed to help qualify and validate the designs and test methods proposed for the Integrated Solar Upper Stage (ISUS) power converters for use during critical evaluations of the complete ISUS bimodal system during the Engine Ground Demonstration (EGD). The test article consisted of eight ISUS prototype thermionic converter diodes electrically connected in series.

Wyant, F.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Luchau, D. [TEAM Specialty Services, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McCarson, T.D. [New Mexico Engineering Research Inst., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Generating Circuit Tests by Exploiting Designed Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes two programs for generating tests for digital circuits that exploit several kinds of expert knowledge not used by previous approaches. First, many test generation problems can be solved efficiently ...

Shirley, Mark Harper

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Design of a hydraulic bulge test apparatus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The various equi-biaxial tension tests for sheet metal were studied and compared to determine the most appropriate equipping in the Impact and Crashworthiness Laboratory, MIT, for the testing of Advanced High Strength ...

Koh, Cheok Wei

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

A general design for energy test procedures  

SciTech Connect

Appliances are increasingly controlled by microprocessors. Unfortunately, energy test procedures have not been modified to capture the positive and negative contributions of the microprocessor to the appliance's energy use. A new test procedure is described which captures both the mechanical and logical features present in many new appliances. We developed an energy test procedure for refrigerators that incorporates most aspects of the proposed new approach. Some of the strengths and weaknesses of the new test are described.

Meier, Alan

2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

NREL: Wind Research - Field Test Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Test Sites Field Test Sites Aerial view of the National Wind Technology Center with the Flatiron Mountains in the background NREL's NWTC has numerous test pads available to industry partners for testing wind turbines that range in size from a few hundred kilowatts to several megawatts. PIX 17711. Manufacturers can take advantage of NREL's numerous test pads and the technical expertise of its staff to field test prototypes of small and large wind turbines. Many of the small wind turbines tested at the NWTC are participants in NREL's Small Wind Turbine Independent Test Program. Small and mid-sized turbines field tested at the NWTC include those manufactured by Atlantic Orient Corporation, Bergey Windpower, Southwest Wind Power, Northern Power Systems, Endurance Wind Power Inc., Gaia-Wind Ltd.,

69

Design science as design of social systems --- implications for information systems research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are indications that contemporary IS research is increasingly concerned with the organizational environment in which information systems are part of or used in. This means that IS design science approaches could benefit from concerning themselves ... Keywords: IS design, design science, organizational design, social systems design, socio-technical systems design

Andreas Drechsler

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Research on encouraging sketching in engineering design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The value of sketching in engineering design has been widely documented. This paper reviews trends in recent studies on sketching in engineering design and focuses on the encouragement of sketching. The authors present three experimental studies on sketching ... Keywords: Experimental Study, Motivation, Sketching, Smartpen

Linda c. Schmidt; Noe vargas Hernandez; Ashley l. Ruocco

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

NREL: Wind Research - Regional Test Centers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Map Printable Version Regional Test Centers To increase the availability of small wind turbine testing and share field expertise, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NREL...

72

Designing a Bubbling Fluidized Bed (BFB) Boiler for Research Purposes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project is part of the efforts made by Savonia University of Applied Sciences to design the future EU-funded combustion research laboratory that will be… (more)

Castiella Franco, Daniel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Tests and Testing Approach  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Association of Laboratory Accreditation (A2LA). The suite of tests conducted on small wind turbines includes acoustic noise emissions, duration, power performance, power...

74

Desiccant contamination research: Report on the desiccant contamination test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The activity in the cooling systems research involves research on high performance dehumidifiers and chillers that can operate efficiently with the variable thermal outputs and delivery temperatures associated with solar collectors. It also includes work on advanced passive cooling techniques. This report describes the work conducted to improve the durability of solid desiccant dehumidifiers by investigating the causes of degradation of desiccant materials from airborne contaminants and thermal cycling. The performance of a dehumidifier strongly depends on the physical properties and durability of the desiccant material. To make durable and reliable dehumidifiers, an understanding is needed of how and to what degree the performance of a dehumidifier is affected by desiccant degradation. This report, an account of work under Cooling Systems Research, documents the efforts to design and fabricate a test facility to investigate desiccant contamination based on industry and academia recommendations. It also discusses the experimental techniques needed for obtaining high-quality data and presents plans for next year. Researchers of the Mechanical and Industrial Technology Division performed this work at the Solar Energy Research Institute in FY 1988 for DOE's Office of Solar Heat Technologies. 7 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Desiccant contamination research: Report on the desiccant contamination test facility  

SciTech Connect

The activity in the cooling systems research involves research on high performance dehumidifiers and chillers that can operate efficiently with the variable thermal outputs and delivery temperatures associated with solar collectors. It also includes work on advanced passive cooling techniques. This report describes the work conducted to improve the durability of solid desiccant dehumidifiers by investigating the causes of degradation of desiccant materials from airborne contaminants and thermal cycling. The performance of a dehumidifier strongly depends on the physical properties and durability of the desiccant material. To make durable and reliable dehumidifiers, an understanding is needed of how and to what degree the performance of a dehumidifier is affected by desiccant degradation. This report, an account of work under Cooling Systems Research, documents the efforts to design and fabricate a test facility to investigate desiccant contamination based on industry and academia recommendations. It also discusses the experimental techniques needed for obtaining high-quality data and presents plans for next year. Researchers of the Mechanical and Industrial Technology Division performed this work at the Solar Energy Research Institute in FY 1988 for DOE's Office of Solar Heat Technologies. 7 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

Pesaran, A.A.; Bingham, C.E.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Resilient Control Systems: Next Generation Design Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since digital control systems were introduced to the market more than 30 years ago, the operational efficiency and stability gained through their use have fueled our migration and ultimate dependence on them for the monitoring and control of critical infrastructure. While these systems have been designed for functionality and reliability, a hostile cyber environment and uncertainties in complex networks and human interactions have placed additional parameters on the design expectations for control systems.

Craig Rieger

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Efficient Test Solutions for Core-based Designs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—A test solution for a complex system requires the design of a test access mechanism (TAM), which is used for the test data transportation, and a test schedule of the test data transportation on the designed TAM. An extensive TAM will lead to lower test-application time at the expense of higher routing costs, compared to a simple TAM with low routing cost but long testing time. It is also possible to reduce the testing time of a testable unit by loading the test vectors in parallel, thus increasing the parallelization of a test. However, such a test-time reduction often leads to higher power consumption, which must be kept under control since exceeding the power budget could damage the system under test. Furthermore, the execution of a test requires resources and concurrent execution of tests may not be possible due to resource or other conflicts. In this paper, we propose an integrated technique for test scheduling, test parallelization, and TAM design, where the test application time and the TAM routing are minimized, while considering test conflicts and power constraints. The main features of our technique are the efficiency in terms of computation time and the flexibility to model the system’s test behavior, as well as the support for the testing of interconnections, unwrapped cores and user-defined logic. We have implemented our approach and made several experiments on benchmarks as well as industrial designs in order to demonstrate that our approach produces high-quality solution at low computational cost. Index Terms—Scan-chain partitioning, system-on-chip (SOC) testing, test access mechanism design, test data transportation, test scheduling, test solutions. I.

Erik Larsson; Klas Arvidsson; Hideo Fujiwara; Zebo Peng; Senior Member

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Software Testing Research: Achievements, Challenges, Dreams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Software engineering comprehends several disciplines devoted to prevent and remedy malfunctions and to warrant adequate behaviour. Testing, the subject of this paper, is a widespread validation approach in industry, but it is still largely ad hoc, expensive, ...

Antonia Bertolino

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

NREL: Buildings Research - Building Physics Test Cases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cases, the model inputs that describe the house are fixed by the test specification. The energy usage for the base case and energy savings for a number of retrofit measures are...

80

Solid oxide materials research accelerated electrochemical testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this work were to develop methods for accelerated testing of cathode material for solid oxide fuel cells under selected operating conditions. The methods would be used to evaluate the performance of LSM cathode material.

Armstrong, T.R.; Windisch, C.; Arey, B.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research design testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Design and Testing of Prototypic Elements Containing Monolithic Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US fuel development team has performed numerous irradiation tests on small to medium sized specimens containing low enriched uranium fuel designs. The team is now focused on qualification and demonstration of the uranium-molybdenum Base Monolithic Design and has entered the next generation of testing with the design and irradiation of prototypic elements which contain this fuel. The designs of fuel elements containing monolithic fuel, such as AFIP-7 (which is currently under irradiation) and RERTR-FE (which is currently under fabrication), are appropriate progressions relative to the technology life cycle. The culmination of this testing program will occur with the design, fabrication, and irradiation of demonstration products to include the base fuel demonstration and design demonstration experiments. Future plans show that design, fabrication, and testing activities will apply the rigor needed for a demonstration campaign.

N.E. Woolstenhulme; M.K. Meyer; D.M. Wachs

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratory and Research Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to quantify the emissions from heavy-duty vehicles operating on alternative fuels or advanced fuel blends, often with novel engine technology or aftertreatment. In the first year of the program West Virginia University (WVU) researchers determined that a transportable chassis dynamometer emissions measurement approach was required so that fleets of trucks and buses did not need to be ferried across the nation to a fixed facility. A Transportable Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Testing Laboratory (Translab) was designed, constructed and verified. This laboratory consisted of a chassis dynamometer semi-trailer and an analytic trailer housing a full scale exhaust dilution tunnel and sampling system which mimicked closely the system described in the Code of Federal Regulations for engine certification. The Translab was first used to quantify emissions from natural gas and methanol fueled transit buses, and a second Translab unit was constructed to satisfy research demand. Subsequent emissions measurement was performed on trucks and buses using ethanol, Fischer-Tropsch fuel, and biodiesel. A medium-duty chassis dynamometer was also designed and constructed to facilitate research on delivery vehicles in the 10,000 to 20,000lb range. The Translab participated in major programs to evaluate low-sulfur diesel in conjunction with passively regenerating exhaust particulate filtration technology, and substantial reductions in particulate matter were recorded. The researchers also participated in programs to evaluate emissions from advanced natural gas engines with closed loop feedback control. These natural gas engines showed substantially reduced levels of oxides of nitrogen. For all of the trucks and buses characterized, the levels of carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and particulate matter were quantified, and in many cases non-regulated species such as aldehydes were also sampled. Particle size was also quantified during selected studies. A laboratory was established at WVU to provide for studies which supported and augmented the Translab research, and to provide for development of superior emissions measurement systems. This laboratory research focused on engine control and fuel sulfur issues. In recent years, as engine and aftertreatment technologies advanced, emissions levels were reduced such that they were at or below the Translab detectable limits, and in the same time frame the US Environmental Protection Agency required improved measurement methodologies for engine emissions certification. To remain current and relevant, the researchers designed a new Translab analytic system, housed in a container which can be transported on a semi-trailer. The new system's dilution tunnel flow was designed to use a subsonic venturi with closed loop control of blower speed, and the secondary dilution and particulate matter filter capture were designed to follow new EPA engine certification procedures. A further contribution of the program has been the development of techniques for creating heavy-duty vehicle test schedules, and the creation of schedules to mimic a variety of truck and bus vocations.

David Lyons

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

OPSAID Initial Design and TestingReport | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OPSAID Initial Design and TestingReport OPSAID Initial Design and TestingReport OPSAID Initial Design and TestingReport Process Control System (PCS) security is critical to our national security. Yet, there are a number of technological, economic, and educational impediments to PCS owners implementing effective security on their systems. OPSAID (Open PCS Security Architecture for Interoperable Design), a project sponsored by the US Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Reliability, aims to address this issue through developing and testing an open source architecture for PCS security. Sandia National Laboratories, along with a team of PCS vendors and owners, have developed and tested this PCS security architecture. This report describes their progress to date. OPSAID Initial Design and Testing Report

84

Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Home > About...

85

NREL: Wind Research - Small Wind Turbine Independent Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind Research Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Small Wind Turbine Independent Testing One of the barriers for the small wind market has been the lack...

86

Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation | National Nuclear Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation

87

Guest Editors' Introduction: The Evolution of RFIC Design and Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are several challenges facing RFIC design and test. The demand in the wireless market will drive RFIC products. For RFIC chipsets, improvements are needed for the elimination of passive components, better integrated passives, power reduction, modeling ... Keywords: RFIC chips, RF measurement, CMOS technology, wireless, design and test

Bruce C. Kim; Craig Force

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Using partial safety factors in wind turbine design and testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the relationship between wind turbine design and testing in terms of the certification process. An overview of the current status of international certification is given along with a description of limit-state design basics. Wind turbine rotor blades are used to illustrate the principles discussed. These concepts are related to both International Electrotechnical Commission and Germanischer Lloyd design standards, and are covered using schematic representations of statistical load and material strength distributions. Wherever possible, interpretations of the partial safety factors are given with descriptions of their intended meaning. Under some circumstances, the authors` interpretations may be subjective. Next, the test-load factors are described in concept and then related to the design factors. Using technical arguments, it is shown that some of the design factors for both load and materials must be used in the test loading, but some should not be used. In addition, some test factors not used in the design may be necessary for an accurate test of the design. The results show that if the design assumptions do not clearly state the effects and uncertainties that are covered by the design`s partial safety factors, outside parties such as test labs or certification agencies could impose their own meaning on these factors.

Musial, W.D.; Butterfield, C.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

LEHIGH UNIVERSITY RESEARCH AND TESTING AGREEMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the Project. Article 4 - Costs, Billings and Other Support 4.1 It is agreed to and understood by the parties and testing project contemplated by this Agreement is of mutual interest and benefit to University have the following meanings: 1.1 "Project" shall mean the project titled

Gilchrist, James F.

90

TRUPACT-2 design, testing and certification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large volume of contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) nuclear waste has been generated and has accumulated at ten Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Approximately 168,000 cubic meters of this waste has been targeted for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. Shipment of all of this waste is expected to require more than 15,000 shipments, totalling approximately 38 million kilometers of travel. The TRUPACT-II is a reusable package for shipment of CH TRU waste; it is designed in accordance with US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requirements for Type B packages found in 10 CFR 71. There are two separate levels of containment to permit shipment of plutonium in excess of 740 GBq per package. The packaging is a right circular cylinder in shape, with a domed top and a flat bottom; external dimensions are 240 centimeters in diameter and 309 centimeters high. The capacity of each TRUPACT-II is 3182 kilograms of waste that can be loaded into fourteen 210-1 drums; or two 1.9 cubic meters standard waste boxes (SWBs). Three TRUPACT-II packages are transported on a custom designed semitrailer which is pulled by a conventional tractor for highway transport of CH TRU waste between DOE sites and to the WIPP near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the TRUPACT-II Package was initially submitted to the NRC in March 1989. Four revisions were issued during the period from May through August 1989. NRC certification of the package was received on August 30, 1989. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Cruse, J. (Pacific Nuclear Systems, Inc., Federal Way, WA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

SPRE I Free-Piston Stirling Engine Testing at NASA Lewis Research Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the NASA funded portion of the SP-100 Advanced Technology Program the Space Power Research Engine (SPRE I) was designed and built to serve as a research tool for evaluation and development of advanced Stirling engine concepts. The SPRE I is designed to produce 12.5 kW electrical power when operated with helium at 15 MPa and with an absolute temperature ratio of two. The engine is now under test in a new test facility which was designed and built at NASA LeRC specifically to test the SPRE I. This paper describes the SPRE I, the NASA test facility, the initial SPRE I test results, and future SPRE I test plans.

Cairelli, J.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

WEB-BASED TRAINING SYSTEM FOR TEACHING BASICS OF RT-LEVEL DIGITAL DESIGN, TEST, AND DESIGN FOR TEST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

engineers to design larger, more complex, integrated circuits. Until recently, most electronic systems and test means teaching a lot of complex connections. Those connected topics have to be explained at first and test of digital devices is presented. The system is designed mainly to illustrate RT-level (Register

Jutman, Artur

93

Design-For-Test in a Multiple Substrate Multichip Module  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper highlights the development and effectiveness of a multichip module (MCM) Design-For-Testability methodology for an application intended for use in a fully electronic active matrix LCD flight instrument. MCM test issues discussed include ... Keywords: Ball Grid Array (BGA), Built-In-Self-Test (BIST), Known-Good Die (KGD), Multichip Module (MCM) Test, boundary-scan

Joel A. Jorgenson; Russell J. Wagner

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Advanced Control Design for Wind Turbines; Part I: Control Design, Implementation, and Initial Tests  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to give wind turbine engineers information and examples of the design, testing through simulation, field implementation, and field testing of advanced wind turbine controls.

Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Chalcogenide Glass Radiation Sensor; Materials Development, Design and Device Testing  

SciTech Connect

For many decades, various radiation detecting material have been extensively researched, to find a better material or mechanism for radiation sensing. Recently, there is a growing need for a smaller and effective material or device that can perform similar functions of bulkier Geiger counters and other measurement options, which fail the requirement for easy, cheap and accurate radiation dose measurement. Here arises the use of thin film chalcogenide glass, which has unique properties of high thermal stability along with high sensitivity towards short wavelength radiation. The unique properties of chalcogenide glasses are attributed to the lone pair p-shell electrons, which provide some distinctive optical properties when compared to crystalline material. These qualities are derived from the energy band diagram and the presence of localized states in the band gap. Chalcogenide glasses have band tail states and localized states, along with the two band states. These extra states are primarily due to the lone pair electrons as well as the amorphous structure of the glasses. The localized states between the conductance band (CB) and valence band (VB) are primarily due to the presence of the lone pair electrons, while the band tail states are attributed to the Van der Waalâ??s forces between layers of atoms [1]. Localized states are trap locations within the band gap where electrons from the valence band can hop into, in their path towards the conduction band. Tail states on the other hand are locations near the band gap edges and are known as Urbach tail states (Eu). These states are occupied with many electrons that can participate in the various transformations due to interaction with photons. According to Y. Utsugi et. al.[2], the electron-phonon interactions are responsible for the generation of the Urbach tails. These states are responsible for setting the absorption edge for these glasses and photons with energy near the band gap affect these states. We have studied the effect of x-rays and Îł-rays, on thin film chalcogenide glasses and applied them in conjunction with film incorporating a silver source in a new type of radiation sensor for which we have an US patent application [3]. In this report, we give data about our studies regarding our designed radiation sensor along with the testing and performance at various radiation doses. These studies have been preceded by materials characterization research related to the compositional and structural characteristics of the active materials used in the radiation sensor design. During the work on the project, we collected a large volume of material since every experiment was repeated many times to verify the results. We conducted a comprehensive material research, analysis and discussion with the aim to understand the nature of the occurring effects, design different structures to harness these effects, generated models to aid in the understanding the effects, built different device structures and collected data to quantify device performance. These various aspects of our investigation have been detailed in previous quarterly reports. In this report, we present our main results and emphasize on the results pertaining to the core project goals â?? materials development, sensor design and testing and with an emphasis on classifying the appropriate material and design for the optimal application. The report has three main parts: (i) Presentation of the main data; (ii) Bulleted summary of the most important results; (iii) List of the patent, journal publications, conference proceedings and conferences participation, occurring as a result of working on the project.

Mitkova, Maria; Butt, Darryl; Kozicki, Michael; Barnaby, Hugo

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

96

Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research and Testing | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research Light Water Reactor Fuel Cladding Research June 01, 2013 Severe Accident Test Station ORNL is the focus point for Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel cladding research and testing. The purpose of this research is to furnish U.S. industry (EPRI, Areva, Westinghouse), and regulators (NRC) with much-needed data supporting safe and economical nuclear power generation and used fuel management. LWR fuel cladding work is tightly integrated with ORNL accident tolerant fuel development and used fuel disposition programs thereby providing a powerful capability that couples basic materials science research with the nuclear applications research and development. The ORNL LWR fuel cladding program consists of five complementary areas of research: Accident tolerant fuel and cladding material testing under design

97

Applying design science research for enterprise architecture business value assessments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the effort to measure the business value and impact of Enterprise Architecture (EA), we need to adapt an appropriate form of information systems research in order to cope with the encountered challenges. For this purpose, we employed Design Science ... Keywords: business value assessment, design science, enterprise architecture

Martin Meyer; Markus Helfert; Brian Donnellan; Jim Kenneally

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Proceedings of 3rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Proceedings of 3rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Proceedings of 3rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design, and Operation Proceedings of 3rd US/German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design, and Operation The 3rd U.S./German Workshop on Salt Repository Research, Design and Operation was held in Albuquerque and Carlsbad, New Mexico on October 8-11, 2012. Approximately 60 salt research scientists from Germany and the United States met to discuss repository science state of the art. Workshop topics included: 1) Safety case for heat-generating waste disposal in salt; 2) Benchmark modeling in preparation for thermomechanical field-scale tests; and 3) Reconsolidation of granular salt. Collaboration being pursued by U.S. and German salt repository researchers is presented in the report.

99

Annual report on the project to design and experimentally test an improved geothermal drill bit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in a research and development program to design, build, and test an improved geothermal drill bit. The major tasks of the Phase I effort are entitled: failure mechanisms of existing bits; new steels and new bearing design; and new seals and lubricants. It appears that a significant gain in drill-bit life can be attained by the use of higher-temperature steels which retain more hardness at temperatures above 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F). Such steels are available, and two research bits of high-temperature steels were made and will shortly be tested in a laboratory-simulated full-scale geothermal drilling environment. Two control bits of the same design, but made with conventional drill bit steels, were also obtained for identical laboratory test runs, so that the performance of the research bits can be meaningfully assessed. Base-line properties of the steels, such as hardness and fracture toughness as functions of temperature, are being measured to further assess the value of the high-temperature steels selected for the research bits. A geothermal test vessel was designed and fabricated in which the full-scale drill bits will be tested. The vessel is capable of temperature to 427/sup 0/C (800/sup 0/F) and pressures to 35 MPa (5,000 psi). Seal and lubrication designs were studied, and the state of the art in high-temperature seals and lubricants was assessed. Some candidate seals and lubricants have been obtained for testing, and others are being procured. In addition, a seal test vessel has been designed and will soon be completed which can simulate the geothermal drilling environment in full-scale testing of seal and lubricant designs and materials. (JGB)

Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.; Maurer, W.C.; DeVries, L.K.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

NREL: Fleet Test and Evaluation - Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Development Research and Development The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team conducts research that supports the development and deployment of alternative fuel and advanced vehicle technologies in medium- and heavy-duty fleet vehicles. Technology evaluation projects focus on drive cycle analysis, hybrid electric vehicles, all-electric vehicles, truck stop electrification, and alternative fuels. Learn more about the team's project areas: Fleet DNA: Vehicle Drive Cycle Analysis Hybrid Electric Drive Systems Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Drive Systems Hydraulic Hybrid Drive Systems Truck Stop Electrification Alternative Fuels Truck Efficiency Printable Version Fleet Test and Evaluation Home Research & Development Vehicle Drive Cycle Analysis Hybrid Electric Drive Systems

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research design testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Advanced Hydropower Turbine System Design for Field Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Alden/Concepts NREC hydroturbine was initially developed under the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Hydropower Turbine Systems Program. This design work was intended to develop a new runner that would substantially reduce fish mortality at hydroelectric projects, while developing power at efficiencies similar to competing hydroturbine designs. A pilot-scale test facility was constructed to quantify the effects of the conceptual turbine design on passing fish and to verify the hydraulic char...

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

Bus Research and Testing Program Heavy-duty Chassis Dynamometer and Emissions Testing Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bus Research and Testing Program Heavy-duty Chassis Dynamometer and Emissions Testing Facility, hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide from transit buses and heavy-duty vehicles when they are tested on simulated includes a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer, required for conducting these tests, as well as a heavy

Lee, Dongwon

103

Test Plan for Heat Cycle Research Program, Phase I Supercritical Cycle Tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 60 kW Heat Cycle Research Facility (HCRF) provides a means of examining different concepts and components associated with the generation of electrical power from a geothermal resource using a binary power cycle. In this power cycle the heat or energy in a hot geothermal fluid is transferred to a secondary working fluid. This working fluid is vaporized in the heat exchange process and the vapor is in turn expanded through a turbine which drives a generator producing electrical power. the heat or energy in the vapor leaving the turbine is transferred to a circulating cooling water in the condenser where the working fluid is condensed to a liquid which can be pumped back to the heaters, completing the cycle. This waste heat load in the condenser is in turn transferred from the cooling water to the atmosphere in a cooling tower. The HCRF allows the different components described in the cycle above to be tested as well as the basic cycle itself. This cycle may vary in that the heaters, condenser, cooling system, pumps, etc. may differ in number and type, however the basic cycle does not change significantly. During this sequence of tests, the HCRF is operated using a supercritical vapor generator and a vertical condenser where the condensation occurs inside of the tubes as opposed to the shell side more commonly used in these applications. In addition to providing the data to be used to evaluate the design of these heat exchangers, these supercritical tests provide cycle and component performance data with both single component working fluids and working fluids comprised of different mixtures of hydrocarbons. The use of these mixtures promises to improve cycle performance, in terms of watt-hours per pound of geothermal fluid, provided the countercurrent flow paths can be maintained between the fluids in both the condenser and the heaters. The supercritical heaters and the condenser to be used in this series of tests were designed to provide the desired countercurrent flow paths.

Mines, Greg L.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

SNERDI Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Institute | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SNERDI Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Institute SNERDI Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Institute Jump to: navigation, search Name SNERDI (Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Institute) Place Shanghai, China Product The Shanghai Nuclear Engineering Research and Design Institute was established on July 28th, 1970, as a key research and design institute under direct administration of China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC). Coordinates 31.247709°, 121.472618° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.247709,"lon":121.472618,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

105

Using design critique as research to link sustainability and interactive technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper echoes and points to work we have presented elsewhere on establishing the links between issues of sustainability and interaction design. The significant contribution of this paper is a description of the use of design critique as a research ... Keywords: design critique, design ethics and values, design research, research methods, social context of interaction design, sustainable interaction design, value sensitive design

Eli Blevis; Youn-kyung Lim; David Roedl; Erik Stolterman

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Experimental Designs for Testing Differences in Survival Among Salmonid Populations.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP) is a supplementation plan for enhancing salmon runs in the Yakima River basin. It is presumed that inadequate spawning and rearing habitat are limiting factors to population abundance of spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawyacha). Therefore, the supplementation effort for spring chinook salmon is focused on introducing hatchery-raised smolts into the basin to compensate for the lack of spawning habitat. However, based on empirical evidence in the Yakima basin, hatchery-reared salmon have survived poorly compared to wild salmon. Therefore, the YFP has proposed to alter the optimal conventional treatment (OCT), which is the state-of-the-art hatchery rearing method, to a new innovative treatment (NIT). The NIT is intended to produce hatchery fish that mimic wild fish and thereby to enhance their survival over that of OCT fish. A limited application of the NIT (LNIT) has also been proposed to reduce the cost of applying the new treatment, yet retain the benefits of increased survival. This research was conducted to test whether the uncertainty using the experimental design was within the limits specified by the Planning Status Report (PSR).

Hoffman, Annette; Busack, Craig; Knudsen, Craig

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Advanced computational research in materials processing for design and manufacturing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The computational requirements for design and manufacture of automotive components have seen dramatic increases for producing automobiles with three times the mileage. Automotive component design systems are becoming increasingly reliant on structural analysis requiring both overall larger analysis and more complex analyses, more three-dimensional analyses, larger model sizes, and routine consideration of transient and non-linear effects. Such analyses must be performed rapidly to minimize delays in the design and development process, which drives the need for parallel computing. This paper briefly describes advanced computational research in superplastic forming and automotive crash worthiness.

Zacharia, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Metals and Ceramics

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation test reactor design report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is working with GenCorp, Aerojet and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation to develop a transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation reactor. The transpiring wall reactor promises to mitigate problems of salt deposition and corrosion by forming a protective boundary layer of pure supercritical water. A laboratory scale test reactor has been assembled to demonstrate the concept. A 1/4 scale transpiring wall reactor was designed and fabricated by Aerojet using their platelet technology. Sandia`s Engineering Evaluation Reactor serves as a test bed to supply, pressurize and heat the waste; collect, measure and analyze the effluent; and control operation of the system. This report describes the design, test capabilities, and operation of this versatile and unique test system with the transpiring wall reactor.

Haroldsen, B.L.; Ariizumi, D.Y.; Mills, B.E.; Brown, B.G. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Engineering for Transportation and Environment Dept.; Rousar, D.C. [GenCorp Aerojet, Sacramento, CA (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

On-Chip Test Infrastructure Design for Optimal Multi-Site Testing of System Chips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-site testing is a popular and effective way to increase test throughput and reduce test costs. We present a test throughput model, in which we focus on wafer testing, and consider parameters like test time, index time, abort-on-fail, and contact yield. Conventional multi-site testing requires sufficient ATE resources, such as ATE channels, to allow to test multiple SOCs in parallel. In this paper, we design and optimize on-chip DfT, in order to maximize the test throughput for a given SOC and ATE. The on-chip DfT consists of an E-RPCT wrapper, and, for modular SOCs, module wrappers and TAMs. We present experimental results for a Philips SOC and several ITC'02 SOC Test Benchmarks.

Goel, Sandeep Kumar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Radiological design criteria for fusion power test facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quest for fusion power and understanding of plasma physics has resulted in planning, design, and construction of several major fusion power test facilities, based largely on magnetic and inertial confinement concepts. We have considered radiological design aspects of the Joint European Torus (JET), Livermore Mirror and Inertial Fusion projects, and Princeton Tokamak. Our analyses on radiological design criteria cover acceptable exposure levels at the site boundary, man-rem doses for plant personnel and population at large, based upon experience gained for the fission reactors, and on considerations of cost-benefit analyses.

Singh, M.S.; Campbell, G.W.

1982-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

111

Conceptual Design of Forced Convection Molten Salt Heat Transfer Testing Loop  

SciTech Connect

This report develops a proposal to design and construct a forced convection test loop. A detailed test plan will then be conducted to obtain data on heat transfer, thermodynamic, and corrosion characteristics of the molten salts and fluid-solid interaction. In particular, this report outlines an experimental research and development test plan. The most important initial requirement for heat transfer test of molten salt systems is the establishment of reference coolant materials to use in the experiments. An earlier report produced within the same project highlighted how thermophysical properties of the materials that directly impact the heat transfer behavior are strongly correlated to the composition and impurities concentration of the melt. It is therefore essential to establish laboratory techniques that can measure the melt composition, and to develop purification methods that would allow the production of large quantities of coolant with the desired purity. A companion report describes the options available to reach such objectives. In particular, that report outlines an experimental research and development test plan that would include following steps: •Molten Salts: The candidate molten salts for investigation will be selected. •Materials of Construction: Materials of construction for the test loop, heat exchangers, and fluid-solid corrosion tests in the test loop will also be selected. •Scaling Analysis: Scaling analysis to design the test loop will be performed. •Test Plan: A comprehensive test plan to include all the tests that are being planned in the short and long term time frame will be developed. •Design the Test Loop: The forced convection test loop will be designed including extensive mechanical design, instrument selection, data acquisition system, safety requirements, and related precautionary measures. •Fabricate the Test Loop. •Perform the Tests. •Uncertainty Analysis: As a part of the data collection, uncertainty analysis will be performed to develop probability of confidence in what is measured in the test loop. Overall, the testing loop will allow development of needed heat transfer related thermophysical parameters for all the salts, validate existing correlations, validate measuring instruments under harsh environment, and have extensive corrosion testing of materials of construction.

Manohar S. Sohal; Piyush Sabharwall; Pattrick Calderoni; Alan K. Wertsching; S. Brandon Grover

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Virtual environment for solar energy systems design and testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper refers to a virtual environment which represents the main support for experiments with photovoltaic energy systems in the design and testing stage. This software environment is very useful because, compairing to the experiments with real energetic ... Keywords: artificial intelligence, photovoltaic energy systems, simulator, synchronization, virtual environment, virtual experiments

Lucian Milea; Orest Oltu; Marius Stoian; Sanda Osiceanu

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Design, implementation and testing of extended and mixed precision BLAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the design rationale, a C implementation, and conformance testing of a subset of the new Standard for the BLAS (Basic Linear Algebra Subroutines): Extended and Mixed Precision BLAS. Permitting higher internal precision and mixed ... Keywords: BLAS, double-double arithmetic, extended and mixed precision

Xiaoye S. Li; James W. Demmel; David H. Bailey; Greg Henry; Yozo Hida; Jimmy Iskandar; William Kahan; Suh Y. Kang; Anil Kapur; Michael C. Martin; Brandon J. Thompson; Teresa Tung; Daniel J. Yoo

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

DESIGN, ANALYSIS AND TEST CONCEPT FOR PROTOTYPE CRYOLINE OF ITER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ITER cryo-distribution and cryoline is a part of the in-kind supply for India. The design of the systems is in progress. The topology of torus and neutral beam cryoline is defined as six process pipes along with thermal shield at 80 K and outer vacuum jacket. In order to develop confidence in the concept and to establish the high level of engineering and manufacturing technology, a prototype testing has been proposed. The prototype test will be carried out on 1:1 model in terms of dimension. However, the mass flow rate of the supercritical helium at 4.5 K and gaseous helium at 80 K will be on a 1:10 scale. The prototype cryoline has been designed and analyzed for thermal, structural and hydraulic parameters. The objective of this prototype test is to verify mechanical behavior due to thermal stress and pressure force, thermal and hydraulic performances. The concept of test facility has been realized along with the Piping and Instrumentation (P and I) diagram, instrumentation, controls, data acquisition, 80 K helium generation system along with supply and return valve boxes and interfacing hardware. The design concept, methodology for analysis and results, as well as the test facility have been discussed.

Sarkar, B.; Badgujar, S.; Vaghela, H.; Shah, N.; Bhattacharya, R.; Chakrapani, Ch. [Institute for Plasma Research Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat, 382428 (India)

2008-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

115

Progress in Implementing and Testing State-Space Controls for the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Designing wind turbines with maximum energy production and longevity for minimal cost is a major goal of the federal wind program and the wind industry. Control can improve the performance of wind turbines by enhancing energy capture and reducing dynamic loads. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) we are designing state-space control algorithms for turbine speed regulation and load reduction and testing them on the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART). The CART is a test-bed especially designed to test advanced control algorithms on a two-bladed teetering hub upwind turbine. In this paper we briefly describe the design of control systems to regulate turbine speed in region 3 for the CART. These controls use rotor collective pitch to regulate speed and also enhance damping in the 1st drive-train torsion, 1st rotor symmetric flap mode, and the 1st tower fore-aft mode. We designed these controls using linear optimal control techniques using state estimation based on limited turbine measurements such as generator speed and tower fore-aft bending moment. In this paper, we describe the issues and steps involved with implementing and testing these controls on the CART, and we show simulated tests to quantify controller performance. We then present preliminary results after implementing and testing these controls on the CART. We compare results from these controls to field test results from a baseline Proportional Integral control system. Finally we report conclusions to this work and outline future studies.

Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.; Stol, K. A.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

THE DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF MAGNETIC FIELDS FOR PLASMA RESEARCH  

SciTech Connect

The main problems arising during the design and con struction of medium size air-core electro-magnets are discussed. The basic equations are given relating magnetic field strength, magnetic field rise time, power input, electrodynamic forces, and thermal conditions e.g., allowable temperature rise to give the detailed dimensions required for the electrical conductor and the cooling annull. The details for a 25 kgauss sectional oil-cooled electromagnet for plasma research are described. (auth)

Gryzinski, M.; Sadowski, M.

1962-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Operation and design of selected industrial process heat field tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE program of solar industrial process heat field tests has shown solar energy to be compatible with numerous industrial needs. Both the operational projects and the detailed designs of systems that are not yet operational have resulted in valuable insights into design and hardware practice. Typical of these insights are the experiences discussed for the four projects reviewed. Future solar IPH systems should benefit greatly not only from the availability of present information, but also from the wealth of operating experience from projects due to start up in 1981.

Kearney, D. W.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

FAST FUEL TEST REACTOR-FFTR CONCEPTUAL DESIGN STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The Fast Fuel Test Reactor (FFTR) is a nuclear facility for the purpose of irradiating samples of fuels and structural components for use in fast reactors. The core consisis of a plate type element in a square configuration. Beryllium metal between the fuel elements is used to obtain a neutron energy spectrum in the hard intermediate region. Cooling of the core and test specimens is accomplished by means of liquid sodium. The design concept was carried through in sufficient degree in the following areas of preliminary concern: number and size of irradiation facilities, sample power requirements, plant layout to evaluate site requirements, plant and nuclear design parameters to evaluate essential equipment requirements. plant-capital-cost estimate, annual- operating-cost estimate, and estimate of construction time schedule. (W.D.M.)

Brubaker, R.; Hummel, H.H.; McArthy, A.; Smaardyk, A.; Kittel, J.H.

1960-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory Of The NASA Bi-Supported Cell Design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory has been researching the application of solid-oxide fuel cell technology for large-scale hydrogen production. As a result, the Idaho National Laboratory has been testing various cell designs to characterize electrolytic performance. NASA, in conjunction with the University of Toledo, has developed a new cell concept with the goals of reduced weight and high power density. This paper presents results of the INL's testing of this new solid oxide cell design as an electrolyzer. Gas composition, operating voltage, and other parameters were varied during testing. Results to date show the NASA cell to be a promising design for both high power-to-weight fuel cell and electrolyzer applications.

C Stoots; J O'Brien; T Cable

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory Of The NASA Bi-Supported Cell Design  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory has been researching the application of solid-oxide fuel cell technology for large-scale hydrogen production. As a result, the Idaho National Laboratory has been testing various cell designs to characterize electrolytic performance. NASA, in conjunction with the University of Toledo, has developed a new cell concept with the goals of reduced weight and high power density. This paper presents results of the INL's testing of this new solid oxide cell design as an electrolyzer. Gas composition, operating voltage, and other parameters were varied during testing. Results to date show the NASA cell to be a promising design for both high power-to-weight fuel cell and electrolyzer applications.

C Stoots; J O' Brien; T Cable

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research design testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A design guide for energy-efficient research laboratories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document--A Design Guide for Energy-Efficient Research Laboratories--provides a detailed and holistic framework to assist designers and energy managers in identifying and applying advanced energy-efficiency features in laboratory-type environments. The Guide fills an important void in the general literature and compliments existing in-depth technical manuals. Considerable information is available pertaining to overall laboratory design issues, but no single document focuses comprehensively on energy issues in these highly specialized environments. Furthermore, practitioners may utilize many antiquated rules of thumb, which often inadvertently cause energy inefficiency. The Guide helps its user to: introduce energy decision-making into the earliest phases of the design process, access the literature of pertinent issues, and become aware of debates and issues on related topics. The Guide does focus on individual technologies, as well as control systems, and important operational factors such as building commissioning. However, most importantly, the Guide is intended to foster a systems perspective (e.g. right sizing) and to present current leading-edge, energy-efficient design practices and principles.

Wishner, N.; Chen, A.; Cook, L. [eds.; Bell, G.C.; Mills, E.; Sartor, D.; Avery, D.; Siminovitch, M.; Piette, M.A.

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

122

NREL: Vehicles and Fuels Research - Fleet Test and Evaluation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Research Search More Search Options Site Map The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory works in partnership with commercial and government fleets and industry groups to evaluate the performance of alternative fuels and advanced technologies in medium- and heavy-duty fleet vehicles. The team's project areas include: Fleet DNA: Vehicle Drive Cycle Analysis Hybrid Electric Drive Systems Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Drive Systems Hydraulic Hybrid Drive Systems Truck Stop Electrification Alternative Fuels Truck Efficiency Key aspects of this work involve meeting with industry stakeholders to understand market factors and customer requirements, evaluating the performance of advanced technology vehicles versus their conventional

123

Blade system design studies volume II : preliminary blade designs and recommended test matrix.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program, Global Energy Concepts, LLC is performing a Blade System Design Study (BSDS) concerning innovations in materials, processes and structural configurations for application to wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt range. The BSDS Volume I project report addresses issues and constraints identified to scaling conventional blade designs to the megawatt size range, and evaluated candidate materials, manufacturing and design innovations for overcoming and improving large blade economics. The current report (Volume II), presents additional discussion of materials and manufacturing issues for large blades, including a summary of current trends in commercial blade manufacturing. Specifications are then developed to guide the preliminary design of MW-scale blades. Using preliminary design calculations for a 3.0 MW blade, parametric analyses are performed to quantify the potential benefits in stiffness and decreased gravity loading by replacement of a baseline fiberglass spar with carbon-fiberglass hybrid material. Complete preliminary designs are then presented for 3.0 MW and 5.0 MW blades that incorporate fiberglass-to-carbon transitions at mid-span. Based on analysis of these designs, technical issues are identified and discussed. Finally, recommendations are made for composites testing under Part I1 of the BSDS, and the initial planned test matrix for that program is presented.

Griffin, Dayton A. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC, Kirkland, WA)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Blade system design studies volume II : preliminary blade designs and recommended test matrix.  

SciTech Connect

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program, Global Energy Concepts, LLC is performing a Blade System Design Study (BSDS) concerning innovations in materials, processes and structural configurations for application to wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt range. The BSDS Volume I project report addresses issues and constraints identified to scaling conventional blade designs to the megawatt size range, and evaluated candidate materials, manufacturing and design innovations for overcoming and improving large blade economics. The current report (Volume II), presents additional discussion of materials and manufacturing issues for large blades, including a summary of current trends in commercial blade manufacturing. Specifications are then developed to guide the preliminary design of MW-scale blades. Using preliminary design calculations for a 3.0 MW blade, parametric analyses are performed to quantify the potential benefits in stiffness and decreased gravity loading by replacement of a baseline fiberglass spar with carbon-fiberglass hybrid material. Complete preliminary designs are then presented for 3.0 MW and 5.0 MW blades that incorporate fiberglass-to-carbon transitions at mid-span. Based on analysis of these designs, technical issues are identified and discussed. Finally, recommendations are made for composites testing under Part I1 of the BSDS, and the initial planned test matrix for that program is presented.

Griffin, Dayton A. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC, Kirkland, WA)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

RERTR 2009 (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration's Office of Global Threat Reduction in cooperation with the China Atomic Energy Authority and International Atomic Energy Agency hosted the 'RERTR 2009 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors.' The meeting was organized by Argonne National Laboratory, China Institute of Atomic Energy and Idaho National Laboratory and was held in Beijing, China from November 1-5, 2009. This was the 31st annual meeting in a series on the same general subject regarding the conversion of reactors within the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI). The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program develops technology necessary to enable the conversion of civilian facilities using high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuels and targets.

Totev, T.; Stevens, J.; Kim, Y. S.; Hofman, G.; Matos, J.; Hanan, N.; Garner, P.; Dionne, B.; Olson, A.; Feldman, E.; Dunn, F.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Atomic Research Center; Inst. of Nuclear Physics; LLNL; INL; Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Comisi?n Nacional de Energ?a At?mica; Nuclear Reactor Lab.; Inst. of Atomic Energy-Poland; AECL-Canada; Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Inst.; Japan Atomic Energy Agency; Nuclear Power Inst. of China; Kyoto Univ. Research Reactor Inst.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Hydrogen storage-bed design for tritium systems test assembly  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory has completed the design of a hydrogen storage bed for the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA). Our objective is to store hydrogen isotopes as uranium hydrides and recover them by dehydriding. The specific use of the storage bed is to store DT gas as U(D,T)/sub 3/ when it is required for the TSTA. The hydrogen storage bed consists of a primary container in which uranium powder is stored and a secondary container for a second level of safety in gas confinement. The primary container, inlet and outlet gas lines, cartridge heaters, and instrumentation are assembled in the secondary container. The design of the hydrogen storage bed is presented, along with the modeling and analysis of the bed behavior during hydriding-dehydriding cycles.

Cullingford, H.S.; Wheeler, M.G.; McMullen, J.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR-ATR FINAL CONCEPTUAL DESIGN  

SciTech Connect

The results of a study are presented which provided additional experimental-loop irradiation space for the AECDRD testing program. It was a premise that the experiments allocated to this reactor were those which could not be accommodated in the MTR, ETR, or in existing commercial test reactors. To accomplish the design objectives called for a reactor producing perturbed neutron fluxes exceeding 1O/sup 15/ thermal n/cm/sup 2/-sec and 1.5 x 1O/sup 15/ epithermal n/cm/sup 2/-sec. To accommodate the experimental samples, the reactor fuel core is four feet long in the direction of experimental loops. This is twice the length of the MTR core and a third longer than the ETR core. The vertical arrangement of reactor and experiments permits the use of loops penetrating the top cap of the reactor vessel running straight and vertically through the reactor core. The design offers a high degree of accessibility of the exterior portions of the experiments and offers very convenient handling and discharge of experiments. Since the loops are to be integrated into the reactor design and the in-pile portions installed before reactor start-up, it is felt that many of the problems encountered in MTR and ETR experience will cease to exist. Installation of the loops prior to startup will have an added advantage in that the flux variations experienced in experiments in ETR every time a new loop is installed will be absent. The Advanced Test Reactor has a core configuration that provides essentially nine flux-trap regions in a geometry that is almost optimum for cylindrical experiments. The geometry is similar to that of a fourleaf clover with one flux trap in each leaf, one at the intersection of the leaves, and one between each pair of leaves. The nominal power level is 250 Mw. The study was carried out in enough detail to permit the establishment of the design parameters and to develop the power requirement which, conservatively rated, will definitely reach the flux specifications. A critical mockup of an arrangement similar to ATR was loaded into the Engineering Test Reactor Critical Facility. (auth)

deBoisblanc, D.R. et al

1960-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Researchers test novel power system for space travel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power system for space travel Power system for space travel Researchers test novel power system for space travel The research team recently demonstrated the first use of a heat pipe to cool a small nuclear reactor and power a Stirling engine. November 26, 2012 John Bounds of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Advanced Nuclear Technology Division makes final adjustments on the DUFF experiment, a demonstration of a simple, robust fission reactor prototype that could be used as a power system for space travel. DUFF is the first demonstration of a space nuclear reactor system to produce electricity in the United States since 1965. John Bounds of Los Alamos National Laboratory's Advanced Nuclear Technology Division makes final adjustments on the DUFF experiment, a demonstration of a simple, robust fission reactor prototype that could be used as a power

129

Design and first tests of the CDF Run 2 farms  

SciTech Connect

The high energy physics experiment CDF, located in the anti-proton-proton collider at Fermilab, will write data in Run 2 at a rate of 20 MByte/s, twenty times the rate of Run 1. The offline production system must be able to handle this rate. Components of that system include a large PC farm, I/O systems to read/write data to and from mass storage, and a system to split the reconstructed data into physics streams which are required for analysis. All of the components must work together seamlessly to ensure the necessary throughput. A description will be given of the overall hardware and software design for the system. A small prototype farm has been used for about one year to study performance, to test software designs and for the first Mock Data Challenge. Results from the tests and experience from the first Mock Data Challenge will be discussed. The hardware for the first production farm is in place and will be used for the second Mock Data Challenge. Finally, the possible scaling of the system to handle larger rates foreseen later in Run 2 will be described.

Jaroslav Antos et al.

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

130

Secure Retrieval of FFTF Testing, Design, and Operating Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the goals of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) is to preserve the knowledge that has been gained in the United States on Liquid Metal Reactors (LMR). In addition, preserving LMR information and knowledge is part of a larger international collaborative activity conducted under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). A similar program is being conducted for EBR-II at the Idaho Nuclear Laboratory (INL) and international programs are also in progress. Knowledge preservation at the FFTF is focused on the areas of design, construction, startup, and operation of the reactor. As the primary function of the FFTF was testing, the focus is also on preserving information obtained from irradiation testing of fuels and materials. This information will be invaluable when, at a later date, international decisions are made to pursue new LMRs. In the interim, this information may be of potential use for international exchanges with other LMR programs around the world. At least as important in the United States, which is emphasizing large-scale computer simulation and modeling, this information provides the basis for creating benchmarks for validating and testing these large scale computer programs. Although the preservation activity with respect to FFTF information as discussed below is still underway, the team of authors above is currently retrieving and providing experimental and design information to the LMR modeling and simulation efforts for use in validating their computer models. On the Hanford Site, the FFTF reactor plant is one of the facilities intended for decontamination and decommissioning consistent with the cleanup mission on this site. The reactor facility has been deactivated and is being maintained in a cold and dark minimal surveillance and maintenance mode until final decommissioning is pursued. In order to ensure protection of information at risk, the program to date has focused on sequestering and secure retrieval. Accomplishments include secure retrieval of: more than 400 boxes of FFTF information, several hundred microfilm reels including Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) information, and 40 boxes of information on the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF). All information preserved to date is now being stored and categorized consistent with the IAEA international standardized taxonomy. Earlier information largely related to irradiation testing is likewise being categorized. The fuel test results information exists in several different formats depending upon the final stage of the test evaluation. In some cases there is information from both non-destructive and destructive examination while in other cases only non-destructive results are available. Non-destructive information would include disassembly records, dimensional profilometry, gamma spectrometry, and neutron radiography. Information from destructive examinations would include fission gas analysis, metallography, and photomicrographs. Archiving of FFTF data, including both the reactor plant and the fuel test information, is being performed in coordination with other data archiving efforts underway under the aegis of the AFCI program. In addition to the FFTF efforts, archiving of data from the EBR-II reactor is being carried out by INL. All material at risk associated with FFTF documentation has been secured in a timely manner consistent with the stated plan. This documentation is now being categorized consistent with internationally agreed upon IAEA standards. Documents are being converted to electronic format for transfer to a large searchable electronic database being developed by INL. In addition, selected FFTF information is being used to generate test cases for large-scale simulation modeling efforts and for providing Design Data Need (DDN) packages as requested by the AFCI program.

Butner, R. Scott; Wootan, David W.; Omberg, Ronald P.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Nielsen, Deborah

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Testing State-Space Controls for the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Control can improve wind turbine performance by enhancing energy capture and reducing dynamic loads. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, we are implementing and testing state-space controls on the Controls Advanced Research Turbine (CART), a turbine specifically configured to test advanced controls. We show the design of control systems to regulate turbine speed in Region 3 using rotor collective pitch and reduce dynamic loads in Regions 2 and 3 using generator torque. These controls enhance damping in the first drive train torsion mode. We base these designs on sensors typically used in commercial turbines. We evaluate the performance of these controls by showing field test results. We also compare results from these modern controllers to results from a baseline proportional integral controller for the CART. Finally, we report conclusions to this work and outline future studies.

Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.; Balas, M. J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Module Design, Materials, and Packaging Research Team: Activities and Capabilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our team activities are directed at improving PV module reliability by incorporating new, more effective, and less expensive packaging materials and techniques. New and existing materials or designs are evaluated before and during accelerated environmental exposure for the following properties: (1) Adhesion and cohesion: peel strength and lap shear. (2) Electrical conductivity: surface, bulk, interface and transients. (3) Water vapor transmission: solubility and diffusivity. (4) Accelerated weathering: ultraviolet, temperature, and damp heat tests. (5) Module and cell failure diagnostics: infrared imaging, individual cell shunt characterization, coring. (6) Fabrication improvements: SiOxNy barrier coatings and enhanced wet adhesion. (7) Numerical modeling: Moisture ingress/egress, module and cell performance, and cell-to-frame leakage current. (8) Rheological properties of polymer encapsulant and sheeting materials. Specific examples will be described.

McMahon, T. J.; del Cueto, J.; Glick, S.; Jorgensen, G.; Kempe, M.; Kennedy, C.; Pern, J.; Terwilliger, K

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2005. Fifty new projects were selected for funding this year, and five FY 2004 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.4 million, for an average per project cost of just under $100,000. Two external audits of SDRD accounting practices were conducted in FY 2005. Both audits found the program's accounting practices consistent with the requirements of DOE Order 413.2A, and one included the observation that the NTS contractor ''did an exceptional job in planning and executing year-start activities.'' Highlights for the year included: the filing of 18 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2005 projects; programmatic adoption of 17 FY 2004 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2005 projects; and the successful completion of 55 R&D projects, as presented in this report.

Will Lewis, Compiler

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

EDRA / Places Awards for Place Design and Place Research -- Call for Entries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The EDRAJPlaces Awards for Place Design and Place ResearchD C LU T h e EDRA/Places awards program was created to rec­and design. Place research awards recognize projects that

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Development of the JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) fuel cleanup system for tests at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tritium Process Laboratory (TPL) at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has developed the Fuel Cleanup System (FCU) which accepts simulated fusion reactor exhaust and produces pure hydrogen isotopes and tritium-free waste. The major components are: a palladium diffuser, a catalytic reactor, cold traps, a ceramic electrolysis cell, and zirconium-cobalt beds. In 1988, an integrated loop of the FCU process was installed in the TPL and a number of hot'' runs were performed to study the system characteristics and improve system performance. Under the US-Japan collaboration program, the JAERI Fuel Cleanup System'' (JFCU) was designed and fabricated by JAERI/TPL for testing at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA) in Los Alamos National Laboratory as a major subsystem of the simulated fusion fuel cycle. The JFCU was installed in the TSTA in early 1990.

Konishi, S.; Inoue, M.; Hayashi, T.; Okuno, K.; Naruse, Y. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Barnes, J.W.; Anderson, J.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

United Technologies Research Center 8-kW prototype wind system. Final test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United Technologies Research Center 8 kW prototype wind system underwent testing at the Rocky Flats Small Wind Systems Test Center from April 1980 through August 1980. During atmospheric testing, the machine survived wind speeds of 30.8 m/s (69 mph) without incurring damage and proved it was capable of meeting the design specification for power production (8 kW at 9 m/s - 20 mph). Erratic cycling of the generator speed detector was the only operational problem encountered. Vibration tests indicated the first and second bending modes of the tower were excited during actual machine operation, but modifications were not required. Noise measurements revealed that sound pressure levels of the UTRC are within an acceptable range and should pose no barriers to machine use.

Higashi, K. K.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Testing Controls to Mitigate Fatigue Loads in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems forced by aerodynamic, gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic loads. The aerodynamics of wind turbines is nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a complicated three-dimensional (3D) turbulent wind inflow field with imbedded coherent vortices that drive fatigue loads and reduce lifetime. Design of control algorithms for wind turbines must account for multiple control objectives. Future large multi-megawatt turbines must be designed with lighter weight structures, using active controls to mitigate fatigue loads, maximize energy capture, and add active damping to maintain stability for these dynamically active structures operating in a complex environment. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory are designing, implementing, and testing advanced controls to maximize energy extraction and reduce structural dynamic loads. These control designs are based on a linear model of the turbine that is generated by specialized modeling software. This paper describes testing of a control algorithm to mitigate blade, tower, and drivetrain loads using advanced state-space control methods. The controller uses independent blade pitch to regulate the turbine's speed in Region 3, mitigate the effects of shear across the rotor disk, and add active damping to the tower's first fore-aft bending mode. Additionally, a separate generator torque control loop is designed to add active damping to the tower's first side-side mode and the first drivetraintorsion mode. This paper discusses preliminary implementation and field tests of this controller in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Also included are preliminary comparisons of the performance of this controller to results from a typical baseline Proportional-Integral-Derivative controller designed with just Region 3 speed regulation as the goal.

Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.; Stol, K. A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

NREL: Water Power Research - Device and Component Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing NREL houses the nation's premier laboratory facilities for testing offshore wind and water power devices and maintains a staff of offshore-trained test engineers and...

139

Lead Coolant Test Facility Systems Design, Thermal Hydraulic Analysis and Cost Estimate  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory prepared a preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic coolant. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research needs listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements were identified as listed: (1) Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger; (2) Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core; (3) Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control; (4) Demonstrate Safe Operation; and (5) Provision for Future Testing. This paper discusses the preliminary design of systems, thermal hydraulic analysis, and simplified cost estimate. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 4200 C. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M (in 2006 $). It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

Soli Khericha; Edwin Harvego; John Svoboda; Ryan Dalling

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

LWRS Fuels Pathway: Engineering Design and Fuels Pathway Initial Testing of the Hot Water Corrosion System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Development R&D pathway performs strategic research focused on cladding designs leading to improved reactor core economics and safety margins. The research performed is to demonstrate the nuclear fuel technology advancements while satisfying safety and regulatory limits. These goals are met through rigorous testing and analysis. The nuclear fuel technology developed will assist in moving existing nuclear fuel technology to an improved level that would not be practical by industry acting independently. Strategic mission goals are to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental nuclear fuel and cladding performance in nuclear power plants, and to apply this information in the development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels. These will result in improved safety, cladding, integrity, and nuclear fuel cycle economics. To achieve these goals various methods for non-irradiated characterization testing of advanced cladding systems are needed. One such new test system is the Hot Water Corrosion System (HWCS) designed to develop new data for cladding performance assessment and material behavior under simulated off-normal reactor conditions. The HWCS is capable of exposing prototype rodlets to heated, high velocity water at elevated pressure for long periods of time (days, weeks, months). Water chemistry (dissolved oxygen, conductivity and pH) is continuously monitored. In addition, internal rodlet heaters inserted into cladding tubes are used to evaluate repeated thermal stressing and heat transfer characteristics of the prototype rodlets. In summary, the HWCS provides rapid ex-reactor evaluation of cladding designs in normal (flowing hot water) and off-normal (induced cladding stress), enabling engineering and manufacturing improvements to cladding designs before initiation of the more expensive and time consuming in-reactor irradiation testing.

Dr. John Garnier; Dr. Kevin McHugh

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research design testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Mechanical Design, Analysis, and Testing of a Two-Bladed Wind Turbine Hub  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) in Golden, Colorado, began performing the Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment in 1993 to better understand the unsteady aerodynamics and structural responses of horizontal-axis wind turbines. The experiment consists of an extensively instrumented, downwind, three-bladed, 20-kilowatt wind turbine. In May 1995, I received a request from the NWTC to design a two-bladed hub for the experiment. For my thesis, I present the results of the mechanical design, analysis, and testing of the hub. The hub I designed is unique because it runs in rigid, teetering, or independent blade-flapping modes. In addition, the design is unusual because it uses two servomotors to pitch the blades independently. These features are used to investigate new load reduction, noise reduction, blade pitch optimization, and yaw control techniques for two-bladed turbines. I used a methodology by G. Phal and W. Bietz to design the hub. The hub meets all the performance specifications except that it achieves only 90% of the specified teeter range. In my thesis, I focus on the analysis and testing of the hub body. I performed solid-mechanics calculations, ran a finite-element analysis simulation, and experimentally investigated the structural integrity of the hub body.

Cotrell, J.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Research and Debate -- Community Activism vs. Community Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hotel and conference center on Center Street. Yet, absent a design process to channel creative energies

Roberts, John N.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Assistance in MSD Research and Development: Part 1, Small scale research, development and testing: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The development and testing of a simple mechanical stemming aid is described. The aid comprises a solid unit placed in the stemming above the explosive column and is designed to improve blasting efficiency and reduce drilling and blasting costs. It is designed to work with back filled drill cuttings or any other suitable stemming material. To date it has consisted of the testing of the aid in small diameter (1.5 and 1.625 inch) holes in Jefferson City Dolomite for both bench and crater blasting configurations. Full scale field trials are being conducted nearby in similar rock in an aggregate quarry. The data acquisition equipment used in Phase 1 included both a Spin Physics SP2000 high speed video motion analysis system and acoustic and seismic monitoring units. Measurements for each test included peak air over pressure, ground surface ppv, stemming displacement and velocity and face movement and extent. The results illustrate that the concept is sound and that its successful application to production blasting at full scale will be a function of manufacturing cost, the development of suitable insertion techniques for large diameter boreholes and the selection of a suitable low cost material for the aid. 17 refs., 20 figs.

Worsey, P.N.; Canon, C.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

NREL Establishes a 1.5-MW Wind Turbine Test Platform for Research Partnerships (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Research turbine supports sustained technology development. For more than three decades, engineers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) have worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program and industry partners to advance wind energy technology, improve wind turbine performance, and reduce the cost of energy. Although there have been dramatic increases in performance and drops in the cost of wind energy-from $0.80 per kilowatt-hour to between $0.06 and $0.08 per kilowatt-hour-the goal of the DOE Wind Program is to further increase performance and reduce the cost of energy for land-based systems so that wind energy can compete with natural gas by 2020. In support of the program's research and development (R and D) efforts, NREL has constructed state-of-the-art facilities at the NWTC where industry partners, universities, and other DOE laboratories can conduct tests and experiments to further advance wind technology. The latest facility to come online is the DOE-GE 1.5-MW wind turbine test platform. Working with DOE, NREL purchased and installed a GE 1.5-MW wind turbine at the NWTC in 2009. Since then, NREL engineers have extensively instrumented the machine, conducted power performance and full-system modal tests, and collected structural loads measurements to obtain baseline characterization of the turbine's power curve, vibration characteristics, and fatigue loads in the uniquely challenging NWTC inflow environment. By successfully completing a baseline for the turbine's performance and structural response, NREL engineers have established a test platform that can be used by industry, university, and DOE laboratory researchers to test wind turbine control systems and components. The new test platform will also enable researchers to acquire the measurements needed to develop and validate wind turbine models and improve design codes.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

NREL Establishes a 1.5-MW Wind Turbine Test Platform for Research Partnerships (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research turbine supports sustained technology development. For more than three decades, engineers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) have worked with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program and industry partners to advance wind energy technology, improve wind turbine performance, and reduce the cost of energy. Although there have been dramatic increases in performance and drops in the cost of wind energy-from $0.80 per kilowatt-hour to between $0.06 and $0.08 per kilowatt-hour-the goal of the DOE Wind Program is to further increase performance and reduce the cost of energy for land-based systems so that wind energy can compete with natural gas by 2020. In support of the program's research and development (R and D) efforts, NREL has constructed state-of-the-art facilities at the NWTC where industry partners, universities, and other DOE laboratories can conduct tests and experiments to further advance wind technology. The latest facility to come online is the DOE-GE 1.5-MW wind turbine test platform. Working with DOE, NREL purchased and installed a GE 1.5-MW wind turbine at the NWTC in 2009. Since then, NREL engineers have extensively instrumented the machine, conducted power performance and full-system modal tests, and collected structural loads measurements to obtain baseline characterization of the turbine's power curve, vibration characteristics, and fatigue loads in the uniquely challenging NWTC inflow environment. By successfully completing a baseline for the turbine's performance and structural response, NREL engineers have established a test platform that can be used by industry, university, and DOE laboratory researchers to test wind turbine control systems and components. The new test platform will also enable researchers to acquire the measurements needed to develop and validate wind turbine models and improve design codes.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Optical Design for the Laser Astrometric Test of Relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the Laser Astrometric Test Of Relativity (LATOR) mission. By using a combination of independent time-series of highly accurate gravitational deflection of light in the immediate proximity to the Sun along with measurements of the Shapiro time delay on the interplanetary scales (to a precision respectively better than $10^{-13}$ radians and 1 cm), LATOR will significantly improve our knowledge of relativistic gravity. The primary mission objective is to i) measure the key post-Newtonian Eddington parameter $\\gamma$ with accuracy of a part in 10$^9$. $(1-\\gamma)$ is a direct measure for presence of a new interaction in gravitational theory, and, in its search, LATOR goes a factor 30,000 beyond the present best result, Cassini's 2003 test. Other mission objectives include: ii) first measurement of gravity's non-linear effects on light to $\\sim$0.01% accuracy; including both the traditional Eddington $\\beta$ parameter and also the spatial metric's 2nd order potential contribution (never been measured before); iii) direct measurement of the solar quadrupole moment $J_2$ (currently unavailable) to accuracy of a part in 200 of its expected size; iv) direct measurement of the ``frame-dragging'' effect on light by the Sun's rotational gravitomagnetic field to one percent accuracy. LATOR's primary measurement pushes to unprecedented accuracy the search for cosmologically relevant scalar-tensor theories of gravity by looking for a remnant scalar field in today's solar system. The key element of LATOR is a geometric redundancy provided by the laser ranging and long-baseline optical interferometry. We discuss the mission and optical designs of this proposed experiment.

Slava G. Turyshev; Michael Shao; Kenneth L. Nordtvedt

2005-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

147

Logic Design for On-Chip Test Clock Generation - Implementation Details and Impact on Delay Test Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses delay test for SOC devices with high frequency clock domains. A logic design for on-chip high-speed clock generation, implemented to avoid expensive test equipment, is described in detail. Techniques for on-chip clock generation, meant to reduce test vector count and to increase test quality, are discussed. ATPG results for the proposed techniques are given.

Beck, Matthias; Kaibel, Martin; Poehl, Frank; Lin, Xijiang; Press, Ron

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Enhancements in Glovebox Design Resulting from Laboratory-Conducted FIre Tests  

SciTech Connect

The primary mission of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) Project was to disassemble nuclear weapons pits and convert the resulting special nuclear materials to a form suitable for further disposition. Because of the nature of materials involved, the fundamental system which allowed PDCF to perform its mission was a series of integrated and interconnected gloveboxes which provided confinement and containment of the radioactive materials being processed. The high throughput planned for PDCF and the relatively high neutron and gamma radiation levels of the pits required that gloveboxes be shielded to meet worker dose limits. The glovebox shielding material was required to contain high hydrogen concentrations which typically result in these materials being combustible. High combustible loadings created design challenges for the facility fire suppression and ventilation system design. Combustible loading estimates for the PDCF Plutonium (Pu) Processing Building increased significantly due to these shielding requirements. As a result, the estimates of combustible loading substantially exceeded values used to support fire and facility safety analyses. To ensure a valid basis for combustible loading contributed by the glovebox system, the PDCF Project funded a series of fire tests conducted by the Southwest Research Institute on door panels and a representative glovebox containing Water Extended Polyester (WEP) radiological shielding to observe their behavior during a fire event. Improvements to PDCF glovebox designs were implemented based on lessons learned during the fire test. In particular, methods were developed to provide high levels of neutron shielding while maintaining combustible loading in the glovebox shells at low levels. Additionally, the fire test results led to design modifications to mitigate pressure increases observed during the fire test in order to maintain the integrity of the WEP cladding. These changes resulted in significantly reducing the credited combustible loading of the facility. These advances in glovebox design should be considered for application in nuclear facilities within the Department of Energy complex in the future.

Brooks, Kriston P.; Wunderlich, Gregory M.; Mcentire, James R.; Richmond, William G.

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

149

Lead Coolant Test Facility Technical and Functional Requirements, Conceptual Design, Cost and Construction Schedule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research need listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements of basis are identified: Develop and Demonstrate Prototype Lead/Lead-Bismuth Liquid Metal Flow Loop Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control Demonstrate Safe Operation and Provision for Future Testing. These five broad areas are divided into twenty-one (21) specific requirements ranging from coolant temperature to design lifetime. An overview of project engineering requirements, design requirements, QA and environmental requirements are also presented. The purpose of this T&FRs is to focus the lead fast reactor community domestically on the requirements for the next unique state of the art test facility. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 420oC. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M. It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

Soli T. Khericha

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Wind Pressure Resistance of Walls with Exterior Rigid Foam: Structural Performance Testing and Development of Design Specifications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Pressure Resistance of Wind Pressure Resistance of Walls with Exterior Rigid Foam: Structural Performance Testing and Development of Design Specifications Building America Stakeholder Meeting February 2012 2 Gaps and Barriers  Wind pressure resistance of multi- layered walls with exterior rigid foam * Performance characteristics * Capacity * Limitations * Design method * Design specification 3 Market Implications  Walls with exterior rigid foam  2012 IECC - Climate Zones 3 and higher  Wall systems:  Claddings and their attachments  Interior finishes  Air sealing, air barriers  Cavity insulation 4 Research Tasks  Laboratory Testing of Wall Assemblies under dynamic wind pressures at the NAHB Research Center  NAHB/DOE/ACC  Laboratory Testing of a One-story House in IBHS Wind Tunnel Facility

151

NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Safety Sensor Testing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R. Burgess, M. Post, C. Rivkin Publication Date: July 2012 Standard Hydrogen Test Protocols for the NREL Sensor Testing Laboratory Publication Type: Brochure Authors: J....

152

Marketing Research Design and Analysis University of Michigan Business School  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Section 3: Specific Research Questions The AWARE research team will present this project in Washington DC. The prototype software will be made available and will run on any Windows or PalmOS machine. Additionally

Michalek, Jeremy J.

153

NISTIR 7297-A FS-TST 2.0: Forensic Software Testing Support Tools Test Plan, Test Design Specifications, and Test Case Specification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

imaging tools typically used in forensic investigations. The package includes programs that initialize disk drives, detect changes in disk content, and compare pairs of disks. This Internal Report consists of three parts. This is Part A, Test Plan, Test Design Specifications, and Test Case Specification. It covers the planning, design, and specification of testing of FS-TST 2.0. The setup of disk drives and the testing is to be performed in the Linux environment; however, some tests will require interaction with the MS-DOS operating system. Part B, Test Summary Report, is a companion document. It reports the result of testing the FS-TST 2.0 package according to Part A. Two programs might have had slightly more convenient behavior in erroneous cases, but no anomalies were found in testing. Part C, Code Review Report, is an additional companion document. It covers the planning and specification of reviewing all the source code in the package and reports the results of the code reviews. Nothing was found in the code reviews that should cause invalid results, that is, that should lead to an imaging tool with systematic errors being incorrectly passed as adhering to the assertions. The intended audience for this document should be familiar with the Linux operating system, computer operation, and computer hardware components such as hard drives.

Serban I. Gavrila

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Real-World Research and Testing: Producing and Using Hydrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant - design & operations - Hydrogen subsystem - CNG subsystem - Safety system * Fuel Dispensing * Hydrogen & HCNG Internal Combustion...

