National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for research atmospheric thermodynamics

  1. INVESTIGATING THERMODYNAMICS OF VERTICAL ATMOSPHERIC ENERGY TRANSPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's climate and on enhancing the overall entropy production of the Earth's climate system are discussed. Potential thermodynamic constraint(s) for the Earth's climate system are also explored from these simple transport are investigated by using simple one-dimensional vertical energy balance models (i.e., radiative

  2. On detecting biospheres from thermodynamic disequilibrium in planetary atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krissansen-Totton, Joshua; Catling, David C

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric chemical disequilibrium has been proposed as a method for detecting extraterrestrial biospheres from exoplanet observations. Chemical disequilibrium is potentially a generalized biosignature since it makes no assumptions about particular biogenic gases or metabolisms. Here, we present the first rigorous calculations of the thermodynamic chemical disequilibrium in the atmospheres of Solar System planets, in which we quantify the difference in Gibbs free energy of an observed atmosphere compared to that of all the atmospheric gases reacted to equilibrium. The purely gas phase disequilibrium in Earth's atmosphere, as measured by this available Gibbs free energy, is not unusual by Solar System standards and smaller than that of Mars. However, Earth's atmosphere is in contact with a surface ocean, which means that gases can react with water, and so a multiphase calculation that includes aqueous species is required. We find that the disequilibrium in Earth's atmosphere-ocean system (in joules per mole o...

  3. Thermodynamics of atmospheric circulation on hot Jupiters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Goodman

    2008-10-07

    Atmospheric circulation on tidally-locked exoplanets is driven by the absorption and reradiation of heat from the host star. They are natural heat engines, converting heat into mechanical energy. A steady state is possible only if there is a mechanism to dissipate mechanical energy, or if the redistribution of heat is so effective that the Carnot efficiency is driven to zero. Simulations based on primitive, equivalent-barotropic, or shallow-water equations without explicit provision for dissipation of kinetic energy and for recovery of that energy as heat, violate energy conservation. More seriously perhaps, neglect of physical sources of drag may overestimate wind speeds and rates of advection of heat from the day to the night side.

  4. Atmospheric Research at BNL

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peter Daum

    2010-01-08

    Brookhaven researcher Peter Daum discusses an international field experiment designed to make observations of critical components of the climate system of the southeastern Pacific. Because elements of this system are poorly understood and poorly represent

  5. Thermodynamic analysis and experimental study of the effect of atmospheric pressure on the ice point

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, A. H. [Thermophysical Properties Division National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado (United States)] [Thermophysical Properties Division National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado (United States); McLinden, M. O. [Thermophysical Properties Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado (United States)] [Thermophysical Properties Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado (United States); Tew, W. L. [Sensor Science Division National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland (United States)] [Sensor Science Division National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland (United States)

    2013-09-11

    We present a detailed thermodynamic analysis of the temperature of the ice point as a function of atmospheric pressure. This analysis makes use of accurate international standards for the properties of water and ice, and of available high-accuracy data for the Henry's constants of atmospheric gases in liquid water. The result is an ice point of 273.150 019(5) K at standard atmospheric pressure, with higher ice-point temperatures (varying nearly linearly with pressure) at lower pressures. The effect of varying ambient CO{sub 2} concentration is analyzed and found to be significant in comparison to other uncertainties in the model. The thermodynamic analysis is compared with experimental measurements of the temperature difference between the ice point and the triple point of water performed at elevations ranging from 145 m to 4302 m, with atmospheric pressures from 101 kPa to 60 kPa.

  6. JournalofGeophysicalResearch: Atmospheres RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raible, Christoph C.

    MAR 2015 The influence of absorbed solar radiation by Saharan dust on hurricane genesis Sebastian, Bern, Switzerland Abstract To date, the radiative impact of dust and the Saharan air layer (SAL the atmosphere due to absorption of solar radiation but thus shifts convection to regions more conducive

  7. Overview of NASA supported Stirling thermodynamic loss research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tew, R.C.; Geng, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is funding research to characterize Stirling machine thermodynamic losses. NASA`s primary goal is to improve Stirling design codes to support engine development for space and terrestrial power. However, much of the fundamental data is applicable to Stirling cooler and heat pump applications. The research results are reviewed. Much has been learned about oscillating-flow hydrodynamics, including laminar/turbulent transition, and tabulated data has been documented for further analysis. Now, with a better understanding of the oscillator-flow field, it is time to begin measuring the effects of oscillating flow and oscillating pressure level on heat transfer in heat exchanger flow passages and in cylinders. This critical phase of the work is just beginning.

  8. Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Jack

    WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents introduced by man (e.g., pollutants). Knowledge of upper-ocean currents is important for navigation and for search and rescue. The ocean currents off Oregon vary seasonally and can also vary from year to year

  9. Introducing Research College of Oceanic & Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    .coas.oregonstate.edu WECOMA WECOMA Coll ege of Oceanic & Atmospheric Scie nces OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY in the O cean currents, to the south in summer and generally to the north in winter, create ocean currents. The strong summertime and the topography of the ocean floor influence the east-west cross-shelf currents. Understanding and being able

  10. THE THERMODYNAMIC EFFECTS OF SUBLIMATING, BLOWING SNOW IN THE ATMOSPHERIC BOUNDARY LAYER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dery, Stephen

    . Apart from the transport of snow, the thermodynamic impact of sublimat- ing blowing snow in air near process is self- limiting despite ongoing transport of snow by wind, yielding significantly lower values their lengthy winters (Stewart et al., 1995). These storms are often associated with sub-freezing temper- atures

  11. Surface OceanLower Atmosphere Processes Geophysical Research Series 187

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohfeld, Karen

    , British Columbia, Canada Andy Ridgwell Bristol Research Initiative for the Dynamic Global Environment251 Surface Ocean­Lower Atmosphere Processes Geophysical Research Series 187 Copyright 2009, and processes have been identified that have improved our understanding of the modern and future carbon cycle

  12. Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connors, Daniel A.

    I-WATER Integrated Water, Atmosphere, Ecosystems, Education and Research Program #12;I-WATER Funding ¤ I-WATER is funded by the National Science Foundation IGERT program ¤ IGERT is NSF's Integrative of the Provost, Office of the Vice President for Research #12;I-WATER: Organizing Concept Water management

  13. 2010 Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Science Team Meeting Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupont, DL

    2011-05-04

    This document contains the summaries of papers presented in poster format at the March 2010 Atmospheric System Research Science Team Meeting held in Bethesda, Maryland. More than 260 posters were presented during the Science Team Meeting. Posters were sorted into the following subject areas: aerosol-cloud-radiation interactions, aerosol properties, atmospheric state and surface, cloud properties, field campaigns, infrastructure and outreach, instruments, modeling, and radiation. To put these posters in context, the status of ASR at the time of the meeting is provided here.

  14. Computing planetary atmospheres with algorithms derived from action thermodynamics and a novel version of the virial theorem for gravitating polyatomic molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kennedy, Ivan R

    2015-01-01

    An objective revision of the Laplace barometric formula for isothermal planetary atmospheres is proposed. From Clausius virial theorem equating the root mean square kinetic energy to half the gravitational potential energy, planetary atmospheres are required to have declining temperature with altitude as a consequence of the interaction between thermodynamic heat flow and gravity. The virial action hypothesis predicts non adiabatic lapse rates in temperature yielding a practical means to calculate variations with altitude in atmospheric entropy, free energy, molecular density and pressure. Remarkably, the new formulae derived enable prediction of atmospheric profiles with physical properties closely resembling those observed on Earth, Venus and Mars. These new formulae provide an objective basis for computing the dynamic morphology of the atmosphere. Climate scientists may consider this explanatory hypothesis for self organisation of planetary atmospheres for its possible relevance for predicting global surfa...

  15. Atmospheric Sciences Program summaries of research in FY 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    This document describes the activities and products of the Atmospheric Science Program of the Environmental Sciences Division, Office of Health and Environmental Research, Office of Energy Research, in FY 1993. Each description contains the project`s title; three-year funding history; the contract period over which the funding applies; the name(s) of the principal investigator(s); the institution(s) conducting the projects; and the project`s objectives, products, approach, and results to date. Project descriptions are categorized within the report according to program areas: atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric dynamics, and support operations. Within these categories, the descriptions are ordered alphabetically by principal investigator. Each program area is preceded by a brief text that defines the program area, states its goals and objectives, lists principal research questions, and identifies program managers. Appendixes provide the addresses and telephone numbers of the principal investigators and define the acronyms used. This document has been indexed to aid the reader in locating research topics, participants, and research institutions in the text and the project descriptions. Comprehensive subject, principal investigator, and institution indexes are provided at the end of the text for this purpose. The comprehensive subject index includes keywords from the introduction and chapter texts in addition to those from the project descriptions.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LR Roeder

    2008-12-01

    The Importance of Clouds and Radiation for Climate Change: The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols, can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To reduce these scientific uncertainties, the ARM Program uses a unique twopronged approach: • The ARM Climate Research Facility, a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes; and • The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF and other data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report provides an overview of each of these components and a sample of achievements for each in fiscal year (FY) 2008.

  17. Atmospheric Science Program. Summaries of research in FY 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    This report provides descriptions for all projects funded by ESD under annual contracts in FY 1994. Each description contains the project`s title; three-year funding history (in thousands of dollars); the contract period over which the funding applies; the name(s) of the principal investigator(s); the institution(s) conducting the projects; and the project`s objectives, products, approach, and results to date (for most projects older than one year). Project descriptions are categorized within the report according to program areas: atmospheric chemistry, atmospheric dynamics, and support operations. Within these categories, the descriptions are ordered alphabetically by principal investigator. Each program area is preceded by a brief text that defines the program area, states it goals and objectives, lists principal research questions, and identifies program managers. Appendixes provide the addresses and telephone numbers of the principal investigators and define the acronyms used.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF) Annual Report 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LR Roeder

    2007-12-01

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the program, and presents key accomplishments in 2007. Notable achievements include: • Successful review of the ACRF as a user facility by the DOE Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee. The subcommittee reinforced the importance of the scientific impacts of this facility, and its value for the international research community. • Leadership of the Cloud Land Surface Interaction Campaign. This multi-agency, interdisciplinary field campaign involved enhanced surface instrumentation at the ACRF Southern Great Plains site and, in concert with the Cumulus Humilis Aerosol Processing Study sponsored by the DOE Atmospheric Science Program, coordination of nine aircraft through the ARM Aerial Vehicles Program. • Successful deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility in Germany, including hosting nearly a dozen guest instruments and drawing almost 5000 visitors to the site. • Key advancements in the representation of radiative transfer in weather forecast models from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. • Development of several new enhanced data sets, ranging from best estimate surface radiation measurements from multiple sensors at all ACRF sites to the extension of time-height cloud occurrence profiles to Niamey, Niger, Africa. • Publication of three research papers in a single issue (February 2007) of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society.

  19. Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program: Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program -- Final Report. Part 1: The lower atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tooman, T.P.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents work done between FY91 and FY95 for the lower atmospheric portion of the joint Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Remote Sensing and Assessment Program (ARSAP) within the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP). The work focused on (1) developing new measurement capabilities and (2) measuring atmospheric heating in a well-defined layer and then relating it to cloud properties an water vapor content. Seven new instruments were develop3ed for use with Unmanned Aerospace Vehicles (UAVs) as the host platform for flux, radiance, cloud, and water vapor measurements. Four major field campaigns were undertaken to use these new as well as existing instruments to make critically needed atmospheric measurements. Scientific results include the profiling of clear sky fluxes from near surface to 14 km and the strong indication of cloudy atmosphere absorption of solar radiation considerably greater than predicted by extant models.

  20. Quantum Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sai Vinjanampathy; Janet Anders

    2015-08-25

    Quantum thermodynamics is an emerging research field aiming to extend standard thermodynamics and non-equilibrium statistical physics to ensembles of sizes well below the thermodynamic limit, in non-equilibrium situations, and with the full inclusion of quantum effects. Fuelled by experimental advances and the potential of future nanoscale applications this research effort is pursued by scientists with different backgrounds, including statistical physics, many-body theory, mesoscopic physics and quantum information theory, who bring various tools and methods to the field. A multitude of theoretical questions are being addressed ranging from issues of thermalisation of quantum systems and various definitions of "work", to the efficiency and power of quantum engines. This overview provides a perspective on a selection of these current trends accessible to postgraduate students and researchers alike.

  1. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3: Atmospheric and climate research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER) atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. PNL has had a long history of technical leadership in the atmospheric sciences research programs within OHER. Within the Environmental Sciences Division of OHER, the Atmospheric Chemistry Program continues DOE`s long-term commitment to understanding the local, regional, and global effects of energy-related air pollutants. Research through direct measurement, numerical modeling, and analytical studies in the Atmospheric Chemistry Program emphasizes the long-range transport, chemical transformation, and removal of emitted pollutants, photochemically produced oxidant species, nitrogen-reservoir species, and aerosols. The atmospheric studies in Complex Terrain Program applies basic research on atmospheric boundary layer structure and evolution over inhomogeneous terrain to DOE`s site-specific and generic mission needs in site safety, air quality, and climate change. Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements, the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics, and Quantitative Links program to form DOE`s contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. The description of ongoing atmospheric and climate research at PNL is organized in two broad research areas: atmospheric research; and climate research. This report describes the progress in fiscal year 1993 in each of these areas. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases.

  2. ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL RESEARCH, ANNUAL REPORT 1976-77

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novakov, T.

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric Chemistry Catalytic Oxidation of ,S02 on Carbonand S.G. Chang, "Catalytic oxidation of S02 on carbonCHEMISTRY LBL-6819 Catalytic Oxidation of S02 on Carbon in

  3. Cheng-Hsuan Lu Atmospheric Sciences and Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrova, Ivana

    and aerosols in Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GEOS-5) by introducing a double-moment cloud component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM) primarily at the National Center for Atmospheric global models (i.e., the Global Forecast System, GFS, and the Climate Forecast System, CFS). Our proposed

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.; Decision and Information Sciences

    2006-09-06

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,965.60 hours (0.90 x 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,856.40 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), the actual hours of operation, and the variance (unplanned downtime) for the period April 1 through June 30, 2006, for the fixed and mobile sites. Although the AMF is currently up and running in Niamey, Niger, Africa, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The third quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. For all fixed sites (especially the TWP locale) and the AMF, the actual data availability (and therefore actual hours of operation) exceeded the individual (and well as aggregate average of the fixed sites) operational goal for the third quarter of fiscal year (FY) 2006.

  5. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and BiofuelsPhysicist47July 1999 ARM1 Atmospheric

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and BiofuelsPhysicist47July 1999 ARM1 Atmospheric7

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and BiofuelsPhysicist47July 1999 ARM12 Atmospheric

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility (ACRF Instrumentation Status: New, Current, and Future)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JW Voyles

    2008-01-30

    The purpose of this report is to provide a concise but comprehensive overview of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility instrumentation status. The report is divided into the following four sections: (1) new instrumentation in the process of being acquired and deployed, (2) existing instrumentation and progress on improvements or upgrades, (3) proposed future instrumentation, and (4) Small Business Innovation Research instrument development.

  9. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1991 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3, Atmospheric and climate research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    Within the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the atmospheric sciences and carbon dioxide research programs are part of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD). One of the central missions of the division Is to provide the DOE with scientifically defensible information on the local, regional, and global distributions of energy-related pollutants and their effects on climate. This information is vital to the definition and Implementation of a sound national energy strategy. This volume reports on the progress and status of all OHER atmospheric science and climate research projects at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Research at PNL provides basic scientific underpinnings to DOE`s program of global climate research. Research projects within the core carbon dioxide and ocean research programs are now integrated with those in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM), the Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics and Model Physics (CHAMMP), and quantitative links programs to form DOEs contribution to the US Global Change Research Program. Climate research in the ESD has the common goal of improving our understanding of the physical, chemical, biological, and social processes that influence the Earth system so that national and international policymaking relating to natural and human-induced changes in the Earth system can be given a firm scientific basis. This report describes the progress In FY 1991 in each of these areas.

  10. NARSTO Support for Atmospheric Science Research and Data Collection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is a public/private alliance with members from Canada, Mexico, and the United States #12;New NARSTO Program and Sigurd W. Christensen NARSTO Quality Systems Science Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Oak Ridge, Tennessee May 17-18, 2006 ORNL research was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy

  11. ANNUAL REPORT CIRACooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    of Economics/CIRA Mark DeMaria, Colorado State University NOAA RAMM Branch Ingrid Guch, NOAA Chief, NOAASat and National Park Service Air Quality Research Division activities) to allow the reader a more complete with the infrastructure and intellectual talent produced and used by both sides of the funded activities. For further

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LR Roeder

    2005-11-30

    This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the ARM Climate Research Facility and ARM Science programs and presents key accomplishments in 2006. Noteworthy scientific and infrastructure accomplishments in 2006 include: • Collaborating with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to lead the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment, a major international field campaign held in Darwin, Australia • Successfully deploying the ARM Mobile Facility in Niger, Africa • Developing the new ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) to provide airborne measurements • Publishing a new finding on the impacts of aerosols on surface energy budget in polar latitudes • Mitigating a long-standing double-Intertropical Convergence Zone problem in climate models using ARM data and a new cumulus parameterization scheme.

  13. Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (J/MAR) University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research (J/MAR) University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822 Department of Oceanography, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology University of Hawaii, Honolulu. Hawaii 96822 Department of Oceanography, School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology

  14. NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Roundtable: Earth System Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Summary NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Roundtable: Earth System Modeling in Environmental Sciences at the University of Colorado, centered on Earth System Modeling and OAR's role develop and/or can use accurate and timely predictions of the Earth system that come from modeling. The 18

  15. Radiological and Environmental Research Division annual report, January-December 1980. Atmospheric physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-08-01

    Contained are twenty-six abstracts of on-going research programs at Argonne National Laboratory concerning the modeling of environmental air pollutants concentration and transport for January-December 1980. Studies on pollutant transport modeling, fluid flow models, and atmospheric precipitations chemistry are included. (DLS)

  16. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1985 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1986-02-01

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales. In 1985, this research has examined the transport and diffusion of atmospheric contaminants in areas of complex terrain, summarized the field studies and analyses of dry deposition and resuspension conducted in past years, and begun participation in a large, multilaboratory program to assess the precipitation scavenging processes important to the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' The description of atmospheric research at PNL is organized in terms of the following study areas: Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain; Dispersion, Deposition, and Resuspension of Atmospheric Contaminants; and Processing of Emissions by Clouds and Precipitation (PRECP).

  17. Quantum Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronnie Kosloff

    2013-05-10

    Quantum thermodynamics addresses the emergence of thermodynamical laws from quantum mechanics. The link is based on the intimate connection of quantum thermodynamics with the theory of open quantum systems. Quantum mechanics inserts dynamics into thermodynamics giving a sound foundation to finite-time-thermodynamics. The emergence of the 0-law I-law II-law and III-law of thermodynamics from quantum considerations is presented. The emphasis is on consistence between the two theories which address the same subject from different foundations. We claim that inconsistency is the result of faulty analysis pointing to flaws in approximations.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2012-10-10

    Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2013-01-11

    Individual datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile research sites are collected and routed to the Data Management Facility (DMF) for processing in near-real-time. Instrument and processed data are then delivered approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made freely available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Data Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

  20. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1984 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 3. Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1985-02-01

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to assess, describe, and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to study the impacts of contaminants on local, regional, and global climates. The contaminants being investigated are those resulting from the development and use of conventional resources (coal, gas, oil, and nuclear power) as well as alternative energy sources. The description of the research is organized into 3 sections: (1) Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT); (2) Boundary Layer Meteorology; and (3) Dispersion, Deposition, and Resuspension of Atmospheric Contaminants. Separate analytics have been done for each of the sections and are indexed and contained in the EDB. (MDF)

  1. NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Roundtable: Severe Weather Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and supporting high- risk, high-payoff research. Dr. Hayes began his remarks by outlining not what keeps him up services. Several themes emerged in the roundtable, including: Information Architecture, Communicating Risk (pipeline) while researching new observational technologies, so data can be shared and not withheld due

  2. Air Resources Laboratory The Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) is a research laboratory within the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). ARL is headquartered at the NOAA Center for Weather in order to improve the Nation's ability to protect human and ecosystem health. What We Do ARL conducts research and development in the fields of atmospheric dispersion, air quality, climate change, and boundary

  3. Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Instrument Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunagan, Stephen; Johnson, Roy; Zavaleta, Jhony; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Livingston, J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal

    2013-08-06

    The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy, to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

  4. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1987-06-01

    The goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales. In 1986, atmospheric research examined the transport and diffusion of atmospheric contaminants in areas of complex terrain and participated in a large, multilaboratory program to assess the precipitation scavenging processes important to the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' In addition, during 1986, a special opportunity for measuring the transport and removal of radioactivity occurred after the Chernobyl reactor accident in April 1986. Separate abstracts were prepared for individual projects.

  5. Entanglement Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsen Alishahiha; Davood Allahbakhshi; Ali Naseh

    2013-08-29

    We study entanglement entropy for an excited state by making use of the proposed holographic description of the entanglement entropy. For a sufficiently small entangling region and with reasonable identifications we find an equation between entanglement entropy and energy which is reminiscent of the first law of thermodynamics. We then suggest four statements which might be thought of as four laws of entanglement thermodynamics.

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1–March 31, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2012-04-13

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Data Archive, where they are made available to the research community. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1–December 31, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2012-01-09

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  8. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1–September 30, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2011-10-10

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  9. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1–June 30, 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voyles, JW

    2011-07-25

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 – March 31, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2007-04-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2009-03-17

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-06-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - July 1 - September 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-09-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - October 1 - December 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2009-01-15

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report - January 1 - March 31, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-04-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-01-08

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2007-07-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  18. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2006-10-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

  19. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 – June 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2006-07-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year; and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 - September 30, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2007-10-01

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998.

  1. Research by BNL investigators was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-DOE research on atmospheric aerosols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Division, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02- 98CH10886. BNL-62609 DOE research on atmospheric aerosols S are an programs dealing with atmospheric science, subsurface science, environmental radon, ocean margins

  2. Thermodynamics of electroweak matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Gynther

    2006-09-21

    This paper is a slightly modified version of the introductory part of a PhD thesis, also containing the articles hep-ph/0303019, hep-ph/0510375 and hep-ph/0512177. We provide a short history of the research of electroweak thermodynamics and a brief introduction to the theory as well as to the necessary theoretical tools needed to work at finite temperatures. We then review computations regarding the pressure of electroweak matter at high temperatures (the full expression of the perturbative expansion of the pressure is given in the appendix) and the electroweak phase diagram at finite chemical potentials. Finally, we compare electroweak and QCD thermodynamics.

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report July 1 - September 30, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-10-08

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1 - September 30, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF has been deployed to China, but the data have not yet been released. The fourth quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. The average exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. HFE represents the AMF statistics for the Shouxian, China, deployment in 2008. FKB represents the AMF statistics for the Haselbach, Germany, past deployment in 2007. NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request a research account on the local site data system. The seven computers for the research accounts are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; and the DMF at PNNL. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Because of the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period October 1, 2007 - September 30, 2008. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period October 1, 2007 - September 30, 2008. For the fourth quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users is down substantially (about 30%) from last quarter. Most of this decrease resulted from a reduction in the ACRF Infrastructure users (e.g., site visits, research accounts, on-site device accounts, etc.) associated with the AMF China deployment. While users had easy access to the previous AMF deployment in Germany that resulted in all-time high user statistics, physical and remote access to on-site accounts are extremely limited for the AMF deployment in China. Furthermore, AMF data have not yet been released from China to the Data Management Facility for processing, which affects Archive user statistics. However, Archive users are only down about 10% from last quarter. Anothe

  4. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1987 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elderkin, C.E.

    1988-08-01

    Currently, the broad goals of atmospheric research at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, and continental scales in the air, in clouds, and on the surface. For several years, studies of transport and diffusion have been extended to mesoscale areas of complex terrain. Atmospheric cleansing research has expanded to a regional scale, multilaboratory investigation of precipitation scavenging processes involving the transformation and wet deposition of chemicals composing ''acid rain.'' In addition, the redistribution and long-range transport of transformed contaminants passing through clouds is recognized as a necessary extension of our research to even larger scales in the future. A few long-range tracer experiments conducted in recent years and the special opportunity for measuring the transport and removal of radioactivity following the Chernobyl reactor accident of April 1986 offer important initial data bases for studying atmospheric processes at these super-regional scales.

  5. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report January 1 - March 31, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-05-22

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period January 1 - March 31, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF is being deployed to China and is not in operation this quarter. The second quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. The average as well as the individual site values exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. FKB represents the AMF statistics for the Haselbach, Germany, past deployment in 2007. NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request a research account on the local site data system. The seven computers for the research accounts are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; and the DMF at PNNL. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Because of the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period April 1, 2007 - March 31, 2008. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period April 1, 2007 - March 31, 2007. For the second quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users was nearly as high as the last reporting period, in which a new record high for number of users was established. This quarter, a new record high was established for the number of user days, particularly due to the large number of field campaign activities in conjunction with the AMF deployment in Germany, as well as major field campaigns at the NSA and SGP sites. This quarter, 37% of the Archive users are ARM science-funded principal investigators and 23% of all other facility users are either ARM science-funded principal investigators or ACRF infrastructure personnel. For reporting purposes, the three ACRF sites and the AMF operate 24 hours per day, 7 days per week, and 52 weeks per year. Time is reported in days instead of hours. I

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2008-01-24

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1 - December 31, 2007, for the fixed sites and the mobile site. The AMF has been deployed to Germany and this was the final operational quarter. The first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. Although the average exceeded our goal this quarter, a series of severe weather events (i.e., widespread ice storms) disrupted utility services, which affected the SGP performance measures. Some instruments were covered in ice and power and data communication lines were down for more than 10 days in some areas of Oklahoma and Kansas, which resulted in lost data at the SGP site. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. The AMF completed its mission at the end of this quarter in Haselback, Germany (FKB designation). NIM represents the AMF statistics for the Niamey, Niger, Africa, past deployment in 2006. PYE represents just the AMF Archive statistics for the Point Reyes, California, past deployment in 2005. In addition, users who do not want to wait for data to be provided through the ACRF Archive can request an account on the local site data system. The eight research computers are located at the Barrow and Atqasuk sites; the SGP central facility; the TWP Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites; the DMF at PNNL; and the AMF, currently in Germany. In addition, the ACRF serves as a data repository for a long-term Arctic atmospheric observatory in Eureka, Canada (80 degrees 05 minutes N, 86 degrees 43 minutes W) as part of the multiagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) Program. NOAA began providing instruments for the site in 2005, and currently cloud radar data are available. The intent of the site is to monitor the important components of the Arctic atmosphere, including clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, and local-scale atmospheric dynamics. Due to the similarity of ACRF NSA data streams, and the important synergy that can be formed between a network of Arctic atmospheric observations, much of the SEARCH observatory data are archived in the ARM archive. Instruments will be added to the site over time. For more information, please visit http://www.db.arm.gov/data. The designation for the archived Eureka data is YEU and is now included in the ACRF user metrics. This quarterly report provides the cumulative numbers of visitors and user accounts by site for the period January 1, 2007 - December 31, 2007. Table 2 shows the summary of cumulative users for the period January 1, 2007 - December 31, 2007. For the first quarter of FY 2008, the overall number of users was up significantly from the last reporting period. For the fourth consecutive reporting period, a record high number of Archive users was recorded. In addition, the number of visitors and visitor days set a new record this reporting period particularly due to the large number of field campaign activities in conjunction with the AMF deployment in Germany. It is interesting to note this quarter that

  7. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutowski, William J.; Prusa, Joseph M.; Smolarkiewicz, Piotr K.

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the "physics" of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited. 3a. EULAG Advances EULAG is a non-hydrostatic, parallel computational model for all-scale geophysical flows. EULAG's name derives from its two computational options: EULerian (flux form) or semi-LAGrangian (advective form). The model combines nonoscillatory forward-in-time (NFT) numerical algorithms with a robust elliptic Krylov solver. A signature feature of EULAG is that it is formulated in generalized time-dependent curvilinear coordinates. In particular, this enables grid adaptivity. In total, these features give EULAG novel advantages over many existing dynamical cores. For EULAG itself, numerical advances included refining boundary conditions and filters for optimizing model performance in polar regions. We also added flexibility to the model's underlying formulation, allowing it to work with the pseudo-compressible equation set of Durran in addition to EULAG's standard anelastic formulation. Work in collaboration with others also extended the demonstrated range of validity of soundproof models, showing that they are more broadly applicable than some had previously thought. Substantial testing of EULAG included application and extension of the Jablonowski-Williamson baroclinic wave test - an archetype of planetary weather - and further analysis of multi-scale interactions arising from collapse of temperature fronts in both the baroclinic wave test and simulations of the Held-Suarez idealized climate. These analyses revealed properties of atmospheric gravity waves not seen in previous work and further demonstrated the ability of EULAG to simulate realistic behavior over several orders of magnitude of length scales. Additional collaborative work enhanced capability for modeling atmospheric flows with adaptive moving meshes and demonstrated the ability of EULAG to move into petascale computing. 3b. CAM-EULAG Advances We have developed CAM-EULAG in collaboration with former project postdoc, now University of Cape Town Assistant Professor, Babatunde Abiodun. Initial study documented good model performance in aqua-planet simulations. In particular, we showed that the grid adaptivity (stretching) implemented in CAM-EULAG allows higher resolution in selected regions without causing anomalous behavior such as spurious wave reflection. We then used the stretched-grid version to analyze simulated extreme precipitation events in West Africa, comparing the precipitation and event environment with observed behavior. The model simulates fairly well the spatial scale and the interannual and intraseasonal variability of the extreme events, although its extreme precipitation intensity is weaker than observed. In addition, both observations and the simulations show possible forcing of extreme events by African easterly waves. 3c. Other Contributions Through our collaborations, we have made contributions to a wide range of outcomes. For research focused on terrestrial behavior, these have included (1) upwind schemes for gas dynamics, (2) a nonlinear perspective on the dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation, (3) numerical realism of thermal co

  8. Quantum measurement and its role in thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Kammerlander; Janet Anders

    2015-02-09

    A central goal of the research effort in quantum thermodynamics is the extension of standard thermodynamics to include small-scale and quantum effects. Here we lay out consequences of seeing measurement, one of the central pillars of quantum theory, not merely as a mathematical projection but as a thermodynamic process. We uncover that measurement, a component of any experimental realisation, is accompanied by work and heat contributions and that these are distinct in classical and quantum thermodynamics. Implications are far-reaching, giving a thermodynamic interpretation to quantum coherence, extending the link between thermodynamics and information theory, and providing key input for the construction of a future quantum thermodynamic framework. Repercussions for existing quantum thermodynamic relations that omitted the role of measurement are discussed, including quantum work fluctuation relations and single-shot approaches.

  9. )OML is a federal oceanic and atmospheric research lab built in 1973 on Virginia Key, and is a part of the National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - glades. They also monitor ocean currents, studying changes that may affect rainfall or climate. AOML)OML is a federal oceanic and atmospheric research lab built in 1973 on Virginia Key, and is a part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). AOML car- ries out world-class research

  10. Bounds on the thermodynamical properties of the fluid envelope of a planet based upon its radiative budget at the top of the atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucarini, Valerio

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we exploit two equivalent formulations of the average rate of material entropy production in a planetary system to propose an approximate splitting between contributions due from vertical processes and those due eminently to horizontal processes. We derive an estimate of the lower bound to the intensity of the Lorenz energy cycle, or of the total dissipation of the kinetic energy, based purely upon 2D radiative fields at the top of the atmosphere of the planet. Bounds on the efficiency of the planetary system are also provided, and provide insight on a previous intuition on the possibility of defining a baroclinic heat engine extracting work from the meridional heat flux. Specific results are derived for Earth-like conditions but the approach can be used to analyse general planetary systems. The possibility of providing constraints to the 3D dynamics of the fluid envelope based only upon 2D observations of radiative fluxes seems promising for the observational study of extra-solar planets and ma...

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January 1 - March 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2005-03-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for this second quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2052 hours (0.95 × 2,160 hours this quarter). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 1944 hours (0.90 × 2,160), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 1836 hours (0.85 × 2,160). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report July 1 – September 30, 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2008-09-30

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY 2008 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 ? 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 ? 2,208), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.80 hours (0.85 ? 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because the data have not yet been released from China to the DMF for processing. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  13. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report October 1 - December 31, 2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-01-15

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, they calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The US Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 x 2,208), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.80 hours (0.85 x 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because the data have not yet been released from China to the DMF for processing. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1-December 31, 2008, for the fixed sites. The AMF has been deployed to China, but the data have not yet been released. The first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours. The average exceeded their goal this quarter.

  14. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report April 1 - June 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2005-06-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 × 2,184 hours this quarter). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 1,965.6 hours (0.90 × 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 1,856.4 hours (0.85 × 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.8 (0.95 × 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2005-12-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 × 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.2 hours (0.90 × 2,208), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 × 2,208). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,097.6 hours (0.95 × 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  16. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report January-March 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2006-03-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year; and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the second quarter for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,052 hours (0.95 × 2,160 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,944 hours (0.90 × 2,160), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,836 hours (0.85 × 2,160). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,052 hours (0.95 × 2,160). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter.

  17. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report October 1 - December 31, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2004-12-31

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The annual OPSMAX time for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 8,322 hours per year (0.95 × 8,760, the number hours in a year, not including leap year). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 7,884 hours per year (0.90 × 8,760), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 7,446 hours per year (0.85 × 8,760). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 365 days per year) the instruments were operating.

  18. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1989 to the DOE (Department of Energy) Office of Energy Research - Part 3: Atmospheric Sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    This 1989 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment, safety, and health conducted during fiscal year 1989. The report again consists of five parts, each in a separate volume. This volume contains research in the atmospheric sciences. Currently, the broad goals of atmospheric research at PNL are to describe and predict the nature and fate of atmospheric contaminants and to develop an understanding of the atmospheric processes contributing to their distribution on local, regional, continental, and global scales in the air, in clouds, and on the surface. The redistribution and long-range transport of transformed contaminants passing through clouds is recognized as a necessary extension of our research to even larger scales in the future. Eventually, large-scale experiments on cloud processing and redistribution of contaminants will be integrated into the national program on global change, investigating how energy pollutants affect aerosols and clouds and the transfer of radiant energy through them. As the significance of this effect becomes clear, its global impact on climate will be studied through experimental and modeling research. The description of ongoing atmospheric research at PNL is organized in terms of the following study areas: atmospheric studies in complex terrain, large-scale atmospheric transport and processing of emissions, and climate change. This report describes the progress in FY 1989 in each of these areas. A divider page summarizes the goals of each area and lists project titles that support research activities. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. QCD Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Fodor

    2007-11-02

    Recent results on QCD thermodynamics are presented. The nature of the T>0 transition is determined, which turns out to be an analytic cross-over. The absolute scale for this transition is calculated. The temperature dependent static potential is given. The results were obtained by using a Symanzik improved gauge and stout-link improved fermionic action. In order to approach the continuum limit four different sets of lattice spacings were used with temporal extensions N_t=4, 6, 8 and 10 (they correspond to lattice spacings a \\sim 0.3, 0.2, 0.15 and 0.12 fm). A new technique is presented, which --in contrast to earlier methods-- enables one to determine the equation of state at very large temperatures.

