Sample records for research challenge site

  1. Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerkhof, L.; Williams, K.H.; Long, P.E.; McGuinness, L.

    2011-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduced the ambient soluble uranium concentration. In this report, sediment samples collected before and after acetate field addition were used to assess the active microbes via {sup 13}C acetate stable isotope probing on 3 phases [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 {micro}m), groundwater (0.2-8 {micro}m)] over a 24-day time frame. TRFLP results generally indicated a stronger signal in {sup 13}C-DNA in the 'fines' fraction compared to the sand and groundwater. Before the field-scale acetate addition, a Geobacter-like group primarily synthesized {sup 13}C-DNA in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. and Decholoromonas-like OTU utilized much of the {sup 13}C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. At the termination of the field-scale acetate addition, the Geobacter-like species was active on the solid phases rather than the groundwater, while the other bacterial groups had very reduced newly synthesized DNA signal. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria in the field and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

  2. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

  3. Phase Preference by Active, Acetate-Utilizing Bacteria at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Challenge Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerkhoff, Lee; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; McGuinness, L.

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium contaminated groundwaters are a legacy concern for the U.S. Department of Energy. Previous experiments at the Rifle, Colorado Integrated Field Challenge (IFC) site have demonstrated that field-scale addition of acetate to groundwater reduces the ambient soluable uranium concentration, sequestering the radionuclide as uraninite. However, questions remain regarding which microorganism(s) are consuming this acetate and if active groundwater microorganisms are different from active particle-associated bacteria. In this report, 13-C acetate was used to assess the active microbes that synthesize DNA on 3 size fractions [coarse sand, fines (8-approximately 150 micron), groundwater (0.2-8 micron)] over a 24 -day time frame. Results indicated a stronger signal from 13-C acetate associated with the “fines” fraction compared with smaller amounts of 13-C uptake on the sand fraction and groundwater samples during the SIP incubations. TRFLP analysis of this 13-C-labeled DNA, indicated 31+ 9 OTU's with 6 peaks dominating the active profiles (166, 187, 210, 212, and 277 bp peaks using MnlI). Cloning/sequencing of the amplification products indicated a Geobacter-like group (187, 210, 212 bp) primarily synthesized DNA from acetate in the groundwater phase, an alpha Proteobacterium (166 bp) primarily grew on the fines/sands, and an Acinetobacter sp. (277 bp) utilized much of the 13C acetate in both groundwater and particle-associated phases. These findings will help to delineate the acetate utilization patterns of bacteria during field-scale acetate addition and can lead to improved methods for stimulating distinct microbial populations in situ.

  4. WINDExchange Webinar: Overcoming Wind Siting Challenges III:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    III: Public Acceptance and Land Use WINDExchange Webinar: Overcoming Wind Siting Challenges III: Public Acceptance and Land Use June 17, 2015 3:00PM to 4:00PM EDT As a follow-up to...

  5. Challenges and Opportunities in Thermoelectric Materials Research...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Materials Research for Automotive Applications Challenges and Opportunities in Thermoelectric Materials Research for Automotive Applications Presentation given at the 2007 Diesel...

  6. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, February 2011 to January 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, P.E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with Sediments from an UMTRA Site. American Society forREDUCTION AT THE OLD RIFLE UMTRA SITE. Geological Society of

  7. Mobile Robotics: Research, Applications and Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nehmzow, Ulrich

    detection -- and presents one of the future challenges of mobile robotics research: that of applying quanti.g. descending stairs), and it must pose no risk to humans in the vicinity of the robot. Section 2 discussesMobile Robotics: Research, Applications and Challenges Ulrich Nehmzow Department of Computer

  8. Beyond moore computing research challenge workshop report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huey, Mark C. [Perspectives, Inc., Albuquerque, NM; Aidun, John Bahram

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the presentations and break out session discussions from the in-house workshop that was held on 11 July 2013 to acquaint a wider group of Sandians with the Beyond Moore Computing research challenge.

  9. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, February 2011 to January 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, P.E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field Scale Uranium Bioremediation. Eos Trans. AGU 88 (52),Iron Reduction and Uranium Mobility. Eos Trans. AGU 88 (52),at a Former Uranium Mill Tailings Site. Eos Trans. AGU 91,

  10. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, February 2011 to January 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, P.E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    during in situ U(VI) Bioremediation with a Field-PortableField Scale Uranium Bioremediation. Environ. Sci. Technol.an in situ uranium bioremediation field site and its impact

  11. 'Grand Challenge' for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    'Grand Challenge' for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage Solicitation 'Grand Challenge' for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage Solicitation DOE is issuing a...

  12. Sandia Energy - Our SSLS EFRC's Scientific Research Challenges...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of light-emission phenomena. Scientific Research Challenge 1 and 2: Materials Architecture Materials Architecture Our second two scientific research challenges focus on...

  13. Data Mining Research: Opportunities and Challenges Data Mining Research: Opportunities and Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Robert

    Data Mining Research: Opportunities and Challenges 1 Data Mining Research: Opportunities and Challenges A Report of three NSF Workshops on Mining Large, Massive, and Distributed Data* Robert Grossman, 1997 and February, 1998 to discuss the current state of the art of data mining and data intensive

  14. Research needs to address ASR challenges 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 8 For all its benefits, aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) does have some potential challenges that warrant further research and planning, according to scientists and others involved in ASR. In 2005, the National Research... systems to map and analyze major aquifers as part of comprehensive, regional planning efforts.? Dr. Robert Mace, Texas Water Development Board?s (TWDB) director of the groundwater resources division, said Texas has the infor- mation to do the 3-D...

  15. Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storage: Statement of Objectives Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage: Statement of Objectives Statement of objectives for the Grand Challenge for...

  16. Sandia National Laboratories: Research Challenge 2: Quantum Dots...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eu3+) This research challenge is aimed at studying materials architectures suitable for SSL wavelength down-conversion. Particular materials we have focused on in this research...

  17. Power Plant Research and Siting Program (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Power Plant Research and Siting Act of 1971 established the Power Plant Research Program (PPRP) to evaluate electric generation issues in the state and recommend responsible, long-term...

  18. ONSITE TRANSPORTATION AUTHORIZATION CHALLENGES AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, R.; Loftin, B.; Hoang, D.; Maxted, M.

    2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to 2008, transfers of radioactive material within the Savannah River Site (SRS) boundary, referred to as onsite transfers, were authorized by Transportation Safety Basis (TSB) documents that only required approval by the SRS contractor. This practice was in accordance with the existing SRS Transportation Safety Document (TSD). In 2008 the Department of Energy Savannah River Field Office (DOE-SR) requested that the SRS TSD be revised to require DOE-SR approval of all Transportation Safety Basis (TSB) documents. As a result, the primary SRS contractor embarked on a multi-year campaign to consolidate old or generate new TSB documents and obtain DOE-SR approval for each. This paper focuses on the challenges incurred during the rewriting or writing of and obtaining DOE-SR approval of all Savannah River Site Onsite Transportation Safety Basis documents.

  19. Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storage Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage Presentation from the Hydrogen Storage Pre-Solicitation Meeting held June 19, 2003 in Washington, DC....

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Research Challenge 6: Beyond Spontaneous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sources. research-challenge-6-beyond-spontaneous-emission-5001 Reflectivity data from a GaN microcavity showing anticrossing behavior and strong coupling. However, coherent light...

  1. Colloid research for the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, E.A.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research is needed to understand the role of particulates in the migration of radionuclides away from the sites of nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. The process of testing itself may produce a reservoir of particles to serve as vectors for the transport of long-lived radionuclides in groundwater. Exploratory experiments indicate the presence of numerous particulates in the vicinity of the Cambric test but a much lower loading in a nearby well that has been pumped continuously for 15 years. Recent groundwater colloid research is briefly reviewed to identify sampling and characterization methods that may be applicable at the Nevada Test Site.

  2. The Living Site and Infrastructure Challenge In pursuit of true sustainability in the built environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    The Living Site and Infrastructure Challenge In pursuit of true sustainability in the built environment Draft Version 1.0 November 2007 #12;NOTIFICATION The Living Site and Infrastructure Challenge - copyright 2007 - Cascadia Region Green Building Council, all rights reserved. The Living Site

  3. Sandia Energy - Research Challenge 1: Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratory FellowsPolariton LasingQuantum0:1:

  4. Autonomous Robots in SWAT Applications: Research, Design, and Operations Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Autonomous Robots in SWAT Applications: Research, Design, and Operations Challenges Mr. Henry L of their application. The robot #12;builders (the ARL researchers and MLB designers) and the SWAT leaders felt Jones Prof. Stephen Rock Aerospace Robotics Laboratory Stanford University (650) 723-3389 hlj

  5. DECOMMISSIONING CHALLENGES AT THE ROCKY FLATS ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dorr, K. A.; Hoover, J.

    2002-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a discussion of the demolition of the Building 788 cluster at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) in Golden, Colorado. The Building 788 Cluster was a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage facilities and ancillary structures. Topics covered include the methods employed for Project Planning, Regulatory Compliance, Waste Management, Hazard Identification, Radiological Controls, Risk Management, Field Implementation, and Cost Schedule control, and Lessons Learned and Project Closeout.

  6. COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES RESEARCH INSTITUTE SITE REMEDIATION PROJECT SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES RESEARCH INSTITUTE SITE REMEDIATION PROJECT SUMMARY May 15, 2007 · The Colorado School of Mines Research Institute Site (the "Site) has been undergoing additional investigation RESEARCH INSTITUTE REMEDIATION PROJECT SUMMARY Page Two May 15, 2007 · The revised Remedial Investigation

  7. DOE Announces Webinars on Overcoming Wind Siting Challenges, Benchmarking

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout » ContactDepartment ofa Site Selection ToolResources,and

  8. A Grand Challenge for Computing Research: a mathematical assistant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Toby

    A Grand Challenge for Computing Research: a mathematical assistant Toby Walsh 1 Cork Constraint Computation Centre, University College Cork, Ireland. tw@4c.ucc.ie The mathematical assistant Scientists to make excellent mathematical assistants. Indeed, in specialized domains, computers already are useful

  9. Savannah River Site Team Wins Carolina Challenge at 2012 DOE Security Protection Officer Competition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Savannah River Site, Aiken, S.C. – Security Protection Officers from Savannah River Site’s (SRS) security contractor WSI-SRS, today won the Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary’s Trophy as the top DOE team in the 2012 Security Protection Officer Team Competition (SPOTC)- 2012 Carolina Challenge, held here, April 22-26. It was the 40th anniversary of the SPOTC competition.

  10. Sandia Energy - Research Challenge 0: Overarching and spillover research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratory FellowsPolariton LasingQuantum0:

  11. The Office of Site Closure: Progress in the Face of Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fiore, J. J.; Murphie, W. E.; Meador, S. W.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Site Closure (OSC) was formed in November 1999 when the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Environmental Management (EM) reorganized to focus specifically on site cleanup and closure. OSC's objective is to achieve safe and cost-effective cleanups and closures that are protective of our workers, the public, and the environment, now and in the future. Since its inception, OSC has focused on implementing a culture of safe closure, with emphasis in three primary areas: complete our responsibility for the Closure Sites Rocky Flats, Mound, Fernald, Ashtabula, and Weldon Spring; complete our responsibility for cleanup at sites where the DOE mission has been completed (examples include Battelle King Avenue and Battelle West Jefferson in Columbus, and General Atomics) or where other Departmental organizations have an ongoing mission (examples include the Brookhaven, Livermore, or Los Alamos National Laboratories, and the Nevada Test Site); and create a framework a nd develop specific business closure tools that will help sites close, such as guidance for and decisions on post-contract benefit liabilities, records retention, and Federal employee incentives for site closure. This paper discusses OSC's 2001 progress in achieving site cleanups, moving towards site closure, and developing specific business closure tools to support site closure. It describes the tools used to achieve progress towards cleanup and closure, such as the application of new technologies, changes in contracting approaches, and the development of agreements between sites and with host states. The paper also identifies upcoming challenges and explores options for how Headquarters and the sites can work together to address these challenges. Finally, it articulates OSC's new focus on oversight of Field Offices to ensure they have the systems in place to oversee contractor activities resulting in site cleanups and closures.

  12. Research Site Locations for Current and Former EERE Postdoctoral...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Research Site Locations for Current and Former EERE Postdoctoral Awards, from the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. eeremap2015.pdf...

  13. Nevada National Security Site-Directed Research

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    lection exercises at two different test sites. To comply with Executive Order 12333, "United States Intelligence Activities," the data collection required approval from the...

  14. Text-Alternative Version: LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification webcast.

  15. Coupled Site Characterization and Foundation Analysis Research Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, John S.

    Engineering Department Bronx, New York, U.S.A. March 2000 #12;Coupled Site Characterization and Foundation Engineering Department Bronx, NY 10471-4098 U.S.A. e-mail: #12;iii Coupled SiteCoupled Site Characterization and Foundation Analysis Research Project: Rational Selection

  16. Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Site Selection Guidelines, Borehole Seals Design, and RD&D Needs The U.S. Department of Energy has been investigating deep borehole disposal as one alternative for the disposal...

  17. Challenges associated with final status survey implementation at a Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (Fusrap) Site's adjacent properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokody, K.J. [Shaw Environmental and Infrastructure, Tonawanda, NY (United States); Boyle, J.D. [U. S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several properties located adjacent to the Linde Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) site in Tonawanda, New York were radiologically contaminated during Manhattan Engineer District (MED) era activities. These properties exhibited a combination of unique characteristics not previously encountered at the Linde Site. This included the properties being littered with building debris, a combination of metals and cesium-137 (Cs-137) commingled in the soil, thorium-230 (Th-230) being the dominant radioactive MED contaminant, and the radioactive contamination consisting of a five to seventy six centimeter thick black colored lens located at various depths below the ground surface. Because of the unique characteristics, several challenges were encountered with the characterization, implementation of the final status survey process to demonstrate compliance with the Record of Decision (ROD) [1], and subsequent remediation of these properties. Overcoming these challenges required a reevaluation of the previously developed gross gamma screening and soil core screening correlation values that ensured both the primary ROD requirements and expected residual concentrations would be met. Furthermore, modifications to the sampling, field implementation, and documentation process necessitated a revision to the Final Status Survey Plan (FSSP) to accommodate the unique conditions present at the adjacent properties. (authors)

  18. Linde FUSRAP Site Remediation: Engineering Challenges and Solutions of Remedial Activities on an Active Industrial Facility - 13506

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beres, Christopher M.; Fort, E. Joseph [Cabrera Services, Inc., 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118 (United States)] [Cabrera Services, Inc., 473 Silver Lane, East Hartford, CT 06118 (United States); Boyle, James D. [United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)] [United States Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo, 1776 Niagara Street, Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Linde FUSRAP Site (Linde) is located in Tonawanda, New York at a major research and development facility for Praxair, Inc. (Praxair). Successful remediation activities at Linde combines meeting cleanup objectives of radiological contamination while minimizing impacts to Praxair business operations. The unique use of Praxair's property coupled with an array of active and abandoned utilities poses many engineering and operational challenges; each of which has been overcome during the remedial action at Linde. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Buffalo District (USACE) and CABRERA SERVICES, INC. (CABRERA) have successfully faced engineering challenges such as relocation of an aboveground structure, structural protection of an active water line, and installation of active mechanical, electrical, and communication utilities to perform remediation. As remediation nears completion, continued success of engineering challenges is critical as remaining activities exist in the vicinity of infrastructure essential to business operations; an electrical substation and duct bank providing power throughout the Praxair facility. Emphasis on engineering and operations through final remediation and into site restoration will allow for the safe and successful completion of the project. (authors)

  19. Hanford Site Cleanup Challenges and Opportunities for Science and Technology--A Strategic Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wood, Thomas W.; Johnson, Wayne L.; Kreid, Dennis K.; Walton, Terry L.

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sheer expanse of the Hanford Site, the inherent hazards associated with the significant inventory of nuclear materials and wastes, the large number of aging contaminated facilities, the diverse nature and extent of environmental contamination, and the proximity to the Columbia River make Hanford perhaps the world's largest and most complex environmental cleanup project. It is not possible to address the more complex elements of this enormous challenge in a cost-effective manner without strategic investments in science and technology. Success requires vigorous and sustained efforts to enhance the science and technology basis, develop and deploy innovative solutions, and provide firm scientific bases to support site cleanup and closure decisions at Hanford.

  20. Challenges with Final Status Surveys at a Large Decommissioning Site - 13417

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Downey, Heath; Collopy, Peter; Shephard, Eugene; Walter, Nelson [AMEC, 511 Congress Street, Portland, ME 04112 (United States)] [AMEC, 511 Congress Street, Portland, ME 04112 (United States); Conant, John [ABB Inc., 5 Waterside Crossing, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States)] [ABB Inc., 5 Waterside Crossing, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of decommissioning a former nuclear fuel manufacturing site, one of the crucial final steps is to conduct Final Status Surveys (FSS) in order to demonstrate compliance with the release criteria. At this decommissioning site, the area for FSS was about 100 hectares (248 acres) and included varying terrain, wooded areas, ponds, excavations, buildings and a brook. The challenges in performing the FSS included determining location, identifying FSS units, logging gamma walkover survey data, determining sample locations, managing water in excavations, and diverting water in the brook. The approaches taken to overcome these challenges will be presented in the paper. The paper will present and discuss lessons learned that will aid others in the FSS process. (authors)

  1. NREL: Wind Research - Site Wind Resource Characteristics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck Platooning Testing Photofrom U.S.6Site Wind Resource

  2. Subsurface characterization of the San Jacinto River Research site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leik, Jason Allan

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to develop an effective petroleum repudiation ics. strategy, the interaction between surface and shallow subsurface water was determined for the San Jacinto River Oi1 Spill Remediation Research site. The ten-acre wetland is located...

  3. NREL: Wind Research - Field Test Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck Platooning Testing Photo ofResearchFAST Revs Up with a

  4. The 300 Area Integrated Field Research Challenge Quality Assurance Project Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fix, N. J.

    2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a group of expert collaborators are using the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site 300 Area uranium plume within the footprint of the 300-FF-5 groundwater operable unit as a site for an Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC). The IFRC is entitled Multi-Scale Mass Transfer Processes Controlling Natural Attenuation and Engineered Remediation: An IFRC Focused on the Hanford Site 300 Area Uranium Plume Project. The theme is investigation of multi-scale mass transfer processes. A series of forefront science questions on mass transfer are posed for research that relate to the effect of spatial heterogeneities; the importance of scale; coupled interactions between biogeochemical, hydrologic, and mass transfer processes; and measurements/approaches needed to characterize and model a mass transfer-dominated system. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the 300 Area IFRC Project. This plan is designed to be used exclusively by project staff.

  5. Long Term Stewardship Challenges at the St. Louis District FUSRAP Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dell'Orco, L.; Chambers, D.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-Federally owned radioactively contaminated sites in St. Louis, Missouri are currently being remediated by the St. Louis District Corps of Engineers under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). When FUSRAP remediation is complete, inaccessible soils which have levels of contamination greater than unrestricted use standards, will remain. The purpose of this paper is to document the initial challenges facing the project team during its development of the Long Term Stewardship plan for the management of these soils. These soils are located under buildings, roads, railroads and bridges. The Long Term Stewardship plan for the majority of the sites is being developed simultaneously with the remedy selection process. A living document, it will ultimately document the remedial action end state and location of inaccessible soils and implement the plan for ensuring these soils are not a threat to human health and the environment. Although these soils are protective in their current configuration, at some point in time, when activities such as maintenance, utility or property improvement occur, the soils will become accessible and need to be addressed by the federal government. Up until that point in time they will need to be effectively managed to ensure they remain protective. The St. Louis District is in the process of collaboratively developing this plan with its regulators, affected stakeholders and interested parties.

  6. An important challenge in magnetic fusion research is to obtain...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    control of edge transport barriers on Alcator C-Mod A crucial challenge in magnetic fusion is to obtain high energy confinement in a stationary plasma that is compatible with...

  7. Hydrogen from biomass: state of the art and research challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milne, Thomas A.; Elam, Carolyn C.; Evans, Robert J.

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report was prepared for the International Energy Agency (IEA) Agreement on the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen, Task 16, Hydrogen from Carbon-Containing Materials. Hydrogen's share in the energy market is increasing with the implementation of fuel cell systems and the growing demand for zero-emission fuels. Hydrogen production will need to keep pace with this growing market. In the near term, increased production will likely be met by conventional technologies, such as natural gas reforming. In these processes, the carbon is converted to CO2 and released to the atmosphere. However, with the growing concern about global climate change, alternatives to the atmospheric release of CO2 are being investigated. Sequestration of the CO2 is an option that could provide a viable near-term solution. Reducing the demand on fossil resources remains a significant concern for many nations. Renewable-based processes like solar- or wind-driven electrolysis and photobiological water splitting hold great promise for clean hydrogen production; however, advances must still be made before these technologies can be economically competitive. For the near-and mid-term, generating hydrogen from biomass may be the more practical and viable, renewable and potentially carbon-neutral (or even carbon-negative in conjunction with sequestration) option. Recently, the IEA Hydrogen Agreement launched a new task to bring together international experts to investigate some of these near- and mid-term options for producing hydrogen with reduced environmental impacts. This review of the state of the art of hydrogen production from biomass was prepared to facilitate in the planning of work that should be done to achieve the goal of near-term hydrogen energy systems. The relevant technologies that convert biomass to hydrogen, with emphasis on thermochemical routes are described. In evaluating the viability of the conversion routes, each must be put in the context of the availability of appropriate feedstocks and deployment scenarios that match hydrogen to the local markets. Co-production opportunities are of particular interest for near-term deployment since multiple products improve the economics; however, co-product development is not covered in this report. Biomass has the potential to accelerate the realization of hydrogen as a major fuel of the future. Since biomass is renewable and consumes atmospheric CO2 during growth, it can have a small net CO2 impact compared to fossil fuels. However, hydrogen from biomass has major challenges. There are no completed technology demonstrations. The yield of hydrogen is low from biomass since the hydrogen content in biomass is low to being with (approximately 6% versus 25% for methane) and the energy content is low due to the 40% oxygen content of biomass. Since over half of the hydrogen from biomass comes from splitting water in the steam reforming reaction, the energy content of the feedstock is an inherent limitation of the process . The low yield of hydrogen on a weight basis is misleading since the energy conversion efficiency is high. However, the cost for growing, harvesting, and transporting biomass is high. Thus even with reasonable energy efficiencies, it is not presently economically competitive with natural gas steam reforming for stand-alone hydrogen without the advantage of high-value co-products. Additionally, as with all sources of hydrogen, production from biomass will require appropriate hydrogen storage and utilization systems to be developed and deployed. The report also looked at promising areas for further research and development. The major areas for R,D and D are: feedstock preparation and feeding; gasification gas conditioning; system integration; modular systems development; valuable co-product integration; and larger-scale demonstrations. These are in addition to the challenges for any hydrogen process in storage and utilization technologies.

  8. MASTER CLINICAL RESEARCH STUDY SITE AGREEMENT THIS MASTER CUNICAL RESEARCH STUDY SITE AGREEMENT ("Master Agreement")

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    ("Master Agreement") is entered into as of the 14th day of May, 2009 ("Effective Date"), by and between UT "clinies in the Memphis,Shelby County, Tennessee area that serve as study sites for r~search studies by The University, pursuant to the terms and conditions of this Master ~~~~. . ..- T~RMS AND CONDITIONS 1. REQUEST

  9. Challenge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and the University of New Mexico. Lockheed Martin, Sandia National Laboratories, Siemens Foundation, and Wolfram Research, Inc. are "Gold" commercial partners. "Silver"...

  10. Cleanup of the Western Research Institute North Site. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merriam, N.W.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to clean up the Western Research Institute`s North Site in an environmentally sound and cost-effective manner. Work is broken down into the following phases: Phase 1, definition of waste streams; Phase 2, disposal of hazardous wastes; Phase 3, disposal of nonhazardous materials; Phase 4, soil sampling and disposal of buried wastes; Phase 5, decontamination and disposal of equipment; Phase 5a, groundwater monitoring; and Phase 6, preparation of material inventory database.

  11. Goals and methods of research: the challenge for family medicine.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, J

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to research. Family medicine was about people, theirfellowships endowed, new family medicine journals devoted toHow will it affect family medicine? What opportunities are

  12. Underwater acoustic sensor networks: research challenges Ian F. Akyildiz *, Dario Pompili, Tommaso Melodia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pompili, Dario

    Underwater acoustic sensor networks: research challenges Ian F. Akyildiz *, Dario Pompili, Tommaso will find applications in oceanographic data collection, pollution monitoring, offshore exploration acoustic networking is the enabling technology for these applications. Underwater networks consist

  13. "Research Challenges in Networking", Mohammed Atiquzzaman, ICCCN, Oct 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atiquzzaman, Mohammed

    2002 Network Security · Trust: security and privacy · Increased emphasis on network security ­ Cyber-security attack · Cybersecurity technologies and methods to develop advanced networks that can replace and telecom, public health, emergency services, water, agriculture, postal services ...... #12;"Research

  14. Social Media, Research, and Ethics: Challenges and Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biederman, Irving

    Chair in Ethics University of Wisconsin-Stout Presentation for The Department of Energy, skype, social media, tweets, online course software, etc · Increasingly, the line between tool ­ Description of research risks/potential benefits ­ Solicitation of identifiable private information (e

  15. Computational Research Challenges and Opportunities for the Optimization of Fossil Energy Power Generation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitney, S.E.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Emerging fossil energy power generation systems must operate with unprecedented efficiency and near-zero emissions, while optimizing profitably amid cost fluctuations for raw materials, finished products, and energy. To help address these challenges, the fossil energy industry will have to rely increasingly on the use advanced computational tools for modeling and simulating complex process systems. In this paper, we present the computational research challenges and opportunities for the optimization of fossil energy power generation systems across the plant lifecycle from process synthesis and design to plant operations. We also look beyond the plant gates to discuss research challenges and opportunities for enterprise-wide optimization, including planning, scheduling, and supply chain technologies.

  16. Future challenges for nuclear data research in fission (u)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chadwick, Mark B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe some high priority research areas in nuclear fission, where applications in nuclear reactor technologies and in modeling criticality in general are demanding higher accuracies in our databases. We focus on fission cross sections, fission neutron spectra, and fission product data.

  17. Welcome to the SSRL User Research Site | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSiteEurekaWeekly User Schedule

  18. Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2012 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ,

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reports included in this report are for project activities that occurred from October 2011 through September 2012. These reports describe in detail the discoveries, achievements, and challenges encountered by our talented and enthusiastic principal investigators (PIs). Many of the reports describe R&D efforts that were “successful” in their pursuits and resulted in a positive outcome or technology realization. As we’ve stated before, and continue to stress, in some cases the result is a “negative” finding, for instance a technology is currently impractical or out of reach. This can often be viewed erroneously as a “failure,” but is actually a valid outcome in the pursuit of high-risk research, which often leads to unforeseen new paths of discovery. Either result advances our knowledge and increases our ability to identify solutions and/or likewise avoid costly paths not appropriate for the challenges presented. The SDRD program continues to provide an unfettered mechanism for innovation and development that returns multifold to the NNSS mission. Overall the program is a strong R&D innovation engine, benefited by an enhanced mission, committed resources, and sound competitiveness to yield maximum benefit. The 23 projects described exemplify the creativity and ability of a diverse scientific and engineering talent base. The efforts also showcase an impressive capability and resource that can be brought to find solutions to a broad array of technology needs and applications relevant to the NNSS mission and national security.