155

Design and implementation of nanoscale fiber mechanical testing apparatus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rapid growth in the synthetic manufacturing industry demands higher resolution mechanical testing devices, capable of working with nanoscale fibers. A new device has been developed to perform single-axis tensile tests ...

Brayanov, Jordan, 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Undergraduate Research at Jefferson Lab - Designing a Multi-Purpose Dark  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Noise Correlation Noise Correlation Previous Project (Noise Correlation) Undergraduate Research Main Index Next Project (Proton-Deuteron Drell-Yan Reaction) Proton-Deuteron Drell-Yan Reaction Designing a Multi-Purpose Dark Box Optimized for PMT Uniformity Testing Student: Nicholas M. Dowdle School: Emory & Henry College at Emory Mentored By: Jack McKisson This paper describes the process of designing a means for measuring the response uniformity for position-sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs), a trait which, in the ideal case, suggests identical responses for every pixel on the face of a PSPMT in a field of uniform light. However, significant non-uniformities arise in the practical usage of PSPMTs, necessitating some form of compensation before or after experimentation. A

157

Solar Pilot Plant Phase I, detailed design report: thermal storage subsystem research experiment. CDRL Item No. 8 (Approved)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Thermal Storage Subsystem Research Experiment is designed to give maximum information for evaluating the design, performance, and operating parameters of the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant. The experiment is summarized, and the experiment components detail design and integration are described. The experiment test and operation is described which is designed to collect engineering data to allow the design, performance, and operational characteristics to be specified for the Pilot Plant. Appended are: design documentation; pressure drop calculations; materials studies for thermal energy storage; flow charts for data acquisition and control; condenser detail design; instrumentation error analysis; logic diagrams for the control system; literature survey to evaluate the two-phase forced convection heat transfer; and the vaporizer performance model. (LEW)

Not Available

1976-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

158

Applications of Systems Engineering to the Research, Design,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

will take place. It also provides a basis for forming team structures and a vehicle for subsequent communication and interaction on refining and implementing the design...

159

Combinatorial Testing and Design of Experiments for Software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... access control testing automation; measurement science and ... Public domain, distribution unlimited; 81 pages ... Modes in Medical Device Software: an ...

160

Design, Development and Testing of a Drillable Straddle Packer for Lost Circulation Control in Geothermal Drilling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lost Circulation is a widespread problem encountered when drilling geothermal wells, and often represents a substantial portion of the cost of drilling a well. The U.S. Department of Energy sponsors research and development work at Sandia National Laboratories in an effort to reduce these lost circulation expenditures. Sandia has developed a down hole tool that improves the effectiveness and reduces th cost of lost circulation cement treatment while drilling geothermal wells. This tool, the Drillable Straddle Packer, is a low-cost disposable device that is used to isolate the loss zone and emplace the cement treatment directly into the region of concern. This report documents the design and development of the Drillabe Straddle Packer, the laboratory and field test results, and the design package that is available to transfer this technology to industry users.

Gabaldon, J.; Glowka, D.A.; Gronewald, P.; Knudsen, S.D.; Raymond, D.W.; Staller, G.E.; Westmoreland, J.J.; Whitlow, G.L.; Wise, J.L.; Wright, E.K.

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research design testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Design of Materials Testing Capsule in PULSTAR Reactor for High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the main features of the irradiation capsule design and results from ... Synchrotron Radiation Study of Hydride Reorientation in Zircaloy under In Situ ...

162

Design and Experimental Test Plan for Hybrid Sulfur Single Cell Pressurized Electrolyzer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) process is one of the leading thermochemical cycles being studied as part of the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). SRNL is conducting analyses and research and development for the Department of Energy on the HyS process. A conceptual design report and development plan for the HyS process was issued on April 1, 2005 [Buckner, et. al., 2005] , and a report on atmospheric testing of a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE), a major component of the HyS process, was issued on August 1, 2005 [Steimke, 2005]. The purpose of this report is to document work related to the design and experimental test plan for a pressurized SDE. Pressurized operation of the SDE is a key requirement for development of an efficient and cost-effective HyS process. The HyS process, a hybrid thermochemical cycle proposed and investigated in the 1970s and early 1980s by Westinghouse Electric Corporation, is a high priority candidate for NHI due to the potential for high efficiency and its relatively high level of technical maturity. It was demonstrated in laboratory experiments by Westinghouse in 1978. Process improvements and component advancements that build on that work are being pursued. One of the objectives of the current work is to develop the SDE in order to permit the demonstration of a closed-loop laboratory model of the HyS process. The heart of the HyS process for generating hydrogen is a bank of electrolyzers incorporating sulfur dioxide depolarized anodes. SRNL planned, designed, built and operated a facility for testing single cell electrolyzers at ambient temperature and near atmospheric pressure during the spring and summer of 2005. The major contribution of the SRNL work was the establishment of the proof-of-concept for utilizing the proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) cell design for the SDE operation. Since PEM cells are being extensively developed for automotive fuel cell use, they offer significant potential for cost-effective application for the HyS Process. This report discusses the modifications necessary to the existing SRNL sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer test facility to allow testing at up to 80 C and 90 psig. Because of the need for significant additional equipment and the ability to infer performance results to higher pressures, it recommends delaying further modifications to support testing at up to 300 psig (the commercial goal) until other, higher priority technical issues are addressed. These issues include membrane material selection, component designs, catalyst type and loading, etc. The factors and rationale that should be considered in developing and executing a detailed test matrix for pressurized operation are also discussed. In addition, an electrolyzer assembly design has been developed to allow the testing of different Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEA's) as part of the planned FY06 HyS Development Program to complete selection of component design specifications for the HyS electrolyzer. MEA's are used in PEM cells to allow intimate contact and minimal resistance between the electrodes and the electrolyte layer. The pressurized electrolyzer assembly presented in this report will facilitate rapid change-out and testing of various MEA designs as part of the electrolyzer development effort.

Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Design and Test of a 100MW X Band TE01 Window  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research at Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is in progress on a TeV-scale linear collider that will operate at 5-10 times the energy of present generation accelerators. This will require development of high power X-Band sources generating 50-100 MW per source. Conventional pillbox window designs are capable of transmitting peak rf powers up to about 30 MW, well below the desired level required for the use of a single window per tube. SLAC has developed a 75 MW TE{sub 01} window [1] that uses a 'traveling wave' design to minimize fields at the window face. Irises match to the dielectric window impedance, resulting in a pure traveling wave in the ceramic and minimum fields on the window face. The use of the TE{sub 01} mode also has zero electric field on the braze fillet. Unfortunately, in-band resonances prevented this window design from achieving the desired 75MW power level. It was believed the resonances resulted from sudden steps in the circular guide to match the 38mm input diameter to the overmoded (TE{sub 01} and TE{sub 02} mode propagating) 65 mm diameter of the window ceramic. Calabazas Creek Research Inc. is currently developing a traveling wave window using compact, numerically optimized, parabolic tapers to match the input diameter of 38mm to the window ceramic diameter of 76mm (Figure 1). The design is projected to handle 100 MW of pulse power with a peak field at the window face of 3.6 MV/m. Cold test of the window has shown the return loss to be better than -25 dB over a 100 MHz bandwidth and to be resonance free (Figure 2). The window is scheduled for high-power testing in July 2003 at the SLAC.

Neilson, J.; Ives, L.; Tantawi, S.G.; /Calabazas Creek Res., Saratoga /SLAC

2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

164

NREL: Wind Research - Mariah Power's Windspire Wind Turbine Testing and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mariah Power's Windspire Wind Turbine Testing and Results Mariah Power's Windspire Wind Turbine Testing and Results A video of Mariah Power's Windspire wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL tested Mariah Power's Windspire Giromill small wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) through January 14, 2009 when NREL terminated its testing. Read a chronology of events and letter from Mariah Power to NREL. The Windspire is a 1.2-kilowatt (kW) vertical-axis small wind turbine. The turbine tower is 9.1 meters tall, and its rotor area is 1.2 by 6.1 meters. The turbine has a permanent-magnet generator with a single-phase output at 120 volts AC. Testing Summary Testing was terminated January 14, 2009. Published test reports include

165

Design and Test of a Carbon-Tolerant Alkaline Fuel Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents new results which may constitute a breakthrough in the effort to develop fuel cells truly suitable for use in cars and trucks. For decades, researchers have known that the alkaline fuel cell (AFC) is much cheaper to make, more efficient and more durable than the more popular PEM fuel cell; however, "carbon poisoning" (either from CO2 in air or from contaminants in reformed methanol) causes big problems in the kind of oxygen-hydrogen AFC commonly used in space. This paper reports successful tests of a technique for coating the electrodes with polystyrene which, in conjunction with older common-sense techniques, appears to solve the problem. This kind of design is applicable to cars run on hydrogen fuel, on reformed methanol or even direct methanol. Developing a test methodology was a major part of the work. A foreword by one of the sponsors at NSF discusses the larger importance of this work for energy security and the environment.

Urquidi-Macdonald, M; Grimes, P; Tewari, A; Sambhy, V; Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna; Sen, Ayusman; Grimes, Patrick; Tewari, Ashutosh; Sambhy, Varun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Field Testing LIDAR Based Feed-Forward Controls on the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems driven by aerodynamic, gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic forces. The aerodynamics of wind turbines are nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a chaotic three-dimensional (3-D) turbulent wind inflow field with imbedded coherent vortices that drive fatigue loads and reduce lifetime. In order to reduce cost of energy, future large multimegawatt turbines must be designed with lighter weight structures, using active controls to mitigate fatigue loads, maximize energy capture, and add active damping to maintain stability for these dynamically active structures operating in a complex environment. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and University of Stuttgart are designing, implementing, and testing advanced feed-back and feed-forward controls in order to reduce the cost of energy for wind turbines.

Scholbrock, A. K.; Fleming, P. A.; Fingersh, L. J.; Wright, A. D.; Schlipf, D.; Haizmann, F.; Belen, F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Test Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Potassium Test Loop to Support an Advanced Potassium Rankine Cycle Power Conversion Systems  

SciTech Connect

Parameters for continuing the design and specification of an experimental potassium test loop are identified in this report. Design and construction of a potassium test loop is part of the Phase II effort of the project ''Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System''. This program is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Design features for the potassium test loop and its instrumentation system, specific test articles, and engineered barriers for ensuring worker safety and protection of the environment are described along with safety and environmental protection requirements to be used during the design process. Information presented in the first portion of this report formed the basis to initiate the design phase of the program; however, the report is a living document that can be changed as necessary during the design process, reflecting modifications as additional design details are developed. Some portions of the report have parameters identified as ''to be determined'' (TBD), reflecting the early stage of the overall process. In cases where specific design values are presently unknown, the report attempts to document the quantities that remain to be defined in order to complete the design of the potassium test loop and supporting equipment.

Yoder, JR.G.L.

2006-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

168

Culvert test bed: fish-passage research facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of juvenile salmonids and other fish through culverts is aappropriate hydraulic and fish-passage designs forWashington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), Alaska

Pearson, Dr. Walter H.; May, Christopher

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

First Principles Modeling for Research and Design of New Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First principles computation can be used to investigate an design materials in ways that can not be achieved with experimental means. We show how computations can be used to rapidly capture the essential physics that ...

Ceder, Gerbrand

170

AVNG as a Test Case for Cooperative Design  

SciTech Connect

Designing a measurement system that might be used in a nuclear facility is a challenging, if not daunting, proposition. The situation is made more complicated when the system needs to be designed to satisfy the disparate requirements of a monitoring and a host party - a relationship that could prove to be adversarial. The cooperative design of the elements of the AVNG (Attribute Verification with Neutrons and Gamma Rays) system served as a crucible that exercised the possible pitfalls in the design and implementation of a measurement system that could be used in a host party nuclear facility that satisfied the constraints of operation for both the host and monitoring parties. Some of the issues that needed to be addressed in the joint design were certification requirements of the host party and the authentication requirements of the monitoring party. In this paper the nature of the problem of cooperative design will be introduced. The details of cooperative design revolve around the idiosyncratic nature of the adversarial relationship between the parties involved in a possible measurement regime, particularly if measurements on items that may contain sensitive information are being pursued. The possibility of an adversarial interaction is more likely if an information barrier is required for the measurement system. The origin of the antagonistic elements of the host party and hosted party relationship will be considered. In addition, some of the conclusions will be presented that make cooperative design (and development) proceed more efficiently. Finally, some lessons learned will be presented as a result of this expedition into cooperative design.

Luke, S J

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

171

Semi-annual report on the project to design and experimentally test an improved geothermal drill bit, Phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test facilities (the geothermal drilling vessel and the geothermal drill-bit seal tester) were completed and de-bugged, and the first tests were run on full-scale research drill bits and drill-bit seals. In addition, more materials information was gathered, and a number of additional seals of high-temperature elastomer materials were obtained for testing. Maurer Engineering has also been active in the design and procurement of candidate high-temperature drill-bit seals for testing, and has done a literature and patent search on the problem of drill-bit insert retention. Reed Tool Co. has cooperated in the fabrication of drill bits for testing, and has offered consultation on certain seal designs.

Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Semi-annual report on the project to design and experimentally test an improved geothermal drill bit, phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test facilities (the geothermal drilling vessel and the geothermal drill-bit seal tester) were completed and de-bugged, and the first tests were run on full-scale research drill bits and drill-bit seals. In addition, more materials information was gathered, and a number of additional seals of high-temperature elastomer materials were obtained for testing. Maurer Engineering, on a subcontract basis, has also been active in the design and procurement of candidate high-temperature drill-bit seals for testing, and has done a literature and patent search on the problem of drill-bit insert retention. Reed Tool Co. has cooperated in the fabrication of drill bits for testing, and has offered consultation on certain seal designs.

Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Using attributed grammars to test designs and implementations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a method for generating test cases that can be used throughout the entire life cycle of a program. This method uses attributed translation grammars to generate both inputs and outputs, which can then be used either as is, in order to test ...

A. G. Duncan; J. S. Hutchison

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Design of Test System on Zero Sequence Current Transformers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The zero sequence current transformer is one of the key component of permanent magnetism leakage circuit protection breaker and release relay. A C8051F120 microcontroller is used as the controller of performance test system of an intelligent zero sequence ... Keywords: zero sequence current transformer, leakage protection, microcontroller, test system

Da-neng Pi; Hai-zhou Gao

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Water Research Center Development -- Conceptual Design (Phase 0)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Impending regulations may place new restrictions on the consumption of water and the quality of wastewater discharges at electric generating units (EGUs). To help EGUs comply with any new water use and discharge limits, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is collaborating with Georgia Power Company (GPC), a subsidiary of Southern Company; Southern Company Services (SCS), Southern Company’s provider of technical services; and Southern Research Institute to collectively form the Water ...

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

176

Fish Protection: Cooperative research advances fish-friendly turbine design  

SciTech Connect

Renewable hydropower is a tremendous resource within the Pacific Northwest that is managed with considerable cost and consideration for the safe migration of salmon. Recent research conducted in this region has provided results that could lower the impacts of hydro power production and make the technology more fish-friendly. This research is now being applied during a period when a huge emphasis is being made to develop clean, renewable energy sources.

Brown, Richard S.; Ahmann, Martin L.; Trumbo, Bradly A.; Foust, Jason

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Design Parameters and Commissioning of Vertical Inserts Used for Testing the XFEL Superconducting Cavities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The European XFEL is a new research facility currently under construction at DESY in the Hamburg area in Germany. From 2015 on, it will generate extremely intense X-ray flashes that will be used by researchers from all over the world. The superconducting XFEL linear accelerator consists of 100 accelerator modules with more than 800 RF-cavities inside. The accelerator modules, superconducting magnets and cavities will be tested in the accelerator module test facility (AMTF). This paper gives an overview of the design parameters and the commissioning of the vertical insert, used in two cryostats (XATC) of the AMTF-hall. The Insert serves as a holder for 4 nine-cell cavities. This gives the possibility to cool down 4 cavities to 2K in parallel and, consequently, to reduce the testing time. The following RF measurement, selected as quality check, will be done separately for each cavity. Afterwards the cavities will be warmed up again and will be sent to the accelerator module assembly.

J. Schaffran; Y. Bozhko; B. Petersen; D. Meissner; M. Chorowski; J. Polinski

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

178

Solar Pilot Plant Phase I, detailed design report: collector subsystem research experiment. CDRL Item No. 6 (Approved)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The configurations of the experimental heliostat, power and control system, and support elements for the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant are described, and the analytical and experimental determination of performance parameters is discussed. A system analysis is presented, including demonstration of pointing accuracy by error analysis, and demonstration of loop performance by simulation. Engineering model test plans are given that are to evaluate subassemblies, processes, and procedures as well as provide insight into best tests for heliostat subsystem testing. Mirror module test data are analyzed. A comprehensive test plan for the experimental model is presented. Appended are: a heliostat power consumption analysis; collector subsystem research experiment detail specification; structural analysis; solar image analysis; computer and software information; breadboard test data; simulation of the heliostat control loop; mirror module reflectance measurements; plywood frame fixed focus mirror module test data; techniques for redirected image characterization; performance of a meteorological measuring system; and heliostat design data. (LEW)

Not Available

1976-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

NREL: Wind Research - National Wind Technology Center Blade Testing Video  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center Blade Testing Video (Text Version) Center Blade Testing Video (Text Version) Below is the text version for the National Wind Technology Center Blade Testing Video. The video opens with the NREL and NWTC logos, surrounded by black screen and including the title: "NWTC Test Facility Introduction, Dr. Fort Felker, Director of the National Wind Technology Center, TRT 1:42, May 29, 2013." Fort Felker is in a yellow helmet and vest, standing in the NWTC's testing facility. There is a railing to his left, construction cones behind him, and a ladder to his right. Fort Felker: "I'm Fort Felker, I'm the director at the Department of Energy's National Wind Technology Center." Fort's name and title cut in on the right. Fort walks toward the camera while talking. Fort Felker: "Here at the NWTC, we have been conducting structural testing

180

Design and testing of a high accuracy robotic single-cell manipulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have designed, built and tested a high accuracy robotic single-cell manipulator to be able to pick individual cells from array of microwells, each 30 Pm or 50 pm cubed. Design efforts have been made for higher accuracy, ...

Yoon, Jun Young, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research design testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Design and testing of components for a low cost laser cutter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main goal of this thesis is to document the design and testing of various components for use in a low cost laser cutting mechanism for hobbyists and recreational designers. Different electronics were used to assess the ...

Ramos, Joshua D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Proceedings of the conference on Design, automation and test in Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to the DATE 08 Conference Proceedings. DATE combines the world's favourite electronic systems design conference and Europe's leading international exhibition for electronic design, automation and test, from system level hardware and software ...

Donatella Sciuto

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Proceedings of the conference on Design, automation and test in Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to the DATE 07 Conference Proceedings. DATE combines the world's leading electronic systems design conference and Europe's leading international exhibition for electronic design, automation and test, from system level hardware and software implementation ...

Rudy Lauwereins; Jan Madsen

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Proceedings of the Conference on Design, Automation and Test in Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We proudly present to you the Advance Programme of DATE 10. DATE combines the world's favourite electronic systems design conference with an international exhibition for electronic design, automation and test, from system level hardware and software ...

Giovanni De Micheli; Bashir Al-Hashimi; Wolfgang Mueller; Enrico Macii

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

NREL: Wind Research - SWIFT Wind Turbine Testing and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SWIFT Wind Turbine Testing and Results SWIFT Wind Turbine Testing and Results The SWIFT wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL is testing the SWIFT small wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The competitive grant was awarded to Cascade Engineering. The SWIFT is a 1-kilowatt (kW), five-bladed with outer ring, horizontal-axis upwind small wind turbine. The turbine's rotor diameter is 2 meters, and its hub height is 13.72 meters. The SWIFT uses a single-phase permanent-magnet generator rated at 1 kW grid connected through an inverter at 240 volts AC. Testing Summary Supporting data and explanations for data provided in this table will be provided in the final reports. Data presented are preliminary and subject

186

NGNP Component Test Capability Design Code of Record  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project is conducting a trade study to select a preferred approach for establishing a capability whereby NGNP technology development testing—through large-scale, integrated tests—can be performed for critical HTGR structures, systems, and components (SSCs). The mission of this capability includes enabling the validation of interfaces, interactions, and performance for critical systems and components prior to installation in the NGNP prototype.

S.L. Austad; D.S. Ferguson; L.E. Guillen; C.W. McKnight; P.J. Petersen

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Design, fabrication, and testing of a miniature impulse turbine driven by compressed gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A miniature impulse turbine has been developed at the Rochester Institute of Technology. The goal of this project was to design, fabricate, and test a… (more)

Holt, Daniel B.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical ApplicationsChapter 17 Designing Field Frying Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical Applications Chapter 17 Designing Field Frying Tests Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press ...

189

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Cytogenetic tests of Radiobiologi...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

relevant low-dose range (less than 0.1 Gy). Relate chromosome damage to radiation-induced cancer. Research Approach By studying molecular mechanisms relevant to low doses and low...

190

Evaluating APIs: a call for design science research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a business world characterized by ecosystem-based competition, APIs are key determinants of success. However, there is very little guidance on how organizations should go about making decisions about APIs. API design must account for the needs of ... Keywords: API, kernel theory, modularity, stakeholders, strategy

Bala Iyer; George Wyner

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

NREL: Wind Research - Five Megawatt Dynamometer Test Facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy's National Wind Technology Center. We're here today in the new 5 megawatt drive train testing facility that has been developed over the last few years. This terrific new...

192

Test blanket modules in ITER: An overview on proposed designs and required DEMO-relevant materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test blanket modules in ITER: An overview on proposed designs and required DEMO-relevant materials, Russian Federation Abstract Within the framework of the ITER Test Blanket Working Group, the ITER Parties have made several proposals for test blanket modules to be tested in ITER from the first day of H

Abdou, Mohamed

193

Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Author U.S. Geological Survey Published U.S. Geological Survey, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site Citation U.S. Geological Survey. Borehole Imaging of In Situ Stress Tests at Mirror Lake Research Site [Internet]. 2013. U.S. Geological Survey. [cited 2013/10/16]. Available from: http://water.usgs.gov/ogw/bgas/toxics/ml_bips.html Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Borehole_Imaging_of_In_Situ_Stress_Tests_at_Mirror_Lake_Research_Site&oldid=688729"

194

NREL: Wind Research - Ventera's VT 10 Turbine Testing and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ventera's VT 10 Turbine Testing and Results Ventera's VT 10 Turbine Testing and Results Ventera's VT10 wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL is testing Ventera's VT10 small wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The VT10 is a horizontal-axis downwind, three-bladed turbine rated at 10 kilowatts (kW). Its diameter is 6.7 meters, and it is mounted on a lattice tower with a hub height of 21.7 meters. The VT10 uses a single-phase, grid-connected, permanent-magnet generator that operates at 240 volts AC. Testing Summary The summary of the tests is listed below, along with the final reports. Cumulative Energy Production 3/22/2010: 0; 3/29/2010: 26; 3/31/2010: 74; 4/1/2010: 75; 4/2/2010: 174;

195

NREL: Wind Research - Offshore Design Tools and Methods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design Tools and Methods Design Tools and Methods Graphic of a modular depiction of the FAST tool, which includes aerodynamics, hydrodynamics, control and electrical system dynamics, and structural dynamics modules. NREL's CAE Tool, FAST, and its Sub-Modules Illustration of wind turbines in various environments including land-based, shallow water (0-30m), transitional depth (30-60m), and deep water floating (greater than 60m). FAST has the capability of modeling a wide range of offshore wind system configurations including shallow water, transitional depth, and floating systems. With DOE's support, NREL has developed and maintains a robust, open-source, modular computer-aided engineering (CAE) tool, known as FAST. It has state-of-the-art capabilities for full dynamic system simulation over a

196

GTA (ground test accelerator) Phase 1: Baseline design report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The national Neutral Particle Beam (NPB) program has two objectives: to provide the necessary basis for a discriminator/weapon decision by 1992, and to develop the technology in stages that lead ultimately to a neutral particle beam weapon. The ground test accelerator (GTA) is the test bed that permits the advancement of the state-of-the-art under experimental conditions in an integrated automated system mode. An intermediate goal of the GTA program is to support the Integrated Space Experiments, while the ultimate goal is to support the 1992 decision. The GTA system and each of its major subsystems are described, and project schedules and resource requirements are provided. (LEW)

Not Available

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Some design considerations for the proposed Dixie Valley tracer test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A tracer test for the Dixie Valley, Nevada, geothermal resource is planned for the summer of 1988, in order to study the fluid flow paths that will develop under typical operating conditions. During the test six production wells will provide the power plant with steam sufficient for generation of 60 MWe, requiring fluid production at a rate of approximately 600 kg/sec. Up to 75% by mass of the extracted fluid will be reinjected into the reservoir, using four injection wells. Tracer will be added to the injected fluid for a twenty-minute period, and subsequently the produced fluid will be monitored for the tracer. 5 refs., 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Doughty, C.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Guidelines for Designing Effective Energy Information Feedback Pilots: Research Protocols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhanced and timely information regarding consumers electricity use and costs, known as feedback, may significantly influence their behavior across a broad spectrum of usage and acquisition decisions. Such information feedback has become increasingly important in light of widespread investments in Smart Grid technologies. This report identifies protocols for three phases of energy information feedback pilotsresearch design, analysis, and reportingalong with three example applications. When used as the co...

2010-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

199

Static load test of Arquin-designed CMU wall.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Arquin Corporation has developed a new method of constructing CMU (concrete masonry unit) walls. This new method uses polymer spacers connected to steel wires that serve as reinforcing as well as means of accurately placing the spacers so that the concrete block can be dry stacked. The hollows of the concrete block used in constructing the wall are then filled with grout. As part of a New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBAP), Sandia National Laboratories conducted a series of tests that statically loaded wall segments to compare the Arquin method to a more traditional method of constructing CMU walls. A total of 12 tests were conducted, three with the Arquin method using a W5 reinforcing wire, three with the traditional method of construction using a number 3 rebar as reinforcing, three with the Arquin method using a W2 reinforcing wire, and three with the traditional construction method but without rebar. The results of the tests showed that the walls constructed with the Arquin method and with a W5 reinforcing wire withstood more load than any of the other three types of walls that were tested.

Jensen, Richard Pearson; Cherry, Jeffery L.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

System-on-Chip Test Architectures: Nanometer Design for Testability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern electronics testing has a legacy of more than 40 years. The introduction of new technologies, especially nanometer technologies with 90nm or smaller geometry, has allowed the semiconductor industry to keep pace with the increased performance-capacity ... Keywords: Computer Architecture, Electricity

Wang

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research design testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Collocation Methods for Distillation Design I: Model Description and Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fast and accurate distillation design requires a model that significantly reduces the problem size while accurately approximating a full order distillation column model. Variable number of trays and variable feed tray location make optimization possible. This collocation model builds on the concepts of past collocation models for design of complex real-world separation systems. Two variable transformations make this method unique. Polynomials cannot accurately fit trajectories which flatten out. In columns, flat sections occur in the middle of large column sections, or where concentrations go to zero or one. With an exponential transformation of the tray number which maps zero to an infinite number of trays onto the range zero to one, two collocation trays can accurately simulate a large column section. With a hyperbolic tangent transformation of the mole fractions, the model can simulate columns which reach high purities. Furthermore, this model uses multiple collocation elements for ...

Robert S. Huss; Arthur W. Westerberg

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Single Component Sorption-Desorption Test Experimental Design Approach Discussions  

SciTech Connect

A task was identified within the fission-product-transport work package to develop a path forward for doing testing to determine behavior of volatile fission products behavior and to engage members of the NGNP community to advise and dissent on the approach. The following document is a summary of the discussions and the specific approaches suggested for components of the testing. Included in the summary isare the minutes of the conference call that was held with INL and external interested parties to elicit comments on the approaches brought forward by the INL participants. The conclusion was that an initial non-radioactive, single component test will be useful to establish the limits of currently available chemical detection methods, and to evaluated source-dispersion uniformity. In parallel, development of a real-time low-concentration monitoring method is believed to be useful in detecting rapid dispersion as well as desorption phenomena. Ultimately, the test cycle is expected to progress to the use of radio-traced species, simply because this method will allow the lowest possible detection limits. The consensus of the conference call was that there is no need for an in-core test because the duct and heat exchanger surfaces that will be the sorption target will be outside the main neutron flux and will not be affected by irradiation. Participants in the discussion and contributors to the INL approach were Jeffrey Berg, Pattrick Calderoni, Gary Groenewold, Paul Humrickhouse, Brad Merrill, and Phil Winston. Participants from outside the INL included David Hanson of General Atomics, Todd Allen, Tyler Gerczak, and Izabela Szlufarska of the University of Wisconsin, Gary Was, of the University of Michigan, Sudarshan Loyalka and Tushar Ghosh of the University of Missouri, and Robert Morris of Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Phil WInston

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Design Attributes and Scale Up Testing of Annular Centrifugal Contactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Annular centrifugal contactors are being used for rapid yet efficient liquid- liquid processing in numerous industrial and government applications. Commercialization of this technology began eleven years ago and now units with throughputs ranging from 0.25 to 700 liters per minute are readily available. Separation, washing, and extraction processes all benefit from the use of this relatively new commercial tool. Processing advantages of this technology include: low in-process volume per stage, rapid mixing and separation in a single unit, connection-in-series for multi-stage use, and a wide operating range of input flow rates and phase ratios without adjustment. Recent design enhancements have been added to simplify maintenance, improve inspection ability, and provide increased reliability. Cartridge-style bearing and mechanical rotary seal assemblies that can include liquid-leak sensors are employed to enhance remote operations, minimize maintenance downtime, prevent equipment damage, and extend service life. Clean-in-place capability eliminates the need for disassembly, facilitates the use of contactors for feed clarification, and can be automated for continuous operation. In nuclear fuel cycle studies, aqueous based separations are being developed that efficiently partition uranium, actinides, and fission products via liquid-liquid solvent extraction. Thus, annular centrifugal contactors are destined to play a significant role in the design of such new processes. Laboratory scale studies using mini-contactors have demonstrated feasibility for many such separation processes but validation at an engineering scale is needed to support actual process design.

David H. Meikrantz; Jack D. Law

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

High uranium density dispersion fuel for the reduced enrichment of research and test reactors program.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work describes the fabrication of a high uranium density fuel for the Reduced Enrichment of Research and Test Reactors Program. In an effort to… (more)

[No author

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Final Site-Specific Decommissioning Inspection Report for the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Report of site-specific decommissioning in-process inspection activities at the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor Facility.

Sarah Roberts

2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

206

Design of an Integrated Laboratory Scale Test for Hydrogen Production via High Temperature Electrolysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is researching the feasibility of high-temperature steam electrolysis for high-efficiency carbon-free hydrogen production using nuclear energy. Typical temperatures for high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) are between 800ș-900șC, consistent with anticipated coolant outlet temperatures of advanced high-temperature nuclear reactors. An Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) test is underway to study issues such as thermal management, multiple-stack electrical configuration, pre-heating of process gases, and heat recuperation that will be crucial in any large-scale implementation of HTE. The current ILS design includes three electrolysis modules in a single hot zone. Of special design significance is preheating of the inlet streams by superheaters to 830°C before entering the hot zone. The ILS system is assembled on a 10’ x 16’ skid that includes electronics, power supplies, air compressor, pumps, superheaters, , hot zone, condensers, and dew-point sensor vessels. The ILS support system consists of three independent, parallel supplies of electrical power, sweep gas streams, and feedstock gas mixtures of hydrogen and steam to the electrolysis modules. Each electrolysis module has its own support and instrumentation system, allowing for independent testing under different operating conditions. The hot zone is an insulated enclosure utilizing electrical heating panels to maintain operating conditions. The target hydrogen production rate for the ILS is 5000 Nl/hr.

G.K. Housley; K.G. Condie; J.E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Conceptual Design for a High-Temperature Gas Loop Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This report documents an early-stage conceptual design for a high-temperature gas test loop. The objectives accomplished by the study include, (1) investigation of existing gas test loops to determine ther capabilities and how the proposed system might best complement them, (2) development of a preliminary test plan to help identify the performance characteristics required of the test unit, (3) development of test loop requirements, (4) development of a conceptual design including process flow sheet, mechanical layout, and equipment specifications and costs, and (5) development of a preliminary test loop safety plan.

James B. Kesseli

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Tracers and Tracer Testing: Design, Implementation, Tracer Selection, and Interpretation Methods  

SciTech Connect

Conducting a successful tracer test requires adhering to a set of steps. The steps include identifying appropriate and achievable test goals, identifying tracers with the appropriate properties, and implementing the test as designed. When these steps are taken correctly, a host of tracer test analysis methods are available to the practitioner. This report discusses the individual steps required for a successful tracer test and presents methods for analysis. The report is an overview of tracer technology; the Suggested Reading section offers references to the specifics of test design and interpretation.

G. Michael Shook; Shannon L.; Allan Wylie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The John Deere E diesel Test & Research Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three non-road Tier II emissions compliant diesel engines manufactured by John Deere were placed on a durability test plan of 2000 hours each at full load, rated speed (FLRS). The fuel was a blend of 10% fuel ethanol and 90% low sulfur #2 diesel fuel. Seven operational failures involving twenty seven fuel system components occurred prior to completion of the intended test plan. Regulated emissions measured prior to component failure indicated compliance to Tier II certification goals for the observed test experience. The program plan included operating three non-road Tier II diesel engines for 2000 hours each monitoring the regulated emissions at 500 hour intervals for changes/deterioration. The program was stopped prematurely due to number and frequency of injection system failures. The failures and weaknesses observed involved injector seat and valve wear, control solenoid material incompatibility, injector valve deposits and injector high pressure seal cavitation erosion. Future work should target an E diesel fuel standard that emphasizes minimum water content, stability, lubricity, cetane neutrality and oxidation resistance. Standards for fuel ethanol need to require water content no greater than the base diesel fuel standard. Lubricity bench test standards may need new development for E diesel.

Fields, Nathan; Mitchell, William E.