  20. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2011-02-01

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of processed data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 x 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 x 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continued through this quarter, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) began deployment this quarter to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The experiment officially began November 15, but most of the instruments were up and running by November 1. Therefore, the OPSMAX time for the AMF2 was 1390.80 hours (.95 x 1464 hours) for November and December (61 days). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Summary. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period October 1-December 31, 2010, for the fixed sites. Because the AMFs operate episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. This first quarter comprises a total of 2,208 possible hours for the fixed sites and the AMF1 and 1,464 possible hours for the AMF2. The average of the fixed sites exceeded our goal this quarter. The AMF1 has essentially completed its mission and is shutting down to pack up for its next deployment to India. Although all the raw data from the operational instruments are in the Archive for the AMF2, only the processed data are tabulated. Approximately half of the AMF2 instruments have data that was fully processed, resulting in the 46% of all possible data made available to users through the Archive for this first quarter. Typically, raw data is not made available to users unless specifically requested.

  1. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facilities quarterly report April 1 - June 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-07-14

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.80 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter); for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale it is 1,965.60 hours (0.90 x 2,184); and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale it is 1,856.40 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was officially operational May 1 in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 1390.80 hours (0.95 x 1464). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for April 1 - June 30, 2009, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and are not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The AMF statistics for this reporting period were not available at the time of this report. The third quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours for the fixed sites. The average well exceeded our goal this quarter.

  2. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report July 1 - Sep. 30, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-10-15

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near-real time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 ? 2,208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 ? 2,208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 ? 2,208). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was officially operational May 1 in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive result from downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1 - September 30, 2009, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. The fourth quarter comprises a total of 2,208 hours for the fixed and mobile sites. The average of the fixed sites well exceeded our goal this quarter. The AMF data statistic requires explanation. Since the AMF radar data ingest software is being modified, the data are being stored in the DMF for data processing. Hence, the data are not at the Archive; they are anticipated to become available by the next report.

  3. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report January 1 - March 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2009-04-23

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the second quarter of FY 2009 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,052.00 hours (0.95 x 2,160 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,944.00 hours (0.90 x 2,160), and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,836.00 hours (0.85 x 2,160). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is not reported this quarter because not all of the metadata have been acquired that are used to generate this metric. The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 90 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Summary. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period January 1 - March 31, 2009, for the fixed sites. The AMF has completed its mission in China but not all of the data can be released to the public at the time of this report. The second quarter comprises a total of 2,160 hours. The average exceeded our goal this quarter.

  4. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program climate research facility operations quarterly report April 1 - June 30, 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2007-07-26

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the third quarter of FY 2007 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 x 2,184 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,965.6 hours (0.90 x 2,184), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,856.4 hours (0.85 x 2,184). The OPSMAX time for the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is 2,074.8 hours (0.95 x 2,184). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 91 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), the actual hours of operation, and the variance (unplanned downtime) for the period April 1 through June 30, 2007, for the fixed sites only. The AMF has been deployed to Germany and is operational this quarter. The third quarter comprises a total of 2,184 hours. Although the average exceeded our goal this quarter, there were cash flow issues resulting from Continuing Resolution early in the period that did not allow for timely instrument repairs that kept our statistics lower than past quarters at all sites. The low NSA numbers resulted from missing MFRSR data this spring that appears to be recoverable but not available at the Archive at the time of this report.

  5. Thermodynamic Origin of Life

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michaelian, K

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the thermodynamic function of life may shed light on its origin. Out of equilibrium structuring in space and time is contingent on continuous entropy production. Entropy production is a measure of the rate of the natural tendency of Nature to explore all available microstates. The process producing the greatest amount of entropy in the biosphere is the absorption and transformation of sunlight, leading to the transpiration of water by plants and cyanobacteria. Here we hypothesize that life began, and exists today, as a dynamic catalyst for the absorption and transformation of sunlight into heat, which could then be efficiently harvested by the water cycle, hurricanes, and ocean and wind currents. RNA and DNA are the most efficient of all known molecules for absorbing the ultraviolet light that could have penetrated the dense early atmosphere, and are extremely rapid in transforming this light into heat that can be readily absorbed by liquid water. The origin and evolution of life was thus driven...

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Quarterly Report. October 1 - December 31, 2009.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. L. Sisterson

    2010-01-12

    Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 - (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the first quarter of FY 2010 for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) locale is 1,987.20 hours (0.90 x 2,208); for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208); and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1,876.8 hours (0.85 x 2,208). The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continues; its OPSMAX time this quarter is 2,097.60 hours (0.95 x 2,208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are the result of downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) the instruments were operating this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP locale has historically had a central facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. Beginning this quarter, the SGP began a transition to a smaller footprint (150 km x 150 km) by rearranging the original and new instrumentation made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The central facility and 4 extended facilities will remain, but there will be up to 16 surface new characterization facilities, 4 radar facilities, and 3 profiler facilities sited in the smaller domain. This new configuration will provide observations at scales more appropriate to current and future climate models. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. These sites will also have expanded measurement capabilities with the addition of new instrumentation made available through ARRA funds. It is anticipated that the new instrumentation at all the fixed sites will be in place within the next 12 months. The AMF continues its 20-month deployment in Graciosa Island, Azores, Portugal, that started May 1, 2009. The AMF will also have additional observational capabilities within the next 12 months. Users can participate in field experiments at the sites and mobile facility, or they can participate remotely. Therefore, a variety of mechanisms are provided to users to access site information. Users who have immediate (real-time) needs for data access can request a research account on the local site data systems. This access is particularly useful to users for quick decisions in executing time-dependent activities associated with field campaigns at the fixed sites and mobile facility locations. T

  7. Thermospheric tides simulated by the national center for atmospheric research thermosphere-ionosphere general circulation model at equinox

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fesen, C.G. (Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH (United States)); Roble, R.G.; Ridley, E.C. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States))

    1993-05-01

    The authors use the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) thermosphere/ionosphere general circulation model (TIGCM) to model tides and dynamics in the thermosphere. This model incorporates the latest advances in the thermosphere general circulation model. Model results emphasized the 70[degree] W longitude region to overlap a series of incoherent radar scatter installations. Data and the model are available on data bases. The results of this theoretical modeling are compared with available data, and with prediction of more empirical models. In general there is broad agreement within the comparisons.

  8. Thermodynamics Review and Relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermodynamics Review and Relations Review · Gas filled piston Motivation Thermodynamics the efficiency of steam engine. Only macroscopic continues states of matter are con- sidered. Thermodynamics of thermodynamics is essential since it easily to statistical mechanics. Definitions and Convention Signs The sign

  9. Thermodynamics and Phase Equilibria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    potential. Cell potentials and thermodynamic functions. Nernst equation. Pourbaix diagrams. 4 Equilibrium

  10. Rising atmospheric CO{sub 2} and crops: Research methodology and direct effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, H.; Acock, B.

    1993-12-31

    Carbon dioxide is the food of trees and grass. Our relentless pursuit of a better life has taken us down a traffic jammed road, past smoking factories and forests. This pursuit is forcing a rise in the atmospheric CO{sub 2} level, and no one know when and if flood stage will be reached. Some thinkers have suggested that this increase of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere will cause warming. No matter whether this prediction is realized or not, more CO{sub 2} will directly affect plants. Data from controlled observations have usually, but not always, shown benefits. Our choices of scientific equipment for gathering CO{sub 2} response data are critical since we must see what is happening through the eye of the instrument. The signals derived from our sensors will ultimately determine the truth of our conclusions, conclusion which will profoundly influence our policy decisions. Experimental gear is selected on the basis of scale of interest and problem to be addressed. Our imaginations and our budgets interact to set bounds on our objectives and approaches. Techniques run the gamut from cellular microprobes through whole-plant controlled environment chambers to field-scale exposure systems. Trade-offs exist among the various CO{sub 2} exposure techniques, and many factors impinge on the choice of a method. All exposure chambers are derivatives of three primary types--batch, plug flow, and continuous stirred tank reactor. Systems for the generation of controlled test atmospheres of CO{sub 2} vary in two basic ways--size and degree of control. Among the newest is free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment which allows tens of square meters of cropland to be studied.

  11. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operation quarterly report July 1 - September 30, 2010.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sisterson, D. L.

    2010-10-26

    Individual raw datastreams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for processing in near real-time. Raw and processed data are then sent approximately daily to the ARM Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual datastream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1-(ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The OPSMAX time for the fourth quarter of FY2010 for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 2097.60 hours (0.95 2208 hours this quarter). The OPSMAX for the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) locale is 1987.20 hours (0.90 2208) and for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) locale is 1876.80 hours (0.85 2208). The first ARM Mobile Facility (AMF1) deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, Portugal, continues, so the OPSMAX time this quarter is 2097.60 hours (0.95 x 2208). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or datastream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous datastreams that have been received by the Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percentage of data in the Archive represents the average percentage of the time (24 hours per day, 92 days for this quarter) that the instruments were operating this quarter. Table 1 shows the accumulated maximum operation time (planned uptime), actual hours of operation, and variance (unplanned downtime) for the period July 1-September 30, 2010, for the fixed sites. Because the AMF operates episodically, the AMF statistics are reported separately and not included in the aggregate average with the fixed sites. This fourth quarter comprises a total of 2208 possible hours for the fixed and mobile sites. The average of the fixed sites exceeded our goal this quarter. The Site Access Request System is a web-based database used to track visitors to the fixed and mobile sites, all of which have facilities that can be visited. The NSA locale has the Barrow and Atqasuk sites. The SGP site has historically had a Central Facility, 23 extended facilities, 4 boundary facilities, and 3 intermediate facilities. Beginning in the second quarter of FY2010, the SGP began a transition to a smaller footprint (150 km x 150 km) by rearranging the original instrumentation and new instrumentation made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA). The Central Facility and 4 extended facilities will remain, but there will be up to 12 new surface characterization facilities, 4 radar facilities, and 3 profiler facilities sited in the smaller domain. This new configuration will provide observations at scales more appropriate to current and future climate models. The transition to the smaller footprint is ongoing through this quarter. The TWP locale has the Manus, Nauru, and Darwin sites. These sites will also have expanded measurement capabilities with the addition of new instrumentation made available through ARRA funds. It is anticipated that the new instrumentation at all the fixed sites will be in place by the end of calendar year 2011. AMF1 continues its 20-month deployment in Graciosa Island, the Azores, P

  12. COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prusa, Joseph

    2012-05-08

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG�s advanced dynamics core with the �physics� of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer- reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  13. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory interests and capabilities for research on the ecological effects of global climatic and atmospheric change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amthor, J.S.; Houpis, J.L.; Kercher, J.R.; Ledebuhr, A.; Miller, N.L.; Penner, J.E.; Robison, W.L.; Taylor, K.E.

    1994-09-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has interests and capabilities in all three types of research that must be conducted in order to understand and predict effects of global atmospheric and climatic (i.e., environmental) changes on ecological systems and their functions (ecosystem function is perhaps most conveniently defined as mass and energy exchange and storage). These three types of research are: (1) manipulative experiments with plants and ecosystems; (2) monitoring of present ecosystem, landscape, and global exchanges and pools of energy, elements, and compounds that play important roles in ecosystem function or the physical climate system, and (3) mechanistic (i.e., hierarchic and explanatory) modeling of plant and ecosystem responses to global environmental change. Specific experimental programs, monitoring plans, and modeling activities related to evaluation of ecological effects of global environmental change that are of interest to, and that can be carried out by LLNL scientists are outlined. Several projects have the distinction of integrating modeling with empirical studies resulting in an Integrated Product (a model or set of models) that DOE or any federal policy maker could use to assess ecological effects. The authors note that any scheme for evaluating ecological effects of atmospheric and climatic change should take into account exceptional or sensitive species, in particular, rare, threatened, or endangered species.

  14. THERMODYNAMICS AND MECHANISMS OF SINTERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pask, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    E. Hoge and Joseph A. Pask, "Thermodynamics of So:!.id StateJoseph A. Pask, "Thermodynamics and Geometric Considerations8419 r- ,y / ( /)~; - - I THERMODYNAMICS AND MECHANISMS OF

  15. Coherence and measurement in quantum thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Kammerlander; Janet Anders

    2015-09-18

    Thermodynamics is a highly successful macroscopic theory widely used across the natural sciences and for the construction of everyday devices, from car engines and fridges to power plants and solar cells. With thermodynamics predating quantum theory, research now aims to uncover the thermodynamic laws that govern finite size systems which may in addition host quantum effects. Here we identify information processing tasks, the so-called "projections", that can only be formulated within the framework of quantum mechanics. We show that the physical realisation of such projections can come with a non-trivial thermodynamic work only for quantum states with coherences. This contrasts with information erasure, first investigated by Landauer, for which a thermodynamic work cost applies for classical and quantum erasure alike. Implications are far-reaching, adding a thermodynamic dimension to measurements performed in quantum thermodynamics experiments, and providing key input for the construction of a future quantum thermodynamic framework. Repercussions are discussed for quantum work fluctuation relations and thermodynamic single-shot approaches.

  16. AOML is an environmental laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research on Virginia Key in Miami, Florida January-February 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to assessing the tropical ocean current system partly responsible for the fresh water budget. AOML will alsoAOML is an environmental laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research Administra- tor of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmo- spheric Research in January and began his new duties

  17. Physical Meteorology I: Thermodynamics (METR 3213)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedorovich, Evgeni

    of energy and its role in the thermal regime of the atmosphere. Part II. Basic notions and equations. Gas and pressure reduction methods. Part III. First law of thermodynamics. Principle of conservation of energy, heat energy transport and transformations, interactions between different water phases

  18. the Department should apply the same principles to climate and atmospheric research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to develop a clean energy alternative pow- ered by domestic resources. As a result of the program's sole dependent on federal funding, but instead as temporary and targeted initiatives with five-year terms- duction. FUSION ENERGY SCIENCES Fusion Energy Sciences conducts basic science research and ex

  19. Spring 2014 Thermodynamics -1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battaglia, Francine

    Spring 2014 Thermodynamics - 1 Consider an insulated (adiabatic) piston and cylinder arrangement. Confirm this statement using the second law of thermodynamics. (b) (20) She now wants to calculate the work done by the air on the piston by using the first law of thermodynamics. Do this. Draw a T

  20. Student Code Number: Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feeny, Brian

    Student Code Number: Thermodynamics Ph.D. Qualifying Exam Department of Mechanical Engineering;Thermodynamics Qualifier January 2013 Problem 1 Air is compressed in an axial-flow compressor operating at steady of exergy destruction within the compressor, in kJ per kg of air flowing. #12;Thermodynamics Qualifier

  1. SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    SECOND LAW OF THERMODYNAMICS: STATUS AND CHALLENGES San Diego, California, USA 14 ­ 15 June 2011 The First Law of energy conservation was even known (Joule 1843) and long before Thermodynamic concepts were, including this one. The Laws of Thermodynamics have much wider, including philosophical significance

  2. Masters thesis Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    I Masters thesis Thermodynamics of Solutes in Cementite Using First-Principles Calculations JangFirst-PrinciplesCalculations Jang,JaeHoon #12;III cementite Thermodynamics of Solutes in Cementite Using First-Principles Calculations #12;IV Thermodynamics of Solutes in Cementite Using First-Principles Calculations By Jang, Jae

  3. Wind Energy Forecasting: A Collaboration of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and Xcel Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parks, K.; Wan, Y. H.; Wiener, G.; Liu, Y.

    2011-10-01

    The focus of this report is the wind forecasting system developed during this contract period with results of performance through the end of 2010. The report is intentionally high-level, with technical details disseminated at various conferences and academic papers. At the end of 2010, Xcel Energy managed the output of 3372 megawatts of installed wind energy. The wind plants span three operating companies1, serving customers in eight states2, and three market structures3. The great majority of the wind energy is contracted through power purchase agreements (PPAs). The remainder is utility owned, Qualifying Facilities (QF), distributed resources (i.e., 'behind the meter'), or merchant entities within Xcel Energy's Balancing Authority footprints. Regardless of the contractual or ownership arrangements, the output of the wind energy is balanced by Xcel Energy's generation resources that include fossil, nuclear, and hydro based facilities that are owned or contracted via PPAs. These facilities are committed and dispatched or bid into day-ahead and real-time markets by Xcel Energy's Commercial Operations department. Wind energy complicates the short and long-term planning goals of least-cost, reliable operations. Due to the uncertainty of wind energy production, inherent suboptimal commitment and dispatch associated with imperfect wind forecasts drives up costs. For example, a gas combined cycle unit may be turned on, or committed, in anticipation of low winds. The reality is winds stayed high, forcing this unit and others to run, or be dispatched, to sub-optimal loading positions. In addition, commitment decisions are frequently irreversible due to minimum up and down time constraints. That is, a dispatcher lives with inefficient decisions made in prior periods. In general, uncertainty contributes to conservative operations - committing more units and keeping them on longer than may have been necessary for purposes of maintaining reliability. The downside is costs are higher. In organized electricity markets, units that are committed for reliability reasons are paid their offer price even when prevailing market prices are lower. Often, these uplift charges are allocated to market participants that caused the inefficient dispatch in the first place. Thus, wind energy facilities are burdened with their share of costs proportional to their forecast errors. For Xcel Energy, wind energy uncertainty costs manifest depending on specific market structures. In the Public Service of Colorado (PSCo), inefficient commitment and dispatch caused by wind uncertainty increases fuel costs. Wind resources participating in the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO) footprint make substantial payments in the real-time markets to true-up their day-ahead positions and are additionally burdened with deviation charges called a Revenue Sufficiency Guarantee (RSG) to cover out of market costs associated with operations. Southwest Public Service (SPS) wind plants cause both commitment inefficiencies and are charged Southwest Power Pool (SPP) imbalance payments due to wind uncertainty and variability. Wind energy forecasting helps mitigate these costs. Wind integration studies for the PSCo and Northern States Power (NSP) operating companies have projected increasing costs as more wind is installed on the system due to forecast error. It follows that reducing forecast error would reduce these costs. This is echoed by large scale studies in neighboring regions and states that have recommended adoption of state-of-the-art wind forecasting tools in day-ahead and real-time planning and operations. Further, Xcel Energy concluded reduction of the normalized mean absolute error by one percent would have reduced costs in 2008 by over $1 million annually in PSCo alone. The value of reducing forecast error prompted Xcel Energy to make substantial investments in wind energy forecasting research and development.

  4. Thermodynamics and scale relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Carroll

    2011-10-13

    It is shown how the fractal paths of scale relativity (following Nottale) can be introduced into a thermodynamical context (following Asadov-Kechkin).

  5. Thermodynamics and Finite size scaling in Scalar Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai for the degree of Master of Science, in Physics By Debasish Research, Mumbai December 2008 #12;ii #12;Synopsis In this work we study the thermodynamics

  6. Atmospheric Environment ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Sethu

    that the influence of the urban region on wind patterns and atmospheric stability could be studied. HeightAtmospheric Environment ] (

  7. Thermodynamic estimation: Ionic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glasser, Leslie, E-mail: l.glasser@curtin.edu.au

    2013-10-15

    Thermodynamics establishes equilibrium relations among thermodynamic parameters (“properties”) and delineates the effects of variation of the thermodynamic functions (typically temperature and pressure) on those parameters. However, classical thermodynamics does not provide values for the necessary thermodynamic properties, which must be established by extra-thermodynamic means such as experiment, theoretical calculation, or empirical estimation. While many values may be found in the numerous collected tables in the literature, these are necessarily incomplete because either the experimental measurements have not been made or the materials may be hypothetical. The current paper presents a number of simple and relible estimation methods for thermodynamic properties, principally for ionic materials. The results may also be used as a check for obvious errors in published values. The estimation methods described are typically based on addition of properties of individual ions, or sums of properties of neutral ion groups (such as “double” salts, in the Simple Salt Approximation), or based upon correlations such as with formula unit volumes (Volume-Based Thermodynamics). - Graphical abstract: Thermodynamic properties of ionic materials may be readily estimated by summation of the properties of individual ions, by summation of the properties of ‘double salts’, and by correlation with formula volume. Such estimates may fill gaps in the literature, and may also be used as checks of published values. This simplicity arises from exploitation of the fact that repulsive energy terms are of short range and very similar across materials, while coulombic interactions provide a very large component of the attractive energy in ionic systems. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Estimation methods for thermodynamic properties of ionic materials are introduced. • Methods are based on summation of single ions, multiple salts, and correlations. • Heat capacity, entropy, lattice energy, enthalpy, Gibbs energy values are available.

  8. Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological LaboratoryMarch-April 2002 Volume 6, Number 3-4 AOML is a research laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    atmospheric CO2 and its "green- house" warming effect. As anticipated, the addition of iron in both patches global warming. The R/V Revelle scientific team distributed several tons of iron sulfate and the inert

  9. First Law of Thermodynamics First Law of Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    First Law of Thermodynamics First Law of Thermodynamics Eth =W +Q Thermal energy Eth : Microscopic. #12;First Law of Thermodynamics Work W done on a gas is (area under the pV curve) W = - pdV = Vi Vf - tools First Law of Thermodynamics An adiabatic process is one for which Q = 0. Fast process but still

  10. DIVISION OF MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyu, Mei-Ling

    DIVISION OF MARINE AND ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY The missions of the Division of Marine and Atmospheric Chemistry (MAC) are to carry out broadly based research on the chemistry of the atmosphere and marine and stratosphere. Atmospheric Chemistry Research activities in atmospheric chemistry and modeling are diverse

  11. Bounds on the thermodynamical properties of the fluid envelope of a planet based upon its radiative budget at the top of the atmosphere: theory and results for Earth, Mars, Titan, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucarini, Valerio

    fields at the top of the atmosphere of the planet. By introducing a measure of the efficiency only upon 2D observations of radiative fluxes seems promising for the observational study of extra-solar metrics for the validation of climate models, as asked for by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate

  12. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Climate Research Facility Operations Cumulative Quarterly Report October 1, 2003 - September 30, 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DL Sisterson

    2004-09-30

    Description. Individual raw data streams from instrumentation at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Climate Research Facility (ACRF) fixed and mobile sites are collected and sent to the Data Management Facility (DMF) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for processing in near real time. Raw and processed data are then sent daily to the ACRF Archive, where they are made available to users. For each instrument, we calculate the ratio of the actual number of data records received daily at the Archive to the expected number of data records. The results are tabulated by (1) individual data stream, site, and month for the current year and (2) site and fiscal year (FY) dating back to 1998. The United States Department of Energy requires national user facilities to report time-based operating data. The requirements concern the actual hours of operation (ACTUAL); the estimated maximum operation or uptime goal (OPSMAX), which accounts for planned downtime; and the VARIANCE [1 – (ACTUAL/OPSMAX)], which accounts for unplanned downtime. The annual OPSMAX time for the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is 8,322 hours per year (0.95 × 8,760, the number hours in a year, not including leap year). The annual OPSMAX for the North Slope Alaska (NSA) site is 7,884 hours per year (0.90 × 8,760), and that for the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site is 7,446 hours per year (0.85 × 8,760). The differences in OPSMAX performance reflect the complexity of local logistics and the frequency of extreme weather events. It is impractical to measure OPSMAX for each instrument or data stream. Data availability reported here refers to the average of the individual, continuous data streams that have been received by the ACRF Archive. Data not at the Archive are caused by downtime (scheduled or unplanned) of the individual instruments. Therefore, data availability is directly related to individual instrument uptime. Thus, the average percent of data in the Archive represents the average percent of the time (24 hours per day, 365 days per year) the instruments were operating.

  13. From Quantum Mechanics to Thermodynamics?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

    From Quantum Mechanics to Thermodynamics? Dresden, 22.11.2004 Jochen Gemmer Universit¨at Osnabr to thermodynamical behavior · Quantum approach to thermodynamical behavior · The route to equilibrium · Summary of thermodynamical behavior entirely on the basis of Hamilton models and Schr¨odinger-type quantum dynamics. · define

  14. 1997 Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul H. Wine

    1998-11-23

    DOE's Atmospheric Chemistry Program is providing partial funding for the Atmospheric Chemistry Colloquium for Emerging Senior Scientists (ACCESS) and FY 1997 Gordon Research Conference in Atmospheric Chemistry

  15. Electrochemical thermodynamic measurement system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reynier, Yvan (Meylan, FR); Yazami, Rachid (Los Angeles, CA); Fultz, Brent T. (Pasadena, CA)

    2009-09-29

    The present invention provides systems and methods for accurately characterizing thermodynamic and materials properties of electrodes and electrochemical energy storage and conversion systems. Systems and methods of the present invention are configured for simultaneously collecting a suite of measurements characterizing a plurality of interconnected electrochemical and thermodynamic parameters relating to the electrode reaction state of advancement, voltage and temperature. Enhanced sensitivity provided by the present methods and systems combined with measurement conditions that reflect thermodynamically stabilized electrode conditions allow very accurate measurement of thermodynamic parameters, including state functions such as the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy of electrode/electrochemical cell reactions, that enable prediction of important performance attributes of electrode materials and electrochemical systems, such as the energy, power density, current rate and the cycle life of an electrochemical cell.

  16. Extensivity and Relativistic Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Dunning-Davies

    2007-06-27

    The mathematical properties associated with the widely accepted concept of the extensivity of many of the common thermodynamic variables are examined and some of their consequences considered. The possible conflict between some of these and currently accepted results of special relativistic thermodynamics is highlighted. Although several questions are raised, answers are not advanced as this seems an area demanding calm, widespread reflection which could conceivably lead to radical revision of part, or parts, of theoretical physics.

  17. Pauli problem in thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artur E. Ruuge

    2013-08-01

    A thermodynamic analogue of the Pauli problem (reconstruction of a wavefunction from the position and momentum distributions) is formulated. The coordinates of a quantum system are replaced by the inverse absolute temperature and other intensive quantities, and the Planck constant is replaced by the Boltzmann constant multiplied by two. A new natural mathematical generalization of the quasithermodynamic fluctuation theory is suggested and sufficient conditions for the existence of asymptotic solutions of the thermodynamic Pauli problem are obtained.

  18. Thermodynamics of Fractal Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad Sheykhi; Zeinab Teimoori; Bin Wang

    2013-01-12

    We investigate the thermodynamical properties of the apparent horizon in a fractal universe. We find that one can always rewrite the Friedmann equation of the fractal universe in the form of the entropy balance relation $ \\delta Q=T_h d{S_h}$, where $ \\delta Q $ and $ T_{h} $ are the energy flux and Unruh temperature seen by an accelerated observer just inside the apparent horizon. We find that the entropy $S_h$ consists two terms, the first one which obeys the usual area law and the second part which is the entropy production term due to nonequilibrium thermodynamics of fractal universe. This shows that in a fractal universe, a treatment with nonequilibrium thermodynamics of spacetime may be needed. We also study the generalized second law of thermodynamics in the framework of fractal universe. When the temperature of the apparent horizon and the matter fields inside the horizon are equal, i.e. $T=T_h$, the generalized second law of thermodynamics can be fulfilled provided the deceleration and the equation of state parameters ranges either as $-1 \\leq q thermodynamics can be secured in a fractal universe by suitably choosing the fractal parameter $\\beta$.

  19. Atmospheric Chemistry of Venus-like Exoplanets Laura Schaefer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    - 1 - Atmospheric Chemistry of Venus-like Exoplanets by Laura Schaefer and Bruce Fegley, Jr thermodynamic calculations to model atmospheric chemistry on terrestrial exoplanets that are hot enough for chemical equilibria between the atmosphere and lithosphere, as on Venus. The results of our calculations

  20. Contributions of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the ARM Climate Research Facility to the U.S. Climate Change Science Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SA Edgerton; LR Roeder

    2008-09-30

    The Earth’s surface temperature is determined by the balance between incoming solar radiation and thermal (or infrared) radiation emitted by the Earth back to space. Changes in atmospheric composition, including greenhouse gases, clouds, and aerosols can alter this balance and produce significant climate change. Global climate models (GCMs) are the primary tool for quantifying future climate change; however, there remain significant uncertainties in the GCM treatment of clouds, aerosol, and their effects on the Earth’s energy balance. The 2007 assessment (AR4) by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) reports a substantial range among GCMs in climate sensitivity to greenhouse gas emissions. The largest contributor to this range lies in how different models handle changes in the way clouds absorb or reflect radiative energy in a changing climate (Solomon et al. 2007). In 1989, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science created the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program within the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) to address scientific uncertainties related to global climate change, with a specific focus on the crucial role of clouds and their influence on the transfer of radiation in the atmosphere. To address this problem, BER has adopted a unique two-pronged approach: * The ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF), a scientific user facility for obtaining long-term measurements of radiative fluxes, cloud and aerosol properties, and related atmospheric characteristics in diverse climate regimes. * The ARM Science Program, focused on the analysis of ACRF data to address climate science issues associated with clouds, aerosols, and radiation, and to improve GCMs. This report describes accomplishments of the BER ARM Program toward addressing the primary uncertainties related to climate change prediction as identified by the IPCC.

  1. Scientific Final Report: COLLABORATIVE RESEARCH: CONTINUOUS DYNAMIC GRID ADAPTATION IN A GLOBAL ATMOSPHERIC MODEL: APPLICATION AND REFINEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William J. Gutowski; Joseph M. Prusa, Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

    2012-04-09

    This project had goals of advancing the performance capabilities of the numerical general circulation model EULAG and using it to produce a fully operational atmospheric global climate model (AGCM) that can employ either static or dynamic grid stretching for targeted phenomena. The resulting AGCM combined EULAG's advanced dynamics core with the 'physics' of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM). Effort discussed below shows how we improved model performance and tested both EULAG and the coupled CAM-EULAG in several ways to demonstrate the grid stretching and ability to simulate very well a wide range of scales, that is, multi-scale capability. We leveraged our effort through interaction with an international EULAG community that has collectively developed new features and applications of EULAG, which we exploited for our own work summarized here. Overall, the work contributed to over 40 peer-reviewed publications and over 70 conference/workshop/seminar presentations, many of them invited.

  2. Confusion in Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremy Dunning-Davies; David Sands

    2011-05-17

    For a long time now, confusion has existed in the minds of many over the meaning of various concepts in thermodynamics. Recently, this point has been brought to people's attention by two articles appearing on the well-known archive (arxiv) web site. The content of these two pieces serves to illustrate many of the problems and has occasioned the construction of this answer to at least some of them. The position of the axiom proposed by Carath\\'eodory is central in this matter and here its position is clarified and secured within the framework of thermodynamics. In particular, its relation to the First Law is examined and justified.

  3. MSE 3050, Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Materials, Leonid Zhigilei Review of classical thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    MSE 3050, Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Materials, Leonid Zhigilei Review of classical thermodynamics Fundamental Laws, Properties and Processes (1) First Law - Energy Balance Thermodynamic functions material in any other textbook on thermodynamics #12;MSE 3050, Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Materials

  4. 12.003 Physics of Atmospheres and Oceans, Fall 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marshall, John C.

    The laws of classical mechanics and thermodynamics are used to explore how the properties of fluids on a rotating Earth manifest themselves in, and help shape, the global patterns of atmospheric winds, ocean currents, and ...

  5. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2013 University of Colorado at Boulder from the Naval Research Center and the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper Air Laboratory (UAL

  6. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2012 University of Colorado at Boulder from the Naval Research Center and the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper Air Laboratory (UAL

  7. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    1 Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2010 University of Colorado from the Na- val Research Center and the Air Force Cambridge Research Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper Air Laboratory (UAL

  8. NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research A world leader in observing, understanding, and predicting the Earth system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Base (= FY 2015 Enacted + Inflationary Adjustments). Highlights include: · High Performance Computing Recapitalization (+ $9.0M) to begin recapitalization of the Research and Development High-Performance Computing

  9. Mathematical thermodynamics of fluids Eduard Feireisl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KrejcĂ­, Pavel

    Mathematical thermodynamics of fluids Eduard Feireisl Institute of Mathematics, Academy of Sciences Agreement 320078 CIME courses, Cetraro 29 June - 4 July 2015 Eduard Feireisl Thermodynamics of fluids #12 Thermodynamics of fluids #12;Fluids at equilibrium Thermodynamic state variables mass density

  10. VAMDC FP7 project and STARK-B database: C II Stark broadening parameters for white dwarf atmospheres research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larbi-Terzi, Neila; Ben Nessib, Nebil; Sahal-Brechot, Sylvie; Dimitrijevic, Milan S.

    2010-11-23

    Stark broadening parameters of C II lines were determined within 3s-np spectral series within the semiclassical perturbation method. The atomic energy levels needed for calculations were taken from TOPBASE as well as the oscillator strengths, calculated additionally using the Coulomb approximation (the method of Bates and Damgaard). The both results were compared and the disagreement is found only in one case where the configuration mixing allows a forbidden transition to a close perturbing energy level. Calculations were performed for plasma conditions relevant for atmospheres of DQ white dwarfs and for a new type of white dwarfs, with surface composed mostly of carbon, discovered in 2007 by Dufour et al.. The aim of this work is to provide accurate C II Stark broadening data, which are crucial for this type of white dwarf atmosphere modellisation. Obtained results will be included in STARK-B database (http://stark-b.obspm.fr/), entering in the FP7 project of European Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Center VAMDC aiming at building an interoperable e-Infrastructure for the exchange of atomic and molecular data (http://www.vamdc.org/).

  11. Spring 2015 Thermodynamics -2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    Spring 2015 Thermodynamics - 2 As indicated in the adjacent figure, a steady- flow cogeneration: recirculating hot water and electricity. Steam flows at 200 kg/s into the cogeneration plant at 5 bar to the factory. b. [30 pts] Determine the rate of entropy production within the cogeneration plant. The plant

  12. Thermodynamics and gravitational collapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Malafarina; Pankaj S. Joshi

    2011-06-19

    It is known now that a typical gravitational collapse in general relativity, evolving from regular initial data and under physically reasonable conditions would end in either a black hole or a naked singularity final state. An important question that needs to be answered in this connection is, whether the analogues of the laws of thermodynamics, as formulated for relativistic horizons are respected by the dynamical spacetimes for collapse that end in the formation of a naked singularity. We investigate here the thermodynamical behaviour of the dynamical horizons that form in spherically symmetric gravitational collapse and we show that the first and second laws of black hole thermodynamics, as extended to dynamical spacetimes in a suitable manner, are not violated whether the collapse ends in a black hole or a naked singularity. We then make a distinction between the naked singularities that result from gravitational collapse, and those that exist in solutions of Einstein equations in vacuum axially symmetric and stationary spacetimes, and discuss their connection with thermodynamics in view of the cosmic censorship conjecture and the validity of the third law of black hole mechanics.