  19. Sandia Energy - Our SSLS EFRC's Scientific Research Challenges and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratory Fellows JerryNuclearPublications Our

  20. Sandia Energy - Research Challenge 2: Quantum Dots and Phosphors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratory FellowsPolariton LasingQuantum0:1:2:

  1. Sandia Energy - Research Challenge 3: Competing Radiative and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratory FellowsPolariton

  2. Sandia Energy - Research Challenge 4: Defect-Carrier Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratory FellowsPolariton4: Defect-Carrier

  3. Sandia Energy - Research Challenge 5: Enhanced Spontaneous Emission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratory FellowsPolariton4: Defect-Carrier5:

  4. Sandia Energy - Research Challenge 6: Beyond Spontaneous Emission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear PressLaboratory FellowsPolariton4: Defect-Carrier5:6:

  5. Security Informatics Research Challenges for Mitigating Cyber Friendly Fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Thomas E.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Roberts, Adam D.

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses cognitive implications and research needs surrounding the problem of cyber friendly re (FF). We dene cyber FF as intentional o*ensive or defensive cyber/electronic actions intended to protect cyber systems against enemy forces or to attack enemy cyber systems, which unintentionally harms the mission e*ectiveness of friendly or neutral forces. We describe examples of cyber FF and discuss how it ts within a general conceptual framework for cyber security failures. Because it involves human failure, cyber FF may be considered to belong to a sub-class of cyber security failures characterized as unintentional insider threats. Cyber FF is closely related to combat friendly re in that maintaining situation awareness (SA) is paramount to avoiding unintended consequences. Cyber SA concerns knowledge of a system's topology (connectedness and relationships of the nodes in a system), and critical knowledge elements such as the characteristics and vulnerabilities of the components that comprise the system and its nodes, the nature of the activities or work performed, and the available defensive and o*ensive countermeasures that may be applied to thwart network attacks. We describe a test bed designed to support empirical research on factors a*ecting cyber FF. Finally, we discuss mitigation strategies to combat cyber FF, including both training concepts and suggestions for decision aids and visualization approaches.

  6. Cyber Friendly Fire: Research Challenges for Security Informatics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greitzer, Frank L.; Carroll, Thomas E.; Roberts, Adam D.

    2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses cognitive implications and research needs surrounding the problem of cyber friendly fire (FF). We define cyber FF as intentional offensive or defensive cyber/electronic actions intended to protect cyber systems against enemy forces or to attack enemy cyber systems, which unintention-ally harms the mission effectiveness of friendly or neutral forces. Just as with combat friendly fire, maintaining situation awareness (SA) is paramount to avoiding cyber FF incidents. Cyber SA concerns knowledge of a system’s topology (connectedness and relationships of the nodes in a system), and critical knowledge elements such as the characteristics and vulnerabilities of the components that comprise the system and its nodes, the nature of the activities or work performed, and the available defensive and offensive countermeasures that may be applied to thwart network attacks. Mitigation strategies to combat cyber FF— including both training concepts and suggestions for decision aids and visualization approaches—are discussed.

  7. LED Site Lighting in the Commercial Building Sector: Opportunities, Challenges, and the CBEA Performance Specification

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This March 26, 2009 webcast presented information about the Commercial Building Energy Alliances' (CBEA) efforts to explore the viability of LED site lighting in commercial parking lots. LED...

  8. Challenges in Obtaining Property Access: The FUSRAP Maywood Site Experience - 13433

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kollar, William [Shaw Environmental, Inc., 100 West Hunter Avenue, Maywood, NJ 07607 (United States)] [Shaw Environmental, Inc., 100 West Hunter Avenue, Maywood, NJ 07607 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) is the US government program started in 1974 to identify, investigate and clean up or control sites that became contaminated as a result of the nation's early atomic programs. Many of these sites are not owned by the federal government and therefore require owner permission to enter. The experience in pursuing such access at the FUSRAP Maywood Superfund Site (the Maywood Site or the Site) in Bergen County, New Jersey, is extensive. Since the US Army Corps of Engineers (the Corps) assumed responsibility for the Maywood Site from the US Department of Energy in 1997, at least 186 separate property access agreements (known in FUSRAP as a Real Estate Right-of- Entry or ROE) have been executed between the Corps and approximately 55 different land owners and tenant occupants at the Maywood Site (agreement renewals with the same owners over time account for the difference). Maywood's experience during the Corps' tenure, reflected here in three case studies of representative property access efforts, offers some lessons and best practices that may apply to other remedial programs. While the Site Community Relations Manager (the author of this paper) managed the property access task, multi-disciplinary support from across the project was also critical to success in this endeavor. (authors)

  9. Asia Research Centre public lecture Pakistan and the challenges of a new decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asia Research Centre public lecture Pakistan and the challenges of a new decade Douglas Alexander of Economics and Political Science Wednesday 26 October 2011 Check against delivery http://www.labour.org.uk/pakistan that Pakistan will be high up in the in tray of whoever becomes Foreign Secretary in 2015. Pakistan is today

  10. maintenance. This research is relevant to opera-tions and maintenance challenges facing aging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the need for preventive maintenance or other diagnostic activities on the physical system. Simulationsmaintenance. This research is relevant to opera- tions and maintenance challenges facing aging-benefit of extending the time between overhauls. reducing the probability of a failure in the field. and preventive

  11. Federal Facilities Liaison Weighs in on EM Achievements, Challenges at Savannah River Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – For more than two decades, Shelly Wilson has been working with the Savannah River Site (SRS) as an employee of South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC)....

  12. Current Challenges for Modeling Enzyme Active Sites by Biomimetic Synthetic Diiron Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedle, Simone

    This tutorial review describes recent progress in modeling the active sites of carboxylate-rich non-heme diiron enzymes that activate dioxygen to carry out several key reactions in Nature. The chemistry of soluble methane ...

  13. Smart Grid Communications: Overview of Research Challenges, Solutions, and Standardization Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Zhong; Gormus, Sedat; Efthymiou, Costas; Kalogridis, Georgios; Sooriyabandara, Mahesh; Zhu, Ziming; Lambotharan, Sangarapillai; Chin, Woon Hau

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimization of energy consumption in future intelligent energy networks (or Smart Grids) will be based on grid-integrated near-real-time communications between various grid elements in generation, transmission, distribution and loads. This paper discusses some of the challenges and opportunities of communications research in the areas of smart grid and smart metering. In particular, we focus on some of the key communications challenges for realizing interoperable and future-proof smart grid/metering networks, smart grid security and privacy, and how some of the existing networking technologies can be applied to energy management. Finally, we also discuss the coordinated standardization efforts in Europe to harmonize communications standards and protocols.

  14. Formerly Used Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) W. R. Grace Building 23 Remedial Action-Challenges and Successes - 12247

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, Brenda; Honerlah, Hans [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers - Baltimore District, 10 S. Howard St., Baltimore, Maryland, 21201 (United States); O'Neill, Mike [EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, 15 Loveton Circle, Baltimore, Maryland, 21152 (United States); Young, Carl [Cabrera Services, Inc., 1106 N. Charles St., Suite 300, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monazite sand processing was conducted at the W. R. Grace Curtis Bay Facility (Baltimore, Maryland) from mid-May 1956 through the spring of 1957 under license to the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), for the extraction of source material in the form of thorium, as well as rare earth elements. The processing was conducted in the southwest quadrant of a ca. 100 year old, five-story, building (Building 23) in the active manufacturing portion of the facility. Building components and equipment in the southwest quadrant of Building 23 exhibited residual radiological activity remaining from the monazite sand processing. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) conducted a remedial investigation (RI) and feasibility study (FS) and prepared a Record of Decision (ROD) to address residual radioactivity on building components and equipment in the southwest quadrant of Building 23. The remedy selected for the southwest quadrant of Building 23, which was documented in the ROD (dated May 2005), was identified as 'Alternative 2: Decontamination With Removal to Industrial Use Levels'. The selected remedy provided for either decontaminating or removing areas of radioactivity to meet the RGs. Demonstration of compliance with the selected ARAR was performed using the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) and other appropriate guidance, as well as appropriate dose modeling codes where necessary. USACE-Baltimore District along with its private industry partner worked together under the terms of a 2008 Settlement Agreement to implement the remedial action (RA) for the southwest quadrant of Building 23. The RA was conducted in two phases: Phase 1 was completed to improve the building condition for support of subsequent remedial action and decrease scope uncertainty of the remedial action, and Phase 2 included decontamination and removal activities to meet the RGs and demonstration of compliance with the selected ARAR. Challenges encountered during the RA include: coordination with stakeholders, coordination between multiple RA contractors, addressing unique structural challenges for Building 23, nonradiological hazards associated with the RA, weather issues, and complex final status survey (FSS) coordination. The challenges during the Phase 1 RA were handled successfully. The challenges for the Phase 2 RA, which is anticipated to be complete by late-summer of 2012, have been handled successfully so far. By fall of 2012, USACE is expecting to finalize a robust RA Closure Report, including the Final Status Survey Report, which summarizes the RA activities and documents compliance with the ROD. During the ongoing RA at Building 23, there have been and still are many challenges both technically and from a project management perspective, due in part to the nature and extent of impact at the site (residual radioactivity within an active processing building), dual oversight by the property owner and USACE, and site-specific challenges associated with a complex RA and multiple contractors. Currently, USACE and its industry partner are overseeing the completion of RA field activities. RA closure documentation for the remediation of Building 23 to address residual contamination in building materials will be reviewed/approved by USACE and its industry partner upon completion of the field activities. USACE and its industry partner are working well together, through the Settlement Agreement, to conduct a cost-efficient and effective remedial action to address the legacy issues at Building 23. This cooperative effort has set a firm foundation for achieving a successful RA at the RWDA using a 'forward think' approach, and it is a case study for other sites where an industry partner is involved. The collaborative effort led to implementation of an RA which is acceptable to the site owner, the regulators, and the public, thus allowing USACE to move this project forward successfully in the FUSRAP program. (authors)

  15. Final Site-Specific Decommissioning Inspection Report for the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarah Roberts

    2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Report of site-specific decommissioning in-process inspection activities at the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor Facility.

  16. Spatial distribution of an uranium-respiring betaproteobacterium at the rifle, CO field research site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Koribanics, Nicole M.; Tuorto, Steven J.; Lopez-Chiaffarelli, Nora; McGuinness, Lora R.; Häggblom, Max M.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Morais, Paula V

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy’s Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site (IFRC) at Rifle, Colorado was created to address the gaps in knowledge on the mechanisms and rates of U(VI) bioreduction in alluvial sediments. Previous studies at the Rifle IFRC have linked microbial processes to uranium immobilization during acetate amendment. Several key bacteria believed to be involved in radionuclide containment have been described; however, most of the evidence implicating uranium reduction with specific microbiota has been indirect. Here, we report on the cultivation of a microorganism from the Rifle IFRC that reduces uranium and appears to utilize it as a terminalmore »electron acceptor for respiration with acetate as electron donor. Furthermore, this bacterium constitutes a significant proportion of the subsurface sediment community prior to biostimulation based on TRFLP profiling of 16S rRNA genes. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicates that the microorganism is a betaproteobacterium with a high similarity to Burkholderia fungorum. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of a betaproteobacterium capable of uranium respiration. Our results indicate that this microorganism occurs commonly in alluvial sediments located between 3-6 m below ground surface at Rifle and may play a role in the initial reduction of uranium at the site.« less

  17. Spatial distribution of an uranium-respiring betaproteobacterium at the rifle, CO field research site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Koribanics, Nicole M. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Tuorto, Steven J. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Lopez-Chiaffarelli, Nora [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); McGuinness, Lora R. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Häggblom, Max M. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Williams, Kenneth H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Long, Philip E. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Kerkhof, Lee J. [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Morais, Paula V [Univ. of Coimbra (Portugal)

    2015-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy’s Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site (IFRC) at Rifle, Colorado was created to address the gaps in knowledge on the mechanisms and rates of U(VI) bioreduction in alluvial sediments. Previous studies at the Rifle IFRC have linked microbial processes to uranium immobilization during acetate amendment. Several key bacteria believed to be involved in radionuclide containment have been described; however, most of the evidence implicating uranium reduction with specific microbiota has been indirect. Here, we report on the cultivation of a microorganism from the Rifle IFRC that reduces uranium and appears to utilize it as a terminal electron acceptor for respiration with acetate as electron donor. Furthermore, this bacterium constitutes a significant proportion of the subsurface sediment community prior to biostimulation based on TRFLP profiling of 16S rRNA genes. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicates that the microorganism is a betaproteobacterium with a high similarity to Burkholderia fungorum. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of a betaproteobacterium capable of uranium respiration. Our results indicate that this microorganism occurs commonly in alluvial sediments located between 3-6 m below ground surface at Rifle and may play a role in the initial reduction of uranium at the site.

  18. Contaminated land and groundwater management at Sellafield, a large operational site with significant legacy and contaminated land challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeve, Phil; Eilbeck, Katherine [British Nuclear Group Sellafield Ltd (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sellafield is a former Royal Ordnance Factory used since the 1940's for the production and reprocessing of fissile materials. Leaks and spills from these plants and their associated waste facilities has led to radioactive contaminated ground legacy of up to 20 million m{sup 3}. Consideration of land contamination at Sellafield began in 1976, following discovery of a major leak from a waste storage silo. Over the past three decades there has been a programme of environmental monitoring and several phases of characterization. The latest phase of characterization is a pounds 10 million contract to develop second generation conceptual and numeric models. The Site Licence Company that operates the site has been subject to structural changes due to reorganizations within the British nuclear industry. There has also been a change in emphasis to place an increased importance on accelerated decommissioning. To address these challenges a new contaminated land team and contaminated land and groundwater management plan have been established. Setting and measuring performance against challenging objectives is important. The management plan has to be cognizant of the long timescales (ca. 80 years) for final remediation. Data review, collation, acquisition, analysis, and storage is critical for success. It is equally important to seize opportunities for early environmental gains. It is possible to accelerate the development and delivery of a contaminated land and groundwater management plan by using international experts. (authors)

  19. Colorado School of Mines Research Institute Site Data Evaluation Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................................... 5 3.2.1 Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study be used to demonstrate the extent of compounds of potential concern (COPCs). Data were collected during past site characterization work by a previous consultant and presented in the remedial investigation

  20. UTM Well Coordinates for the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    David Lim

    A series of oscillatory pumping tests were performed at the BHRS. The data collected from these wells will be used to tomographically image the shallow subsurface. This excel file only contains well coordinates for all wells at the Boise site.

  1. UTM Well Coordinates for the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Lim

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of oscillatory pumping tests were performed at the BHRS. The data collected from these wells will be used to tomographically image the shallow subsurface. This excel file only contains well coordinates for all wells at the Boise site.

  2. Research Summary RECOAL: Reintegration of coal ash disposal sites and mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research Summary RECOAL: Reintegration of coal ash disposal sites and mitigation of pollution being used for coal ash deposits. Pollutants present in the ash can contaminate water resources and soil its research on the thermo-electric plant (TEP) and associated coal ash sites at Tuzla, Bosnia

  3. Key Challenges and New Trends in Battery Research (2011 EFRC Forum)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tarascon, Jean Marie (University de Picardie Jules Verne, France)

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Jean-Marie Tarascon, Professor at the University de Picardie Jules Verne, France, was the fourth speaker in the May 26, 2011 EFRC Forum session, "Global Perspectives on Frontiers in Energy Research." In his presentation, Professor Tarascon recounted European basic research activates in electrical energy storage. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  4. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 9, Index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules.

  5. Site M. L. Wesely Environmental Research Division Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9Morgan McCorkleSingin' in theCleanup SiteSite M. L.

  6. Remote Handled TRU Waste Status and Activities and Challenges at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCKENNEY, D.E.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant portion of the Department of Energy's forecast volume of remote-handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste will originate from the Hanford Site. The forecasted Hanford RH-TRU waste volume of over 2000 cubic meters may constitute over one-third of the forecast inventory of RH-TRU destined for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). To date, the Hanford TRU waste program has focused on the retrieval, treatment and certification of the contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) wastes. This near-term focus on CH-TRU is consistent with the National TRU Program plans and capabilities. The first shipment of CH-TRU waste from Hanford to the WIPP is scheduled early in Calendar Year 2000. Shipments of RH-TRU from Hanford to the WIPP are scheduled to begin in Fiscal Year 2006 per the National TRU Waste Management Plan. This schedule has been incorporated into milestones within the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). These Tri-Party milestones (designated the ''M-91'' series of milestones) relate to development of project management plans, completion of design efforts, construction and contracting schedules, and initiation of process operations. The milestone allows for modification of an existing facility, construction of a new facility, and/or commercial contracting to provide the capabilities for processing and certification of RH-TRU wastes for disposal at the WIPP. The development of a Project Management Plan (PMP) for TRU waste is the first significant step in the development of a program for disposal of Hanford's RH-TRU waste. This PMP will address the path forward for disposition of waste streams that cannot be prepared for disposal in the Hanford Waste Receiving and Processing facility (a contact-handled, small container facility) or other Site facilities. The PMP development effort has been initiated, and the PMP will be provided to the regulators for their approval by June 30, 2000. This plan will detail the path forward for the Hanford RH-TRU program.

  7. Grand Challenges for Biological and Environmental Research: A Long-Term Vision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arkin, A.; Baliga, N.; Braam, J.; Church, G.; Collins, J; Cottingham, R.; Ecker, J.; Gerstein, M.; Gilna, P.; Greenberg, J.; Handelsman, J.; Hubbard, S.; Joachimiak, A.; Liao, J.; Looger, L.; Meyerowitz, E.; Mjolness, E.; Petsko, G.; Sayler, G.; Simpson, M.; Stacey, G.; Sussman, M.; Tiedje, J.; Bader, D.; Cessi, P.; Collins, W.; Denning, S.; Dickinson, R.; Easterling, D.; Edmonds, J.; Feddema, J.; Field, C.; Fridlind, A.; Fung, I.; Held, I.; Jackson, R.; Janetos, A.; Large, W.; Leinen, M.; Leung, R.; Long, S.; Mace, G.; Masiello, C.; Meehl, G.; Ort, D.; Otto-Bliesner, B.; Penner, J.; Prather, M.; Randall, D.; Rasch, P.; Schneider, E.; Shugart, H.; Thornton, P.; Washington, W.; Wildung, R.; Wiscombe, W.; Zak, D.; Zhang, M.; Bielicki, J.; Buford, M.; Cleland, E.; Dale, V.; Duke, C.; Ehleringer, J.; Hecht, A.; Kammen, D.; Marland, G.; Pataki, D.; Riley, M. Robertson, P.; Hubbard, S.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interactions and feedbacks among plants, animals, microbes, humans, and the environment ultimately form the world in which we live. This world is now facing challenges from a growing and increasingly affluent human population whose numbers and lifestyles are driving ever greater energy demand and impacting climate. These and other contributing factors will make energy and climate sustainability extremely difficult to achieve over the 20-year time horizon that is the focus of this report. Despite these severe challenges, there is optimism that deeper understanding of our environment will enable us to mitigate detrimental effects, while also harnessing biological and climate systems to ensure a sustainable energy future. This effort is advanced by scientific inquiries in the fields of atmospheric chemistry and physics, biology, ecology, and subsurface science - all made possible by computing. The Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Science has a long history of bringing together researchers from different disciplines to address critical national needs in determining the biological and environmental impacts of energy production and use, characterizing the interplay of climate and energy, and collaborating with other agencies and DOE programs to improve the world's most powerful climate models. BER science focuses on three distinct areas: (1) What are the roles of Earth system components (atmosphere, land, oceans, sea ice, and the biosphere) in determining climate? (2) How is the information stored in a genome translated into microbial, plant, and ecosystem processes that influence biofuel production, climate feedbacks, and the natural cycling of carbon? (3) What are the biological, geochemical, and physical forces that govern the behavior of Earth's subsurface environment? Ultimately, the goal of BER science is to support experimentation and modeling that can reliably predict the outcomes and behaviors of complex biological and environmental systems, leading to robust solutions for DOE missions and strategic goals. In March 2010, the Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee held the Grand Challenges for Biological and Environmental Research: A Long-Term Vision workshop to identify scientific opportunities and grand challenges for BER science in the coming decades and to develop an overall strategy for drafting a long-term vision for BER. Key workshop goals included: (1) Identifying the greatest scientific challenges in biology, climate, and the environment that DOE will face over a 20-year time horizon. (2) Describing how BER should be positioned to address those challenges. (3) Determining the new and innovative tools needed to advance BER science. (4) Suggesting how the workforce of the future should be trained in integrative system science. This report lays out grand research challenges for BER - in biological systems, climate, energy sustainability, computing, and education and workforce training - that can put society on a path to achieve the scientific evidence and predictive understanding needed to inform decision making and planning to address future energy needs, climate change, water availability, and land use.

  8. Solar Energy Research Institute Validation Test House Site Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burch, J.; Wortman, D.; Judkoff, R.; Hunn, B.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Validation Test House at the Solar Energy Research Institute in Golden, Colorado, is being used to collect performance data for analysis/design tool validation as part of the DOE Passive Solar Class A Performance Evaluation Program.

  9. Research Site Locations for Current and Former EERE Postdoctoral Awards |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS September 9,Award RecipientsActMission toResearch Mentors Research

  10. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development, FY 2007 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wil Lewis, editor

    2008-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2007. Twenty-nine new projects were selected for funding this year, and eight projects started in FY 2006 were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.67 million, for an average per-project cost of $153 thousand. An external audit conducted in September 2007 verified that appropriate accounting practices were applied to the SDRD program. Highlights for the year included: programmatic adoption of 8 SDRD-developed technologies; the filing of 9 invention disclosures for innovation evolving from SDRD projects; participation in the tri-Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD Symposium that was broadly attended by Nevada Test Site (NTS), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), LDRD, U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2007 projects; and the successful completion of 37 R&D projects, as presented in this report. In response to a company-wide call, authors throughout the NTS complex submitted 182 proposals for FY 2007 SDRD projects. The SDRD program has seen a dramatic increase in the yearly total of submitted proposals--from 69 in FY 2002 to 182 this year--while the number of projects funded has actually decreased from a program high of 57 in FY 2004. The overall effect of this trend has helped ensure an increasingly competitive program that benefited from a broader set of innovative ideas, making project selection both challenging and rewarding. Proposals were evaluated for technical merit, including such factors as innovation, probability of success, potential benefit, and mission applicability. Authors and reviewers benefited from the use of a shortfalls list entitled the 'NTS Technology Needs Assessment' that was compiled from NTS, National Weapons Laboratory (NWL), and NNSA sources. This tool continues to be of considerable value in aligning the SDRD program with mission priorities, and was expanded in FY 2007 to include technology development needs from the DHS and other agencies with missions closely aligned to that of the NTS.

  11. DOE Research and Development Accomplishments Site Index (A-Z)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management Fermi SitePART I SECTIONPlasmaDatabase Help The DOEwithA -

  12. Ecosystem Site Description Funding Opportunities for Research, Education, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . ­ Steer a committee towards ESD development. #12;Program Areas and Investment: FY 2010 Agriculture $22 million #12;Program Areas and Investment: FY 2010 Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education on foreign oil; have net positive social, environmental, and rural economic impacts; and are compatible

  13. Funding Opportunity: Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) in Engineering and Computer Science Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    The principal investigator of a RET in Engineering and Computer Science Site proposal must have a facultyFunding Opportunity: Research Experiences for Teachers (RET) in Engineering and Computer Science Site Sponsor: National Science Foundation Internal Deadline: July 1, 2013 Sponsor Deadline: October 7

  14. A PUBLICATION OF DOE'S SAVANNAH RIVER SITE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PARK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    #12;A PUBLICATION OF DOE'S SAVANNAH RIVER SITE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH PARK April 1990 River Ecology Laboratory Drawer E Aiken, SC 29802 USA #12;VEGETATION OF THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE: MAJOR COMMUNITY TYPES Sarah W. Workman Kenneth W. McLeod Savannah River Ecology Laboratory A Publication

  15. Social Network Sites (SNS): do they match ? Definitions and methods for social sciences and marketing research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Social Network Sites (SNS): do they match ? Definitions and methods for social sciences and marketing research Abstract : Social Networks Sites (SNS) such as Facebook, MySpace, Skyrock.com or Linkedin, a an analysis of the texts in core disciplines specialising in social networks analysis (mainly sociometry

  16. Final Report - Independent Verification Survey Activities at the Seperations Process Research Unit Sites, Niskayuna, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

  17. Off Site University Research (OSUR) | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One ofSpeeding access toSpeedingInnovation

  18. The MODEST questions: challenges and future directions in stellar cluster research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melvyn B. Davies; Pau Amaro-Seoane; Cees Bassa; Jim Dale; Francesca De Angeli; Marc Freitag; Pavel Kroupa; Dougal Mackey; M. Coleman Miller; Simon Portegies Zwart

    2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a review of some of the current major challenges in stellar cluster research, including young clusters, globular clusters, and galactic nuclei. Topics considered include: primordial mass segregation and runaway mergers, expulsion of gas from clusters, the production of stellar exotica seen in some clusters (eg blue stragglers and extreme horizontal--branch stars), binary populations within clusters, the black--hole population within stellar clusters, the final parsec problem, stellar dynamics around a massive black hole, and stellar collisions. The Modest Questions posed here are the outcome of discussions which took place at the Modest-6A workshop held in Lund, Sweden, in December, 2005. Modest-6A was organised as part of the activities of the Modest Collaboration (see www.manybody.org for further details)

  19. Characterize and explore potential sites and prepare research and development plan (site investigation study). Final draft. Task 2. Milestone report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A specific research and development plan to investigate the behavior and suitability of aquifers as compressed air energy storage (CAES) sites is presented. The proposed effort will evaluate present uncertainties in the performance of the underground energy storage subsystem and its impact on above ground plant design and cost. The project is planned to provide the utility industry with a quantitative basis for confidence that financial commitment to a demonstration plant and subsequent expansion is justified and poses acceptable risks. Activities in Phase II of a 5-phase overall CAES development program are reported. Information is included on the development of field testing specifications and schedules; selection of specific site for the conceptual design; development plan and schedule for the media site; development of analytical models of aquifer airflow; and well drilling requirements. As a result of these studies 14 sites in Illinois and Indiana were evaluated, 7 were ranked for suitability for CAES, and 4 were selected for possible use in the field testing program. Test procedures, the mathematical models and drilling requirments were developed. (LCL)

  20. Energy Research at UC Santa Barbara Energy is one of the most important challenges of the century. Energy research at the University of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akhmedov, Azer

    Energy Research at UC Santa Barbara Energy is one of the most important challenges of the century. Energy research at the University of California Santa Barbara (UC Santa Barbara) is largely focused on developing new technologies that increase energy efficiency, thereby reducing energy consumption. UC Santa

  1. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chapter six describes the basis for facility design, the completed facility conceptual design, the completed analytical work relating to the resolution of design issues, and future design-related work. The basis for design and the conceptual design information presented in this chapter meet the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, for a conceptual repository design that takes into account site-specific requirements. This information is presented to permit a critical evaluation of planned site characterization activities. Chapter seven describes waste package components, emplacement environment, design, and status of research and development that support the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) Project. The site characterization plan (SCP) discussion of waste package components is contained entirely within this chapter. The discussion of emplacement environment in this chapter is limited to considerations of the environment that influence, or which may influence, if perturbed, the waste packages and their performance (particularly hydrogeology, geochemistry, and borehole stability). The basis for conceptual waste package design as well as a description of the design is included in this chapter. The complete design will be reported in the advanced conceptual design (ACD) report and is not duplicated in the SCP. 367 refs., 173 figs., 68 tabs.