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

210

NREL: Buildings Research - Utility Bill Calibration Test Cases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Utility Bill Calibration Test Cases Utility Bill Calibration Test Cases The diagram below illustrates the utility bill calibration test cases in BESTEST-EX. In these cases, participants are given input ranges and synthetic utility bills. Software tools calibrate key model inputs using the utility bills and then predict energy savings for the different retrofit cases. Participant energy savings predictions using calibrated models are compared to NREL predictions using state-of-the-art building energy simulation programs. For self-testing, participants should not view reference results until after tested software results have been generated. This diagram provides an overview of the BESTEST-EX utility bill calibration case process. On the left side of the diagram is a box labeled "BESTEST-EX Document" with a list that contains two bulleted items. The first bullet reads "Defines a representative existing home and several retrofit measures." The second bullet reads "Provides input ranges for key model inputs." Underneath this list is an image of a house and to the right of the house is a listing of the measures: R-wall=4.5-6.2; ELA=137-216 in2 ; Tsat=60-75°F, etc. Underneath this grouping is another bullet that reads "Presents utility bills that were generated by: A) randomly selecting key model inputs within ranges (values remain hidden); B) running test cases with selected inputs in EnergyPlus, DOE2.1E, and SUNREL." Below this bullet is a bar graph showing energy savings on the y axis and retrofit measure on the x axis. Inside the graph area is text reading "Reference results remains hidden for utility bill calibration cases." An arrow labeled "Results" points horizontally to the right to the results box. From the top half of this box are two arrows that are labeled "Input Ranges" and "Utility Bills" and points horizontally to the right to another smaller box that is labeled "Audit Software Provider." Underneath this heading are three bullets: one reads "Creates model of existing home knowing input ranges from test," the next one reads "Calibrates model inputs using utility bills," and the third one reads "Predicts retrofit energy savings. Underneath these bullets is an image of a house; to the right of this is a bar graph showing energy savings on the y axis and retrofit measure on the x axis. From this box an arrow labeled "Results" points directly below

211

50 kW PEM Fuel Cell System Design, Fabrication, and Test: System Design -- Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report describes the results of a development program funded jointly by the U.S. Department of Energy, Arthur D. Little, and EPRIsolutions. The effort was aimed at the conceptual design and optimization of a 50 kW commercial power system, using advanced proton exchange (or polymer electrolyte) membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology and the verification of key design parameters. (Note: This design effort addresses some of the key technical issues faced by the developers of commercial-scale PEMFC...

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

212

Design of the NSLS-II Linac Front End Test Stand  

SciTech Connect

The NSLS-II operational parameters place very stringent requirements on the injection system. Among these are the charge per bunch train at low emittance that is required from the linac along with the uniformity of the charge per bunch along the train. The NSLS-II linac is a 200 MeV linac produced by Research Instruments Gmbh. Part of the strategy for understanding to operation of the injectors is to test the front end of the linac prior to its installation in the facility. The linac front end consists of a 100 kV electron gun, 500 MHz subharmonic prebuncher, focusing solenoids and a suite of diagnostics. The diagnostics in the front end need to be supplemented with an additional suite of diagnostics to fully characterize the beam. In this paper we discuss the design of a test stand to measure the various properties of the beam generated from this section. In particular, the test stand will measure the charge, transverse emittance, energy, energy spread, and bunching performance of the linac front end under all operating conditions of the front end.

Fliller III, R.; Johanson, M.; Lucas, M.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

213

PRA insights applicable to the design of the Broad Applications Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Design insights applicable to the design of a new Broad Applications Test Reactor (BATR), being studied at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, are summarized. Sources of design insights include past probabilistic risk assessments and related studies for department of Energy-owned Class A reactors and for commercial reactors. The report includes a preliminary risk allocation scheme for the BATR.

Khericha, S.T.; Reilly, H.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Agile enterprise software development using domain-driven design and test first  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present the experience gained and lessons learned when the IT department at Statoil ASA, a large Oil and Gas company in Norway, applied Domain-Driven design techniques in combination with agile software development practices to assess ... Keywords: PL/SQL, agile software development, domain-driven design, object databases, object-relational mapping, oracle, relational databases, test driven design, test first, versant

Einar Landre; Harald Wesenberg; Jorn Olmheim

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Development of a Fissile Materials Irradiation Capability for Advanced Fuel Testing at the MIT Research Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A fissile materials irradiation capability has been developed at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Research Reactor (MITR) to support nuclear engineering studies in the area of advanced fuels. The focus of the expected research is to investigate the basic properties of advanced nuclear fuels using small aggregates of fissile material. As such, this program is intended to complement the ongoing fuel evaluation programs at test reactors. Candidates for study at the MITR include vibration-packed annular fuel for light water reactors and microparticle fuels for high-temperature gas reactors. Technical considerations that pertain to the design of the MITR facility are enumerated including those specified by 10 CFR 50 concerning the definition of a research reactor and those contained in a separate license amendment that was issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission to MIT for these types of experiments. The former includes limits on the cross-sectional area of the experiment, the physical form of the irradiated material, and the removal of heat. The latter addresses experiment reactivity worth, thermal-hydraulic considerations, avoidance of fission product release, and experiment specific temperature scrams.

Hu Linwen; Bernard, John A.; Hejzlar, Pavel; Kohse, Gordon [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

Expanded microchannel heat exchanger: design, fabrication and preliminary experimental test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper first reviews non-traditional heat exchanger geometry, laser welding, practical issues with microchannel heat exchangers, and high effectiveness heat exchangers. Existing microchannel heat exchangers have low material costs, but high manufacturing costs. This paper presents a new expanded microchannel heat exchanger design and accompanying continuous manufacturing technique for potential low-cost production. Polymer heat exchangers have the potential for high effectiveness. The paper discusses one possible joining method - a new type of laser welding named "forward conduction welding," used to fabricate the prototype. The expanded heat exchanger has the potential to have counter-flow, cross-flow, or parallel-flow configurations, be used for all types of fluids, and be made of polymers, metals, or polymer-ceramic precursors. The cost and ineffectiveness reduction may be an order of magnitude or more, saving a large fraction of primary energy. The measured effectiveness of the prototype with 28 micro...

Denkenberger, David C; Pearce, Joshua M; Zhai, John; 10.1177/0957650912442781

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

ENERGY SMART SCHOOLS - APPLIED RESEARCH, FIELD TESTING, AND TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This multi-state collaborative project brings together federal, state, and private sector resources in order to move the design and use of high-performance energy technologies in schools to the forefront. Projects within each task area have begun to show results. Recently, NETL representatives and NASEO met with all Task Project Managers to discuss the progress of each project. Each project began slowly due to several unforeseen obstacles, which have now been overcome. Some projects may require an extension to complete project to full extent. Most tasks are now running smoothly and have or will soon acquire results.

Frank Bishop

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

ENERY SMART SCHOOLS - APPLIED RESEARCH, FIELD TESTING, AND TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION  

SciTech Connect

This multi-state collaborative project will coordinate federal, state, and private sector resources and high-priority school-related energy research under a comprehensive initiative that includes tasks that increase adoption of advanced energy efficiency high-performance technologies in both renovation of existing schools and building new ones; educate and inform school administrators, architects, engineers, and manufacturers nationwide as to the energy, economic, and environmental benefits of energy efficiency technologies; and improve the learning environment for the nation's students through use of better temperature controls, improvements in air quality, and increased daylighting in schools.

Kate Burke

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

ENERGY SMART SCHOOLS - APPLIED RESEARCH, FIELD TESTING, AND TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION  

SciTech Connect

This multi-state collaborative project will coordinate federal, state, and private sector resources and high-priority school-related energy research under a comprehensive initiative that includes tasks that increase adoption of advanced energy efficiency high-performance technologies in both renovation of existing schools and building new ones; educate and inform school administrators, architects, engineers, and manufacturers nationwide as to the energy, economic, and environmental benefits of energy efficiency technologies; and improve the learning environment for the nation's students through use of better temperature controls, improvements in air quality, and increased daylighting in schools.

Kate Burke

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Block IV solar cell module design and test specification for Intermediate Load Center applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Requirements are established for performance of terrestial solar cell modules intended for use in various test applications typically characterized as Intermediate Load Centers. During the 1979 to 1980 time period, such applications are expected to be in the 20 kilowatt to 500 kilowatt size range. In addition to module design and performance requirements, a series of characterization and qualification tests necessary to certify the module design for production, and the necessary performance tests for acceptance of modules are also specified.

Not Available

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research design testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Fatigue Testing of 9 m Carbon Fiber Wind Turbine Research Blades  

SciTech Connect

Fatigue testing was conducted on Carbon Experimental and Twist-Bend Experimental (CX-100 and TX-100) 9-m wind turbine research blades. The CX-100 blade was designed to investigate the use of a carbon spar cap to reduce weight and increase stiffness while being incorporated using conventional manufacturing techniques. The TX-100 blade used carbon in the outboard portion of the skin to produce twist-bend coupling to passively alleviate aerodynamic loads. In the fatigue tests, the CX-100 blade was loaded by a single hydraulic cylinder while the TX-100 blade was loaded via a hydraulically-actuated resonant loading system called the Universal Resonant Exciter. The blades were outfitted with approximately 30 strain gages as well as displacement and load sensors. Both blades survived to cycle counts sufficient to demonstrate a 20-year operational life. The CX-100 blade failed at approximately 1.6 million cycles because of a buckle and crack that formed and grew just outboard of max-chord. The TX-100 blade failed because of a crack that grew from the termination point of the spar cap at the midspan of the blade. This paper covers the results of the fatigue tests.

Paquette, J.; van Dam, J.; Hughes, S.; Johnson, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF HEAT EXCHANGER TEST STAND WITH INITIAL TEST RESULTS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Continual development of internal combustion engines requires greater performance from liquid coolants and heat exchangers to maintain optimal temperature. For the purpose of experimental testing… (more)

Albrecht, Daniel David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

A Virtual Test Approach to Incorporate Materials and Manufacturing Processes to Aid Design choices in High Performance Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing use of fibre reinforced composites in structural components in the aerospace industry is providing many challenges to designers in understanding how they can be used more effectively to exploit their advantages. One of the main challenges is the selection of lay-ups for a given application. The difficulty lies in the variability that is achievable with composites. Each new layup or configuration is effectively a new material and requires and extensive test programme to validate the performance, from coupons which give basic material characteristics, up through the test pyramid through to large sub-component which contains basic assemblies. This variety of testing gives confidence in understanding the material behaviour and performance in structural assemblies. On the other hand, the manufacturing process is also important here with different processes sometimes needed for different materials or thicknesses. This is a time consuming and expensive process requiring many thousands of small tests leading up to a few major tests which are complex to set up and carry out. This research is attempting to address this by developing a virtual test system which will sit hand-in-hand with a physical test system. The goal of virtual tests appears reachable using the finite element analysis technique in which many experimental tests can be replaced by high fidelity simulations. The payoff in reduced cycle time and costs for designing and certifying composite structures is very attractive; and the possibility also arises of considering material configurations that are too complex to certify by purely empirical methods. The validated simulations could then be subsequently used for variants or derivatives of composites to inform design choices and establish new validation programmes where appropriate. This paper presents a series of simulations of the critical testing procedures needed to validate high performance composites materials using linear and non-linear models and compares the results with physical test performed in carbon fibre specimens.

Gonzalez-Murillo, C.; Price, M. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queens University, Belfast (United Kingdom)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

224

Task 8 -- Design and test of critical components  

SciTech Connect

This report covers tasks 8.1, 8.1.1, and 8.2. The primary objective of Task 8.1, Particulates Flow Deposition, is to characterize the particulate generated in an operating gas turbine combined cycle (GTCC) power plant whose configuration approximates that proposed for an ATS power plant. In addition, the task is to evaluate the use of full-flow filtering to reduce the steam particulate loads. Before the start of this task, GE had already negotiated an agreement with the candidate power plant, piping and a filter unit had already been installed at the power plant site, and major elements of the data acquisition system had been purchased. The objective of Task 8.1.1, Coolant Purity, is to expose typical ATS gas turbine airfoil cooling channel geometries to real steam flow to determine whether there are any unexpected deposit formations. The task is a static analog of the centrifugal deposition rig trials of Task 8.2, in which a bucket channel return bend is exposed to steam flow. Two cooling channel geometries are of primary interest in this static exposure. The primary objective of Task 8.2, Particle Centrifugal Sedimentation, is to determine the settling characteristics of particles in a cooling stream from an operating gas turbine combined cycle (GTCC) power plant when that stream is ducted through a passage experiencing the G-loads expected in a simulated bucket channel specimen representative of designs proposed for an ATS gas turbine.

Chance, T.F.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Testing and design of solar cooling systems employing liquid dessicants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An open cycle liquid desiccant cooling system with cooling capacity of 3 tons (10.5 kW) a subject of research at Colorado State University. The system comprises two main units: the dehumidifier and the regenerator. Lithium bromide is the desiccant solution that dehumidifies the air stream during a counter-current, liquid-gas contacting in the packed tower. The regenerator concentrates the lithium bromide solution during a similar gas-liquid contacting using solar heated air with the only difference being that the direction of heat and mass transfer are reversed in this unit. The earlier studies conducted on the dehumidifier revealed significant departures from an energy balance closure. An attempt has been made to provide a realistic energy balance closure to the dehumidifier side. This has resulted in substantial re-calibration of the major instruments involved. Performance data of the entire system with the regenerator and dehumidifier operated in coupled mode have been presented. An optimization scheme to predict operating conditions suited for best performance of the two units, for varying ambient temperature and humidity to the dehumidifier, has been devised. 15 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

Lenz, T.; Loef, G.O.G.; Flaherty, M.; Misra, S.; Patnaik, S.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Testing a Prototype Adsorption Cooler in a Research Dwelling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cooling with heat is hot. Demand for cooling often coincides with the supply of solar heat. This makes thermally driven chillers (TDC's) in combination with solar collectors interesting for improving the energy efficiency of comfort cooling. Several TDC's are already available on the market. Only small scale (comfort) TDC's for applications in dwellings are not commercially available yet. This is why the Energy research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) developed a prototype adsorption chiller, based on silica gel water, with a nominal cooling capacity of 2.5 kW. This paper will explain the working principle of the water-silica adsorption chiller, and will summarize executed measurements and their results. These results show that the choice of water and silica is successful and that the technology is ready to be commercialised.

Sijpheer, N.; Bakker, E.J.; De Boer, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Dynamic load test of Arquin-designed CMU wall.  

SciTech Connect

The Arquin Corporation has developed a new method of constructing CMU (concrete masonry unit) walls. This new method uses polymer spacers connected to steel wires that serve as reinforcing as well as a means of accurately placing the spacers so that the concrete block can be dry stacked. The hollows of the concrete block are then filled with grout. As part of a New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program (NMSBA), Sandia National Laboratories conducted a series of tests that dynamically loaded wall segments to compare the performance of walls constructed using the Arquin method to a more traditional method of constructing CMU walls. A total of four walls were built, two with traditional methods and two with the Arquin method. Two of the walls, one traditional and one Arquin, had every third cell filled with grout. The remaining two walls, one traditional and one Arquin, had every cell filled with grout. The walls were dynamically loaded with explosive forces. No significant difference was noted between the performance of the walls constructed by the Arquin method when compared to the walls constructed by the traditional method.

Jensen, Richard Pearson

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The Emergence of Weather-Related Test Beds Linking Research and Forecasting Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Test beds have emerged as a critical mechanism linking weather research with forecasting operations. The U.S. Weather Research Program (USWRP) was formed in the 1990s to help identify key gaps in research related to major weather prediction problems and ...

F. Martin Ralph; Janet Intrieri; David Andra Jr.; Robert Atlas; Sid Boukabara; David Bright; Paula Davidson; Bruce Entwistle; John Gaynor; Steve Goodman; Jiann-Gwo Jiing; Amy Harless; Jin Huang; Gary Jedlovec; John Kain; Steven Koch; Bill Kuo; Jason Levit; Shirley Murillo; Lars Peter Riishojgaard; Timothy Schneider; Russell Schneider; Travis Smith; Steven Weiss

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Zero-Release Mixed Waste Process Facility Design and Testing  

SciTech Connect

A zero-release offgas cleaning system for mixed-waste thermal treatment processes has been evaluated through experimental scoping tests and process modeling. The principles can possibly be adapted to a fluidized-bed calcination or stream reforming process, a waste melter, a rotarykiln process, and possibly other waste treatment thermal processes. The basic concept of a zero-release offgas cleaning system is to recycle the bulk of the offgas stream to the thermal treatment process. A slip stream is taken off the offgas recycle to separate and purge benign constituents that may build up in the gas, such as water vapor, argon, nitrogen, and CO2. Contaminants are separated from the slip stream and returned to the thermal unit for eventual destruction or incorporation into the waste immobilization media. In the current study, a standard packed-bed scrubber, followed by gas separation membranes, is proposed for removal of contaminants from the offgas recycle slipstream. The scrub solution is continuously regenerated by cooling and precipitating sulfate, nitrate, and other salts that reach a solubility limit in the scrub solution. Mercury is also separated by the scrubber. A miscible chemical oxidizing agent was shown to effectively oxidize mercury and also NO, thus increasing their removal efficiency. The current study indicates that the proposed process is a viable option for reducing offgas emissions. Consideration of the proposed closed-system offgas cleaning loop is warranted when emissions limits are stringent, or when a reduction in the total gas emissions volume is desired. Although the current closed-loop appears to be technically feasible, economical considerations must be also be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.

Richard D. Boardman; John A. Deldebbio; Robert J. Kirkham; Martin K. Clemens; Robert Geosits; Ping Wan

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Advancement of Erosion Testing, Modeling, and Design of Concrete Pavement Subbase Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concrete pavement systems have great capacity to provide long service lives; however, if the subbase layer is improperly designed or mismanaged, service life would be diminished significantly since the subbase layer performs many important roles in a concrete pavement system. The erosion of material beneath a concrete slab is an important performance-related factor that if applied to the selection of base materials can enhance the overall design process for concrete pavement systems. However, erosion of the subbase has not been included explicitly in analysis and design procedures since there is not a well accepted laboratory test and related erosion model suitable for design. Previous erosion test methods and erosion models are evaluated in terms of their utility to characterize subbase materials for erosion resistance. With this information, a new test configuration was devised that uses a Hamburg wheel-tracking device for evaluating erodibility with respect to the degree of stabilization and base type. Test devices, procedures, and results are explained and summarized for application in mechanistic design processes. A proposed erosion model is calibrated by comparing erosion to lab test results and LTPP field performance data. Subbase design guidelines are provided with a decision flowchart and a design assistant spread sheet for the economical and sustainable design of concrete pavement subbase layers by considering many design factors that affect the performance of the subbase.

Jung, Youn Su

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Winchester/Camberley Homes New Construction Test House Design, Construction, and Short-Term Testing in a Mixed-Humid Climate  

SciTech Connect

The NAHB Research Center partnered with production builder Winchester/Camberley Homes to build a DOE Building America New Construction Test House (NCTH). This single family, detached house, located in the mixed-humid climate zone of Silver Spring, MD, was completed in June 2011. The primary goal for this house was to improve energy efficiency by 30% over the Building America B10 benchmark by developing and implementing an optimized energy solutions package design that could be cost effectively and reliably constructed on a production basis using quality management practices. The intent of this report is to outline the features of this house, discuss the implementation of the energy efficient design, and report on short-term testing results. During the interactive design process of this project, numerous iterations of the framing, air sealing, insulation, and space conditioning systems were evaluated for energy performance, cost, and practical implementation. The final design featured numerous advanced framing techniques, high levels of insulation, and the HVAC system entirely within conditioned space. Short-term testing confirmed a very tight thermal envelope and efficient and effective heating and cooling. In addition, relevant heating, cooling, humidity, energy, and wall cavity moisture data will be collected and presented in a future long-term report.

Mallav, D.; Wiehagen, J.; Wood, A.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

ENERGY SMART SCHOOLS APPLIED RESEARCH, FIELD TESTING, AND TECHNOLOGY INTEGRATION  

SciTech Connect

This multi-state collaborative project brings together federal, state, and private sector resources in order to move the design and use of high-performance energy technologies in schools to the forefront. NASEO and its contractors continue to make progress on completion of the statement of work. The high watermark for this period is the installation and operation of the micro-turbine in the Canton School District. The school is pleased to begin the monitoring phase of the project and looks forward to a ribbon cutting this Spring. The other projects continue to move forward and NYSERDA has now begun work in earnest. We expect the NASEO/NYSERDA workshop sometime this Spring as well. By the time the next Annual Technical Progress Report is submitted, we plan to have finished all of the work. The next year should be filled with dissemination of information to interested parties on the success of the project in an effort to get others to duplicate the high performance, and energy smart schools initiatives. We expect all of the deliverables to be completed with the possible exception of the high-performance schools retrofits in California. We expect that 2 of the 3 campuses undergoing retrofits will be complete and the third will be nearly complete. All other activities are on schedule for 10/1/03 completion at this time.

Frank Bishop

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

A Model of R&D Valuation and the Design of Research Incentives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Advancing to Phase II R&D Table 4. Hybrid Plans: variableif successful) Probability of Advancing to Phase II R&DA Model of R&D Valuation and the Design of Research

Hsu, Jason C.; Schwartz, Eduardo S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

PPPL-led researchers seek to demonstrate a novel design for a...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PPPL-led researchers seek to demonstrate a novel design for a key diagnostic tool for ITER By John Greenwald April 13, 2012 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One Dave Johnson...

235

Fusion Engineering and Design 46 (1999) 207220 ITER divertor, design issues and research and development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the PFCs is performed ex-vessel in a hot cell, where it is anticipated the refurbishment of 60 cassettes, November 1997. [19] E. Martin, et al., Design of the ITER Divertor Remote Handling System; 19th SOFT, tritium inventory, impurity control, armour lifetime, electromagnetic loads, diagnostics, and remote

Raffray, A. René

236

Activity theory: A framework for design and reporting on research projects based on ICT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose using activity theory as a basis for designing and reporting on research projects that focus on information and communication technology (ICT) as a means to support educational processes. Adopting the theory, we describe teaching/learning ... Keywords: activity theory, evaluation, project design and reports, theoretical models

Rosa-Maria Bottino; Giancarlo Chiappini; Paola Forcheri; Enrica Lemut; Maria-Teresa Molfino

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

ASHRAE Transactions: Research 105 Current duct design methods for variable air volume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASHRAE Transactions: Research 105 ABSTRACT Current duct design methods for variable air volume (VAV for different design conditions are sought using a duct fitting database program as described in ASHRAE (1993 Jeffrey D. Spitler, Ph.D., P.E. Ronald D. Delahoussaye, Ph.D. Member ASHRAE Taecheol Kim is a Ph

238

Design, Construction, and Test Results for Three Different Fiber Optic Tow Cables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design, manufacture, and testing of three armored fiber optic tow cables is discussed. The motivation for these developments was the technical need to have low-loss high-bandwidth transmission lines, that function with negligible crosstalk and absence ...

E. Althouse

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Design and testing of an experiment to measure self-filtration in particulate suspensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experiment for measuring self-filtration in terms of change in volume fraction downstream of a constriction compared to volume fraction upstream of said constriction was designed and tested. The user has the ability to ...

Flander, Mattias S. (Mattias Simon)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Designing and testing the neutron source deployment system and calibration plan for a dark matter detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we designed and tested a calibration and deployment system for the MiniCLEAN dark matter detector. The deployment system uses a computer controlled winch to lower a canister containing a neutron source into ...

Westerdale, Shawn (Shawn S.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research design testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Design, build and test of an axial flow hydrokinetic turbine with fatigue analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OpenProp is an open source propeller and turbine design and analysis code that has been in development since 2007 by MIT graduate students under the supervision of Professor Richard Kimball. In order to test the performance ...

Ketcham, Jerod W

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Design and component integration of a T63-A-700 gas turbine engine test facility ; .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A gas turbine engine test cell was developed integrating an Allison T63-A-700 helicopter engine with a superflow water brake dynamometer power absorber. Design specifications were… (more)

Eckerle, Brian P.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Design ofWindow Comparators for Integrator-Based Capacitor Array Testing Circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the impact of window comparator threshold variations on the performance of integratorbased programmable capacitor array (PCA) testing circuits. It presents two window comparator designs that take different approaches to address ...

Amit Laknaur; Haibo Wang

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

At-sea test system point design for a one-third scale cold water pipe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One step in the development of the technology for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Cold Water Pipes (CWP) is the at-sea testing of a fiberglass reinforced plastic nominal 10-foot diameter pipe. A design procedure and criteria for developing test hardware by scaling down a 30-foot diameter OTEC 10/40 MW Pilot Plant CWP design are presented. An example point design for the pipe, instrumentation to be used during the at-sea tests, and methods for selecting the support platform and mooring are described. The design considered starts with a scale model of a larger prototype, and then is modified to address the problems of fabrication and of survivability and handling during the 1/3rd scale model tests.

Sutherland, W.H. (ed.)

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Develop Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Develop Standard Method of Test for Develop Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project Develop Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into the development of standard Method of Test (MOT) for integrated heat pumps (IHPs). No active, recognized test procedure or rating standard exists for IHPs. Generating a rating standard with supporting test procedure that is approved by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning (ASHRAE) and the Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) is necessary for these products to be viably marketed. The primary market segment for IHPs is residential buildings, both single-family and small, low-rise multifamily dwellings.

246

Designing Survey Instruments for Measuring Behavior Change: Applications to Feedback Research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance on how to develop survey-based studies and instruments to gather self-reported changes in participant behavior that can be attributable to feedback interventions. The report provides guidelines, intended to complement past EPRI work on behavioral research evaluation, to move researchers through the study design process, from overarching considerations, to setting up the survey research methods to establish attribution, to providing techniques for collecting behavioral inform...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

Meeting Human Reliability Requirements through Human Factors Design, Testing, and Modeling  

SciTech Connect

In the design of novel systems, it is important for the human factors engineer to work in parallel with the human reliability analyst to arrive at the safest achievable design that meets design team safety goals and certification or regulatory requirements. This paper introduces the System Development Safety Triptych, a checklist of considerations for the interplay of human factors and human reliability through design, testing, and modeling in product development. This paper also explores three phases of safe system development, corresponding to the conception, design, and implementation of a system.

R. L. Boring

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

SECOND GENERATION EXPERIMENTAL EQUIPMENT DESIGN TO SUPPORT VOLOXIDATION TESTING AT INL  

SciTech Connect

Voloxidation is a potential head-end process used prior to aqueous or pyrochemical spent-oxide-fuel treatment. The spent oxide fuel is heated to an elevated temperature in oxygen or air to promote separation of the fuel from the cladding as well as volatize the fission products. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) have been collaborating on voloxidation research through a joint International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI). A new furnace and off-gas trapping system (OTS) with enhanced capability was necessary to perform further testing. The design criteria for the OTS were jointly agreed upon by INL and KAERI. First, the equipment must accommodate the use of spent nuclear fuel and be capable of operating in the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the INL. This primarily means the furnace and OTS must be remotely operational and maintainable. The system requires special filters and distinctive temperature zones so that the fission products can be uniquely captured. The OTS must be sealed to maximize the amount of fission products captured. Finally, to accommodate the largest range of operating conditions, the OTS must be capable of handling high temperatures and various oxidizing environments. The constructed system utilizes a vertical split-tube furnace with four independently controlled zones. One zone is capable of reaching 1200°C to promote the release of volatile fission products. The three additional zones that capture fission products can be controlled to operate between 100-1100°C. A detailed description of the OTS will be presented as well as some initial background information on high temperature seal options.

Dennis L. Wahlquit; Kenneth J. Bateman; Brian R. Westphal

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

GridAgents DER Testing: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-265  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project objectives are to perform research, development, and pilot-scale testing of advanced, next-generation distribution operational strategies using ConEdison's 3G: Distribution System of the Future and associated infrastructure for the real-world Test Bed (demonstration network) combined with the Infotility GridAgents: Secure Agent Framework for Energy as the software platform for advanced operational strategies development. The objective is to accelerate high-payoff technologies that, because of their risk, are unlikely to be developed in a timely manner without a partnership between industry and the Federal government. NREL will be responsible for the evaluation of equipment design and control methods for DER integration and testing of prototype DER technologies and control equipment at the NREL test facility.

Harrison, K.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

THE SNAP-II POWER CONVERSION SYSTEM. TOPICAL REPORT NO. 4. TURBINE DESIGN AND TESTING  

SciTech Connect

SNAP II is the designation for a 3 kw nuclear auxiliary power unit to be used in a satellite vehicle. The SNAP II system consist of a reactor heat source, a mercury Rankine engine, and an alternator. A two stage, full admission, axial flow turbine was chosen for this APU application. Design details and test results are presented. (auth).

Poulos, E.N.; Furman, E.R.

1960-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

251

Proceedings of the Conference on Design, Automation and Test in Europe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Welcome to DATE-2009, the 12th anniversary of the Design, Automation and Test in Europe Conference. DATE is a world-leading event on electronic systems design and industrial applications. This year's event is marked by an exciting development which is ...

Luca Benini; Giovanni De Micheli; Bashir Al-Hashimi; Wolfgang Mueller

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Special design and testing aspects of the 345 kV East Fishkill substation  

SciTech Connect

The installation of two 135 MVAR capacitor banks in the 345 kV East Fishkill substation required special design of the grounding system, installation of reactors in series with the capacitor banks, closing resistors in the circuit breakers and special shielding of control cables. This paper describes the design of the substation and the tests performed before commissioning the capacitor banks.

Fogarty, R.P.; Halleran, T.M.; Laskowski, L.M.; Mark, D.A. (Consolidated Edison Co. of New York, Inc., New York, NY (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Nuclear fuels technologies fiscal year 1998 research and development test plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of research and development (R and D) activities are planned at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in FY98 in support of the Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). During the past few years, the ability to fabricate mixed oxide (MOX) nuclear fuel using surplus-weapons plutonium has been researched, and various experiments have been performed. This research effort will be continued in FY98 to support further development of the technology required for MOX fuel fabrication for reactor-based plutonium disposition. R and D activities for FY98 have been divided into four major areas: (1) feed qualification/supply, (2) fuel fabrication development, (3) analytical methods development, and (4) gallium removal. Feed qualification and supply activities encompass those associated with the production of both PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} feed materials. Fuel fabrication development efforts include studies with a new UO{sub 2} feed material, alternate sources of PuO{sub 2}, and determining the effects of gallium on the sintering process. The intent of analytical methods development is to upgrade and improve several analytical measurement techniques in support of other R and D and test fuel fabrication tasks. Finally, the purpose of the gallium removal system activity is to develop and integrate a gallium removal system into the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) design and the Phase 2 Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) demonstration line. These four activities will be coordinated and integrated appropriately so that they benefit the Fissile Materials Disposition Program. This plan describes the activities that will occur in FY98 and presents the schedule and milestones for these activities.

Alberstein, D.; Blair, H.T.; Buksa, J.J. [and others

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Design and implementation of a chassis dynamometer for testing battery-powered motorcycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to design and implement a chassis dynamometer for testing dynamic characteristics of a battery-powered motorcycle (BPM). By using a load simulation system, which is constituted with a DC motor and two rollers, a roller ... Keywords: battery-powered motorcycle, chassis dynamometer, drag force, driving resistance, kinetic energy recycle, road patterns, test platform

Ding-Tsair Su; Ying-Shing Shiao; Jui-Liang Yang

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Nuclear fuels technologies: Thermally induced gallium removal system (TIGRS), fiscal year 1998 research and development test plan  

SciTech Connect

This document details the research and development (R and D) activities that will be conducted in Fiscal Year 1998 (FY98) by the Thermally Induced Gallium Removal System (TIGRS) team for the Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition. This work is a continuation and extension of experimental activities that have been conducted in support of using weapons-derived plutonium in the fabrication of mixed-oxide (MOX) nuclear fuel for reactor-based plutonium disposition. The ultimate purpose of this work is to demonstrate adequate Thermally Induced Gallium Removal with a prototypic system. This Test Plan presents more than the FY98 R and D efforts in order to frame the Task in its entirety. To achieve the TIGRS Program objectives, R and D activities during the next two years will be focused on (1) process development leading to a prototypic TIGRS design, and (2) prototypic TIGRS design and testing leading to and including a prototypic demonstration of TIGRS operation. Both the process development and system testing efforts will consist of a series of surrogate-based cold tests and plutonium-based hot tests. Some of this testing has already occurred and will continue into FY99.

Buksa, J.J.; Butt, D.P.; Chidester, K.; DeMuth, S.F.; Havrilla, G.J.; James, C.A.; Kolman, D.G.

1997-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

256

Design and testing of a deep sea formation water and temeperature sampling probe for the Ocean Drilling Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Ocean Drilling Program is an international research consortium dedicated to exploring the structure and history of earth beneath the oceans. The program receives funds from the National Science Foundation and 18 member countries. Texas A&M University serves as the science operator, drill ship operator, and Gulf Coast Core Repository. The objective of the program is to learn about the geological makeup of the ocean floor and develop a better understanding of how it was formed. Fluid and temperature samples are one means of determining the chemistry of the formation. In order to obtain quality samples a tool must probe into the formation approximately 18 inches and capture a small volume of fluid and record temperatures. The Ocean Drilling Program has developed two such probes, the IPOD in situ Pore Water Sampling Probe (PWS) and the Water Sample and Temperature Probe (WSTP). These probes return samples at near in situ conditions; however, fluid samples typically encounter a pressure drop as they enter the tool. Samples collected using these probes are suspected of giving questionable results due to possible gas/fluid separation as the sample experiences a pressure drop upon entering the probe. Fluid returned at formation pressure is hoped to give scientist a more accurate picture of the formation conditions and allow comparison between samples returned at formation pressure and those returned under partial pressure. The objective of this project was to design, test, and manufacture a probe that would consistently-return fluid and temperature samples at in situ conditions, The project was broken down into two stages, namely the design stage and the testing and manufacturing stage. The design stage was governed by a regimented design methodology. Steps included in the methodology were 1) Need Analysis, 2) Conceptual Design, 3) Conceptual Design Evaluation, and 4) Embodiment Design. The manufacturing and testing stage of the project consisted of full sample system testing and supervision of the manufacturing process. the result of the design process was a sampling system that combined a back pressure piston and metering valve. Full testing of this sampling system showed the sampling system allowed sampling of formation fluid with minimal pressure drop between the formation and the probe. Favorable results of the sampling system allowed for the development of a new probe tip configuration, as well as, a new modularized electronics section. Machine drawings were generated for all components of the tool. Components were then fabricated by a local machine shop. All components under went quality inspection and were then assembled. Full scale testing at the Ocean Drilling Programs Annex is the next step. If successful, the probe is to undergo sea trials in October of 1995.

Fisseler, Patrick James

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report period were to complete the development of the Gas Generator design, which was done; fabricate and test of the non-polluting unique power turbine drive gas Gas Generator, which has been postponed. Focus during this report period has been to complete the brazing and bonding necessary to fabricate the Gas Generator hardware, continue making preparations for fabricating and testing the Gas Generator, and continuing the fabrication of the Gas Generator hardware and ancillary hardware in preparation for the test program. Fabrication is more than 95% complete and is expected to conclude in early May 2002. the test schedule was affected by relocation of the testing to another test supplier. The target test date for hot fire testing is now not earlier than June 15, 2002.