  13. 2, 15151615, 2005 Thermodynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - tions of the standard molal thermodynamic properties of ionized proteins as a func- tion of temperature and T at high temperature were taken from the recent literature, which ensures an internally consistent revision, pressure, composition and intra- and extracellular chemical potentials of O2, H2, NH3, H2PO4 and CO2. 1516

  14. Cyclic Thermodynamics with Open Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, R.S.; Ward, W.C.; Swift, G.W.

    1998-05-01

    Some general features of a new class of thermodynamic device combining a thermodynamic cycle with the externally applied steady flow of an open thermodynamic process are discussed and experimentally demonstrated in the context of a thermoacoustic refrigerator. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  15. Kinetic equilibrium and relativistic thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ván

    2011-02-01

    Relativistic thermodynamics is treated from the point of view of kinetic theory. It is shown that the generalized J\\"uttner distribution suggested in [1] is compatible with kinetic equilibrium. The requirement of compatibility of kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium reveals several generalizations of the Gibbs relation where the velocity field is an independent thermodynamic variable.

  16. Algorithmic Thermodynamics John C. Baez

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    Algorithmic Thermodynamics John C. Baez Department of Mathematics, University of California in statistical mechanics. This viewpoint allows us to apply many techniques developed for use in thermodynamics and chemical potential. We derive an analogue of the fundamental thermodynamic relation dE = TdS - PdV + µd

  17. Thermodynamics CHE 361, 4 credits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuchs, Alan

    Thermodynamics CHE 361, 4 credits Spring Semester 2006 Tuesday and Thursday, 11:00 ­ 12:15PM, LME Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics", Prentice Hall PTR, 1999. Prerequisites Calculus III (Math 283 of this course, students will understand the first and second laws, PVT properties of fluids, thermodynamic

  18. Phenomenological thermodynamics in a nutshell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neumaier, Arnold

    Phenomenological thermodynamics in a nutshell Arnold Neumaier Fakult¨at f¨ur Mathematik, Universit of phenomeno- logical equilibrium thermodynamics for single-phase systems in the absence of chemical reactions-known thermodynamics book the basic concepts by means of a few postulates from which every- thing else follows. His

  19. Contact Symmetries and Hamiltonian Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bravetti; C. S. Lopez-Monsalvo; F. Nettel

    2015-02-22

    It has been shown that contact geometry is the proper framework underlying classical thermodynamics and that thermodynamic fluctuations are captured by an additional metric structure related to Fisher's Information Matrix. In this work we analyze several unaddressed aspects about the application of contact and metric geometry to thermodynamics. We consider here the Thermodynamic Phase Space and start by investigating the role of gauge transformations and Legendre symmetries for metric contact manifolds and their significance in thermodynamics. Then we present a novel mathematical characterization of first order phase transitions as equilibrium processes on the Thermodynamic Phase Space for which the Legendre symmetry is broken. Moreover, we use contact Hamiltonian dynamics to represent thermodynamic processes in a way that resembles the classical Hamiltonian formulation of conservative mechanics and we show that the relevant Hamiltonian coincides with the irreversible entropy production along thermodynamic processes. Therefore, we use such property to give a geometric definition of thermodynamically admissible fluctuations according to the Second Law of thermodynamics. Finally, we show that the length of a curve describing a thermodynamic process measures its entropy production.

  20. Thermodynamics of Chaplygin gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung

    2011-05-11

    We clarify thermodynamics of the Chaplygin gas by introducing the integrability condition. All thermal quantities are derived as functions of either volume or temperature. Importantly, we find a new general equation of state, describing the Chaplygin gas completely. We confirm that the Chaplygin gas could show a unified picture of dark matter and energy which cools down through the universe expansion without any critical point (phase transition).

  1. Classical QGP : IV. Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sungtae Cho; Ismail Zahed

    2008-12-09

    We construct the equation of a state of the classical QGP valid for all values of Gamma=V/K, the ratio of the mean Coulomb to kinetic energy. By enforcing the Gibbs relations, we derive the pertinent pressure and entropy densities for all Gamma. For the case of an SU(2) classical gluonic plasma our results compare well with lattice simulations. We show that the strongly coupled component of the classical QGP contributes significantly to the bulk thermodynamics across T_c.

  2. Gravity, Dimension, Equilibrium, & Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerome Perez

    2006-03-30

    Is it actually possible to interpret gravitation as space's property in a pure classical way. Then, we note that extended self-gravitating system equilibrium depends directly on the number of dimension of the space in which it evolves. Given those precisions, we review the principal thermodynamical knowledge in the context of classical gravity with arbitrary dimension of space. Stability analyses for bounded 3D systems, namely the Antonov instability paradigm, are then rapproched to some amazing properties of globular clusters and galaxies.

  3. Simulations of Clouds and Sensitivity Study by Weather Research and Forecast Model for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Case 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, J.; Zhang, M.

    2005-03-18

    One of the large errors in general circulation models (GCMs) cloud simulations is from the mid-latitude, synoptic-scale frontal cloud systems. Now, with the availability of the cloud observations from Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) 2000 cloud Intensive Operational Period (IOP) and other observational datasets, the community is able to document the model biases in comparison with the observations and make progress in development of better cloud schemes in models. Xie et al. (2004) documented the errors in midlatitude frontal cloud simulations for ARM Case 4 by single-column models (SCMs) and cloud resolving models (CRMs). According to them, the errors in the model simulated cloud field might be caused by following reasons: (1) lacking of sub-grid scale variability; (2) lacking of organized mesoscale cyclonic advection of hydrometeors behind a moving cyclone which may play important role to generate the clouds there. Mesoscale model, however, can be used to better under stand these controls on the subgrid variability of clouds. Few studies have focused on applying mesoscale models to the forecasting of cloud properties. Weaver et al. (2004) used a mesoscale model RAMS to study the frontal clouds for ARM Case 4 and documented the dynamical controls on the sub-GCM-grid-scale cloud variability.

  4. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mace, Gerald

    2008-01-15

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  5. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mace, Gerald

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  6. The role of quantum information in thermodynamics --- a topical review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Goold; Marcus Huber; Arnau Riera; Lídia del Rio; Paul Skrzypczyk

    2015-06-23

    This topical review article gives an overview of the interplay between quantum information theory and thermodynamics of quantum systems. We focus on several trending topics including the foundations of statistical mechanics, resource theories, entanglement in thermodynamic settings, fluctuation theorems and thermal machines. This is not a comprehensive review of the diverse field of quantum thermodynamics; rather, it is a convenient entry point for the thermo-curious information theorist. Furthermore this review should facilitate the unification and understanding of different interdisciplinary approaches emerging in research groups around the world.

  7. Research Update: Atmospheric pressure spatial atomic layer deposition of ZnO thin films: Reactors, doping, and devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoye, Robert L. Z.; Muńoz-Rojas, David; Nelson, Shelby F.; Illiberi, Andrea; Poodt, Paul; Roozeboom, Fred; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.

    2015-04-02

    given to describe this system, but in this research update, we standardize its name to the Cambridge University Close Proximity (CUCP) reactor (design details are given in Ref. 24). An illustration of the CUCP gas manifold is given in Fig. 2... times, as indicated. Reprinted with permission from D. Muńoz-Rojas, H. Sun, D. C. Iza, J. Weickert, L. Chen, H. Wang, L. Schmidt-Mende, J. L. MacManus-Driscoll, Prog. Photovoltaics: Res. Appl. 21, 393 (2013). Copyright 2013 Wiley-VCH. adherent...

  8. Atmospheric Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2006-12-11

    This paper is a brief overview of the theory and experimental data of atmospheric neutrino production at the fiftieth anniversary of the experimental discovery of neutrinos.

  9. Thermodynamic Stability of Nanobubbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phil Attard

    2015-03-15

    The observed stability of nanobubbles contradicts the well-known result in classical nucleation theory, that the critical radius is both microscopic and thermodynamically unstable. Here nanoscopic stability is shown to be the combined result of two non-classical mechanisms. It is shown that the surface tension decreases with increasing supersaturation, and that this gives a nanoscopic critical radius. Whilst neither a free spherical bubble nor a hemispherical bubble mobile on an hydrophobic surface are stable, it is shown that an immobilized hemispherical bubble with a pinned contact rim is stable and that the total entropy is a maximum at the critical radius.

  10. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1988 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 3, Atmospheric sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-04-01

    Disposal of spent fuel or high level nuclear waste into marine sediments would create high temperature-high gamma radiation environments adjacent to waste canisters. Under these conditions sediments will react producing pore waters that differ significantly from those occurring naturally. These changes may enhance canister corrosion or facilitate transport of radionuclides through unreacted sediments beyond the heated zone. In addition, the term ''near field'' needs clarification, as it is used widely without having a precise meaning. Research in three areas was undertaken to improve our understanding of near field chemical processes. Initially, isothermal experiments were carried out in ''Dickson'' hydrothermal systems. These were followed by an experimental program directed at understanding the chemical effects of temperature-gradient induced transport. Finally, additional experimentation was done to study the combined effects of hydrothermal conditions and intense gamma radiation. Having completed this body of experimental work, it was concluded that near field conditions are not an obstacle to the safe use of abyssal marine sediments for the disposal of spent fuel or high level nuclear wastes. 41 refs., 6 figs., 17 tabs.

  11. Thermodynamics of error correction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Sartori; Simone Pigolotti

    2015-04-24

    Information processing at the molecular scale is limited by thermal fluctuations. This can cause undesired consequences in copying information since thermal noise can lead to errors that can compromise the functionality of the copy. For example, a high error rate during DNA duplication can lead to cell death. Given the importance of accurate copying at the molecular scale, it is fundamental to understand its thermodynamic features. In this paper, we derive a universal expression for the copy error as a function of entropy production and dissipated work of the process. Its derivation is based on the second law of thermodynamics, hence its validity is independent of the details of the molecular machinery, be it any polymerase or artificial copying device. Using this expression, we find that information can be copied in three different regimes. In two of them, work is dissipated to either increase or decrease the error. In the third regime, the protocol extracts work while correcting errors, reminiscent of a Maxwell demon. As a case study, we apply our framework to study a copy protocol assisted by kinetic proofreading, and show that it can operate in any of these three regimes. We finally show that, for any effective proofreading scheme, error reduction is limited by the chemical driving of the proofreading reaction.

  12. Initial Assessment of the Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR)-Based Aerosol Retrieval: Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Schmid, Beat; Russell, P. B.; Sinyuk, Alexander

    2012-10-24

    The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) being developed for airborne measurements will offer retrievals of aerosol microphysical and optical properties from multi-angular and multi-spectral measurements of sky radiance and direct-beam sun transmittance. In this study, we assess the expected accuracy of the 4STAR-based aerosol retrieval and its sensitivity to major sources of anticipated perturbations in the 4STAR measurements by adapting a theoretical approach previously developed for the AERONET measurements. The major anticipated perturbations are (1) an apparent enhancement of sky radiance at small scattering angles associated with the necessarily compact design of the 4STAR and (2) and an offset (i.e. uncertainty) of sky radiance calibration independent of scattering angle. The assessment is performed through application of the operational AERONET aerosol retrieval and constructed synthetic 4STAR-like data. Particular attention is given to the impact of these perturbations on the upwelling and downwelling broadband fluxes and the direct aerosol radiative forcing at the bottom and top of the atmosphere. The results from this study suggest that limitations in the accuracy of 4STAR-retrieved particle size distributions and scattering phase functions have diminished impact on the accuracy of retrieved bulk microphysical parameters, permitting quite accurate retrievals of properties including the effective radius (up to 10%, or 0.03), and the radiatively important optical properties, such as the asymmetry factor (up to 4%, or ±0.02) and single-scattering albedo (up to 6%, or ±0.04). Also, the obtained results indicate that the uncertainties in the retrieved aerosol optical properties are quite small in the context of the calculated fluxes and direct aerosol radiative forcing (up to 15%, or 3 Wm-2).

  13. Thermodynamics in Loop Quantum Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li-Fang Li; Jian-Yang Zhu

    2008-12-18

    Loop quantum cosmology (LQC) is very powerful to deal with the behavior of early universe. And the effective loop quantum cosmology gives a successful description of the universe in the semiclassical region. We consider the apparent horizon of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe as a thermodynamical system and investigate the thermodynamics of LQC in the semiclassical region. The effective density and effective pressure in the modified Friedmann equation from LQC not only determine the evolution of the universe in LQC scenario but are actually also found to be the thermodynamic quantities. This result comes from the energy definition in cosmology (the Misner-Sharp gravitational energy) and is consistent with thermodynamic laws. We prove that within the framework of loop quantum cosmology, the elementary equation of equilibrium thermodynamics is still valid.

  14. Reassessing thermodynamic and dynamic constraints on global wind power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makarieva, A M; Nefiodov, A V; Sheil, D; Nobre, A D; Li, B L

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the determinants of the power output of moist atmospheric air. It is shown to be represented as a sum of terms with different physical meanings and uncertainties. We demonstrate that using a thermodynamic approach to constrain the global power output as a whole, e.g. by considering the entropy budget (Lalibert\\'e et al., 2015), results in a loss of information concerning the rate of kinetic energy generation. We discuss why it is important to find dynamic constraints on wind power and emphasize the role of condensation in the generation of atmospheric circulation.

  15. Practical Thermodynamic Quantities for Aqueous Vanadium- and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Practical Thermodynamic Quantities for Aqueous Vanadium- and Iron-Based Flow Batteries. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Practical Thermodynamic Quantities for Aqueous...

  16. Thermodynamics of metallic systems | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermodynamics of metallic systems Many thermodynamics properties of metallic systems are not readily available through experimental measurements or widely available databases...

  17. Thermodynamics of clusterized matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ad. R. Raduta; F. Gulminelli

    2009-08-26

    Thermodynamics of clusterized matter is studied in the framework of statistical models with non-interacting cluster degrees of freedom. At variance with the analytical Fisher model, exact Metropolis simulation results indicate that the transition from homogeneous to clusterized matter lies along the $\\rho=\\rho_0$ axis at all temperatures and the limiting point of the phase diagram is not a critical point even if the surface energy vanishes at this point. Sensitivity of the inferred phase diagram to the employed statistical framework in the case of finite systems is discussed by considering the grand-canonical and constant-pressure canonical ensembles. A Wigner-Seitz formalism in which the fragment charge is neutralized by an uniform electron distribution allows to build the phase diagram of neutron star matter.

  18. Thermodynamics and cement science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damidot, D.; Lothenbach, B.; Herfort, D.; Glasser, F.P.

    2011-07-15

    Thermodynamics applied to cement science has proved to be very valuable. One of the most striking findings has been the extent to which the hydrate phases, with one conspicuous exception, achieve equilibrium. The important exception is the persistence of amorphous C-S-H which is metastable with respect to crystalline calcium silicate hydrates. Nevertheless C-S-H can be included in the scope of calculations. As a consequence, from comparison of calculation and experiment, it appears that kinetics is not necessarily an insuperable barrier to engineering the phase composition of a hydrated Portland cement. Also the sensitivity of the mineralogy of the AFm and AFt phase compositions to the presence of calcite and to temperature has been reported. This knowledge gives a powerful incentive to develop links between the mineralogy and engineering properties of hydrated cement paste and, of course, anticipates improvements in its performance leading to decreasing the environmental impacts of cement production.

  19. Atmospheric Pollution Research 3 (2012) 279288 Atmospheric Pollution Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aneja, Viney P.

    2012-01-01

    a commercial anaerobic swine waste treatment lagoon and from an on­site finishing swine confinement house.32±0.32 kg NH3­N animal ­1 yr ­1 , 0.78±0.49 kg NH 3 ­N animal ­1 yr ­1 , 1.55±1.40 kg NH3­N animal ­1 yr ­1 , and 1.35±0.61 kg NH 3 ­N animal ­1 yr ­1 in summer, fall, winter, and spring respectively

  20. Radiative and thermodynamic responses to aerosol extinction profiles during the pre-monsoon month over South Asia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feng, Y.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Coulter, R.; Zhao, C.; Cadeddu, M.

    2015-01-01

    Aerosol radiative effects and thermodynamic responses over South Asia are examined with a version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) for March 2012. Model results of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and extinction profiles are analyzed and compared to satellite retrievals and two ground-based lidars located in the northern India. The WRF-Chem model is found to underestimate the AOD during the simulated pre-monsoon month and about 83 % of the model low-bias is due to aerosol extinctions below ~2 km. Doubling the calculated aerosol extinctions below 850 hPa generates much better agreement with the observed AODmore »and extinction profiles averaged over South Asia. To separate the effect of absorption and scattering properties, two runs were conducted: in one run (Case I), the calculated scattering and absorption coefficients were increased proportionally, while in the second run (Case II) only the calculated aerosol scattering coefficient was increased. With the same AOD and extinction profiles, the two runs produce significantly different radiative effects over land and oceans. On the regional mean basis, Case I generates 48 % more heating in the atmosphere and 21 % more dimming at the surface than Case II. Case I also produces stronger cooling responses over the land from the longwave radiation adjustment and boundary layer mixing. These rapid adjustments offset the stronger radiative heating in Case I and lead to an overall lower-troposphere cooling up to -0.7 K day?1, which is smaller than that in Case II. Over the ocean, direct radiative effects dominate the heating rate changes in the lower atmosphere lacking such surface and lower atmosphere adjustments due to fixed sea surface temperature, and the strongest atmospheric warming is obtained in Case I. Consequently, atmospheric dynamics (boundary layer heights and meridional circulation) and thermodynamic processes (water vapor and cloudiness) are shown to respond differently between Case I and Case II underlying the importance of determining the exact portion of scattering or absorbing aerosols that lead to the underestimation of aerosol optical depth in the model. In addition, the model results suggest that both direct radiative effect and rapid thermodynamic responses need to be quantified for understanding aerosol radiative impacts.« less

  1. Radiative and thermodynamic responses to aerosol extinction profiles during the pre-monsoon month over South Asia

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Feng, Y.; Kotamarthi, V. R.; Coulter, R.; Zhao, C.; Cadeddu, M.

    2015-06-19

    Aerosol radiative effects and thermodynamic responses over South Asia are examined with a version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) for March 2012. Model results of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) and extinction profiles are analyzed and compared to satellite retrievals and two ground-based lidars located in the northern India. The WRF-Chem model is found to underestimate the AOD during the simulated pre-monsoon month and about 83 % of the model low-bias is due to aerosol extinctions below ~2 km. Doubling the calculated aerosol extinctions below 850 hPa generates much better agreement with the observed AODmore »and extinction profiles averaged over South Asia. To separate the effect of absorption and scattering properties, two runs were conducted: in one run (Case I), the calculated scattering and absorption coefficients were increased proportionally, while in the second run (Case II) only the calculated aerosol scattering coefficient was increased. With the same AOD and extinction profiles, the two runs produce significantly different radiative effects over land and oceans. On the regional mean basis, Case I generates 48 % more heating in the atmosphere and 21 % more dimming at the surface than Case II. Case I also produces stronger cooling responses over the land from the longwave radiation adjustment and boundary layer mixing. These rapid adjustments offset the stronger radiative heating in Case I and lead to an overall lower-troposphere cooling up to -0.7 K day?1, which is smaller than that in Case II. Over the ocean, direct radiative effects dominate the heating rate changes in the lower atmosphere lacking such surface and lower atmosphere adjustments due to fixed sea surface temperature, and the strongest atmospheric warming is obtained in Case I. Consequently, atmospheric dynamics (boundary layer heights and meridional circulation) and thermodynamic processes (water vapor and cloudiness) are shown to respond differently between Case I and Case II underlying the importance of determining the exact portion of scattering or absorbing aerosols that lead to the underestimation of aerosol optical depth in the model. In addition, the model results suggest that both direct radiative effect and rapid thermodynamic responses need to be quantified for understanding aerosol radiative impacts.« less

  2. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. 103, NO. D17, PAGES 22,449-22,462, SEPTEMBER 20, 1998 Atmospheric chemistry and distribution of formaldehyde and several

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atmospheric chemistry and distribution of formaldehyde and several multioxygenated carbonyl compoundsduring formaldehyde(FA), glycolaldehyde(GA), glyoxal(GL), methylglyoxal(MG), andpyruvicacid

  3. ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE LETTERS Atmos. Sci. Let. (2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE LETTERS Atmos. Sci. Let. (2012) Published online in Wiley Online Library using National Centers for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP) concentrations and sea- surface temperatures (SSTs). These integrations enable the relative role of ozone

  4. Laboratory for Atmospheric and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics Activity Report 2008 University of Colorado at Boulder, Jet Propulsion Laboratory) LASP: A Brief History In 1946-47, a handful of American universities joined Laboratory (now the Phillips Laboratory), the University of Colorado formed a research group called the Upper

  5. Thermodynamic geometry of holographic superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sayan Basak; Pankaj Chaturvedi; Poulami Nandi; Gautam Sengupta

    2015-09-02

    We obtain the thermodynamic geometry of a (2+1) dimensional strongly coupled quantum field theory at a finite temperature in a holographic set up through the gauge/gravity correspondence. The bulk dual gravitational theory is described by a 3+1 dimensional charged AdS black hole in the presence of a charged massive scalar field. The holographic free energy of the (2+1) dimensional strongly coupled boundary field theory is computed analytically through the bulk boundary correspondence. The thermodynamic metric and the corresponding scalar curvature is then obtained from the holographic free energy. The thermodynamic scalar curvature characterizes the superconducting phase transition of the boundary field theory.

  6. Thermodynamic geometry of holographic superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sayan Basak; Pankaj Chaturvedi; Poulami Nandi; Gautam Sengupta

    2015-09-21

    We obtain the thermodynamic geometry of a (2+1) dimensional strongly coupled quantum field theory at a finite temperature in a holographic set up, through the gauge/gravity correspondence. The bulk dual gravitational theory is described by a (3+1) dimensional charged AdS black hole in the presence of a massive charged scalar field. The holographic free energy of the (2+1) dimensional strongly coupled boundary field theory is computed analytically through the bulk boundary correspondence. The thermodynamic metric and the corresponding scalar curvature is then obtained from the holographic free energy. The thermodynamic scalar curvature characterizes the superconducting phase transition of the boundary field theory.

  7. Thermodynamic geometry of holographic superconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basak, Sayan; Nandi, Poulami; Sengupta, Gautam

    2015-01-01

    We obtain the thermodynamic geometry of a (2+1) dimensional strongly coupled quantum field theory at a finite temperature in a holographic set up through the gauge/gravity correspondence. The bulk dual gravitational theory is described by a 3+1 dimensional charged AdS black hole in the presence of a charged massive scalar field. The holographic free energy of the (2+1) dimensional strongly coupled boundary field theory is computed analytically through the bulk boundary correspondence. The thermodynamic metric and the corresponding scalar curvature is then obtained from the holographic free energy. The thermodynamic scalar curvature characterizes the superconducting phase transition of the boundary field theory.

  8. Actinide Thermodynamics at Elevated Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friese, Judah I.; Rao, Linfeng; Xia, Yuanxian; Bachelor, Paula P.; Tian, Guoxin

    2007-11-16

    The postclosure chemical environment in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is expected to experience elevated temperatures. Predicting migration of actinides is possible if sufficient, reliable thermodynamic data on hydrolysis and complexation are available for these temperatures. Data are scarce and scattered for 25 degrees C, and nonexistent for elevated temperatures. This collaborative project between LBNL and PNNL collects thermodynamic data at elevated temperatures on actinide complexes with inorganic ligands that may be present in Yucca Mountain. The ligands include hydroxide, fluoride, sulfate, phosphate and carbonate. Thermodynamic parameters of complexation, including stability constants, enthalpy, entropy and heat capacity of complexation, are measured with a variety of techniques including solvent extraction, potentiometry, spectrophotometry and calorimetry

  9. QCD Thermodynamics with Improved Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsch, Frithjof; Engels, J; Joswig, R; Laermann, E; Peikert, A; Petersson, B

    1996-01-01

    The thermodynamics of the SU(3) gauge theory has been analyzed with tree level and tadpole improved Symanzik actions. A comparison with the continuum extrapolated results for the standard Wilson action shows that improved actions lead to a drastic reduction of finite cut-off effects already on lattices with temporal extent $N_\\tau=4$. Results for the pressure, the critical temperature, surface tension and latent heat are presented. First results for the thermodynamics of four-flavour QCD with an improved staggered action are also presented. They indicate similarly large improvement factors for bulk thermodynamics.

  10. ORISE: Climate and Atmospheric Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxideUser WorkEP Power ConditioningClimate and

  11. Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Research Isotopes produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory are saving lives, advancing cutting-edge research and keeping the U.S. safe. Research thorium test foil A...

  12. Some topics in thermodynamics and quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Carroll

    2012-11-17

    We sketch some connecting relations involving fractional and quantum calculi, fractal structure, thermodynamics, and quantum mechanics.

  13. THE LANDAUER LIMIT AND THERMODYNAMICS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baez, John

    THE LANDAUER LIMIT AND THERMODYNAMICS OF BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS David H. Wolpert Santa Fe Institute1 v2 b) h 2R vv1 v2 c) h vv1 v2 R Thermodynamic cost to erase a bit - the minimal amount of entropy be thermodynamically reversible ... but if it is applied to known data, it is thermodynamically irreversible." #12;HEAT

  14. Thermodynamics Henri J.F. Jansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansen, Henri J. F.

    Thermodynamics Henri J.F. Jansen Department of Physics Oregon State University August 19, 2010 #12;II #12;Contents PART I. Thermodynamics Fundamentals 1 1 Basic Thermodynamics. 3 1.1 Introduction of Thermodynamics. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 1.4 First law: Energy

  15. Relativisticlike structure of classical thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernando Quevedo; Alberto Sanchez; Alejandro Vazquez

    2014-10-26

    We analyze in the context of geometrothermodynamics a Legendre invariant metric structure in the equilibrium space of an ideal gas. We introduce the concept of thermodynamic geodesic as a succession of points, each corresponding to a state of equilibrium, so that the resulting curve represents a quasi-static process. A rigorous geometric structure is derived in which the thermodynamic geodesics at a given point split the equilibrium space into two disconnected regions separated by adiabatic geodesics. This resembles the causal structure of special relativity, which we use to introduce the concept of adiabatic cone for thermodynamic systems. This result might be interpreted as an alternative indication of the inter-relationship between relativistic physics and classical thermodynamics.

  16. On the Mathematics of Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. B. Cooper; T. Russell

    2011-02-08

    We show that the mathematical structure of Gibbsian thermodynamics flows from the following simple elements: the state space of a thermodynamical substance is a measure space together with two orderings (corresponding to "warmer than" and "adiabatically accessible from") which satisfy certain plausible physical axioms and an area condition which was introduced by Paul Samuelson. We show how the basic identities of thermodynamics, in particular the Maxwell relations, follow and so the existence of energy, free energy, enthalpy and the Gibbs potential function. We also discuss some questions which we have not found dealt with in the literature, such as the amount of information required to reconstruct the equations of state of a substance and a systematic approach to thermodynamical identities.

  17. Thermodynamics of regular black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung; Yong-Wan Kim; Young-Jai Park

    2008-09-21

    We investigate thermodynamics for a magnetically charged regular black hole (MCRBH), which comes from the action of general relativity and nonlinear electromagnetics, comparing with the Reissner-Norstr\\"om (RN) black hole in both four and two dimensions after dimensional reduction. We find that there is no thermodynamic difference between the regular and RN black holes for a fixed charge $Q$ in both dimensions. This means that the condition for either singularity or regularity at the origin of coordinate does not affect the thermodynamics of black hole. Furthermore, we describe the near-horizon AdS$_2$ thermodynamics of the MCRBH with the connection of the Jackiw-Teitelboim theory. We also identify the near-horizon entropy as the statistical entropy by using the AdS$_2$/CFT$_1$ correspondence.

  18. JournalofGeophysicalResearch: Atmospheres RESEARCH ARTICLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to optical frequencies, extending to X-rays and gamma rays. The electromagnetic pulse associated to its abundance in nature. Lightning processes radiate impulsive electromagnetic waves from DC

  19. Black hole thermodynamics in finite time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruber, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Finite-time thermodynamics provides the means to revisit ideal thermodynamic equilibrium processes in the light of reality and investigate the energetic "price of haste", i.e. the consequences of carrying out a process in finite time, when perfect equilibrium cannot be awaited due to economic reasons or the nature of the process. Employing the formalism of geometric thermodynamics, a lower bound on the energy dissipated during a process is derived from the thermodynamic length of that process. The notion of length is hereby defined via a metric structure on the space of equilibrium thermodynamics, spanned by a set of thermodynamic variables describing the system. Since the aim of finite-time thermodynamics is to obtain realistic limitations on idealized scenarios, it is a useful tool to reassess the efficiency of thermodynamic processes. We examine its implications for black hole thermodynamics, in particular scenarios inspired by the Penrose process, a thought experiment by which work can be extracted from a...

  20. Conformal Gauge Transformations in Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bravetti; C. S. Lopez-Monsalvo; F. Nettel

    2015-06-23

    In this work we consider conformal gauge transformations of the geometric structure of thermodynamic fluctuation theory. In particular, we show that the Thermodynamic Phase Space is naturally endowed with a non-integrable connection, defined by all those processes that annihilate the Gibbs 1-form, i.e. reversible processes. Therefore the geometry of reversible processes is invariant under re-scalings, that is, it has a conformal gauge freedom. Interestingly, as a consequence of the non-integrability of the connection, its curvature is not invariant under conformal gauge transformations and, therefore, neither is the associated pseudo-Riemannian geometry. We argue that this is not surprising, since these two objects are associated with irreversible processes. Moreover, we provide the explicit form in which all the elements of the geometric structure of the Thermodynamic Phase Space change under a conformal gauge transformation. As an example, we revisit the change of the thermodynamic representation and consider the resulting change between the two metrics on the Thermodynamic Phase Space which induce Weinhold's energy metric and Ruppeiner's entropy metric. As a by-product we obtain a proof of the well-known conformal relation between Weinhold's and Ruppeiner's metrics along the equilibrium directions. Finally, we find interesting properties of the almost para-contact structure and of its eigenvectors which may be of physical interest.

  1. Thermodynamics of Neptunium (V) Complexes with Phosphate at Elevated Temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xia, Yuanxian

    2009-01-01

    VITORGE, H. WANNER, Chemical Thermodynamics of Neptunium andData Bank, Chemical Thermodynamics 4, Elsevier, New York 4.Thermodynamics of Neptunium (V) Complexes with Phosphate at

  2. Thermodynamics, Entropy, Information and the Efficiency of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrams, Zeev R.

    2012-01-01

    and P.T. Landsberg, Thermodynamics and reciprocity of solar59. E. Yablonovitch, Thermodynamics of the fluorescentC. 139. E. Yablonovitch, Thermodynamics of the fluorescent

  3. Thermodynamics and Ionic Conductivity of Block Copolymer Electrolytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wanakule, Nisita Sidra

    2010-01-01

    2.3 REFERENCES Flory, P.J. , Thermodynamics of high polymerBlock Copolymer Thermodynamics - Theory And Experiment.on block copolymer thermodynamics by measuring the changes

  4. Thermodynamics of Nanoscale Calcium and Strontium Titanate Perovskites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahu, Sulata Kumari

    2013-01-01

    and A. Navrotsky, “Thermodynamics of Nanoscale Lead Titanate2007. A. Navrotsky, “Thermodynamics of Solid Electrolytesand Y. Fei, “The Thermodynamics of Ordered Perovskites on

  5. On the geometrical thermodynamics of chemical reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel Santoro; Albert S. Benight

    2005-07-08

    The formal structure of geometrical thermodynamics is reviewed with particular emphasis on the geometry of equilibria submanifolds. On these submanifolds thermodynamic metrics are defined as the Hessian of thermodynamic potentials. Links between geometry and thermodynamics are explored for single and multiple component, closed and open systems. For multi-component closed and open systems the Gibbs free energy is employed as the thermodynamic potential to investigate the connection between geometry and thermodynamics. The Gibbs free energy is chosen for the analysis of multicomponent systems and, in particular, chemical reactions.

  6. Hessian geometry and entanglement thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsueda, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    We reconstruct entanglement thermodynamics by means of Hessian geometry, since this method exactly generalizes thermodynamics into much wider exponential family cases including quantum entanglement. Starting with the correct first law of entanglement thermodynamics, we derive that a proper choice of the Hessian potential leads to both of the entanglement entropy scaling for quantum critical systems and hyperbolic metric (or AdS space with imaginary time). We also derive geometric representation of the entanglement entropy in which the entropy is described as integration of local conserved current of information flowing across an entangling surface. We find that the entangling surface is equivalent to the domain boundary of the Hessian potential. This feature originates in a special property of critical systems in which we can identify the entanglement entropy with the Hessian potential after the second derivative by the canonical parameters, and this identification guarantees violation of extensive nature of ...

  7. Hessian geometry and entanglement thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroaki Matsueda

    2015-08-11

    We reconstruct entanglement thermodynamics by means of Hessian geometry, since this method exactly generalizes thermodynamics into much wider exponential family cases including quantum entanglement. Starting with the correct first law of entanglement thermodynamics, we derive that a proper choice of the Hessian potential leads to both of the entanglement entropy scaling for quantum critical systems and hyperbolic metric (or AdS space with imaginary time). We also derive geometric representation of the entanglement entropy in which the entropy is described as integration of local conserved current of information flowing across an entangling surface. We find that the entangling surface is equivalent to the domain boundary of the Hessian potential. This feature originates in a special property of critical systems in which we can identify the entanglement entropy with the Hessian potential after the second derivative by the canonical parameters, and this identification guarantees violation of extensive nature of the entropy.

  8. Non-hermitian quantum thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bart?omiej Gardas; Sebastian Deffner; Avadh Saxena

    2015-11-19

    Thermodynamics is a phenomenological theory of heat and work. Here we analyze to what extent quantum thermodynamic relations are immune to the underlying mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics. As a main result, we show that the Jarzynski equality holds true for all non-hermitian quantum systems with real spectrum. This equality expresses the second law of thermodynamics for isothermal processes arbitrarily far from equilibrium. In the quasistatic limit however, the second law is reflected in the Carnot bound and it is fulfilled even if some eigenenergies are complex provided they appear in conjugate pairs. Furthermore, we propose a setup to test our predictions. The quantum system in question consists of strongly interacting excitons and photons in a semiconductor microcavity.