  2. DOE Research Set-Aside Areas of the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, C.E.; Janecek, L.L.

    1997-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Designated as the first of seven National Environmental Research Parks (NERPs) by the Atomic Energy Commission (now the Department of Energy), the Savannah River Site (SRS) is an important ecological component of the Southeastern Mixed Forest Ecoregion located along the Savannah River south of Aiken, South Carolina. Integral to the Savannah River Site NERP are the DOE Research Set-Aside Areas. Scattered across the SRS, these thirty tracts of land have been set aside for ecological research and are protected from public access and most routine Site maintenance and forest management activities. Ranging in size from 8.5 acres (3.44 ha) to 7,364 acres (2,980 ha), the thirty Set-Aside Areas total 14,005 acres (5,668 ha) and comprise approximately 7% of the Site`s total area. This system of Set-Aside Areas originally was established to represent the major plant communities and habitat types indigenous to the SRS (old-fields, sandhills, upland hardwood, mixed pine/hardwood, bottomland forests, swamp forests, Carolina bays, and fresh water streams and impoundments), as well as to preserve habitats for endangered, threatened, or rare plant and animal populations. Many long-term ecological studies are conducted in the Set-Asides, which also serve as control areas in evaluations of the potential impacts of SRS operations on other regions of the Site. The purpose of this document is to give an historical account of the SRS Set-Aside Program and to provide a descriptive profile of each of the Set-Aside Areas. These descriptions include a narrative for each Area, information on the plant communities and soil types found there, lists of sensitive plants and animals documented from each Area, an account of the ecological research conducted in each Area, locator and resource composition maps, and a list of Site-Use permits and publications associated with each Set-Aside.

  3. New Challenges in Contamination Control: The Leadership Role of IEST in Shaping Future Research and Practices.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tengfang; Eudy, Jane; Berndt, Charles

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New Challenges in Contamination Control: The Leadership RoleS&P) portion of the Contamination Control (CC) program,engineers, and contamination control professionals from all

  4. Lessons learned from bacterial transport research at the South Oyster Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheibe, T.; Hubbard, S.S.; Onstott, T.C.; DeFlaun, M.F.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a review of bacterial transport experiments conducted by a multi-investigator, multi-institution, multi-disciplinary team of researchers under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The experiments were conducted during the time period 1999-2001 at a field site near the town of Oyster, Virginia known as the South Oyster Site, and included four major experimental campaigns aimed at understanding and quantifying bacterial transport in the subsurface environment. Several key elements of the research are discussed here: (1) quantification of bacterial transport in physically, chemically and biologically heterogeneous aquifers, (2) evaluation of the efficacy of conventional colloid filtration theory, (3) scale effects in bacterial transport, (4) development of new methods for microbial enumeration and screening for low adhesion strains, (5) application of novel hydrogeophysical techniques for aquifer characterization, and (6) experiences regarding management of a large field research effort. Lessons learned are summarized in each of these areas. The body of literature resulting from South Oyster Site research has been widely cited and continues to influence research into the controls exerted by aquifer heterogeneity on reactive transport (including microbial transport). It also served as a model (and provided valuable experience) for subsequent and ongoing highly-instrumented field research efforts conducted by DOE-sponsored investigators.

  5. Accelerator Physics Accelerators form the backbone of SLAC's on-site experimental program. Research at SLAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    #12;Accelerator Physics Accelerators form the backbone of SLAC's on-site experimental program. Research at SLAC is continually improving accelerators, both here and at other laboratories, and paving the way for a new generation of particle acceleration technology. SLAC's famous linear accelerator

  6. Savannah River Site Salt Processing Project: FY2002 Research and Development Program Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harmon, Harry D.; Leugemors, Robert K.; Schlahta, Stephan N.; Fink, Samuel D.; Thompson, Major C.; Walker, Darrell D.

    2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Plan describes the technology development program for alpha/strontium removal and Caustic Side Solvent Extraction cesium removal in FY2002. Crystalline Silicotitanate and Small Tank Tetratphenylborate Precipitation are discussed as possible backup technologies. Previous results are summarized in the Savannah River Site Salt Processing Project Research and Development Summary Report

  7. Impacts of Humic Injection Experiments on the South Oyster Field Research Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John F. McCarthy

    2004-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A closure plan for the South Oyster Focus Area (SOFA) is being implemented to assess the impacts of a series of experimental injections of microorganisms, tracers and chemical amendments on the chemical and physical properties of the aquifer. The proposed research addresses environmental monitoring of humic substances injected into the aquifer, as described in the Site Closure Plan for the South Oyster Field Research Site. The goal of the research is to demonstrate that the dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the groundwater at and downgradient from the injection site has returned to a pre-injection �baseline� conditions with respect to either the concentration or chemical composition of the DOM. For clarity, the humic solution injected during the experiment will be referred to as �humic injectate.� The term �DOM� will refer to the organic material recovered in the groundwater, which includes the autochthonous groundwater DOM as well as any of the humic injectate remaining in the groundwater. Specific objectives include: � Estimate the amount of humic material remaining in the aquifer at the completion of the push-pull experiment and the potential for environmental impacts due to release of humics retained on the sediments. � Monitor the DOM concentrations in groundwater over time at the injection well and at sampling locations within the potential downgradient plume of the injected tracers. � Evaluate the chemical composition of the DOM to determine whether the injection experiment had an impact of the chemical properties of the aquifer. The product of this research will be a contribution to the Site Closure Report documenting the impact of the humic experiments on the aquifer. Return of the aquifer to a �baseline� conditions will be achieved if the DOM concentrations in the groundwater are determined over the course of the research to have decreased to the pre-injection level, or if the chemical properties of the DOM are similar to that of the autochthonous DOM.

  8. Site Selection and Geological Research Connected with High Level Waste Disposal Programme in the Czech Republic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomas, J.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Attempts to solve the problem of high-level waste disposal including the spent fuel from nuclear power plants have been made in the Czech Republic for over the 10 years. Already in 1991 the Ministry of Environment entitled The Czech Geological Survey to deal with the siting of the locality for HLW disposal and the project No. 3308 ''The geological research of the safe disposal of high level waste'' had started. Within this project a sub-project ''A selection of perspective HLW disposal sites in the Bohemian Massif'' has been elaborated and 27 prospective areas were identified in the Czech Republic. This selection has been later narrowed to 8 areas which are recently studied in more detail. As a parallel research activity with siting a granitic body Melechov Massif in Central Moldanubian Pluton has been chosen as a test site and the 1st stage of research i.e. evaluation and study of its geological, hydrogeological, geophysical, tectonic and structural properties has been already completed. The Melechov Massif was selected as a test site after the recommendation of WATRP (Waste Management Assessment and Technical Review Programme) mission of IAEA (1993) because it represents an area analogous with the host geological environment for the future HLW and spent fuel disposal in the Czech Republic, i.e. variscan granitoids. It is necessary to say that this site would not be in a locality where the deep repository will be built, although it is a site suitable for oriented research for the sampling and collection of descriptive data using up to date and advanced scientific methods. The Czech Republic HLW and spent fuel disposal programme is now based on The Concept of Radioactive Waste and Spent Nuclear Fuel Management (''Concept'' hereinafter) which has been prepared in compliance with energy policy approved by Government Decree No. 50 of 12th January 2000 and approved by the Government in May 2002. Preparation of the Concept was required, amongst other reasons in connection with preparations for the Czech Republic's accession to the European Union and in connection with the Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management adopted under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency, which was signed by the Czech Republic in 1997. According to the approved Concept it is expected that a deep geological repository in the Czech Republic will be built in granitic rocks.

  9. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. Chapter 3 summarizes present knowledge of the regional and site hydrologic systems. The purpose of the information presented is to (1) describe the hydrology based on available literature and preliminary site-exploration activities that have been or are being performed and (2) provide information to be used to develop the hydrologic aspects of the planned site characterization program. Chapter 4 contains geochemical information about the Yucca Mountain site. The chapter references plan for continued collection of geochemical data as a part of the site characterization program. Chapter 4 describes and evaluates data on the existing climate and site meterology, and outlines the suggested procedures to be used in developing and validating methods to predict future climatic variation. 534 refs., 100 figs., 72 tabs.

  10. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain site in Neavada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining hte geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare and environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

  11. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended and approved by the President for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in accordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site; to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package; and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstate the suitability of the site for a repository, to desin the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next; it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

  12. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended by the Secretary of Energy and approved by the President for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the requirements of the Nulcear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package;and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and developing a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing principles, and organization of the site characterization plan are oulined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed.

  13. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada: Consultation draft, Nuclear Waste Policy Act: Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain site in Nevada is one of three candidate sites for the first geologic repository for radioactive waste. On May 28, 1986, it was recommended for detailed study in a program of site characterization. This site characterization plan (SCP) has been prepared in acordance with the requirements of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act to summarize the information collected to date about the geologic conditions at the site;to describe the conceptual designs for the repository and the waste package and to present the plans for obtaining the geologic information necessary to demonstrate the suitability of the site for a repository, to design the repository and the waste package, to prepare an environmental impact statement, and to obtain from the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) an authorization to construct the repository. This introduction begins with a brief section on the process for siting and eveloping a repository, followed by a discussion of the pertinent legislation and regulations. A description of site characterization is presented next;it describes the facilities to be constructed for the site characterization program and explains the principal activities to be conducted during the program. Finally, the purpose, content, organizing prinicples, and organization of this site characterization plan are outlined, and compliance with applicable regulations is discussed. 880 refs., 130 figs., 25 tabs.

  14. US DOE-EM On-Site Disposal Cell Working Group - Fostering Communication On Performance Assessment Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, Roger R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Suttora, Linda C. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Site Restoration, Germantown, MD (United States); Phifer, Mark [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These facilities are typically developed with regulatory oversight from States and/or the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in addition to USDOE. The facilities are developed to meet design standards for disposal of hazardous waste as well as the USDOE performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. The involvement of multiple and different regulators for facilities across separate sites has resulted in some differences in expectations for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RA) that are developed for the disposal facilities. The USDOE-EM Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to performance and risk assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement. The working group holds teleconferences, as needed, focusing on specific topics of interest. The topics addressed to date include an assessment of the assumptions used for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RAs) for on-site disposal cells, requirements and assumptions related to assessment of inadvertent intrusion, DOE Manual 435.1-1 requirements, and approaches for consideration of the long-term performance of liners and covers in the context of PAs. The working group has improved communication among the staff and oversight personnel responsible for onsite disposal cells and has provided a forum to identify and resolve common concerns.

  15. Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs): A Response to Five Challenges for Science and the Imagination (2011 EFRC Summit, panel session)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Alivisatos, Paul (Director, LBNL); Crabtree, George (ANL); Dresselhaus, Mildred (MIT); Ratner, Mark (Northwestern University)

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A distinguished panel of speakers at the 2011 EFRC Summit looks at the EFRC Program and how it serves as a response to "Five Challenges for Science and the Imagination?, the culminating report that arose from a series of Basic Research Needs workshops. The panel members are Paul Alivisatos, the Director of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, George Crabtree, Distinguished Fellow at Argonne National Laboratory, Mildred Dresselhause, Institute Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and Mark Ratner, Professor at Northwestern University. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  16. Conceptual Site Treatment Plan Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research Environmental Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, T.E.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Facilities Compliance Act (the Act) of 1992 waives sovereign immunity for federal facilities for fines and penalties under the provisions of the Resource Recovery and Conservation Act, state, interstate, and local hazardous and solid waste management requirements. However, for three years the Act delays the waiver for violations involving US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The Act, however, requires that the DOE prepare a Conceptual Site Treatment Plan (CSTP) for each of its sites that generate or store mixed wastes (MWs). The purpose of the CSTP is to present DOE`s preliminary evaluations of the development of treatment capacities and technologies for treating a site`s MW. This CSTP presents the preliminary capacity and technology evaluation for the Laboratory for Energy-Related Health Research (LEHR). The five identified MW streams at LEHR are evaluated to the extent possible given available information. Only one MW stream is sufficiently well defined to permit a technology evaluation to be performed. Two other MW streams are in the process of being characterized so that an evaluation can be performed. The other two MW streams will be generated by the decommissioning of inactive facilities onsite within the next five years.

  17. Eastern Europe Research Reactor Initiative nuclear education and training courses - Current activities and future challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snoj, L. [Josef Stefan Inst., Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sklenka, L.; Rataj, J. [Dept. of Nuclear Reactor, Czech Technical Univ. in Prague, V Holesovickach 2, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Boeck, H. [Vienna Univ. of Technology/Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Eastern Europe Research Reactor Initiative was established in January 2008 to enhance cooperation between the Research Reactors in Eastern Europe. It covers three areas of research reactor utilisation: irradiation of materials and fuel, radioisotope production, neutron beam experiments, education and training. In the field of education and training an EERRI training course was developed. The training programme has been elaborated with the purpose to assist IAEA Member States, which consider building a research reactor (RR) as a first step to develop nuclear competence and infrastructure in the Country. The major strength of the reactor is utilisation of three different research reactors and a lot of practical exercises. Due to high level of adaptability, the course can be tailored to specific needs of institutions with limited or no access to research reactors. (authors)

  18. Academic Librarians & Open Access of Data:  Challenges & Opportunities in Research Data Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Daniel C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for some researchers Web archiving is another wayto capture at risk web data and archive it AtUCI we are beginning to consider web archiving a collection

  19. C u r r e n t s UCSD Libraries' New Web Site: The Smart Start for ResearchUCSD Libraries' New Web Site: The Smart Start for Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    1 C u r r e n t s UCSD Libraries' New Web Site: The Smart Start for ResearchUCSD Libraries' New Web Site: The Smart Start for Research N e w s f r o m t h e B i o m e d i c a l L i b r a r y a n d M e d faculty, staff, and stu- dents. Until recently using these services from home or an off-campus office

  20. Research Program at Maxey Flats and Consideration of Other Shallow Land Burial Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ,

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maxey Flats research program is a multidisciplinary, multilaboratory program with the objectives to define the radiochemical and chemical composition of leachates in the burial trenches, define the areal distribution of radionuclides on the site and the factors responsible for this distribution, define the concentrations of radionuclides in vegetation both on and offsite and the uptake of radionuclides by representative agricultural crops, define the atmospheric pathways for radionuclide transport and the mechanisms involved, determine the subsurface migration rates of radionuclides and the chemical, physical, biological, and hydrogeological factors which affect this migration. and evaluate the engineering practices which influence the seepage of surface waters into the burial trenches. The program was initiated in 1979 and a research meeting was held at the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Headquarters on July 16, 1980, to report the research findings of each of the participating laboratories and universities. Important observations from the research are included in the Summary and the results reported for each of the research efforts are summarized in the individual reports that are combined to form this document.

  1. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 1, Part A: Chapters 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 750 refs., 123 figs., 42 tabs.

  2. Site Characterization Plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 3, Part A: Chapters 6 and 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 218 figs., 50 tabs.

  3. Challenges in defining a radiologic and hydrologic source term for underground nuclear test centers, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, D.K.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The compilation of a radionuclide inventory for long-lived radioactive contaminants residual from nuclear testing provides a partial measure of the radiologic source term at the Nevada Test Site. The radiologic source term also includes potentially mobile short-lived radionuclides excluded from the inventory. The radiologic source term for tritium is known with accuracy and is equivalent to the hydrologic source term within the saturated zone. Definition of the total hydrologic source term for fission and activation products that have high activities for decades following underground testing involves knowledge and assumptions which are presently unavailable. Systematic investigation of the behavior of fission products, activation products and actinides under saturated or Partially saturated conditions is imperative to define a representative total hydrologic source term. This is particularly important given the heterogeneous distribution of radionuclides within testing centers. Data quality objectives which emphasize a combination of measurements and credible estimates of the hydrologic source term are a priority for near-field investigations at the Nevada Test Site.

  4. Implementation of MPC and A systems at the VNIIEF research (reactor) site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skripka, G.; Koloyartsev, V.; Mikijchuk, N. [Rossijskij Federal`nyj Yadernyj Tsentr, Arzamas (Russian Federation). Nauchno-Issledovatel`skij Inst. Ehksperimental`noj Fiziki] [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the US-Russian Lab-to-Lab program for strengthening nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A), an integrated MPC and A system is being installed at a large site within the VNIIEF complex to upgrade safeguards on the nuclear material stored and used at this site. In addition to storage facilities, the site houses a number of critical facilities at which nuclear physics research is conducted. The design of the MPC and A system is based on the test bed work presented earlier and provides the functions of nondestructive measurements for plutonium and highly enriched uranium, item control, personnel access control, radiation portal monitoring, and computed on-line accounting. The system controls, monitors, and accounts for nuclear material and people as the material moves through three material balance areas, a measurement room, and a number of control points. It also assists with physical inventory taking. The instrumentation used to implement these functions will include US commercial equipment as well as Russian-designed and -fabricated items.

  5. Seeding Change: The Challenges of Transfer and Transformation of Educational Practice and Research in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    issues: the Postdoctoral Fellowships in Mathematics Science Engineering and Technology Education preparation programs, one for physics graduate students and one for postdocs. Both programs focus, and regional and research universities); · Providing physics graduate students with professional and career

  6. Unintended effects of changes in NIH appropriations : challenges for biomedical research workforce development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez Diaz, Mauricio

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. government doubled NIH appropriations between 1998 and 2003, aiming to significantly foster research activities in biomedicine. However, several indicators demonstrate not only that the impact of the budget increase ...

  7. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES AT SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H CANYON FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, L.; Fuller, Kenneth

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site's (SRS) H Canyon Facility is the only large scale, heavily shielded, nuclear chemical separations plant still in operation in the U.S. The facility's operations historically recovered uranium-235 (U-235) and neptunium-237 (Np-237) from aluminum-clad, enriched-uranium fuel tubes from Site nuclear reactors and other domestic and foreign research reactors. Today the facility, in conjunction with HB Line, is working to provide the initial feed material to the Mixed Oxide Facility also located on SRS. Many additional campaigns are also in the planning process. Furthermore, the facility has started to integrate collaborative research and development (R&D) projects into its schedule. H Canyon can serve as the appropriate testing location for many technologies focused on monitoring the back end of the fuel cycle, due to the nature of the facility and continued operation. H Canyon, in collaboration with the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), has been working with several groups in the DOE complex to conduct testing demonstrations of novel technologies at the facility. The purpose of conducting these demonstrations at H Canyon will be to demonstrate the capabilities of the emerging technologies in an operational environment. This paper will summarize R&D testing activities currently taking place in H Canyon and discuss the possibilities for future collaborations.

  8. Use of comparative genomics approaches to characterize interspecies differences in response to environmental chemicals: Challenges, opportunities, and research needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess-Herbert, Sarah L., E-mail: sarah.burgess@alum.mit.edu [American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 2009–10 (United States); Euling, Susan Y. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A critical challenge for environmental chemical risk assessment is the characterization and reduction of uncertainties introduced when extrapolating inferences from one species to another. The purpose of this article is to explore the challenges, opportunities, and research needs surrounding the issue of how genomics data and computational and systems level approaches can be applied to inform differences in response to environmental chemical exposure across species. We propose that the data, tools, and evolutionary framework of comparative genomics be adapted to inform interspecies differences in chemical mechanisms of action. We compare and contrast existing approaches, from disciplines as varied as evolutionary biology, systems biology, mathematics, and computer science, that can be used, modified, and combined in new ways to discover and characterize interspecies differences in chemical mechanism of action which, in turn, can be explored for application to risk assessment. We consider how genetic, protein, pathway, and network information can be interrogated from an evolutionary biology perspective to effectively characterize variations in biological processes of toxicological relevance among organisms. We conclude that comparative genomics approaches show promise for characterizing interspecies differences in mechanisms of action, and further, for improving our understanding of the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating inferences across species in both ecological and human health risk assessment. To achieve long-term relevance and consistent use in environmental chemical risk assessment, improved bioinformatics tools, computational methods robust to data gaps, and quantitative approaches for conducting extrapolations across species are critically needed. Specific areas ripe for research to address these needs are recommended.

  9. Solar energy research at Princeton University Universities today bear the same responsibility to confront environmental challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar energy research at Princeton University Universities today bear the same responsibility in anticipation of increased power demands required by almost two million square feet of new development by the central power facility that provides power, heating, and cooling to campus buildings. Although additional

  10. Exploring challenges and strategies when using medical databases in research: a review 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calanzani, Natalia; Vojt, Gaby; Campbell, Christine; Weller, David

    2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of medical databases in research is well-established in the UK, and is likely to intensify further with the launch of the care.data programme in England. However, managing and analysing these datasets is not straightforward. Specialised...

  11. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research and Development: FY 2006 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wil Lewis, editor

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site–Directed Research and Development (SDRD) program completed its fifth successful year of research and development activities in FY 2006. Forty new projects were selected for funding this year, and ten FY 2005 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $6 million, for an average per-project cost of $120 thousand. Beginning in May, 2006 programmatic burden rates were applied to SDRD project costs. An external audit conducted in September 2006 verified that appropriate accounting practices were applied to the SDRD program. Highlights for the year included: the filing of 27 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2006 projects; programmatic adoption of four FY 2005 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-Lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2006 projects; and the successful completion of 50 R&D projects, as presented in this report.

  12. Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration. FY2005 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Will Lewis, Compiler

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site-Directed Research, Development, and Demonstration (SDRD) program completed a very successful year of research and development activities in FY 2005. Fifty new projects were selected for funding this year, and five FY 2004 projects were brought to conclusion. The total funds expended by the SDRD program were $5.4 million, for an average per project cost of just under $100,000. Two external audits of SDRD accounting practices were conducted in FY 2005. Both audits found the program's accounting practices consistent with the requirements of DOE Order 413.2A, and one included the observation that the NTS contractor ''did an exceptional job in planning and executing year-start activities.'' Highlights for the year included: the filing of 18 invention disclosures for intellectual property generated by FY 2005 projects; programmatic adoption of 17 FY 2004 SDRD-developed technologies; participation in the tri-lab Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) and SDRD program review that was broadly attended by NTS, NNSA, LDRD, and U.S. Department of Homeland Security representatives; peer reviews of all FY 2005 projects; and the successful completion of 55 R&D projects, as presented in this report.

  13. Nevada National Security Site-Directed Research and Development FY 2011 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howard Bender, comp.

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This fiscal year 2011 annual report of the Site-Directed Research and Development program, the 10th anniversary edition, recognizes a full decade of innovative R&D accomplishments in support of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Last year the NNSS itself was renamed to reflect a diversifying mission, and our R&D program has contributed significantly to shape emerging missions that will continue to evolve. New initiatives in stockpile stewardship science, nonproliferation, and treaty verification and monitoring have had substantial successes in FY 2011, and many more accomplishments are expected. SDRD is the cornerstone on which many of these initiatives rest. Historically supporting our main focus areas, SDRD is also building a solid foundation for new, and non-traditional, emerging national security missions. The program continues its charter to advance science and technology for a broad base of agencies including the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), and many others.

  14. Overview of Fiscal Year 2002 Research and Development for Savannah River Site's Salt Waste Processing Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. D. Harmon, R. Leugemors, PNNL; S. Fink, M. Thompson, D. Walker, WSRC; P. Suggs, W. D. Clark, Jr

    2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) high-level waste program is responsible for storage, treatment, and immobilization of high-level waste for disposal. The Salt Processing Program (SPP) is the salt (soluble) waste treatment portion of the SRS high-level waste effort. The overall SPP encompasses the selection, design, construction and operation of treatment technologies to prepare the salt waste feed material for the site's grout facility (Saltstone) and vitrification facility (Defense Waste Processing Facility). Major constituents that must be removed from the salt waste and sent as feed to Defense Waste Processing Facility include actinides, strontium, cesium, and entrained sludge. In fiscal year 2002 (FY02), research and development (R&D) on the actinide and strontium removal and Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) processes transitioned from technology development for baseline process selection to providing input for conceptual design of the Salt Waste Processing Facility. The SPP R&D focused on advancing the technical maturity, risk reduction, engineering development, and design support for DOE's engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) contractors for the Salt Waste Processing Facility. Thus, R&D in FY02 addressed the areas of actual waste performance, process chemistry, engineering tests of equipment, and chemical and physical properties relevant to safety. All of the testing, studies, and reports were summarized and provided to the DOE to support the Salt Waste Processing Facility, which began conceptual design in September 2002.

  15. Harnessing Light: Capitalizing on Optical Science Trends and Challenges for Future Research. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svedberg, Erik

    2014-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The committee has during the earlier period finalized their work on the report, Optics and Photonics: Essential Technologies for Our Nation (2013) . The report did undergo review and initial editorial processing. The NRC released a pre-publication report on August 13, 2012. A final report is now available. The study director has been able to practice his skills in running a national academies committee. From a research perspective the grant has generated a report with recommendations to the government. The work itself is the meetings where the committee convened to hear presenters and to discuss the status of optics and photonics as well as writing the report.

  16. 2003 Georgia Basin/Puget Sound Research Conference Challenge and Directions Statement: Securing a Sustainable Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karlsen, Erik; Gaydos, Joseph K.; Dowty, Peter; Fraser, David; Lesperance, Ann M.; Kay, Bruce; Rylko, M.; Ronald, Peter

    2003-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2003 GB-PS Research Conference has demonstrated that although much has been done to stem toxic pollution and to contain urban growth, as well as to protect and restore ecosystems in this outstanding region, many environmental health and ecosystem function issues remain and emerging ones are being recognized. More needs to be done to minimize the ongoing degradation and loss and to protect, recover, and restore the natural qualities of this regional ecosystem if we are to secure its sustainable future. This "directions statement" was prepared by several of the members of the technical steering committee from both the US and Canada.

  17. Problem statement:Problem statement:Problem statement:Problem statement: A major challenge for all researchers is the long term preservation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    "version" is always available and accessible · Data backup, replication and preservation are managed Institute of Sustainability is developing the Virtual Notebook, a knowledge management system, to help our researchers is the long term preservation of their research data. This complex challenge covers not only

  18. Electron Transport at the Microbe–Mineral Interface: A Synthesis of Current Research Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, David; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many bacterial and archaeal species can couple growth to the respiratory reduction or oxidation of insoluble mineral oxides of transition metals. These solid substrates are abundant electron sinks and sources for life on Earth, but, since they are insoluble in water, they cannot enter the bacterial cells. So, to exploit these electron sinks and sources, specific respiratory electron-transfer mechanisms must overcome the physical limitations associated with electron transfer between a microbe and extracellular metal oxides. Recent microbiological, geochemical, biochemical, spectroscopic and structural work is beginning to shed light on the molecular mechanism and impacts of electron transfer at themicrobe–mineral interface from a nanometre to kilometre scale. The research field is attracting attention in applied quarters from those with interests in nanowires, microbial fuel cells, bioremediation and microbial cell factories.

  19. Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada; Volume 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

  20. Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain site, Nevada research and development area, Nevada; Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high- level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guideline for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EA), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that it is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as of five sites suitable for characterization.

  1. Environmental assessment: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada; Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. The site is in the Great Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. To determine their suitability, the Yucca Mountain site and the eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE`s General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. These evaluations were reported in draft environmental assessments (EAs), which were issued for public review and comment. After considering the comments received on the draft EAs, the DOE prepared the final EAs. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Yucca Mountain site is not disqualified under the guidelines. The DOE has also found that is is suitable for site characterization because the evidence does not support a conclusion that the site will not be able to meet each of the qualifying conditions specified in the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Yucca Mountain site as one of five sites suitable for characterization.

  2. PoroTomo Subtask 3.8D - Raw Pressure Data from Boise Hydrogephysical Research Site (BHRS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Lim

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressure data from a phreatic aquifer was collected in the summer of 2013 during Multi-frequency Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography pumping tests. All tests were performed at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site. The data will be inverted using a fast steady-periodic adjoint-based inverse code.

  3. PoroTomo Subtask 3.8D - Raw Pressure Data from Boise Hydrogephysical Research Site (BHRS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    David Lim

    Pressure data from a phreatic aquifer was collected in the summer of 2013 during Multi-frequency Oscillatory Hydraulic Tomography pumping tests. All tests were performed at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site. The data will be inverted using a fast steady-periodic adjoint-based inverse code.