Unknown

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Silica precipitation and scaling in a dynamic loop system. [Design and testing of titanium corrosion test loop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A titanium corrosion test loop was modified to provide a dynamic facility for studying the formation of silica precipitates and scale from simulated geothermal brines as a function of composition, temperature, and flow conditions. A schematic of the modified loop system is presented. The principal components and connecting piping are all constructed of commercially pure titanium. These components include a centrifugal pump, silica saturator column, segmented heat exchanger, reheat heat exchanger, and a high pressure feed pump (stainless steel). The system is designed to circulate simulated geothermal brines saturated with silica to approximately 300/sup 0/C for study of silica scaling. Data obtained from a test run are included. (JGB)

Bohlmann, E.G.; Shor, A.J.; Berlinski, P.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Development and Test Plans for a small Vertical Axis Turbine Designed and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development and Test Plans for a small Vertical Axis Turbine Designed and Development and Test Plans for a small Vertical Axis Turbine Designed and Built by the Russian State Rocket Center under Berkeley Lab auspices Speaker(s): Anthony Radspieler Jr. Glen Dahlbacka Joseph Rasson Date: March 4, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Berkeley Lab Engineering Division teamed with Empire Magnetics, Rohnert Park and the Makeyev State Rocket Center under a DOE NNSA non-proliferation project to develop and test a series of small wind turbines of vertical axis design. Over the years, about 100 Russian scientists and engineers worked on the project and the hydrodynamic, aerodynamic and mechanical test facilities of the SRC were used. The objective was to create a highly manufacturable Darieus unit with a modest Tip Speed Ratio (quiet and low

260

Chemical tracer test at the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada. Geothermal Reservoir Technology research program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the injection test described, chemical tracers established the fluid flow between one injection well and one production well. Measured tracer concentrations, calculated flow rates, sampling schedules, and the daily events of the tracer test are documented. This experiment was designed to test the application of organic tracers, to further refine the predictive capability of the reservoir model, and to improve the effectiveness of Oxbow`s injection strategy.

Adams, M.C.; Moore, J.N. [Utah Univ. Research Inst., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Benoit, W.R. [Oxbow Geothermal Corp., Reno, NV (United States); Doughty, C.; Bodvarsson, G.S. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research design testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Joint EPRI-CEA Research on Small Punch Testing for Nuclear Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A joint research project between EPRI and the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) has been under way since 1998 to compare the fracture behavior of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) materials in the transition region as tested by a subsize impact test (Charpy) and subsize specimen techniques. This report summarizes the progress made under this joint effort.

2001-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

262

Test Plan for Characterization Testing of SO2-depolarized Electrolyzer Cell Designs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SRNL received funding in FY 2005 to test the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process for generating hydrogen. This technology employs an electrolyzer that uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized anode to greatly reduce the electrical energy requirement. The required current is the same as for conventional electrolysis of water, but the required cell voltage is reduced. The electrolyzer is a key part of HyS technology. Completing the material loop for HyS requires a high temperature decomposition of sulfuric acid to regenerate the sulfur dioxide gas needed for the anode reaction. Oxygen is also produced and could be sold. The decomposition of sulfuric acid is being studied by others in a separately funded task. It is not included in this SRNL task.

Steimke, J. L.

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES OF THE SINGLE CELL TEST SYSTEM FOR SO2 DEPOLARIZED ELECTROLYZER DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

The single cell test system development for the SRNL sulfur dioxide-depolarized electrolyzer has been completed. Operating experience and improved operating procedures were developed during test operations in FY06 and the first quarter of FY07. Eight different cell configurations, using various MEA designs, have been tested. The single cell test electrolyzer has been modified to overcome difficulties experienced during testing, including modifications to the inlet connection to eliminate minute acid leaks that caused short circuits. The test facility was modified by adding a water bath for cell heating, thus permitting operation over a wider range of flowrates and cell temperatures. Modifications were also identified to permit continuous water flushing of the cathode to remove sulfur, thus extending operating time between required shutdowns. This is also expected to permit a means of independently measuring the rate of sulfur formation, and the corresponding SO{sub 2} flux through the membrane. This report contains a discussion of the design issues being addressed by the single cell test program, a test matrix being conducted to address these issues, and a summary of the performance objectives for the single cell test system. The current primary objective of single cell test system is to characterize and qualify electrolyzer configurations for the following 100-hour longevity tests. Although the single cell test system development is considered complete, SRNL will continue to utilize the test facility and the single cell electrolyzer to measure the operability and performance of various cell design configurations, including new MEA's produced by the component development tasks.

Steimke, J

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Idaho National Laboratory Lead or Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) Test Facility - R&D Requirements, Design Criteria, Design Concept, and Concept Guidance  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho National Laboratory Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Test Facility will advance the state of nuclear technology relative to heavy-metal coolants (primarily Pb and Pb-Bi), thereby allowing the U.S. to maintain the pre-eminent position in overseas markets and a future domestic market. The end results will be a better qualitative understanding and quantitative measure of the thermal physics and chemistry conditions in the molten metal systems for varied flow conditions (single and multiphase), flow regime transitions, heat input methods, pumping requirements for varied conditions and geometries, and corrosion performance. Furthering INL knowledge in these areas is crucial to sustaining a competitive global position. This fundamental heavy-metal research supports the National Energy Policy Development Group’s stated need for energy systems to support electrical generation.1 The project will also assist the Department of Energy in achieving goals outlined in the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Long Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan,2 the Generation IV Roadmap for Lead Fast Reactor development, and Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative research and development. This multi-unit Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Test Facility with its flexible and reconfigurable apparatus will maintain and extend the U.S. nuclear knowledge base, while educating young scientists and engineers. The uniqueness of the Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Test Facility is its integrated Pool Unit and Storage Unit. This combination will support large-scale investigation of structural and fuel cladding material compatibility issues with heavy-metal coolants, oxygen chemistry control, and thermal hydraulic physics properties. Its ability to reconfigure flow conditions and piping configurations to more accurately approximate prototypical reactor designs will provide a key resource for Lead Fast Reactor research and development. The other principal elements of the Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Test Facility (in addition to the Pool Unit and Storage Unit) are the Bench Scale Unit and Supporting Systems, principal of which are the O2 Sensor/Calibration System, Feed System, Transfer System, Off- Gas System, Purge and Evacuation System, Oxygen Sensor and Control System, Data Acquisition and Control System, and the Safety Systems. Parallel and/or independent corrosion studies and convective heat transfer experiments for cylindrical and annular geometries will support investigation of heat transfer phenomena into the secondary side. In addition, molten metal pumping concepts and power requirements will be measured for future design use.

Eric P. Loewen; Paul Demkowicz

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Design and Test of an Event Detector and Locator for the ReflectoActive Seals System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to research, design, develop and test a novel instrument for detecting fiber optic loop continuity and spatially locating fiber optic breaches. The work is for an active seal system called ReflectoActive{trademark} Seals whose purpose is to provide real time container tamper indication. A Field Programmable Gate Array was used to implement a loop continuity detector and a spatial breach locator based on a high acquisition speed single photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. Communication and other control features were added in order to create a usable instrument that met defined requirements. A host graphical user interface was developed to illustrate system use and performance. The resulting device meets performance specifications by exhibiting a dynamic range of 27dB and a spatial resolution of 1.5 ft. The communication scheme used expands installation options and allows the device to communicate to a central host via existing Local Area Networks and/or the Internet.

Stinson, Brad J [ORNL

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Design and Test of an Event Detector for the ReflectoActive Seals System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis was to research, design, develop and test a novel instrument for detecting fiber optic loop continuity and spatially locating fiber optic breaches. The work is for an active seal system called ReflectoActive Seals whose purpose is to provide real time container tamper indication. A Field Programmable Gate Array was used to implement a loop continuity detector and a spatial breach locator based on a high acquisition speed single photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. Communication and other control features were added in order to create a usable instrument that met defined requirements. A host graphical user interface was developed to illustrate system use and performance. The resulting device meets performance specifications by exhibiting a dynamic range of 27dB and a spatial resolution of 1.5 ft. The communication scheme used expands installation options and allows the device to communicate to a central host via existing Local Area Networks and/or the Internet.

Stinson, Brad J [ORNL

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Testing Kentucky Coal to Set Design Criteria for a Lurgi Gasification Plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tri-State Synfuels Company, in cooperation with the Commonwealth of Kentucky, undertook a comprehensive coal testing program to support the development of an indirect coal liquefaction project. One of the major elements of the program was a commercial scale gasification test with Kentucky 9 coal in a Lurgi Mark IV dry-bottom gasifier at the Sasol One Plant in Sasolburg, Republic of South Africa, in 1981. The test was conducted to confirm the operability of the Lurgi process on Western Kentucky coal, and to establish the design bases for the TriState Synfuels Project. Other elements of the overall program with Kentucky 9 coal included coal selection, coal characterization, stockpile weatherability, corrosion testing, by-product characterization, and wastewater treatability. The results from this testing program formed the basis for recommendations concerning technical and environmental design criteria and permit applications.

Roeger, A., III; Jones, J. E., Jr.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Niobium 1% zirconium/potassium and titanium/potassium life-test heat pipe design and testing  

SciTech Connect

Experimental lifetime performance studies currently in progress use Niobium-1% Zirconium (Nb-1Zr) and Titanium (Ti) heat pipes with potassium (K) as the working fluid. A heat pipe life-test matrix has been developed for testing the heat pipes. Because the corrosion rates in alkali metal heat pipes are affected by temperature and working fluid evaporation flux, the variable parameters of the experimental matrix are established as steady operating temperature and input heat flux density. Total impurity inventory is a factor in corrosion rate so impurity levels are being evaluated in the heat pipe materials before and after testing. Eight Nb-1Zr/K heat pipes were designed, fabricated, and tested. Two of the heat pipes have completed testing whereas the other six are currently in test. These are gravity-assist heat pipes operating in a reflux mode. The heat pipes are tested by sets, one set of two and two sets of three heat pipes. Three Ti/K heat pipes are also in life test. These heat pipes are tested as a set in a horizontal position in a capillary pumped annular flow mode. Each of the heat pipes is encapsulated in a quartz vacuum container with a water calorimeter over the vacuum container for power throughput measurements. Thermocouples are attached to the heat pipes for measuring temperature. Heat input to the heat pipes is via an rf coil. The heat pipes are operating at between 800 and 900 K, with heat input fluxes of 13.8 to 30 W/sq cm. Of the Nb-1Zr/K heat pipes, two of the heat pipes have been in operation for 14,000 hours, three over 10,000 hours, and three over 7,000 hours. The Ti/K heat pipes have been in operation for 1,266 hours. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Sena, J.T.; Merrigan, M.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Preliminary design for hot dirty-gas control-valve test facility. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of a preliminary design and cost estimating effort for a facility for the testing of control valves in Hot Dirty Gas (HDGCV) service. This design was performed by Mittelhauser Corporation for the United States Department of Energy's Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The objective of this effort was to provide METC with a feasible preliminary design for a test facility which could be used to evaluate valve designs under simulated service conditions and provide a technology data base for DOE and industry. In addition to the actual preliminary design of the test facility, final design/construction/operating schedules and a facility cost estimate were prepared to provide METC sufficient information with which to evaluate this design. The bases, assumptions, and limitations of this study effort are given. The tasks carried out were as follows: METC Facility Review, Environmental Control Study, Gas Generation Study, Metallurgy Review, Safety Review, Facility Process Design, Facility Conceptual Layout, Instrumentation Design, Cost Estimates, and Schedules. The report provides information regarding the methods of approach used in the various tasks involved in the completion of this study. Section 5.0 of this report presents the results of the study effort. The results obtained from the above-defined tasks are described briefly. The turnkey cost of the test facility is estimated to be $9,774,700 in fourth quarter 1979 dollars, and the annual operating cost is estimated to be $960,000 plus utilities costs which are not included because unit costs per utility were not available from METC.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Design and test of a two-step solar oil-shale retort  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar retorting of oil shale has been identified as a technically feasible process where focused solar energy can displace fossil energy in the production of liquid fuels. The predicted result is a 10 to 40% improvement in the exportable fuel (oil + gas) production per ton of raw shale. The degree of improvement depends strongly on the grade of the shale. Greater improvements can be achieved with the lower grade shales where with nonsolar processes a larger fraction of the fuel content has to be used in the processing. This report presents a design of a two-step solar oil shale retort, the logic for the design, and the results from a preliminary test of the design at the White Sands Solar Furnace, New Mexico. The tests showed that the basic design had considerable promise, but more development work would be needed to optimize it.

Gregg, D.W.; Taylor, R.W.; Aiman, W.R.; Ruiz, R.

1981-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

271

The design and testing of a molten salt steam generator for solar application  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design and testing of the Steam Generator Subsystem (SGS) for the Molten Salt Electric Experiment at Sandia Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The Molten Salt Electric Experiment (MSEE) has been established to demonstrate the feasibility of the molten salt central receiver concept. The experiment is capable of generating 0.75 megawatts of electric power from solar energy, with the capability of storing seven megawatt-hours of thermal energy. The steam generator subsystem transfers sensible heat from the solar-heated molten nitrate salt to produce steam to drive a conventional turbine. This paper discusses the design requirements dictated by the steam generator application and also reviews the process conditions. Details of each of the SGS components are given, featuring the aspects of the design and performance unique to the solar application. The paper concludes with a summary of the test results confirming the overall design of the subsystem.

Allman, W.A.; Smith, D.C.; Kakarala, C.R.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology  

SciTech Connect

Gilbert Commonwealth, Southern Research Institute and the American Electric Power Service Corporation have embarked on a program to convert DOE's Duct Injection Test Facility located at the Muskingum River Power Plant of Ohio Power Company to test alternate duct injection technologies. The technologies to be tested include slurry sorbent injection of hydrated lime using dual fluid nozzles, or a rotary atomizer and pneumatic injection of hydrated lime, with flue gas humidification before or after sorbent injection. The literature review and analysis contained in this report is a part of the preparatory effort for the test program.

Gooch, J.P.; Dismukes, E.B.; Dahlin, R.S.; Faulkner, M.G. (Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States)); Klett, M.G.; Buchanan, T.L.; Hunt, J.E. (Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States))

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Design of a Scaled-down DRACS Test Facility for an AHTR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Direct Reactor Auxiliary Cooling System (DRACS) has been proposed for an Advanced-High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) that uses fluoride salt as the coolant. A study is being carried out to test its performance and provide experimental data for model validation. A detailed scaling analysis has been performed for the DRACS, as reported in a companion paper [1], in which a scaling methodology is developed. In this paper, scaling results for a protoltypic DRACS design are presented to design a scaled-down DRACs test facility.

Christensen, R. N. [Ohio State University; Lv, Q. NMN [Ohio State University; Subharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Sun, X NMN [Ohio State University; Blue, T. E. [Ohio State University; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Wang, X. NMN [Ohio State University

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Design Construction and Test Results of a HTS Solenoid for Energy Recovery Linac  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DESIGN CONSTRUCTION AND TEST RESULTS OF A HTS SOLENOID DESIGN CONSTRUCTION AND TEST RESULTS OF A HTS SOLENOID FOR ENERGY RECOVERY LINAC* R. Gupta # , M. Anerella, I. Ben-Zvi, G. Ganetis, D. Kayran, G. McIntyre, J. Muratore, S. Plate and W. Sampson, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY, 11973 USA and M. Cole and D. Holmes, Advanced Energy Systems, Inc., Medord, NY, 11763 USA Abstract An innovative feature of the proposed Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is the use of a solenoid made with High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) with the Superconducting RF cavity. The use of HTS allows solenoid to be placed in close proximity to the cavity and thus provides early focusing of the electron beam. In addition, cryogenic testing at ~77 K is simpler and cheaper than 4 K testing. This paper will present the

275

DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report period was to continue the development of the Gas Generator design, fabrication and test of the non-polluting unique power turbine drive Gas Generator. Focus during this past report period has been to continue completion the Gas Generator design, completing the brazing and bonding experiments to determine the best method and materials necessary to fabricate the Gas Generator hardware, continuing to making preparations for fabricating and testing this Gas Generator and commencing with the fabrication of the Gas Generator hardware and ancillary hardware. Designs have been completed sufficiently such that Long Lead Items [LLI] have been ordered and upon arrival will be readied for the fabrication process. The keys to this design are the platelet construction of the injectors that precisely measures/meters the flow of the propellants and water all throughout the steam generating process and the CES patented gas generating cycle. The Igniter Assembly injector platelets fabrication process has been completed and bonded to the Igniter Assembly and final machined. The Igniter Assembly is in final assembly and is being readied for testing in the October 2001 time frame. Test Plan dated August 2001, was revised and finalized, replacing Test Plan dated May 2001.

Unknown

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

The Primary Research Design of the Integrated Architecture and Using Solar Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article try to research the designing method of how to melt using solar energy and architecture in an excellent form. It compares the functions and the shape with both structure of buildings and the equipments of solar energy to find the way to ... Keywords: solar energy, architecture, reasonable, Artistic

Cao Ziyu; Gao Guanghua; Zhao Mengyu

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

96 ASHRAE Transactions: Research Current duct design methods for variable air volume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

96 ASHRAE Transactions: Research ABSTRACT Current duct design methods for variable air volume (VAV in the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals (ASHRAE 1997): equal friction, static regain, and the T Systems Taecheol Kim Jeffrey D. Spitler, Ph.D., P.E. Ronald D. Delahoussaye, Ph.D. Member ASHRAE Taecheol

278

Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility (RSF) (Book)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An in-depth look at how the U.S. DOE and NREL used a performance-based design-build contract to build the Research Support Facility (RSF); one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world.

Not Available

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Digital form and materiality: propositions for a new approach to interaction design research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced information and interaction technology pervades everyday life, introducing new forms and meanings of computer applications beyond desktop computers---from varying types of digital devices to interactive fashion and architecture. Motivated by ... Keywords: digital artifact, form, form-driven interaction design and research, materiality

Heekyoung Jung; Erik Stolterman

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Design and implementation of P2P multimedia system on Taiwan Advance Research and Education Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study designs and implements a cross-platform, cross-domain P2P multimedia sharing system in the Taiwan Advance Research and Education Network. The system allows users to easily access the multimedia resources of the entire network from any network ... Keywords: OSGi, P2P network, multimedia system

Sung-Yen Chang; Chin-Feng Lai; Yueh-Min Huang; Te-Lung Liu; Jen-Wei Hu; Chia-Cheng Hu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research design testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Detailed design, fabrication and testing of an engineering prototype compensated pulsed alternator. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design, fabrication, and test results of a prototype compensated pulsed alternator are discussed. The prototype compulsator is a vertical shaft single phase alternator with a rotating armature and salient pole stator. The machine is designed for low rep rate pulsed duty and is sized to drive a modified 10 cm Beta amplifier. The load consists of sixteen 15 mm x 20 mm x 112 cm long xenon flashlamps connected in parallel. The prototype compulsator generates an open circuit voltage of 6 kV, 180 Hz, at a maximum design speed of 5400 rpm. At maximum speed, the inertial energy stored in the compulsator rotor is 3.4 megajoules.

Bird, W.L. Jr.; Woodson, H.H.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Design and test of nodes for field information acquisition based on WUSN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The wireless sensor network technology was researched. Some wireless underground sensor network nodes and a sink node based on embedded technology and RF technology were designed innovatively. WUSN node consists of sensor, the processor, wireless communication ... Keywords: MSP430, WUSN, depth, field information acquisition, frequency, sink node

Xiaoqing Yu; Pute Wu; Zenglin Zhang

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Design, Fabrication and Testing of a Superconducting Fault Current Limiter (SFCL)  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to conduct R&D on specified components and provide technical design support to a SuperPower team developing a high temperature superconducting Fault Current Limiter (SFCL). ORNL teamed with SuperPower, Inc. on a Superconductivity Partnerships with Industry (SPI) proposal for the SFCL that was submitted to DOE and approved in FY 2003. A contract between DOE and SuperPower, Inc. was signed on July 14, 2003 to design, fabricate and test the SFCL. This device employs high temperature superconducting (HTS) elements and SuperPower's proprietary technology. The program goal was to demonstrate a device that will address a broad range of the utility applications and meet utility industry requirements. This DOE-sponsored Superconductivity Partnership with Industry project would positively impact electric power transmission reliability and security by introducing a new element in the grid that can significantly mitigate fault currents and provide lower cost solutions for grid protection. The project will conduct R&D on specified components and provide technical design support to a SuperPower-led team developing a SFCL as detailed in tasks 1-5 below. Note the SuperPower scope over the broad SPI project is much larger than that shown below which indicates only the SuperPower tasks that are complementary to the ORNL tasks. SuperPower is the Project Manager for the SFCL program, and is responsible for completion of the project on schedule and budget. The scope of work for ORNL is to provide R&D support for the SFCL in the following four broad areas: (1) Assist with high voltage subsystem R&D, design, fabrication and testing including characterization of the general dielectric performance of LN2 and component materials; (2) Consult on cryogenic subsystem R&D, design, fabrication and testing; (3) Participate in project conceptual and detailed design reviews; and (4) Guide commercialization by participation on the Technical Advisory Board (TAB). SuperPower's in-kind work for the SFCL will be provided in the following areas: (1) Work with ORNL to develop suitable test platforms for the evaluation of subsystems and components; (2) Provide cryogenic and high voltage subsystem designs for evaluation; (3) Lead the development of the test plans associated with the subsystem and components and participate in test programs at ORNL; and (4) Based on the test results, finalize the subsystem and component designs and incorporate into the respective SFCL prototypes.

Gouge, M..; Schwenterly, S.W.; Hazelton, D. (SuperPower, Inc.)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

NREL: Wind Research - Gaia-Wind's 11 Kilowatt Wind Turbine Testing and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gaia-Wind's 11 Kilowatt Wind Turbine Testing and Results Gaia-Wind's 11 Kilowatt Wind Turbine Testing and Results A video of Gaia-Wind's 11-kW wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL tested Gaia-Wind's 11-kilowatt (kW) small wind turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Gaia-Wind's turbine is a three-phase induction generator that operates at 480 volts. The turbine's downwind rotor has a 13-meter diameter, and its tower is 18 meters tall. The two-bladed, oversized rotor is designed for low to moderate wind speeds. Testing Summary The summary of the tests is below with the final reports. Cumulative Energy Production 6/11/2008: 210; 6/13/2008: 528; 6/16/2008: 716; 6/18/2008: 731; 6/19/2008:

285

Test container design/fabrication/function for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant gas generation experiment glovebox  

SciTech Connect

The gas generation experiments (GGE) are being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL0W) with contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The purpose of the GGE is to determine the different quantities and types of gases that would be produced and the gas-generation rates that would develop if brine were introduced to CH-TRU waste under post-closure WIPP disposal room conditions. The experiment requires that a prescribed matrix of CH-TRU waste be placed in a 7.5 liter test container. After loaded with the CH-TRU waste, brine and inoculum mixtures (consisting of salt and microbes indigenous to the Carlsbad, New Mexico region) are added to the waste. The test will run for an anticipated time period of three to five years. The test container itself is an ASME rated pressure vessel constructed from Hastelloy C276 to eliminate corrosion that might contaminate the experimental results. The test container is required to maintain a maximum 10% head space with a maximum working pressure of 17.25 MPa (2,500 psia). The test container is designed to provide a gas sample of the head space without the removal of brine. Assembly of the test container lid and process valves is performed inside an inert atmosphere glovebox. Glovebox mockup activities were utilized from the beginning of the design phase to ensure the test container and associated process valves were designed for remote handling. In addition, test container processes (including brine addition, sparging, leak detection, and test container pressurization) are conducted inside the glovebox.

Knight, C.J.; Russell, N.E.; Benjamin, W.W.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Michelbacher, J.A.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Applications of Systems Engineering to the Research, Design, and Development of Wind Energy Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper surveys the landscape of systems engineering methods and current wind modeling capabilities to assess the potential for development of a systems engineering to wind energy research, design, and development. Wind energy has evolved from a small industry in a few countries to a large international industry involving major organizations in the manufacturing, development, and utility sectors. Along with this growth, significant technology innovation has led to larger turbines with lower associated costs of energy and ever more complex designs for all major subsystems - from the rotor, hub, and tower to the drivetrain, electronics, and controls. However, as large-scale deployment of the technology continues and its contribution to electricity generation becomes more prominent, so have the expectations of the technology in terms of performance and cost. For the industry to become a sustainable source of electricity, innovation in wind energy technology must continue to improve performance and lower the cost of energy while supporting seamless integration of wind generation into the electric grid without significant negative impacts on local communities and environments. At the same time, issues associated with wind energy research, design, and development are noticeably increasing in complexity. The industry would benefit from an integrated approach that simultaneously addresses turbine design, plant design and development, grid interaction and operation, and mitigation of adverse community and environmental impacts. These activities must be integrated in order to meet this diverse set of goals while recognizing trade-offs that exist between them. While potential exists today to integrate across different domains within the wind energy system design process, organizational barriers such as different institutional objectives and the importance of proprietary information have previously limited a system level approach to wind energy research, design, and development. To address these challenges, NREL has embarked on an initiative to evaluate how methods of systems engineering can be applied to the research, design and development of wind energy systems. Systems engineering is a field within engineering with a long history of research and application to complex technical systems in domains such as aerospace, automotive, and naval architecture. As such, the field holds potential for addressing critical issues that face the wind industry today. This paper represents a first step for understanding this potential through a review of systems engineering methods as applied to related technical systems. It illustrates how this might inform a Wind Energy Systems Engineering (WESE) approach to the research, design, and development needs for the future of the industry. Section 1 provides a brief overview of systems engineering and wind as a complex system. Section 2 describes these system engineering methods in detail. Section 3 provides an overview of different types of design tools for wind energy with emphasis on NREL tools. Finally, Section 4 provides an overview of the role and importance of software architecture and computing to the use of systems engineering methods and the future development of any WESE programs. Section 5 provides a roadmap of potential research integrating systems engineering research methodologies and wind energy design tools for a WESE framework.

Dykes, K.; Meadows, R.; Felker, F.; Graf, P.; Hand, M.; Lunacek, M.; Michalakes, J.; Moriarty, P.; Musial, W.; Veers, P.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Texas Tech University Accomplishments 2011: Research http://www.depts.ttu.edu/communications/test/accomplishments/research.php[3/22/2011 2:37:35 PM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas Tech University Accomplishments 2011: Research http://www.depts.ttu.edu/communications/test/accomplishments/research.php[3/22/2011 2:37:35 PM] YEAR IN REVIEW STUDENTS RESEARCH OUTREACH EXCELLENCE Texas Tech researchers scientists and scholars will continue to find the answers that matter. Texas Tech is included in a $5

Rock, Chris

288

Design, Manufacture and Testing of A Bend-Twist D-Spar  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies have indicated that an adaptive wind turbine blade design can significantly enhance the performance of the wind turbine blade on energy capture and load mitigation. In order to realize the potential benefits of aeroelastic tailoring, a bend-twist D-spar, which is the backbone of a blade, was designed and fabricated to achieve the objectives of having maximum bend-twist coupling and fulfilling desirable structural properties (031 & GJ). Two bend-twist D-spars, a hybrid of glass and carbon fibers and an all-carbon D-spar, were fabricated using a bladder process. One of the D-spars, the hybrid D-spar, was subjected to a cantilever static test and modal testing. Various parameters such as materials, laminate schedule, thickness and internal rib were examined in designing a bend-twist D-spar. The fabrication tooling, the lay-up process and the joint design for two symmetric clamshells are described in this report. Finally, comparisons between the experimental test results and numerical results are presented. The comparisons indicate that the numerical analysis (static and modal analysis) agrees well with test results.

Ong, Cheng-Huat; Tsai, Stephen W.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Results from evaporation tests to support the MWTF heat removal system design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental tests program was conducted to measure the evaporative heat removal from the surface of a tank of simulated waste. The results contained in this report constitute definition design data for the latest heat removal function of the MWTF primary ventilation system.

Crea, B.A.

1994-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

290

Design, Construction, and Field Testing of a Prototype Mobile Vault Water Treatment System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface vaults and manholes provide access to underground electric distribution equipment in many areas. These structures can accumulate water through storm water runoff or ground water seepage. The water must be removed before maintenance work can proceed. This report presents results of a project to design, construct, and test a mobile treatment system to manage vault waters.

2001-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

291

Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program: Full-scale testing and demonstration final report.  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of the Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program was to develop a home evaluation tool that could assess the ignition potential of a structure subjected to wildfire exposures. This report describes the tests that were conducted, summarizes the results, and discusses the implications of these results with regard to the vulnerabilities to homes and buildings.

Quarles, Stephen, L.; Sindelar, Melissa

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

292

Design and testing of a PFN for the washer-gun in SYMPLE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Pulse Forming Network (PFN) with mutual coupling has been designed, developed and tested for its performance as a pulsed (? 100 ”s) high voltage (up to 10 KV) source for washer gun plasma production in SYMPLE (SYstem for Microwave PLasma Experiments). ...

Priyavandna J. Rathod; V. P. Anitha; Z. H. Sholapurwala; Jayesh Raval; Renu Bahl; Y. C. Saxena

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

*-9~~I ' DESIGN AND LABORATORY TESTING. OFAN UNEQUAL PARALLEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;*-9~~I ' DESIGN AND LABORATORY TESTING. OFAN UNEQUAL PARALLEL -t"~~~I~MULTICOMPRESSOR SUPERMARKET REFRIGERATION SYSTEM WITH A MICROPROCESSOR-BASED ELECTRONIC CONTROL SYSTEM William M. Toscano, Ph new highly energy-efficient supermarket systems. A supermarket refrigeration system consisting of: UI

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

294

Design, Development and Testing of a DSP Based Dynamic Voltage Restorer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the design, development and testing of a three phase prototype Voltage Source Inverter (VSI) as part of the Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) system technology development at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Kolkata. ... Keywords: SMES, DSC, LC filter, Injection Transformer, Space Vector PWM, Software PLL

A. De, S. Kumari, V. K. Khare, S. S. Pal, A. Sadhukhan, V. K. Meshram, S. K. Thakur, S. Saha

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

DESIGN CRITERIA FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE LATTICE TEST REACTOR PROJECT CAH-100  

SciTech Connect

Design and construction specifications to be followed in the development of the reactor, its associated systems and experimental facilities, and the housing and required services for the facility are presented. The testing procedures to be used are outlined. (D.C.W.)

Ballard, D.L.; Brown, W.W.; Harrison, C.W.; Heineman, R.E.; Henry, H.L.; Jeffs, T.W.; Morrow, G.W.; Russell, J.T.; Waite, J.K.

1963-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

296

US EPR Tests Performed to confirm the Mechanical and Hydraulic Design of the Vessel Internals  

SciTech Connect

The EPR is an Evolutionary high-Power Reactor which is based on the best French and German experience of the past twenty years in plant design construction and operation. In the present detailed engineering phase of the plant under construction in Finland (Okiluoto 3) or scheduled in France (Flamanville 3), a few actions are still ongoing mainly to complement equipment validation files. Design and validation of the main EPR components were performed within Framatome ANP's engineering teams and its two Technical Centers located in France and Germany, which develop state of the art methods in the field of thermo hydraulic testing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel internals are mainly derived from components already implemented on presently operating plants, but they differ in some features from the design used in French N4 or German Konvoi. The aim of this paper is to present the tests performed to confirm the hydraulic and mechanical design of the EPR vessel internals. - Four different mock-ups are presented to illustrate these tests: - JULIETTE for the reactor pressure vessel lower internals; - ROMEO for the reactor pressure vessel upper internals; - MAGALY for the design of the skeleton-type control rod guide assembly; - HYDRAVIB for the vibratory response of the reactor pressure vessel lowers internals. (authors)

Dolleans, Philippe; Chambrin, Jean-Luc; Muller, Thierry [FRAMATOME ANP, Tour AREVA 1 place de la Coupole, 92084 PARIS La D ense (France)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Design Considerations and Operating Experience of the Sanford Com Test Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 400 MW oil-fired boiler was fitted with new burner guns and accessories to burn coal/oil mixture (COM) for a 120 full-power burn-day demonstration. Coal unloading and storage, and COM preparation and storage facilities were installed adjacent to the power house. Modifications to the steam generator and firing systems were made as the test program progressed. Burn tests through 50 percent coal (by weight) were completed, and optimization and long term test programs with 40 percent coal were completed. This paper describes the reasons for the demonstration, the project schedule, and the test facility itself. Discussions are also included of the rationale for equipment and process selection, the test program, and some of the operating experience that should be considered in the design of future permanent facilities.

Causilla, H.; Kasprik, A. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Validation of the new mixture design and testing protocol for lime stabilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Mississippi Department of Transportation (MDOT) has used hydrated lime for over 30 years to stabilize subgrades. In 1998 a project was initiated to assess material properties and performance derived from lime treated subgrades (LTS). This thesis describes some pertinent findings of the study. In situ properties of lime stabilized subgrades are identified based on Falling Weight Deflectometer (FWD) deflection measurements, Ground Penetration Radar (GPR) profiles, and Dynamic Cone Penetrometer (DCP) logs. The in situ properties are compared to laboratory strength and resilient modulus test results for the same materials to establish reliable design resilient and strength properties for these stabilized layers. A laboratory mixture design and testing protocol is presented for lime stabilized subgrades. Comparison of field test data and laboratory test data shows that laboratory design test properties were achieved in the field. These properties are used in a mechanistic analysis to assess the effectiveness of the lime stabilized subgrades in Mississippi. The LTS layers in the four pavements evaluated, are effective structural layers.

Yusuf, Fateh Ul Anam Muhammad Shafee

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Design, construction and testing of a liquid-heating flat-plate solar collector  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to design, construct, and test a liquid-heating flat-plate solar collector. From the literature search, information was gathered concerning the basic components of the collector, the different processes and materials that can be used in the construction of these components, and their advantages and disadvantages. The literature search also revealed a method used to measure the performance of the collector in terms of efficiency and heat output. Design considerations were then listed for each of the major components as well as the collector as a single unit. Then, each component was designed, taking into consideration the final assembly of the completed unit. Detailed designs were required for the absorber plate and the box and frame assembly because of their complexity in construction and assembly. Once the components were designed, the construction details were arranged in a logical sequence, again considering the final assembly of the unit. The collector was then carefully constructed and assembled following the design details. After the solar collector was assembled completely, tests were made, data were obtained and recorded, and a collector performance curve was developed.

Tuttle, R E

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

The Science, Technology and Mission Design for the Laser Astrometric Test of Relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Laser Astrometric Test of Relativity (LATOR) is a Michelson-Morley-type experiment designed to test the Einstein's general theory of relativity in the most intense gravitational environment available in the solar system -- the close proximity to the Sun. By using independent time-series of highly accurate measurements of the Shapiro time-delay (laser ranging accurate to 1 cm) and interferometric astrometry (accurate to 0.1 picoradian), LATOR will measure gravitational deflection of light by the solar gravity with accuracy of 1 part in a billion, a factor ~30,000 better than currently available. LATOR will perform series of highly-accurate tests of gravitation and cosmology in its search for cosmological remnants of scalar field in the solar system. We present science, technology and mission design for the LATOR mission.