  9. Thermodynamics of quantum photon spheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. Baldiotti; Walace S. Elias; C. Molina; Thiago S. Pereira

    2014-11-21

    Photon spheres, surfaces where massless particles are confined in closed orbits, are expected to be common astrophysical structures surrounding ultracompact objects. In this paper a semiclassical treatment of a photon sphere is proposed. We consider the quantum Maxwell field and derive its energy spectra. A thermodynamic approach for the quantum photon sphere is developed and explored. Within this treatment, an expression for the spectral energy density of the emitted radiation is presented. Our results suggest that photon spheres, when thermalized with their environment, have nonusual thermodynamic properties, which could lead to distinct observational signatures.

  10. Horizon thermodynamics and composite metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo Sindoni

    2012-11-12

    We examine the conditions under which the thermodynamic behaviour of gravity can be explained within an emergent gravity scenario, where the metric is defined as a composite operator. We show that due to the availability of a boundary of a boundary principle for the quantum effective action, Clausius-like relations can always be constructed. Hence, any true explanation of the thermodynamic nature of the metric tensor has to be referred to an equilibration process, associated to the presence of an H-theorem, possibly driven by decoherence induced by the pregeometric degrees of freedom, and their entanglement with the geometric ones.

  11. Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    My research interests. Numerical method of stochastic partial differential equations; Uncertainty Quantification; High-order numerical method; Domain ...

  12. Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    author

    Research Interests. Mathematical biology: Computational modelling of biological systems, experimental design and control of cellular processes. Applied math: ...

  13. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: ATMOSPHERES, VOL. 118, 11,58911,599, doi:10.1002/2013JD020526, 2013 Seasonal cycle of orographic gravity wave occurrence above small

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, M. Joan

    are not observed in AIRS data they have likely dissipated and induced a drag force on the atmosphere below the 40 to the Southern Hemisphere's lack of orographic waves and orographic wave drag relative to the Northern Hemisphere by mountainous terrain. Mountains are the source of some of the largest amplitude waves in the strato- sphere

  14. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH: ATMOSPHERES, VOL. 118, 112, doi:10.1002/jgrd.50505, 2013 SO2 as a possible proxy for volcanic ash in aviation hazard avoidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    gases such as water vapor, carbon dioxide, and sulphur dioxide into the atmosphere [Robock, 2000 accurately using satellite data, while sulphur dioxide is much easier to detect accurately, but is much less]. These eruptions can occur in remote locations which are not the focus of regular measurements, and the first

  15. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 9, NO. 10, PAGES 1207-1210, OCTOBEX 1982 PARTICLE SIZE DISTRIBUTION OF NITRATE AND SULFATE IN THE MARINE ATMOSPHERE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prospero, Joseph M.

    of nitrate in the atmosphere have been conducted in continental (primarily urban) areas; data on nitrate polycarbonate sheets were used as impaction surfaces; these sheets had a "frosted" finish which minimizes to collect the smallest particles. The polycarbonate inlpaction sheets were used because of their inertness

  16. Thermodynamics of microstructure evolution: grain growth Victor L. Berdichevsky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Thermodynamics of microstructure evolution: grain growth Victor L. Berdichevsky Mechanical thermodynamic parameters, entropy of microstructure and temperature of microstruc- ture. It was claimed that there is "one more law of thermodynamics": entropy of microstructure must decay in isolated thermodynamic stable

  17. Hawking Emission and Black Hole Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Don N. Page

    2006-12-18

    A brief review of Hawking radiation and black hole thermodynamics is given, based largely upon hep-th/0409024.

  18. Cosmological two-fluid thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winfried Zimdahl; Diego Pavón

    2000-05-17

    We reveal unifying thermodynamic aspects of so different phenomena as the cosmological electron-positron annihilation, the evaporation of primordial black holes with a narrow mass range, and the ``deflationary'' transition from an initial de Sitter phase to a subsequent standard Friedmann-Lema\\^{\\i}tre-Robertson-Walker begin (FLRW) behavior.

  19. Thermodynamic Analysis for Energy Conservation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenney, W. F.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes a methodology for performing a thermodynamic analysis of a process, and it demonstrates how such a study can be useful in identifying areas in the process with the greatest potential for improvement in energy use. The basis is a...

  20. Equilibrium Thermodynamics of Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. K. Sinclair

    2007-02-03

    Lattice QCD allows us to simulate QCD at non-zero temperature and/or densities. Such equilibrium thermodynamics calculations are relevant to the physics of relativistic heavy-ion collisions. I give a brief review of the field with emphasis on our work.

  1. Dabasinksas: Thermodynamics and Energy Transfer

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    later. G E F F B D A C Internal Energy (Joules) t t t t t t t t First Law of Thermodynamics: UQ+W for a closed system Q h t i t d W k i t +Q heat input and +W ...

  2. Conservation of Energy Thermodynamic Energy Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    , is derived beginning with an alternative form of the 1st Law of Thermodynamics, the internal energy formConservation of Energy Thermodynamic Energy Equation The previous two sections dealt addresses the conservation of energy. The first law of thermodynamics, of which you should be very familiar

  3. CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETICS Class Meetings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    CHEM 6471 CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETICS Class Meetings 9:35 ­ 10:55 am, Tuesday and Thursday of October 22-26 Textbooks Molecular Thermodynamics by D.A McQuarrie and J.D. Simon, University Science Books the laws of classical thermodynamics and some of their chemical applications. It also covers basic

  4. NonEquilibrium Thermodynamics Explains Semiotic Shapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kreinovich, Vladik

    Non­Equilibrium Thermodynamics Explains Semiotic Shapes: Applications to Astronomy and to Non­equilibrium thermodynamics, non­destructive testing, aerospace structures 1. SEMIOTIC SHAPES IN ASTRONOMY: FORMULATION by using the fundamental physical ideas of symmetry and non­equilibrium thermodynamics. 2. MAIN PHYSICAL

  5. Particles, maps and Irreversible Thermodynamics { I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rondoni, Lamberto

    Particles, maps and Irreversible Thermodynamics { I E. G. D. Cohen The Rockefeller University New Thermodynamics from deterministic dynamics. We #12;nd that these models do not posses the crucial property of local thermodynamic equilibrium, since they rep- resent noninteracting particles systems. Hence

  6. Vibrational Thermodynamics of Materials Brent Fultz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fultz, Brent

    Vibrational Thermodynamics of Materials Brent Fultz California Institute of Technology, W. M. Keck Laboratory, Pasadena CA 91125 USA July 6, 2009 Abstract. The literature on vibrational thermodynamics of harmonic phonons in alloys are organized into thermodynamic models for unmixing and ordering

  7. Thermodynamics of Protein Folding Erik Sandelin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandelin, Erik

    Thermodynamics of Protein Folding and Design Erik Sandelin Department of Theoretical Physics Lund Sölvegatan 14A 223 62 LUND September 2000 Erik Sandelin Thermodynamics of Protein Folding and Design sequence-independent local interactions which are found to strongly influence the thermodynamics

  8. Thermodynamics of viscoelastic fluids: the temperature equation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wapperom, Peter

    Thermodynamics of viscoelastic fluids: the temperature equation. Peter Wapperom Martien A. Hulsen and Hydrodynamics Rotterdamseweg 145 2628 AL Delft (The Netherlands) Abstract From the thermodynamics with internal. The well- known stress differential models that fit into the thermodynamic theory will be treated

  9. Thermodynamics and Mass Transport in Multicomponent,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    Thermodynamics and Mass Transport in Multicomponent, Multiphase H2O Systems of Planetary Interest, cryogenic systems, thermodynamics, fluid dynamics, clathrates, Mars, Enceladus, sound speed Abstract Heat of the noncondensible components can greatly alter the thermodynamic properties of the phases and their flow properties

  10. Thermodynamics and timeaverages October 13, 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carati, Andrea

    Thermodynamics and time­averages A. Carati October 13, 2004 ABSTRACT For a dynamical system far­averages, and the main problem is then how to formulate an appropriate statistical thermodynamics. The com- mon answer: Thermodynamics and time­averages Universit`a di Milano, Dipartimento di Matematica Via Saldini 50, 20133 Milano

  11. THERMODYNAMICS Molecular Simulation of Multicomponent Reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisal, Martin

    THERMODYNAMICS Molecular Simulation of Multicomponent Reaction and Phase Equilibria in MTBE Ternary System Martin Lisal´ E. Hala Laboratory of Thermodynamics, Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals N1G 2W1, Canada Ivo Nezbeda E. Hala Laboratory of Thermodynamics, Institute of Chemical Process

  12. Thermodynamics of a Nonlocal PNJL Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weise, Wolfram

    Thermodynamics of a Nonlocal PNJL Model Thomas Hell, Simon Rößner and Wolfram Weise Physik Th. Hell Thermodynamics of a Nonlocal NJL-type Model #12;Outline 1 The Nonlocal Nambu Approximation Dynamical Quark Mass 2 Thermodynamics of the Nonlocal PNJL Model Coupling Quarks and Polyakov Loop

  13. Thermodynamics of a Nonlocal PNJL Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weise, Wolfram

    Thermodynamics of a Nonlocal PNJL Model Thomas Hell, Simon Rößner and Wolfram Weise Physik Darmstadt, March 14th 2008 T. Hell Thermodynamics of a Nonlocal NJL-type Model #12;Outline 1 The Nonlocal Model Mean Field Approximation Dynamical Quark Mass 2 Thermodynamics of the Nonlocal PNJL Model Coupling

  14. Polymer Physics Research Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Polymer Physics Research Profile Our main interests are the theory of simplification and some behavior on different autonomous levels of description. Our favorite applications range from polymer + Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics + Coarse Graining + Soft Matter + Polymer Physics + Rheology + Competences

  15. New and Improved Data Logging and Collection System for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility, Tropical Western Pacific, and North Slope of Alaska Sky Radiation, Ground Radiation, and MET Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, M.T.; Holdridge, D.J.; Pearson, R.

    2005-03-18

    Aging systems and technological advances mandated changes to the data collection systems at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites. Key reasons for the upgrade include the following: achieve consistency across all ACRF sites for easy data use and operational maintenance; minimize the need for a single mentor requiring specialized knowledge and training; provide local access to real-time data for operational support, intensive operational period (IOP) support, and public relations; eliminate problems with physical packaging (condensation, connectors, etc.); and increase flexibility in programming and control of the data logger.

  16. Thermodynamic cost of creating correlations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus Huber; Martí Perarnau-Llobet; Karen V. Hovhannisyan; Paul Skrzypczyk; Claude Klöckl; Nicolas Brunner; Antonio Acín

    2015-01-15

    We investigate the fundamental limitations imposed by thermodynamics for creating correlations. Considering a collection of initially uncorrelated thermal quantum systems, we ask how much classical and quantum correlations can be obtained via a cyclic Hamiltonian process. We derive bounds on both the mutual information and entanglement of formation, as a function of the temperature of the systems and the available energy. While for a finite number of systems there is a maximal temperature allowing for the creation of entanglement, we show that genuine multipartite entanglement---the strongest form of entanglement in multipartite systems---can be created at any temperature when sufficiently many systems are considered. This approach may find applications, e.g. in quantum information processing, for physical platforms in which thermodynamic considerations cannot be ignored.

  17. Thermodynamics of the PNJL model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Ratti; S. Roessner; M. A. Thaler; W. Weise

    2006-09-21

    QCD thermodynamics is investigated by means of the Polyakov-loop-extended Nambu Jona-Lasinio (PNJL) model, in which quarks couple simultaneously to the chiral condensate and to a background temporal gauge field representing Polyakov loop dynamics. The behaviour of the Polyakov loop as a function of temperature is obtained by minimizing the thermodynamic potential of the system. A Taylor series expansion of the pressure is performed. Pressure difference and quark number density are then evaluated up to sixth order in quark chemical potential, and compared to the corresponding lattice data. The validity of the Taylor expansion is discussed within our model, through a comparison between the full results and the truncated ones.

  18. Black Hole Thermodynamics and Electromagnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2005-07-15

    We show a strong parallel between the Hawking, Beckenstein black hole Thermodynamics and electromagnetism: When the gravitational coupling constant transform into the electromagnetic coupling constant, the Schwarzchild radius, the Beckenstein temperature, the Beckenstein decay time and the Planck mass transform to respectively the Compton wavelength, the Hagedorn temperature, the Compton time and a typical elementary particle mass. The reasons underlying this parallalism are then discussed in detail.

  19. Thermodynamic States in Explosion Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L

    2010-03-12

    We investigate the thermodynamic states occurring in explosion fields from condensed explosive charges. These states are often modeled with a Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) function. However, the JWL function is not a Fundamental Equation of Thermodynamics, and therefore cannot give a complete specification of such states. We use the Cheetah code of Fried to study the loci of states of the expanded detonation products gases from C-4 charges, and their combustion products air. In the Le Chatelier Plane of specific-internal-energy versus temperature, these loci are fit with a Quadratic Model function u(T), which has been shown to be valid for T < 3,000 K and p < 1k-bar. This model is used to derive a Fundamental Equation u(v,s) for C-4. Given u(v,s), one can use Maxwell's Relations to derive all other thermodynamic functions, such as temperature: T(v,s), pressure: p(v,s), enthalpy: h(v,s), Gibbs free energy: g(v,s) and Helmholz free energy: f(v,s); these loci are displayed in figures for C-4. Such complete equations of state are needed for numerical simulations of blast waves from explosive charges, and their reflections from surfaces.

  20. Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners *ReindustrializationEnergyWindNO.RequirementsResearch Research

  1. Atmospheric science and power production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randerson, D.

    1984-07-01

    This is the third in a series of scientific publications sponsored by the US Atomic Energy Commission and the two later organizations, the US Energy Research and Development Adminstration, and the US Department of Energy. The first book, Meteorology and Atomic Energy, was published in 1955; the second, in 1968. The present volume is designed to update and to expand upon many of the important concepts presented previously. However, the present edition draws heavily on recent contributions made by atmospheric science to the analysis of air quality and on results originating from research conducted and completed in the 1970s. Special emphasis is placed on how atmospheric science can contribute to solving problems relating to the fate of combustion products released into the atmosphere. The framework of this book is built around the concept of air-quality modeling. Fundamentals are addressed first to equip the reader with basic background information and to focus on available meteorological instrumentation and to emphasize the importance of data management procedures. Atmospheric physics and field experiments are described in detail to provide an overview of atmospheric boundary layer processes, of how air flows around obstacles, and of the mechanism of plume rise. Atmospheric chemistry and removal processes are also detailed to provide fundamental knowledge on how gases and particulate matter can be transformed while in the atmosphere and how they can be removed from the atmosphere. The book closes with a review of how air-quality models are being applied to solve a wide variety of problems. Separate analytics have been prepared for each chapter.

  2. Fundamental limitations for quantum and nano thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Micha? Horodecki; Jonathan Oppenheim

    2014-10-25

    The relationship between thermodynamics and statistical physics is valid in the thermodynamic limit - when the number of particles becomes very large. Here, we study thermodynamics in the opposite regime - at both the nano scale, and when quantum effects become important. Applying results from quantum information theory we construct a theory of thermodynamics in these limits. We derive general criteria for thermodynamical state transformations, and as special cases, find two free energies: one that quantifies the deterministically extractable work from a small system in contact with a heat bath, and the other that quantifies the reverse process. We find that there are fundamental limitations on work extraction from nonequilibrium states, owing to finite size effects and quantum coherences. This implies that thermodynamical transitions are generically irreversible at this scale. As one application of these methods, we analyse the efficiency of small heat engines and find that they are irreversible during the adiabatic stages of the cycle.

  3. New Thermodynamic Paradigm of Chemical Equilibria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Zilbergleyt

    2011-10-28

    The paper presents new thermodynamic paradigm of chemical equilibrium, setting forth comprehensive basics of Discrete Thermodynamics of Chemical Equilibria (DTd). Along with previous results by the author during the last decade, this work contains also some new developments of DTd. Based on the Onsager's constitutive equations, reformulated by the author thermodynamic affinity and reaction extent, and Le Chatelier's principle, DTd brings forward a notion of chemical equilibrium as a balance of internal and external thermodynamic forces (TdF), acting against a chemical system. Basic expression of DTd is the chemical system logistic map of thermodynamic states that ties together energetic characteristics of chemical reaction, occurring in the system, the system shift from "true" thermodynamic equilibrium (TdE), and causing that shift external thermodynamic forces. Solutions to the basic map are pitchfork bifurcation diagrams in coordinates "shift from TdE - growth factor (or TdF)"; points, corresponding to the system thermodynamic states, are dwelling on its branches. The diagrams feature three typical areas: true thermodynamic equilibrium and open equilibrium along the thermodynamic branch before the threshold of its stability, i.e. bifurcation point, and bifurcation area with bistability and chaotic oscillations after the point. The set of solutions makes up the chemical system domain of states. The new paradigm complies with the correspondence principle: in isolated chemical system external TdF vanish, and the basic map turns into traditional expression of chemical equilibrium via thermodynamic affinity. The theory binds together classical and contemporary thermodynamics of chemical equilibria on a unique conceptual basis. The paper is essentially reworked and refocused version of the earlier preprint on the DTd basics, supplemented with new results.

  4. Ernest S. Colantonio College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    ) and document imaging and workflow processing system (Nolij); developed data warehouse queries; identifiedErnest S. Colantonio College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Oregon State University State University, College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences Faculty Research Assistant Conduct

  5. 5.60 Thermodynamics & Kinetics, Spring 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bawendi, Moungi Gabriel, 1961-

    This subject deals primarily with equilibrium properties of macroscopic systems, basic thermodynamics, chemical equilibrium of reactions in gas and solution phase, and rates of chemical reactions.

  6. Adsorption Thermodynamics and Intrinsic Activation Parameters...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Adsorption Thermodynamics and Intrinsic Activation Parameters for Monomolecular Cracking of n-Alkanes on Bronsted Acid Sites in Zeolites Previous Next List Amber Janda, Bess...

  7. Thermodynamics of Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subenoy Chakraborty; Nairwita Mazumder; Ritabrata Biswas

    2010-06-13

    Here we consider our universe as inhomogeneous spherically symmetric Lemaitre-Tolman-Bondi Model and analyze the thermodynamics of this model of the universe. The trapping horizon is calculated and is found to coincide with the apparent horizon. The Einstein field equations are shown to be equivalent with the unified first law of thermodynamics. Finally assuming the first law of thermodynamics validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics is examined at the apparent horizon for the perfect fluid and at the event horizon for holographic dark energy.

  8. Thermodynamic and kinetic characterization of hydroxyethylamine...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    inhibitors in terms of their association and dissociation rate constants and thermodynamics of binding using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Rate constants of association...

  9. Thermodynamic Advantages of Low Temperature Combustion Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advantages of Low Temperature Combustion Engines Including the Use of Low Heat Rejection Concepts Thermodynamic Advantages of Low Temperature Combustion Engines Including the Use...

  10. Particle Production and Universal Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subhajit Saha; Subenoy Chakraborty

    2015-07-06

    In the present work, particle creation mechanism has been employed to the Universe as a thermodynamical system. The Universe is considered to be a spatially flat FRW model and cosmic fluid is chosen as a perfect fluid with a barotropic equation of state -- $p = (\\gamma -1)\\rho$. By proper choice of the particle creation rate, expressions for the entropy and temperature have been determined at various stages of evolution of the Universe. Finally, using the deceleration parameter $q$ as a function of the redshift parameter $z$ based on recent observations, the particle creation rate has been evaluated and its variation at different epochs have been shown graphically.

  11. Thermodynamic data for uranium fluorides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    Self-consistent thermodynamic data have been tabulated for uranium fluorides between UF/sub 4/ and UF/sub 6/, including UF/sub 4/ (solid and gas), U/sub 4/F/sub 17/ (solid), U/sub 2/F/sub 9/ (solid), UF/sub 5/ (solid and gas), U/sub 2/F/sub 10/ (gas), and UF/sub 6/ (solid, liquid, and gas). Included are thermal function - the heat capacity, enthalpy, and free energy function, heats of formation, and vaporization behavior.

  12. Thermodynamics of tubelike flexible polymers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Vogel; Thomas Neuhaus; Michael Bachmann; Wolfhard Janke

    2009-07-17

    In this work we present the general phase behavior of short tubelike flexible polymers. The geometric thickness constraint is implemented through the concept of the global radius of curvature. We use sophisticated Monte Carlo sampling methods to simulate small bead-stick polymer models with Lennard-Jones interaction among non-bonded monomers. We analyze energetic fluctuations and structural quantities to classify conformational pseudophases. We find that the tube thickness influences the thermodynamic behavior of simple tubelike polymers significantly, i.e., for given temperature, the formation of secondary structures strongly depends on the tube thickness.

  13. Thermodynamics of discrete quantum processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janet Anders; Vittorio Giovannetti

    2012-11-01

    We define thermodynamic configurations and identify two primitives of discrete quantum processes between configurations for which heat and work can be defined in a natural way. This allows us to uncover a general second law for any discrete trajectory that consists of a sequence of these primitives, linking both equilibrium and non-equilibrium configurations. Moreover, in the limit of a discrete trajectory that passes through an infinite number of configurations, i.e. in the reversible limit, we recover the saturation of the second law. Finally, we show that for a discrete Carnot cycle operating between four configurations one recovers Carnot's thermal efficiency.

  14. Thermodynamic Properties of Supported Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorte, Raymond J.

    2014-03-26

    The goals of this work were to develop Coulometric Titration as a method for characterizing the thermodynamic redox properties of oxides and to apply this technique to the characterization of ceria- and vanadia-based catalysts. The redox properties of ceria and vanadia are a major part of what makes these materials catalytically active but their properties are also dependent on their structure and the presence of other oxides. Quantifying these properties through the measurement of oxidation energetics was the goal of this work.

  15. Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProtonAboutNuclearPrincipal InvestigatorsResearch

  16. Thermodynamics of reformulated automotive fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zudkevitch, D. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Murthy, A.K.S. [BOC Gases, Murray Hill, NJ (United States); Gmehling, J. [Technische Chemie Univ. Oldenburg (Germany)

    1995-06-01

    Two methods for predicting Reid vapor pressure (Rvp) and initial vapor emissions of reformulated gasoline blends that contain one or more oxygenated compounds show excellent agreement with experimental data. In the first method, method A, D-86 distillation data for gasoline blends are used for predicting Rvp from a simulation of the mini dry vapor pressure equivalent (Dvpe) experiment. The other method, method B, relies on analytical information (PIANO analyses) of the base gasoline and uses classical thermodynamics for simulating the same Rvp equivalent (Rvpe) mini experiment. Method B also predicts composition and other properties for the fuel`s initial vapor emission. Method B, although complex, is more useful in that is can predict properties of blends without a D-86 distillation. An important aspect of method B is its capability to predict composition of initial vapor emissions from gasoline blends. Thus, it offers a powerful tool to planners of gasoline blending. Method B uses theoretically sound formulas, rigorous thermodynamic routines and uses data and correlations of physical properties that are in the public domain. Results indicate that predictions made with both methods agree very well with experimental values of Dvpe. Computer simulation methods were programmed and tested.

  17. Thermodynamic States in Explosion Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L

    2009-10-16

    Here we investigate the thermodynamic states occurring in explosion fields from the detonation of condensed explosives in air. In typical applications, the pressure of expanded detonation products gases is modeled by a Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) function: P{sub JWL} = f(v,s{sub CJ}); constants in that function are fit to cylinder test data. This function provides a specification of pressure as a function of specific volume, v, along the expansion isentrope (s = constant = s{sub CJ}) starting at the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state. However, the JWL function is not a fundamental equation of thermodynamics, and therefore gives an incomplete specification of states. For example, explosions inherently involve shock reflections from surfaces; this changes the entropy of the products, and in such situations the JWL function provides no information on the products states. In addition, most explosives are not oxygen balanced, so if hot detonation products mix with air, they after-burn, releasing the heat of reaction via a turbulent combustion process. This raises the temperature of explosion products cloud to the adiabatic flame temperature ({approx}3,000K). Again, the JWL function provides no information on the combustion products states.

  18. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 428 (1999) 593}607 Radio-controlled xenon #ashers for atmospheric monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 428 (1999) 593}607 Radio-controlled xenon of Physics, High Energy Astrophysics Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA Department of Physics and Mathematical Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia 5005, Australia

  19. AOML is an environmental laboratory of NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research on Virginia Key in Miami, Florida September-October 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Sandy's powerful winds and the regions of heaviest precipitation. These highly-accurate, real-time data winds, torrential rains, and a storm surge that flooded low-lying regions from the Carolinas to Maine of the Caribbean and pelting Florida with tropical storm-force winds and rain. Hurricane Research Division (HRD

  20. THERMODYNAMICS OF SOLID AND LIQUID GROUP III-V ALLOYS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, T.J.

    2011-01-01

    D.A. Stevenson, J. Chern. Thermodynamics, J.V. Smith, D.J.P. Bros, J. Chern. Thermodynamics, z, R. Hultgren, P.D.J.M. Prausnitz, Molecular Thermodynamics of Fluid-Phase

  1. Theory of Thermodynamics of Computation Ming Li \\Lambda Paul Vit'anyi y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vitanyi, Paul M.B.

    thermodynamic cost of computing from x to y. Other than its fundamental importance, such research has@math.waterloo.edu The Netherlands, paulv@cwi.nl Abstract We investigate a new research area: we are inter­ ested in the ultimate implications for future miniaturiza­ tion of VLSI chips reducing the energy dissipation be­ low kT (thermal

  2. Thermodvnamics Thermodynamics of Wax Precipitation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Thermodvnamics Thermodynamics of Wax Precipitation in Petroleum Mixtures C. Lira-Galeana and A, Berkeley, CIA 94720 A thermodynamic pamework is developed for calculating wax precipitation in petroleum that precipitated wax consists of several solid phases; each solid phase is described as a pure component

  3. Loop expansion in Yang-Mills thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ralf Hofmann

    2009-11-05

    We argue that a selfconsistent spatial coarse-graining, which involves interacting (anti)calorons of unit topological charge modulus, implies that real-time loop expansions of thermodynamical quantities in the deconfining phase of SU(2) and SU(3) Yang-Mills thermodynamics are, modulo 1PI resummations, determined by a finite number of connected bubble diagrams.

  4. Thermodynamic optimization of a Penrose process: an engineers' approach to black hole thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bravetti, Alessandro; Lopez-Monsalvo, Cesar S

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present a new view on the thermodynamics of black holes introducing effects of irreversibility by employing thermodynamic optimization and finite-time thermodynamics. These questions are of importance both in physics and in engineering, combining standard thermodynamics with optimal control theory in order to find optimal protocols and bounds for realistic processes without assuming anything about the microphysics involved. We find general bounds on the maximum work and the efficiency of thermodynamic processes involving black holes that can be derived exclusively from the knowledge of thermodynamic relations at equilibrium. Since these new bounds consider the finite duration of the processes, they are more realistic and stringent than their reversible counterparts. To illustrate our arguments, we consider in detail the thermodynamic optimization of a Penrose process, i.e. the problem of finding the least dissipative process extracting all the angular momentum from a Kerr black hole in finite ...

  5. Thermodynamics of an accelerated expanding universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bin Wang; Yungui Gong; Elcio Abdalla

    2005-11-10

    We investigate the laws of thermodynamics in an accelerating universe driven by dark energy with a time-dependent equation of state. In the case we consider that the physically relevant part of the Universe is that envelopped by the dynamical apparent horizon, we have shown that both the first law and second law of thermodynamics are satisfied. On the other hand, if the boundary of the Universe is considered to be the cosmological event horizon the thermodynamical description based on the definitions of boundary entropy and temperature breaks down. No parameter redefinition can rescue the thermodynamics laws from such a fate, rendering the cosmological event horizon unphysical from the point of view of the laws of thermodynamics.

  6. A Three-Dimensional Ocean-Seaice-Carbon Cycle Model and its Coupling to a Two-Dimensional Atmospheric Model: Uses in Climate Change Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutkiewicz, Stephanie.

    We describe the coupling of a three-dimensional ocean circulation model, with explicit thermodynamic seaice and ocean carbon cycle representations, to a two-dimensional atmospheric/land model. This coupled system has been ...

  7. Thermodynamics of Iodide Adsorption at the Instantaneous Air...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thermodynamics of Iodide Adsorption at the Instantaneous Air-Water Interface. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermodynamics of Iodide Adsorption at the Instantaneous...

  8. The Thermodynamics of Gaseous, Cuprous Chloride Monomer and Trimer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewer, Leo

    2010-01-01

    No.W-7405-eng~48B TIiE THERMODYNAMICS OF GASEOUS" CUPROUSCu(s) + HCl::= I Thermodynamics of Vaporization to Monomeric

  9. Improved Engine Design Concepts Using the Second Law of Thermodynamics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Design Concepts Using the Second Law of Thermodynamics Improved Engine Design Concepts Using the Second Law of Thermodynamics Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

  10. Thermodynamics Student Guide (6 Activities) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Student Guide (6 Activities) Thermodynamics Student Guide (6 Activities) Information about Thermodynamics, six student activities on energy basics for grades 5-8 and 9-12....

  11. Thermodynamic Guidelines for the Prediction of Hydrogen Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermodynamic Guidelines for the Prediction of Hydrogen Storage Reactions and Their Application to Destabillzed Hydride Mixtures Thermodynamic Guidelines for the Prediction of...

  12. Thermodynamic Investigations of Lithium- and Manganese-Rich Transition...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Thermodynamic Investigations of Lithium- and Manganese-Rich Transition Metal Oxides Thermodynamic Investigations of Lithium- and Manganese-Rich Transition Metal Oxides 2013 DOE...

  13. Thermodynamic properties of uranium dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, J.K.; Chasanov, M.G.; Leibowitz, L.

    1981-04-01

    In order to provide reliable and consistent data on the thermophysical properties of reactor materials for reactor safety studies, this revision is prepared for the thermodynamic properties of the uranium dioxide portion of the fuel property section of the report Properties for LMFBR Safety Analysis. Since the original report was issued in 1976, there has been international agreement on a vapor pressure equation for the total pressure over UO/sub 2/, new methods have been suggested for the calculation of enthalpy and heat capacity, and a phase change at 2670 K has been proposed. In this report, an electronic term is used in place of the Frenkel defect term in the enthalpy and heat capacity equation and the phase transition is accepted.

  14. Thermodynamics of quantum feedback cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liuzzo-Scorpo, Pietro; Schmidt, Rebecca; Adesso, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    The ability to initialize quantum registers in pure states lies at the core of many applications of quantum technologies, from sensing to quantum information processing and computation. In this paper we tackle the problem of increasing the polarization bias of an ensemble of two-level register spins by means of joint coherent manipulations, involving a second ensemble of ancillary spins, and energy dissipation into an external heat bath. We formulate this spin refrigeration protocol, akin to algorithmic cooling, in the general language of quantum feedback control, and identify the relevant thermodynamic variables involved. Our analysis is twofold: On the one hand, we assess the optimality of the protocol by means of suitable figures of merit, accounting for both its work cost and effectiveness. On the other hand, we characterise the nature of correlations built up between the register and the ancilla. In particular, we observe that neither the amount of classical correlations nor the quantum entanglement seem...

  15. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility and Atmospheric

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications TraditionalWithAntiferromagneticInexpensive 2-Nek5000 |

  16. Thermodynamics, Optical Properties and Coordination Modes of Np(V) with Dipicolinic Acid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Guoxin

    2010-01-01

    Thermodynamics, Optical Properties and Coordination Modes ofacid, complexation, thermodynamics, coordination mode 1.

  17. Thermodynamics for Single-Molecule Stretching Experiments J. M. Rubi,*, D. Bedeaux, and S. Kjelstrup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kjelstrup, Signe

    Thermodynamics for Single-Molecule Stretching Experiments J. M. Rubi,*, D. Bedeaux, and S to construct nonequilibrium thermodynamics for systems too small to be considered thermodynamically be viewed as a large thermodynamic system, we discuss the validity of nonequilibrium thermodynamics

  18. Thermodynamic universality of quantum Carnot engines

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gardas, Bart?omiej; Deffner, Sebastian

    2015-10-12

    The Carnot statement of the second law of thermodynamics poses an upper limit on the efficiency of all heat engines. Recently, it has been studied whether generic quantum features such as coherence and quantum entanglement could allow for quantum devices with efficiencies larger than the Carnot efficiency. The present study shows that this is not permitted by the laws of thermodynamic —independent of the model. We will show that rather the definition of heat has to be modified to account for the thermodynamic cost of maintaining non-Gibbsian equilibrium states. As a result, our theoretical findings are illustrated for two experimentallymore »relevant examples.« less

  19. Hessian structures, Euler vector fields, and thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Á. García-Ariza

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, it is shown that the underlying geometric structure of thermodynamics is formed by two elements. The first one is a degenerate Hessian structure distinguished by the fact that its potentials are extensive functions. A suitable coordinate-free definition of the latter is presented, relying on a particular vector field which is proposed to be the second ingredient of the geometric structure of thermodynamics. This vector has the form of an Euler vector in certain coordinate charts that somehow generalize those formed by internal energy or entropy and deformation coordinates in the spaces of equilibrium states of thermodynamic systems. Intensive functions and Legendre transforms are reviewed under this approach.

  20. Phase Transitions of Aqueous Atmospheric Particles Scot T. Martin*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Transformations of Polar Stratospheric Cloud Particles," in 1995-1996 at MIT in Atmospheric Chemistry. He was an Assistant Professor in Aquatic and Atmospheric Chemistry in the Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineers in the Atmospheric Chemistry Program). His laboratory research group is currently active in two

  1. Photo: RSMAS The Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , marine geophysics, ocean acoustics, and marine and atmospheric chemistry. The school is also known as onePhoto: RSMAS The Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science (RSMAS) was founded in 1943 in Biscayne Bay near Miami. It is the only subtropical applied and basic marine and atmospheric research

  2. Atmospheric Transport of Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, T.V.

    2003-03-03

    The purpose of atmospheric transport and diffusion calculations is to provide estimates of concentration and surface deposition from routine and accidental releases of pollutants to the atmosphere. This paper discusses this topic.

  3. EMEC 320: THERMODYNAMICS I Updated: June 27, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    EMEC 320: THERMODYNAMICS I Updated: June 27, 2012 CATALOG DATA: Spring, 3 cr. Basic thermodynamic., Fundamentals of Thermodynamics, 7th ed., Wiley, ISBN 0-470-04192-7 INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Sarah Codd, 201 Roberts Hall of thermodynamics to engineering problems involving closed and open systems. · effectively apply and understand

  4. Thermodynamics of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Thermodynamics of the Corn-Ethanol Biofuel Cycle Tad W. Patzek Department of Civil Sustainability & Renewability 28 1 Introduction 28 2 Disclaimer 28 #12;ii Thermodynamics of corn-ethanol biofuel. . . Web Version 3 Preliminaries 29 4 Laws of Thermodynamics 29 5 Thermodynamics and Economics 31 6

  5. Thermodynamic assessment and experimental verification of reactive...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    thermodynamic analysis of etch chemistries for Co, Fe, and Ni using a combination of hydrogen, oxygen, and halogen gases suggested that a single etchant does not work at 300 K;...