  4. Detection and Extraction of Text Connected to Graphics in Maps The separation of text from graphics has been challenging researchers for many years. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Chew Lim

    Detection and Extraction of Text Connected to Graphics in Maps Abstract The separation of text from graphics has been challenging researchers for many years. The difficulty arises when there is text connected to graphics. This paper proposes a specific method of detecting and extracting graphics

  5. Research on jet mixing of settled sludges in nuclear waste tanks at Hanford and other DOE sites: A historical perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, M.R.; Onishi, Y.; Shekarriz, R.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jet mixer pumps will be used in the Hanford Site double-shell tanks to mobilize and mix the settled solids layer (sludge) with the tank supernatant liquid. Predicting the performance of the jet mixer pumps has been the subject of analysis and testing at Hanford and other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) waste sites. One important aspect of mixer pump performance is sludge mobilization. The research that correlates mixer pump design and operation with the extent of sludge mobilization is the subject of this report. Sludge mobilization tests have been conducted in tanks ranging from 1/25-scale (3 ft-diameter) to full scale have been conducted at Hanford and other DOE sites over the past 20 years. These tests are described in Sections 3.0 and 4.0 of this report. The computational modeling of sludge mobilization and mixing that has been performed at Hanford is discussed in Section 5.0.

  6. Adaptation of eastern white pine provenances to planting sites. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demeritt, M.E.; Garrett, P.W.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eastern white pine provenances from the extreme limits of the natural range of this species are changing from above- and below-average stability to average stability for height growth with increasing age. The regression method is useful for evaluating the stability of provenance to planting sites. The same general conclusions are reached for the performance at different planting sites from the regression method as from the relative difference method.

  7. Appendix B: Site Visit Reports. Assessment of Research Needs for Coal Utilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penner, S.S.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This section contains edited copies of site-visit and other reports prepared by CCAWG members. Some of the hand-out materials prepared by DOE contractors and others are included (without explication) to permit readers the construction of a coherent picture of work in progress.

  8. Structure and Function of Chihuahuan Desert Ecosystem The Jornada Basin Long-Term Ecological Research Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Land degradation in most of the Chihuahuan Desert is characterized by a shift from grass- to shrub objective where perennial plants have been completely lost from a site, whereas the term reclamation is used to support revegetation, reclamation, and restoration objectives. This chapter is organized into three

  9. COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES RESEARCH INSTITUTE (CSMRI) SITE FLOOD PLAIN AREA CLEANUP FACT SHEET & PROJECT SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In 1992 a water main break at the Site flooded a tailings pond that overflowed into Clear Creek. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency excavated and stockpiled soil from the tailings pond and surrounding area at the west end of the former tailings pond area previously cleaned up by EPA was found to contain

  10. The solar energy challenge?Seth Darling

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Seth Darling

    2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne researcher Seth Darling talks about the solar energy challenge in creating alternative sources of energy

  11. Data Archive of the Harvard Forest, a Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Site

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Since 1907 research and education have been the mission of the Harvard Forest is one of the oldest and most intensively studied forests in North America. Located in Petersham, Massachusetts, its 3000 acres of land have been a center of research and education since 1907. The Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) program, established in 1988 and funded by the National Science Foundation, provides a framework for much of this activity. An understanding of forest responses to natural and human disturbance and environmental change over broad spatial and temporal scales pulls together research topics including biodiversity studies, the effects of invasive organisms, large experiments and permanent plot studies, historical and retrospective studies, soil nutrient dynamics, and plant population and community ecological interactions. Major research in forest-atmosphere exchange, hydrology, and regional studies places the work in regional and global context, aided by modeling tools. Conservation and management research and linkages to policy have been part of the Forest since its beginning, and the approaches used in New England can often apply to international studies. [Copied from http://harvardforest.fas.harvard.edu/research.html] In addition to more than 150 datasets, the Visual Information Access system at Harvard University Library makes nearly 900 images pertaining to Harvard Forest research available online to the public.

  12. Chemistry Research Projects Available to Undergraduates Consult Individual Faculty Members' Web Sites for More Details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    . · Applications to solar energy conversion or electrocatalysis. · Design and synthesis of mixedmetal and photochemical energy storage. · Particular emphasis is placed on probing the propertiesChemistry Research Projects Available to Undergraduates Consult Individual Faculty Members' Web

  13. The Role of Research Universities in Helping Solve our Energy Challenges: A Case Study at Stanford and SLAC (2011 EFRC Summit)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hennessey, John (President, Stanford University)

    2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The first speaker in the 2011 EFRC Summit session titled "Leading Perspectives in Energy Research" was John Hennessey, President of Stanford University. He discussed the important role that the academic world plays as a partner in innovative energy research by presenting a case study involving Stanford and SLAC. The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate research that transforms the future of energy and the environment.

  14. EA-1924: Consolidation and Relocation of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) OffSite Research Programs to a New Off-Site Location that also Allows for Future Growth, San Francisco East Bay Area, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to consolidate and relocate LBNL research programs that are currently in leased off-site buildings at various locations around the San Francisco East Bay Area in California, to a new single location that also provides room for future growth of LBNL research programs.

  15. Collaborative Research: hydrogeological-geophysical methods for subsurface site characterization. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G. [Stanford Univ., CA (US); Rubin, Y.N. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'The general purpose is the subsurface characterization of LLNL superfund site. The goal is to get the most accurate map of the hydrogeological parameters, necessary for modeling and designing the cleanup efforts at the site, using well log data and remote sensing geophysical techniques. In the second year of the project progress has been made in several areas: gathering and interpreting Vertical Seismic Profile (VSP) and Electromagnetic (EM) surveys; investigating the impact of various seismic measurements on upscaling of rock physics relations between sediment properties; and developing a new approach to integrate geophysical and hydrological data using state of the art methods to characterize the subsurface lithology. Vertical Seismic Profile data has been gathered from selected wells at the Treatment Facility D (TFD) during April 1996 and April 1998. The most striking finding here is the detection of anomalies related to saturation conditions. Preliminary results have revealed three anomalously low acoustic velocity zones with velocities below 1,000 m/s; this is lower than the natural acoustic velocity in saturated media by pure water (1,500 m/s). These three zones appear to be associated with HSUs 3a, 3b and 5. Velocities below 600 m/s have been revealed in the 3a and 3b HSUs (http://www.ce.Berkeley.edu/{approximately}ezzedine/DOE/paul.html). The authors believe that these anomalies are indicative of partial saturation. This explanation is supported by the water samples taken from pumping stations near the VSP well sites which appears to contain air bubbles. A gas analysis of water samples has not yet been performed. The authors hypothesize that this gas can be either air being sucked-in from the vadose zone above the water table, or from some chemical reaction. As a matter of fact, the natural water table level at this site was around 20 m below ground surface before any large scale pumping began, and had dropped to 25.5 m, in April 98. Furthermore, some of these low velocity zones are occurring not only in the major free-flowing sand or gravel parts of the HSU, but in boundary layers of silty sand either above or below the main HSU conductor. An electromagnetic survey was conducted at the site during June 4--25, 1997, and they worked on its interpretation. Seven cross well EM data sets were collected. Both 1D and 2D simulations, approximating the actual site and survey setup, were conducted. The 1D simulations were conducted using the code EM1D for one data set. Newman and Alumbaugh''s 3D forward code was used to simulate the response of both a resistive layer (representing HSU 4) and a conductive layer at the same location. Three separate inversion algorithms were applied to the data: Newman and Alumbaugh''s 2.5D finite difference and integral solution algorithm, Alumbaugh''s iterative Born approximation with a cylindrical symmetry, and Tseng''s 3D extended born approximation. The field EM data are still being analyzed.'

  16. Grazing on regeneration sites encourages pine seedling growth. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratliff, R.D.; Denton, R.G.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Effects of season-long, deferred-rotation, and rest-rotation grazing, on ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. ex Laws.) seedling growth and herbaceous vegetation control were studied in regeneration sites at Boyd Hill, Modoc National Forest, California. Seedlings were planted in 1989. Pine seedling survival and damage did not differ, but the seedlings were significantly taller, with longer leaders with season-long grazing than without grazing. Treatment comparisons for plant group and non-plant percent cover differed only for litter and bare soil, but cover and composition of bottlebrush squirreltail (Elymus elymoides (Raf.) Swezey) were greater without grazing.

  17. Collaborative Research: Hydrogeological-Geophysical Methods for Subsurface Site Characterization - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, G.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research contributes three newly-developed relationships that significantly improve aquifer characterization: (1) a general relationship between total and channel porosities, (2) a general relationship between electrical resistivity and channel porosity, and (3) bounds on the electrical resistivity - seismic velocity relationship.

  18. 1996 Oxford University Press 47094718Nucleic Acids Research, 1996, Vol. 24, No. 23 Logitlinear models for the prediction of splice sites in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brendel, Volker

    © 1996 Oxford University Press 4709­4718Nucleic Acids Research, 1996, Vol. 24, No. 23 Logitlinear the degree of fit to some average signal pattern around known splice sites in a learning set (e.g., 3

  19. The National Criticality Experiments Research Center at the Device Assembly Facility, Nevada National Security Site: Status and Capabilities, Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Bess; J. Werner

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) was officially opened on August 29, 2011. Located within the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), the NCERC has become a consolidation facility within the United States for critical configuration testing, particularly those involving highly enriched uranium (HEU). The DAF is a Department of Energy (DOE) owned facility that is operated by the National Nuclear Security Agency/Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). User laboratories include the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Personnel bring their home lab qualifications and procedures with them to the DAF, such that non-site specific training need not be repeated to conduct work at DAF. The NNSS Management and Operating contractor is National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) and the NNSS Safeguards and Security contractor is Wackenhut Services. The complete report provides an overview and status of the available laboratories and test bays at NCERC, available test materials and test support configurations, and test requirements and limitations for performing sub-critical and critical tests. The current summary provides a brief summary of the facility status and the method by which experiments may be introduced to NCERC.

  20. REVISED FINAL REPORT – INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY ACTIVITIES AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT SITES, NISKAYUNA, NEW YORK – DCN 0496-SR-06-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

  1. AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The AWEA Wind Project Siting Seminar takes an in-depth look at the latest siting challenges and identify opportunities to reduce risks associated with the siting and operation of wind farms to...

  2. Supercomputing Challenge top winners: Los Alamos schools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputing Challenge top winners: Los Alamos schools Supercomputing Challenge top winners: Los Alamos schools Cole Kendrick won the top prize for his research project,...

  3. Site Support Program Plan Infrastructure Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fiscal Year 1996 Infrastructure Program Site Support Program Plan addresses the mission objectives, workscope, work breakdown structures (WBS), management approach, and resource requirements for the Infrastructure Program. Attached to the plan are appendices that provide more detailed information associated with scope definition. The Hanford Site`s infrastructure has served the Site for nearly 50 years during defense materials production. Now with the challenges of the new environmental cleanup mission, Hanford`s infrastructure must meet current and future mission needs in a constrained budget environment, while complying with more stringent environmental, safety, and health regulations. The infrastructure requires upgrading, streamlining, and enhancement in order to successfully support the site mission of cleaning up the Site, research and development, and economic transition.

  4. Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing:A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues,recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, anddescriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

  5. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 2, Part A: Chapters 3, 4, and 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1--5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 575 refs., 84 figs., 68 tabs.

  6. Biological and Environmental Research: Climate and Environmental Sciences Division: U.S./European Workshop on Climate Change Challenges and Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mather, James [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; McCord, Raymond [Oak Ridge National Laboratory] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Sisterson, Doug [Argonne National Laboratory] [Argonne National Laboratory; Voyles, Jimmy [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The workshop aimed to identify outstanding climate change science questions and the observational strategies for addressing them. The scientific focus was clouds, aerosols, and precipitation, and the required ground- and aerial-based observations. The workshop findings will be useful input for setting priorities within the Department of Energy (DOE) and the participating European centers. This joint workshop was envisioned as the first step in enhancing the collaboration among these climate research activities needed to better serve the science community.

  7. Site Index - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariate Metal-OrganicPulseSimulation,Site Index

  8. Isolation and Characterization of Mobile Genetic Elements from Microbial Assemblages Obtained from the Field Research Center Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia Sobecky; Cassie Hodges; Kerri Lafferty; Mike Humphreys; Melanie Raimondo; Kristin Tuttle; Tamar Barkay

    2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable knowledge has been gained from the intensive study of a relatively limited group of bacterial plasmids. Recent efforts have begun to focus on the characterization of, at the molecular level, plasmid populations and associated mobile genetic elements (e.g., transposons, integrons) occurring in a wider range of aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Surprisingly, however, little information is available regarding the incidence and distribution of mobile genetic elements extant in contaminated subsurface environments. Such studies will provide greater knowledge on the ecology of plasmids and their contributions to the genetic plasticity (and adaptation) of naturally occurring subsurface microbial communities. We requested soil cores from the DOE NABIR Field Research Center (FRC) located on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The cores, received in February 2003, were sampled from four areas on the Oak Ridge Site: Area 1, Area 2, Area 3 (representing contaminated subsurface locales) and the background reference sites. The average core length (24 in) was subdivided into three profiles and soil pH and moisture content were determined. Uranium concentration was also determined in bulk samples. Replicate aliquots were fixed for total cell counts and for bacterial isolation. Four different isolation media were used to culture aerobic and facultative microbes from these four study areas. Colony forming units ranged from a minimum of 100 per gram soil to a maximum of 10,000 irrespective of media composition used. The vast majority of cultured subsurface isolates were gram-positive isolates and plasmid characterization was conducted per methods routinely used in the Sobecky laboratory. The percentage of plasmid incidence ranged from 10% to 60% of all isolates tested. This frequency appears to be somewhat higher than the incidence of plasmids we have observed in other habitats and we are increasing the number of isolates screened to confirm this observation. We are also characterizing the plasmid populations at the molecular level. Isolates cultured from the background control site exhibited the lowest occurrence of plasmids (10%). Aliquots of samples were also used in enrichment assays to isolate metal resistant subsurface isolates. Samples were subjected to three different metals (chromium, mercury and cadmium) at two different concentrations and incubated following a conditioning period in which samples were amended with a carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus source. Isolates were plated on metal selection, purified to single isolates and plasmid content determined.

  9. "Fundamental Challenges in Solar Energy Conversion" workshop...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Fundamental Challenges in Solar Energy Conversion" workshop hosted by LMI-EFRC Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events...

  10. UMore Park Update October 2013 UMore Park. The University of Minnesota Outreach, Research and Education (UMore) Park is a 5,000-acre site 25 miles southeast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amin, S. Massoud

    UMore Park Update ­ October 2013 UMore Park. The University of Minnesota Outreach, Research and Education (UMore) Park is a 5,000-acre site 25 miles southeast of the Twin Cities at the suburban presentation set for October 11 The UMore Development LLC will provide an update on UMore Park activities

  11. Supercomputing Challenge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4th New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge April 22, 2014 Modeling Tree Growth and Resource Use with Applications LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 22, 2014-The dynamic duo of Eli Echt-Wilson...

  12. Supercomputing Challenge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3rd New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge April 23, 2013 Clustering algorithms to find correlations, "meaningful" words, topics LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 23, 2013-A trio of Albuquerque...

  13. Supercomputing Challenge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manzano High School student wins top award in 22nd New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge April 24, 2012 LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, April 24, 2012-Jordan Medlock of Albuquerque's Manzano...

  14. Discriminant-function approach to ecological site classification in northern New England. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fincher, J.; Smith, M.L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report describes one approach to ecologically based classification of upland forest community types of the White and Green Mountain physiographic regions. The classification approach is based on an intensive statistical analysis of the relationship between the communities and soil-site factors. Discriminant functions useful in distinguishing between types based on soil-site factors most strongly correlated with their distribution over the landscape are presented.

  15. alpine site jungfraujoch: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 166 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  16. allosteric site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 69 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  17. affect redd site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 62 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  18. agnostic splice site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 279 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  19. agent dumping site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 357 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  20. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, February 2011 to January 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, P.E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    concentration * [mM] Isotope enrichment * 150 [CH 3 COO -enrichment of tank groundwater by 400‰; dD of tank water ~280‰; Cambridge Isotope

  1. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, February 2011 to January 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, P.E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHARACTERIZATION OF U CONTAMINATION AND SOLID PHASE MINERALOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY IN THE RIFLE SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS. Geological

  2. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, February 2011 to January 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, P.E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D.R. , 2008. Sustained removal of uranium from contaminatedAnderson, R.T. , 2007. Uranium Removal from Groundwater viaand highly effective removal of uranium from groundwater at

  3. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, February 2011 to January 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, P.E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between aqueous Fe(II) and goethite: An Fe isotope tracerEffect of amended goethite on microbial communityP.R. , 2009. Effect of 57Fe-goethite Amendment on Microbial

  4. The solar energy challenge-Seth Darling | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The solar energy challenge-Seth Darling Share Description Argonne researcher Seth Darling talks about the solar energy challenge. Topic Energy Energy sources Renewable energy Solar...

  5. Nuclear Proliferation and Grand Challenges

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McCarthy, Kathy

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear engineer Dr. Kathy McCarthy leads systems analysis. She talks about proliferation and the grand challenges of nuclear R&D. For more information about INL energy research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  6. UKERC ENERGY RESEARCH ATLAS: CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE (version 10 February 2008) Section 1: An overview which includes a broad characterisation of research activity in the sector and the key research challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    UKERC ENERGY RESEARCH ATLAS: CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE (version 10 February 2008) Section 1 Research and Technology Development (RTD) Programmes. Section 8: UK participation in energy-related EU international initiatives, including those supported by the International Energy Agency. Version 1.2 published

  7. Development of red oak seedlings using plastic shelters on hardwood sites in West Virginia. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, H.C.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plastic shelters were used to grow red oak seedlings on good-to-excellent Appalachian hardwood growing sites in north central West Virginia. Preliminary results indicate that shelters have the potential to stimulate development of red oak seedlingheight growth, especially if height growth continues once the seedling tops are above the 5-foot-tall shelters.

  8. Experience in Remote Demolition of the Activated Biological Shielding of the Multi Purpose Research Reactor (MZFR) on the German Karlsruhe Site - 12208

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eisenmann, Beata; Fleisch, Joachim; Prechtl, Erwin; Suessdorf, Werner; Urban, Manfred [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O.Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2009, WAK Decommissioning and Waste Management GmbH (WAK) became owner and operator of the waste treatment facilities of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) as well as of the prototype reactors, the Compact Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (KNK) and Multi-Purpose Reactor (MZFR), both being in an advanced stage of dismantling. Together with the dismantling and decontamination activities of the former WAK reprocessing facility since 1990, the envisaged demolishing of the R and D reactor FR2 and a hot cell facility, all governmentally funded nuclear decommissioning projects on the Karlsruhe site are concentrated under the WAK management. The small space typical of prototype research reactors represented a challenge also during the last phase of activated dismantling, dismantling of the activated biological shield of the MZFR. Successful demolition of the biological shield required detailed planning and extensive testing in the years before. In view of the limited space and the ambient dose rate that was too high for manual work, it was required to find a tool carrier system to take up and control various demolition and dismantling tools in a remote manner. The strategy formulated in the concept of dismantling the biological shield by means of a modified electro-hydraulic demolition excavator in an adaptable working scaffolding turned out to be feasible. The following boundary conditions were essential: - Remote exchange of the dismantling and removal tools in smallest space. - Positioning of various supply facilities on the working platform. - Avoiding of interfering edges. - Optimization of mass flow (removal of the dismantled mass from the working area). - Maintenance in the surroundings of the dismantling area (in the controlled area). - Testing and qualification of the facilities and training of the staff. Both the dismantling technique chosen and the proceeding selected proved to be successful. Using various designs of universal cutters developed on the basis of wall saws, both the activated steel liner and the inner reinforcing layer were cut remotely in one process. This allowed for the efficient execution of the following remote concrete removal steps using mining techniques. The electro-hydraulic demolition excavator that was purchased and then modified turned out to be an ideal tool carrier system with rapid-exchange coupling. Due to the high availability, no major delays occurred. This also was a result of the consistently implemented maintenance and repair concept. With the excavator installed in a modifiable scaffolding suspended from a rotating carrier ring, all dismantling areas could be reached and treated in spite of the small space. Thanks to an optimum organization of work-flows, routine change of dismantling work, and maintenance or repair, the iterative radiological measurement campaigns could be integrated in the whole activity without the dismantling work being disturbed significantly. The ventilation system with pressure grading and pre-filtration units ensured a low contamination level in the dismantling area. It was also possible to manage the dust formed by the milling of concrete surfaces. As it was possible to further cut metal parts and crushed concrete later on, residue flows were optimized. The planned overall period for testing, dismantling the bio-shield and removing the equipment was 36 months. The final duration was 39 months. (authors)

  9. How to reconcile product standardization and diversity of agricultural practices? A challenge for research-action in partnership: the case of farmers' organizations in Costa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .) with high level risks related to price variations in international markets. Farmers' organizations play standards. In Costa Rica three stakeholders; a farmers' organization MNC (Mesa Nacional CaHow to reconcile product standardization and diversity of agricultural practices? A challenge

  10. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-B: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Design well program; LaFourche Crossing; MG-T/DOE Amoco Fee No. 1 (Sweet Lake); Environmental monitoring at Sweet Lake; Air quality; Water quality; Microseismic monitoring; Subsidence; Dow/DOE L.R. Sweezy No. 1 well; Reservoir testing; Environmental monitoring at Parcperdue; Air monitoring; Water runoff; Groundwater; Microseismic events; Subsidence; Environmental consideration at site; Gladys McCall No. 1 well; Test results of Gladys McCall; Hydrocarbons in production gas and brine; Environmental monitoring at the Gladys McCall site; Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well; Pleasant Bayou hybrid power system; Environmental monitoring at Pleasant Bayou; and Plug abandonment and well site restoration of three geopressured-geothermal test sites. 197 figs., 64 tabs.

  11. Hanford Challenge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal848 Unlimited Release1/2OctoberChallenge 219 tst

  12. Results of the radiological survey at the Sacandaga site Glenville, New York. Waste Management Research and Development Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, R.D.; Cottrell, W.D.; Carrier, R.F.

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sacandaga site, located on Sacandaga Road, Glenville, New York, was operated by the General Electric Company for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) between 1947 and 1951. Originally used for the study and development of radar during World War II, the facilities housed later operations involving physics studies and sodium technology development in support of breeder reactor design and other AEC programs. Though not in use since the original equipment was dismantled and removed in the early 1950s, portions of the 51-acre site are known to contain buried rubble from demolished structures used in former operations. At the request of the Office of Naval Reactors through the Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, a characterization of current radiological conditions over the site was performed between August and October 1989. The survey included the measurement of direct radiation levels (gamma, alpha, and beta-gamma) over all surfaces both inside and outside the building and tunnel, radionuclide analysis of systematic, biased, and auger hole soil samples, and analysis of sediments from underground structures. Gamma logging of auger holes was conducted and removable contamination levels inside the tunnel were determined. Samples of soil and structural materials from within and around an excavated concrete bunker were analyzed to determine concentrations of radionuclides and nonradioactive elemental beryllium.

  13. 1997 Oxford University Press49945002 Nucleic Acids Research, 1997, Vol. 25, No. 24 Information analysis of Fis binding sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Thomas D.

    © 1997 Oxford University Press4994­5002 Nucleic Acids Research, 1997, Vol. 25, No. 24 Information to fit into two successive major grooves on straight B-form DNA, suggesting that the DNA bends

  14. SRC, SIA Tackle Ultra-Low Power SoC Design Challenges for 'Extreme... http://home.businesswire.com/portal/site/google/index.jsp?ndmViewId... 1 of 3 10/10/2006 11:19 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hempstead, Mark

    SRC, SIA Tackle Ultra-Low Power SoC Design Challenges for 'Extreme... http://home.businesswire Eastern Time SRC, SIA Tackle Ultra-Low Power SoC Design Challenges for `Extremely Scaled' Silicon via supply of talented design engineers." The Harvard entry, "Design and Implementation of an Ultra-Low

  15. Preparing planting sites for loblolly pine with hexazinone, picloram, or by chopping and burning. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haywood, J.D.

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four treatments were applied to prepare two upland sites for planting of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.): (1) preplant broadcasting of extruded pellets of soil-active picloram at the rate of 6 lb acid equivalent per acre in March 1979, (2) preplant broadcasting of 0.12-cubic inch molded pellets of soil-active hexazinone at the rate of 2 lb active ingredient (a.i.) per acre in March 1979, (3) preplant chopping and burning during the summer of 1979, and (4) postplant broadcasting of 0.12-cubic inch molded pellets of hexazinone at the rate of 2 lb a.i. per acre in March 1980. The pine seedlings were hand-planted in January 1980. The herbicides did not injure the seedlings. The size and number of hardwoods after the third growing season were negatively related to the development and yield of planted pine trees after seven growing seasons. Conversely, the percentage of herbaceous plant cover at age 3 was positively related to pine stand development. Hexazinone can be effectively applied either before or after planting as a site-preparation method, but this formulation is less effective than a combination chopping and burning treatment.

  16. Final Site Specific Decommissioning Inspection Report #2 for the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor, Seattle, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.J. Roberts

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    During the period of August through November 2006, ORISE performed a comprehensive IV at the University of Washington Research and Test Reactor Facility. The objective of the ORISE IV was to validate the licensee’s final status survey processes and data, and to assure the requirements of the DP and FSSP were met.

  17. Compressed air energy storage: preliminary design and site development program in an aquifer. Final draft, Task 2: Volume 2 of 3. Characterize and explore potential sites and prepare research and development plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of sites in Indiana and Illinois which are being investigated as potential sites for compressed air energy storage power plants are documented. These characteristics include geological considerations, economic factors, and environmental considerations. Extensive data are presented for 14 specific sites and a relative rating on the desirability of each site is derived. (LCL)

  18. Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariate Metal-OrganicPulseSimulation,Site

  19. Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariateSite Map Main Menu About the ALS ALS@20

  20. NGNP SITE 2 HAZARDS ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayne Moe

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project initiated at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) by the U.S. Department of Energy pursuant to the 2005 Energy Policy Act, is based on research and development activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative. The principal objective of the NGNP Project is to support commercialization of the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. The HTGR is a helium-cooled and graphite-moderated reactor that can operate at temperatures much higher than those of conventional light water reactor (LWR) technologies. Accordingly, it can be applied in many industrial applications as a substitute for burning fossil fuels, such as natural gas, to generate process heat in addition to producing electricity, which is the principal application of current LWRs. Nuclear energy in the form of LWRs has been used in the U.S. and internationally principally for the generation of electricity. However, because the HTGR operates at higher temperatures than LWRs, it can be used to displace the use of fossil fuels in many industrial applications. It also provides a carbon emission-free energy supply. For example, the energy needs for the recovery and refining of petroleum, for the petrochemical industry and for production of transportation fuels and feedstocks using coal conversion processes require process heat provided at temperatures approaching 800 C. This temperature range is readily achieved by the HTGR technology. This report summarizes a site assessment authorized by INL under the NGNP Project to determine hazards and potential challenges that site owners and HTGR designers need to be aware of when developing the HTGR design for co-location at industrial facilities, and to evaluate the site for suitability considering certain site characteristics. The objectives of the NGNP site hazard assessments are to do an initial screening of representative sites in order to identify potential challenges and restraints to be addressed in design and licensing processes; assure the HTGR technology can be deployed at variety of sites for a range of applications; evaluate potential sites for potential hazards and describe some of the actions necessary to mitigate impacts of hazards; and, provide key insights that can inform the plant design process. The report presents a summary of the process methodology and the results of an assessment of hazards typical of a class of candidate sites for the potential deployment of HTGR reactor technology. The assessment considered health and safety, and other important siting characteristics to determine the potential impact of identified hazards and potential challenges presented by the location for this technology. A four reactor module nuclear plant (2000 to 2400 MW thermal), that co-generates steam, electricity for general use in the plant, and hot gas for use in a nearby chemical processing facility, to provide the requisite performance and reliability was assumed for the assessment.