Slava G. Turyshev

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Systems Engineering Applications to Wind Energy Research, Design, and Development (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the last few decades, wind energy has evolved into a large international industry involving major players in the manufacturing, construction, and utility sectors. Coinciding with the industry's growth, significant innovation in the technology has resulted in larger turbines with lower associated costs of energy and more complex designs in all subsystems. However, as the deployment of the technology grows, and its role within the electricity sector becomes more prominent, so has the expectations of the technology in terms of performance, reliability, and cost. The industry currently partitions its efforts into separate paths for turbine design, plant design and development, grid interaction and operation, and mitigation of adverse community and environmental impacts. These activities must be integrated to meet a diverse set of goals while recognizing trade-offs between them. To address these challenges, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has embarked on the Wind Energy Systems Engineering (WESE) initiative to use methods of systems engineering in the research, design, and development of wind energy systems. Systems engineering is a field that has a long history of application to complex technical systems. The work completed to date represents a first step in understanding this potential. It reviews systems engineering methods as applied to related technical systems and illustrates how these methods can be combined in a WESE framework to meet the research, design, and development needs for the future of the industry.

Dykes, K.; Damiani, R.; Felker, F.; Graf, P.; Hand, M.; Meadows, R.; Musial, W.; Moriarty, P.; Ning, A.; Scott, G.; Sirnivas, S.; Veers, P.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Building a Model Patient Room to Test Design Innovations With Actual Patients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comfortable hospital environment SUMMARY Designing and constructing a new hospital is a complex and costly undertaking that involves experts from many disciplines both inside and outside the health care arena. But despite expending funds and time, hospital leaders often discover significant flaws once a hospital opens that can undermine the quality of patient care and staff effectiveness and efficiency. From 2010 to 2012, a team at the Princeton HealthCare System worked to devise an optimal design for inpatient rooms at a new hospital: the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro. The project entailed building a “functional model patient room.” This was a unique and innovative method to allow the team to test design innovations with actual patients, according to project director Susan Lorenz, DrNP, RN, vice president of patient care services and chief nursing officer for the Princeton HealthCare System. The project helped support the emerging field of evidence-based hospital design.

A Princeton; More Efficient; Key Results

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Health IT at NIST NIST research and development in standards, testing,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and leadership. Since 2004, NIST has worked closely with the Department of Health and Human Services' Office Senior Advisor and Program Coordinator, Health IT Information Technology Laboratory bjlide@nist.gov (301Health IT at NIST NIST research and development in standards, testing, security and privacy

304

Mechanical design and vibro-acoustic testing of ultrathin carbon foils for a spacecraft instrument  

SciTech Connect

IBEX-Hi is an electrostatic analyzer spacecraft instrument designed to measure the energy and flux distribution of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) emanating from the interaction zone between the Earth's solar system and the Milky Way galaxy. A key element to this electro-optic instrument is an array of fourteen carbon foils that are used to ionize the ENAs. The foils are comprised of an ultrathin (50-100 {angstrom} thick) layer of carbon suspended across the surface of an electroformed Nickel wire screen, which in turn is held taught by a metal frame holder. The electro formed orthogonal screen has square wire elements, 12.7 {micro}m thick, with a pitch of 131.1 wires/cm. Each foil holder has an open aperture approximately 5 cm by 2.5 cm. Designing and implementing foil holders with such a large surface area has not been attempted for spaceflight in the past and has proven to be extremely challenging. The delicate carbon foils are subject to fatigue failure from the large acoustic and vibration loads that they will be exposed to during launch of the spacecraft. This paper describes the evolution of the foil holder design from previous space instrument applications to a flight-like IBEX-Hi prototype. Vibro-acoustic qualification tests of the IBEX-Hi prototype instrument and the resulting failure of several foils are summarized. This is followed by a discussion of iterative foil holder design modifications and laser vibrometer modal testing to support future fatigue failure analyses, along with additional acoustic testing of the IBEX-Hi prototype instrument. The results of these design and testing activities are merged and the resulting flight-like foil holder assembly is proposed.

Bernardin, John D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Baca, Allen G [SNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

General-Purpose Heat Source: Research and development program: Cold-Process Verification Test Series  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Because any space mission could experience a launch abort or return from orbit, the heat source must be designed and constructed to survive credible accident environments. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions documented the response of GPHSs and individual GPHS capsules fueled with {sup 238}UO{sub 2} ({sup 235}U-depleted) to a variety of explosive overpressure and impact events. In the early 1990s, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) resumed fabrication of {sup 238}UO{sub 2} GPHS pellets. The Cold-Process Verification (CPV) Test Series was designed to compare the response of GPHS heat sources loaded with recently fabricated hot- and cold-pressed {sup 238}UO{sub 2} pellets to the response of urania pellets used in the Galileo and Ulysses performance tests. This report documents eleven bare-capsule impacts and one impact of a fully loaded GPHS module. All of the failures observed in the bare-clad impact tests were similar to failures observed in previous safety tests. No failures occurred in the module impact test.

Reimus, M.A.H.; George, T.G.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Design and Testing of Vacuum Breaker Check Valve for Simplified Boiling Water Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new design of the vacuum breaker check valve was developed to replace the mechanical valve in a simplified boiling water reactor. Scaling and design calculations were performed to obtain the geometry of new passive hydraulic vacuum breaker check valve. In order to check the valve performance, a RELAP5 model of the simplified boiling water reactor system with the new valve was developed. The valve was implemented in an integral facility, PUMA and was tested for large break loss of coolant accident. (authors)

Ishii, M.; Xu, Y.; Revankar, S.T. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Design for energy efficiency: Energy efficient industrialized housing research program. Progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy has sponsored the Energy Efficient Industrialized Housing research program (EEIH) to improve the energy efficiency of industrialized housing. Two research centers share responsibility for this program: The Center for Housing Innovation at the University of Oregon and the Florida Solar Energy Center, a research institute of the University of Central Florida. Additional funding is provided through the participation of private industry, state governments and utilities. The program is guided by a steering committee comprised of industry and government representatives. This report summarizes Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 activities and progress, and proposed activities for FY 1991 in Task 2.1 Design for Energy Efficiency. This task establishes a vision of energy conservation opportunities in critical regions, market segments, climate zones and manufacturing strategies significant to industrialized housing in the 21st Century. In early FY 1990, four problem statements were developed to define future housing demand scenarios inclusive of issues of energy efficiency, housing design and manufacturing. Literature surveys were completed to assess seven areas of influence for industrialized housing and energy conservation in the future. Fifty-five future trends were identified in computing and design process; manufacturing process; construction materials, components and systems; energy and environment; demographic context; economic context; and planning policy and regulatory context.

Kellett, R.; Berg, R.; Paz, A.; Brown, G.Z.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Design and Validation of Control Room Upgrades Using a Research Simulator Facility  

SciTech Connect

Since 1981, the United States (U.S.) Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) [1] requires a plant- specific simulator facility for use in training at U.S. nuclear power plants (NPPs). These training simulators are in near constant use for training and qualification of licensed NPP operators. In the early 1980s, the Halden Man-Machine Laboratory (HAMMLab) at the Halden Reactor Project (HRP) in Norway first built perhaps the most well known set of research simulators. The HRP offered a high- fidelity simulator facility in which the simulator is functionally linked to a specific plant but in which the human-machine interface (HMI) may differ from that found in the plant. As such, HAMMLab incorporated more advanced digital instrumentation and controls (I&C) than the plant, thereby giving it considerable interface flexibility that researchers took full advantage of when designing and validating different ways to upgrade NPP control rooms. Several U.S. partners—the U.S. NRC, the Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI), Sandia National Laboratories, and Idaho National Laboratory (INL) – as well as international members of the HRP, have been working with HRP to run control room simulator studies. These studies, which use crews from Scandinavian plants, are used to determine crew behavior in a variety of normal and off-normal plant operations. The findings have ultimately been used to guide safety considerations at plants and to inform advanced HMI design—both for the regulator and in industry. Given the desire to use U.S. crews of licensed operators on a simulator of a U.S. NPP, there is a clear need for a research simulator facility in the U.S. There is no general-purpose reconfigurable research oriented control room simulator facility in the U.S. that can be used for a variety of studies, including the design and validation of control room upgrades.

Ronald L. Boring; Vivek Agarwal; Jeffrey C. Joe; Julius J. Persensky

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Design and Simulation of IOTA - a Novel Concept of Integrable Optics Test Accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of nonlinear lattices with large betatron tune spreads can increase instability and space charge thresholds due to improved Landau damping. Unfortunately, the majority of nonlinear accelerator lattices turn out to be nonintegrable, producing chaotic motion and a complex network of stable and unstable resonances. Recent advances in finding the integrable nonlinear accelerator lattices have led to a proposal to construct at Fermilab a test accelerator with strong nonlinear focusing which avoids resonances and chaotic particle motion. This presentation will outline the main challenges, theoretical design solutions and construction status of the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA) underway at Fermilab.

Nagaitsev, S.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab; Danilov, V.V.; /Oak Ridge; Shatilov, D.N.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials with Particles and Components Testing (IMPACT) facility and the Pacific Northwest Nuclear Laboratory (PNNL) Radiochemistry Processing Laboratory (RPL) and PIE facilities were added. The ATR NSUF annually hosts a weeklong event called User’s Week in which students and faculty from universities as well as other interested parties from regulatory agencies or industry convene in Idaho Falls, Idaho to see presentations from ATR NSUF staff as well as select researchers from the materials research field. User’s week provides an overview of current materials research topics of interest and an opportunity for young researchers to understand the process of performing work through ATR NSUF. Additionally, to increase the number of researchers engaged in LWR materials issues, a series of workshops are in progress to introduce research staff to stress corrosion cracking, zirconium alloy degradation, and uranium dioxide degradation during in-reactor use.

John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Advanced Control Design and Field Testing for Wind Turbines at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utility-scale wind turbines require active control systems to operate at variable rotational speeds. As turbines become larger and more flexible, advanced control algorithms become necessary to meet multiple objectives such as speed regulation, blade load mitigation, and mode stabilization. At the same time, they must maximize energy capture. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has developed control design and testing capabilities to meet these growing challenges.

Hand, M. M.; Johnson, K. E.; Fingersh, L. J.; Wright, A. D.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Proceedings of the 1988 International Meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The international effort to develop and implement new research reactor fuels utilizing low-enriched uranium, instead of highly- enriched uranium, continues to make solid progress. This effort is the cornerstone of a widely shared policy aimed at reducing, and possibly eliminating, international traffic in highly-enriched uranium and the nuclear weapon proliferation concerns associated with this traffic. To foster direct communication and exchange of ideas among the specialists in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the eleventh of a series which began 1978. Individual papers presented at the meeting have been cataloged separately.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

An Infrastructure to Functionally Test Designs Generated by Compilers Targeting FPGAs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an infrastructure to test the functionality of the specific architectures output by a high-level compiler targeting dynamically reconfigurable hardware. It results in a suitable scheme to verify the architectures generated by the compiler, each time new optimization techniques are included or changes in the compiler are performed. We believe this kind of infrastructure is important to verify, by functional simulation, further research techniques, as far as compilation to Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) platforms is concerned.

Rodrigues, Rui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Experimental and Sampling Design for the INL-2 Sample Collection Operational Test  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the experimental and sampling design developed to assess sampling approaches and methods for detecting contamination in a building and clearing the building for use after decontamination. An Idaho National Laboratory (INL) building will be contaminated with BG (Bacillus globigii, renamed Bacillus atrophaeus), a simulant for Bacillus anthracis (BA). The contamination, sampling, decontamination, and re-sampling will occur per the experimental and sampling design. This INL-2 Sample Collection Operational Test is being planned by the Validated Sampling Plan Working Group (VSPWG). The primary objectives are: 1) Evaluate judgmental and probabilistic sampling for characterization as well as probabilistic and combined (judgment and probabilistic) sampling approaches for clearance, 2) Conduct these evaluations for gradient contamination (from low or moderate down to absent or undetectable) for different initial concentrations of the contaminant, 3) Explore judgment composite sampling approaches to reduce sample numbers, 4) Collect baseline data to serve as an indication of the actual levels of contamination in the tests. A combined judgmental and random (CJR) approach uses Bayesian methodology to combine judgmental and probabilistic samples to make clearance statements of the form "X% confidence that at least Y% of an area does not contain detectable contamination” (X%/Y% clearance statements). The INL-2 experimental design has five test events, which 1) vary the floor of the INL building on which the contaminant will be released, 2) provide for varying the amount of contaminant released to obtain desired concentration gradients, and 3) investigate overt as well as covert release of contaminants. Desirable contaminant gradients would have moderate to low concentrations of contaminant in rooms near the release point, with concentrations down to zero in other rooms. Such gradients would provide a range of contamination levels to challenge the sampling, sample extraction, and analytical methods to be used in the INL-2 study. For each of the five test events, the specified floor of the INL building will be contaminated with BG using a point-release device located in the room specified in the experimental design. Then quality control (QC), reference material coupon (RMC), judgmental, and probabilistic samples will be collected according to the sampling plan for each test event. Judgmental samples will be selected based on professional judgment and prior information. Probabilistic samples were selected with a random aspect and in sufficient numbers to provide desired confidence for detecting contamination or clearing uncontaminated (or decontaminated) areas. Following sample collection for a given test event, the INL building will be decontaminated. For possibly contaminated areas, the numbers of probabilistic samples were chosen to provide 95% confidence of detecting contaminated areas of specified sizes. For rooms that may be uncontaminated following a contamination event, or for whole floors after decontamination, the numbers of judgmental and probabilistic samples were chosen using the CJR approach. The numbers of samples were chosen to support making X%/Y% clearance statements with X = 95% or 99% and Y = 96% or 97%. The experimental and sampling design also provides for making X%/Y% clearance statements using only probabilistic samples. For each test event, the numbers of characterization and clearance samples were selected within limits based on operational considerations while still maintaining high confidence for detection and clearance aspects. The sampling design for all five test events contains 2085 samples, with 1142 after contamination and 943 after decontamination. These numbers include QC, RMC, judgmental, and probabilistic samples. The experimental and sampling design specified in this report provides a good statistical foundation for achieving the objectives of the INL-2 study.

Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Matzke, Brett D.

2009-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

315

Evaluation of Demo 1C composite flywheel rotor burst test and containment design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory-Directed funds were provided in FY 1995 for research to develop flywheel containment specifications and to consider concepts that could satisfy these specifications and produce a prototype small, lightweight, inexpensive, mobile flywheel containment. Research activities have included an analytical and pictorial review of the Demo 1C flywheel failure test, which provided significant insight about radial and axial failure modes; calculations of the thickness of ultra-conservative pressure vessel containment; entertainment of advanced containment concepts using lightweight materials and armor literature; consideration of fabrication assembly procedures; and participation in a Flywheel Energy Storage Workshop during which additional flywheel failure experiences were discussed. Based on these activities, calculations, and results, a list of conclusions concerning flywheel containment and its relation to the flywheel are presented followed by recommendations for further research.

Kass, M.D.; McKeever, J.W.; Akerman, M.A.; Goranson, P.L.; Litherland, P.S.; O`Kain, D.U.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Ground Testing a Nuclear Thermal Rocket: Design of a sub-scale demonstration experiment  

SciTech Connect

In 2008, the NASA Mars Architecture Team found that the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) was the preferred propulsion system out of all the combinations of chemical propulsion, solar electric, nuclear electric, aerobrake, and NTR studied. Recently, the National Research Council committee reviewing the NASA Technology Roadmaps recommended the NTR as one of the top 16 technologies that should be pursued by NASA. One of the main issues with developing a NTR for future missions is the ability to economically test the full system on the ground. In the late 1990s, the Sub-surface Active Filtering of Exhaust (SAFE) concept was first proposed by Howe as a method to test NTRs at full power and full duration. The concept relied on firing the NTR into one of the test holes at the Nevada Test Site which had been constructed to test nuclear weapons. In 2011, the cost of testing a NTR and the cost of performing a proof of concept experiment were evaluated.

David Bedsun; Debra Lee; Margaret Townsend; Clay A. Cooper; Jennifer Chapman; Ronald Samborsky; Mel Bulman; Daniel Brasuell; Stanley K. Borowski

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Main report  

SciTech Connect

Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 1 (Main Report) contains the results in summary form.

Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Primary Coolant Pump and Motor Replacement Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

Noel Duckwitz

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Emergency Firewater Injection System Replacement Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

Noel Duckwitz

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Diesel Bus (E-3) and Switchgear Replacement Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

Noel Duckwitz

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research design testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

Reactor core design and modeling of the MIT research reactor for conversion to LEU  

SciTech Connect

Feasibility design studies for conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR) to LEU are described. Because the reactor fuel has a rhombic cross section, a special input processor was created in order to model the reactor in great detail with the REBUS-PC diffusion theory code, in 3D (triangular-z) geometry. Comparisons are made of fuel assembly power distributions and control blade worth vs. axial position, between REBUS-PC results and Monte Carlo predictions from the MCNP code. Results for the original HEU core at zero burnup are also compared with measurement. These two analysis methods showed remarkable agreement. Ongoing fuel cycle studies are summarized. A status report will be given as to results thus far that affect key design decisions. Future work plans and schedules to achieve completion of the conversion are presented. (author)

Newton, Thomas H. Jr. [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 138 Albany St., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Olson, Arne P.; Stillman, John A. [RERTR Program, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Dynamometer Testing of a NW2200 Drivetrain: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-394  

SciTech Connect

Northern Power Systems specializes in direct drive wind turbine designs. CRADA CRD-10-394 involved testing the NW2200 wind turbine power train. Power train testing is important because it allows validation of the generator design and some control algorithms prior to installation on a tower, where this data would be more difficult and time consuming to collect. In an effort to keep the commercial product schedule on time, Northern Power requested testing support from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for this testing. The test program was performed using NREL's 2.5 MW dynamometer test bed at the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, CO.

Wallen, R.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Dynamometer Testing of a NW2200 Drivetrain: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-394  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Northern Power Systems specializes in direct drive wind turbine designs. CRADA CRD-10-394 involved testing the NW2200 wind turbine power train. Power train testing is important because it allows validation of the generator design and some control algorithms prior to installation on a tower, where this data would be more difficult and time consuming to collect. In an effort to keep the commercial product schedule on time, Northern Power requested testing support from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for this testing. The test program was performed using NREL's 2.5 MW dynamometer test bed at the National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, CO.

Wallen, R.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Design and testing of the New Muon Lab cryogenic system at Fermilab  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is constructing a superconducting 1.3 GHz cryomodule test facility located at the New Muon Lab building. The facility will be used for testing and validating cryomodule designs as well as support systems. For the initial phase of the project, a single Type III plus 1.3 GHz cryomodule will be cooled and tested using a single Tevatron style standalone refrigerator. Subsequent phases involve testing as many as two full RF units consisting of up to six 1.3 GHz cryomodules with the addition of a new cryogenic plant. The cryogenic infrastructure consists of the refrigerator system, cryogenic distribution system as well as an ambient temperature pumping system to achieve 2 K operations with supporting purification systems. A discussion of the available capacity for the various phases versus the proposed heat loads is included as well as commissioning results and testing schedule. This paper describes the plans, status and challenges of this initial phase of the New Muon Lab cryogenic system.

Martinez, A.; Klebaner, A.L.; Theilacker, J.C.; DeGraff, B.D.; Leibfritz, J.; /Fermilab

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

A CONCEPTUAL DESIGN OF A SHIELD TESTING AND MATERIALS IRRADIATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual design is presented for a test reactor facility to be used for shielding experiments and component irradintions necessary for airframe development for the nuclear airplane program. To meet both requirements a modified swimming-pool reactor is used, with a dry irradintion cell of 320 cu ft of useful volume provided for component testing, while shielding experiments are performed in the pool in the usual manner. A BSR-type core is operated at 1 MW to provide a fest neutron flux in the irradiation cell of 10/sup 12/n/cm/sup 2/ sec at the core face and 10/sup 11/at a distance of 4 feet. The irradiation-cell facility is designed to avoid the need of remote operations in making up service connections to the experimental piece. The reactor is contained in a cylindrical building designed for 6 psi internal pressure to meet the conditions of the maximum credible accident. The estimated cost of the facility, including the reactor and the fabrication cost for an initial fuel charge, is 874,000. (auth)

Frankfort, J.H.

1956-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

326

DESIGN AND PRELIMINARY TEST OF THE 1500 MHZ NSLS-II PASSIVE SUPERCONDUCTING RF CAVITY  

SciTech Connect

NSLS-II is a new ultra-bright 3 GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. Ion clearing gaps are required to suppress ion effects on the beam. The natural bunch length of 3mm is planned to be lengthened by means of a third harmonic cavity in order to increase the Touschek limited lifetime. Earlier work described the design alternatives and the geometry selected for a copper prototype. We subsequently have iterated the design to lower the R/Q of the cavity and to increase the diameter of the beam pipe ferrite HOM dampers to reduce the wakefield heating. A niobium cavity and full cryomodule including LN2 shield, magnetic shield and insulating vacuum vessel have been fabricated and installed. A passive SRF 3rd harmonic cavity consisting of two tightly coupled cells has been designed and fabricated for NSLS-II. Initial cold tests of this cavity are very promising. These tests have verified that the cavity frequency and mode separation between the 0 and {pi}-modes can be set at manufacture. Further, the frequency separation can be maintained over wide tuning ranges necessary for operation. Future work includes HOM damper and motorized tuner development.

Rose, J.; Gash, W.; Kosciuk, B.; Ravindranath, V.; Sikora, B.; Sharma, S.; Towne, N.; Grimm, T.L.; Boulware, C.H.; Krizmanich, C.; Kuhlman, B.; Miller, N.; Siegel, B.; Winowski, M.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

327

Evaluation of injector location and nozzle design in a direct-injection hydrogen research engine.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The favorable physical properties of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) make it an excellent alternative fuel for internal combustion (IC) engines and hence it is widely regarded as the energy carrier of the future. Hydrogen direct injection provides multiple degrees of freedom for engine optimization and influencing the in-cylinder combustion processes. This paper compares the results in the mixture formation and combustion behavior of a hydrogen direct-injected single-cylinder research engine using two different injector locations as well as various injector nozzle designs.

Wallner, T.; Nande, A. M.; Naber, J.; Energy Systems; Michigan Technological Univ.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Design and Analysis of a Test Rig for Modeling the Bit/Formation Interface in Petroleum Drilling Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equipment failure and well deviations are prevailing contributors to production delays within the petroleum industry. Particular monetary focus is given to the drilling operations of wells to overcome these deficits, in order to extract natural resources as efficiently, and as safely, as possible. The research presented here focuses on minimizing vibrations of the drill string near the bottom-hole assembly (BHA) by identifying the cause of external forcing on the drillstring in vertical and horizontal wells and measuring the effects of various factors on the stability of perturbations on the system. A test rig concept has been developed to accurately measure the interaction forces and torques between the bit, formation and fluids during drilling in order to clearly define a bit/formation interface law (BFIL) for the purpose vibrational analysis. As a secondary function, the rig will be able to measure the potential inputs to a drilling simulation code that can be used to model drillstring vibrations. All notable quantities will be measured including torque on bit (TOB), weight on bit (WOB), lateral impact loads (LIL), formation stiffness, bit specific properties, fluid damping coefficients and rate of penetration (ROP). The conceptual design has been analyzed and refined, in detail, to verify its operational integrity and range of measurement error. The operational envelope of the rig is such that a drill bit of up to 8 œ inches in diameter can be effectively tested at desired operational parameters (WOB: 0-55,000 lbf, RPM: 60-200) with various rock formations and multiple fluid types. Future use and design possibilities are also discussed to enhance the functionality of the rig and the potential for further research in the area of oil and gas drilling and vibrational modeling.

Wilson, Joshua Kyle

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Science, Technology and Mission Design for the Laser Astrometric Test Of Relativity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Laser Astrometric Test Of Relativity (LATOR) is a Michelson-Morley-type experiment designed to achieve a major improvement in the accuracy of the tests of relativistic gravity in the solar system. By using a combination of independent time-series of gravitational deflection of light in the immediate proximity to the Sun, along with measurements of the relativistic time delay on interplanetary scales (to a precision respectively better than 0.1 picoradians and 1 cm), LATOR will measure the key post-Newtonian Eddington parameter \\gamma with accuracy of one part in a billion - a factor of 30,000 improvement compared to the present best result, Cassini's 2003 test. LATOR's primary measurement pushes to unprecedented accuracy the search for cosmologically relevant scalar-tensor modifications of gravity by looking for a remnant scalar field in today's solar system. We present a comprehensive discussion of the science objectives, proposed technology, mission and optical designs, as well as the expected performance of this fundamental physics experiment in space.

Slava G. Turyshev; Michael Shao; Kenneth L. Nordtvedt Jr

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

330

Design, Test and Demonstration of Saturable Reactor High-Temperature Superconductor Fault Current Limiters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Zenergy Power has successfully designed, built, tested, and installed in the US electrical grid a saturable reactor Fault Current Limiter. Beginning in 2007, first as SC Power Systems and from 2008 as Zenergy Power, Inc., ZP used DOE matching grant and ARRA funds to help refine the design of the saturated reactor fault current limiter. ZP ultimately perfected the design of the saturated reactor FCL to the point that ZP could reliably design a suitable FCL for most utility applications. Beginning with a very basic FCL design using 1G HTS for a coil housed in a LN2 cryostat for the DC bias magnet, the technology progressed to a commercial system that was offered for sale internationally. Substantial progress was made in two areas. First, the cryogenics cooling system progressed from a sub-cooled liquid nitrogen container housing the HTS coils to cryostats utilizing dry conduction cooling and reaching temperatures down to less than 20 degrees K. Large, round cryostats with â??warm boreâ? diameters of 1.7 meters enabled the design of large tanks to hold the AC components. Second, the design of the AC part of the FCL was refined from a six legged â??spiderâ? design to a more compact and lighter design with better fault current limiting capability. Further refinement of the flux path and core shape led to an efficient saturated reactor design requiring less Ampere-turns to saturate the core. In conclusion, the development of the saturable reactor FCL led to a more efficient design not requiring HTS magnets and their associated peripheral equipment, which yielded a more economical product in line with the electric utility industry expectations. The original goal for the DOE funding of the ZP project â??Design, Test and Demonstration of Saturable Reactor High-Temperature Superconductor Fault Current Limitersâ? was to stimulate the HTS wire industry with, first 1G, then 2G, HTS wire applications. Over the approximately 5 years of ZPâ??s product development program, the amount of HTS wire employed per FCL and its cost as a percentage of the total FCL product content had not dropped substantially from an unsustainable level of more than 50% of the total cost of the FCL, nor had the availability increased (today the availability of 2G wire for commercial applications outside of specific partnerships with the leading 2G wire manufacturers is extremely limited). ZP had projected a very significant commercial potential for FCLs with higher performance and lower costs compared to the initial models built with 1G wire, which would come about from the widespread availability of low-cost, high-performance 2G HTS wire. The potential for 2G wires at greatly reduced performance-based prices compared to 1G HTS conductor held out the potential for the commercial production of FCLs at price and performance levels attractive to the utility industry. However, the price of HTS wire did not drop as expected and today the available quantities of 2G wire are limited, and the price is higher than the currently available supplies of 1G wire. The commercial option for ZP to provide a reliable and reasonably priced FCL to the utility industry is to employ conventional resistive conductor DC electromagnets to bias the FCL. Since the premise of the original funding was to stimulate the HTS wire industry and ZP concluded that copper-based magnets were more economical for the foreseeable future, DOE and ZP decided to mutually terminate the project.

Frank Darmann; Robert Lombaerde; Franco Moriconi; Albert Nelson

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Planning and design of additional East Mesa Geothermal Test Facilities. Phase 1B. Volume I. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The planning and design of additions to the ERDA East Mesa Geothermal Component Test Facility are discussed. The ERDA East Mesa Geothermal Component Test Facility will provide moderate temperature/low salinity fluids to facilitate comprehensive testing of conversion systems and components under realistic field conditions. The project objectives included development of designs of new wells and modifications to existing wells to improve definitive reservoir evaluations and design of additional test facilities integrated with the limited-scale facilities to accommodate diverse commercial utilization technology experiments. A reservoir utilization evaluation was conducted to establish locations and design drilling programs for three new wells and modifications to existing wells to improve reservoir definition and provide a comprehensive inventory of geothermal well fluids for testing. Ten test facility additions were developed as individual procurement packages of specifications and drawings to facilitate near term construction activation.

Pearson, R.O.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Design and testing of high power, repetitively pulsed solid-state closing switches  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Repetitively pulsed closing switches are often required in high-power physics experiments. Traditionally, ignitrons have been used for these applications. There are reasons why ignitrons have undesirable features, such as the high trigger current which causes electromagnetic interference, the arc instability and environmental concern with the mercury used in the switches. With the development of ever increasing power rating of solid-state switches, in particular thyristors, the designer has the tools to replace ignitrons with solid-state devices. Using as an example a recently designed and tested 10 kV, 80 kA high-power switch, the design philosophy for repetitively pulsed switches is developed. The parameters which impose the greatest challenge on the device, such as di/dt, temperature rise and reverse blocking voltage are investigated with respect to their capability when operating in the pulsed mode. Starting with the available device data sheet information and published results of the dependency of the number of life cycles as a function of the device temperature, it is shown how the overload capability of a device for short term pulsed applications can be exploited. The detailed design of a 2 Hz, 10{sup 8} cycle, 12.5 kV, 80 kA, 3 ms switch, with a short circuit capability of 250 kA, is presented. The paper concludes with a short summary about device limits in voltage, current amplitude and pulse length ratings for repetitively pulsed switches using available thyristors.

Boenig, H.J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Schwartzenberg, J.W.; Willinger, L.J.; Piccone, D.E. [Silicon Power Corp., Malvern, PA (United States); Lopez, D.A.; Smolleck, H.A. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Plasma Panel Detectors for MIP Detection for the SLHC and a Test Chamber Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance demands for high and super-high luminosity at the LHC (up to 10^35 cm^(-2) sec^(-1) after the 2017 shutdown) and at future colliders demand high resolution tracking detectors with very fast time response and excellent temporal and spatial resolution. We are investigating a new radiation detector technology based on Plasma Display Panels (PDP), the underlying engine of panel plasma television displays. The design and production of PDPs is supported by four decades of industrial development. Emerging from this television technology is the Plasma Panel Sensor (PPS), a novel variant of the micropattern radiation detector. The PPS is fundamentally an array of micro-Geiger plasma discharge cells operating in a non-ageing, hermetically sealed gas mixture . We report on the PPS development program, including design of a PPS Test Cell.

Ball, Robert; Etzion, Erez; Friedman, Peter S; Levin, Daniel S; Moshe, Meny Ben; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Zhou, Bing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Plasma Panel Detectors for MIP Detection for the SLHC and a Test Chamber Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance demands for high and super-high luminosity at the LHC (up to 10^35 cm^(-2) sec^(-1) after the 2017 shutdown) and at future colliders demand high resolution tracking detectors with very fast time response and excellent temporal and spatial resolution. We are investigating a new radiation detector technology based on Plasma Display Panels (PDP), the underlying engine of panel plasma television displays. The design and production of PDPs is supported by four decades of industrial development. Emerging from this television technology is the Plasma Panel Sensor (PPS), a novel variant of the micropattern radiation detector. The PPS is fundamentally an array of micro-Geiger plasma discharge cells operating in a non-ageing, hermetically sealed gas mixture . We report on the PPS development program, including design of a PPS Test Cell.

Robert Ball; John W. Chapman; Erez Etzion; Peter S. Friedman; Daniel S. Levin; Meny Ben Moshe; Curtis Weaverdyck; Bing Zhou

2010-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

335

Inverse Design: Playing "Jeopardy" in Materials Science (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

'Inverse Design: Playing 'Jeopardy' in Materials Science' was submitted by the Center for Inverse Design (CID) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. CID, an EFRC directed by Bill Tumas at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from five institutions: NREL (lead), Northwestern University, University of Colorado, Stanford University, and Oregon State University. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Inverse Design is 'to replace trial-and-error methods used in the development of materials for solar energy conversion with an inverse design approach powered by theory and computation.' Research topics are: solar photovoltaic, photonic, metamaterial, defects, spin dynamics, matter by design, novel materials synthesis, and defect tolerant materials.

Alex Zunger (former Director, Center for Inverse Design); Tumas, Bill (Director, Center for Inverse Design); CID Staff

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Design and testing of the magnetic quadrupole for the Heavy Ion Fusion Program  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Ion Fusion Program at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is conducting experiments in the transport and acceleration of ``driverlike`` beams. The single beam coming from the four-to-one beam combiner will be transported in a lattice of pulsed magnetic quadrupoles. The present beam transport consists of high field, short aspect ratio magnetic quadrupoles to maximize the transportable current. This design could also be converted to be superconducting for future uses in a driver. The pulsed quadrupole will develop a maximum field of two Tesla and will be housed within the induction accelerator cells at the appropriate lattice period. Hardware implementation of the physics requirements and full parameter testing is described.

Benjegerdes, R.; Faltens, A.; Fawley, W.; Peters, C.; Reginato, L.; Stuart, M.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Design, implementation and testing of extended and mixed precisionBLAS  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the design rationale, a C implementation, and conformance testing of a subset of the new Standard for the BLAS (Basic Linear Algebra Subroutines): Extended and Mixed Precision BLAS. Permitting higher internal precision and mixed input/output types and precisions allows us to implement some algorithms that are simpler, more accurate, and sometimes faster than possible without these features. The new BLAS are challenging to implement and test because there are many more subroutines than in the existing Standard, and because we must be able to assess whether a higher precision is used for internal computations than is used for either input or output variables. We have therefore developed an automated process of generating and systematically testing these routines. Our methodology is applicable to languages besides C. In particular, our algorithms used in the testing code will be valuable to all other BLAS implementors. Our extra precision routines achieve excellent performance--close to half of the machine peak Megaflop rate even for the Level 2 BLAS, when the data access is stride one.

Li, X.S.; Demmel, J.W.; Bailey, D.H.; Henry, G.; Hida, Y.; Iskandar, J.; Kahan, W.; Kapur, A.; Martin, M.C.; Tung, T.; Yoo, D.J.

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

338

Design Construction and Test Results of a HTS Solenoid For Energy Recovery Linac  

SciTech Connect

An innovative feature of the proposed Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is the use of a solenoid made with High Temperature Superconductor (HTS) with the Superconducting RF cavity. The use of HTS allows solenoid to be placed in close proximity to the cavity and thus provides early focusing of the electron beam. In addition, cryogenic testing at {approx}77 K is simpler and cheaper than 4 K testing. This paper will present the design, construction and test results of this HTS solenoid. The HTS solenoid in the proposed ERL will be situated in the transition region between the superconducting cavity at {approx}4 K and the cryostat at the room temperature. Solenoid inside the cryogenic structure provides an early focusing and hence low emittance beam. The temperature in the transition region will be too high for a conventional low temperature superconductor and resistive heat load from copper coils will be too high on cryogenic system. HTS coils also allow much higher current density and significant reduction in size as compared to copper coils. Hence HTS solenoid provide a unique and technically superior solution. The use of a HTS solenoid with superconducting cavity offers a unique option as it can be placed in a cold to warm transition region to provide early focussing without using additional space. Construction and test results so far are very encouraging for its use in the ERL project.