  6. Linear Thermodynamics of Rodlike DNA Filtration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zirui

    Linear thermodynamics transportation theory is employed to study filtration of rodlike DNA molecules. Using the repeated nanoarray consisting of alternate deep and shallow regions, it is demonstrated that the complex ...

  7. QCD Thermodynamics on the Lattice: Recent Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carleton DeTar

    2010-12-31

    I give a brief introduction to the goals, challenges, and technical difficulties of lattice QCD thermodynamics and present some recent results from the HotQCD collaboration for the crossover temperature, equation of state, and other observables.

  8. Thermodynamics in NJL-like models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Friesen; Yu. L. Kalinovsky; V. D. Toneev

    2011-03-11

    Thermodynamic behavior of conventional Nambu-Jona-Lasinio and Polyakov-loop-extended Nambu-Jona-Lasinio models is compared. A particular attention is paid to the phase diagram in the ($T -\\mu$) plane.

  9. VARIOUS APPROACHES TO THERMODYNAMICS Peter Salamon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salamon, Peter

    -619-594-6746, salamon@sdsu.edu ABSTRACT The paper surveys classical and recent approaches to thermodynamic analysis as defining the mechanical engineers' topics of interest. Availability (exergy) is one such topic whose

  10. Chapter 8. Spontaneous Processes and Thermodynamic Equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihee, Hyotcherl

    to drive that cycle · Carnot's conclusion: There is no device that can transfer heat from a colder of Thermodynamics · The efficiency: the ratio of work accomplished by the engine in a cycle to the heat invested

  11. Atmospheric chemistry and global change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, MJ

    1999-01-01

    and particles. Thus Atmospheric Chemistry and Global Changethe future of atmospheric chemistry. BROWSINGS Tornadothe complexity of atmospheric chemistry well, but trips a

  12. Classical and thermodynamic stability of black holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo Monteiro

    2010-06-28

    We consider the stability of black holes within both classical general relativity and the semiclassical thermodynamic description. In particular, we study linearised perturbations and their contribution to the gravitational partition function, addressing technical issues for charged (Reissner-Nordstrom) and rotating (Kerr-AdS) black holes. Exploring the connection between classical and thermodynamic stability, we find classical instabilities of Myers-Perry black holes and bifurcations to new black hole families.

  13. Tables of thermodynamic properties of sodium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, J.K.

    1982-06-01

    The thermodynamic properties of saturated sodium, superheated sodium, and subcooled sodium are tabulated as a function of temperature. The temperature ranges are 380 to 2508 K for saturated sodium, 500 to 2500 K for subcooled sodium, and 400 to 1600 K for superheated sodium. Tabulated thermodynamic properties are enthalpy, heat capacity, pressure, entropy, density, instantaneous thermal expansion coefficient, compressibility, and thermal pressure coefficient. Tables are given in SI units and cgs units.

  14. Thermodynamics of (2+1)-flavor QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Schmidt; T. Umeda

    2006-09-21

    We report on the status of our QCD thermodynamics project. It is performed on the QCDOC machine at Brookhaven National Laboratory and the APEnext machine at Bielefeld University. Using a 2+1 flavor formulation of QCD at almost realistic quark masses we calculated several thermodynamical quantities. In this proceeding we show the susceptibilites of the chiral condensate and the Polyakov loop, the static quark potential and the spatial string tension.

  15. THERMODYNAMIC TABLES FOR NUCLEAR WASTE ISOLATION, V.1: AQUEOUSSOLUTIONS DATABASE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, S.L.; Hale, F.V.; Silvester, L.F.

    1988-05-01

    Tables of consistent thermodynamic property values for nuclear waste isolation are given. The tables include critically assessed values for Gibbs energy of formation. enthalpy of formation, entropy and heat capacity for minerals; solids; aqueous ions; ion pairs and complex ions of selected actinide and fission decay products at 25{sup o}C and zero ionic strength. These intrinsic data are used to calculate equilibrium constants and standard potentials which are compared with typical experimental measurements and other work. Recommendations for additional research are given.

  16. MSE 3050, Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Materials, Leonid Zhigilei Instructor: Leonid Zhigilei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    on microstructure. Syllabus: thermodynamic driving forces + kinetics of mass and heat transfer = complex for materials modeling at multiple length & time-scales Investigation of non-equilibrium materials processing-mail: Major: Minor (if any): Are you involved in a research project? If so, what is the topic? Who is your

  17. Short Communication Kinetics and thermodynamics of heavy metal ions sequestration onto novel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Jian Ru

    Short Communication Kinetics and thermodynamics of heavy metal ions sequestration onto novel biomasses had been chosen and utilized by researchers to sequester toxic heavy metal ions from industrial seeds {Cu(II)} (Chowdhury and Saha, 2011) and Mustard oil cake {Ni(II)} (Khan et al., 2012). Adsorbents

  18. Omega Equation The calculation of vertical motion in the atmosphere is one of the most challenging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennon, Christopher C.

    ATMS 310 Omega Equation The calculation of vertical motion in the atmosphere is one of the most that the kinematic method involved integrating the continuity equation in the vertical, yielding (in isobaric method based on the thermodynamic equation: + + = - y T v x T u t T Sp 1 (2

  19. Microwave-induced thermoacoustic effect in dielectrics and its coupling to external medium-A thermodynamical formulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, T.C.; Guo, W.W.; Larsen, L.E.

    1984-08-01

    A thorough formulation of electromagnetic wave interaction with biological systems is presented. The thermodynamic process of the microwave-induced thermoacoustic generation is clearly defined. Couplings of the acoustic and thermal energies to the surrounding medium are included through consideration of discontinuities of thermodynamical variables and microwave exposure. Contrary to prior analyses, it is shown that acoustic waves may be generated by pulsed microwaves, even in the absence of inhomogeneity of microwave absorption, owing to discontinuities of thermodynamical variables and microwave exposure conditions across the interface. General equations for the thermoacoustic waves are derived, and the validity of the first-order linear approximation is estimated in terms of its percentage error. For a system with water as the absorbing dielectric interfacing with air of 1 atmosphere pressure, the first-order approximation becomes invalid for a peak specific absorption rate greater than 13 kW/gm.

  20. Thermodynamic properties of a magnetically modulated graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SK Firoz Islam; Naveen K. Singh; Tarun Kanti Ghosh

    2011-09-12

    The effect of magnetic modulation on thermodynamic properties of a graphene monolayer in presence of a constant perpendicular magnetic field is reported here. One-dimensional spatial electric or magnetic modulation lifts the degeneracy of the Landau levels and converts into bands and their band width oscillates with magnetic field leading to Weiss-type oscillation in the thermodynamic properties. The effect of magnetic modulation on thermodynamic properties of a graphene sheet is studied and then compared with electrically modulated graphene and magnetically modulated conventional two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). We observe Weiss-type and de Haas-van Alphen (dHvA) oscillations at low and high magnetic field, respectively. There is a definite phase difference in Weiss-type oscillations in thermodynamic quantities of magnetically modulated graphene in compare to electrically modulated graphene. On the other hand, the phase remains same and amplitude of the oscillation is large when compared with the magnetically modulated 2DEG. Explicit asymptotic expressions of density of states and the Helmholtz free energy are provided to understand the phase and amplitude of the Weiss-type oscillations qualitatively. We also study thermodynamic properties when both electric and magnetic modulations are present. The Weiss-type oscillations still exist when the modulations are out-of-phase.

  1. THERMODYNAMICS OF ELECTROLYTES. X. ENTHALPY AND THE EFFECT OF TEMPERATURE ON THE ACTIVITY COEFFICIENTS.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvester, Leonard F.

    2011-01-01

    09 THERMODYNAMICS OFELECI'ROLYTES. X'rights. r'-" e. ct THERMODYNAMICS OF ELECTROLYTES. X.Coefficient, Electrolyte, Thermodynamics v ~p , I J ! l

  2. Thermodynamics and the role of allostery in the thrombin- thrombomodulin interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beach, Muneera Aina

    2008-01-01

    64 Chapter IV Using Thermodynamics to Probe the Allosteric81 Table 4.3. Thermodynamics of isotherms atOF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Thermodynamics and the Role of

  3. Thermodynamics of neptunium(V) fluoride and sulfate at elevated temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin; Xia, Yuanxian; Friese, Judah I.

    2006-01-01

    Rao, O. Tochiyama; “Chemical Thermodynamics of Compounds andUpdate on the chemical thermodynamics of uranium, neptunium,Thermodynamics of Neptunium(V) Fluoride and Sulfate at

  4. Correlating structure and thermodynamics of hydrophobicâ??hydrophilic ion pairs in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Ilan

    2015-01-01

    Correlating Structure and Thermodynamics of Hydrophobic-hydration structure and thermodynamics associated with thefunction) with the thermodynamics (potential of mean force

  5. THERMODYNAMICS OF LOW-TEMPERATURE (700-850oC) HOT CORROSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misra, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Ref. 2). J. Lumsden, Thermodynamics of molten salt mixtures,R. Defay, Chemical thermodynamics, Longmans Green and Co. ,Electrochemical Society THERMODYNAMICS OF LOW-TEMPERATURE {

  6. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O DBiomass and BiofuelsPhysicist47 Industrial1

  7. ORISE Climate and Atmospheric Research: Contact Us

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSE The 2014 surveyNuclear andTwo-Phase75ORCIDContact Us

  8. ORISE: Capabilities in Climate and Atmospheric Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSE The 2014 surveyNuclearHowAssetonCapabilities ORISE

  9. Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2005-02-18

    Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

  10. Thermodynamics of sustaining gases in the roughness of submerged superhydrophobic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelesh A. Patankar

    2015-05-22

    Rough surfaces submerged in a liquid can remain almost dry if the liquid does not fully wet the roughness and gases are sustained in roughness grooves. Such partially dry surfaces can help reduce drag or enhance boiling. Gases sustained in roughness grooves would be composed of air and the vapor phase of the liquid itself. The thermodynamics of sustaining vapor was considered in a prior work [Patankar, Soft Matter, 2010, 6:1613]. Here, the thermodynamics of sustaining gases (e.g. air) is considered. Governing equations are presented along with a solution methodology to determine a critical condition to sustain gases. The critical roughness scale to sustain gases is estimated for different degrees of saturation of gases dissolved in the liquid. It is shown that roughness spacings of less than a micron are essential to sustain gases on surfaces submerged in water at atmospheric pressure. This is consistent with prior empirical data.

  11. Quantum Thermodynamic Cycles and quantum heat engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. T. Quan; Yu-xi Liu; C. P. Sun; Franco Nori

    2007-04-03

    In order to describe quantum heat engines, here we systematically study isothermal and isochoric processes for quantum thermodynamic cycles. Based on these results the quantum versions of both the Carnot heat engine and the Otto heat engine are defined without ambiguities. We also study the properties of quantum Carnot and Otto heat engines in comparison with their classical counterparts. Relations and mappings between these two quantum heat engines are also investigated by considering their respective quantum thermodynamic processes. In addition, we discuss the role of Maxwell's demon in quantum thermodynamic cycles. We find that there is no violation of the second law, even in the existence of such a demon, when the demon is included correctly as part of the working substance of the heat engine.

  12. A microscopic perspective on stochastic thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernhard Altaner; Jürgen Vollmer

    2015-05-18

    We consider stochastic thermodynamics as a theory of statistical inference for experimentally observed fluctuating time-series. To that end, we introduce a general framework for quantifying the knowledge about the dynamical state of the system on two scales: a fine-grained or microscopic, deterministic and a coarse-grained or mesoscopic, stochastic level of description. For a generic model dynamics, we show how the mathematical expressions for fluctuating entropy changes used in Markovian stochastic thermodynamics emerge naturally. Our ideas are conceptional approaches towards (i) connecting entropy production and its fluctuation relations in deterministic and stochastic systems and (ii) providing a complementary information-theoretic picture to notions of entropy and entropy production in stochastic thermodynamics.

  13. Black Hole Thermodynamics in Modified Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonas R. Mureika; John W. Moffat; Mir Faizal

    2015-03-03

    We analyze the thermodynamics of a non-rotating and rotating black hole in a modified theory of gravity that includes scalar and vector modifications to general relativity, which results in a modified gravitational constant $G = G_N(1+\\alpha)$ and a new gravitational charge $Q = \\sqrt{\\alpha G_N}M$. The influence of the parameter $\\alpha$ alters the non-rotating black hole's lifetime, temperature and entropy profiles from the standard Schwarzschild case. The thermodynamics of a rotating black hole is analyzed and it is shown to possess stable, cold remnants. The thermodynamic properties of a vacuum solution regular at $r=0$ are investigated and the solution without a horizon called a "gray hole" is not expected to possess an information loss problem.

  14. Thermodynamics of pairing in mesoscopic systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tony Sumaryada; Alexander Volya

    2007-06-12

    Using numerical and analytical methods implemented for different models we conduct a systematic study of thermodynamic properties of pairing correlation in mesoscopic nuclear systems. Various quantities are calculated and analyzed using the exact solution of pairing. An in-depth comparison of canonical, grand canonical, and microcanonical ensemble is conducted. The nature of the pairing phase transition in a small system is of a particular interest. We discuss the onset of discontinuity in the thermodynamic variables, fluctuations, and evolution of zeros of the canonical and grand canonical partition functions in the complex plane. The behavior of the Invariant Correlational Entropy is also studied in the transitional region of interest. The change in the character of the phase transition due to the presence of magnetic field is discussed along with studies of superconducting thermodynamics.

  15. Towards a 'Thermodynamics' of Active Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sho C. Takatori; John F. Brady

    2014-11-21

    Self-propulsion allows living systems to display unusual collective behavior. Unlike passive systems in thermal equilibrium, active matter systems are not constrained by conventional thermodynamic laws. A question arises however as to what extent, if any, can concepts from classical thermodynamics be applied to nonequilibrium systems like active matter. Here we use the new swim pressure perspective to develop a simple theory for predicting phase separation in active matter. Using purely mechanical arguments we generate a phase diagram with a spinodal and critical point, and define a nonequilibrium chemical potential to interpret the "binodal." We provide a generalization of thermodynamic concepts like the free energy and temperature for nonequilibrium active systems. Our theory agrees with existing simulation data both qualitatively and quantitatively and may provide a framework for understanding and predicting the behavior of nonequilibrium active systems.

  16. Mathematical Conception of "Phenomenological" Equilibrium Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. P. Maslov

    2012-06-29

    In the paper, the principal aspects of the mathematical theory of equilibrium thermodynamics are distinguished. It is proved that the points of degeneration of a Bose gas of fractal dimension in the momentum space coincide with critical points or real gases, whereas the jumps of critical indices and the Maxwell rule are related to the tunnel generalization of thermodynamics. Semiclassical methods are considered for the tunnel generalization of thermodynamics and also for the second and ultrasecond quantization (operators of creation and annihilation of pairs). To every pure gas there corresponds a new critical point of the limit negative pressure below which the liquid passes to a dispersed state (a foam). Relations for critical points of a homogeneous mixture of pure gases are given in dependence on the concentration of gases.

  17. Mathematical Conception of "Phenomenological" Equilibrium Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maslov, V P

    2011-01-01

    In the paper, the principal aspects of the mathematical theory of equilibrium thermodynamics are distinguished. It is proved that the points of degeneration of a Bose gas of fractal dimension in the momentum space coincide with critical points or real gases, whereas the jumps of critical indices and the Maxwell rule are related to the tunnel generalization of thermodynamics. Semiclassical methods are considered for the tunnel generalization of thermodynamics and also for the second and ultrasecond quantization (operators of creation and annihilation of pairs). To every pure gas there corresponds a new critical point of the limit negative pressure below which the liquid passes to a dispersed state (a foam). Relations for critical points of a homogeneous mixture of pure gases are given in dependence on the concentration of gases.

  18. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems – FY 2010 Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Peter R. Zalupski

    2010-09-01

    This report presents a summary of the work performed in the area of thermodynamics and kinetics of advanced separations systems under the Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCR&D) program during FY 2010. Thermodynamic investigations into metal extraction dependencies on lactate and HDEHP have been performed. These metal distribution studies indicate a substantial deviation from the expected behavior at conditions that are typical of TALSPEAK process operational platform. These studies also identify that no thermodynamically stable mixed complexes exist in the aqueous solutions and increasing the complexity of the organic medium appears to influence the observed deviations. Following on from this, the first calorimetric measurement of the heat of extraction of americium across a liquid-liquid boundary was performed.

  19. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 WinnersAffiliates ResearchToIrrigation'sRetrieving Thermodynamic Profiles in

  20. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 WinnersAffiliates ResearchToIrrigation'sRetrieving Thermodynamic Profiles

  1. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 WinnersAffiliates ResearchToIrrigation'sRetrieving Thermodynamic

  2. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 WinnersAffiliates ResearchToIrrigation'sRetrieving ThermodynamicTurbulent

  3. MM5 Aids Forecasters Over the past five years a group in the Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    Jaeglé's specialty is atmospheric chemistry. Her research deals with analysis and modelingMM5 Aids Forecasters Over the past five years a group in the Atmospheric Sciences department has around the region. (see Page 8) New Faculty Join Atmospheric Sciences In the past year, Atmospheric

  4. Unified phonon-based approach to the thermodynamics of solid, liquid and gas states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dima Bolmatov; Dmitry Zavyalov; Mikhail Zhernenkov; Edvard T. Musaev; Yong Q. Cai

    2015-12-22

    We introduce a unified approach to states of matter (solid, liquid and gas) and describe the thermodynamics of the pressure-temperature phase diagram in terms of phonon excitations. We derive the effective Hamiltonian with low-energy cutoff in two transverse phonon polarizations (phononic band gaps) by breaking the symmetry in phonon interactions. Further, we construct the statistical mechanics of states of aggregation employing the Debye approximation. The introduced formalism covers the Debye theory of solids, the phonon theory of liquids, and thermodynamic limits such as the Dulong-Petit thermodynamic limit, the ideal gas limit and the new thermodynamic limit, dubbed here the Frenkel line thermodynamic limit. We discuss the phonon propagation and localization effects in liquids above and below the Frenkel line, and explain the "fast sound" phenomenon. As a test for our theory we calculate velocity-velocity autocorrelation and pair distribution functions within the Green-Kubo formalism. We show the consistency between dynamics of phonons and pair correlations in the framework of the unified approach. New directions towards advancements in phononic band gaps engineering, hypersound manipulation technologies and exploration of exotic behaviour of fluids relevant to geo- and planetary sciences are discussed. The presented results are equally important both for practical implications and for fundamental research.

  5. Measurement of thermodynamics using gradient flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masakiyo Kitazawa; Masayuki Asakawa; Tetsuo Hatsuda; Takumi Iritani; Etsuko Itou; Hiroshi Suzuki

    2014-12-15

    We analyze bulk thermodynamics and correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor in pure Yang-Mills gauge theory using the energy-momentum tensor defined by the gradient flow and small flow time expansion. Our results on thermodynamic observables are consistent with those obtained by the conventional integral method. The analysis of the correlation function of total energy supports the energy conservation. It is also addressed that these analyses with gradient flow require less statistics compared with the previous methods. All these results suggest that the energy-momentum tensor can be successfully defined and observed on the lattice with moderate numerical costs with the gradient flow.

  6. Black Hole Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven Carlip

    2008-07-28

    We have known for more than thirty years that black holes behave as thermodynamic systems, radiating as black bodies with characteristic temperatures and entropies. This behavior is not only interesting in its own right; it could also, through a statistical mechanical description, cast light on some of the deep problems of quantizing gravity. In these lectures, I review what we currently know about black hole thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, suggest a rather speculative "universal" characterization of the underlying states, and describe some key open questions.

  7. Large Transverse Momenta and Tsallis Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleymans, J

    2015-01-01

    The charged particle transverse momentum ($p_T$) spectra measured by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations in proton - proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 0.9 and 7 TeV have been studied using Tsallis thermodynamics. A thermodynamically consistent form of the Tsallis distribution is used for fitting the transverse momentum spectra at mid-rapidity. It is found that the fits based on the proposed distribution provide an excellent description over 14 orders of magnitude with $p_T$ values up to 200 GeV/c.

  8. Large Transverse Momenta and Tsallis Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Cleymans; M. D. Azmi

    2015-08-13

    The charged particle transverse momentum ($p_T$) spectra measured by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations in proton - proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 0.9 and 7 TeV have been studied using Tsallis thermodynamics. A thermodynamically consistent form of the Tsallis distribution is used for fitting the transverse momentum spectra at mid-rapidity. It is found that the fits based on the proposed distribution provide an excellent description over 14 orders of magnitude with $p_T$ values up to 200 GeV/c.

  9. Hard-thermal-loop QED thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nan Su; Jens O. Andersen; Michael Strickland

    2009-11-24

    The weak-coupling expansion for thermodynamic quantities in thermal field theories is poorly convergent unless the coupling constant is tiny. We discuss the calculation of the free energy for a hot gas of electrons and photons to three-loop order using hard-thermal-loop perturbation theory (HTLpt). We show that the hard-thermal-loop perturbation reorganization improves the convergence of the successive approximations to the QED free energy at large coupling, e ~ 2. The reorganization is gauge invariant by construction, and due to the cancellations among various contributions, we obtain a completely analytic result for the resummed thermodynamic potential at three loops.

  10. Thermodynamics of Dyonic Lifshitz Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobias Zingg

    2011-07-15

    Black holes with asymptotic anisotropic scaling are conjectured to be gravity duals of condensed matter system close to quantum critical points with non-trivial dynamical exponent z at finite temperature. A holographic renormalization procedure is presented that allows thermodynamic potentials to be defined for objects with both electric and magnetic charge in such a way that standard thermodynamic relations hold. Black holes in asymptotic Lifshitz spacetimes can exhibit paramagnetic behavior at low temperature limit for certain values of the critical exponent z, whereas the behavior of AdS black holes is always diamagnetic.

  11. Thermodynamic entropy is the Noether invariant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasa, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    We study a classical many-particle system with an external control represented by a time dependent parameter in a Lagrangian. We show that thermodynamic entropy of the system is the Noether invariant associated with a symmetry for an infinitesimal non-uniform time translation $t\\to t+\\eta\\hbar \\beta$, where $\\eta$ is a small parameter, $\\hbar$ is the Planck constant, $\\beta$ is the inverse temperature that depends on the energy, and trajectories in the phase space are restricted to those consistent with quasi-static processes in thermodynamics.

  12. Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Oceanography and Atmospheric Sciences 1959­2009 WayneBurt. #12;Oceanography and Atmospheric in Oceanography (TENOC). Wayne Burt immediately responds with proposal to President Strand of Oregon State College to start a graduate Department of Oceanography. 1959 Oregon State Board of Higher Education approves

  13. Thermodynamics of Hydrogen Production from Dimethyl Ether Steam Reforming and Hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.A. Semelsberger

    2004-10-01

    The thermodynamic analyses of producing a hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feed from the process of dimethyl ether (DME) steam reforming were investigated as a function of steam-to-carbon ratio (0-4), temperature (100 C-600 C), pressure (1-5 atm), and product species: acetylene, ethanol, methanol, ethylene, methyl-ethyl ether, formaldehyde, formic acid, acetone, n-propanol, ethane and isopropyl alcohol. Results of the thermodynamic processing of dimethyl ether with steam indicate the complete conversion of dimethyl ether to hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide for temperatures greater than 200 C and steam-to-carbon ratios greater than 1.25 at atmospheric pressure (P = 1 atm). Increasing the operating pressure was observed to shift the equilibrium toward the reactants; increasing the pressure from 1 atm to 5 atm decreased the conversion of dimethyl ether from 99.5% to 76.2%. The order of thermodynamically stable products in decreasing mole fraction was methane, ethane, isopropyl alcohol, acetone, n-propanol, ethylene, ethanol, methyl-ethyl ether and methanol--formaldehyde, formic acid, and acetylene were not observed. The optimal processing conditions for dimethyl ether steam reforming occurred at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 1.5, a pressure of 1 atm, and a temperature of 200 C. Modeling the thermodynamics of dimethyl ether hydrolysis (with methanol as the only product considered), the equilibrium conversion of dimethyl ether is limited. The equilibrium conversion was observed to increase with temperature and steam-to-carbon ratio, resulting in a maximum dimethyl ether conversion of approximately 68% at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 4.5 and a processing temperature of 600 C. Thermodynamically, dimethyl ether processed with steam can produce hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feeds--with hydrogen concentrations exceeding 70%. This substantiates dimethyl ether as a viable source of hydrogen for PEM fuel cells.

  14. 12.480 Thermodynamics for Geoscientists, Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grove, Timothy L.

    Principles of thermodynamics are used to infer the physical conditions of formation and modification of igneous and metamorphic rocks. Includes phase equilibria of homogeneous and heterogeneous systems and thermodynamic ...

  15. Fifteenth combustion research conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-06-01

    The BES research efforts cover chemical reaction theory, experimental dynamics and spectroscopy, thermodynamics of combustion intermediates, chemical kinetics, reaction mechanisms, combustion diagnostics, and fluid dynamics and chemically reacting flows. 98 papers and abstracts are included. Separate abstracts were prepared for the papers.

  16. Thermodynamic stability of actinide pyrochlore minerals in deep...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SCIENCE; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; PLUTONIUM; PYROCHLORE; STABILITY; THERMODYNAMICS; WASTE FORMS; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; BACKFILLING; RADIOACTIVE WASTE...

  17. Compound hybrid geothermal-fossil power plants: thermodynamic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SUPERHEATING; THERMODYNAMICS; WELL TEMPERATURE; WELLHEADS; WESTERN REGION; HEATING; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; NORTH AMERICA; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POWER PLANTS; RESERVOIR TEMPERATURE;...

  18. Thermodynamic Origin of the Null Energy Condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maulik Parikh; Andrew Svesko

    2015-11-20

    We derive the classical null energy condition, understood as a constraint on the Ricci tensor, from the second law of thermodynamics applied to Bekenstein-Hawking entropy. The derivation provides evidence that the null energy condition, which has usually been regarded as a condition on matter, is fundamentally a property of gravity.

  19. Thermodynamic Origin of the Null Energy Condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parikh, Maulik

    2015-01-01

    We derive the classical null energy condition, understood as a constraint on the Ricci tensor, from the second law of thermodynamics applied to Bekenstein-Hawking entropy. The derivation provides evidence that the null energy condition, which has usually been regarded as a condition on matter, is fundamentally a property of gravity.

  20. A thermodynamic switch for chromosome colocalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Nicodemi; B. Panning; A. Prisco

    2008-09-27

    A general model for the early recognition and colocalization of homologous DNA sequences is proposed. We show, on a thermodynamic ground, how the distance between two homologous DNA sequences is spontaneously regulated by the concentration and affinity of diffusible mediators binding them, which act as a switch between two phases corresponding to independence or colocalization of pairing regions.

  1. Thermodynamics Teacher and Student Guides (6 Activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    This is a hands-on laboratory unit exploring the concepts of heat and movement. Teachers set up six laboratory stations that will introduce students to the basic concepts of thermodynamics, including atomic structure, atomic and molecular motion, states of matter, heat transfer, thermal expansion, specific heat, and heats of fusion and vaporization. It also includes a unit exam and teacher demonstrations.

  2. Cyclic thermodynamic processes and entropy production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liouvillean. We then show that the entropy production per cycle is (strictly) positive, a property that implies Carnot's formulation of the second law of thermodynamics. 1 Introduction During the past several, we make a contribution to this program by studying Carnot's for­ mulation of the second law

  3. QCD thermodynamics with dynamical overlap fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Borsanyi; Y. Delgado; S. Durr; Z. Fodor; S. D. Katz; S. Krieg; T. Lippert; D. Nogradi; K. K. Szabo

    2012-08-02

    We study QCD thermodynamics using two flavors of dynamical overlap fermions with quark masses corresponding to a pion mass of 350 MeV. We determine several observables on N_t=6 and 8 lattices. All our runs are performed with fixed global topology. Our results are compared with staggered ones and a nice agreement is found.

  4. Perturbative String Thermodynamics near Black Hole Horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas G. Mertens; Henri Verschelde; Valentin I. Zakharov

    2015-07-01

    We provide further computations and ideas to the problem of near-Hagedorn string thermodynamics near (uncharged) black hole horizons, building upon our earlier work JHEP 1403 (2014) 086. The relevance of long strings to one-loop black hole thermodynamics is emphasized. We then provide an argument in favor of the absence of $\\alpha'$-corrections for the (quadratic) heterotic thermal scalar action in Rindler space. We also compute the large $k$ limit of the cigar orbifold partition functions (for both bosonic and type II superstrings) which allows a better comparison between the flat cones and the cigar cones. A discussion is made on the general McClain-Roth-O'Brien-Tan theorem and on the fact that different torus embeddings lead to different aspects of string thermodynamics. The black hole/string correspondence principle for the 2d black hole is discussed in terms of the thermal scalar. Finally, we present an argument to deal with arbitrary higher genus partition functions, suggesting the breakdown of string perturbation theory (in $g_s$) to compute thermodynamical quantities in black hole spacetimes.

  5. Thermodynamics of nuclei in thermal contact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl-Heinz Schmidt; Beatriz Jurado

    2010-10-05

    The behaviour of a di-nuclear system in the regime of strong pairing correlations is studied with the methods of statistical mechanics. It is shown that the thermal averaging is strong enough to assure the application of thermodynamical methods to the energy exchange between the two nuclei in contact. In particular, thermal averaging justifies the definition of a nuclear temperature.

  6. Thermodynamic modelling of solid solutions JIBAMITRA GANGULY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganguly, Jibamitra

    with the phase equilibrium constraints. The latter are calculated from the internally consistent thermochemical will summarise the general concepts of thermodynamic solution theory and a number of macroscopic models that have were originally developed for polymer and liquid solutions, but are also applicable to oxide and solid

  7. Thermodynamics of the N=2* flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchel, A S; Buchel, Alex; Liu, James T.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the thermodynamics of the N=2*, SU(N) gauge theory at large 't Hooft coupling. The tool we use is the non-extremal deformation of the supergravity solution of Pilch and Warner (PW) [hep-th/0004063], dual to N=4, SU(N) gauge theory softly broken to N=2. We construct the exact non-extremal solution in five-dimensional gauged supergravity and further uplift it to ten dimensions. Turning to the thermodynamics, we analytically compute the leading correction in m/T to the free energy of the non-extremal D3 branes due to the PW mass deformation, and find that it is positive. We also demonstrate that the mass deformation of the non-extremal D3 brane geometry induces a temperature dependent gaugino condensate. We find that the standard procedure of extracting the N=2* gauge theory thermodynamic quantities from the dual supergravity leads to a violation of the first law of thermodynamics. We speculate on a possible resolution of this paradox.

  8. Thermodynamics of Energy Production from Biomass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Thermodynamics of Energy Production from Biomass Tad W. Patzek 1 and David Pimentel 2 1 Department #12;3 Biomass from Tropical Tree Plantations 14 3.1 Scope of the Problem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 3.2 Environmental Impacts of Industrial Biomass Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 3

  9. Entanglement theory and the second law of thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss, Daniel

    ARTICLES Entanglement theory and the second law of thermodynamics FERNANDO G. S. L. BRAND~AO1 aim to draw from them formal analogies to the second law of thermodynamics; however, whereas relationship with thermodynamics may be established when considering all non-entangling transformations

  10. Thermodynamics of Statistical Inference by Cells Alex H. Lang,1,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, Pankaj

    Thermodynamics of Statistical Inference by Cells Alex H. Lang,1,* Charles K. Fisher,1 Thierry Mora June 2014; published 3 October 2014) The deep connection between thermodynamics, computation that thermodynamics also places fundamental constraints on statistical estimation and learning. To do so, we

  11. ChE 210A M. F. Doherty Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bigelow, Stephen

    ChE 210A M. F. Doherty Thermodynamics Instructor: Michael F. Doherty (mfd@engineering.ucsb.edu, 893 is an introduction to the fundamentals of classical and statistical thermodynamics. We focus on equilibrium are formulated using either classical or statistical thermodynamics, and these methods have found wide

  12. Thermodynamics and Structure of Peptide-Aggregates at Membrane Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Thermodynamics and Structure of Peptide- Aggregates at Membrane Surfaces INAUGURALDISSERTATION zur. Introduction 01 1.1 ­ Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation 01 1.2 ­ Formation of Protein Aggregates 03 1 and P-glycoprotein: Connecting Thermodynamics and Membrane Structure with Functional Activity 23 3

  13. On thermodynamics of crystal plasticity V.L. Berdichevsky

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    On thermodynamics of crystal plasticity V.L. Berdichevsky Mechanical Engineering, Wayne State; Plasticity theory; Dislocation theory 1. Introduction Thermodynamics is a theory of the slow variables of very complex systems. The goals of thermodynamics of crystal plasticity are to identify the slow

  14. Thermodynamics of resonances and blurred particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. N. Voskresensky

    2008-04-10

    Exact and approximate expressions for thermodynamic characteristics of heated matter, which consists of particles with finite mass-widths, are constructed. They are expressed in terms of Fermi/Bose distributions and spectral functions, rather than in terms of more complicated combinations between real and imaginary parts of the self-energies of different particle species. Therefore thermodynamically consistent approximate treatment of systems of particles with finite mass-widths can be performed, provided spectral functions of particle species are known. Approximation of the free resonance gas at low densities is studied. Simple ansatz for the energy dependence of the spectral function is suggested that allows to fulfill thermodynamical consistency conditions. On examples it is shown that a simple description of dense systems of interacting particle species can be constructed, provided some species can be treated in the quasiparticle approximation and others as particles with widths. The interaction affects quasiparticle contributions, whereas particles with widths can be treated as free. Example is considered of a hot gas of heavy fermions strongly interacting with light bosons, both species with zero chemical potentials. The density of blurred fermions is dramatically increased for high temperatures compared to the standard Boltzmann value. The system consists of boson quasiparticles (with effective masses) interacting with fermion -- antifermion blurs. In thermodynamical values interaction terms partially compensate each other. Thereby, in case of a very strong coupling between species thermodynamical quantities of the system, like the energy, pressure and entropy, prove to be such as for the quasi-ideal gas mixture of quasi-free fermion blurs and quasi-free bosons.

  15. Research Profiles AT MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feeny, Brian

    and applied research in mechanical engineering: fluid mechanics, combustion, heat Introduction From The Chair Alejandro Diaz transfer, thermodynamics, biomedical en- gineering, internal combustion engines FOSS Biomechanics of Sports Injuries 28 ROGER HAUT Advanced CFD Modeling 30 FARHAD JABERI Experimental

  16. Ensemble Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Addis, R.P.

    2002-06-24

    Prognostic atmospheric dispersion models are used to generate consequence assessments, which assist decision-makers in the event of a release from a nuclear facility. Differences in the forecast wind fields generated by various meteorological agencies, differences in the transport and diffusion models, as well as differences in the way these models treat the release source term, result in differences in the resulting plumes. Even dispersion models using the same wind fields may produce substantially different plumes. This talk will address how ensemble techniques may be used to enable atmospheric modelers to provide decision-makers with a more realistic understanding of how both the atmosphere and the models behave.