  1. Submeter Challenge

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic Safety Goals Strategic Safety|Research

  2. Making your Building Smarter : The Retrofit Challenge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brady, N.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wireless Temp Sensors IBM Dublin Research Labs : Smart Buildings Living Lab Environment Background ? 2012 IBM Corporation IBM Dublin Research Labs Our Smart Building Retrofit Challenges Retrofit Challenges Summary 1. Smart Building Design 2... Comfortable environment ?Reduce Energy/Water usage environment ?Keep within Budget ?Biggest Challenge ?? Constantly competing (& changing) objectives within the design and build cycles What to include ? What is critical? Where to Invest ? 5 ? 2012...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: Grand Challenge Laboratory-Directed...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grand Challenge Laboratory-Directed Research and Development project Recent Sandia Secure, Scalable Microgrid Advanced Controls Research Accomplishments On March 3, 2015, in...

  4. Adaptive Web Sites: Automatically Synthesizing Web Pages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Etzioni, Oren

    Adaptive Web Sites: Automatically Synthesizing Web Pages Mike Perkowitz Oren Etzioni Department interfaces Abstract The creation of a complex web site is a thorny problem in user interface design. In IJCAI '97, we challenged the AI community to address this problem by creating adaptive web sites: sites

  5. Using Multiple Unmanned Systems for a Site Security Task

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew O. Anderson; Curtis W. Nielsen; Mark D. McKay; Derek C. Wadsworth; Ryan C. Hruska; John A. Koudelka

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unmanned systems are often used to augment the ability of humans to perform challenging tasks. While the value of individual unmanned vehicles have been proven for a variety of tasks, it is less understood how multiple unmanned systems should be used together to accomplish larger missions such as site security. The purpose of this paper is to discuss efforts by researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to explore the utility and practicality of operating multiple unmanned systems for a site security mission. This paper reviews the technology developed for a multi-agent mission and summarizes the lessons-learned from a technology demonstration.

  6. The web site Van Oldenborgh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    The web site Van Oldenborgh Over the last few years the knmi web site (www.knmi.nl) has grown into an important communication channel, also for Climate Research and Seismology. In fact, as the World-Wide Web · The target audience of the Climate Research and Seismology Department part of knmi web site can be roughly

  7. Decommissioning of the Dragon High Temperature Reactor (HTR) Located at the Former United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA) Research Site at Winfrith - 13180

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Anthony A. [Research Sites Restoration Ltd, Winfrith, Dorset (United Kingdom)] [Research Sites Restoration Ltd, Winfrith, Dorset (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dragon Reactor was constructed at the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Winfrith in Dorset through the late 1950's and into the early 1960's. It was a High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR) with helium gas coolant and graphite moderation. It operated as a fuel testing and demonstration reactor at up to 20 MW (Thermal) from 1964 until 1975, when international funding for this project was terminated. The fuel was removed from the core in 1976 and the reactor was put into Safestore. To meet the UK's Nuclear Decommissioning Authority (NDA) objective to 'drive hazard reduction' [1] it is necessary to decommission and remediate all the Research Sites Restoration Ltd (RSRL) facilities. This includes the Dragon Reactor where the activated core, pressure vessel and control rods and the contaminated primary circuit (including a {sup 90}Sr source) still remain. It is essential to remove these hazards at the appropriate time and return the area occupied by the reactor to a safe condition. (author)

  8. Army High Performance Computing Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    Army High Performance Computing Research Center Applying advanced computational science research challenges http://me.stanford.edu/research/centers/ahpcrc #12;Army High Performance Computing challenges http://me.stanford.edu/research/centers/ahpcrc #12;Army High Performance Computing Research

  9. Addressing Common Subsurface Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Common Subsurface Challenges Mastering the subsurface for energy production and storage and for the management of energy waste streams constitutes an energy "grand challenge." To...

  10. activity-dependent polyadenylation site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 37 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  11. allosteric citalopram-binding site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 69 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  12. atp-binding site lesions: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 107 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  13. adenine dinucleotide-binding site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    commercial setting. Contaminants: Contaminants: Vinyl Chloride 43 Clinical Research Site Management Engineering Websites Summary: Clinical Research Site Management Dan...

  14. Data Mining: Opportunities and Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Xindong

    1 Data Mining: Opportunities and Challenges Xindong Wu University of Vermont, USA; Hefei University Systems 2004 ...... #12;3 Outline 1.1. Data Mining OpportunitiesData Mining Opportunities Major Conferences and Journals in Data Mining Main Topics in Data Mining Some Research Directions in Data Mining 2

  15. Energy Challenge Three: The Greenbelt Green Neighborhood Challenge...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Challenge Three: The Greenbelt Green Neighborhood Challenge Energy Challenge Three: The Greenbelt Green Neighborhood Challenge June 21, 2010 - 5:52pm Addthis John Lippert...

  16. Adapting MARSSIM for FUSRAP site closure.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; Durham, L.; Rieman, C.; Hoover, R.

    2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) provides a coherent, technically defensible process for establishing that exposed surfaces satisfy site cleanup requirements. Unfortunately, many sites have complications that challenge a direct application of MARSSIM. Example complications include Record of Decision (ROD) requirements that are not MARSSIM-friendly, the potential for subsurface contamination, and incomplete characterization information. These types of complications are typically the rule, rather than the exception, for sites undergoing radiologically-driven remediation and closure. One such site is the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) Linde site in Tonawanda, New York. Cleanup of the site is currently underway. The Linde site presented a number of challenges to designing and implementing a closure strategy consistent with MARSSIM. This paper discusses some of the closure issues confronted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District at the Linde site, and describes how MARSSIM protocols were adapted to address these issues.

  17. NREL: Wind Research - Site Tours

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy: GridTruck Platooning Testing Photofrom U.S.6

  18. Cyber Security Grand Challenges and Prognosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandhu, Ravi

    Cyber Security Grand Challenges and Prognosis Prof. Ravi Sandhu Executive Director and Institute for Cyber Security Executive Director and Endowed Chair ravi.sandhu@utsa.edu www.profsandhu.com www.ics.utsa.edu © Ravi Sandhu World-Leading Research with Real Cyber Security Grand Challenges and Prognosis Prof. Ravi

  19. Physics challenges for advanced fuel cycle assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giuseppe Palmiotti; Massimo Salvatores; Gerardo Aliberti

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advanced fuel cycles and associated optimized reactor designs will require substantial improvements in key research area to meet new and more challenging requirements. The present paper reviews challenges and issues in the field of reactor and fuel cycle physics. Typical examples are discussed with, in some cases, original results.

  20. Site Feeds - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariate Metal-OrganicPulseSimulation,

  1. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 5, Part B: Chapter 8, Sections 8.3.1.5 through 8.3.1.17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Sections 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the SOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules.

  2. Site characterization plan: Yucca Mountain Site, Nevada Research and Development Area, Nevada: Volume 8, Part B: Chapter 8, Sections 8.4 through 8.7; Glossary and Acronyms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This site characterization plan (SCP) has been developed for the candidate repository site at Yucca Mountain in the State of Nevada. The SCP includes a description of the Yucca Mountain site (Chapters 1-5), a conceptual design for the repository (Chapter 6), a description of the packaging to be used for the waste to be emplaced in the repository (Chapter 7), and a description of the planned site characterization activities (Chapter 8). The schedules and milestones presented in Section 8.3 and 8.5 of the SCP were developed to be consistent with the June 1988 draft Amendment to the DOE`s Mission Plan for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. The five month delay in the scheduled start of exploratory shaft construction that was announced recently is not reflected in these schedules. 88 figs., 42 tabs.

  3. 20th New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Melrose High trio named top team in 20th New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge April 27, 2010 Student research project modeled behavior of wildfire LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, April 27,...

  4. Overview of GRI research at the Rock Creek Site, Black Warrior Basin. Overview of GRI research at Rock Creek: Eight years of cooperative research, coalbed methane shortcourse. Held in Birmingham, Alabama on October 21, 1992. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schraufnagel, R.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presentation slides from the October 21, 1992 workshop on coalbed methane exploration and production are assembled in this volume. They illustrate the following discussions Overview of GRI Research at Rock Creek: Eight Years of Cooperative Research, Drilling and Completing Coalbed to the Formation: Perforations vs. Slotting, Coalbed Methane Well Testing in the Warrior Basin, Reservoir Engineering: A Case Study at Rock Creek, Fraccing of Multiple Thin Seams: Considerations and Constraints, Implementing Coal Seam Stimulations: Requirements for Successful Treatments, Coal-Fluid Interactions, Mine-Through Observations of Coal Seam Stimulations: Reality vs. Theory, and Improving Gas Production: Techniques of Operations.

  5. Overview of GRI research at the Rock Creek Site, Black Warrior Basin. Overview of GRI research at Rock Creek: Eight years of cooperative research, coalbed methane shortcourse. Held in Abingdon, Virginia on October 23, 1992. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schraufnagel, R.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presentation slides from the October 23, 1992 workshop on coalbed methane exploration and production are assembled in this volume. They illustrate the following discussions: Overview of GRI Research at Rock Creek: Eight Years of Cooperative Research, Drilling and Completing Coalbed Methane Wells: Techniques for Fragile Formations, Connecting the Wellborne to the Formation: Perforations vs. Slotting, Coalbed Methane Well Testing in the Warrior Basin, Reservoir Engineering: A Case Study at Rock Creek, Fraccing of Multiple Thin Seams: Considerations and Constraints, Implementing Coal Seam Stimulations: Requirements for Successful Treatments, Coal-Fluid Interactions, Mine-Through Observations of Coal Seam Stimulations: Reality vs. Theory, and Recompleting Coalbed Methane Wells: The Second Try at Success.

  6. TRACKING SITE

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003235MLTPL00 AASG Geothermal Data submissions tracking application and site.  https://github.com/usgin/aasgtrack 

  7. Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliabilityPrincipal Investigators PostdoctoralResearch

  8. Ten-year development of douglas-fir and associated vegetation after different site preparation on coast range clearcuts. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, W.I.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten-years results are presented from an operational-sized, replicated experiment in the Coast Ranges of Oregon to determine the effects of six site-preparation methods on the subsequent survival and growth of Douglas-fir and associated species. Site preparation and seedling protection with plastic mesh tubing significantly enhanced tree development. Site preparation also produced large differences in frequency and cover of associated species but only minor differences in the species represented.

  9. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: BIOfuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Broad Run HS in Ashburn, VA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  10. Arid sites stakeholder participation in evaluating innovative technologies: VOC-Arid Site Integrated Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, T.S.; McCabe, G.H.; Brockbank, B.R. [and others

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing and deploying innovative environmental cleanup technologies is an important goal for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which faces challenging remediation problems at contaminated sites throughout the United States. Achieving meaningful, constructive stakeholder involvement in cleanup programs, with the aim of ultimate acceptance of remediation decisions, is critical to meeting those challenges. DOE`s Office of Technology Development sponsors research and demonstration of new technologies, including, in the past, the Volatile Organic Compounds Arid Site Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID), hosted at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The purpose of the VOC-Arid ID has been to develop and demonstrate new technologies for remediating carbon tetrachloride and other VOC contamination in soils and ground water. In October 1994 the VOC-Arid ID became a part of the Contaminant Plume Containment and Remediation Focus Area (Plume Focus Area). The VOC Arid ID`s purpose of involving stakeholders in evaluating innovative technologies will now be carried on in the Plume Focus Area in cooperation with Site Technology Coordination Groups and Site Specific Advisory Boards. DOE`s goal is to demonstrate promising technologies once and deploy those that are successful across the DOE complex. Achieving that goal requires that the technologies be acceptable to the groups and individuals with a stake in DOE facility cleanup. Such stakeholders include groups and individuals with an interest in cleanup, including regulatory agencies, Native American tribes, environmental and civic interest groups, public officials, environmental technology users, and private citizens. This report documents the results of the stakeholder involvement program, which is an integral part of the VOC-Arid ID.

  11. EM-21 Retrieval Knowledge Center: Waste Retrieval Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellinger, Andrew P.; Rinker, Michael W.; Berglin, Eric J.; Minichan, Richard L.; Poirier, Micheal R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Martin, Bruce A.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Saldivar, Eloy; Mullen, O Dennis; Chapman, Noel F.; Wells, Beric E.; Gibbons, Peter W.

    2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    EM-21 is the Waste Processing Division of the Office of Engineering and Technology, within the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). In August of 2008, EM-21 began an initiative to develop a Retrieval Knowledge Center (RKC) to provide the DOE, high level waste retrieval operators, and technology developers with centralized and focused location to share knowledge and expertise that will be used to address retrieval challenges across the DOE complex. The RKC is also designed to facilitate information sharing across the DOE Waste Site Complex through workshops, and a searchable database of waste retrieval technology information. The database may be used to research effective technology approaches for specific retrieval tasks and to take advantage of the lessons learned from previous operations. It is also expected to be effective for remaining current with state-of-the-art of retrieval technologies and ongoing development within the DOE Complex. To encourage collaboration of DOE sites with waste retrieval issues, the RKC team is co-led by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Two RKC workshops were held in the Fall of 2008. The purpose of these workshops was to define top level waste retrieval functional areas, exchange lessons learned, and develop a path forward to support a strategic business plan focused on technology needs for retrieval. The primary participants involved in these workshops included retrieval personnel and laboratory staff that are associated with Hanford and Savannah River Sites since the majority of remaining DOE waste tanks are located at these sites. This report summarizes and documents the results of the initial RKC workshops. Technology challenges identified from these workshops and presented here are expected to be a key component to defining future RKC-directed tasks designed to facilitate tank waste retrieval solutions.

  12. Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges - Advanced R and D|...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Advanced R and D Unique Aspects and Scientific Challenges High Energy Physics (HEP) HEP Home About Research Science Drivers of Particle Physics Energy Frontier Intensity Frontier...

  13. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cleanup Document Date: 10162009 Keywords: recovery, waste site, BC Control, soil, contamination Area: BC Control Area Description: Using Recovery Act funding, contractors are...

  14. Kaplan Symposium Challenges of the Global Water Shortage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einat, Aharonov

    The 3rd Kaplan Symposium 2010 Challenges of the Global Water Shortage Environmental, Challenges of the Global Water Shortage, brings together different aspects of water research. We hope - Challenges of the Global Water Shortage Program Sunday, April 11th Field excursion 08:00 ­ Leaving Jerusalem

  15. Multiphysics simulations: challenges and opportunities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyes, D.; McInnes, L. C.; Woodward, C.; Gropp, W.; Myra, E.; Pernice, M. (Mathematics and Computer Science); (KAUST and Columbia Univ.); (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory); (Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign); (Univ. of Mich.); (Idaho National Lab.)

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an outcome of the workshop Multiphysics Simulations: Challenges and Opportunities, sponsored by the Institute of Computing in Science (ICiS). Additional information about the workshop, including relevant reading and presentations on multiphysics issues in applications, algorithms, and software, is available via https://sites.google.com/site/icismultiphysics2011/. We consider multiphysics applications from algorithmic and architectural perspectives, where 'algorithmic' includes both mathematical analysis and computational complexity and 'architectural' includes both software and hardware environments. Many diverse multiphysics applications can be reduced, en route to their computational simulation, to a common algebraic coupling paradigm. Mathematical analysis of multiphysics coupling in this form is not always practical for realistic applications, but model problems representative of applications discussed herein can provide insight. A variety of software frameworks for multiphysics applications have been constructed and refined within disciplinary communities and executed on leading-edge computer systems. We examine several of these, expose some commonalities among them, and attempt to extrapolate best practices to future systems. From our study, we summarize challenges and forecast opportunities. We also initiate a modest suite of test problems encompassing features present in many applications.

  16. results.Research and Graduate Studies at North Carolina State University Achievements in Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Matthew D. Brown

    it comes to this global challenge. Research here is expanding North Carolina's biofuels industries, smart

  17. Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: Program Challenges The Geothermal Technologies Program Multi-Year Research,...

  18. 20% Wind by 2030: Overcoming the Challenges in West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Mann; Christine Risch

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Final Report for '20% Wind by 2030: Overcoming the Challenges in West Virginia'. The objective of this project was to examine the obstacles and constraints to the development of wind energy in West Virginia as well as the obstacles and constraints to the achievement of the national goal of 20% wind by 2030. For the portion contracted with WVU, there were four tasks in this examination of obstacles and constraints. Task 1 involved the establishment of a Wind Resource Council. Task 2 involved conducting limited research activities. These activities involved an ongoing review of wind energy documents including documents regarding the potential for wind farms being located on reclaimed surface mining sites as well as other brownfield sites. The Principal Investigator also examined the results of the Marshall University SODAR assessment of the potential for placing wind farms on reclaimed surface mining sites. Task 3 involved the conducting of outreach activities. These activities involved working with the members of the Wind Resource Council, the staff of the Regional Wind Energy Institute, and the staff of Penn Future. This task also involved the examination of the importance of transmission for wind energy development. The Principal Investigator kept informed as to transmission developments in the Eastern United States. The Principal Investigator coordinated outreach activities with the activities at the Center for Business and Economic Research at Marshall University. Task 4 involved providing technical assistance. This task involved the provision of information to various parties interested in wind energy development. The Principal Investigator was available to answer requests from interested parties regarding in formation regarding both utility scale as well as small wind development in West Virginia. Most of the information requested regarded either the permitting process for wind facilities of various sizes in the state or information regarding the wind potential in various parts of the state. This report describes four sub-categories of work done by the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) at Marshall University under this contract. The four sub-projects are: (1) research on the impacts of wind turbines on residential property values; (2) research on the integration of wind energy in regional transmission systems; (3) review of state-based wind legislation in consideration of model new policy options for West Virginia; and (4) promotion of wind facilities on former surface mine sites through development of a database of potential sites.

  19. Sandia Energy - Research Challenge 1: Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wang, George T. Optical performance of top-down fabricated InGaNGaN nanorod light emitting diode arrays, Optics Express, 19, 25528-25534 (2011). 10.1364OE.19.025528 Sun,...

  20. Sandia National Laboratories: Research Challenge 3: Competing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chow, Weng W. Modeling excitation-dependent bandstructure effects on InGaN light-emitting diode efficiency, Optics Express, 19, 21818 (2011). 10.1364OE.19.021818 Xu, Jiuru;...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: Research Challenge 1: Nanowires

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wang, George T. Optical performance of top-down fabricated InGaNGaN nanorod light emitting diode arrays, Optics Express, 19, 25528-25534 (2011). 10.1364OE.19.025528 Sun,...

  2. Sandia National Laboratories: Research Challenge 5: Enhanced...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    enhancement both from electroluminescent quantum wells used in solid-state lighting (SSL) as the primary originator of light, as well as from photoluminescent QDs, which could...

  3. Challenges in LED Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View the video about LED lighting technology, where it is headed, and the DOE’s role in its continued R&D.

  4. Challenges in OLED Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    View the video about OLED technology’s advantages and what is needed to move it fully into the lighting market.

  5. Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -Department ofEMSpent NuclearEnergy| Department

  6. NREL: Buildings Research - Challenges in Commercial Buildings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gifNREL NRELChemical andWhat Is a Biorefinery?

  7. Research Projects Addressing Technical Challenges to Environmentally

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergy Small TeamNOTDeliveryDepartment| Department of

  8. Tour Brookhaven Lab's Future Hub for Energy Research: The Interdisciplinary Science Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerry Stokes; Jim Misewich

    2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction is under way for the Interdisciplinary Science Building (ISB), a future world-class facility for energy research at Brookhaven Lab. Meet two scientists who will develop solutions at the ISB to tackle some of the nation's energy challenges, and tour the construction site.

  9. Tour Brookhaven Lab's Future Hub for Energy Research: The Interdisciplinary Science Building

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Gerry Stokes; Jim Misewich

    2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction is under way for the Interdisciplinary Science Building (ISB), a future world-class facility for energy research at Brookhaven Lab. Meet two scientists who will develop solutions at the ISB to tackle some of the nation's energy challenges, and tour the construction site.

  10. Microsoft PowerPoint - 6_Rowe-Future Challenges for Global Fuel...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Nuclear Fuel Cycle Information System (NFCIS) web site IAEA Safeguards Begins Here 4 Future Challenges for Global Fuel Cycle Material...

  11. Challenges to Introducing and Managing Disturbance Regimes for Holocarpha macradenia, an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holl, Karen

    Challenges to Introducing and Managing Disturbance Regimes for Holocarpha macradenia, an Endangered sites to test the effects of clipping frequency and litter accumulation on seed germination, seedling

  12. Supporting Your Research at Ohio State Office of Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­ Randy Moses · Food, Agricultural, & Environmental Sciences ­ Steve Slack · Law ­ Donald Tobin · Medicine at Ohio State Office of Research Research Support Resources Visit the Office of Research web site

  13. Native-species establishment on an oil-drill pad site in the Uintah Mountains, Utah: effects of introduced grass density and fertilizer. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chambers, J.C.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examined the effects of introduced grass seeding density and fertilizer on native-species establishment on an oil drill-pad site in the Uintah Mountains, UT. Differences in first-year seeding density and 3-year standing crop biomass among treatments were evaluated for seeded introduced grasses and native species and for unseeded colonizers. Aerial cover was measured all 3 years and the effects of fertilization on soil NO/sub 3/(2-), N, available P, and exchangeable K were examined 2 years after application. Recommendations for reclamation of similar sites are given.

  14. Guidance on site selection for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    harvestingbrash materialfollowingtimber harvestingto supply biomass for heat and power generation. A numberGuidance on site selection for brash removal Forest Research, May 2009 The Research Agency SELECTION FOR BRASH REMOVAL | Forest Research | May 09 #12;Brash Removal Background Interest is growingin

  15. AQUIFER STORAGE SITE EVALUATION AND MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Mike

    CO2 AQUIFER STORAGE SITE EVALUATION AND MONITORING Edited and compiled by Martin Smith, David Campbell, Eric Mackay and Debbie Polson Understanding the challenges of CO2 storage: results of the CASSEM Project Im agecopyrightofNERC #12;#12;CO2 Aquifer storage site evaluation and monitoring EDITED

  16. Ten Hundred and One word challenge | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    People's Choice Voting for the Ten Hundred and One Word Challenge Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights News & Events EFRC News...

  17. On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Orlando Lawrencefrom Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Farrar, C.D. , M.L.1999. Reichle, D. et al. , Carbon sequestration research and

  18. Site Risks:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9Morgan McCorkleSingin' in theCleanup SiteSite

  19. Digital Libraries - Meeting the Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warner, Beth Forrest

    2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Digital Libraries – Meeting the Challenges Beth Forrest Warner Digital Library Challenges Are … … not just Digital Library challenges They are many of the same challenges facing libraries and scholarly communication in general... learning contexts In short, change … … leading to new organizational structures Challenges of Definition and Purpose What are Digital Libraries?? What’s their purpose?? A Digital Library Is: Selected and managed...

  20. High School Ocean Sciences Challenge 2008 Challenge Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    High School Ocean Sciences Challenge 2008 Challenge Review Created by Laura Dover, Ocean Sciences Laboratory at Oregon State University High School Students Record PSAs James Roddey Facilitates a PSA ................................ 3 High School Challenge ............................ 3 High School Program Model

  1. Site Management Guide (Blue Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (Department) Office of Legacy Management (LM), established in 2003, manages the Department’s postclosure responsibilities and ensures the future protection of human health and the environment. During World War II and the Cold War, the Federal government developed and operated a vast network of industrial facilities for the research, production, and testing of nuclear weapons, as well as other scientific and engineering research. These processes left a legacy of radioactive and chemical waste, environmental contamination, and hazardous facilities and materials at well over 100 sites. Since 1989, the Department has taken an aggressive accelerated cleanup approach to reduce risks and cut costs. At most Departmental sites undergoing cleanup, some residual hazards will remain at the time cleanup is completed due to financial and technical impracticality. However, the Department still has an obligation to protect human health and the environment after cleanup is completed. LM fulfills DOE’s postclosure obligation by providing long-term management of postcleanup sites which do not have continuing missions. LM is also responsible for sites under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). Currently, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is responsible for site surveys and remediation at FUSRAP sites. Once remediation is completed, LM becomes responsible for long-term management. LM also has responsibility for uranium processing sites addressed by Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA). UMTRCA Title II sites are sites that were commercially owned and are regulated under a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) license. For license termination, the owner must conduct an NRC-approved cleanup of any on-site radioactive waste remaining from former uranium ore-processing operations. The site owner must also provide full funding for inspections and, if necessary, ongoing maintenance. Once site cleanup is complete, LM accepts title to these sites on behalf of the United States and assumes long-term management.

  2. SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H-CANYON FACILITY: IMPACTS OF FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS ON SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISPOSITION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magoulas, V.

    2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The US has a non-proliferation policy to receive foreign and domestic research reactor returns of spent fuel materials of US origin. These spent fuel materials are returned to the Department of Energy (DOE) and placed in storage in the L-area spent fuel basin at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The foreign research reactor returns fall subject to the 123 agreements for peaceful cooperation. These “123 agreements” are named after section 123 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and govern the conditions of nuclear cooperation with foreign partners. The SRS management of these foreign obligations while planning material disposition paths can be a challenge.

  3. DOE Announces Webinars on Overcoming Wind Siting Challenges,...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the latest energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies, to training for the clean energy workforce. Webinars are free; however, advanced registration is typically required....

  4. Hanford Site Workers Meet Challenging Performance Goal at Plutonium...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    glove box in the former processing portion of the facility. This work is performed in plastic enclosures to limit the spread of contamination. Progress Continues Toward Demolition...

  5. WINDExchange Webinar: Overcoming Wind Siting Challenges III: Public

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradley Nickell Director of Transmission PlanningWICFAcceptance and

  6. DOE Announces Webinars on Overcoming Wind Siting Challenges, Benchmarking

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014Contributing DataDepartmentGuideand Transparency, and More |

  7. Deep Challenges for Foundation Performance at Savannah River Site |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPMMilestone |Procurement of, 2011DepartmentDepartment of

  8. WINDExchange Webinar: Overcoming Wind Siting Challenges II: Radar |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: SinceDevelopment | Department ofPartnerships Toolkit VoluntaryHURRICANE * FLASHA

  9. Hanford Site Workers Meet Challenging Performance Goal at Plutonium

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), GeothermalGridHYDROGEN TO THEHudson ChairSelects

  10. SITE BUILDER: ENHANCEMENTS TO THE UNIVERSITY'S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oyet, Alwell

    for specific sites Research + web trends · The web is constantly evolving! ­ Responsive design ­ Google IN DEVELOPMENT · Brand standards for the web · New standardized template · Responsive design · Leaderboard

  11. Albuquerque duo wins Supercomputing Challenge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Challenge Erika DeBenedictis and Tony Huang captured the top prize during the 2008 New Mexico Supercomputing Challenge award ceremony. April 22, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory...