Anerella, M; Ben-Zvi, I; Kayran, D; McIntyre, G; Muratore, J; Plate, S; Sampson, W; Cole, M

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

339

Design concepts for a pulse power test facility to simulate EMP surges. Part II. Slow pulses  

SciTech Connect

The work described in this report was sponsored by the Division of Electric Energy Systems (EES) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) through a subcontract with the Power Systems Technology Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work deals with the effect of high altitude nuclear bursts on electric power systems. In addition to fast voltage transients, slow, quasi-dc currents are also induced into extended power systems with grounded neutral connections. Similar phenomena at lower magnitude are generated by solar induced electromagnetic pulses (EMP). These have caused power outages, related to solar storms, at northern latitudes. The applicable utility experience is reviewed in order to formulate an optimum approach to future testing. From a wide variety of options two pulser designs were selected as most practical, a transformer-rectifier power supply, and a lead acid battery pulser. both can be mounted on a trailer as required for field testing on utility systems. The battery system results in the least cost. Testing on power systems requires that the dc pulser pass high values of alternating current, resulting from neutral imbalance or from potential fault currents. Batteries have a high ability to pass alternating currents. Most other pulser options must be protected by an ac bypass in the form of an expensive capacitor bank. 8D truck batteries can meet the original specification of 1 kA test current. Improved batteries for higher discharge currents are available.

Dethlefsen, R.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

The Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility (RSF), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design-Build Process for Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility An in-depth look at how the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory used a performance-based design-build contract process to build one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world. Table of Contents The Design-Build Process for the Research Support Facility | 1 Table of Contents Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Building Features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Owner Roles and Responsibilities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Acquisition Strategy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Defining Performance Objectives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research design testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data: Custom Engineering trough with glass reflector surface and Sandia-designed receivers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Custom Engineering trough and Sandia-designed receivers, with glass reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States. Two experimental receivers were tested, one with an antireflective coating on the glass envelope around the receiver tube and one without the antireflective coating.

Harrison, T.D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Results of Research Engine and Vehicle Drive Cycle Testing during Blended Hydrogen/Methane Operation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Results of Research Engine and Results of Research Engine and Vehicle Drive Cycle Testing during Blended Hydrogen/Methane Operation Thomas Wallner, Henning Lohse-Busch, Henry Ng Argonne National Laboratory Robert Peters University of Alabama at Birmingham NHA Annual Hydrogen Conference 2007 San Antonio/Texas March 19 th - 22 nd 2007 DOE-Sponsors: Lee Slezak, Gurpreet Singh Government license The submitted manuscript was developed by the UChicago Argonne LLC as Operator of Argonne National Laboratory ("Argonne") under Contract No. DE-AC-02-06CH11357 with DOE. The U.S. Government retains for itself, and others acting on its behalf, a paid-up, nonexclusive, irrevocable worldwide license in said article to reproduce, prepare derivative works, distribute copies to the public, and perform publicly and display publicly, by or on

343

NREL Determines Better Testing Methods for Photovoltaic Module Durability (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NREL discoveries will enable manufacturers to produce more robust photovoltaic modules. Over the past decade, some photovoltaic (PV) modules have experienced power losses because of the system voltage stress that modules experience in fielded arrays. This is partly because qualification tests and standards do not adequately evaluate the durability of modules that undergo the long-term effects of high voltage. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) tried various testing methods and stress levels to demonstrate module durability to system voltage potential-induced degradation (PID) mechanisms. The results of these accelerated tests, along with outdoor testing, were used to estimate the acceleration factors needed to more accurately evaluate the durability of modules to system voltage stress. NREL was able to determine stress factors, levels, and methods for testing based on the stresses experienced by modules in the field. These results, in combination with those in the literature, suggest that constant stress with humidity and system voltage is more damaging than stress applied intermittently or with periods of recovery comprising hot and dry conditions or alternating bias in between. NREL has determined some module constructions to be extremely durable to PID. These findings will help the manufacturers of PV materials and components produce more durable products that better satisfy their customers. NREL determined that there is rapid degradation of some PV modules under system voltage stress and evaluated degradation rates in the field to develop more accurate accelerated testing methods. PV module manufacturers will be better able to choose robust materials and durable designs and guarantee sturdier, longer-lasting products. As PV modules become more durable, and thus more efficient over the long term, the risks and the cost of PV power will be reduced.

Not Available

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors. Appendices  

SciTech Connect

Safety and Cost Information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of two representative licensed nuclear research and test reactors. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied to obtain comparisons between costs (in 1981 dollars), occupational radiation doses, potential radiation dose to the public, and other safety impacts. The alternatives considered are: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and EMTOMB (entombment). The study results are presented in two volumes. Volume 2 (Appendices) contains the detailed data that support the results given in Volume 1, including unit-component data.

Konzek, G.J.; Ludwick, J.D.; Kennedy, W.E. Jr.; Smith, R.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Fuel development activities of the US RERTR Program. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the development and irradiation testing of high-density fuels for use with low-enriched uranium in research and test reactors is reported. Swelling and blister-threshold temperature data obtained from the examination of miniature fuel plates containing UAl/sub x/, U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/, or U/sub 3/Si dispersed in an aluminum matrix are presented. Combined with the results of metallurgical examinations, these data show that these four fuel types will perform adequately to full burnup of the /sup 235/U contained in the low-enriched fuel. The exothermic reaction of the uranium-silicide fuels with aluminum has been found to occur at about the same temperature as the melting of the aluminum matrix and cladding and to be essentially quenched by the melting endotherm. A new series of miniature fuel plate irradiations is also discussed.

Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Wiencek, T.C.; Copeland, G.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Testing and Analysis to Advance R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing and Analysis to Advance R&D Testing and Analysis to Advance R&D Get the Adobe Flash Player to see this video. Text Alternative NREL has capabilities and experts in measurements, characterization, reliability, engineering, scientific computing, and theory to support photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R&D) across a range of conversion technologies and scales. Conversion technologies include the primary areas of silicon, polycrystalline thin films (cadmium telluride [CdTe], copper indium gallium diselenide [CIGS]), III-V-based multijunctions, and organic PV. And scales of interest range from materials, to cells, modules, and systems. Measurements and Characterization Photo of a hand holding tweezers pinching a square wafer that is striped gold and black. We provide a huge range of techniques for measuring and characterizing PV

347

Design and Application of an Electronic Logbook for Space System Integration and Test Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the highly technological aerospace world paper is still widely used to document space system integration and test (I&T) operations. E-Logbook is a new technology designed to substitute the most commonly used paper logbooks in space system I&T, such as the connector mate/demate logbook, the flight hardware and flight software component installation logbook, the material mix record logbook and the electronic ground support equipment validation logbook. It also includes new logbook concepts, such as the shift logbook, which optimizes management oversight and the shift hand-over process, and the configuration logbook, which instantly reports on the global I&T state of the space system before major test events or project reviews. The design of E-Logbook focuses not only on a reliable and efficient relational database, but also on an ergonomic human-computer interactive (HCI) system that can help reduce human error and improve I&T management and oversight overall. E-Logbook has been used for the I&T operation of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) Large Area Telescope (LAT) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). More than 41,000 records have been created for the different I&T logbooks, with no data having been corrupted or critically lost. 94% of the operators and 100% of the management exposed to E-Logbook prefer it to paper logbooks and recommend its use in the aerospace industry.

Kavelaars, Alicia T.; /SLAC /Stanford U., Dept. Aeronaut. Astronaut.

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

348

Report on design, construction, and testing of CO/sub 2/ breakout system for geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A skid mounted test facility has been built for determining conditions at which CO/sub 2/ flashes from geothermal brines. The system has been checked and operated at one geothermal plant. It performed as designed. The equipment is designed to operate at temperatures and pressures typical of wells near Heber, California. (Nominally 180/sup 0/C and 300 to 500 psig). It has heat exchangers which can cool the brine to less than 70/sup 0/C. (The cooling water is recirculated after being cooled by a forced air heat exchanger). Breakout pressures can be determined for any temperature between 70/sup 0/C and wellhead temperature. An adjustable orifice provides final control on pressure required to initiate flashing. The orifice is at the bottom of a sight glass. A light beam shines through the sight glass and focuses on a photoelectric cell. The presence of bubbles scatters light and decreases the output of the cell. Results using the cell were more reproducible than those using the naked eye. Results from one test show a smooth curve over the temperature range 75/sup 0/C to 165/sup 0/C. Agreement between the experimental values and calculated ones is discussed.

Robertus, R.J.; Shannon, D.W.; Sullivan, R.G.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

OECD MCCI project Melt Eruption Test (MET) design report, Rev. 2. April 15, 2003.  

SciTech Connect

The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is pursuing separate effect tests to examine the viability of the melt coolability mechanisms identified as part of the MACE program. These mechanisms include bulk cooling, water ingression, volcanic eruptions, and crust breach. At the second PRG meeting held at ANL on 22-23 October 2002, a preliminary design1 for a separate effects test to investigate the melt eruption cooling mechanism was presented for PRG review. At this meeting, NUPEC made several recommendations on the experiment approach aimed at optimizing the chances of achieving a floating crust boundary condition in this test. The principal recommendation was to incorporate a mortar sidewall liner into the test design, since data from the COTELS experiment program indicates that corium does not form a strong mechanical bond with this material. Other recommendations included: (i) reduction of the electrode elevation to well below the melt upper surface elevation (since the crust may bond to these solid surfaces), and (ii) favorably taper the mortar liner to facilitate crust detachment and relocation during the experiment. Finally, as a precursor to implementing these modifications, the PRG recommended the development of a design for a small-scale scoping test intended to verify the ability of the mortar liner to preclude formation of an anchored bridge crust under core-concrete interaction conditions. This revised Melt Eruption Test (MET) plan is intended to satisfy these PRG recommendations. Specifically, the revised plan focuses on providing data on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions, including a floating crust boundary condition. The overall objective of MET is to determine to what extent core debris is rendered coolable by eruptive-type processes that breach the crust that rests upon the melt. The specific objectives of this test are as follows: (1) Evaluate the augmentation in surface heat flux during periods of melt eruption; (2) Evaluate the melt entrainment coefficient from the heat flux and gas flow rate data for input into models that calculate ex-vessel debris coolability; (3) Characterize the morphology and coolability of debris resulting from eruptive processes that transport melt into overlying water; and (4) Discriminate between periods when eruptions take the form of particle ejections into overlying water, leading to a porous particle bed, and single-phase extrusions, which lead to volcano-type structures.

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

350

Process Testing to Support the Conceptual Design of a Plutonium Vitrification Facility  

SciTech Connect

In the aftermath of the Cold War, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has identified up to 50 metric tonnes of excess plutonium that needs to be dispositioned. The bulk of the material is slated to be blended with uranium and fabricated into a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel for subsequent burning in commercial nuclear reactors. Excess plutonium-containing materials that are not suitable for fabrication into MOX fuel will need to be dispositioned via other means. A lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass was identified as a preferred form for the disposition of the impure plutonium-containing feeds. The LaBS glass formulation uses a lanthanide borosilicate frit rather than the alkali borosilicate frit used to vitrify high level waste. The LaBS glass has been shown to be able to accommodate high quantities of fissile material (greater than 10 wt % elemental plutonium) and tolerate the impurities expected in the plutonium feed streams. A conceptual design effort is now underway at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to design a vitrification facility to immobilize the excess Pu feeds that are not slated for disposition via MOX fuel. The conceptual design phase is planned to complete in FY07. A test program was initiated at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to provide input data to the conceptual design effort. A major component of this test effort involves vitrification process testing. A cylindrical induction melter (CIM) was developed for the vitrification of actinide feed streams. Due to the high temperatures required to incorporate high plutonium oxide contents into the glass by dissolution and melting, the melter vessel is constructed out of Pt/Rh alloy and can be operated at temperatures up to 1600 deg. C. Additionally, the melter design is compact to facilitate installation in a glovebox (the size of the conceptual facility melter is approximately 6'' in diameter by 18'' tall). The CIM has proven to be a viable means to process the LaBS glass at processing temperatures of 1400-1500 deg. C. In this paper, the offgas sampling tests conducted in the CIM to capture and analyze the particulate and vapors emitted from lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) Frit X with HfO{sub 2} as a surrogate for PuO{sub 2} and added impurities are discussed. The tests with impurities added showed that alkali salts such as NaCl and KCl were substantially emitted into the offgas system as the salt particulate, HCl, or Cl{sub 2}. Retention of Na and K in the glass were about 80 and 55%, respectively. Chloride retention was about 35%; chloride remaining in the glass was 0.29-0.37 wt%. Overall, about 58-72% of the impurities added were volatilized. Virtually all of the particulate species were collected on the nominal 0.3 {mu}m filter. The particulate was found to be as small as 0.2 {mu}m and have an approximate median size of 0.5 {mu}m. The particulate salt was also found to stick together by forming bridges between particles. (authors)

Zamecnik, J.R.; Jones, T.M.; Miller, D.H.; Herman, D.T.; Marra, J.C. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Design of a micro-Functional Testing System for process characterization of a hot micro-embossing machine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growth in industrial, commercial, and medical applications for micro-fluidic devices has fueled heightened research and development into micro-fluidic design, materials, and increasingly manufacturing. Polymers (Poly(methyl ...

Thaker, Kunal H. (Kunal Harish)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Waste Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC), National Environmental Design. Topical report  

SciTech Connect

The 4th Annual Waste-Management Education and Research Consortium (WERC) for National Environmental Design was held on April 10--14 in Las Cruces, New Mexico. The purpose of the WERC is to train students in the area of site remediation and restoration. Consistent with the Cooperative Agreement`s 3rd Task, the ultimate goal of WERC is to provide training for potential engineers and scientists for the DOE`s remediation and restoration efforts. WERC is sponsored by the Department of Energy and is housed at New Mexico State University. Two student groups from West Virginia University`s Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering traveled to New Mexico. Group 1 was composed of graduate students and Group 2 was composed of undergraduate students. Students who participated in this program were exposed to all aspects of the solution of a real life environmental problem.

Reed, B.E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Green IS for GHG emission reporting on product-level? an action design research project in the meat industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas emission reporting gained importance in the last years, due to societal and governmental pressure. However, this task is highly complex, especially in interdependent batch production processes and for reporting on the product-level. Green ... Keywords: GHG emissions, Green IS, PCF, action design research, design science, meat industry, product carbon footprint

Hendrik Hilpert, Christoph Beckers, Lutz M. Kolbe, Matthias Schumann

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Brayton Point Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of the impacts of future mercury regulations to Brayton Point Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has variable (29-75%) native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables and activated carbon on mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included: (1) Plant and PG&E National Energy Group corporate personnel; (2) Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); (3) United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL); (4) ADA-ES, Inc.; (5) NORIT Americas, Inc.; (6) Apogee Scientific, Inc.; (7) TRC Environmental Corporation; (8) URS Corporation; (9) Quinapoxet Solutions; (10) Energy and Environmental Strategies (EES); and (11) Reaction Engineering International (REI). The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall, the objectives of this field test program were to determine the impact of activated carbon injection on mercury control and balance-of-plant processes on Brayton Point Unit 1. Brayton Point Unit 1 is a 250-MW unit that fires a low-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. Particulate control is achieved by two electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) in series. The full-scale tests were conducted on one-half of the flue gas stream (nominally 125 MW). Mercury control sorbents were injected in between the two ESPs. The residence time from the injection grid to the second ESP was approximately 0.5 seconds. In preparation for the full-scale tests, 12 different sorbents were evaluated in a slipstream of flue gas via a packed-bed field test apparatus for mercury adsorption. Results from these tests were used to determine the five carbon-based sorbents that were tested at full-scale. Conditions of interest that were varied included SO{sub 3} conditioning on/off, injection concentrations, and distribution spray patterns. The original test plan called for parametric testing of NORIT FGD carbon at 1, 3, and 10 lbs/MMacf. These injection concentrations were estimated based on results from the Pleasant Prairie tests that showed no additional mercury removal when injection concentrations were increased above 10 lbs/MMacf. The Brayton Point parametric test data indicated that higher injection concentrations would achieve higher removal efficiencies and should be tested. The test plan was altered to include testing at 20 lbs/MMacf. The first test at this higher rate showed very high removal across the second ESP (>80%). Unlike the ''ceiling'' phenomenon witnessed at Pleasant Prairie, increasing sorbent injection concentration resulted in further capture of vapor-phase mercury. The final phase of field-testing was a 10-day period of continuous injection of NORIT FGD carbon. During the first five days, the injection concentration was held at 10 lbs/MMacf, followed by nominally five days of testing at an injection concentration of 20 lbs/MMacf. The mercury removal, as measured by the semi-continuous emission monitors (S-CEM), varied between 78% and 95% during the 10 lbs/MMacf period and increased to >97% when the injection concentration was increased to 20 lbs/MMacf. During the long-term testing period, mercury measurements following EPA's draft Ontario Hydro method were conducted by TRC Environmental Corporation at both 10 and 20 lbs/MMacf test conditions. The Ontario Hydro data showed that the particulate mercury removal was similar between the two conditions of 10 or 20 lbs/MMacf and removal efficiencies were greater than 99%. Elemental mercury was not detected in any samples, so no conclusions as to its removal can be drawn. Removal of oxidized mercury, on the other hand, increased from 68% to 93% with the higher injection concentration. These removal rates agreed well with the S-CEM results.

Michael D. Durham

2005-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

355

Design of a low enrichment, enhanced fast flux core for the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Worldwide, there is limited test reactor capacity to perform the required irradiation experiments on advanced fast reactor materials and fuel designs. This is particularly true in the U.S., which no longer has an operating ...

Ellis, Tyler Shawn

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Design and Flight Demonstration Test of a Continuous Descent Approach Procedure for Louisville International Airport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A design methodology based on the principles of system analysis was used to design a noise abatement

Clarke, John-Paul

357

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PG&E NEG Salem Harbor Station Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of mercury control at Salem Harbor Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has very high native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included plant and PG&E headquarters personnel, EPRI and several of its member companies, DOE, ADA, Norit Americas, Inc., Hamon Research-Cottrell, Apogee Scientific, TRC Environmental Corporation, Reaction Engineering, as well as other laboratories. The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall the objectives of this field test program were to determine the mercury control and balance-of-plant impacts resulting from activated carbon injection into a full-scale ESP on Salem Harbor Unit 1, a low sulfur bituminous-coal-fired 86 MW unit. It was also important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury removal (>85%). One half of the gas stream was used for these tests, or 43 MWe. Activated carbon, DARCO FGD supplied by NORIT Americas, was injected upstream of the cold side ESP, just downstream of the air preheater. This allowed for approximately 1.5 seconds residence time in the duct before entering the ESP. Conditions tested in this field evaluation included the impacts of the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) system on mercury capture, of unburned carbon in the fly ash, of adjusting ESP inlet flue gas temperatures, and of boiler load on mercury control. The field evaluation conducted at Salem Harbor looked at several sorbent injection concentrations at several flue gas temperatures. It was noted that at the mid temperature range of 322-327 F, the LOI (unburned carbon) lost some of its ability to capture vapor phase Hg, however activated carbon performed relatively well. At the normal operating temperatures of 298-306 F, mercury emissions from the ESP were so low that both particulate and elemental mercury were ''not detected'' at the detection limits of the Ontario Hydro method for both baseline and injection tests. The oxidized mercury however, was 95% lower at a sorbent injection concentration of 10 lbs/MMacf compared with baseline emissions. When the flue gas temperatures were increased to a range of 343-347 F, mercury removal efficiencies were limited to fly ash LOI, operation of the SNCR system, and flue gas temperature on the native mercury capture without sorbent injection. Listed below are the main conclusions from this program: (1) SNCR on/off test showed no beneficial effect on mercury removal caused by the SNCR system. (2) At standard operating temperatures ({approx} 300 F), reducing LOI from 30-35% to 15-20% had minimal impact on Hg removal. (3) Increasing flue gas temperatures reduced Hg removal regardless of LOI concentrations at Salem Harbor (minimum LOI was 15%). Native mercury removal started to fall off at temperatures above 320 F. ACI effectiveness for mercury removal fell off at temperatures above 340 F. (4) Test method detection limits play an important role at Salem Harbor due to the low residual emissions. Examining the proposed MA rule, both the removal efficiency and the emission concentrations will be difficult to demonstrate on an ongoing basis. (5) Under tested conditions the baseline emissions met the proposed removal efficiency for 2006, but not the proposed emission concentration. ACI can meet the more-stringent 2012 emission limits, as long as measurement detection limits are lower than the Ontario Hydro method. SCEM testing was able to verify the low emissions. For ACI to perform at this level, process conditions need to match those obtained during testing.

Michael D. Durham

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development: FY 2006 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site–Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program completed its fifth successful year of research and development activities in FY 2006. Forty new projects were selected for funding this year, and ten FY 2005 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $6 million, for an average per-project cost of $120 thousand. Beginning in May, 2006 programmatic burden rates were applied to SDRD project costs. An external audit conducted in September 2006 verified that appropriate accounting practices were applied to the SDRD program. Highlights for the year included: the filing of 27 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2006 projects; programmatic adoption of four FY 2005 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2006 projects; and the successful completion of 50 R&D projects, as presented in this report.

Wil Lewis, editor

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical ApplicationsChapter 16 General Considerations for Designing Laboratory Scale Fry-Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical Applications Chapter 16 General Considerations for Designing Laboratory Scale Fry-Tests Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition -

360

Design and test of non-evacuated solar collectors with compound parabolic concentrators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The intermediate range of concentration ratios (1.5X-10X) which can be achieved with CPC's without diurnal tracking provides both economic and thermal advantages for solar collector design even when used with non-evacuated absorbers. The present paper summarizes more than 3 years of research on non-evacuated CPC's and reviews measured performance data and critical design considerations. Concentrations in the upper portions of the practical range (e.g. 6X) can provide good efficiency (40% to 50%) in the 100/sup 0/C to 160/sup 0/C temperature range with relatively frequent tilt adjustments (12 to 20 times per year). At lower concentrations (e.g. 3X) performance will still be substantially better than that for a double glazed flat plate collector above about 70/sup 0/C and competitive below, while requiring only semi-annual adjustments for year round operation. In both cases the cost savings associated with inexpensive reflectors, and the optimal coupling to smaller, simple inexpensive absorbers (e.g. tubes, fins, etc.) can be as important an advantage as the improved thermal performance.

Rabl, A.; O'Gallagher, J.; Winston, R.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research design testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in PEM Fuel Cells: in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization J. Vernon Cole and Ashok Gidwani CFDRC Prepared for: DOE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Kickoff Meeting February 13, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information. Background Water Management Issues Arise From: ƒ Generation of water by cathodic reaction ƒ Membrane humidification requirements ƒ Capillary pressure driven transport through porous MEA and GDL materials ƒ Scaling bipolar plate channel dimensions J.H. Nam and M. Kaviany, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 46, pp. 4595-4611 (2003) Relevant Barriers and Targets ƒ Improved Gas Diffusion Layer, Flow Fields, Membrane Electrode Assemblies Needed to Improve Water Management: * Flooding blocks reactant transport

362

NETL: News Release - Microhole "Designer" Seismic Testing Its Potential in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 24, 2007 April 24, 2007 Microhole "Designer" Seismic Testing Its Potential in the Field DOE-Funded Technology Offers Low-Cost Deployment of Vertical Seismic Profiling MORGANTOWN, WV - Using microhole technology developed in partnership with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to inexpensively deploy sensors for vertical seismic profiling (VSP) could dramatically enhance the oil and gas industry's ability to find and produce huge volumes of by-passed oil and natural gas. VSP's advantages over conventional surface seismic have long been known. Placing seismic recording devices in boreholes results in a much improved signal-to-noise ratio compared with surface seismic. VSP gives an especially high-resolution image of the immediate vicinity of the borehole.

363

Design and testing criteria for bipolar plate materials for PEM fuel cell applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Bipolar plates for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells are currently under development. These plates separate individual cells of the fuel cell stack, and thus must be sufficiently strong to support clamping forces, be electrically conducting, be fitted with flow channels for stack thermal control, be of a low permeability material to separate safely hydrogen and oxygen feed streams, be corrosion resistant, and be fitted with distribution channels to transfer the feed streams over the plate surface. To date, bipolar plate costs dominate stack costs, and therefore future materials need to meet strict cost targets. A first step in the bipolar plate development program is an assessment of design constraints. Such constraints have been estimated and evaluated and are discussed here. Conclusions point to promising advanced materials, such as conductive, corrosion resistant coatings on metal substrates, as candidates for mass production of fuel cell bipolar plates. Possible candidate materials are identified, and testing procedures developed to determine suitability of various materials.

Borup, R.L.; Vanderborgh, N.E.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Design, fabrication and testing of a model heating and cooling system for a vacuum vessel  

SciTech Connect

A full-size model of a typical cooling and heating system for a vacuum vessel was manufactured and examined in order to clarify and enhance the efficiency and reliability of the designed system. The model consisted of two parts; one of which had the same structure as the other and was located facing each other to simulate the adiabatic condition of the vacuum-side of a vacuum vessel. Its components were rectangular plates, eletric heater units, cooling pipes inside of which water and air flew as cooling fluid. A lot of kinds of tests and measurements were performed to evaluate efficiency and reliability on the model. The numerical and theoretical analyses on the system were also carried out using the dimensional finite difference technique. The analytical results agreed pretty well with the experimental.

Shimizu, M.; Miyauchi, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Kajiura, S.; Koizumi, M.; Hata, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Test bench to commission a third ion source beam line and a newly designed extraction system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HIT (Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center) is the first hospital-based treatment facility in Europe where patients can be irradiated with protons and carbon ions. Since the commissioning starting in 2006 two 14.5 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are routinely used to produce a variety of ion beams from protons up to oxygen. In the future a helium beam for regular patient treatment is requested, therefore a third ion source (Supernanogan source from PANTECHNIK S.A.) will be integrated. This third ECR source with a newly designed extraction system and a spectrometer line is installed at a test bench at HIT to commission and validate this section. Measurements with different extraction system setups will be presented to show the improvement of beam quality for helium, proton, and carbon beams. An outlook to the possible integration scheme of the new ion source into the production facility will be discussed.

Winkelmann, T.; Cee, R.; Haberer, T.; Naas, B.; Peters, A. [Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapie Centrum (HIT), D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Energy Smart Schools--Applied Research, Field Testing, and Technology Integration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO) in conjunction with the California Energy Commission, the Energy Center of Wisconsin, the Florida Solar Energy Center, the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, and the Ohio Department of Development's Office of Energy Efficiency conducted a four-year, cost-share project with the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to focus on energy efficiency and high-performance technologies in our nation's schools. NASEO was the program lead for the MOU-State Schools Working group, established in conjunction with the USDOE Memorandum of Understanding process for collaboration among state and federal energy research and demonstration offices and organizations. The MOU-State Schools Working Group included State Energy Offices and other state energy research organizations from all regions of the country. Through surveys and analyses, the Working Group determined the school-related energy priorities of the states and established a set of tasks to be accomplished, including the installation and evaluation of microturbines, advanced daylighting research, testing of schools and classrooms, and integrated school building technologies. The Energy Smart Schools project resulted in the adoption of advanced energy efficiency technologies in both the renovation of existing schools and building of new ones; the education of school administrators, architects, engineers, and manufacturers nationwide about the energy-saving, economic, and environmental benefits of energy efficiency technologies; and improved the learning environment for the nation's students through use of better temperature controls, improvements in air quality, and increased daylighting in classrooms. It also provided an opportunity for states to share and replicate successful projects to increase their energy efficiency while at the same time driving down their energy costs.

Nebiat Solomon; Robin Vieira; William L. Manz; Abby Vogen; Claudia Orlando; Kimberlie A. Schryer

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project: United Technologies Research Center. Final report, Volume 3. Engineering field test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A solar-powered air conditioning system was designed, constructed, and installed at a Phoenix, Arizona site whose climatic conditions approximate those of Saudi Arabia. The nominal 18 ton capacity Rankine cycle chiller system with hot and cold storage and conventional fan/coil delivery units was operated for two cooling seasons and met its design objectives.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

A PRECISION, CONTINUOUS FLOW ENVIRONMENTAL APPARATUS DESIGNED FOR THE TESTING AND CALIBRATION OF HUMIDITY-MEASURING ELEMENTS  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus is designed for testing and calibrating relative humidity elements. A brief history of other apparatus of this type and similar types is given along with the primary areas of differences. Factors affecting the design of the various parts, accuracy of the system, and its capabilities are discussed. (D.J.C.)

Wade, J.B.

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Design of an Experiment to Test Quantum Probabilistic Behavior of the Financial market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent crash demonstrated (once again) that the description of the financial market by present financial mathematics cannot be considered as totally satisfactory. We remind that nowadays financial mathematics is heavily based on the use of random variables and stochastic processes which are described by Kolmogorov's measure-theoretic model for probability ("classical probabilistic model"). I speculate that the present financial crises is a sign (a kind of experiment to test validity of classical probability theory at the financial market) that the use of this model in finances should be either totally rejected or at least completed. One of the best candidates for a new probabilistic financial model is quantum probability or its generalizations, so to say quantum-like (QL) models. Speculations that the financial market may be nonclassical have been present in scientific literature for many years. The aim of this note is to move from the domain of speculation to rigorous statistical arguments in favor of probabilistic nonclassicality of the financial market. I design a corresponding statistical test which is based on violation of the formula of total probability (FTP). The latter is the basic in classical probability and its violation would be a strong sign in favor of QL behavior at the market.

Andrei Khrennikov

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

370

Design and testing of a non-intrusive torque measurement system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis details the initial development of a non-intrusive torque measurement system to measure torque in a rotating driveshaft like those commonly found on internal combustion engine powered irrigation pumping plants. A typical driveshaft used in pumping plant applications consists of flanged U-joints on each end with a constant cross-section steele tube portion connecting the U-joints. The photoelectric sensor based system was able to predict torque to within 3?9.1 N-m (346 in-lbs) under constant rpm conditions. Two sensor types, phototransistor and photodiode, were tested. The photodiode sensor was tested with two emitter types: infrared LED and red laser. No significant difference in response was found using either the LED or red laser emmitters. Both the photoelectric and photodiode sensor measurements showed correlation to actual torque. The photoelectric sensor configuration correlation had a standard error of 5?% of a typical natural-gas pumping plant installation running at 773.9 N-m of torque. The sensors were mounted independent of the driveshaft and measured the phaseshift of two pins mounted on the shaft as they passed through the photosensing area. This caused extreme sensitivity to vibration of the engine and driveshaft. A similar design with a temporary mount connected to the shaft and transmitting the response signal via radio frequency telemetry could decrease the effects of vibration on the system.

Wilson, Edwin Ernest

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

A first step in the design of a formally verified constraint-based testing tool: focaltest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Constraint-based test data generators rely on SMT or constraint solvers to automatically generate test data (e.g., Pex, Sage, Gatel, PathCrawler, Euclide). However, for some test data generation requests corresponding to particular test objectives, these ...

Matthieu Carlier; Catherine Dubois; Arnaud Gotlieb

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Blade Testing Equipment Development and Commercialization: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-346  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Blade testing is required to meet wind turbine design standards, reduce machine cost, and reduce the technical and financial risk of deploying mass-produced wind turbine models. NREL?s National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) in Colorado is the only blade test facility in the U.S. capable of performing full-scale static and fatigue testing of multi-megawatt-scale wind turbine blades. Rapid growth in wind turbine size over the past two decades has outstripped the size capacity of the NWTC blade test facility leaving the U.S. wind industry without a suitable means of testing blades for large land-based and offshore turbines. This CRADA will develop and commercialize testing technologies and test equipment, including scaling up, value engineering, and testing of equipment to be used at blade testing facilities in the U.S. and around the world.

Snowberg, D.; Hughes, S.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

EXPERIMENTS, CONCEPTUAL DESIGN, PRELIMINARY COST ESTIMATES AND SCHEDULES FOR AN UNDERGROUND RESEARCH FACILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design, Preliminary Cost Estimates and Schedules roroundDESIGN, PRELIMINARY COST ESTIMATES AND SCHEDULES FOR ANSchedule and Cost Estimates Excavation Damage/Sealing

Korbin, G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Vehicle to Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Smart Grid Communications Interface Research and Testing Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs), including battery electric, plug-in hybrid electric, and extended range electric vehicles, are under evaluation by the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) and other various stakeholders to better understand their capability and potential petroleum reduction benefits. PEVs could allow users to significantly improve fuel economy over a standard hybrid electric vehicles, and in some cases, depending on daily driving requirements and vehicle design, PEVs may have the ability to eliminate petroleum consumption entirely for daily vehicle trips. The AVTA is working jointly with the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) to assist in the further development of standards necessary for the advancement of PEVs. This report analyzes different methods and available hardware for advanced communications between the electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and the PEV; particularly Power Line Devices and their physical layer. Results of this study are not conclusive, but add to the collective knowledge base in this area to help define further testing that will be necessary for the development of the final recommended SAE communications standard. The Idaho National Laboratory and the Electric Transportation Applications conduct the AVTA for the United States Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Program.

Kevin Morrow; Dimitri Hochard; Jeff Wishart

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Preliminary Feasibility, Design, and Hazard Analysis of a Boiling Water Test Loop Within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A Boiling Water Test Loop (BWTL) is being designed for one of the irradiation test positions within the. The objective of the new loop will be to simulate boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions to support clad corrosion and related reactor material testing. Further it will accommodate power ramping tests of candidate high burn-up fuels and fuel pins/rods for the commercial BWR utilities. The BWTL will be much like the pressurized water loops already in service in 5 of the 9 “flux traps” (region of enhanced neutron flux) in the ATR. The loop coolant will be isolated from the primary coolant system so that the loop’s temperature, pressure, flow rate, and water chemistry can be independently controlled. This paper presents the proposed general design of the in-core and auxiliary BWTL systems; the preliminary results of the neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses; and the preliminary hazard analysis for safe normal and transient BWTL and ATR operation.