  17. GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;#12;GREAT LAKES ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LABORATORY YEARLY REPORT FY 1992 Director Alfred M and Atmospheric Research Environmental Research Laboratories Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory 2205 adjacent to GLERL Muskegon Vessel Operations Facility. Photo courtesy of Mark Ford. ii #12;Contents

  18. Toxicity of atmospheric aerosols on marine phytoplankton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    address: Center for Atmospheric Chemistry Study, Departmenttween phytoplankton, atmospheric chemistry, and climate areno. 12 ? 4601– 4605 CHEMISTRY Atmospheric aerosol deposition

  19. ATS 620: Thermodynamics and Cloud Physics Dr. Sonia Kreidenweis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van den Heever, Susan C.

    structure; microphysical properties and processes. h. Atmospheric Electricity: Principles of atmospheric electricity; fair weather electric field, effects of atmospheric pollution; charge generation mechanisms

  20. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hulstrom, Roland L. (Bloomfield, CO); Cannon, Theodore W. (Golden, CO)

    1988-01-01

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions.

  1. Atmospheric optical calibration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hulstrom, R.L.; Cannon, T.W.

    1988-10-25

    An atmospheric optical calibration system is provided to compare actual atmospheric optical conditions to standard atmospheric optical conditions on the basis of aerosol optical depth, relative air mass, and diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio. An indicator can show the extent to which the actual conditions vary from standard conditions. Aerosol scattering and absorption properties, diffuse horizontal skylight to global horizontal photon flux ratio, and precipitable water vapor determined on a real-time basis for optical and pressure measurements are also used to generate a computer spectral model and for correcting actual performance response of a photovoltaic device to standard atmospheric optical condition response on a real-time basis as the device is being tested in actual outdoor conditions. 7 figs.

  2. Autumn 2014 Atmospheric Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    to perform atmospheric chemistry measurements in this remote region of ubiquitous oil and gas drilling 30 days they raised $12,000, enough to support Maria's travel to Utah and to cover the costs

  3. Atmospheric Chemistry, Modeling, and Biogeochemistry of Mercury

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    activities that release mercury to the atmosphere include coal burning, industrial processes, waste incine and climate projections; critically and quantitatively analyze environmental management and policy proposals mercury research. Global Budget of Mercury Prior to the onset of human industrial activities, the amount

  4. The Influence of Chemi-ionization and Recombination Processes on Spectral Line Shapes in Stellar Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mihajlov, Anatolij A; Sreckovic, Vladimir A; Dimitrijevic, Milan S

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the chemi-ionization processes in atom- Rydberg atom collisions, as well as the corresponding chemi-recombination processes are considered as factors of influence on the atom exited-state populations in weakly ionized layers of stellar atmospheres. The presented results are related to the photospheres of the Sun and some M red dwarfs as well as weakly ionized layers of DB white dwarfs atmospheres. It has been found that the mentioned chemi ionization/recombination processes dominate over the relevant concurrent electron-atom and electron-ion ionization and recombination process in all parts of considered stellar atmospheres. The obtained results demonstrate the fact that the considered chemi ionization/recombination processes must have a very significant influence on the optical properties of the stellar atmospheres. Thus, it is shown that these processes and their importance for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (non-LTE) modeling of the solar atmospheres should be investigated further.

  5. Statistical thermodynamics of supercapacitors and blue engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    René van Roij

    2012-11-06

    We study the thermodynamics of electrode-electrolyte systems, for instance supercapacitors filled with an ionic liquid or blue-energy devices filled with river- or sea water. By a suitable mapping of thermodynamic variables, we identify a strong analogy with classical heat engines. We introduce several Legendre transformations and Maxwell relations. We argue that one should distinguish between the differential capacity at constant ion number and at constant ion chemical potential, and derive a relation between them that resembles the standard relation between heat capacity at constant volume and constant pressure. Finally, we consider the probability distribution of the electrode charge at a given electrode potential, the standard deviation of which is given by the differential capacity.

  6. Thermodynamic behavior and stability of Polytropic gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Moradpour; A. Abri; H. Ebadi

    2015-07-10

    We focus on the thermodynamic behavior of Polytropic gas as a candidate for dark energy. We use the general arguments of thermodynamics to investigate its properties and behavior. We find that a Polytropic gas may exhibit the dark energy like behavior in the large volume and low temperature limits. It also may be used to simulate a fluid with zero pressure at the small volume and high temperature limits. Briefly, our study shows that this gas may be used to describe the universe expansion history from the matter dominated era to the current accelerating era. By applying some initial condition to the system, we can establish a relation between the Polytropic gas parameters and initial conditions. Relationships with related works has also been addressed.

  7. A dissipation bound for thermodynamic control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machta, Benjamin B

    2015-01-01

    Biological and engineered systems operate by coupling function to the transfer of heat and/or particles down a thermal or chemical gradient. In idealized \\textit{deterministically} driven systems, thermodynamic control can be exerted reversibly, with no entropy production, as long as the rate of the protocol is made slow compared to the equilibration time of the system. Here we consider \\textit{fully realizable, entropically driven} systems where the control parameters themselves obey rules that are reversible and that acquire directionality in time solely through dissipation. We show that when such a system moves in a directed way through thermodynamic space, it must produce entropy that is on average larger than its generalized displacement as measured by the Fisher information metric. This distance measure is sub-extensive but cannot be made small by slowing the rate of the protocol.

  8. Thermodynamics in the Viscous Early Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tawfik, A

    2010-01-01

    Assuming that the matter filling the background geometry in the Early Universe was a free gas and no phase transitions took place, we discuss the thermodynamics of this closed system using classical approaches. We found that essential cosmological quantities, such as the Hubble parameter $H$, the scaling factor $a$ and the curvature parameter $k$, can be derived from this simple model. The results are compatible with the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker model and Einstein field equations. Including finite bulk viscosity coefficient leads to important changes in the cosmological quantities. Accordingly, our picture about evolution of the Universe and its astrophysical consequences seems to be a subject of radical revision. We found that $k$ strongly depends on thermodynamics of the cosmic background matter. The time scale, at which negative curvature might take place, depends on the relation between the matter content and the total energy. Using quantum and statistical approaches, we introduced expressions for $H$ a...

  9. Identifying Functional Thermodynamics in Autonomous Maxwellian Ratchets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd, A B; Crutchfield, J P

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a family of Maxwellian Demons for which correlations among information bearing degrees of freedom can be calculated exactly and in compact analytical form. This allows one to precisely determine Demon functional thermodynamic operating regimes, when previous methods either misclassify or simply fail due to approximations they invoke. These Demons are as functional as alternative candidates, behaving either as engines, lifting a mass against gravity by extracting energy from a single heat reservoir, or Landauer erasers, removing information from a sequence of binary symbols by consuming external work. In both cases, explicitly accounting for informational correlations leads to tight bounds on Demon performance, expressed as a refined Second Law of thermodynamics that relies on the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy.

  10. Thermodynamic motivations of spherically symmetric static metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Moradpour; S. Nasirimoghadam

    2015-06-14

    Bearing the thermodynamic arguments together with the two definitions of mass in mind, we try to find metrics with spherical symmetry. We consider the adiabatic condition along with the Gong-Wang mass, and evaluate the $g_{rr}$ element which points to a null hypersurface. In addition, we generalize the thermodynamics laws to this hypersurface to find its temperature and thus the corresponding surface gravity which enables us to get a relation for the $g_{tt}$ element. Finally, we investigate the mathematical and physical properties of the discovered metric in the Einstein relativity framework which shows that the primary mentioned null hypersurface is an event horizon. We also show that if one considers the Misner-Sharp mass in the calculations, the Schwarzschild metric will be got. The relationship between the two mass definitions in each metric is studied. The results of considering the geometrical surface gravity are also addressed.

  11. Thermodynamic motivations of spherically symmetric static metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moradpour, H

    2015-01-01

    Bearing the thermodynamic arguments together with the two definitions of mass in mind, we try to find metrics with spherical symmetry. We consider the adiabatic condition along with the Gong-Wang mass, and evaluate the $g_{rr}$ element which points to a null hypersurface. In addition, we generalize the thermodynamics laws to this hypersurface to find its temperature and thus the corresponding surface gravity which enables us to get a relation for the $g_{tt}$ element. Finally, we investigate the mathematical and physical properties of the discovered metric in the Einstein relativity framework which shows that the primary mentioned null hypersurface is an event horizon. We also show that if one considers the Misner-Sharp mass in the calculations, the Schwarzschild metric will be got. The relationship between the two mass definitions in each metric is studied. The results of considering the geometrical surface gravity are also addressed.

  12. Identifying Functional Thermodynamics in Autonomous Maxwellian Ratchets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Boyd; D. Mandal; J. P. Crutchfield

    2015-07-28

    We introduce a family of Maxwellian Demons for which correlations among information bearing degrees of freedom can be calculated exactly and in compact analytical form. This allows one to precisely determine Demon functional thermodynamic operating regimes, when previous methods either misclassify or simply fail due to approximations they invoke. These Demons are as functional as alternative candidates, behaving either as engines, lifting a mass against gravity by extracting energy from a single heat reservoir, or Landauer erasers, removing information from a sequence of binary symbols by consuming external work. In both cases, explicitly accounting for informational correlations leads to tight bounds on Demon performance, expressed as a refined Second Law of thermodynamics that relies on the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy.

  13. Lattice QCD Thermodynamics with Physical Quark Masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. A. Soltz; C. DeTar; F. Karsch; Swagato Mukherjee; P. Vranas

    2015-02-08

    Over the past few years new physics methods and algorithms as well as the latest supercomputers have enabled the study of the QCD thermodynamic phase transition using lattice gauge theory numerical simulations with unprecedented control over systematic errors. This is largely a consequence of the ability to perform continuum extrapolations with physical quark masses. Here we review recent progress in lattice QCD thermodynamics, focussing mainly on results that benefit from the use of physical quark masses: the crossover temperature, the equation of state, and fluctuations of the quark number susceptibilities. In addition, we place a special emphasis on calculations that are directly relevant to the study of relativistic heavy ion collisions at RHIC and the LHC.

  14. Thermodynamics of free Domain Wall fermions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. V. Gavai; Sayantan Sharma

    2008-11-19

    Studying various thermodynamic quantities for the free domain wall fermions for both finite and infinite fifth dimensional extent N_5, we find that the lattice corrections are minimum for $N_T\\geq10$ for both energy density and susceptibility, for its irrelevant parameter M in the range 1.45-1.50. The correction terms are, however, quite large for small lattice sizes of $N_T\\leq8$. We propose modifications of the domain wall operator, as well as the overlap operator, to reduce the finite cut-off effects to within 10% of the continuum results of the thermodynamic quantities for the currently used N_T=6-8 lattices. Incorporating chemical potential, we show that \\mu^2 divergences are absent for a large class of such domain wall fermion actions although the chiral symmetry is broken for $\\mu\

  15. Thermodynamics and geometry of strange quark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Gholizade; A. Altaibayeva; R. Myrzakulov

    2014-12-21

    We study thermodynamic of strange quark matter (SQM) using the analytic expressions of free and internal energies. We investigate two regimes of the high density and low density separately. As a vital program, in the case of a massless gluon and massless quarks at finite temperature, we also present a geometry of thermodynamics for the gluon and Bosons using a Legendre invariance metric, it is so called as geometrothermodynamic (GTD) to better understanding of the phase transition. The GTD metric and its second order scalar invariant have been obtained, and we clarify the phase transition by study the singularities of the scalar curvature of this Riemannian metric. This method is ensemble dependence and to complete the phase transition. Meanwhile, we also investigate enthalpy and entropy and internal energy representations. Our work exposes new pictures of the nature of phase transitions in SQM.

  16. Work and reversibility in quantum thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephanie Wehner; Mark M. Wilde; Mischa P. Woods

    2015-06-26

    It is a central question in quantum thermodynamics to determine how much work can be gained by a process that transforms an initial state $\\rho$ to a final state $\\sigma$. For example, we might ask how much work can be obtained by thermalizing $\\rho$ to a thermal state $\\sigma$ at temperature $T$ of an ambient heat bath. Here, we show that for large systems, or when allowing slightly inexact catalysis, the amount of work is characterized by how reversible the process is. More specifically, the amount of work to be gained depends on how well we can return the state $\\sigma$ to its original form $\\rho$ without investing any work. We proceed to exhibit an explicit reversal operation in terms of the Petz recovery channel coming from quantum information theory. Our result establishes a quantitative link between the reversibility of thermodynamical processes and the corresponding work gain.

  17. Thermodynamic Origin of the Cardassian Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao-Jun Feng; Xin-Zhou Li; Xian-Yong Shen

    2011-01-31

    In the Cadassian universe, one can explain the acceleration of the universe without introducing dark energy component. However, the dynamical equations of this model can not be directly obtained from the action principle. Recently, works on the relation between thermodynamics and gravity indicates that gravity force may not be the fundamental force. In this paper, we study the thermodynamics of the Cardassian universe, and regard it as the origin of this cosmological model. We find that the corresponding entropy obeys ordinary area law when the area of the trapping horizon is small, while it becomes a constant when area is going to be large in the original and modified polytropic Cardassian model, and it has a maximum value in the exponential one. It seems that the Cardassian universe only contains finite information according to the holographic principle, which states that all the information in the bulk should be encoded in the boundary of the bulk.

  18. FUNDAMENTALS OF ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE COURSE: ...................................................................................... EAS B9014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolberg, George

    and Physics 20700 and 20800 Textbook (required): Atmospheric Science: An Introductory Survey (2nd editionFUNDAMENTALS OF ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE COURSE% Students will write a term paper, linking a topic learned in class with either (a) their own research or (b

  19. The second laws of quantum thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernando G. S. L. Brandao; Micha? Horodecki; Nelly Huei Ying Ng; Jonathan Oppenheim; Stephanie Wehner

    2014-09-25

    The second law of thermodynamics tells us which state transformations are so statistically unlikely that they are effectively forbidden. Its original formulation, due to Clausius, states that "Heat can never pass from a colder to a warmer body without some other change, connected therewith, occurring at the same time". The second law applies to systems composed of many particles interacting; however, we are seeing that one can make sense of thermodynamics in the regime where we only have a small number of particles interacting with a heat bath. Is there a second law of thermodynamics in this regime? Here, we find that for processes which are cyclic or very close to cyclic, the second law for microscopic systems takes on a very di?erent form than it does at the macroscopic scale, imposing not just one constraint on what state transformations are possible, but an entire family of constraints. In particular, we find a family of free energies which generalise the traditional one, and show that they can never increase. We further find that there are three regimes which determine which family of second laws govern state transitions, depending on how cyclic the process is. In one regime one can cause an apparent violation of the usual second law, through a process of embezzling work from a large system which remains arbitrarily close to its original state. These second laws are not only relevant for small systems, but also apply to individual macroscopic systems interacting via long-range interactions, which only satisfy the ordinary second law on average. By making precise the definition of thermal operations, the laws of thermodynamics take on a simple form with the first law defining the class of thermal operations, the zeroeth law emerging as a unique condition ensuring the theory is nontrivial, and the remaining laws being a monotonicity property of our generalised free energies.

  20. Heterophase liquid states: Thermodynamics, structure, dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Bakai

    2015-01-12

    An overview of theoretical results and experimental data on the thermodynamics, structure and dynamics of the heterophase glass-forming liquids is presented. The theoretical approach is based on the mesoscopic heterophase fluctuations model (HPFM) developed within the framework of the bounded partition function approach. The Fischer cluster phenomenon, glass transition, liquid-liquid transformations, parametric phase diagram, cooperative dynamics and fragility of the glass-forming liquids is considered.

  1. Thermodynamics of quantum systems under dynamical control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Gelbwaser-Klimovsky; Wolfgang Niedenzu; Gershon Kurizki

    2015-03-04

    In this review the debated rapport between thermodynamics and quantum mechanics is addressed in the framework of the theory of periodically-driven/controlled quantum-thermodynamic machines. The basic model studied here is that of a two-level system (TLS), whose energy is periodically modulated while the system is coupled to thermal baths. When the modulation interval is short compared to the bath memory time, the system-bath correlations are affected, thereby causing cooling or heating of the TLS, depending on the interval. In steady state, a periodically-modulated TLS coupled to two distinct baths constitutes the simplest quantum heat machine (QHM) that may operate as either an engine or a refrigerator, depending on the modulation rate. We find their efficiency and power-output bounds and the conditions for attaining these bounds. An extension of this model to multilevel systems shows that the QHM power output can be boosted by the multilevel degeneracy. These results are used to scrutinize basic thermodynamic principles: (i) Externally-driven/modulated QHMs may attain the Carnot efficiency bound, but when the driving is done by a quantum device ("piston"), the efficiency strongly depends on its initial quantum state. Such dependence has been unknown thus far. (ii) The refrigeration rate effected by QHMs does not vanish as the temperature approaches absolute zero for certain quantized baths, e.g., magnons, thous challenging Nernst's unattainability principle. (iii) System-bath correlations allow more work extraction under periodic control than that expected from the Szilard-Landauer principle, provided the period is in the non-Markovian domain. Thus, dynamically-controlled QHMs may benefit from hitherto unexploited thermodynamic resources.

  2. Laws of thermodynamics and game theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lev Sakhnovich

    2011-05-23

    Using a game theory approach and a new extremal problem, Gibbs formula is proved in a most simple and general way for the classical mechanics case. A corresponding conjecture on the asymptotics of the classical entropy is formulated. For the ordinary quantum mechanics case, the third law of thermodynamics is derived. Some results on the number of ground states and residual entropy are obtained rigorously.

  3. Standard Model thermodynamics across the electroweak crossover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laine, M

    2015-01-01

    Even though the Standard Model with a Higgs mass mH = 125 GeV possesses no bulk phase transition, its thermodynamics still experiences a "soft point" at temperatures around T = 160 GeV, with a deviation from ideal gas thermodynamics. Such a deviation may have an effect on precision computations of weakly interacting dark matter relic abundances if their mass is in the few TeV range, or on leptogenesis scenarios operating in this temperature range. By making use of results from lattice simulations based on a dimensionally reduced effective field theory, we estimate the relevant thermodynamic functions across the crossover. The results are tabulated in a numerical form permitting for their insertion as a background equation of state into cosmological particle production/decoupling codes. We find that Higgs dynamics induces a non-trivial "structure" visible e.g. in the heat capacity, but that in general the largest radiative corrections originate from QCD effects, reducing the energy density by a couple of perce...

  4. Standard Model thermodynamics across the electroweak crossover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Laine; M. Meyer

    2015-07-23

    Even though the Standard Model with a Higgs mass mH = 125 GeV possesses no bulk phase transition, its thermodynamics still experiences a "soft point" at temperatures around T = 160 GeV, with a deviation from ideal gas thermodynamics. Such a deviation may have an effect on precision computations of weakly interacting dark matter relic abundances if their mass is in the few TeV range, or on leptogenesis scenarios operating in this temperature range. By making use of results from lattice simulations based on a dimensionally reduced effective field theory, we estimate the relevant thermodynamic functions across the crossover. The results are tabulated in a numerical form permitting for their insertion as a background equation of state into cosmological particle production/decoupling codes. We find that Higgs dynamics induces a non-trivial "structure" visible e.g. in the heat capacity, but that in general the largest radiative corrections originate from QCD effects, reducing the energy density by a couple of percent from the free value even at T > 160 GeV.

  5. ZINC MITIGATION INTERIM REPORT - THERMODYNAMIC STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P.

    2010-12-17

    An experimental program was initiated in order to develop and validate conditions that will effectively trap Zn vapors that are released during extraction. The proposed work is broken down into three tasks. The first task is to determine the effectiveness of various pore sizes of filter elements. The second task is to determine the effect of filter temperature on zinc vapor deposition. The final task is to determine whether the zinc vapors can be chemically bound. The approach for chemically binding the zinc vapors has two subtasks, the first is a review of literature and thermodynamic calculations and the second is an experimental approach using the best candidates. This report details the results of the thermodynamic calculations to determine feasibility of chemically binding the zinc vapors within the furnace module, specifically the lithium trap (1). A review of phase diagrams, literature, and thermodynamic calculations was conducted to determine if there are suitable materials to capture zinc vapor within the lithium trap of the extraction basket. While numerous elements exist that form compounds with zinc, many of these also form compounds with hydrogen or the water that is present in the TPBARs. This relatively comprehensive review of available data indicates that elemental cobalt and copper and molybdenum trioxide (MoO3) may have the requisite properties to capture zinc and yet not be adversely affected by the extraction gases and should be considered for testing.

  6. 13, 1479714822, 2013 Atmospheric waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovejoy, Shaun

    .5194/acpd-13-14797-2013 © Author(s) 2013. CC Attribution 3.0 License. Sciences ss Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics OpenAccess Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics OpenAccess Discussions Atmospheric Measurement s Discussions This discussion paper is/has been under review for the journal Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

  7. The middle Martian atmosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaquin, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    Profiles of scattered light above the planetary limb from 116 Viking Orbiter images are used to constrain the temporal and spatial behavior of aerosols suspended in the Martian atmosphere. The data cover a wide range of seasons, locations, and viewing geometry, providing information about the aerosol optical properties and vertical distribution. The typical atmospheric column contains one or more discrete, optically thin, ice-like haze layers between 30 and 90 km elevation whose composition is inferred to be water ice. Below the detached hazes, a continuous haze, interpreted to have a large dust component, extends from as much as 50 km to the surface. The haze distribution exhibits an annual variation that reflects a seasonally driven circulation in the middle atmosphere. The potential role of stationary gravity waves in modifying the middle atmosphere circulation is explored using a linear theory applied to a realistic Martian environment. Martian topography derived from radar observations is decomposed into Fourier harmonics and used to linearly superpose gravity waves arising from each component. The larger amplitude topography on Mars combined with the absence of extended regions of smooth topography like oceans generates larger wave amplitudes than on the Earth. The circulation of the middle atmosphere is examined using a two-dimensional, linearized, axisymmetric model successfully employed in the study of the terrestrial mesosphere. Illustrations of temperature and wind speeds are presented for the southern summer solstice and southern spring equinox.

  8. Thermodynamic Data for Geochemical Modeling of Carbonate Reactions Associated with CO2 Sequestration – Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2010-09-28

    Permanent storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deep geologic formations is being considered as a means to reduce the concentration of atmospheric CO2 and thus its contribution to global climate change. To ensure safe and effective geologic sequestration, numerous studies have been completed of the extent to which the CO2 migrates within geologic formations and what physical and geochemical changes occur in these formations when CO2 is injected. Sophisticated, computerized reservoir simulations are used as part of field site and laboratory CO2 sequestration studies. These simulations use coupled multiphase flow-reactive chemical transport models and/or standalone (i.e., no coupled fluid transport) geochemical models to calculate gas solubility, aqueous complexation, reduction/oxidation (redox), and/or mineral solubility reactions related to CO2 injection and sequestration. Thermodynamic data are critical inputs to modeling geochemical processes. The adequacy of thermodynamic data for carbonate compounds has been identified as an important data requirement for the successful application of these geochemical reaction models to CO2 sequestration. A review of thermodynamic data for CO2 gas and carbonate aqueous species and minerals present in published data compilations and databases used in geochemical reaction models was therefore completed. Published studies that describe mineralogical analyses from CO2 sequestration field and natural analogue sites and laboratory studies were also reviewed to identify specific carbonate minerals that are important to CO2 sequestration reactions and therefore require thermodynamic data. The results of the literature review indicated that an extensive thermodynamic database exists for CO2 and CH4 gases, carbonate aqueous species, and carbonate minerals. Values of ?fG298° and/or log Kr,298° are available for essentially all of these compounds. However, log Kr,T° or heat capacity values at temperatures above 298 K exist for less than approximately one-third of these compounds. Because the temperatures of host formations that will be used for CO2 injection and sequestration will be at tempera¬tures in the range of 50şC to 100şC or greater, the lack of high temperature thermodynamic values for key carbonate compounds especially minerals, will impact the accuracy of some modeling calculations.

  9. Thermodynamic Branch in the Chemical System Response to External Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Zilbergleyt

    2012-03-20

    The paper gives an account of a detailed investigation of the thermodynamic branch as a path of the chemical system deviation from its isolated thermodynamic equilibrium under an external impact. For a combination of direct and reverse reactions in the same chemical system, full thermodynamic branch is presented by an S-shaped curve, whose ends asymptotically achieve appropriate initial states, which, in turn, are logistic ends of the opposite reactions. The slope tangents of the steepest parts of the curves, the areas of the maximum rate of the shift growth vs. the external thermodynamic force, occurred to be directly proportional to the force and, simultaneously, linearly proportional to the thermodynamic equivalent of chemical reaction, which is the ratio between the amount in moles of any reaction participant, transformed in an isolated system, along the reaction way from its initial state to thermodynamic equilibrium, to its stoichiometric coefficient. The found linearity is valid for arbitrary combination of the stoichiometric coefficients in a reaction of compound synthesis from chemical elements like aA+bB=AaBb, and confirms the exclusive role of the thermodynamic equivalent of transformation as the chemical system characteristic of robustness and irreversibility. Results of this work allow for quantitative evaluation of the chemical system shift from thermodynamic equilibrium along thermodynamic branch and its rate vs. the shifting force. Such an investigation became possible due to the development of discrete thermodynamics of chemical equilibria.

  10. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration US Department of Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). Vienna: International Atomic Energy Agency: Proceedings Series. IAEA. 2005. Worldwide marine Radionuclides in the Marine Environment: A Selected Bibliography Compiled and edited by: Chris Belter: NOAA's Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research and National Marine Fisheries Service, have prepared

  11. Observations of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crossfield, Ian J M

    2015-01-01

    Detailed characterization of an extrasolar planet's atmosphere provides the best hope for distinguishing the makeup of its outer layers, and the only hope for understanding the interplay between initial composition, chemistry, dynamics & circulation, and disequilibrium processes. In recent years, some areas have seen rapid progress while developments in others have come more slowly and/or have been hotly contested. This article gives an observer's perspective on the current understanding of extrasolar planet atmospheres prior to the considerable advances expected from the next generation of observing facilities. Atmospheric processes of both transiting and directly-imaged planets are discussed, including molecular and atomic abundances, cloud properties, thermal structure, and planetary energy budgets. In the future we can expect a continuing and accelerating stream of new discoveries, which will fuel the ongoing exoplanet revolution for many years to come.

  12. Flammability Characteristics of Hydrogen and Its Mixtures with Light Hydrocarbons at Atmospheric and Sub-atmospheric Pressures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le, Thuy Minh Hai

    2013-07-13

    /vapor. This research focuses on the flammability limits of hydrogen and its binary mixtures with light hydrocarbons (methane, ethane, n-butane, and ethylene) at sub-atmospheric pressures. The flammability limits of hydrogen, light hydrocarbons, and binary mixtures...

  13. Thermodynamic Branch in the Chemical System Response to External Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zilbergleyt, B

    2012-01-01

    The paper gives an account of a detailed investigation of the thermodynamic branch as a path of the chemical system deviation from its isolated thermodynamic equilibrium under an external impact. For a combination of direct and reverse reactions in the same chemical system, full thermodynamic branch is presented by an S-shaped curve, whose ends asymptotically achieve appropriate initial states, which, in turn, are logistic ends of the opposite reactions. The slope tangents of the steepest parts of the curves, the areas of the maximum rate of the shift growth vs. the external thermodynamic force, occurred to be directly proportional to the force and, simultaneously, linearly proportional to the thermodynamic equivalent of chemical reaction, which is the ratio between the amount in moles of any reaction participant, transformed in an isolated system, along the reaction way from its initial state to thermodynamic equilibrium, to its stoichiometric coefficient. The found linearity is valid for arbitrary combinati...

  14. HGSYSTEMUF6. Model for Simulating Dispersion due to Atmospheric Release of UF6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanna, G; Chang, J.C.; Zhang, J.X.; Bloom, S.G.; Goode, W.D. Jr; Lombardi, D.A.; Yambert, M.W.

    1998-08-01

    HGSYSTEMUF6 is a suite of models designed for use in estimating consequences associated with accidental, atmospheric release of Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) and its reaction products, namely Hydrogen Fluoride (HF), and other non-reactive contaminants which are either negatively, neutrally, or positively buoyant. It is based on HGSYSTEM Version 3.0 of Shell Research LTD., and contains specific algorithms for the treatment of UF6 chemistry and thermodynamics. HGSYSTEMUF6 contains algorithms for the treatment of dense gases, dry and wet deposition, effects due to the presence of buildings (canyon and wake), plume lift-off, and the effects of complex terrain. The models components of the suite include (1) AEROPLUME/RK, used to model near-field dispersion from pressurized two-phase jet releases of UF6 and its reaction products, (2) HEGADAS/UF6 for simulating dense, ground based release of UF6, (3) PGPLUME for simulation of passive, neutrally buoyant plumes (4) UF6Mixer for modeling warm, potentially reactive, ground-level releases of UF6 from buildings, and (5) WAKE, used to model elevated and ground-level releases into building wake cavities of non-reactive plumes that are either neutrally or positively buoyant.

  15. Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Process And Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter C. Kong; Myrtle

    2006-09-01

    This paper provides a general discussion of atmospheric-pressure plasma generation, processes, and applications. There are two distinct categories of atmospheric-pressure plasmas: thermal and nonthermal. Thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas include those produced in high intensity arcs, plasma torches, or in high intensity, high frequency discharges. Although nonthermal plasmas are at room temperatures, they are extremely effective in producing activated species, e.g., free radicals and excited state atoms. Thus, both thermal and nonthermal atmosphericpressure plasmas are finding applications in a wide variety of industrial processes, e.g. waste destruction, material recovery, extractive metallurgy, powder synthesis, and energy conversion. A brief discussion of recent plasma technology research and development activities at the Idaho National Laboratory is included.

  16. Continuum Thermodynamics of the SU(N) Gauge Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saumen Datta; Sourendu Gupta

    2010-12-30

    The thermodynamics of the deconfined phase of the SU(N) gauge theory is studied. Careful study is made of the approach to the continuum limit. The latent heat of the deconfinement transition is studied, for the theories with 3, 4 and 6 colors. Continuum estimates of various thermodynamic quantities are studied, and the approach to conformality investigated. The bulk thermodynamic quantities at different N are compared, to investigate the validity of 't Hooft scaling at these values of N.

  17. Thermodynamics and evaporation of the noncommutative black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yun Soo Myung; Yong-Wan Kim; Young-Jai Park

    2007-01-21

    We investigate the thermodynamics of the noncommutative black hole whose static picture is similar to that of the nonsingular black hole known as the de Sitter-Schwarzschild black hole. It turns out that the final remnant of extremal black hole is a thermodynamically stable object. We describe the evaporation process of this black hole by using the noncommutativity-corrected Vaidya metric. It is found that there exists a close relationship between thermodynamic approach and evaporation process.

  18. Autumn 2012 Atmospheric Circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doty, Sharon Lafferty

    wind, and accumulated precipitation at a designated city. Forecasts are made over a two-week period Department 1 The UW Atmospheric Sciences spring forecast contest has been an annual tradition there will be a marine push or a convergence zone wrecking their forecast for maximum temperature and precipitation

  19. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND PHYSICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandenburg, Axel

    of electronic formats. Some content that appears in print may not be available in electronic formats. For more information about Wiley products, visit our web site at www.wiley.com. Library of Congress Cataloging components of the atmosphere, nitrogen, oxygen, water, carbon dioxide, and the noble gases. In the late

  20. A Community Atmosphere Model with Superparameterized Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall, David; Branson, Mark; Wang, Minghuai; Ghan, Steven J.; Craig, Cheryl; Gettelman, A.; Edwards, Jim

    2013-06-18

    In 1999, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) scientists Wojciech Grabowski and Piotr Smolarkiewicz created a "multiscale" atmospheric model in which the physical processes associated with clouds were represented by running a simple high-resolution model within each grid column of a lowresolution global model. In idealized experiments, they found that the multiscale model produced promising simulations of organized tropical convection, which other models had struggled to produce. Inspired by their results, Colorado State University (CSU) scientists Marat Khairoutdinov and David Randall created a multiscale version of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM). They removed the cloud parameterizations of the CAM, and replaced them with Khairoutdinov's high-resolution cloud model. They dubbed the embedded cloud model a "super-parameterization," and the modified CAM is now called the "SP-CAM." Over the next several years, many scientists, from many institutions, have explored the ability of the SP-CAM to simulate tropical weather systems, the day-night changes of precipitation, the Asian and African monsoons, and a number of other climate processes. Cristiana Stan of the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Interactions found that the SP-CAM gives improved results when coupled to an ocean model, and follow-on studies have explored the SP-CAM's utility when used as the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model. Much of this research has been performed under the auspices of the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes, a National Science Foundation (NSF) Science and Technology Center for which the lead institution is CSU.

  1. Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013 Peer Review Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants - 2013 Peer Review Emerging Technologies Project for...

  2. Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global-Warming-Potential Refrigerants...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Global-Warming-Potential Refrigerants Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global-Warming-Potential Refrigerants Lead Performer: National Institute of Standards and Technology -...

  3. Thermodynamic Systems for Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engines | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems for Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engines Thermodynamic Systems for Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engines Discusses engine technology enablers that help achieve overall system integration...

  4. Stability of black holes based on horizon thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Meng-Sen

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of horizon thermodynamics we study the thermodynamic stability of black holes constructed in general relativity and Gauss-Bonnet gravity. In the framework of horizon thermodynamics there are only five thermodynamic variables $E,P,V,T,S$. It is not necessary to consider concrete matter fields, which may contribute to the pressure of black hole thermodynamic system. In non-vacuum cases, we can derive the equation of state, $P=P(V,T)$. According to the requirements of stable equilibrium in conventional thermodynamics, we start from these thermodynamic variables to calculate the heat capacity at constant pressure and Gibbs free energy and analyze the local and global thermodynamic stability of black holes. It is shown that $P>0$ is the necessary condition for black holes in general relativity to be thermodynamically stable, however this condition cannot be satisfied by many black holes in general relativity. For black hole in Gauss-Bonnet gravity negative pressure can be feasible, but only local stab...

  5. Major Effects in the Thermodynamics of Detonation Products: Phase...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Major Effects in the Thermodynamics of Detonation Products: Phase Segregation versus Ionic Dissociation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Major Effects in the...