  12. A Faculty Senate Vision for UVa As a site for cutting-edge research in major scholarly fields and as the home for an unparalleled undergraduate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acton, Scott

    already underway--including efforts in the sciences and engineering, movements toward internationalization concrete initiatives that, if taken together, would lead toward the transformational goals we regard it are these core aims: Build internationally prominent research programs, as assessed by academic metrics like

  13. Software Analytics: Achievements and Challenges Dongmei Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Tao

    , USA Email: xie@csc.ncsu.edu Abstract--A huge wealth of various data exist in the practice of software insightful and actionable information; such information is used for completing various tasks around software and challenges of research and practice on principles, techniques, and applications of soft- ware analytics

  14. Preliminary Site Characterization Report, Rulsion Site, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of environmental information gathered during a review of the documents pertaining to Project Rulison and interviews with personnel who worked on the project. Project Rulison was part of Operation Plowshare (a program designed to explore peaceful uses for nuclear devices). The project consisted of detonating a 43-kiloton nuclear device on September 10, 1969, in western Colorado to stimulate natural gas production. Following the detonation, a reentry well was drilled and several gas production tests were conducted. The reentry well was shut-in after the last gas production test and was held in standby condition until the general cleanup was undertaken in 1972. A final cleanup was conducted after the emplacement and testing wells were plugged in 1976. However, some surface radiologic contamination resulted from decontamination of the drilling equipment and fallout from the gas flaring during drilling operations. With the exception of the drilling effluent pond, all surface contamination at the Rulison Site was removed during the cleanup operations. All mudpits and other excavations were backfilled, and both upper and lower drilling pads were leveled and dressed. This report provides information regarding known or suspected areas of contamination, previous cleanup activities, analytical results, a review of the regulatory status, the site`s physical environment, and future recommendations for Project Ruhson. Based on this research, several potential areas of contamination have been identified. These include the drilling effluent pond and mudpits used during drilling operations. In addition, contamination could migrate in the gas horizon.

  15. Site clearance working group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana continue to be areas with a high level of facility removal, and the pace of removal is projected to increase. Regulations were promulgated for the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana requiring that abandoned sites be cleared of debris that could interfere with fishing and shrimping activities. The site clearance regulations also required verification that the sites were clear. Additionally, government programs were established to compensate fishermen for losses associated with snagging their equipment on oil and gas related objects that remained on the water bottoms in areas other than active producing sites and sites that had been verified as clear of obstructions and snags. The oil and gas industry funds the compensation programs. This paper reviews the regulations and evolving operating practices in the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana where site clearance and fisherman`s gear compensation regulations have been in place for a number of years. Although regulations and guidelines may be in place elsewhere in the world, this paper focuses on the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana. Workshop participants are encouraged to bring up international issues during the course of the workshop. Additionally, this paper raises questions and focuses on issues that are of concern to the various Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana water surface and water bottom stakeholders. This paper does not have answers to the questions or issues. During the workshop participants will debate the questions and issues in an attempt to develop consensus opinions and/or make suggestions that can be provided to the appropriate organizations, both private and government, for possible future research or policy adjustments. Site clearance and facility removal are different activities. Facility removal deals with removal of the structures used to produce oil and gas including platforms, wells, casing, piles, pipelines, well protection structures, etc.

  16. Mulching to regenerate a harsh site: Effect on douglas-fir seedlings, forbs, grasses, and ferns. Forest Service research paper (Final)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, P.M.; Fiddler, G.O.; Harrison, H.R.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Douglas-fir seedlings on the Arcata District, Bureau of Land Management, U.S. Department of the Interior, in central coastal California, were planted in an effort to restore the natural forest to what was then pastureland. Douglas-fir seedlings were released from a complex forb-gass-fern plant community by applying very large (10-ft square) and very small (2-foot square) durable mulches one month after planting. In spite of high cost, the promising role of large mulches for establishing fast-growing Douglas-fir seedlings on a harsh site and the increased stability and sustainability that the future trees will bring to the more natural plant community give large mulches a place in the toolkit of ecosystem managers.

  17. Ris Energy Report 6 Energy challenges 3 Energy challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risř Energy Report 6 Energy challenges 3 Energy challenges POUL ERIk MORTHORsT, RIsř DTU; JřRgEN HENNINgsEN, FORMER PRINCIPAL ADVIsER, Dg FOR ENERgY AND TRANsPORT, EUROPEAN COMMIssION 3.1 Danish and European energy challenges The European Community faces three major energy challenges [1]: · Sustainability

  18. The Current and Historical Distribution of Special Status Amphibians at the Livermore Site and Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hattem, M V; Paterson, L; Woollett, J

    2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    65 surveys were completed in 2002 to assess the current distribution of special status amphibians at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) Livermore Site and Site 300. Combined with historical information from previous years, the information presented herein illustrates the dynamic and probable risk that amphibian populations face at both sites. The Livermore Site is developed and in stark contrast to the mostly undeveloped Site 300. Yet both sites have significant issues threatening the long-term sustainability of their respective amphibian populations. Livermore Site amphibians are presented with a suite of challenges inherent of urban interfaces, most predictably the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana), while Site 300's erosion issues and periodic feral pig (Sus scrofa) infestations reduce and threaten populations. The long-term sustainability of LLNL's special status amphibians will require active management and resource commitment to maintain and restore amphibian habitat at both sites.

  19. Free Air C02 Enrichment (FACE) Research Data from the Oak Ridge FACE Site and Experiment on CO2 Enrichment of Sweetgum

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The facility was established with support from the ORNL Director's R&D Fund and the Biological and Environmental Research program of the U. S. Department of Energy Office of Science. Additional support was provided by the Terrestrial Ecology and Global Change (TECO) program through the National Science Foundation. This project was part of the CO2 research network fostered by the Global Change and Terrestrial Ecosystems core project of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme. Results from the experiment contributed to the Terrestrial Ecosystem Response to Atmospheric and Climatic Change (TERACC) project, a 5-year initiative integrating experimental data and global change modeling. Data from the ORNL FACE experiment are being used in an model benchmarking activity at the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis. [Copied from http://face.ornl.gov/goals.html

  20. Banff Challenge 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Junk, Thomas R.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental particle physics collaborations constantly seek newer and better ideas for improving the sensitivity of their searches for new particles and phenomena. Statistical techniques are the last step in interpreting the results of an experiment; they are used to make discoveries (hypothesis testing), and to measure parameters (point estimation). They are also used in the first step - experiment and analysis design. Banff Challenge 2 asks participants to test their methods of discovering hidden signals in simulated datasets and of measuring the properties of these signals. The Challenge problems are described, and the performances of the submitted entries is summarized, for datasets with and without simulated signals present.

  1. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonic EngineHIVDecember> About Us > Hanford Site

  2. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonic EngineHIVDecember> About Us > Hanford SiteW

  3. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonic EngineHIVDecember> About Us > Hanford SiteW

  4. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site Cleanup 100K Area

  5. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site Cleanup 100K

  6. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site Cleanup

  7. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site Cleanupwaste

  8. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site Cleanupwastewaste

  9. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site Cleanupwastewaste

  10. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site CleanupwastewasteB

  11. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site

  12. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site

  13. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site

  14. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site

  15. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste Site

  16. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOE office of river

  17. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOE office of

  18. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOE office ofF

  19. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOE office ofF

  20. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOE office

  1. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOE

  2. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOE

  3. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOE

  4. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOEPress Conference

  5. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOEPress

  6. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOEPress

  7. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOEPress

  8. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOEPress

  9. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOEPress

  10. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOEPress

  11. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOEPress

  12. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOEPress

  13. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery Waste SiteDOEPressdepartment

  14. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery WasteSite Public Tours

  15. Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3 Outlook forSDPPP Individual Permit:Site Map TUNL

  16. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpg Gallery: VPPCompanyFebruary 2005GloveSite visit EdBoard3

  17. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpg Gallery: VPPCompanyFebruary 2005GloveSite visit

  18. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpg Gallery: VPPCompanyFebruary 2005GloveSite visitARRA Funded

  19. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpg Gallery: VPPCompanyFebruary 2005GloveSite visitARRA

  20. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpg Gallery: VPPCompanyFebruary 2005GloveSite

  1. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpg Gallery: VPPCompanyFebruary 2005GloveSite03080006-010df

  2. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpg Gallery: VPPCompanyFebruary4155-8HoursBasin Waste Site

  3. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanford LEED&soil PRC Soildumptoolstrack hoe Waste Site

  4. Site C

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O'1 ~(3JlpV Project Proposal -Site40s'

  5. CN ENGINEERING CHALLENGES David Ferryman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkan, Christopher P.L.

    Railway Engineering Challenges Weakest component in track is thermite welds ­ Half the impact strength

  6. Services Breakout: Expressiveness Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    industry standards? a) What to accomplish? b) How? 5. Address specific DAML+OIL challenges for DAML with existing standards ­ WSDL, uPnP, Corba?, ... #12;1 (cont'd.) Requirements · "Web of Services" ­ Compositional architecture ­ API mechanisms supporting modularity, reuse ­ Distinguish API from implementation

  7. ENHANCING EFFECTIVENESS OF EMSP PROJECTS THROUGH STRONG CONNECTIONS TO SITE PROBLEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Josephson, Gary B.; Hale, Donna

    2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Management Science Program (EMSP) funds basic science research that will lead to reduced remediation cost, schedule, technical uncertainties, and risk for DOE’s environmental clean up. The Tanks Focus Area (TFA) has partnered with EMSP to accomplish those same objectives for DOE’s largest and most expensive remediation effort – to retrieve and immobilize the highly radioactive wastes that are our nation's chief nuclear defense program legacy. TFA has been tasked to facilitate success of the EMSP investment. The key for EMSP projects to contribute to this remediation effort is communication. First, the scientist needs to understand much more about how his scientific results would be used than he could ever learn from the original EMSP solicitation or by reading the referenced DOE needs statements. Second, the scientist’s results must be communicated to the site problem holders in a usable form and in a timely manner such that important information gaps can still be filled by the EMSP project. Research results can be used in a variety of ways besides deployment of new hardware or a new process. When results are USED the site problem holders become “users”. The important aspect that research results are to be used is captured in the TFA lexicon for their clients, the DOE sites--“USERS”. The best method observed, so far, to accomplish the indispensable communication necessary for success is through direct contact between EMSP researchers and TFA/site problem holders, person to person. The observation that direct contact is the best medium for exchange of complex information may seem inanely obvious. However, it is not the normal procedure in the more academic world of the fundamental scientists, where publishing of results in a peer-reviewed journal completes the transmittal of scientific results. Direct communication between EMSP researchers and site users doesn’t occur naturally. TFA actively bridges this gap between science and technology development and site users through its technology integration managers (TIMs). TIMs are experienced researchers, usually from DOE’s national laboratories, with intimate knowledge of the needs of sites at the working level. They help focus the research projects to develop technical solutions to site submitted needs. They stand in a rather unique position with one foot in the research community and the other foot “in the tanks”. This paper will show, through several examples, significant contributions EMSP scientists have made to solving DOE's high-level waste challenges through direct and enhanced communication with TFA and site users.

  8. Technical solutions to nonproliferation challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satkowiak, Lawrence [Director, Nonproliferation, Safeguards and Security Programs, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States)

    2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The threat of nuclear terrorism is real and poses a significant challenge to both U.S. and global security. For terrorists, the challenge is not so much the actual design of an improvised nuclear device (IND) but more the acquisition of the special nuclear material (SNM), either highly enriched uranium (HEU) or plutonium, to make the fission weapon. This paper provides two examples of technical solutions that were developed in support of the nonproliferation objective of reducing the opportunity for acquisition of HEU. The first example reviews technologies used to monitor centrifuge enrichment plants to determine if there is any diversion of uranium materials or misuse of facilities to produce undeclared product. The discussion begins with a brief overview of the basics of uranium processing and enrichment. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), its safeguard objectives and how the technology evolved to meet those objectives will be described. The second example focuses on technologies developed and deployed to monitor the blend down of 500 metric tons of HEU from Russia's dismantled nuclear weapons to reactor fuel or low enriched uranium (LEU) under the U.S.-Russia HEU Purchase Agreement. This reactor fuel was then purchased by U.S. fuel fabricators and provided about half the fuel for the domestic power reactors. The Department of Energy established the HEU Transparency Program to provide confidence that weapons usable HEU was being blended down and thus removed from any potential theft scenario. Two measurement technologies, an enrichment meter and a flow monitor, were combined into an automated blend down monitoring system (BDMS) and were deployed to four sites in Russia to provide 24/7 monitoring of the blend down. Data was downloaded and analyzed periodically by inspectors to provide the assurances required.

  9. A little here, a little there, a fairly big problem everywhere: Small quantity site transuranic waste disposition alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Luke; D. Parker; J. Moss; T. Monk (INEEL); L. Fritz (DOE-ID); B. Daugherty (SRS); K. Hladek (WM Federal Services Hanford); S. Kosiewicx (LANL)

    2000-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Small quantities of transuranic (TRU) waste represent a significant challenge to the waste disposition and facility closure plans of several sites in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This paper presents the results of a series of evaluations, using a systems engineering approach, to identify the preferred alternative for dispositioning TRU waste from small quantity sites (SQSs). The TRU waste disposition alternatives evaluation used semi-quantitative data provided by the SQSs, potential receiving sites, and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to select and recommend candidate sites for waste receipt, interim storage, processing, and preparation for final disposition of contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. The evaluations of only four of these SQSs resulted in potential savings to the taxpayer of $33 million to $81 million, depending on whether mobile systems could be used to characterize, package, and certify the waste or whether each site would be required to perform this work. Small quantity shipping sites included in the evaluation included the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL), University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), and Mound Laboratory. Candidate receiving sites included the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), the Savannah River Site (SRS), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge (OR), and Hanford. At least 14 additional DOE sites having TRU waste may be able to save significant money if cost savings are similar to the four evaluated thus far.

  10. A Little Here, A Little There, A Fairly Big Problem Everywhere: Small Quantity Site Transuranic Waste Disposition Alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luke, Dale Elden; Parker, Douglas Wayne; Moss, J.; Monk, Thomas Hugh; Fritz, Lori Lee; Daugherty, B.; Hladek, K.; Kosiewicx, S.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small quantities of transuranic (TRU) waste represent a significant challenge to the waste disposition and facility closure plans of several sites in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This paper presents the results of a series of evaluations, using a systems engineering approach, to identify the preferred alternative for dispositioning TRU waste from small quantity sites (SQSs). The TRU waste disposition alternatives evaluation used semi-quantitative data provided by the SQSs, potential receiving sites, and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to select and recommend candidate sites for waste receipt, interim storage, processing, and preparation for final disposition of contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. The evaluations of only four of these SQSs resulted in potential savings to the taxpayer of $33 million to $81 million, depending on whether mobile systems could be used to characterize, package, and certify the waste or whether each site would be required to perform this work. Small quantity shipping sites included in the evaluation included the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL), University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), and Mound. Candidate receiving sites included the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), the Savannah River Site (SRS), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge (OR), and Hanford. At least 14 additional DOE sites having TRU waste may be able to save significant money if cost savings are similar to the four evaluated thus far.

  11. Document Assignment in Multi-site Search Engines Ulf Brefeld

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brefeld, Ulf

    Document Assignment in Multi-site Search Engines Ulf Brefeld Yahoo! Research Barcelona, Spain to sites is critical for the perfor- mance of multi-site Web search engines. In such settings, sites crawl General Terms Design, Performance, Experimentation Keywords Multi-site web search engines, document

  12. 1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ENGEL-COX,J.; ZIMMERMAN,E.; LEE,R.; WILLIAMS,J.; GREEN,T.; PAQUETTE,D.; HOODA,B.; SCARPITTA,S.; GENZER,P.; ET AL

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Throughout the scientific community, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is renowned for its leading-edge research in physics, medicine, chemistry, biology, materials, and the environment. BNL is committed to supporting its world-class scientific research with an internationally recognized environmental protection program. The 1999 Site Environmental Report (SER) summarizes the status of the Laboratory's environmental programs and performance, including the steady progress towards cleaning up the site and fully integrating environmental stewardship into all facets of the Laboratory's mission. BNL is located on 5,265 acres of pine barrens in Suffolk County in the center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated above a sole source aquifer at the headwaters of the Peconic River; therefore, protecting ground and surface water quality is a special concern. Approximately 3,600 acres of the site are undeveloped and serve as habitat for a wide variety of animals and plants, including one New York State endangered species, the tiger salamander, and two New York State threatened species, the banded sunfish and the stiff goldenrod. Monitoring, preserving, and restoring these ecological resources is a high priority for the Laboratory.

  13. Microsoft External Research Backgrounder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    are undeniable. M icrosoft Research believes that collaboration between the public and private sectors, combined with the power of computing, can help researchers as they work to solve the most urgent challenges in medicine, Building the Future of Technology Microsoft External Research Backgrounder #12;The team promotes research

  14. Radical and open innovation : the challenge for established firms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leroy, Charlotte, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past research has shown that breakthrough innovations are often prevalent in the context of entrants rather than incumbents. There are many challenges associated with radical and open innovation initiatives for established ...

  15. Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-A: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal resource description; Resource origin and sediment type; Gulf Coast resource extent; Resource estimates; Project history; Authorizing legislation; Program objectives; Perceived constraints; Program activities and structure; Well testing; Program management; Program cost summary; Funding history; Resource characterization; Wells of opportunity; Edna Delcambre No. 1 well; Edna Delcambre well recompletion; Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well; Beulah Simon No. 2 well; P.E. Girouard No. 1 well; Prairie Canal No. 1 well; Crown Zellerbach No. 2 well; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 well; Tenneco Fee N No. 1 well; Pauline Kraft No. 1 well; Saldana well No. 2; G.M. Koelemay well No. 1; Willis Hulin No. 1 well; Investigations of other wells of opportunity; Clovis A. Kennedy No. 1 well; Watkins-Miller No. 1 well; Lucien J. Richard et al No. 1 well; and the C and K-Frank A. Godchaux, III, well No. 1.

  16. Site Monitoring Area Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

  17. Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariate

  18. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanford LEED& treatremovereview Researching 618-10

  19. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanford LEED& treatremovereview Researching

  20. Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cn SunnybankD.jpgHanford LEED& treatremovereview Researching

  1. ORISE: Site Map

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One of theDedicationOak CSEPPInterestedSite Map

  2. Site Map - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariateSite Map Main Menu About the ALS

  3. Site Map - Pantex Plant

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariateSite Map Main Menu About the ALSSite Map

  4. Site map | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariateSite Map Main Menu About the

  5. Weather Charts - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSiteEureka AnalyticsLargeHome| Center for

  6. What's New - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSiteEurekaWeekly User

  7. GREEN BUILDINGS IN CHALLENGES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    GREEN BUILDINGS IN DELAWARE: CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES FINAL REPORT A Renewable Energy-8405 Telefax: (302) 831-3098 Website: http://ceep.udel.edu #12;GREEN BUILDINGS IN DELAWARE: CHALLENGES .......................................................................................................2 2.1. Green Buildings

  8. Scientific Challenges for Understanding the Quantum Universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A workshop titled "Scientific Challenges for Understanding the Quantum Universe" was held December 9-11, 2008, at the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center-National Accelerator Laboratory. The primary purpose of the meeting was to examine how computing at the extreme scale can contribute to meeting forefront scientific challenges in particle physics, particle astrophysics and cosmology. The workshop was organized around five research areas with associated panels. Three of these, "High Energy Theoretical Physics," "Accelerator Simulation," and "Experimental Particle Physics," addressed research of the Office of High Energy Physics’ Energy and Intensity Frontiers, while the"Cosmology and Astrophysics Simulation" and "Astrophysics Data Handling, Archiving, and Mining" panels were associated with the Cosmic Frontier.

  9. The Global Energy Challenge

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    George Crabtree

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The expected doubling of global energy demand by 2050 challenges our traditional patterns of energy production, distribution and use.   The continued use of fossil fuels raises concerns about supply, security, environment and climate.  New routes are needed for the efficient conversion of energy from chemical fuel, sunlight, and heat to electricity or hydrogen as an energy carrier and finally to end uses like transportation, lighting, and heating. Opportunities for efficient new energy conversion routes based on nanoscale materials will be presented, with emphasis on the sustainable energy technologies they enable.

  10. DOE Challenge Home Verification

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM | DepartmentIOffshoreDepartmentBegins DOE Challenge Home

  11. Quantum Information: Opportunities and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennink, Ryan S [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern society is shaped by the ability to transmit, manipulate, and store large amounts of information. Although we tend to think of information as abstract, information is physical, and computing is a physical process. How then should we understand information in a quantum world, in which physical systems may exist in multiple states at once and are altered by the very act of observation? This question has evolved into an exciting new field of research called Quantum Information (QI). QI challenges many accepted rules and practices in computer science. For example, a quantum computer would turn certain hard problems into soft problems, and would render common computationally-secure encryption methods (such as RSA) insecure. At the same time, quantum communication would provide an unprecedented kind of intrinsic information security at the level of the smallest physical objects used to store or transmit the information. This talk provides a general introduction to the subject of quantum information and its relevance to cyber security. In the first part, two of the stranger aspects of quantum physics namely, superposition and uncertainty are explained, along with their relation to the concept of information. These ideas are illustrated with a few examples: quantum ID cards, quantum key distribution, and Grover s quantum search algorithm. The state-of-the-art in quantum computing and communication hardware is then discussed, along with the daunting technological challenges that must be overcome. Relevant experimental and theoretical efforts at ORNL are highlighted. The talk concludes with speculations on the short- and long-term impact of quantum information on cyber security.

  12. China’s Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In line with its aim to meet growing energy demand while shifting away from coal, China has set an ambitious goal of doubling its use of natural gas from 2011 levels by 2015. Prospects are good for significant new supplies – both domestic and imported, conventional and unconventional – to come online in the medium term, but notable challenges remain, particularly concerning gas pricing and the institutional and regulatory landscape. While China’s circumstances are, in many respects unique, some current issues are similar to those a number of IEA countries have faced. This report highlights some key challenges China faces in its transition to greater reliance on natural gas, then explores in detail relevant IEA experience, particularly in the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, the European Union, and the United States. Preliminary suggestions about how lessons learned in other countries could be applied to China’s situation are offered as well. The aim is to provide stakeholders in China with a useful reference as they consider decisions about the evolution of the gas sector in their country. PARTNER COUNTRY SERIES

  13. The ALICE Data Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baud, J P; Carminati, F; Collignon, M; Collin, F; Diviŕ, R; Durand, J D; Jarp, S; Jouanigot, J M; Panzer, B; Rademakers, F; Saiz, P; Schossmaier, K; Van de Vyvre, P; Vascotto, Alessandro

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1998, the ALICE experiment and the CERN/IT division have jointly executed several large-scale high throughput distributed computing exercises: the ALICE data challenges. The goals of these regular exercises are to test hardware and software components of the data acquisition and computing systems in realistic conditions and to execute an early integration of the overall ALICE computing infrastructure. This paper reports on the third ALICE Data Challenge (ADC III) that has been performed at CERN from January to March 2001. The data used during the ADC III are simulated physics raw data of the ALICE TPC, produced with the ALICE simulation program AliRoot. The data acquisition was based on the ALICE online framework called the ALICE Data Acquisition Test Environment (DATE) system. The data after event building were then formatted with the ROOT I/O package and a data catalogue based on MySQL was established. The Mass Storage System used during ADC III is CASTOR. Different software tools have been used to mo...

  14. Decommissioning Small Research and Training Reactors; Experience on Three Recent University Projects - 12455

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, Thomas [LVI Services Inc. (United States); DeWitt, Corey; Miller, Dustin; Colborn, Kurt [Enercon Services, Inc. (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Decommissioning small reactors within the confines of an active University environment presents unique challenges. These range from the radiological protection of the nearby University population and grounds, to the logistical challenges of working in limited space without benefit of the established controlled, protected, and vital areas common to commercial facilities. These challenges, and others, are discussed in brief project histories of three recent (calendar year 2011) decommissioning activities at three University training and research reactors. These facilities include three separate Universities in three states. The work at each of the facilities addresses multiple phases of the decommissioning process, from initial characterization and pre-decommissioning waste removal, to core component removal and safe storage, through to complete structural dismantlement and site release. The results of the efforts at each University are presented, along with the challenges that were either anticipated or discovered during the decommissioning efforts, and results and lessons learned from each of the projects. (authors)

  15. Hanford and Savannah River Site Programmatic and Technical Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsey, William Gene

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract only. The Hanford Site and the Savannah River Site (SRS) were the primary plutonium production facilities within the U.S. nuclear weapons complex. Radioactive wastes were generated as part of these missions and are stored in similar fashion. The majority of radioactivity maintained by the two sites is located in underground carbon steel tanks in the physical form of supernatant, saltcake, or sludge. Disposition of SRS tank waste is ongoing by converting it into glass (pathway for sludge and radionuclides separated from supernatant or dissolved saltcake) or cement (pathway for the decontaminated supernatant and dissolved saltcake). Tank closure activity has also begun at SRS and will continue for the duration of mission. The Hanford tank waste inventory is roughly 2/3rds larger than SRS's by volume- but nominally half the radioactivity. The baseline disposition path includes high-level and low-activity waste vitrification with separate disposition of contact-handled transuranic tank waste. Retrieval of tank waste from aging single­ shell tanks (SSTs) into double-shell tanks (DSTs) is currently ongoing. As vitrification commences later this decade, Hanford will be in a similar operations mode as SRS. Site integration is increasing as the missions align. The ongoing integration is centered on key issues that impact both sites- regardless of mission timeframe. Three recent workshop exchanges have been held to improve communication with the primary intent of improving operations and technical work organization. The topics of these workshops are as follows: DST space utilization, optimization, and closure; Waste Feed Qualification; and, Cementitious Waste Forms. Key goals for these and future exchanges include aligning research and technology, preparing for joint initiatives (to maximize budgetary value for the customer), and reviewing lessons learned. Each site has played a leading role in the development of technology and operational practices that can be used to meet current challenges and to minimize the impact of future challenges. This paper provides an overview of the exchanges held, but predominately focuses on the team development and actions leading from the workshops.

  16. A Site-Wide Perspective on Uranium Geochemistry at the Hanford Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PNNL-17031 A Site-Wide Perspective on Uranium Geochemistry at the Hanford Site J. Zachara C. Liu C of River Protection (ORP) #12;#12;PNNL-17031 A Site-Wide Perspective on Uranium Geochemistry at the Hanford with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and its collaborators. Significant research has more recently

  17. BRAZIL RESEARCH INITIATIVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Taosheng

    BRAZIL RESEARCH INITIATIVES Michigan State University (MSU) identifies Brazil as a global priority and challenges become increasingly part of the U.S.-Brazil agenda, MSU desires partnerships aimed at producing in the U.S. and one in Brazil, to share research strategies and explore joint projects in several research

  18. Fuel Cell Technology Challenges | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Challenges Fuel Cell Technology Challenges Cost and durability are the major challenges to fuel cell commercialization. However, hurdles vary according to the...

  19. Workshop and conference on Grand Challenges applications and software technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    On May 4--7, 1993, nine federal agencies sponsored a four-day meeting on Grand Challenge applications and software technology. The objective was to bring High-Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Grand Challenge applications research groups supported under the federal HPCC program together with HPCC software technologists to: discuss multidisciplinary computational science research issues and approaches, identify major technology challenges facing users and providers, and refine software technology requirements for Grand Challenge applications research. The first day and a half focused on applications. Presentations were given by speakers from universities, national laboratories, and government agencies actively involved in Grand Challenge research. Five areas of research were covered: environmental and earth sciences; computational physics; computational biology, chemistry, and materials sciences; computational fluid and plasma dynamics; and applications of artificial intelligence. The next day and a half was spent in working groups in which the applications researchers were joined by software technologists. Nine breakout sessions took place: I/0, Data, and File Systems; Parallel Programming Paradigms; Performance Characterization and Evaluation of Massively Parallel Processing Applications; Program Development Tools; Building Multidisciplinary Applications; Algorithm and Libraries I; Algorithms and Libraries II; Graphics and Visualization; and National HPCC Infrastructure.