Douglas M. Gerstner

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Test Automation Test Automation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

Mousavi, Mohammad

377

Simulation methods to estimate design power: an overview for applied research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

130. Arnold et al. BMC Medical Research Methodology 2011,Arnold et al. BMC Medical Research Methodology 2011, 11:94cited. Arnold et al. BMC Medical Research Methodology 2011,

Arnold, Benjamin F; Hogan, Daniel R; Colford, John M; Hubbard, Alan E

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty research and development FY95-96 program plan  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the United States Government`s (USG) research and development (R&D) functions for monitoring nuclear explosions in the context of a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). This responsibility includes the November 1993 transfer of the Department of Defense`s (DoD) CTBT R&D responsibility to DOE. The DOE research program builds on the broad base of USG expertise developed historically and includes R&D for detecting, locating, identifying, and characterizing nuclear explosions in all environments. The Office of Research and Development (NN-20), within the Department of Energy`s Office of Nonproliferation and National Security, formulates and executes the efforts necessary to meet the Department`s responsibilities. The following DOE laboratories as a team will support NN-20 in implementing the program plan: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. DOE has committed to a cooperative program that draws upon the core competencies of the national laboratories and upon the strengths of other government agencies and the private sector (academia and industry). The integration of resources under a common direction will allow the program to be flexible and responsive to changing technical and policy requirements while maximizing the effectiveness of funding appropriations. DOE will develop and demonstrate appropriate technologies, algorithms, procedures, and integrated systems in a cost-effective and timely manner. The program comprises seismic, radionuclide, hydroacoustic, and infrasound monitoring; on-site inspection; space-based monitoring; and automated data processing elements.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Survey-guided load research: An end-use analysis methodology test  

SciTech Connect

Energy use by end-use equipment is a function of the rated capacity of the equipment, frequency of use, and duration of each use. Many end used include multiple states, each with a different capacity, frequency, and duration. Some equipment provides benefits that are related to other uses, resulting in an indirect linkage between the primary energy-using equipment and the end use. Water heaters are one example. End-use metering of energy-using equipment provides the most accurate measure of energy use. Nevertheless, this energy-use ``signal`` is buried in background ``noise`` due to variations in the capacity, frequency, and duration of each end use and end user. Reliable estimates of energy use depend on a variety of methods to increase the ``signal-to-noise`` ratio (i.e., reduce the variance). Research of the energy consumption of household end-uses contains some inherent sampling problems: intrusiveness, cost, extensive data generated, analyses are time and computationally intensive. The goal of the methodology test described in this paper was to address these problems through a method that focused end-use analyses on a limited set of issues and data for program evaluation purposes. The approach tested used a detailed survey of end-use metered subjects to identify the pattern of end-use behavior as an alternative to estimating the frequency and duration of each use from the end-use data itself.

Warwick, W.M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Preliminary design for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Stationkeeping Subsystem (SKSS). Task IV. Development and testing recommendations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary designs of Stationkeeping Subsystems (SKSS) for the OTEC Modular Experiment Plant are being prepared for a barge and spar platform. The SKSS selected by NOAA for the barge is a multiple anchor leg mooring with active tensioning (MAL), while that for the spar is a tension anchor leg (TAL) moor. The development and testing program required to provide design data and to validate performance predictions is described. Basic assumptions are made with regard to site characteristics, behavior of the SKSS and platform in the sea state, and characteristics of SKSS components. The test program is intended to provide the data necessary to confirm assumptions or to support design revisions. The testing program for the multiple anchor leg system is considered first, followed by the tension anchor leg program. Development and testing are recommended in the areas of materials, components and procedures which are beyond modest extrapolation of current ocean engineering practice. (WHK)

None

1979-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development, FY 2007 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2007. Twenty-nine new projects were selected for funding this year, and eight projects started in FY 2006 were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.67 million, for an average per-project cost of $153 thousand. An external audit conducted in September 2007 verified that appropriate accounting practices were applied to the SDRD program. Highlights for the year included: programmatic adoption of 8 SDRD-developed technologies; the filing of 9 invention disclosures for innovation evolving from SDRD projects; participation in the tri-Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD Symposium that was broadly attended by Nevada Test Site (NTS), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), LDRD, U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2007 projects; and the successful completion of 37 R&D projects, as presented in this report. In response to a company-wide call, authors throughout the NTS complex submitted 182 proposals for FY 2007 SDRD projects. The SDRD program has seen a dramatic increase in the yearly total of submitted proposals--from 69 in FY 2002 to 182 this year--while the number of projects funded has actually decreased from a program high of 57 in FY 2004. The overall effect of this trend has helped ensure an increasingly competitive program that benefited from a broader set of innovative ideas, making project selection both challenging and rewarding. Proposals were evaluated for technical merit, including such factors as innovation, probability of success, potential benefit, and mission applicability. Authors and reviewers benefited from the use of a shortfalls list entitled the 'NTS Technology Needs Assessment' that was compiled from NTS, National Weapons Laboratory (NWL), and NNSA sources. This tool continues to be of considerable value in aligning the SDRD program with mission priorities, and was expanded in FY 2007 to include technology development needs from the DHS and other agencies with missions closely aligned to that of the NTS.

Wil Lewis, editor

2008-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

382

Software security testing of an online banking system: a unique research experience for undergraduates and computer teachers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a unique summer project for a group of undergraduate students and high school computer teachers to gain research experiences in the area of cybersecurity. The students and teachers were selected from the participants in the NSF REU ... Keywords: access control, cybersecurity, mutation analysis, security attacks, security testing, software testing

Dianxiang Xu

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 15, PAGES 22452248, AUGUST 1, 2000 Subsurface nuclear tests monitoring through the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nuclear tests down to 1 kiloton (kt) TNT equivalent anywhere on the planet. The IMS is based upon four waves will help check for underground, under­water and atmospheric nuclear tests. The fourth networkGEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 15, PAGES 2245­2248, AUGUST 1, 2000 Sub­surface nuclear

Hourdin, Chez Frédéric

384

Design of a high-pressure research flow loop for the experimental investigation of liquid loading in gas wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid loading in producing gas wells is the inability of the produced gas to remove produced liquids from the wellbore. A review of existing flow loops worldwide revealed that specialized areas of research such as liquid loading in gas wells are still lacking dedicated test facilities. This project presents the design of a new dedicated facility to be located at the TowerLab at the Richardson building with adequate operating conditions to reproduce the flow regimes encountered prior to and after the onset of liquid loading in gas wells. The facility consists of a compressed air system, pipelines for air and water, a pressure vessel containing glass beads, an injection manifold, and flow control and monitoring devices. Our results show that three compressors working in parallel is the most technical and economic configuration for the TowerLab based on the overall costs provided by the supplier, the footprint but most importantly the flexibility. The design of the pressure vessel required a cylindrical body with top and bottom welded-flat head covers with multiple openings to minimize its weight. The pipelines connecting major equipment and injection manifold located at the pressure vessel were selected based on the superficial velocities for air and water. These values also showed the need for independent injection using two manifolds instead of commingling flow through a tee joint. The use of digital pressure gauges with an accuracy of 0.05 to 25% and coriolis or vortex meters to measure air flowrate is also suggested. For the water line, installation of turbine meters results in the most economic approach.

Fernandez Alvarez, Juan Jose

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

PG&E NEG Salem Harbor Station Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of mercury control at Salem Harbor Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has very high native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included plant and PG&E headquarters personnel, EPRI and several of its member companies, DOE, ADA, Norit Americas, Inc., Hamon Research-Cottrell, Apogee Scientific, TRC Environmental Corporation, Reaction Engineering, as well as other laboratories. The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall the objectives of this field test program were to determine the mercury control and balance-of-plant impacts resulting from activated carbon injection into a full-scale ESP on Salem Harbor Unit 1, a low sulfur bituminous-coal-fired 86 MW unit. It was also important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury removal (>85%). One half of the gas stream was used for these tests, or 43 MWe. Activated carbon, DARCO FGD supplied by NORIT Americas, was injected upstream of the cold side ESP, just downstream of the air preheater. This allowed for approximately 1.5 seconds residence time in the duct before entering the ESP. Conditions tested in this field evaluation included the impacts of the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) system on mercury capture, of unburned carbon in the fly ash, of adjusting ESP inlet flue gas temperatures, and of boiler load on mercury control. The field evaluation conducted at Salem Harbor looked at several sorbent injection concentrations at several flue gas temperatures. It was noted that at the mid temperature range of 322-327 F, the LOI (unburned carbon) lost some of its ability to capture vapor phase Hg, however activated carbon performed relatively well. At the normal operating temperatures of 298-306 F, mercury emissions from the ESP were so low that both particulate and elemental mercury were ''not detected'' at the detection limits of the Ontario Hydro method for both baseline and injection tests. The oxidized mercury however, was 95% lower at a sorbent injection concentration of 10 lbs/MMacf compared with baseline emissions. When the flue gas temperatures were increased to a range of 343-347 F, mercury removal efficiencies were limited to <25%, even at the same sorbent injection concentration. Other tests examined the impacts of fly ash LOI, operation of the SNCR system, and flue gas temperature on the native mercury capture without sorbent injection. Listed below are the main conclusions from this program: (1) SNCR on/off test showed no beneficial effect on mercury removal caused by the SNCR system. (2) At standard operating temperatures ({approx} 300 F), reducing LOI from 30-35% to 15-20% had minimal impact on Hg removal. (3) Increasing flue gas temperatures reduced Hg removal regardless of LOI concentrations at Salem Harbor (minimum LOI was 15%). Native mercury removal started to fall off at temperatures above 320 F. ACI effectiveness for mercury removal fell off at temperatures above 340 F. (4) Test method detection limits play an important role at Salem Harbor due to the low residual emissions. Examining the proposed MA rule, both the removal efficiency and the emission concentrations will be difficult to demonstrate on an ongoing basis. (5) Under tested conditions the baseline emissions met the proposed removal efficiency for 2006, but not the proposed emission concentration. ACI can meet the more-stringent 2012 emission limits, as long as measurement detection limits are lower than the Ontario Hydro method. SCEM testing was able to verify the low emissions. For ACI to perform at this level, process conditions need to match those obtained during testing.

Michael D. Durham

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Design and construction of the NMSU Geothermally Heated Greenhouse Research Facility: Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the design, construction, and performance of the New Mexico State University (NMSU) Geothermal Greenhouse Research Facility. Two 6000-square-foot greenhouses were built on the NMSU campus and supplied with geothermal energy for heating. The geothermal water is pumped from one of three wells producing water at temperatures from 141/degree/F to 148/degree/F. Heat is delivered to the greenhouse space by means of overhead fan-coil unit heaters. The two greenhouses are double-glazed on roof and wall surfaces employing a total of four different film materials: Tedlar/Reg Sign/, Melinex/Reg Sign/, Softglass/Reg Sign/, and Agrifilm/Reg Sign/. One greenhouse is cooled using a traditional fan and pad cooling system. The second greenhouse is cooled with a high-pressure fog system and natural ventilation through roof and side vents. A 2400-square-foot metal building next to the greenhouses provides office, work, and storage space for the facility. The greenhouse facility was leased to two commerical tenants who produced a variety of crops. The performance of the greenhouses was monitored and reported both qualitatively and quantitatively. Results from the tenant's pilot-scale studies in the NMSU greenhouse facility were transferred and applied to two commercial greenhouse ranges that were built in southern New Mexico during 1986/87. 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Schoenmackers, R.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Design and construction of the NMSU Geothermally Heated Greenhouse Research Facility: Final technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the design, construction, and performance of the New Mexico State University (NMSU) Geothermal Greenhouse Research Facility. Two 6000-square-foot greenhouses were built on the NMSU campus and supplied with geothermal energy for heating. The geothermal water is pumped from one of three wells producing water at temperatures from 141/degree/F to 148/degree/F. Heat is delivered to the greenhouse space by means of overhead fan-coil unit heaters. The two greenhouses are double-glazed on roof and wall surfaces employing a total of four different film materials: Tedlar/Reg Sign/, Melinex/Reg Sign/, Softglass/Reg Sign/, and Agrifilm/Reg Sign/. One greenhouse is cooled using a traditional fan and pad cooling system. The second greenhouse is cooled with a high-pressure fog system and natural ventilation through roof and side vents. A 2400-square-foot metal building next to the greenhouses provides office, work, and storage space for the facility. The greenhouse facility was leased to two commerical tenants who produced a variety of crops. The performance of the greenhouses was monitored and reported both qualitatively and quantitatively. Results from the tenant's pilot-scale studies in the NMSU greenhouse facility were transferred and applied to two commercial greenhouse ranges that were built in southern New Mexico during 1986/87. 9 figs., 5 tabs.

Schoenmackers, R.

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Heihe Watershed Allied Telemetry Experimental Research (HiWATER): Scientific Objectives and Experimental Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major research plan entitled “Integrated research on the ecohydrological process of the Heihe River Basin” was launched by the National Natural Science Foundation of China in 2010. One of the key aims of this research plan is to establish a research ...

Xin Li; Guodong Cheng; Shaomin Liu; Qing Xiao; Mingguo Ma; Rui Jin; Tao Che; Qinhuo Liu; Weizhen Wang; Yuan Qi; Jianguang Wen; Hongyi Li; Gaofeng Zhu; Jianwen Guo; Youhua Ran; Shuoguo Wang; Zhongli Zhu; Jian Zhou; Xiaoli Hu; Ziwei Xu

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

The P3 Platform: An approach and software system for developing diagrammatic model-based methods in design research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parameter-driven task-based model of the design process. Research in Engineering Design, 12(1), 2000, pp. 18-38. Contact: David Wynn University of Cambridge Department of Engineering Trumpington Street Cambridge. CB2 1PZ United Kingdom. Email: dcw24... @cam.ac.uk URL: http://www-edc.eng.cam.ac.uk/people/dcw24.html Dr. David Wynn holds an MEng in Engineering and Computing Science from the University of Oxford and a PhD from the University of Cambridge. He is now a Research Associate in the Cambridge...

Wynn, David C; Nair, Seena MT; Clarkson, P John

390

Money for Research, Not for Energy Bills: Finding Energy and Cost Savings in High Performance Computer Facility Designs  

SciTech Connect

High-performance computing facilities in the United States consume an enormous amount of electricity, cutting into research budgets and challenging public- and private-sector efforts to reduce energy consumption and meet environmental goals. However, these facilities can greatly reduce their energy demand through energy-efficient design of the facility itself. Using a case study of a facility under design, this article discusses strategies and technologies that can be used to help achieve energy reductions.

Drewmark Communications; Sartor, Dale; Wilson, Mark

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Design, testing and two-dimensional flow modeling of a multiple-disk fan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiple-disk Tesla type fan has been designed, tested and analyzed two-dimensionally using the conservation of angular momentum principle. Experimental results showed that such multiple-disk fans exhibited exceptionally low performance characteristics, which could be attributed to the low viscosity, tangential nature of the flow, and large mechanical energy losses at both suction and discharge sections that are comparable to the total input power. By means of theoretical analysis, local and overall shearing stresses on the disk surfaces have been determined based on tangential and radial velocity distributions of the air flow of different volume flow rates at prescribed disk spaces and rotational speeds. Then the total power transmitted by rotating disks to air flow, and the power acquired by the air flow in the gap due to transfer of angular momentum have been obtained by numerically integrating shearing stresses over the disk surfaces. Using the measured shaft and hydraulic powers, these quantities were utilized to evaluate mechanical energy losses associated with the suction and discharge sections of the fan. (author)

Engin, Tahsin; Oezdemir, Mustafa; Cesmeci, Sevki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Sakarya, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

FY 1994 program summary: Office of Technology Development, Office of Research and Development, Office of Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management, formerly the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), was established in November 1989 as the first step toward correcting contamination problems resulting from nearly 50 years of nuclear weapons production and fuel processing activities. EM consolidates several DOE organizations previously responsible for the handling, treatment, and disposition of radioactive and hazardous waste. Within EM, the Office of Technology Development (OTD/EM-50) is responsible for developing technologies to meet DOE`s goal for environmental restoration. OTD manages an aggressive national program of applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT and E) for environmental cleanup, waste management, and related technologies. The program is designed to resolve major technical issues, to rapidly advanced beyond current technologies for environmental restoration and waste management operations, and to expedite compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations. This report summarizes Fiscal Year 1994 (FY94) programmatic information, accomplishments, and planned activities relevant to the individual activities within OTD`s RDDT and E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Analysis and Design of a Test Apparatus for Resolving Near-Field Effects Associated With Using a Coarse Sun Sensor as Part of a 6-DOF Solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Though the Aerospace industry is moving towards small satellites and smaller sensor technologies, sensors used for close-proximity operations are generally cost (and often size and power) prohibitive for University-class satellites. Given the need for low-cost, low-mass solutions for close-proximity relative navigation sensors, this research analyzed the expected errors due to near-field effects using a coarse sun sensor as part of a 6-degree-of-freedom (6-dof) solution. To characterize these near-field effects, a test bed (Characterization Test Apparatus or CTA) was proposed, its design presented, and the design stage uncertainty analysis of the CTA performed. A candidate coarse sun sensor (NorthStarTM) was chosen for testing, and a mathematical model of the sensor’s functionality was derived. Using a Gaussian Least Squares Differential Correction (GLSDC) algorithm, the model parameters were estimated and a comparison between simulated NorthStarTM measurements and model estimates was performed. Results indicate the CTA is capable of resolving the near-field errors. Additionally, this research found no apparent show stoppers for using coarse sun sensors for 6-dof solutions.

Stancliffe, Devin Aldin

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Design and optimization of a high thermal flux research reactor via Kriging-based algorithm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In response to increasing demands for the services of research reactors, a 5 MW LEU-fueled research reactor core is developed and optimized to provide high thermal flux within specified limits upon thermal hydraulic ...

Kempf, Stephanie Anne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2010 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

This annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program represents the highly significant R&D accomplishments conducted during fiscal year 2010. This year was noteworthy historically, as the Nevada Test Site was renamed to the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This change not only recognizes how the site's mission has evolved, but also heralds a future of new challenges and opportunities for the NNSS. In many ways, since its inception in 2002, the SDRD program has helped shape that evolving mission. As we approach 2012, SDRD will also mark a milestone, having completed its first full decade of innovative R&D in support of the site and national security. The program continues to fund advanced science and technology development across traditional Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear security areas such as stockpile stewardship and non-proliferation while also supporting Department of Homeland Security (DHS) needs, and specialized work for government agencies like the Department of Defense (DoD) and others. The NNSS will also contribute technologies in the areas of treaty verification and monitoring, two areas of increasing importance to national security. Keyed to the NNSS's broadened scope, the SDRD program will continue to anticipate and advance R&D projects that will help the NNSS meet forthcoming challenges.

Howard Bender, comp.

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

396

Scaleup tests and supporting research for the development of duct injection technology. Topical report No. 1, Literature review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gilbert Commonwealth, Southern Research Institute and the American Electric Power Service Corporation have embarked on a program to convert DOE`s Duct Injection Test Facility located at the Muskingum River Power Plant of Ohio Power Company to test alternate duct injection technologies. The technologies to be tested include slurry sorbent injection of hydrated lime using dual fluid nozzles, or a rotary atomizer and pneumatic injection of hydrated lime, with flue gas humidification before or after sorbent injection. The literature review and analysis contained in this report is a part of the preparatory effort for the test program.

Gooch, J.P.; Dismukes, E.B.; Dahlin, R.S.; Faulkner, M.G. [Southern Research Inst., Birmingham, AL (United States); Klett, M.G.; Buchanan, T.L.; Hunt, J.E. [Gilbert/Commonwealth, Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Advanced energy design and operation technologies research: Recommendations for a US Department of Energy multiyear program plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes recommendations for a multiyear plan developed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Advanced Energy Design and Operation Technologies (AEDOT) project. The plan is an outgrowth of earlier planning activities conducted for DOE as part of design process research under the Building System Integration Program (BSIP). The proposed research will produce intelligent computer-based design and operation technologies for commercial buildings. In this document, the concept is explained, the need for these new computer-based environments is discussed, the benefits are described, and a plan for developing the AEDOT technologies is presented for the 9-year period beginning FY 1989. 45 refs., 37 figs., 9 tabs.

Brambley, M.R.; Crawley, D.B.; Hostetler, D.D.; Stratton, R.C.; Addision, M.S.; Deringer, J.J.; Hall, J.D.; Selkowitz, S.E.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Enhanced Ride-Through for Industrial Power Supplies: Feasibility, Testing, Design, and Assessment of Future Intelligent Embedded Sol utions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the value and interest in characterizing end-use devices for their susceptibility to disturbances such as voltage sags and momentary interruptions increased, EPRI and its utility funders in power quality (PQ) began testing industrial power supplies (IPSs). Tests conducted by EPRI Solutions as a part of the EPRI System Compatibility Research Project in the mid-1990s indicated that the immunity of IPSs to these disturbances, like the immunity of personal computer (PC) power supplies (CPSs), could be imp...

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

399

Announcement of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity for a Large-Scale Blade Test Facility Partnership  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is seeking government, private, or non-profit partners to design, construct, and assist in operating one or more wind turbine blade test facilities capable of testing blades up to at least 70 m (230 ft) in length. DOE/NREL encourages interested parties to respond to this CRADA announcement with a proposal by September 1, 2006.

Not Available

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Announcement of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) Opportunity for a Large-Scale Blade Test Facility Partnership  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is seeking government, private, or non-profit partners to design, construct, and assist in operating one or more wind turbine blade test facilities capable of testing blades up to at least 70 m (230 ft) in length. DOE/NREL encourages interested parties to respond to this CRADA announcement with a proposal by September 1, 2006.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research design testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

NUMERICAL SIMULATION FOR MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF U10MO MONOLITHIC MINIPLATES FOR RESEARCH AND TEST REACTORS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article presents assessment of the mechanical behavior of U-10wt% Mo (U10Mo) alloy based monolithic fuel plates subject to irradiation. Monolithic, plate-type fuel is a new fuel form being developed for research and test reactors to achieve higher uranium densities within the reactor core to allow the use of low-enriched uranium fuel in high-performance reactors. Identification of the stress/strain characteristics is important for understanding the in-reactor performance of these plate-type fuels. For this work, three distinct cases were considered: (1) fabrication induced residual stresses (2) thermal cycling of fabricated plates; and finally (3) transient mechanical behavior under actual operating conditions. Because the temperatures approach the melting temperature of the cladding during the fabrication and thermal cycling, high temperature material properties were incorporated to improve the accuracy. Once residual stress fields due to fabrication process were identified, solution was used as initial state for the subsequent simulations. For thermal cycling simulation, elasto-plastic material model with thermal creep was constructed and residual stresses caused by the fabrication process were included. For in-service simulation, coupled fluid-thermal-structural interaction was considered. First, temperature field on the plates was calculated and this field was used to compute the thermal stresses. For time dependent mechanical behavior, thermal creep of cladding, volumetric swelling and fission induced creep of the fuel foil were considered. The analysis showed that the stresses evolve very rapidly in the reactor. While swelling of the foil increases the stress of the foil, irradiation induced creep causes stress relaxation.

Hakan Ozaltun & Herman Shen

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Design and Testing of ITER ECH and CD Transmission Line Components (A26198)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of 25th Symposium On Fusion Technology, Rostock, Germany, 2008; To Be Published In Fusion Eng. Design25th Symposium on Fusion Technology Rostock, DE, 2008999614985

Callis, R.W.

2008-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

403

Motivation, Design, and Ubiquity: A Discussion of Research Ethics and Computer Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern society is permeated with computers, and the software that controls them can have latent, long-term, and immediate effects that reach far beyond the actual users of these systems. This places researchers in Computer Science and Software Engineering in a critical position of influence and responsibility, more than any other field because computer systems are vital research tools for other disciplines. This essay presents several key ethical concerns and responsibilities relating to research in computing. The goal is to promote awareness and discussion of ethical issues among computer science researchers. A hypothetical case study is provided, along with questions for reflection and discussion.

David R. Wright

2007-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

404

Computer system design description for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Description of the Proposed Activity/REPORTABLE OCCURRENCE or PIAB: This ECN changes the computer systems design description support document describing the computers system used to control, monitor and archive the processes and outputs associated with the Hydrogen Mitigation Test Pump installed in SY-101. There is no new activity or procedure associated with the updating of this reference document. The updating of this computer system design description maintains an agreed upon documentation program initiated within the test program and carried into operations at time of turnover to maintain configuration control as outlined by design authority practicing guidelines. There are no new credible failure modes associated with the updating of information in a support description document. The failure analysis of each change was reviewed at the time of implementation of the Systems Change Request for all the processes changed. This document simply provides a history of implementation and current system status.

Ermi, A.M.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition from normal high-flow operation to natural circulation. Low-flow coolant events are the most difficult to design for because they involve the most complex thermal-hydraulic behavior induced by the dominance of thermal-buoyancy forces acting on the coolants. Such behavior can cause multiple-component flow interaction phenomena, which are not adequately understood or appreciated by reactor designers as to their impact on reactor performance and safety. Since the early 1990s, when DOE canceled the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program, little has been done experimentally to further understand the importance of the complex thermal-buoyancy phenomena and their impact on reactor design or to improve the ability of three-dimensional (3-D) transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and structures codes to model the phenomena. An improved experimental data base and the associated improved validated codes would provide needed design tools to the reactor community. The improved codes would also facilitate scale-up from small-scale testing to prototype size and would facilitate comparing performance of one reactor/component design with another. The codes would also have relevance to the design and safety of water-cooled reactors. To accomplish the preceding, it is proposed to establish a national GNEP-LMR research and development center at Argonne having as its foundation state-of-art science-based infrastructure consisting of: (a) thermal-hydraulic experimental capabilities for conducting both water and sodium testing of individual reactor components and complete reactor in-vessel models and (b) a computational modeling development and validation capability that is strongly interfaced with the experimental facilities. The proposed center would greatly advance capabilities for reactor development by establishing the validity of high-fidelity (i.e., close to first principles) models and tools. Such tools could be used directly for reactor design or for qualifying/tuning of lower-fidelity models, which now require costly experimental qualification for each different type of design

Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

US DCLL Test Blanket Module Design and Relevance to DEMO (A25844)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of 2nd IAEA Technical Committee Meeting On First Generation Of Fusion Power Plants - Design And Technology, Vienna, Austria, 2007, To Be Published2nd IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on First Generation of Fusion Power Plants - Design and Technology Vienna, AT, 2007999613900

Wong, C.P.C.

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

407

Design, fabrication, and testing of a sodium evaporator for the STM4-120 kinematic Stirling engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the development and testing of a compact heat-pipe heat exchanger kW(e) designed to transfer thermal energy from hot combustion gases to the heater tubes of a 25-kW(e) Stirling engine. In this system, sodium evaporates from a surface that is heated by a stream of hot gases. The liquid metal then condenses on the heater tubes of a Stirling engine, where energy is transferred to the engine`s helium working fluid. Tests on a prototype unit illustrated that a compact (8 cm {times} 13 cm {times} 16 cm) sodium evaporator can routinely transfer 15 kW(t) of energy at an operating vapor temperature of 760 C. Four of these prototype units were eventually used to power a 25-kW(e) Stirling engine system. Design details and test results from the prototype unit are presented in this report.

Rawlinson, K.S.; Adkins, D.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Full-Scale Cross-Flow Filter Testing in Support of the Salt Waste Processing Facility Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parsons and its team members General Atomics and Energy Solutions conducted a series of tests to assess the constructability and performance of the Cross-Flow Filter (CFF) system specified for the Department of Energy (DOE) Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). The testing determined the optimum flow rates, operating pressures, filtrate-flow control techniques, and cycle timing for filter back pulse and chemical cleaning. Results have verified the design assumptions made and have confirmed the suitability of cross-flow filtration for use in the SWPF. In conclusion: The CFF Test Program demonstrated that the SWPF CFF system could be successfully fabricated, that the SWPF CFF design assumptions were conservative with respect to filter performance and provided useful information on operational parameters and techniques. The filter system demonstrated performance in excess of expectations. (authors)

Stephens, A.B.; Gallego, R.M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Singer, S.A.; Swanson, B.L. [Energy Solutions, Aiken, SC (United States); Bartling, K. [Parsons, Aiken, SC (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Design, fabrication and testing of a 15-kW gas-fired liquid-metal evaporator  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the development and testing of a compact heat- pipe heat exchanger that is designed to transfer thermal energy from hot combustion gases to the heater tubes of a 25-kW{sub e} Stirling engine. In this system, sodium evaporates from a surface that is heated by a stream of hot gases and the liquid metal then condenses on the heater tubes of a Stirling engine where energy is transferred to the engine`s helium working fluid. Recent tests on a prototype unit illustrated that a compact (8 cm {times} 13 cm {times} 16 cm) sodium evaporator can routinely transfer 15-kW{sub t} of energy at an operating vapor temperature of 760{degrees}C. Four of these prototype units will eventually be used to power a 25-kW{sub e} Stirling engine system. Design details and test results from the prototype unit are presented in this paper.

Adkins, D.R.; Rawlinson, K.S.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Design, fabrication and testing of a 15-kW gas-fired liquid-metal evaporator  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the development and testing of a compact heat- pipe heat exchanger that is designed to transfer thermal energy from hot combustion gases to the heater tubes of a 25-kW{sub e} Stirling engine. In this system, sodium evaporates from a surface that is heated by a stream of hot gases and the liquid metal then condenses on the heater tubes of a Stirling engine where energy is transferred to the engine's helium working fluid. Recent tests on a prototype unit illustrated that a compact (8 cm {times} 13 cm {times} 16 cm) sodium evaporator can routinely transfer 15-kW{sub t} of energy at an operating vapor temperature of 760{degrees}C. Four of these prototype units will eventually be used to power a 25-kW{sub e} Stirling engine system. Design details and test results from the prototype unit are presented in this paper.

Adkins, D.R.; Rawlinson, K.S.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Design and testing of a combustor for a turbo-ramjet for UAV and missile applications .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An existing freejet facility was upgraded and its range of operation extended into the high subsonic regime for operation as a test rig for the… (more)

Piper, Ross H.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Design and Use of an Alternative Fuel Testing Apparatus and Assessment of the Feasibility of Biodiesel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Petroleum supply and environmental pollution issues constantly increase interest in renewable low polluting alternative fuels. Published test results show decreased pollution with similar power output… (more)

Tanner, Matthew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Design, fabrication and test on piezoelectric energy harvesters with non-traditional geometries.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Unimorph piezoelectric cantilevers with non-traditional surface geometries were investigated by theoretical calculations, finite element models, and sample tests. The study shows the average output voltage… (more)

Wang, Lei, 1987-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

PCR and antibody methods: Research compares two cattle feed tests that detect bovine byproduct contaminants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2000. A rapid method for PCR detection of bovine materialsRESEARCH ARTICLE PCR and antibody methods: Aldridge/UCDavispolymerase chain reaction [PCR] assay and a commercially

Sawyer, Mary M.; Smith, Wayne L.; Rensen, Gabriel J.; Osburn, Bennie I.; Cullor, James S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Medical Records for Animals Used in Research, Teaching, and Testing: Public Statement from the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Records for Animals Used in Research, Teaching, and Testing: Public Statement from the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine ACLAM Medical Records Committee: Karl Field (Chair), Michele. Suckow Abstract Medical records are considered to be a key element of a program of adequate veterinary

Oliver, Douglas L.

416

Final Site Specific Decommissioning Inspection Report #2 for the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor, Seattle, Washington  

SciTech Connect

During the period of August through November 2006, ORISE performed a comprehensive IV at the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor Facility. The objective of the ORISE IV was to validate the licensee’s final status survey processes and data, and to assure the requirements of the DP and FSSP were met.

S.J. Roberts

2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

417

4.181 Architecture Design Workshop: Researching User Demand for Innovative Offices, Fall 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The theme of this Workshop is the design of the changing workplace. The objective of this workshop is to make MIT graduate students fully aware of emerging technological and social trends that are revolutionizing the working ...

Duffy, Francis, 1940-

418

Conceptual Design of Molten Salt Loop Experiment for MIT Research Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molten salt is a promising coolant candidate for Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) Gen-IV designs. The low neutron absorption, high thermal capacity, chemical inertness, and high boiling point at low pressure of ...

Bean, Malcolm K.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Home systems research house: Gas heat pump cooling characterization test results. Topical report, July-September 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling performance characterization tests were performed at the GRI Home Systems Research House located in the NAHB Research Home Park in Prince George's County, Maryland. Test protocols followed guidelines set forth in GRI's Research House Utilization Plan (RHUP). A combination of minute-by-minute and hourly average data consisting of weather, comfort, and energy parameters was collected by using an automated data acquisition system. The tests were performed from July 1991 through September 1991. The gas heat pump (GHP) had an average daily gas coefficient of performance (COP) value of 1.49 at an outdoor temperature of 72.8 F and 0.84 at an outdoor temperature of 83.9 F. The average test period gas COP was 1.13. The GHP peak cooling capacity achieved was approximately 34,000 Btuh. The GHP provided good overall thermal comfort control on the first-floor and moderate thermal comfort control on the second floor. Reduced second floor performance was primarily due to thermostat location and the stack effect. Good latent heat removal existed throughout the test period. Unit modulation kept room air stratification to a minimum. Thermostat setback saved energy at high average daily outdoor temperatures and used more energy at lower average daily outdoor temperatures, compared to a constant thermostat setpoint control, due to changes in unit gas COP values from low-speed to high-speed operation.

Reigel, H.D.; Kenney, T.M.; Liller, T.C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

NREL: Wind Research - Entegrity Wind Systems's EW50 Turbine Testing and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Entegrity Wind Systems's EW50 Turbine Testing and Results Entegrity Wind Systems's EW50 Turbine Testing and Results Entegrity Wind Systems' EW50 wind turbine. Text Version As part of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Department of Energy (NREL/DOE) Independent Testing project, NREL tested Entegrity Wind Systems' EW50 turbine at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). The EW50 is a 50-kilowatt (kW), three-bladed, horizontal-axis downwind small wind turbine. The turbine's rotor diameter is 15 meters, and its hub height is 30.5 meters. It has a three-phase induction generator that operates at 480 volts AC. Testing Summary The summary of the tests is listed below, along with the final reports. Cumulative Energy Production 3/11/2009: 17; 3/12/2009: 17; 3/13/2009: 17; 3/14/2009: 17; 3/15/2009: 17;

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "research design testing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Conceptual design and analysis of a 100-MWe line focus solar central power plant. Test plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plans for a test program are presented whose objectives are: to verify the overall efficiency of a linear parabolic trough solar collector with varied receiver tube subsystem configurations; to compare surface temperatures, and efficiency values to derived values from an analytical model; and to identify the optimal receivr tube and annulus combination as determined by economical, optical, and thermal efficiency. The test facility to be used is described with the aid ofnumerous photographs. The range in conditions under which testing is to be done is briefly described. The instrumentation and measurement plans for the tests are described, and include thermal, flow, and meteorological data. Th data acquisition and processing system is outlined. Means are discussed for calculating efficiency and thermal loss, and requirements for statistical data are given. The test schedule is diagrammed and discussed. (LEW)

Semmens, M.G.; Fong, A.; Collaros, G.J.; Dascher, R.E.; Grassberger, R.E.; Griego, D.B.; Suteber, T.F.

422

Design, prototyping and preliminary testing of an elastic-powered climbing exoskeleton  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human powered elastic mechanisms can be used to reduce work requirements of muscles, by storing and releasing energy to more evenly distribute work load. An exoskeleton was designed to delay human fatigue during rock ...

Briner, Hazel (Hazel Linn)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

A Water Vapor-Energy Balance Model Designed for Sensitivity Testing of Climatic Feedback Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A zonal mean water vapor-energy balance (WEB) model is formulated to assess feedback interactions of the hydrologic cycle and lapse rate with the radiative fluxes, snow-dependent albedo and transport mechanisms. The WEB model is designed for ...

Robert G. Gallimore