  6. Stability of black holes based on horizon thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng-Sen Ma; Ren Zhao

    2015-11-11

    On the basis of horizon thermodynamics we study the thermodynamic stability of black holes constructed in general relativity and Gauss-Bonnet gravity. In the framework of horizon thermodynamics there are only five thermodynamic variables $E,P,V,T,S$. It is not necessary to consider concrete matter fields, which may contribute to the pressure of black hole thermodynamic system. In non-vacuum cases, we can derive the equation of state, $P=P(V,T)$. According to the requirements of stable equilibrium in conventional thermodynamics, we start from these thermodynamic variables to calculate the heat capacity at constant pressure and Gibbs free energy and analyze the local and global thermodynamic stability of black holes. It is shown that $P>0$ is the necessary condition for black holes in general relativity to be thermodynamically stable, however this condition cannot be satisfied by many black holes in general relativity. For black hole in Gauss-Bonnet gravity negative pressure can be feasible, but only local stable black hole exists in this case.

  7. Sandia Energy - Phase Field model elucidates competing thermodynamic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A detail understanding of this proposed mechanism requires detangling the thermodynamics of the coupled bulk and interfacial regions of the metal. We have developed a...

  8. BE.011J Statistical Thermodynamics of Biomolecular Systems, Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly

    This course provides an introduction to the physical chemistry of biological systems. Topics include: connection of macroscopic thermodynamic properties to microscopic molecular properties using statistical mechanics, ...

  9. Thermodynamics of weakly measured quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose Joaquin Alonso; Eric Lutz; Alessandro Romito

    2015-08-03

    We consider continuously monitored quantum systems and introduce definitions of work and heat along individual quantum trajectories that are valid for coherent superpositions of energy eigenstates. We use these quantities to extend the first and second laws of stochastic thermodynamics to the quantum domain. We illustrate our results with the case of a weakly measured driven two-level system and show how to distinguish between quantum work and heat contributions. We finally employ quantum feedback control to suppress detector backaction and determine the work statistics.

  10. Thermodynamics of Few-Particle Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasily E. Tarasov

    2007-06-23

    We consider the wide class of few-particle systems that have some analog of the thermodynamic laws. These systems are characterized by the distributions that are determined by the Hamiltonian and satisfy the Liouville equation. Few-particle systems of this class are described by a non-holonomic constraint: the power of non-potential forces is directly proportional to the velocity of the elementary phase volume change. The coefficient of this proportionality is determined by the Hamiltonian. In the general case, the examples of the few-particle systems of this class are the constant temperature systems, canonical-dissipative systems, and Fermi-Bose classical systems.

  11. Some remarks on black hole thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Y. Chiao

    2011-02-04

    Two thermodynamic "paradoxes" of black hole physics are re-examined. The first is that there is a thermal instability involving two coupled blackbody cavities containing two black holes, and second is that a classical black hole can swallow up entropy in the form of ambient blackbody photons without increasing its mass. The resolution of the second paradox by Bekenstein and by Hawking is re-visited. The link between Hawking radiation and Wigner's superluminal tunneling time is discussed using two equivalent Feynman diagrams, and Feynman's re-interpretation principle.

  12. Quark mass thresholds in QCD thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Laine; Y. Schroder

    2006-05-05

    We discuss radiative corrections to how quark mass thresholds are crossed, as a function of the temperature, in basic thermodynamic observables such as the pressure, the energy and entropy densities, and the heat capacity of high temperature QCD. The indication from leading order that the charm quark plays a visible role at surprisingly low temperatures, is confirmed. We also sketch a way to obtain phenomenological estimates relevant for generic expansion rate computations at temperatures between the QCD and electroweak scales, pointing out where improvements over the current knowledge are particularly welcome.

  13. Thermodynamics of Ideal Gas in Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ying-Qiu Gu

    2009-10-04

    The equation of state and the state functions for the gravitational source are necessary conditions for solving cosmological model and stellar structure. The usual treatments are directly based on the laws of thermodynamics, and the physical meanings of some concepts are obscure. This letter show that, we can actually derive all explicit fundamental state functions for the ideal gas in the context of cosmology via rigorous dynamical and statistical calculation. These relations have clear physical meanings, and are valid in both non-relativistic and ultra-relativistic cases. Some features of the equation of state are important for a stable structure of a star with huge mass.

  14. Recent Progress in Lattice QCD Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carleton DeTar

    2008-11-14

    This review gives a critical assessment of the current state of lattice simulations of QCD thermodynamics and what it teaches us about hot hadronic matter. It outlines briefly lattice methods for studying QCD at nonzero temperature and zero baryon number density with particular emphasis on assessing and reducing cutoff effects. It discusses a variety of difficulties with methods for determining the transition temperature. It uses results reported recently in the literature and at this conference for illustration, especially those from a major study carried out by the HotQCD collaboration.

  15. On QCD Thermodynamics with Improved Actions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsch, Frithjof

    1998-01-01

    We discuss recent advances in the calculation of thermodynamic observables using improved actions. In particular, we discuss the calculation of the equation of state of the SU(3) gauge theory, the critical temperature in units of the string tension, the surface tension and the latent heat at the deconfinement transition. We also present first results from a calculation of the equation of state for four-flavour QCD using an O(a^2) improved staggered fermion action and discuss possible further improvements of the staggered fermion action.

  16. Liu UCD Phy9B 07 1 Ch 19. The First Law of Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, S. J. Ben

    Liu UCD Phy9B 07 1 Ch 19. The First Law of Thermodynamics #12;Liu UCD Phy9B 07 2 19-1. Thermodynamic Systems Thermodynamic system: A system that can interact (and exchange energy) with its surroundings Thermodynamic process: A process in which there are changes in the state of a thermodynamic system

  17. Reactive greenhouse gas scenarios: Systematic exploration of uncertainties and the role of atmospheric chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, Michael J; Holmes, Christopher D; Hsu, Juno

    2012-01-01

    et al. (2011b), The RCP greenhouse gas concentrations andResearch Council (2010), Greenhouse Gas Emissions: MethodsATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY AND GREENHOUSE GASES Prather, M. , and

  18. Thermodynamics of the Complexation of Uranium(VI) by oxalate in aqueous solution at 10-70oC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Bernardo, Plinio

    2009-01-01

    O. Tochiyama in Chemical Thermodynamics of Compounds andUpdate on the Chemical Thermodynamics of Uranium, Neptunium,Thermodynamics of the Complexation of Uranium(VI) with

  19. A review of the remote sensing of lower-tropospheric thermodynamic profiles and its indispensable role for the understanding and the simulation of water and energy cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wulfmeyer, Volker; Hardesty, Mike; Turner, David D.; Behrendt, Andreas; Cadeddu, Maria; Di Girolamo, Paolo; Schlüssel, Peter; van Baelen, Joël; Zus, Florian

    2015-07-08

    A review of remote sensing technology for lower-tropospheric thermodynamic (TD) profiling is presented with focus on high accuracy and high temporal-vertical resolution. The contributions of these instruments to the understanding of the Earth system are assessed with respect to radiative transfer, land-surface-atmosphere feedback, convection initiation, and data assimilation. We demonstrate that for progress in weather and climate research, TD profilers are essential. These observational systems must resolve gradients of humidity and temperature in the stable or unstable atmospheric surface layer close to the ground, in the mixed layer, in the interfacial layer – usually characterized by an inversion – and the lower troposphere. A thorough analysis of the current observing systems is performed revealing significant gaps that must be addressed to fulfill existing needs. We analyze whether current and future passive and active remote sensing systems can close these gaps. A methodological analysis and demonstration of measurement capabilities with respect to bias and precision is executed both for passive and active remote sensing including passive infrared and microwave spectroscopy, the global positioning system as well as water-vapor and temperature Raman lidar and water-vapor differential absorption lidar. Whereas passive remote sensing systems are already mature with respect to operational applications, active remote sensing systems require further engineering to become operational in networks. However, active remote sensing systems provide a smaller bias as well as higher temporal and vertical resolutions. For a suitable mesoscale network design, TD profiler system developments should be intensified and dedicated observing system simulation experiments should be performed.

  20. A review of the remote sensing of lower-tropospheric thermodynamic profiles and its indispensable role for the understanding and the simulation of water and energy cycles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wulfmeyer, Volker; Hardesty, Mike; Turner, David D.; Behrendt, Andreas; Cadeddu, Maria; Di Girolamo, Paolo; Schlüssel, Peter; van Baelen, Joël; Zus, Florian

    2015-07-08

    A review of remote sensing technology for lower-tropospheric thermodynamic (TD) profiling is presented with focus on high accuracy and high temporal-vertical resolution. The contributions of these instruments to the understanding of the Earth system are assessed with respect to radiative transfer, land-surface-atmosphere feedback, convection initiation, and data assimilation. We demonstrate that for progress in weather and climate research, TD profilers are essential. These observational systems must resolve gradients of humidity and temperature in the stable or unstable atmospheric surface layer close to the ground, in the mixed layer, in the interfacial layer – usually characterized by an inversion – andmore »the lower troposphere. A thorough analysis of the current observing systems is performed revealing significant gaps that must be addressed to fulfill existing needs. We analyze whether current and future passive and active remote sensing systems can close these gaps. A methodological analysis and demonstration of measurement capabilities with respect to bias and precision is executed both for passive and active remote sensing including passive infrared and microwave spectroscopy, the global positioning system as well as water-vapor and temperature Raman lidar and water-vapor differential absorption lidar. Whereas passive remote sensing systems are already mature with respect to operational applications, active remote sensing systems require further engineering to become operational in networks. However, active remote sensing systems provide a smaller bias as well as higher temporal and vertical resolutions. For a suitable mesoscale network design, TD profiler system developments should be intensified and dedicated observing system simulation experiments should be performed.« less

  1. Conservation-dissipation formalism of irreversible thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi Zhu; Liu Hong; Zaibao Yang; Wen-An Yong

    2014-07-21

    We propose a conservation-dissipation formalism (CDF) for coarse-grained descriptions of irreversible processes. This formalism is based on a stability criterion for non-equilibrium thermodynamics. The criterion ensures that non-equilibrium states tend to equilibrium in long time. As a systematic methodology, CDF provides a feasible procedure in choosing non-equilibrium state variables and determining their evolution equations. The equations derived in CDF have a unified elegant form. They are globally hyperbolic, allow a convenient definition of weak solutions, and are amenable to existing numerics. More importantly, CDF is a genuinely nonlinear formalism and works for systems far away from equilibrium. With this formalism, we formulate novel thermodynamics theories for heat conduction in rigid bodies and non-isothermal compressible Maxwell fluid flows as two typical examples. In these examples, the non-equilibrium variables are exactly the conjugate variables of the heat fluxes or stress tensors. The new theory generalizes Cattaneo's law or Maxwell's law in a regularized and nonlinear fashion.

  2. A general theory for irreversible thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arias-Gonzalez, J Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that irreversibility arises from the principle of microscopic reversibility and the presence of memory in the time evolution of a single copy of a system driven by a protocol. We introduce microscopic reversibility by using the concept of protocol- and pathway-dependent thermodynamic function, as defined in J.R. Arias-Gonzalez, arXiv:1511.08017 [cond-mat.stat-mech], and memory by using the concept of non-Markovianity, as in J.R. Arias-Gonzalez, arXiv:1511.06139 [cond-mat.stat-mech]. We define work as the change in free energy and heat as the change in entropy for micoscopic, individual pathways of a system subject to a protocol. We find that all non-equilibrium statistics emerge naturally. In particular, we derive most known fluctuation theorems and formulate two others. While the conservation of energy is invoked both at the level of the individual pathway and in ensemble-average processes, the second law of thermodynamics and the time arrow, which are only fulfilled in ensemble-average proces...

  3. A Lagrangian formalism for nonequilibrium thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    François Gay-Balmaz; Hiroaki Yoshimura

    2015-10-03

    In this paper, we present a Lagrangian formalism for nonequilibrium thermodynamics. This formalism is an extension of the Hamilton principle in classical mechanics that allows the inclusion of irreversible phenomena in both discrete and continuum systems (i.e., systems with finite and infinite degrees of freedom). The irreversibility is encoded into a nonlinear nonholonomic constraint given by the expression of entropy production associated to all the irreversible processes involved. Hence from a mathematical point of view, our variational formalism may be regarded as a generalization of the Lagrange-d'Alembert principle used in nonholonomic mechanics. In order to formulate the nonholonomic constraint, we associate to each irreversible process a variable called the thermodynamic displacement. This allows the definition of a corresponding variational constraint. Our theory is illustrated with various examples of discrete systems such as mechanical systems with friction, matter transfer, electric circuits, chemical reactions, and diffusion across membranes. For the continuum case, the variational formalism is naturally extended to the setting of infinite dimensional nonholonomic Lagrangian systems and is expressed in material representation, while its spatial version is obtained via a nonholonomic Lagrangian reduction by symmetry. In the continuum case, our theory is systematically illustrated by the example of a multicomponent viscous heat conducting fluid with chemical reactions and mass transfer.

  4. Identifying Functional Thermodynamics in Autonomous Maxwellian Ratchets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Boyd; D. Mandal; J. P. Crutchfield

    2015-09-13

    We introduce a family of Maxwellian Demons for which correlations among information bearing degrees of freedom can be calculated exactly and in compact analytical form. This allows one to precisely determine Demon functional thermodynamic operating regimes, when previous methods either misclassify or simply fail due to approximations they invoke. This reveals that these Demons are more functional than previous candidates. They too behave either as engines, lifting a mass against gravity by extracting energy from a single heat reservoir, or as Landauer erasers, consuming external work to remove information from a sequence of binary symbols by decreasing their individual uncertainty. Going beyond these, our Demon exhibits a new functionality that erases bits not by simply decreasing individual-symbol uncertainty, but by increasing inter-bit correlations (that is, by adding temporal order) while increasing single-symbol uncertainty. In all cases, but especially in the new erasure regime, exactly accounting for informational correlations leads to tight bounds on Demon performance, expressed as a refined Second Law of Thermodynamics that relies on the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy for dynamical processes and not on changes purely in system configurational entropy, as previously employed. We rigorously derive the new Second Law under minimal assumptions and so it applies quite broadly---for Demons with and without memory and input sequences that are correlated or not. We note that general Maxwellian Demons readily violate previously proposed, alternative such "laws", while ours still holds.

  5. Identifying Functional Thermodynamics in Autonomous Maxwellian Ratchets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. B. Boyd; D. Mandal; J. P. Crutchfield

    2015-12-22

    We introduce a family of Maxwellian Demons for which correlations among information bearing degrees of freedom can be calculated exactly and in compact analytical form. This allows one to precisely determine Demon functional thermodynamic operating regimes, when previous methods either misclassify or simply fail due to approximations they invoke. This reveals that these Demons are more functional than previous candidates. They too behave either as engines, lifting a mass against gravity by extracting energy from a single heat reservoir, or as Landauer erasers, consuming external work to remove information from a sequence of binary symbols by decreasing their individual uncertainty. Going beyond these, our Demon exhibits a new functionality that erases bits not by simply decreasing individual-symbol uncertainty, but by increasing inter-bit correlations (that is, by adding temporal order) while increasing single-symbol uncertainty. In all cases, but especially in the new erasure regime, exactly accounting for informational correlations leads to tight bounds on Demon performance, expressed as a refined Second Law of Thermodynamics that relies on the Kolmogorov-Sinai entropy for dynamical processes and not on changes purely in system configurational entropy, as previously employed. We rigorously derive the refined Second Law under minimal assumptions and so it applies quite broadly---for Demons with and without memory and input sequences that are correlated or not. We note that general Maxwellian Demons readily violate previously proposed, alternative such bounds, while the current bound still holds.

  6. Stochastic thermodynamics, fluctuation theorems, and molecular machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udo Seifert

    2012-05-18

    Stochastic thermodynamics as reviewed here systematically provides a framework for extending the notions of classical thermodynamics like work, heat and entropy production to the level of individual trajectories of well-defined non-equilibrium ensembles. It applies whenever a non-equilibrium process is still coupled to one (or several) heat bath(s) of constant temperature. Paradigmatic systems are single colloidal particles in time-dependent laser traps, polymers in external flow, enzymes and molecular motors in single molecule assays, small biochemical networks and thermoelectric devices involving single electron transport. For such systems, a first-law like energy balance can be identified along fluctuating trajectories. Various integral and detailed fluctuation theorems, which are derived here in a unifying approach from one master theorem, constrain the probability distributions for work, heat and entropy production depending on the nature of the system and the choice of non-equilibrium conditions. For non-equilibrium steady states, particularly strong results hold like a generalized fluctuation-dissipation theorem involving entropy production. Ramifications and applications of these concepts include optimal driving between specified states in finite time, the role of measurement-based feedback processes and the relation between dissipation and irreversibility. Efficiency and, in particular, efficiency at maximum power, can be discussed systematically beyond the linear response regime for two classes of molecular machines, isothermal ones like molecular motors, and heat engines like thermoelectric devices, using a common framework based on a cycle decomposition of entropy production.

  7. Falsification Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects Within The Frame Of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerlich, Gerhard

    2007-01-01

    The atmospheric greenhouse effect, an idea that authors trace back to the traditional works of Fourier 1824, Tyndall 1861 and Arrhenius 1896 and is still supported in global climatology essentially describes a fictitious mechanism in which a planetary atmosphere acts as a heat pump driven by an environment that is radiatively interacting with but radiatively equilibrated to the atmospheric system. According to the second law of thermodynamics such a planetary machine can never exist. Nevertheless, in almost all texts of global climatology and in a widespread secondary literature it is taken for granted that such mechanism is real and stands on a firm scientific foundation. In this paper the popular conjecture is analyzed and the underlying physical principles are clarified. By showing that (a) there are no common physical laws between the warming phenomenon in glass houses and the fictitious atmospheric greenhouse effects, (b) there are no calculations to determine an average surface temperature of a planet, ...

  8. Differential atmospheric tritium sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griesbach, O.A.; Stencel, J.R.

    1987-10-02

    An atmospheric tritium sampler is provided which uses a carrier gas comprised of hydrogen gas and a diluting gas, mixed in a nonexplosive concentration. Sample air and carrier gas are drawn into and mixed in a manifold. A regulator meters the carrier gas flow to the manifold. The air sample/carrier gas mixture is pulled through a first moisture trap which adsorbs water from the air sample. The moisture then passes through a combustion chamber where hydrogen gas in the form of H/sub 2/ or HT is combusted into water. The manufactured water is transported by the air stream to a second moisture trap where it is adsorbed. The air is then discharged back into the atmosphere by means of a pump.

  9. EK424 THERMODYNAMICS AND STATISTICAL MECHANICS (Spring 2015) Thermodynamics is the study of processes (e.g., expansion of a gas, boiling of water, or diffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vajda, Sandor

    EK424 THERMODYNAMICS AND STATISTICAL MECHANICS (Spring 2015) Thermodynamics is the study in order to take place? We will study the thermodynamics of two types of processes: mechanical, or the chemical conversion of glucose into useful work), and a good understanding of thermodynamics is essential

  10. Thermodynamics of finite magnetic two-isomer systems Peter Borrmann, Heinrich Stamerjohanns,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tománek, David

    Thermodynamics of finite magnetic two-isomer systems Peter Borrmann, Heinrich Stamerjohanns Carlo simulations to investigate the thermodynamical behavior of aggregates consisting of few thermodynamically the nature of the transition between the ring and the chain ``phase.'' © 1999 American Institute

  11. Atmospheric Chemistry Theodore S. Dibble

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dibble, Theodore

    SYLLABUS FOR Atmospheric Chemistry FCH 511 Fall 2014 Theodore S. Dibble Professor of Chemistry 421 in Required Text Seinfeld, J. H. and Pandis, S. N. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution nineteenth year at ESF, and my seventeenth year teaching FCH 511 (Atmospheric Chemistry). I have done a lot

  12. Thermodynamics and the naked singularity in the Gamma-metric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Lochan; D. Malafarina; T. P. Singh

    2010-09-23

    We investigate a possible way of establishing a parallel between the third law of black hole mechanics, and the strong version of the third law of thermodynamics. We calculate the surface gravity and area for a naked singular null surface in the Gamma-metric and explain in what sense this behaviour violates thermodynamics.

  13. Notes on the Generalised Second Law of Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. -T. Sung

    1997-03-22

    Several comments are given to previous proofs of the generalised second law of thermodynamics: black hole entropy plus ordinary matter entropy never decreases for a thermally closed system. Arguments in favour of its truism are given in the spirit of conventional thermodynamics.

  14. Thermodynamic Analysis of a single chamber Microbial Eric A. Zielke

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 #12;Microbial Fuel Cell Zielke 1 1 Introduction Renewable energy (RE) applications are becomingThermodynamic Analysis of a single chamber Microbial Fuel Cell Eric A. Zielke May 5, 2006 #12;Microbial Fuel Cell Zielke ii List of Tables 1 First Law Thermodynamic Efficiencies from Experimental Data

  15. VAPORIZATION THERMODYNAMICS OF KCl. COMBINING VAPOR PRESSURE AND GRAVIMETRIC DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudnyi, Evgenii B.

    1 VAPORIZATION THERMODYNAMICS OF KCl. COMBINING VAPOR PRESSURE AND GRAVIMETRIC DATA Rudnyi E of thermodynamic properties of the vapor and the vaporization process, coupling pressure measurements. INTRODUCTION The vapor pressure of a substance is an important system property in many applications. Its value

  16. Thermodynamics and Finite size scaling in Scalar Field Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debasish Banerjee; Saumen Datta; Sourendu Gupta

    2008-12-05

    In this work we consider the 1-component real scalar $\\phi^4$ theory in 4 space-time dimensions on the lattice and investigate the finite size scaling of thermodynamic quantities to study whether the thermodynamic limit is attained. The results are obtained for the symmetric phase of the theory.

  17. 23.10.2012 1 Level 2 thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    23.10.2012 1 Toolbox Level 2 thermodynamics Maria Zevenhoven #12;23.10.2012 2/37 First Grade: Thermodynamics Simple phase diagrams #12;23.10.2012 4/37 Calculating the melting behaviour of KCl-K2CO3 mixtures

  18. Thermodynamic properties of nuclear matter at finite temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Soma; P. Bozek

    2006-09-17

    A self-consistent approach based on finite temperature Green's functions is used to investigate thermodynamic properties of nuclear matter. The internal energy is derived from the diagrams associated to the interaction energy. Pressure and entropy up to T=20 MeV are obtained from the generating functional form of the thermodynamic potential.

  19. ''Averaged'' statistical thermodynamics, energy equipartition and the third law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vesselin I. Dimitrov

    1997-07-03

    Arguments are presented that the assumption, implicit to traditional statistical thermodynamics, that at zero temperature all erratic motions cease, should be dispensed with. Assuming instead a random ultrarelativistic unobservable motion, similar to zitterbewegung, it is demonstrated that in an ideal gas of classical particles the energy equipartition fails in a way that complies with the third law of thermodynamics.

  20. Lifetimes and eigenstates in atmospheric chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prather, Michael J

    1994-01-01

    Perturbation dynamics in atmospheric chemistry. J. Geophys.isotopic variations in atmospheric chemistry. Geophys. Res.M. et al. 2001 Atmospheric chemistry and greenhouse gases (

  1. Atmospheric chemistry of an Antarctic volcanic plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    L. , et al. (2010), Atmospheric chemistry results from theI. , et al. (2006), Atmospheric chemistry of a 33 – 34 hourvolcanic eruptions on atmospheric chemistry, Chem. Geol. ,

  2. A sensitivity study of the thermodynamic environment on GFDL model hurricane intensity: Implications for global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, W.; Tuleya, R.E.; Ginis, I.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, the effect of thermodynamic environmental changes on hurricane intensity is extensively investigated with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory hurricane model for a suite of experiments with different initial upper-tropospheric temperature anomalies up to {+-}4 C and sea surface temperatures ranging from 26 to 31 C given the same relative humidity profile. The results indicate that stabilization in the environmental atmosphere and sea surface temperature (SST) increase cause opposing effects on hurricane intensity. The offsetting relationship between the effects of atmospheric stability increase (decrease) and SST increase (decrease) is monotonic and systematic in the parameter space. This implies that hurricane intensity increase due to a possible global warming associated with increased CO{sub 2} is considerably smaller than that expected from warming of the oceanic waters alone. The results also indicate that the intensity of stronger (weaker) hurricanes is more (less) sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes. The model-attained hurricane intensity is found to be well correlated with the maximum surface evaporation and the large-scale environmental convective available potential energy. The model-attained hurricane intensity if highly correlated with the energy available from wet-adiabatic ascent near the eyewall relative to a reference sounding in the undisturbed environment for all the experiments. Coupled hurricane-ocean experiments show that hurricane intensity becomes less sensitive to atmospheric stability and SST changes since the ocean coupling causes larger (smaller) intensity reduction for stronger (weaker) hurricanes. This implies less increase of hurricane intensity related to a possible global warming due to increased CO{sub 2}.

  3. Study of atmospheric pollution scavenging. [Annotated bibligraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, A.L.

    1990-08-01

    Atmospheric scavenging research conducted by the Illinois State Water Survey under contract with the Department of Energy has been a significant factor in the historical development of the field of precipitation scavenging. Emphasis of the work during the 1980's became focused on the problem of acid rain problem with the Survey being chosen as the Central Analytical Laboratory for sample analysis of the National Atmospheric Deposition Program National Trends Network (NADP/NTN). The DOE research was responsible for laying the groundwork from the standpoint of sampling and chemical analysis that has now become routine features of NADP/NTN. A significant aspect of the research has been the participation by the Water Survey in the MAP3S precipitation sampling network which is totally supported by DOE, is the longest continuous precipitation sampling network in existence, and maintains an event sampling protocol. The following review consists of a short description of each of the papers appearing in the Study of Atmospheric Scavenging progress reports starting with the Eighteenth Progress Report in 1980 to the Twenty- Third Progress Report in 1989. In addition a listing of the significant publications and interviews associated with the program are given in the bibliography.

  4. Thermodynamics of Charged Lovelock - AdS Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasobh C. B.; Jishnu Suresh; V. C. Kuriakose

    2015-10-16

    We investigate the thermodynamic behavior of maximally symmetric charged, asymptotically AdS black hole solutions of Lovelock gravity. We explore the thermodynamic stability of such solutions by the ordinary method of calculating the specific heat of the black holes and investigating its divergences which signal second order phase transitions between black hole states. We then utilize the methods of thermodynamic geometry of black hole spacetimes in order to explain the origin of these points of divergence. We calculate the curvature scalar corresponding to a Legendre-invariant thermodynamic metric of these spacetimes and find that the divergences in the black hole specific heat correspond to singularities in the thermodynamic phase space. We also calculate the area spectrum for large black holes in the model by applying the Bohr-Sommerfeld quantization to the adiabatic invariant calculated for the spacetime.

  5. Thermodynamics in f(R,T) Theory of Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Sharif; M. Zubair

    2012-04-11

    A non-equilibrium picture of thermodynamics is discussed at the apparent horizon of FRW universe in $f(R,T)$ gravity, where $R$ is the Ricci scalar and $T$ is the trace of the energy-momentum tensor. We take two forms of the energy-momentum tensor of dark components and demonstrate that equilibrium description of thermodynamics is not achievable in both cases. We check the validity of the first and second law of thermodynamics in this scenario. It is shown that the Friedmann equations can be expressed in the form of first law of thermodynamics $T_hdS'_h+T_hd_{\\jmath}S'=-dE'+W'dV$, where $d_{\\jmath}S'$ is the entropy production term. Finally, we conclude that the second law of thermodynamics holds both in phantom and non-phantom phases.

  6. Hessian structures, Euler vector fields, and thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Á. García-Ariza

    2015-11-19

    This paper studies the underlying geometric structure of thermodynamics from a coordinate-free standpoint in the context of Hessian structures. The contribution of this work is the translation of the concept of "extensivity" to geometric terms by means of a vector field and an affine connection. It is shown that entropy's being extensive is equivalent to the vector's being a null direction of the Hessian structure. The latter induces a metric tensor-a generalized version of Ruppeiner's metrics-on the Riemannian Hessian submanifolds of a system's space of equilibrium states. These are embedded, and locally described as level sets of extensive functions. Under this approach, total Legendre transforms and intensive functions are given a straightforward geometrical meaning. The invariance of the metrics under total Legendre transforms is readily observed.

  7. Thermodynamics of pairing transition in hot nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang Liu; Zhen-Hua Zhang; Peng-Wei Zhao

    2014-12-16

    The pairing correlations in hot nuclei $^{162}$Dy are investigated in terms of the thermodynamical properties by covariant density functional theory. The heat capacities $C_V$ are evaluated in the canonical ensemble theory and the paring correlations are treated by a shell-model-like approach, in which the particle number is conserved exactly. A S-shaped heat capacity curve, which agrees qualitatively with the experimental data, has been obtained and analyzed in details. It is found that the one-pair-broken states play crucial roles in the appearance of the S shape of the heat capacity curve. Moreover, due to the effect of the particle-number conservation, the pairing gap varies smoothly with the temperature, which indicates a gradual transition from the superfluid to the normal state.

  8. The thermodynamics of quantum spacetime histories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smolin, Lee

    2015-01-01

    We show that the simplicity constraints, which define the dynamics of spin foam models, imply, and are implied by, the first law of thermodynamics, when the latter is applied to causal diamonds in the quantum spacetime. This result reveals an intimate connection between the holographic nature of gravity, as reflected by the Bekenstein entropy, and the fact that general relativity and other gravitational theories can be understood as constrained topological field theories. To state and derive this correspondence we describe causal diamonds in the causal structure of spin foam histories and generalize arguments given for the near horizon region of black holes by Frodden, Gosh and Perez and Bianchi. This allows us to apply a recent argument of Jacobson to show that if a spin foam history has a semiclassical limit described in terms of a smooth metric geometry, that geometry satisfies the Einstein equations. These results suggest also a proposal for a quantum equivalence principle.

  9. Thermodynamics in variable speed of light theories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Racker, Juan [CONICET, Centro Atomico Bariloche, Avenida Bustillo 9500 (8400), San Carlos De Bariloche (Argentina); Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N (1900), La Plata (Argentina); Sisterna, Pablo [Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Mar del Plata, Funes 3350 (7600), Mar del Plata (Argentina); Vucetich, Hector [Facultad de Ciencias Astronomicas y Geofisicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N (1900), La Plata (Argentina)

    2009-10-15

    The perfect fluid in the context of a covariant variable speed of light theory proposed by J. Magueijo is studied. On the one hand the modified first law of thermodynamics together with a recipe to obtain equations of state are obtained. On the other hand the Newtonian limit is performed to obtain the nonrelativistic hydrostatic equilibrium equation for the theory. The results obtained are used to determine the time variation of the radius of Mercury induced by the variability of the speed of light (c), and the scalar contribution to the luminosity of white dwarfs. Using a bound for the change of that radius and combining it with an upper limit for the variation of the fine structure constant, a bound on the time variation of c is set. An independent bound is obtained from luminosity estimates for Stein 2015B.

  10. Thermodynamics in variable speed of light theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan Racker; Pablo Sisterna; Hector Vucetich

    2009-11-30

    The perfect fluid in the context of a covariant variable speed of light theory proposed by J. Magueijo is studied. On the one hand the modified first law of thermodynamics together with a recipe to obtain equations of state are obtained. On the other hand the Newtonian limit is performed to obtain the nonrelativistic hydrostatic equilibrium equation for the theory. The results obtained are used to determine the time variation of the radius of Mercury induced by the variability of the speed of light ($c$), and the scalar contribution to the luminosity of white dwarfs. Using a bound for the change of that radius and combining it with an upper limit for the variation of the fine structure constant, a bound on the time variation of $c$ is set. An independent bound is obtained from luminosity estimates for Stein 2015B.

  11. Thermodynamics of pairing transition in hot nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang Liu; Zhen-Hua Zhang; Peng-Wei Zhao

    2015-10-09

    The pairing correlations in hot nuclei $^{162}$Dy are investigated in terms of the thermodynamical properties by covariant density functional theory. The heat capacities $C_V$ are evaluated in the canonical ensemble theory and the paring correlations are treated by a shell-model-like approach, in which the particle number is conserved exactly. A S-shaped heat capacity curve, which agrees qualitatively with the experimental data, has been obtained and analyzed in details. It is found that the one-pair-broken states play crucial roles in the appearance of the S shape of the heat capacity curve. Moreover, due to the effect of the particle-number conservation, the pairing gap varies smoothly with the temperature, which indicates a gradual transition from the superfluid to the normal state.

  12. Stochastic thermodynamics of chemical reaction networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tim Schmiedl; Udo Seifert

    2006-12-19

    For chemical reaction networks described by a master equation, we define energy and entropy on a stochastic trajectory and develop a consistent nonequilibrium thermodynamic description along a single stochastic trajectory of reaction events. A first-law like energy balance relates internal energy, applied (chemical) work and dissipated heat for every single reaction. Entropy production along a single trajectory involves a sum over changes in the entropy of the network itself and the entropy of the medium. The latter is given by the exchanged heat identified through the first law. Total entropy production is constrained by an integral fluctuation theorem for networks arbitrarily driven by time-dependent rates and a detailed fluctuation theorem for networks in the steady state. Further exact relations like a generalized Jarzynski relation and a generalized Clausius inequality are discussed. We illustrate these results for a three-species cyclic reaction network which exhibits nonequilibrium steady states as well as transitions between different steady states.

  13. Maxwell's equal area law for Lovelock Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Hao

    2015-01-01

    We present the construction of Maxwell's equal area law for the Guass-Bonnet AdS black holes in $d=5,6$ and third order Lovelock AdS black holes in $d=7,8$. The equal area law can be used to find the number and location of the points of intersection in the plots of Gibbs free energy, so that we can get the thermodynamically preferred solution which corresponds to the first order phase transition. We have the radius of the small and larger black holes in the phase transition which share the same Gibbs free energy. The latent heat can also be calculated. For the third order Lovelock AdS black holes in $d=8$, the first order phase transition can be found in $T_t

  14. Thermodynamics of Cosmic Defect Network Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avelino, P P

    2015-01-01

    We show that simple thermodynamic conditions determine, to a great extent, the equation of state and dynamics of cosmic defects of arbitrary dimensionality. We use these conditions to provide a more direct derivation of the Velocity-dependent One-Scale (VOS) model for the macroscopic dynamics of topological defects of arbitrary dimensionality in a $N+1$-dimensional homogeneous and isotropic universe. We parameterize the modifications to the VOS model associated to the interaction of the topological defects with other fields, including, in particular, a new dynamical degree of freedom associated to the variation of the mass per unit $p$-area of the defects, and compute the corresponding scaling solutions. The observational impact of this new dynamical degree of freedom is also briefly discussed.