  20. Nevada National Security Site-Directed Research

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found TheHot electron dynamicsAspenNOTRECSIVEP ev TinLogin

  1. NYSUNY 2020 Challenge Grant Application Binghamton University's Smart Energy Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    NYSUNY 2020 Challenge Grant Application Binghamton University's Smart Energy Initiative 2 Executive areas of research will include, for example, the development of solar energy and fuel cell technologies Summary 5 Constructing a Smart Energy Research and Development Facility 9 Expanding the Academic Mission

  2. Cyber Security Major R&D Challenges Ram Krishnan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandhu, Ravi

    1 Cyber Security Major R&D Challenges Ram Krishnan http://engineering.utsa.edu/~krishnan/ Cyber Security Research Institute (CSRI) Cyber Security R&D Workshop April 19-20, 2012 World-Leading Research with Real-World Impact! Institute for Cyber Security Prof. Ravi Sandhu conveys his regrets for inability

  3. Five-Year Technology Development Strategic Plan Targets EM’s Decommissioning Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – Leaders from EM headquarters and field offices and the UK’s Sellafield nuclear site gathered recently to discuss developing technologies needed to address decommissioning challenges across the Cold War cleanup program.

  4. Verification Challenges at Low Numbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benz, Jacob M.; Booker, Paul M.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many papers have dealt with the political difficulties and ramifications of deep nuclear arms reductions, and the issues of “Going to Zero”. Political issues include extended deterrence, conventional weapons, ballistic missile defense, and regional and geo-political security issues. At each step on the road to low numbers, the verification required to ensure compliance of all parties will increase significantly. Looking post New START, the next step will likely include warhead limits in the neighborhood of 1000 . Further reductions will include stepping stones at1000 warheads, 100’s of warheads, and then 10’s of warheads before final elimination could be considered of the last few remaining warheads and weapons. This paper will focus on these three threshold reduction levels, 1000, 100’s, 10’s. For each, the issues and challenges will be discussed, potential solutions will be identified, and the verification technologies and chain of custody measures that address these solutions will be surveyed. It is important to note that many of the issues that need to be addressed have no current solution. In these cases, the paper will explore new or novel technologies that could be applied. These technologies will draw from the research and development that is ongoing throughout the national laboratory complex, and will look at technologies utilized in other areas of industry for their application to arms control verification.

  5. Verifying disarmament: scientific, technological and political challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilat, Joseph R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    There is growing interest in, and hopes for, nuclear disarmament in governments and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) around the world. If a nuclear-weapon-free world is to be achievable, verification and compliance will be critical. VerifYing disarmament would have unprecedented scientific, technological and political challenges. Verification would have to address warheads, components, materials, testing, facilities, delivery capabilities, virtual capabilities from existing or shutdown nuclear weapon and existing nuclear energy programs and material and weapon production and related capabilities. Moreover, it would likely have far more stringent requirements. The verification of dismantlement or elimination of nuclear warheads and components is widely recognized as the most pressing problem. There has been considerable research and development done in the United States and elsewhere on warhead and dismantlement transparency and verification since the early 1990s. However, we do not today know how to verifY low numbers or zero. We need to develop the needed verification tools and systems approaches that would allow us to meet this complex set of challenges. There is a real opportunity to explore verification options and, given any realistic time frame for disarmament, there is considerable scope to invest resources at the national and international levels to undertake research, development and demonstrations in an effort to address the anticipated and perhaps unanticipated verification challenges of disarmament now andfor the next decades. Cooperative approaches have the greatest possibility for success.

  6. Geothermal: Site Map

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Site Map Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs News Related Links Site Map...

  7. SITE OFFICE CONSOLIDATION

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Paul Golan, Site Office Manager, SLAC/LBNL, will present on the role of the DOE Site Office. We anticipate that Paul will cover the role of the DOE Site Office, operating model, and vision.

  8. Hanford Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

  9. Chesapeake Bay Eutrophication: Scientific Understanding, Ecosystem Restoration, and Challenges for Agriculture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesapeake Bay Eutrophication: Scientific Understanding, Ecosystem Restoration, and Challenges'scultural eutrophication and extensive efforts to reduce nutrient inputs. In 1987 a commitment was made to reduce of eutrophication were incompletely known. research, policies, and concerted management action Subsequent research

  10. Natural and Cultural Resources 6 2009 Site environmental report6-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environ- mental Policy Act of 969 for the proposed BP Solar Long Island Solar Farm (LISF) on site, and research. A wide variety of vegetation, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and mammals inhabit the site. Through

  11. Savannah River Site environmental data for 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnett, M.W. [ed.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents data from Savannah River Site routine environmental monitoring and surveillance programs. An attempt also has been made to include all available data from environmental research programs.

  12. Berkeley Lab scientists develop criteria for $20 million energy challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Labs Iain Walker and his colleagues in environmental energy research helped the Siebel Foundation develop the criteria for its Energy Free Home Challenge, which comes with a $20 million global incentive prize. The Challenge is a competition to create a new generation of systems and technologies for practical homes that realize a net-zero, non-renewable energy footprint without increasing the cost of ownership. It is open to everyone everywhere — university teams to handymen and hobbyists.

  13. Berkeley Lab scientists develop criteria for $20 million energy challenge

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Walker, Iain

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Berkeley Labs Iain Walker and his colleagues in environmental energy research helped the Siebel Foundation develop the criteria for its Energy Free Home Challenge, which comes with a $20 million global incentive prize. The Challenge is a competition to create a new generation of systems and technologies for practical homes that realize a net-zero, non-renewable energy footprint without increasing the cost of ownership. It is open to everyone everywhere ? university teams to handymen and hobbyists.

  14. Microgrids: distributed on-site generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    : · Diversity of the load profile as a function of microgrid size; · Feasibility of accurate control of bothMicrogrids: distributed on-site generation Suleiman Abu-Sharkh, Rachel Li, Tom Markvart, Neil Ross for Climate Change Research Technical Report 22 #12;1 Microgrids: distributed on-site generation Tyndall

  15. VPP Photo Gallery - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSite MapScience AcceleratorSurvey> Hanford Site

  16. 2002 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2002 Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1, ''Environment, Safety and Health Reporting'', and summarizes the status of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) environmental programs and performance and restoration efforts, as well as any impacts, both past and present, that Laboratory operations have had on the environment. The document is intended to be technical in nature. A summary of the report is also prepared as a separate document to provide a general overview and includes a CD version of the full report. Operated by Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) for the Department of Energy (DOE), BNL manages its world-class scientific research with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues. BNL's motto, ''Exploring Life's Mysteries...Protecting its Future'', reflects BNL's management philosophy to fully integrate environmental stewardship into all facets of its missions, with a health balance between science and the environment.

  17. DOE Energy Challenge Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Murray; Michael Schaepe

    2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Objectives: 1. Promote energy efficiency concepts in undergraduate and graduate education. 2. Stimulate and interest in pulp and paper industrial processes, which promote and encourage activities in the area of manufacturing design efficiency. 3. Attract both industrial and media attention. Background and executive Summary: In 1997, the Institute of Paper Science and Technology in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy developed a university design competition with an orientation to the Forest Products Industry. This university design competition is in direct alignment with DOE’s interests in instilling in undergraduate education the concepts of developing energy efficient processes, minimizing waste, and providing environmental benefits and in maintaining and enhancing the economic competitiveness of the U.S. forest products industry in a global environment. The primary focus of the competition is projects, which are aligned with the existing DOE Agenda 2020 program for the industry and the lines of research being established with the colleges comprising the Pulp and Paper Education and Research Alliance (PPERA). The six design competitions were held annually for the period 1999 through 2004.

  18. The Hanford Site: An anthology of early histories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: Memories of War: Pearl Harbor and the Genesis of the Hanford Site; safety has always been promoted at the Hanford Site; women have an important place in Hanford Site history; the boom and bust cycle: A 50-year historical overview of the economic impacts of Hanford Site Operations on the Tri-Cities, Washington; Hanford`s early reactors were crucial to the sites`s history; T-Plant made chemical engineering history; the UO{sub 3} plant has a long history of service. PUREX Plant: the Hanford Site`s Historic Workhorse. PUREX Plant Waste Management was a complex challenge; and early Hanford Site codes and jargon.

  19. An overview: Challenges in wind technology development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thresher, R W; Hock, S M

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing innovative wind turbine components and advanced turbine configurations is a primary focus for wind technology researchers. In their rush to bring these new components and systems to the marketplace, designers and developers should consider the lessons learned in the wind farms over the past 10 years. Experience has shown that a disciplined design approach is required that realistically accounts for the turbulence-induced loads, unsteady stall loading, and fatigue effects. This paper reviews past experiences and compares current modelling capabilities with experimental measurements in order to identify some of the knowledge gaps that challenge designers of advanced components and systems. 7 refs., 11 figs.

  20. Industrial Sites - An Approach to Closure

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Management (EM) Program at the Nevada Site Office was created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to address the environmental legacy of contamination resulting from more than 50 years of nuclear weapons research, production and testing. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NSO) is responsible for remediating portions of the Nevada National Security Site (formerly the Nevada Test Site) and the Tonopah Test Range, which is within the Nevada Test and Training Range.

  1. Westinghouse-DOE integration: Meeting the challenge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, S.V.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Westinghouse Electric Corporation (WEC) is in a unique position to affect national environmental management policy approaching the 21st Century. Westinghouse companies are management and operating contractors (MOC,s) at several environmentally pivotal government-owned, contractor operated (GOCO) facilities within the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) nuclear defense complex. One way the WEC brings its companies together is by activating teams to solve specific DOE site problems. For example, one challenging issue at DOE facilities involves the environmentally responsible, final disposal of transuranic and high-level nuclear wastes (TRUs and HLWS). To address these disposal issues, the DOE supports two Westinghouse-based task forces: The TRU Waste Acceptance Criteria Certification Committee (WACCC) and the HLW Vitrification Committee. The WACCC is developing methods to characterize an estimated 176,287 cubic meters of retrievably stored TRUs generated at DOE production sites. Once characterized, TRUs could be safely deposited in the WIPP repository. The Westinghouse HLW Vitrification Committee is dedicated to assess appropriate methods to process an estimated 380,702 cubic meters of HLWs currently stored in underground storage tanks (USTs). As planned, this processing will involve segregating, and appropriately treating, low level waste (LLW) and HLW tank constituents for eventual disposal. The first unit designed to process these nuclear wastes is the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Initiated in 1973, the DWPF project is scheduled to begin operations in 1991 or 1992. Westinghouse companies are also working together to achieve appropriate environmental site restoration at DOE sites via the GOCO Environmental Restoration Committee.

  2. Independent Activity Report, Los Alamos Site Office- December 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Los Alamos Site Office, Office of Quality Assurance Assessment of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building Replacement Project Quality Assurance Plan

  3. action plan site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    goals for research 155 Reconnaissance Soil Geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Fremont Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites...

  4. Wind Power Siting: Public Acceptance and Land Use

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Wind Power Siting: Public Acceptance and Land Use Suzanne Tegen WINDExchange Webinar June 17, 2015 2 Overview * Current NREL Research *...

  5. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Bioenergy History

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  6. Challenges in Industrial Heat Recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dafft, T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation will address several completed and working projects involving waste heat recovery in a chemical plant. Specific examples will be shown and some of the challenges to successful implementation and operation of heat recovery projects...

  7. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Environmental Impacts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  8. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Bessie's Biofuel

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Smithtown HS East in St. James, NY, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  9. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biofuel Acts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic...

  10. Challenges in Industrial Heat Recovery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dafft, T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation will address several completed and working projects involving waste heat recovery in a chemical plant. Specific examples will be shown and some of the challenges to successful implementation and operation of heat recovery projects...

  11. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Tertiary Treatment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Nikola Tesla STEM High School in Redmond, WA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME...

  12. History of Hanford Site Defense Production (Brief)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GERBER, M S

    2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper acquaints the audience with the history of the Hanford Site, America's first full-scale defense plutonium production site. The paper includes the founding and basic operating history of the Hanford Site, including World War II construction and operations, three major postwar expansions (1947-55), the peak years of production (1956-63), production phase downs (1964-the present), a brief production spurt from 1984-86, the end of the Cold War, and the beginning of the waste cleanup mission. The paper also delineates historical waste practices and policies as they changed over the years at the Hanford Site, past efforts to chemically treat, ''fractionate,'' and/or immobilize Hanford's wastes, and resulting major waste legacies that remain today. This paper presents original, primary-source research into the waste history of the Hanford Site. Finally, the paper places the current Hanford Site waste remediation endeavors in the broad context of American and world history.

  13. Annual Site Environmental Report Paducah Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of U. S. Department of Energy Order 231.1A. The data and information contained in this report were collected in accordance with the Paducah Site Environmental Monitoring Plan (LATA...

  14. Key Opportunities and Challenges for Program Sustainability ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Key Opportunities and Challenges for Program Sustainability Key Opportunities and Challenges for Program Sustainability Better Buildings Neighborhood Program, Peer Exchange Call:...

  15. Known Challenges Associated with the Production, Transportation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Known Challenges Associated with the Production, Transportation, Storage and Usage of Pyrolysis Oil in Residential and Industrial Settings Known Challenges Associated with the...

  16. Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate Change Symbiosis: Addressing Biomass Production Challenges and Climate Change This presentation was the opening...

  17. Leadership Challenges in a Midwestern City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nalbandian, John; Wilkes, J. Michael; Kaufman, Amanda

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article identifies leadership challenges that local governments are facing. It includes specific instances of the challenges and how they have been addressed....

  18. 2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar Slides 2nd International Hydrogen Infrastructure Challenges Webinar Slides Presentation slides from the Fuel Cell...

  19. DOE Challenge Home Recommended Quality Management Provisions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Recommended Quality Management Provisions DOE Challenge Home Recommended Quality Management Provisions DOE Challenge Home Recommended Quality Management Provisions. qm6-14-13.pdf...

  20. Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in Industrial...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Documents & Publications Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in Industrial Energy Efficiency, January 2011 - pg 8 Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovations in...

  1. Towards a Visual Turing Challenge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mateusz Malinowski; Mario Fritz

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    As language and visual understanding by machines progresses rapidly, we are observing an increasing interest in holistic architectures that tightly interlink both modalities in a joint learning and inference process. This trend has allowed the community to progress towards more challenging and open tasks and refueled the hope at achieving the old AI dream of building machines that could pass a turing test in open domains. In order to steadily make progress towards this goal, we realize that quantifying performance becomes increasingly difficult. Therefore we ask how we can precisely define such challenges and how we can evaluate different algorithms on this open tasks? In this paper, we summarize and discuss such challenges as well as try to give answers where appropriate options are available in the literature. We exemplify some of the solutions on a recently presented dataset of question-answering task based on real-world indoor images that establishes a visual turing challenge. Finally, we argue despite the success of unique ground-truth annotation, we likely have to step away from carefully curated dataset and rather rely on 'social consensus' as the main driving force to create suitable benchmarks. Providing coverage in this inherently ambiguous output space is an emerging challenge that we face in order to make quantifiable progress in this area.

  2. 5 The Transformation of Policy Ideas: A Challenge for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    103 5 The Transformation of Policy Ideas: A Challenge for Development Research Laurent Goetschel1 by Legro (2000) and exploring the conditions for the transformation of these col- lective policy ideas their expectations on transformation knowledge, from which they expect the greatest added value. While

  3. Designing for Doubt Citizen Science and the Challenge of Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulos, Eric

    Designing for Doubt Citizen Science and the Challenge of Change Eric Paulos Human enable an entirely novel and empowering genre of mobile computing and research called citizen science of fact as a path towards social change. Citizen science; sensors; sustainibility; ambiguity I

  4. Development Challenges in the Caribbean and Central America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Part VII Development Challenges in the Caribbean and Central America: Social Exclusion, Migration in Central America, Mexico, and the Caribbean: Towards a New Research Agenda Maria Angelina PĂ©rez Gutierrez1 25.1 The region The 25 countries2 within the Caribbean and Central American region can be grouped

  5. Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST) Challenges and Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST) Challenges and Facilities on the Pathway to DEMO Princeton,NJ 7-10 September 2011 1 #12;Fusion Nuclear Science and Technology (FNST) must be the Central and Technology Center (UCLA) President, Council of Energy Research and Education Leaders, CEREL (USA) With input

  6. International Conference on Carbon Nanotechnology: Potential and Challenges (Carbon 10)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

    International Conference on Carbon Nanotechnology: Potential and Challenges (Carbon 10) 15 - 17th Since the discovery of the carbon nanotube (CNT) about two decades ago, research related to its of Materials and Process Engineering Kanpur Chapter hosted the `International Conference on Carbon

  7. Taking the China Challenge: China and the Future of Latin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufts University

    Taking the China Challenge: China and the Future of Latin American Economic Development Kevin P-author of the new book, The Dragon in the Room: China and the Future of Latin American Industrialization, Stanford University Press. The author would like to thank Elen Shrethsa for research as- sistance #12;Taking the China

  8. Site Environmental Report, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` This 1993 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in the Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here.

  9. Managing contaminated sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asante-Duah, D.K.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This book summarizes the generic principles of contaminated site management. The book walks the reader through contaminated site identification, risk assessment and the evaluation of remediation alternatives. The book is divided into two major sections, problem diagnosis and development of site restoration. In problem diagnosis, the general principles of site investigation are discussed, including the objectives and differences between tier 1,2, and 3 investigations. The principles of data collection and analysis are presented. A small quantitative discussion of statistical analysis is presented but in keeping with the objectives of the text is not sufficient comprehensive or detailed to provide much of a guide for the practitioner. Chapters on contaminant fate and transport processes and risk assessment help the reader understand the role of these issues in site investigation and remedial planning. A chapter is also included on elements of a site characterization activity, which summarizes some of the key considerations in conducting a site investigation.

  10. PPA Strategy and Challenges 1 PPA Strategy and Challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wechsler, Risa H.

    of mass? · How did the Universe come to be? ­ What is the dark matter and dark energy? What happened coming in September from ASTRO2010 #12;PPA Strategy and Challenges 5 PASAG Guidance · Prioritization · Guidance ­ Dark matter & dark energy both remain high priorities ­ Dark energy funding recommended

  11. Coupled Vadose Zone and Atmospheric Surface-Layer Transport of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Unger, Andre J.A.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1999. Reichle, D. et al. , Carbon sequestration research andfrom geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneCO 2 from a geologic carbon sequestration site showing the

  12. Geological challenges in radioactive waste isolation: Third worldwide review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witherspoon Editor, P.A.; Bodvarsson Editor, G.S.

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The broad range of activities on radioactive waste isolation that are summarized in Table 1.1 provides a comprehensive picture of the operations that must be carried out in working with this problem. A comparison of these activities with those published in the two previous reviews shows the important progress that is being made in developing and applying the various technologies that have evolved over the past 20 years. There are two basic challenges in perfecting a system of radioactive waste isolation: choosing an appropriate geologic barrier and designing an effective engineered barrier. One of the most important developments that is evident in a large number of the reports in this review is the recognition that a URL provides an excellent facility for investigating and characterizing a rock mass. Moreover, a URL, once developed, provides a convenient facility for two or more countries to conduct joint investigations. This review describes a number of cooperative projects that have been organized in Europe to take advantage of this kind of a facility in conducting research underground. Another critical development is the design of the waste canister (and its accessory equipment) for the engineered barrier. This design problem has been given considerable attention in a number of countries for several years, and some impressive results are described and illustrated in this review. The role of the public as a stakeholder in radioactive waste isolation has not always been fully appreciated. Solutions to the technical problems in characterizing a specific site have generally been obtained without difficulty, but procedures in the past in some countries did not always keep the public and local officials informed of the results. It will be noted in the following chapters that this procedure has caused some problems, especially when approval for a major component in a project was needed. It has been learned that a better way to handle this problem is to keep all stakeholders fully informed of project plans and hold periodic meetings to brief the public, especially in the vicinity of the selected site. This procedure has now been widely adopted and represents one of the most important developments in the Third Worldwide Review.

  13. Journal of Computing, Volume 2, Issue 6, June 2010, ISSN 2151-9617 HTTPS://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/SITE/JOURNALOFCOMPUTING/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ], and OWL [2] are modelling web languages that have already been developed to represent or express, much research has been conducted into creating a powerful Ontology modelling language. This research://SITES.GOOGLE.COM/SITE/JOURNALOFCOMPUTING/ WWW.JOURNALOFCOMPUTING.ORG 166 The State of the Art: Ontology Web- Based Languages: XML Based Mohammad

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: Research & Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    security research at Sandia seeks to address key challenges facing our nation and the world. We work with the energy industry to improve current hardware and develop the next...

  15. LATIN AMERICAN TECHNICAL,RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    . INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZED GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN MANY AREAS, INCLUDING: Food / Health / Energy / Environment opportunities / Personalized guidance on professional development programs Institutions/agency sponsors RESEARCH PROGRAMS FOCUSED ON KEY GLOBAL CHALLENGES PURDUE UNIVERSITY Agriculture Education Engineering

  16. Wave Energy challenges and possibilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © Wave Energy ­ challenges and possibilities By: Per Resen Steenstrup www.WaveStarEnergy.com Risř-R-1608(EN) 161 #12;© Wave energy is an old story.... The first wave energy patent is 200 years old. Over the last 100 years more than 200 new wave energy devices have been developped and more than 1.000 patents

  17. Challenges in Integrating Renewable Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -5706 Phone: 480-965-1643 Fax: 480-965-0745 Notice Concerning Copyright Material Permission is given to copy as the source material. This white paper is available for downloading from the PSERC website. 2010 Arizona State University All rights reserved #12;PSERC White Paper 1 Challenges in Integrating Renewable Technologies

  18. Challenge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C oCNMSStaffCerium OxideChair Summariesduo wins

  19. Challenge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C oCNMSStaffCerium OxideChair Summariesduo wins12th

  20. Challenge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C oCNMSStaffCerium OxideChair Summariesduo

  1. Environmental Assessment for Selection and Operation of the Proposed Field Research Centers for the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), within the Office of Science (SC), proposes to add a Field Research Center (FRC) component to the existing Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Program. The NABIR Program is a ten-year fundamental research program designed to increase the understanding of fundamental biogeochemical processes that would allow the use of bioremediation approaches for cleaning up DOE's contaminated legacy waste sites. An FRC would be integrated with the existing and future laboratory and field research and would provide a means of examining the fundamental biogeochemical processes that influence bioremediation under controlled small-scale field conditions. The NABIR Program would continue to perform fundamental research that might lead to promising bioremediation technologies that could be demonstrated by other means in the future. For over 50 years, DOE and its predecessor agencies have been responsible for the research, design, and production of nuclear weapons, as well as other energy-related research and development efforts. DOE's weapons production and research activities generated hazardous, mixed, and radioactive waste products. Past disposal practices have led to the contamination of soils, sediments, and groundwater with complex and exotic mixtures of compounds. This contamination and its associated costs and risks represents a major concern to DOE and the public. The high costs, long duration, and technical challenges associated with remediating the subsurface contamination at DOE sites present a significant need for fundamental research in the biological, chemical, and physical sciences that will contribute to new and cost-effective solutions. One possible low-cost approach for remediating the subsurface contamination of DOE sites is through the use of a technology known as bioremediation. Bioremediation has been defined as the use of microorganisms to biodegrade or biotransform hazardous organic contaminants to environmentally safe levels in soils, subsurface materials, water, sludges, and residues.. While bioremediation technology is promising, DOE managers and non-DOE scientists have recognized that the fundamental scientific information needed to develop effective bioremediation technologies for cleanup of the legacy waste sites is lacking in many cases. DOE believes that field-based research is needed to realize the full potential of bioremediation. The Department of Energy faces a unique set of challenges associated with cleaning up waste at its former weapons production and research sites. These sites contain complex mixtures of contaminants in the subsurface, including radioactive compounds. In many cases, the fundamental field-based scientific information needed to develop safe and effective remediation and cleanup technologies is lacking. DOE needs fundamental research on the use of microorganisms and their products to assist DOE in the decontamination and cleanup of its legacy waste sites. The existing NABIR program to-date has focused on fundamental scientific research in the laboratory. Because subsurface hydrologic and geologic conditions at contaminated DOE sites cannot easily be duplicated in a laboratory, however, the DOE needs a field component to permit existing and future laboratory research results to be field-tested on a small scale in a controlled outdoor setting. Such field-testing needs to be conducted under actual legacy waste field conditions representative of those that DOE is most in need of remediating. Ideally, these field conditions should be as representative as practicable of the types of subsurface contamination conditions that resulted from legacy wastes from the nuclear weapons program activities. They should also be representative of the types of hydrologic and geologic conditions that exist across the DOE complex.

  2. Molecular Science Computing Facility Scientific Challenges: Linking Across Scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Jong, Wibe A.; Windus, Theresa L.

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to define the evolving science drivers for performing environmental molecular research at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) and to provide guidance associated with the next-generation high-performance computing center that must be developed at EMSL's Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in order to address this critical research. The MSCF is the pre-eminent computing facility?supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER)?tailored to provide the fastest time-to-solution for current computational challenges in chemistry and biology, as well as providing the means for broad research in the molecular and environmental sciences. The MSCF provides integral resources and expertise to emerging EMSL Scientific Grand Challenges and Collaborative Access Teams that are designed to leverage the multiple integrated research capabilities of EMSL, thereby creating a synergy between computation and experiment to address environmental molecular science challenges critical to DOE and the nation.

  3. Enterprise Assessments Review, Savannah River Site 2014 Site...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Independent Oversight Inspection, Savannah River Site - January 2010 Independent Oversight Review, Savannah River Site Tritium Facilities - December...

  4. Performance House -- A Cold Climate Challenge Home

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puttagunta, S.; Grab, J.; Williamson, J.

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Working with builder partners on a test homes allows for vetting of whole-house building strategies to eliminate any potential unintended consequences prior to implementing these solution packages on a production scale. To support this research, CARB partnered with Preferred Builders Inc. on a high-performance test home in Old Greenwich, CT. The philosophy and science behind the 2,700 ft2 'Performance House' was based on the premise that homes should be safe, healthy, comfortable, durable, efficient, and adapt with the homeowners. The technologies and strategies used in the 'Performance House' were not cutting-edge, but simply 'best practices practiced'. The focus was on simplicity in construction, maintenance, and operation. When seeking a 30% source energy savings targets over a comparable 2009 IECC code-built home in the cold climate zone, nearly all components of a home must be optimized. Careful planning and design are critical. To help builders and architects seeking to match the performance of this home, a step-by-step guide through the building shell components of DOE's Challenge Home are provided in a pictorial story book. The end result was a DOE Challenge Home that achieved a HERS Index Score of 20 (43 without PV, the minimum target was 55 for compliance). This home was also awarded the 2012 HOBI for Best Green Energy Efficient Home from the Home Builders & Remodelers Association of Connecticut.

  5. Materials Research Lab -Research Internships in Science and Engineering http://www.mrl.ucsb.edu/mrl/outreach/educational/RISE/interns07.html[5/10/12 9:08:02 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    Materials Research Lab - Research Internships in Science and Engineering http CMAS- A NEW CHALLENGE FOR #12;Materials Research Lab - Research Internships in Science and Engineering For Teachers Education Contacts News Research Internships in Science and Engineering Research Interns

  6. Potential Release Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    found. Some examples of potential release sites include septic tanks and associated drain lines chemical storage areas wastewater outfalls material disposal areas incinerators...

  7. 2001 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 2001, AS REQUIRED BY DOE ORDER 231.1.

  8. 1999 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Site Environmental Report for Brookhaven National Laboratory for the calendar year 1999, as required by DOE Order 231.1.

  9. 1994 Site environmental report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fernald site is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the site in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the site. The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. This 1994 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in this Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here. All information presented in this summary is discussed more fully in the main body of this report.

  10. Site Office Manager, Princeton

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as the Princeton Site Office (PSO) Manager by providing overall executive leadership to the PSO.

  11. The Challenge of Greening Energy Systems1 Alain Joseph and Larry Hughes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    in the implementation of biomass, wind, and solar energy. Price and implementation challenges in the renewables sector of rising world energy prices and the potential `peaking' of liquid and gaseous fossil-fuel suppliesERG2006/11 The Challenge of Greening Energy Systems1 Alain Joseph and Larry Hughes Energy Research

  12. Challenges in the Development of Advanced Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Sabharwall; M.C. Teague; S.M. Bragg-Sitton; M.W. Patterson

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past generations of nuclear reactors have been successively developed and the next generation is currently being developed, demonstrating the constant progress and technical and industrial vitality of nuclear energy. In 2000 US Department of Energy launched Generation IV International Forum (GIF) which is one of the main international frameworks for the development of future nuclear systems. The six systems that were selected were: sodium cooled fast reactor, lead cooled fast reactor, supercritical water cooled reactor, very high temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR), gas cooled fast reactor and molten salt reactor. This paper discusses some of the proposed advanced reactor concepts that are currently being researched to varying degrees in the United States, and highlights some of the major challenges these concepts must overcome to establish their feasibility and to satisfy licensing requirements.

  13. Energy-conserving site design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McPherson, E.G. (ed.)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information useful to landscape architects, architects, planners, engineers, students, and homeowners is presented. The concepts and examples needed to create more energy-efficient landscapes are described. The book is organized into five sections, including: an overview and history of energy-efficient design research; detailed information and new strategies on site analysis and planning; energy-efficient landscape design of clustered and single residences; alternative energy-conserving scenarios for the future; and appendices. The appendices contain such technical information as: lists of energy-conserving design options, formulas to calculate solar radiation and soil temperatures, tools for climatic analysis, and techniques for precision planting for solar control and access.

  14. Operating Ground Rules - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclear Astrophysics One ofSpeedingthis site » Open Government

  15. Site Index | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariate Metal-OrganicPulseSimulation,Site Index

  16. WRPS Contract Modifications - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program TheSiteEureka AnalyticsLargeHome Page DirectionalDOE

  17. Sandia Energy - Research Challenge 5: Enhanced Spontaneous Emission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    quantum. The inset shows the z-component of the electric field and depicts the surface plasmon mode at the metalGaAs interface occurring at 945 cm-1 This is not a new field of...

  18. Sandia Energy - Research Challenge 6: Beyond Spontaneous Emission

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stephen; Chow, Weng W.; and Shaner, Eric A. Observation of Rabi Splitting from Surface-plasmon Coupled Conduction-state Transitions in Electrically-excited InAs Quantum Dots, Nano...

  19. Relevant Empirical Testing Research: Challenges and Responses James H. Andrews

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Jamie

    associated with poor quality to the costs associated with achieving quality, we get a ``total cost'' curve Quality Cost of Poor Quality Cost Total Cost Figure 1 take as our starting point the received wisdom about the goals of the software quality assurance

  20. Sandia Energy - Research Challenge 3: Competing Radiative and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chow, Weng W. Modeling excitation-dependent bandstructure effects on InGaN light-emitting diode efficiency, Optics Express, 19, 21818 (2011). 10.1364OE.19.021818 Xu, Jiuru;...

  1. ORNL research reveals new challenges for mercury cleanup | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mercury to methylmercury, a neurotoxin that can penetrate skin and at high doses affect brain and muscle tissue, causing paralysis and brain damage. The discovery of how...

  2. Underwater Sensor Networking: Research Challenges and Potential Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidemann, John

    synchronization, and localization protocols for high- latency acoustic networks, long-duration network sleeping SCADA systems, but in- creasingly with more rapidly deployed sensor networks [39]. Advances in reducing

  3. Sensory theories of developmental dyslexia: three challenges for research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goswami, Usha

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent years have seen the publication of a range of new theories suggesting that the basis of dyslexia may be sensory dysfunction. Here, the evidence for and against several prominent sensory theories of dyslexia is closely scrutinized. Contrary...

  4. Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for both internal combustion engine and for fuel cell use, based on the low likelihood of power-plant specific fuel being commercially viable. c Systems must be energy efficient -...

  5. Sandia Energy - Research Challenge 0: Overarching and spillover...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Strong light-extraction enhancement in GaInN light-emitting diodes patterned with TiO2 micro-pillars with tapered sidewalls, Applied Physics Letters, 101, 141105 (2012)....

  6. Text-Alternative Version: Challenges in OLED Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Narrator: Organic light-emitting diodes, OLEDs, are made using organic carbon-based materials. Unlike LEDs, which are small point light sources, OLEDs are made in sheets that create diffuse area...

  7. Perspective Research in Macromolecular Science: Challenges and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Eric R.

    . K. Ober, S. Z. D. Cheng, P. T. Hammond,§ M. Muthukumar,| E. Reichmanis, K. L. Wooley,# and T. P committee including Stephen Cheng, Paula Hammond, M. Muthukumar, Elsa Reichmanis, and Karen Wooley, over 50

  8. NIH/NSF Visualization Research Challenges January 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rheingans, Penny

    , Harvard University, BWH SPL; Chuck Hansen, University of Utah; Karl Heinz Hoehne, University of Hamburg

  9. Text-Alternative Version: Challenges in LED Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Narrator: LEDs have made remarkable progress in the past decade and gained a strong foothold in the US marketplace. In 2012, LED lighting saved an estimated 71 trillion BTUs, equivalent to annual...

  10. Sandia National Laboratories: Research Challenge 4: Defect-Carrier...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    edge. Note that the density is much higher in the rightmost QW1 closest to the n-type GaN region. Our study of defects involves unique experimental and theoretical capabilities....

  11. Sandia Energy - Research Challenge 4: Defect-Carrier Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    theoretical capabilities. We are using deep-level optical spectroscopy to quantify defect energy levels and densities. Advanced density functional theory is being used to predict...

  12. New Climate Research Centers Forecast Changes and Challenges | Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency VisitSilverNephelineNeuralNew Advances inDepartmentNewAof

  13. Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), Geothermal TechnologiesGeothermalGo forDepartment of Energy

  14. Research Projects to Address Technical Challenges Facing Small Oil and

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM615_CostNSAR -Department ofEMSpent NuclearEnergy| DepartmentNatural

  15. 'Grand Challenge' for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is always evolving, so are our1pm EST |Department ofSavingSolicitation

  16. Clean Room Challenge: Nanoscientist Quiz 2 | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t zManufacturing: U.S. Competitiveness2 P r o j e cClean

  17. Challenges and Opportunities in Thermoelectric Materials Research for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof EnergyAdministration-Desertof Energy0 ChairsDepartment of

  18. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: UCLA Smart Grid Energy Research

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: SinceDevelopment | DepartmentDepartment of Energy LewisDepartment ofof

  19. Grand Challenge for Basic and Applied Research in Hydrogen Storage:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(Fact Sheet), Geothermal TechnologiesGeothermalGo forDepartment of

  20. High-Level Fusion Physics and Materials Interface Challenges July 27, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-Level Fusion Physics and Materials Interface Challenges July 27, 2012 a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF), to test materials under severe and fusion.S. fusion program complete the near term critical research and development (R

  1. The Brownfields Challenge: A Survey of Environmental Justice and Community Participation Initiatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    The Brownfields Challenge: A Survey of Environmental Justice and Community Participation Initiatives Among Ten National Brownfield Pilot Projects Researchers: Raymond Scattone Victoria Stewart participation and environmental justice into brownfields redevelopment. This report reviews existing brownfields

  2. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Richard P. Bowers; Dr. Lynn Sparling; Bruce Buckheit; Daniel LoBue

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  3. Mid-Atlantic Wind - Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel F. Ancona III; Kathryn E. George; Lynn Sparling; Bruce C. Buckheit; Daniel LoBue; and Richard P. Bowers

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This study, supported by the US Department of Energy, Wind Powering America Program, Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Chesapeake Bay Foundation, analyzed barriers to wind energy development in the Mid-Atlantic region along with options for overcoming or mitigating them. The Mid-Atlantic States including Delaware, Maryland, North Carolina and Virginia, have excellent wind energy potential and growing demand for electricity, but only two utility-scale projects have been installed to date. Reasons for this apathetic development of wind resources were analyzed and quantified for four markets. Specific applications are: 1) Appalachian mountain ridgeline sites, 2) on coastal plains and peninsulas, 3) at shallow water sites in Delaware and Chesapeake Bays, Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds, and 4) at deeper water sites off the Atlantic coast. Each market has distinctly different opportunities and barriers. The primary barriers to wind development described in this report can be grouped into four categories; state policy and regulatory issues, wind resource technical uncertainty, economic viability, and public interest in environmental issues. The properties of these typologies are not mutually independent and do interact. The report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to land-based wind energy projects and they could be economically viable today. Likewise potential sites in sheltered shallow waters in regional bay and sounds have been largely overlooked but could be viable currently. Offshore ocean-based applications face higher costs and technical and wind resource uncertainties. The ongoing research and development program, revision of state incentive policies, additional wind measurement efforts, transmission system expansion, environmental baseline studies and outreach to private developers and stakeholders are needed to reduce barriers to wind energy development.

  4. Site Energy Reduction Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagen, P. R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DuPont’s Sabine River Works site is the largest energy consuming location within DuPont. In the year 2000, each production area was encouraged to reduce energy costs. By 2003 site energy consumption was down 16% on an absolute basis and 12% on a BTU...

  5. VAST 2010 Challenge: Arms Dealings and Pandemics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinstein, Georges; Konecni, Shawn; Plaisant, Catherine; Scholtz, Jean; Whiting, Mark A.

    2010-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The 5th VAST Challenge consisted of three mini-challenges that involved both intelligence analysis and bioinformatics. Teams could solve one, two or all three mini-challenges and assess the overall situation to enter the Grand Challenge. Mini-challenge one involved text reports about people and events giving information about arms dealers, situations in various countries and linkages between different countries. Mini-challenge two involved hospital admission and death records from various countries providing information about the spread of a world wide pandemic. Mini-challenge three involved genetic data to be used to identify the origin of the pandemic and the most dangerous viral mutations. The Grand Challenge was to determine how these various mini-challenges were connected. As always the goal was to analyze the data and provide novel interactive visualizations useful in the analytic process. We received 58 submissions in total and gave 15 awards.

  6. Technical challenges for dismantlement verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, C.T.; Stanbro, W.D.; Johnston, R.G.; Nakhleh, C.W.; Dreicer, J.S.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In preparation for future nuclear arms reduction treaties, including any potential successor treaties to START I and II, the authors have been examining possible methods for bilateral warhead dismantlement verification. Warhead dismantlement verification raises significant challenges in the political, legal, and technical arenas. This discussion will focus on the technical issues raised by warhead arms controls. Technical complications arise from several sources. These will be discussed under the headings of warhead authentication, chain-of-custody, dismantlement verification, non-nuclear component tracking, component monitoring, and irreversibility. The authors will discuss possible technical options to address these challenges as applied to a generic dismantlement and disposition process, in the process identifying limitations and vulnerabilities. They expect that these considerations will play a large role in any future arms reduction effort and, therefore, should be addressed in a timely fashion.

  7. Site directed recombination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jurka, Jerzy W. (Los Altos, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Enhanced homologous recombination is obtained by employing a consensus sequence which has been found to be associated with integration of repeat sequences, such as Alu and ID. The consensus sequence or sequence having a single transition mutation determines one site of a double break which allows for high efficiency of integration at the site. By introducing single or double stranded DNA having the consensus sequence flanking region joined to a sequence of interest, one can reproducibly direct integration of the sequence of interest at one or a limited number of sites. In this way, specific sites can be identified and homologous recombination achieved at the site by employing a second flanking sequence associated with a sequence proximal to the 3'-nick.

  8. Site decommissioning management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fauver, D.N.; Austin, J.H.; Johnson, T.C.; Weber, M.F.; Cardile, F.P.; Martin, D.E.; Caniano, R.J.; Kinneman, J.D.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has identified 48 sites contaminated with radioactive material that require special attention to ensure timely decommissioning. While none of these sites represent an immediate threat to public health and safety they have contamination that exceeds existing NRC criteria for unrestricted use. All of these sites require some degree of remediation, and several involve regulatory issues that must be addressed by the Commission before they can be released for unrestricted use and the applicable licenses terminated. This report contains the NRC staff`s strategy for addressing the technical, legal, and policy issues affecting the timely decommissioning of the 48 sites and describes the status of decommissioning activities at the sites.

  9. The challenge of unconventional superconductivity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, M. R. (Materials Science Division)

    2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past few decades, several new classes of superconductors have been discovered that do not appear to be related to traditional superconductors. The source of the superconductivity of these materials is likely different from the electron-ion interactions that are at the heart of conventional superconductivity. Developing a rigorous theory for any of these classes of materials has proven to be a difficult challenge and will remain one of the major problems in physics in the decades to come.

  10. Nuclear Safeguards and Security Challenge:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire3627 Federal Register /76Safeguards and Security Challenge:

  11. Savannah River Site's Site Specific Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Site Specific Plan (SSP) has been prepared by the Savannah River Site (SRS) in order to show the Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities that were identified during the preparation of the Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Five-Year Plan (FYP) for FY 1992--1996. The SSP has been prepared in accordance with guidance received from DOE-HQ. DOE-SR is accountable to DOE-HQ for the implementation of this plan. The purpose of the SSP is to develop a baseline for policy, budget, and schedules for the DOE Environmental Restoration and Waste Management activities. The plan explains accomplishments since the Fiscal Year (FY) 1990 plan, demonstrates how present and future activities are prioritized, identifies currently funded activities and activities that are planned to be funded in the upcoming fiscal year, and describes future activities that SRS is considering.

  12. HANFORD SITE RIVER CORRIDOR CLEANUP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BAZZELL, K.D.

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2005, the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the third generation of closure contracts, including the River Corridor Closure (RCC) Contract at Hanford. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made on cleaning up the river shore that bordes Hanford. However, the most important cleanup challenges lie ahead. In March 2005, DOE awarded the Hanford River Corridor Closure Contract to Washington Closure Hanford (WCH), a limited liability company owned by Washington Group International, Bechtel National and CH2M HILL. It is a single-purpose company whose goal is to safely and efficiently accelerate cleanup in the 544 km{sup 2} Hanford river corridor and reduce or eliminate future obligations to DOE for maintaining long-term stewardship over the site. The RCC Contract is a cost-plus-incentive-fee closure contract, which incentivizes the contractor to reduce cost and accelerate the schedule. At $1.9 billion and seven years, WCH has accelerated cleaning up Hanford's river corridor significantly compared to the $3.2 billion and 10 years originally estimated by the US Army Corps of Engineers. Predictable funding is one of the key features of the new contract, with funding set by contract at $183 million in fiscal year (FY) 2006 and peaking at $387 million in FY2012. Another feature of the contract allows for Washington Closure to perform up to 40% of the value of the contract and subcontract the balance. One of the major challenges in the next few years will be to identify and qualify sufficient subcontractors to meet the goal.

  13. VAST 2009 Challenge: An Insider Threat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grinstein, Georges; Scholtz, Jean; Whiting, Mark A.; Plaisant, Catherine

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 4th year of the VAST Challenge offered participating teams the opportunity to analyze three mini challenges and to combine the data and analyses and enter the Grand challenge. In this paper we provide a description of the data collections used, the overall scenario and the specific questions asked in the mini challenges. We also discuss the infrastructure developed to evaluate accuracy measures in this year’s social network mini challenge. We provide a few examples of visualizations that merited awards. As in previous year, The VAST 2009 Challenge was held in conjunction with the 2009 IEEE VAST Symposium.

  14. Department of Computer Science University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill August 2005 The Challenge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    , the ligand binding sites in nuclear binding domains, and the co-factor binding sites in NADP binding proteins Snoeyink, Professor Alex Tropsha, Professor (School of Pharmacy) Graduate Research Assistants Deepak Bandyopadhyay, Yetian Chen (School of Pharmacy), Luke Huan, Jinze Liu, Ruchir Shah (School of Pharmacy) Research

  15. Research Councils UK Joint Vision For Collaborative Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berzins, M.

    Research Councils UK Joint Vision For Collaborative Training Objectives: Research Council Collaborative Training will provide doctoral students with a first- rate, challenging research training organisations in the private, public and civil society sectors. Benefits to the student ­ Collaborative Training

  16. RESEARCH REPORT 2012 ResearchResearchResearch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    research on batteries and energy storage, and are part of a multimillion- dollar investment by Johnson Controls that aims to make Wisconsin a hub for energy-storage technology. #12;Chancellor's Welcome A great powerful UW-MILWAUKEE RESEARCH REPORT 2012 As Wisconsin's premier public urban institution, the University

  17. november 2010 Student Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papautsky, Ian

    November 2010 ResearchUc #12;2 UCReseaRch November 2010 Design vs. Dyslexia Reading and retaining information is the challenge faced by the one in five children who has some form of dyslexia. Overcoming movement to increase the reading and retention abilities of children aged 9 to 11 who have dyslexia

  18. Biological and Environmental Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    recalcitrance. Using an integrated approach to solving the challenge of producing biofuel from cellulosic materials, the center will not only provide the scientific basis for affordable and sustainable biofuel but will also advance our understanding in areas of fundamental biological science. BESC researchers have

  19. Complexity of Groundwater Contaminants at DOE Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, T.C.; Faybishenko, B.; Jordan, P.

    2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the remediation and long-term stewardship of one of the world's largest groundwater contamination portfolios, with a significant number of plumes containing various contaminants, and considerable total mass and activity. As of 1999, the DOE's Office of Environmental Management was responsible for remediation, waste management, or nuclear materials and facility stabilization at 144 sites in 31 states and one U.S. territory, out of which 109 sites were expected to require long-term stewardship. Currently, 19 DOE sites are on the National Priority List. The total number of contaminated plumes on DOE lands is estimated to be 10,000. However, a significant number of DOE sites have not yet been fully characterized. The most prevalent contaminated media are groundwater and soil, although contaminated sediment, sludge, and surface water also are present. Groundwater, soil, and sediment contamination are present at 72% of all DOE sites. A proper characterization of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites is critical for accomplishing one of the primary DOE missions -- planning basic research to understand the complex physical, chemical, and biological properties of contaminated sites. Note that the definitions of the terms 'site' and 'facility' may differ from one publication to another. In this report, the terms 'site,' 'facility' or 'installation' are used to identify a contiguous land area within the borders of a property, which may contain more than one plume. The term 'plume' is used here to indicate an individual area of contamination, which can be small or large. Even though several publications and databases contain information on groundwater contamination and remediation technologies, no statistical analyses of the contaminant inventory at DOE sites has been prepared since the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The DOE Groundwater Data Base (GWD) presents data as of 2003 for 221 groundwater plumes at 60 DOE sites and facilities. Note that Riley and Zachara analyzed the data from only 18 sites/facilities including 91 plumes. In this paper, we present the results of statistical analyses of the data in the GWD as guidance for planning future basic and applied research of groundwater contaminants within the DOE complex. Our analyses include the evaluation of a frequency and ranking of specific contaminants and contaminant groups, contaminant concentrations/activities and total contaminant masses and activities. We also compared the results from analyses of the GWD with those from the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara. The difference between our results and those summarized in the 1992 report by Riley and Zachara could be caused by not only additional releases, but also by the use of modern site characterization methods, which more accurately reveal the extent of groundwater contamination. Contaminated sites within the DOE complex are located in all major geographic regions of the United States, with highly variable geologic, hydrogeologic, soil, and climatic conditions. We assume that the information from the 60 DOE sites included in the GWD are representative for the whole DOE complex. These 60 sites include the major DOE sites and facilities, such as Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Colorado; Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho; Savannah River Site, South Carolina; Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee; and Hanford Reservation, Washington. These five sites alone ccount for 71% of the value of the remediation work.

  20. lightsource_data_challenge-analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Parkinson (ALS), Nobumichi Tamura (ALS), Craig E. Tull (CRD) Advanced Light Source, LBNL; Computing Research Division, LBNL BES facilities (Light Sources and Neutron Sources)...

  1. Scientific Solutions to Nuclear Waste Environmental Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Bradley R.

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hidden Cost of Nuclear Weapons The Cold War arms race drove an intense plutonium production program in the U.S. This campaign produced approximately 100 tons of plutonium over 40 years. The epicenter of plutonium production in the United States was the Hanford site, a 586 square mile reservation owned by the Department of Energy and located on the Colombia River in Southeastern Washington. Plutonium synthesis relied on nuclear reactors to convert uranium to plutonium within the reactor fuel rods. After a sufficient amount of conversion occurred, the rods were removed from the reactor and allowed to cool. They were then dissolved in an acid bath and chemically processed to separate and purify plutonium from the rest of the constituents in the used reactor fuel. The acidic waste was then neutralized using sodium hydroxide and the resulting mixture of liquids and precipitates (small insoluble particles) was stored in huge underground waste tanks. The byproducts of the U.S. plutonium production campaign include over 53 million gallons of high-level radioactive waste stored in 177 large underground tanks at Hanford and another 34 million gallons stored at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. This legacy nuclear waste represents one of the largest environmental clean-up challenges facing the world today. The nuclear waste in the Hanford tanks is a mixture of liquids and precipitates that have settled into sludge. Some of these tanks are now over 60 years old and a small number of them are leaking radioactive waste into the ground and contaminating the environment. The solution to this nuclear waste challenge is to convert the mixture of solids and liquids into a durable material that won't disperse into the environment and create hazards to the biosphere. What makes this difficult is the fact that the radioactive half-lives of some of the radionuclides in the waste are thousands to millions of years long. (The half-life of a radioactive substance is the amount of time it takes for one-half of the material to undergo radioactive decay.) In general, the ideal material would need to be durable for approximately 10 half-lives to allow the activity to decay to negligible levels. However, the potential health effects of each radionuclide vary depending on what type of radiation is emitted, the energy of that emission, and the susceptibility for the human body to accumulate and concentrate that particular element. Consequently, actual standards tend to be based on limiting the dose (energy deposited per unit mass) that is introduced into the environment. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has the responsibility to establish standards for nuclear waste disposal to protect the health and safety of the public. For example, the Energy Policy Act of 1992 directed the EPA to establish radiation protection standards for the Yucca Mountain geologic repository for nuclear wastes. The standards for Yucca Mountain were promulgated in 2008, and limit the dose to 15 millirem per year for the first 10,000 years, and 100 milirem per year between 10,000 years and 1 million years (40 CFR Part 197; http://www.epa.gov/radiation/yucca/2008factsheet.html). So, the challenge is two-fold: (1) develop a material (a waste form) that is capable of immobilizing the waste over geologic time scales, and (2) develop a process to convert the radioactive sludge in the tanks into this durable waste form material. Glass: Hard, durable, inert, and with infinite chemical versatility Molten glass is a powerful solvent liquid, which can be designed to dissolve almost anything. When solidified, it can be one of the most chemically inert substances known to man. Nature's most famous analogue to glass is obsidian, a vitreous product of volcanic activity; formations over 17 million years old have been found. Archaeologists have found man-made glass specimens that are five thousand years old.

  2. Site Sustainability Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9Morgan McCorkleSingin' in theCleanup SiteSiteSite5 DOE

  3. Overview of IMG Challenges (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Markowitz, Victor [JGI

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE JGI's Victor Markowitz gives an overview of IMG challenges at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  4. Overview of IMG Challenges (MICW - Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop: 10K Genomes at a Time)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markowitz, Victor [JGI] [JGI

    2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE JGI's Victor Markowitz gives an overview of IMG challenges at the Metagenomics Informatics Challenges Workshop held at the DOE JGI on October 12-13, 2011.

  5. Scientific Grand Challenges: Challenges in Climate Change Science and the Role of Computing at the Extreme Scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Johnson, Gary M.; Washington, Warren M.

    2009-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) in partnership with the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) held a workshop on the challenges in climate change science and the role of computing at the extreme scale, November 6-7, 2008, in Bethesda, Maryland. At the workshop, participants identified the scientific challenges facing the field of climate science and outlined the research directions of highest priority that should be pursued to meet these challenges. Representatives from the national and international climate change research community as well as representatives from the high-performance computing community attended the workshop. This group represented a broad mix of expertise. Of the 99 participants, 6 were from international institutions. Before the workshop, each of the four panels prepared a white paper, which provided the starting place for the workshop discussions. These four panels of workshop attendees devoted to their efforts the following themes: Model Development and Integrated Assessment; Algorithms and Computational Environment; Decadal Predictability and Prediction; Data, Visualization, and Computing Productivity. The recommendations of the panels are summarized in the body of this report.

  6. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: What is Biomass?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  7. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Biomass

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Broad Run HS in Ashburn, VA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  8. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Iowa Ethanol Production

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  9. Breakout Session: Solar Securitization: Opportunities and Challenges...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Securitization: Opportunities and Challenges Breakout Session: Solar Securitization: Opportunities and Challenges May 21, 2014 6:30PM to 7:30PM PDT Avila A & B The U.S. solar...

  10. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: Biomass Reduces Carbon Dioxide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  11. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: History of Bioenergy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Troy High School in Troy, MI, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  12. BIOENERGIZEME INFOGRAPHIC CHALLENGE: What is Biogas?

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This infographic was created by students from Sparks HS in Sparks, NV, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge. The BioenergizeME Infographic Challenge...

  13. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Radiation Control Program - Partners in Site Restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, S. L.; Stafford, M. W.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded the Management and Integration (M&I) contract for all five of the Oak Ridge Operations (ORO) facilities to Bechtel Jacobs Company LLC (BJC). At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a world renowned national laboratory and research and development facility, the BJC mission involves executing the DOE Environmental Management (EM) program. In addition to BJC's M&I contract, UT-Battelle, LLC, a not-for-profit company, is the Management and Operating (M&O) contractor for DOE on the ORNL site. As part of ORNL's EM program, legacy inactive facilities (i.e., reactors, nuclear material research facilities, burial grounds, and underground storage tanks) are transferred to BJC and are designated as remediation, decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), or long-term surveillance and maintenance (S&M) facilities. Facilities operated by both UT-Battelle and BJC are interspersed throughout the site and are usually in close proximity. Both UT-Battelle and BJC have DOE-approved Radiation Protection Programs established in accordance with 10 CFR 835. The BJC Radiological Control (RADCON) Program adapts to the M&I framework and is comprised of a combination of subcontracted program responsibilities with BJC oversight. This paper focuses on the successes and challenges of executing the BJC RADCON Program for BJC's ORNL Project through a joint M&I contractor relationship, while maintaining a positive working relationship and partnership with UT-Battelle's Radiation Protection organization.

  14. Challenges and Opportunities in Thermoelectric Energy Conversion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Conversion Challenges and Opportunities in Thermoelectric Energy Conversion 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Lawrence Berkeley...

  15. SunShot Rooftop Challenge Awardees

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Awardees, partners, award amounts, estimated population, and project descriptions for the 2011 SunShot Rooftop Challenge.

  16. Technetium Chemistry Science Challenges in Environmental Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technetium Chemistry Science Challenges in Environmental Science and Waste Processing Workshop Sponsored by Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory Richland, Washington July...

  17. 2010 Site Environmental Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratel, K.; Lee, R; Remien, J; Hooda, B; Green, T; Williams, J; Pohlot, P; Dorsch, W; Paquette, D; Burke, J

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection, of this volume. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the full report. BNL is operated and managed for DOE's Office of Science by Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA), a partnership formed by Stony Brook University and Battelle Memorial Institute. For more than 60 years, the Laboratory has played a lead role in the DOE Science and Technology mission and continues to contribute to the DOE missions in energy resources, environmental quality, and national security. BNL manages its world-class scientific research with particular sensitivity to environmental issues and community concerns. The Laboratory's motto, 'Exploring Life's Mysteries...Protecting its Future,' and its Environmental, Safety, Security and Health Policy reflect the commitment of BNL's management to fully integrate environmental stewardship into all facets of its mission and operations.

  18. Hanford Site Cleanup Completion Framework - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery WasteSite PublicOfficial

  19. Hanford Site Safety Standards - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery WasteSite

  20. Hanford Site Voluntary Protection Program - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonicbet When yourecovery WasteSiteProgram About