  15. Maxwell's equal area law for Lovelock Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao Xu; Zhen-Ming Xu

    2015-10-22

    We present the construction of Maxwell's equal area law for the Guass-Bonnet AdS black holes in $d=5,6$ and third order Lovelock AdS black holes in $d=7,8$. The equal area law can be used to find the number and location of the points of intersection in the plots of Gibbs free energy, so that we can get the thermodynamically preferred solution which corresponds to the first order phase transition. We have the radius of the small and larger black holes in the phase transition which share the same Gibbs free energy. The latent heat can also be calculated. For the third order Lovelock AdS black holes in $d=8$, the first order phase transition can be found in $T_t

  16. Entanglement Production in Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Vedral

    2007-06-21

    We define and analyse the concept of entanglement production during the evolution of a general quantum mechanical dissipative system. While it is important to minimise entropy production in order to achieve thermodynamical efficiency, maximising the rate of change of entanglement is important in quantum information processing. Quantitative relations are obtained between entropy and entanglement productions, under specific assumptions detailed in the text. We apply these to the processes of dephasing and decay of correlations between two initially entangled qubits. Both the Master equation treatment as well as the higher Hilbert space analysis are presented. Our formalism is very general and contains as special cases many reported individual instance of entanglement dynamics, such as, for example, the recently discovered notion of the sudden death of entanglement.

  17. 8.2.2015bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/32 Irreversible thermodynamics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    /32 Irreversible thermodynamics, a.k.a. Non-equilibrium thermodynamics (an introduction) Ron Zevenhoven Ĺbo Akademi

  18. ARM - Atmospheric Heat Budget

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016Study (CHAPS)Archive CampaignListAtmospheric Heat

  19. ARM - Atmospheric Pressure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.TheoryTuesday, August 10, 20102016Study (CHAPS)Archive CampaignListAtmospheric

  20. Atmospheric PSF Interpolation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby a contractor ofvarDOE PAGES11 PPPL-Atmospheric PSF

  1. Atmospheric,OceanicandSpaceSciences IntroductIon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    Atmospheric,OceanicandSpaceSciences #12;IntroductIon A Rich History in Science Driven Engineering, through research sponsored by NASA, NSF, DoD, DoE and other governmental agencies. This research has than individual components. The proud history of the disciplines has yielded a department honored

  2. Strategic Plan NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strategic Plan NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research FY 2005 ­ FY 2010 United States decisions regarding our resources and economic well-being. NOAA Research's FY 2005 ­ FY 2010 Strategic Plan is guided by the vision and goals expressed in the agency's Strategic Plan. We support a broad range

  3. Environmental Research Center to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and transportation energy were established. Today there are five main areas of research in atmospheric processes energy. Projects range from developing autonomous vehicles, and transportation systems of the future the center has branched out into solar energy and energy storage research, which has created an important

  4. CHARACTERIZING THE ATMOSPHERES OF TRANSITING PLANETS WITH A DEDICATED SPACE TELESCOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tessenyi, M.; Tinetti, G.; Swinyard, B.; Aylward, A.; Tennyson, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Ollivier, M. [Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, Universite de Paris-Sud and CNRS (UMR 8617), IAS UMR8617, Orsay F-91405 (France); Beaulieu, J. P. [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, CNRS, UMR7095, Universite Paris VI, 98bis Boulevard Arago, Paris (France); Coude du Foresto, V.; Encrenaz, T. [Observatoire de Paris, LESIA, Meudon (France); Micela, G. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, 90134 Palermo (Italy); Ribas, I. [Institut de Ciencies de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Swain, M. R.; Vasisht, G.; Deroo, P. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States); Sozzetti, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, Strada Osservatorio 20, 10025 Pino Torinese (Italy)

    2012-02-10

    Exoplanetary science is one of the fastest evolving fields of today's astronomical research, continuously yielding unexpected and surprising results. Ground-based planet-hunting surveys, together with dedicated space missions such as Kepler and CoRoT, are delivering an ever-increasing number of exoplanets, over 690, and ESA's Gaia mission will escalate the exoplanetary census into the several thousands. The next logical step is the characterization of these new worlds. What is their nature? Why are they as they are? Use of the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope to probe the atmospheres of transiting hot, gaseous exoplanets has opened perspectives unimaginable even just 10 years ago, demonstrating that it is indeed possible with current technology to address the ambitious goal of characterizing the atmospheres of these alien worlds. However, these successful measurements have also shown the difficulty of understanding the physics and chemistry of these exotic environments when having to rely on a limited number of observations performed on a handful of objects. To progress substantially in this field, a dedicated facility for exoplanet characterization, able to observe a statistically significant number of planets over time and a broad spectral range will be essential. Additionally, the instrument design (e.g., detector performances, photometric stability) will be tailored to optimize the extraction of the astrophysical signal. In this paper, we analyze the performance and tradeoffs of a 1.2/1.4 m space telescope for exoplanet transit spectroscopy from the visible to the mid-IR. We present the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of integration time and stellar magnitude/spectral type for the acquisition of spectra of planetary atmospheres for a variety of scenarios: hot, warm, and temperate planets orbiting stars ranging in spectral type from hot F- to cooler M-dwarfs. Our results include key examples of known planets (e.g., HD 189733b, GJ 436b, GJ 1214b, and Cancri 55 e) and simulations of plausible terrestrial and gaseous planets, with a variety of thermodynamical conditions. We conclude that even most challenging targets, such as super-Earths in the habitable zone of late-type stars, are within reach of an M-class, space-based spectroscopy mission.

  5. Firewalls, black-hole thermodynamics, and singular solutions of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zurek, Wojciech H

    2015-01-01

    We investigate thermodynamic equilibrium of a self-gravitating perfect fluid in a spherically symmetric system containing a black hole of mass M by means of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkoff (TOV) equation. At r >> 2M its solutions describe a black-body radiation atmosphere with the Hawking temperature T_BH~1/(8 \\pi M) that is increasingly blueshifted as r approaches 2M. However, there is no horizon at the Schwarzschild radius. Instead, the fluid becomes increasingly hot and dense there, piling up into a "firewall" with the peak temperatures and densities reaching Planck values somewhat below r = 2M. This firewall surrounds a negative point mass residing at r=0, the only singularity of the solution. The entropy of the firewall is comparable to the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy.

  6. THERMODYNAMICS OF PARTIALLY FROZEN COOLING LAKES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, A.; Casterline, M.; Salvaggio, C.

    2010-01-05

    The Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) collected visible, SWIR, MWIR and LWIR imagery of the Midland (Michigan) Cogeneration Ventures Plant from aircraft during the winter of 2008-2009. RIT also made ground-based measurements of lake water and ice temperatures, ice thickness and atmospheric variables. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) used the data collected by RIT and a 3-D hydrodynamic code to simulate the Midland cooling lake. The hydrodynamic code was able to reproduce the time distribution of ice coverage on the lake during the entire winter. The simulations and data show that the amount of ice coverage is almost linearly proportional to the rate at which heat is injected into the lake (Q). Very rapid melting of ice occurs when strong winds accelerate the movement of warm water underneath the ice. A snow layer on top of the ice acts as an insulator and decreases the rate of heat loss from the water below the ice to the atmosphere above. The simulated ice cover on the lake was not highly sensitive to the thickness of the snow layer. The simplicity of the relationship between ice cover and Q and the weak responses of ice cover to snow depth over the ice are probably attributable to the negative feedback loop that exists between ice cover and heat loss to the atmosphere.

  7. Hessian matrix, specific heats, Nambu brackets, and thermodynamic geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seyed Ali Hosseini Mansoori; Behrouz Mirza; Mohamadreza Fazel

    2015-05-06

    As an extension to our earlier work \\cite{Mirza2}, we employ the Nambu brackets to prove that the divergences of heat capacities correspond to their counterparts in thermodynamic geometry. We also obtain a simple representation for the conformal transformations that connect different thermodynamics metrics to each other. Using our bracket approach, we obtain interesting exact relations between the Hessian matrix with any number of parameters and specific heat capacities. Finally, we employ this approach to investigate some thermodynamic properties of the Meyers-Perry black holes with three spins.

  8. A new approach toward geometrical concept of black hole thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendi, S H; Panah, B Elam; Momennia, M

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the energy representation of Riemannian metric, in this paper we will study different approaches toward the geometrical concept of black hole thermodynamics. We investigate thermodynamical Ricci scalar of Weinhold, Ruppeiner and Quevedo metrics and show that their number and location of divergences do not coincide with phase transition points arisen from heat capacity. Next, we introduce a new metric to solving these problems. The denominator of the this thermodynamical metric whose Ricci scalar only contains terms that match to the phase transition of heat capacity.

  9. Zeroth Law compatibility of non-additive thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. S. Biró; P. Ván

    2011-06-02

    Non-extensive thermodynamics was criticized among others by stating that the Zeroth Law cannot be satisfied with non-additive composition rules. In this paper we determine the general functional form of those non-additive composition rules which are compatible with the Zeroth Law of thermodynamics. We find that this general form is additive for the formal logarithms of the original quantities and the familiar relations of thermodynamics apply to these. Our result offers a possible solution to the longstanding problem about equilibrium between extensive and non-extensive systems or systems with different non-extensivity parameters.

  10. A Study of Universal Thermodynamics in Brane World Scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saugata Mitra; Subhajit Saha; Subenoy Chakraborty

    2015-03-25

    A study of Universal thermodynamics is done in the frame work of RSII brane model and DGP brane scenario. The Universe is chosen as FRW model bounded by apparent or event horizon. Assuming extended Hawking temperature on the horizon, the unified first law is examined for perfect fluid (with constant equation of state) and modified Chaplygin gas model. As a result there is a modification of Bekenstein entropy on the horizons. Further the validity of the generalized second law of thermodynamics and thermodynamical equilibrium are also investigated.

  11. Lovelock black hole thermodynamics in a string cloud model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tae-Hun; Maharaj, Sunil D; Baboolal, Dharmanand

    2015-01-01

    The Lovelock theory is an extension of general relativity to higher dimensions. We study the Lovelock black hole for a string cloud model in arbitrary dimensional spacetime, and in turn also analyze its thermodynamical properties. Indeed, we compute the mass, temperature and entropy of the black hole and also perform a thermodynamical stability analysis. The phase structure suggests that the Hawking-Page phase transition is achievable. It turns out that the presence of the Lovelock terms and/or background string cloud completely changes the black hole thermodynamics. Interestingly, the entropy of a black hole is unaffected due to a background string cloud, but has a correction term due to Lovelock gravity.

  12. Thermodynamics of strong-interaction matter from Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heng-Tong Ding; Frithjof Karsch; Swagato Mukherjee

    2015-04-21

    We review results from lattice QCD calculations on the thermodynamics of strong-interaction matter with emphasis on input these calculations can provide to the exploration of the phase diagram and properties of hot and dense matter created in heavy ion experiments. This review is organized as follows: 1) Introduction, 2) QCD thermodynamics on the lattice, 3) QCD phase diagram at high temperature, 4) Bulk thermodynamics, 5) Fluctuations of conserved charges, 6) Transport properties, 7) Open heavy flavors and heavy quarkonia, 8) QCD in external magnetic fields, 9) Summary.

  13. Thermodynamics on the apparent horizon in generalized gravity theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shao-Feng Wu; Bin Wang; Guo-Hong Yang

    2008-01-17

    We present a general procedure to construct the first law of thermodynamics on the apparent horizon and illustrate its validity by examining it in some extended gravity theories. Applying this procedure, we can describe the thermodynamics on the apparent horizon in Randall-Sundrum braneworld imbedded in a nontrivial bulk. We discuss the mass-like function which was used to link Friedmann equation to the first law of thermodynamics and obtain its special case which gives the generalized Misner-Sharp mass in Lovelock gravity.

  14. Methods for thermodynamic evaluation of battery state of health

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yazami, Rachid; McMenamin, Joseph; Reynier, Yvan; Fultz, Brent T

    2013-05-21

    Described are systems and methods for accurately characterizing thermodynamic and materials properties of electrodes and battery systems and for characterizing the state of health of electrodes and battery systems. Measurement of physical attributes of electrodes and batteries corresponding to thermodynamically stabilized electrode conditions permit determination of thermodynamic parameters, including state functions such as the Gibbs free energy, enthalpy and entropy of electrode/electrochemical cell reactions, that enable prediction of important performance attributes of electrode materials and battery systems, such as energy, power density, current rate, cycle life and state of health. Also provided are systems and methods for charging a battery according to its state of health.

  15. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 WinnersAffiliates Research AffiliatesThe SurprisinglyAtmospheric Aerosol

  16. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 WinnersAffiliates Research AffiliatesThe SurprisinglyAtmospheric

  17. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 WinnersAffiliates Research AffiliatesThe SurprisinglyAtmosphericSimulating

  18. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 WinnersAffiliates ResearchTo Be or NotNewPreferred States of theAtmospheric

  19. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 WinnersAffiliates ResearchTo Be orTheImproving WaterPollutionAtmospheric Sea

  20. Research Highlight

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 WinnersAffiliates ResearchTo Be orTheImproving WaterPollutionAtmospheric

  1. Research Misconduct (Research Integrity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wapstra, Erik

    Research Misconduct (Research Integrity Coordinator report) Glossary ADR Associate Dean Research ANDS Australian National Data Sharing ITS Information Technology Services NeCTAR National eResearch Collaboration Tools and Resources RSDI Research Storage Data Infrastructure input Research Integrity Advisors

  2. On the Relation Between Reaction Dynamics and Thermodynamics in Closed Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) , D : RN RR . #12;Thermodynamic conditions · Adopting Dalton's law for this reactive mixture, which

  3. M. Bahrami ENSC 388 (F09) 2nd Law of Thermodynamics 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    M. Bahrami ENSC 388 (F09) 2nd Law of Thermodynamics 1 The Second Law of Thermodynamics The second law of thermodynamics asserts that processes occur it satisfies both the first and the second laws of thermodynamics. The second law also asserts that energy

  4. Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-Global Warming Potential Refrigerants

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermodynamic Evaluation of Low-GWP Refrigerants Mark O. McLinden National Institute of Standards and Technology markm@boulder.nist.gov; 303-497-3580 April 3, 2013 Optimization...

  5. Thermodynamic Complexity of Carbon Capture in Alkylamine-Functionalize...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermodynamic Complexity of Carbon Capture in Alkylamine-Functionalized Metal-Organic Frameworks Previous Next List D. Wu, T. M. McDonald, Z. Quan, S. V. Ushakov, P. Zhang, J. R....

  6. Specific heat at constant volume in the thermodynamic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. B. Das; S. Das Gupta; A. Z. Mekjian

    2003-07-04

    A thermodynamic model for multifragmentation which is frequently used appears to give very different values for specific heat at constant volume depending upon whether canonical or grand canonical ensemble is used. The cause for this discrepancy is analysed.

  7. Thermodynamic behavior of particular f(R,T)-gravity models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharif, M. Zubair, M.

    2013-08-15

    We investigate the thermodynamics at the apparent horizon of the FRW universe in f(R, T) theory in the nonequilibrium description. The laws of thermodynamics are discussed for two particular models of the f(R, T) theory. The first law of thermodynamics is expressed in the form of the Clausius relation T{sub h} dS-circumflex{sub h} = {delta} Q , where {delta}Q is the energy flux across the horizon and dS-circumflex is the entropy production term. Furthermore, the conditions for the generalized second law of thermodynamics to be preserved are established with the constraints of positive temperature and attractive gravity. We illustrate our results for some concrete models in this theory.

  8. Thermodynamics, Entropy, Information and the Efficiency of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrams, Zeev R.

    2012-01-01

    a photovoltaic solar cell is one which produces electricitythe current of the solar cell is one of the main themes ofsingle junction solar cell is one that is thermodynamically

  9. Dynamics And Thermodynamics Of Blackholes And Naked Singularities II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo Fatibene; Mauro Francaviglia; Roberto Giambň; Giulio Magli

    2012-05-20

    Proceedings of the second edition of the international Workshop "Dynamics and Thermodynamics of Blackholes and Naked Singularities" (Department of Mathematics of the Politecnico of Milano from May 10-12, 2007.

  10. Lithium-ion battery modeling using non-equilibrium thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Todd R. (Todd Richard)

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this thesis work is the application of non-equilibrium thermodynamics in lithium-ion battery modeling. As the demand for higher power and longer lasting batteries increases, the search for materials suitable ...

  11. Applications of the thermodynamics of elastic, crystalline materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Si, Xiuhua

    2006-10-30

    The thermodynamic behaviors of multicomponent, elastic, crystalline solids under stress and electro-magnetic fields are developed, including the extension of Euler�s equation, Gibbs equation, Gibbs-Duhem equation, the conditions to be expected...

  12. Physics 112 Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics Winter 2000 COURSE OUTLINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Physics 112 Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics Winter 2000 COURSE OUTLINE TOPIC READINGS 1 and probability theory can be found in Chapter 16 of Mathematical Methods in the Physical Sciences, by Mary L

  13. A new approach toward geometrical concept of black hole thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. H. Hendi; S. Panahiyan; B. Elam Panah; M. Momennia

    2015-10-28

    Motivated by the energy representation of Riemannian metric, in this paper we study different approaches toward the geometrical concept of black hole thermodynamics. We investigate thermodynamical Ricci scalar of Weinhold, Ruppeiner and Quevedo metrics and show that their number and location of divergences do not coincide with phase transition points arisen from heat capacity. Next, we introduce a new metric to solve these problems. We show that the denominator of the Ricci scalar of the new metric contains terms which coincide with different types of phase transitions. We elaborate the effectiveness of the new metric and shortcomings of the previous metrics with some examples. Furthermore, we find a characteristic behavior of the new thermodynamical Ricci scalar which enables one to distinguish two types of phase transitions. In addition, we generalize the new metric for the cases of more than two extensive parameters and show that in these cases the divergencies of thermodynamical Ricci scalar coincide with phase transition points of the heat capacity.

  14. Beyond heat baths II: Framework for generalized thermodynamic resource theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicole Yunger Halpern

    2015-06-17

    Thermodynamics, which describes vast systems, has been reconciled with small scales, relevant to single-molecule experiments, in resource theories. Resource theories have been used to model exchanges of energy and information. Recently, particle exchanges were modeled; and an umbrella family of thermodynamic resource theories was proposed to model diverse baths, interactions, and free energies. This paper motivates and details the family's structure and prospective applications. How to model electrochemical, gravitational, magnetic, and other thermodynamic systems is explained. Szilard's engine and Landauer's Principle are generalized, as resourcefulness is shown to be convertible not only between information and gravitational energy, but also among diverse degrees of freedom. Extensive variables are associated with quantum operators that might fail to commute, introducing extra nonclassicality into thermodynamic resource theories. This generalization expands the theories' potential for modeling realistic systems with which small-scale statistical mechanics might be tested experimentally.

  15. Perturbative thermodynamics at nonzero isospin density for cold QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graf, Thorben; Fraga, Eduardo S

    2015-01-01

    We use next-to-leading-order in perturbation theory to investigate the effects of a finite isospin density on the thermodynamics of cold strongly interacting matter. Our results include nonzero quark masses and are compared to lattice data.

  16. Perturbative thermodynamics at nonzero isospin density for cold QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thorben Graf; Juergen Schaffner-Bielich; Eduardo S. Fraga

    2015-11-30

    We use next-to-leading-order in perturbation theory to investigate the effects of a finite isospin density on the thermodynamics of cold strongly interacting matter. Our results include nonzero quark masses and are compared to lattice data.

  17. Thermodynamics of a non-commutative fermion gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F G Scholtz; J Govaerts

    2008-10-17

    Building on the recent solution for the spectrum of the non-commutative well in two dimensions, the thermodynamics that follows from it is computed. In particular the focus is put on an ideal fermion gas confined to such a well. At low densities the thermodynamics is the same as for the commutative gas. However, at high densities the thermodynamics deviate strongly from the commutative gas due to the implied excluded area resulting from the non-commutativity. In particular there are extremal macroscopic states, characterized by area, number of particles and angular momentum, that correspond to a single microscopic state and thus have vanishing entropy. When the system size and excluded area are comparable, thermodynamic quantities, such as entropy, exhibit non-extensive features.

  18. Thermodynamics of de Sitter Black Holes: Thermal Cosmological Constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuichi Sekiwa

    2006-04-10

    We study the thermodynamic properties associated with the black hole event horizon and the cosmological horizon for black hole solutions in asymptotically de Sitter spacetimes. We examine thermodynamics of these horizons on the basis of the conserved charges according to Teitelboim's method. In particular, we have succeeded in deriving the generalized Smarr formula among thermodynamical quantities in a simple and natural way. We then show that cosmological constant must decrease when one takes into account the quantum effect. These observations have been obtained if and only if cosmological constant plays the role of a thermodynamical state variable. We also touch upon the relation between inflation of our universe and a phase transition of black holes.

  19. First-Principles Prediction of Thermodynamically Reversible Hydrogen...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First-Principles Prediction of Thermodynamically Reversible Hydrogen Storage Reactions in the Li-Mg-Ca-B-H system Home Author: V. Ozolins, E. H. Majzoub, C. Wolverton Year: 2009...

  20. Thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of the CO2 chemisorption mechanism...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of the CO2 chemisorption mechanism on Na2TiO3: Experimental and theoretical evidences Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  1. Thermodynamic characterization of new palladium alloy tritides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoelder, J.S.; Wermer, J.R.

    1994-08-09

    The decay of tritium in a metal tritide generates {sup 3}He in the lattice which tends to degrade the performance of the material over time. It is desired to develop a material which minimizes the tritium aging effects and may be tailored to a particular tritium processing application. Pd alloys with Ni and Co have been investigated, as Pd tritide is known to be resistant to tritium aging effects and alloying provides a means for adjusting the plateau pressure of the metal tritide. Sets of tritium desorption isotherms were acquired at temperatures between 273 and 338 K over the pressure range of 1 to 900 kPa. The thermodynamic parameters of {Delta}H and {Delta}S for the {beta}-{alpha} phase transition of the metal tritides were determined across the plateau regions of the P-C-T curves. The average values of {Delta}H (kJ/mol{center_dot}T) and {Delta}S (J/K/mol{center_dot}T) were found to be 15.8 and 50.1 for Pd(2.8 wt. %)Ni, 13.7 and 50.3 for Pd(5.2 wt. %)Ni, 15.9 and 51.3 for Pd(2.8 wt. %)Co, and 13.6 and 51.8 for Pd(5.2 wt. %)Co, respectively.

  2. Coal surface structure and thermodynamics. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, J.W.; Wernett, P.C.; Glass, A.S.; Quay, D.; Roberts, J.

    1994-05-01

    Coals surfaces were studied using static surface adsorption measurements, low angle x-ray scattering (LAXS), inverse gas chromatography (IGC) and a new {sup 13}C NMR relaxation technique. A comparison of surface areas determined by hydrocarbon gas adsorption and LAXS led to the twin conclusions that the hydrocarbons had to diffuse through the solid to reach isolated pores and that the coal pores do not form interconnected networks, but are largely isolated. This conclusion was confirmed when IGC data for small hydrocarbons showed no discontinuities in their size dependence as usually observed with porous solids. IGC is capable of providing adsorption thermodynamics of gases on coal surfaces. The interactions of non-polar molecules and coal surfaces are directly proportioned to the gas molecular polarizability. For bases, the adsorption enthalpy is equal to the polarizability interaction plus the heat of hydrogen bond formation with phenol. Amphoteric molecules have more complex interactions. Mineral matter can have highly specific effects on surface interactions, but with most of the molecules studied is not an important factor.

  3. Thermodynamic properties of bulk and confined water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallamace, Francesco; Corsaro, Carmelo; Mallamace, Domenico; Vasi, Sebastiano; Vasi, Cirino; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2014-11-14

    The thermodynamic response functions of water display anomalous behaviors. We study these anomalous behaviors in bulk and confined water. We use nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to examine the configurational specific heat and the transport parameters in both the thermal stable and the metastable supercooled phases. The data we obtain suggest that there is a behavior common to both phases: that the dynamics of water exhibit two singular temperatures belonging to the supercooled and the stable phase, respectively. One is the dynamic fragile-to-strong crossover temperature (T{sub L} ? 225 K). The second, T{sup *} ? 315 ± 5 K, is a special locus of the isothermal compressibility K{sub T}(T, P) and the thermal expansion coefficient ?{sub P}(T, P) in the P–T plane. In the case of water confined inside a protein, we observe that these two temperatures mark, respectively, the onset of protein flexibility from its low temperature glass state (T{sub L}) and the onset of the unfolding process (T{sup *})

  4. The Bayesian Second Law of Thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartolotta, Anthony; Leichenauer, Stefan; Pollack, Jason

    2015-01-01

    We derive a generalization of the Second Law of Thermodynamics that uses Bayesian updates to explicitly incorporate the effects of a measurement of a system at some point in its evolution. By allowing an experimenter's knowledge to be updated by the measurement process, this formulation resolves a tension between the fact that the entropy of a statistical system can sometimes fluctuate downward and the information-theoretic idea that knowledge of a stochastically-evolving system degrades over time. The Bayesian Second Law can be written as $\\Delta H(\\rho_m, \\rho) + \\langle \\mathcal{Q}\\rangle_{F|m}\\geq 0$, where $\\Delta H(\\rho_m, \\rho)$ is the change in the cross entropy between the original phase-space probability distribution $\\rho$ and the measurement-updated distribution $\\rho_m$, and $\\langle \\mathcal{Q}\\rangle_{F|m}$ is the expectation value of a generalized heat flow out of the system. We also derive refined versions of the Second Law that bound the entropy increase from below by a non-negative number, ...

  5. Thermodynamics and Luminosities of Rainbow Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mu, Benrong; Yang, Haitang

    2015-01-01

    Doubly special relativity (DSR) is an effective model for encoding quantum gravity in flat spacetime. As a result of the nonlinearity of the Lorentz transformation, the energy-momentum dispersion relation is modified. One simple way to import DSR to curved spacetime is \\textquotedblleft Gravity's rainbow", where the spacetime background felt by a test particle would depend on its energy. Focusing on the \\textquotedblleft Amelino-Camelia dispersion relation" which is $E^{2}=m^{2}+p^{2}\\left[ 1-\\eta\\left( E/m_{p}\\right) ^{n}\\right] $ with $n>0$, we investigate the thermodynamical properties of a Schwarzschild black hole and a static uncharged black string for all possible values of $\\eta$ and $n$ in the framework of rainbow gravity. It shows that there are non-vanishing minimum masses for these two black holes in the cases with $\\eta<0$ and $n\\geq2$. Considering effects of rainbow gravity on both the Hawking temperature and radius of the event horizon, we use the geometric optics approximation to compute lum...

  6. Thermodynamics and Luminosities of Rainbow Black Holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benrong Mu; Peng Wang; Haitang Yang

    2015-07-14

    Doubly special relativity (DSR) is an effective model for encoding quantum gravity in flat spacetime. As a result of the nonlinearity of the Lorentz transformation, the energy-momentum dispersion relation is modified. One simple way to import DSR to curved spacetime is \\textquotedblleft Gravity's rainbow", where the spacetime background felt by a test particle would depend on its energy. Focusing on the \\textquotedblleft Amelino-Camelia dispersion relation" which is $E^{2}=m^{2}+p^{2}\\left[ 1-\\eta\\left( E/m_{p}\\right) ^{n}\\right] $ with $n>0$, we investigate the thermodynamical properties of a Schwarzschild black hole and a static uncharged black string for all possible values of $\\eta$ and $n$ in the framework of rainbow gravity. It shows that there are non-vanishing minimum masses for these two black holes in the cases with $\\eta<0$ and $n\\geq2$. Considering effects of rainbow gravity on both the Hawking temperature and radius of the event horizon, we use the geometric optics approximation to compute luminosities of a 2D black hole, a Schwarzschild one and a static uncharged black string. It is found that the luminosities can be significantly suppressed or boosted depending on the values of $\\eta$ and $n$.

  7. A Thermodynamic Discriminator for Carbon Nanomaterials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamoghna Bhattacharyaa; Anjan Kr. Dasgupta

    2015-07-07

    Interaction between carbon nanomaterials and micellar substrates is studied. A notable observation is the dependence of nano-surface topology on thermodynamic signatures of the carbon nanomaterials e.g., single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT), multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) and graphene. The disruption of the self assembly process while the micelles were converted to monomer has a unique character in presence of graphene. This unique behavior follows irrespective of whether the micelle forming monomer is anionic (Sodium dodecyl sulfate) or cationic(Cetrimonium bromide). The direct measurement of temperature(T) also indicates that T falls monotonically as the micelles are formed in presence of graphene, this being different in all other cases (SWNT and MWNT). The photon correlation studies indicated formation of smaller and well distributed micelles in contact with graphene,this being not the case with SWNT and MWNT. Importantly the free energy change corresponding to the micelle formation has same order of magnitude (-26 to -25 KJ/Mole), the enthalpy showing a nanosurface specific value that varies between -9 to +7 KJ /mole depending on the nature of the nanomaterial and that of the self assembling micellar monomer. The constancy of the free energy and surface dependent vaiations of enthalpy implies that an entropy enthalpy compensation (free energy being a linear combination of the two) is inevitable in the self assembly process. The micellar cooling induced by graphene further implies a possible potential of the nano-embedded self assembly in fields like energy harnessing and bioenergetic manipulations. .

  8. Quadractic Model of Thermodynamic States in SDF Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L; Khasainov, B

    2007-05-04

    We study the thermodynamic states encountered during Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) explosions. Such explosions contain up to six components: three fuels (PETN, TNT and Aluminum) and their products corresponding to stoichiometric combustion with air. We establish the loci in thermodynamic state space that correctly describes the behavior of the components. Results are fit with quadratic functions that serve as fast equations of state suitable for 3D numerical simulations of SDF explosions.

  9. From the archives: Analyzing atmospheric behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panofsky, Hans

    2014-06-01

    Most meteorologists are really physicists in disguise. They use thermodynamics and hydrodynamics to understand snow squalls in Buffalo and typhoons in Japan.

  10. Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Space Science : Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect Part-5a Solar + Earth Spectrum IR Absorbers Grey Atmosphere Greenhouse Effect #12;Radiation: Solar and Earth Surface B"(T) Planck Ideal Emission Integrate and it emits Note: heat balance Fvis( = Fout = Te 4 z #12;(simple Greenhouse cont.) 0 1 2 3 4 Ground Space Top

  11. Atmospheric science encompasses meteorology and climatology, as well as fields such as atmospheric chemistry and remote sensing.Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chemistry and remote sensing.Atmospheric scientists apply physics, mathematics, and chemistry to understandAtmospheric science encompasses meteorology and climatology, as well as fields such as atmospheric the atmosphere and its interactions with land and sea. One of the goals of atmospheric science is to understand

  12. STAG RESEARCH CENTERSTAG RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrahams, I. David

    STAG RESEARCH CENTERSTAG RESEARCH CENTERSTAG RESEARCH CENTER Postrgraduate study in mathematical physics Marika Taylor Mathematical Sciences and STAG research centre, Southampton December 19, 2014 Marika Taylor (University of Southampton) Mathematical Physics December 19, 2014 1 / 26 #12;STAG RESEARCH

  13. Institute of Space Atmospheric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    Outreach: Media and General Funding, Staff and Programs Department of Physics and Engineering Physics: isas@dansas.usask.ca Web site: http://www.usask.ca/physics/isas Annual Report 2000 #12;3 Table Ionospheric Physics Aeronomy Research G.R. Davis A.H. Manson G.J. Sofko, A.V. Koustov A.V. Koustov, G

  14. THERMODYNAMICS OF THE COMA CLUSTER OUTSKIRTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simionescu, A.; Werner, N.; Urban, O.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Sanders, J. S.; Walker, S. A.; Mantz, A.; Matsushita, K.; Sasaki, T.; Sato, T.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Takei, Y.

    2013-09-20

    We present results from a large mosaic of Suzaku observations of the Coma Cluster, the nearest and X-ray brightest hot ({approx}8 keV), dynamically active, non-cool core system, focusing on the thermodynamic properties of the intracluster medium on large scales. For azimuths not aligned with an infalling subcluster toward the southwest, our measured temperature and X-ray brightness profiles exhibit broadly consistent radial trends, with the temperature decreasing from about 8.5 keV at the cluster center to about 2 keV at a radius of 2 Mpc, which is the edge of our detection limit. The southwest merger significantly boosts the surface brightness, allowing us to detect X-ray emission out to {approx}2.2 Mpc along this direction. Apart from the southwestern infalling subcluster, the surface brightness profiles show multiple edges around radii of 30-40 arcmin. The azimuthally averaged temperature profile, as well as the deprojected density and pressure profiles, all show a sharp drop consistent with an outwardly-propagating shock front located at 40 arcmin, corresponding to the outermost edge of the giant radio halo observed at 352 MHz with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The shock front may be powering this radio emission. A clear entropy excess inside of r{sub 500} reflects the violent merging events linked with these morphological features. Beyond r{sub 500}, the entropy profiles of the Coma Cluster along the relatively relaxed directions are consistent with the power-law behavior expected from simple models of gravitational large-scale structure formation. The pressure is also in agreement at these radii with the expected values measured from Sunyaev-Zel'dovich data from the Planck satellite. However, due to the large uncertainties associated with the Coma Cluster measurements, we cannot yet exclude an entropy flattening in this system consistent with that seen in more relaxed cool core clusters.

  15. Rigorous and General Definition of Thermodynamic Entropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gian Paolo Beretta; Enzo Zanchini

    2010-10-05

    The physical foundations of a variety of emerging technologies --- ranging from the applications of quantum entanglement in quantum information to the applications of nonequilibrium bulk and interface phenomena in microfluidics, biology, materials science, energy engineering, etc. --- require understanding thermodynamic entropy beyond the equilibrium realm of its traditional definition. This paper presents a rigorous logical scheme that provides a generalized definition of entropy free of the usual unnecessary assumptions which constrain the theory to the equilibrium domain. The scheme is based on carefully worded operative definitions for all the fundamental concepts employed, including those of system, property, state, isolated system, environment, process, separable system, system uncorrelated from its environment, and parameters of a system. The treatment considers also systems with movable internal walls and/or semipermeable walls, with chemical reactions and/or external force fields, and with small numbers of particles. The definition of reversible process is revised by introducing the new concept of scenario. The definition of entropy involves neither the concept of heat nor that of quasistatic process; it applies to both equilibrium and nonequilibrium states. The role of correlations on the domain of definition and on the additivity of energy and entropy is discussed: it is proved that energy is defined and additive for all separable systems, while entropy is defined and additive only for separable systems uncorrelated from their environment; decorrelation entropy is defined. The definitions of energy and entropy are extended rigorously to open systems. Finally, to complete the discussion, the existence of the fundamental relation for stable equilibrium states is proved, in our context, for both closed and open systems.

  16. Computer support to run models of the atmosphere. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fung, I.

    1996-08-30

    This research is focused on a better quantification of the variations in CO{sub 2} exchanges between the atmosphere and biosphere and the factors responsible for these exchangers. The principal approach is to infer the variations in the exchanges from variations in the atmospheric CO{sub 2} distribution. The principal tool involves using a global three-dimensional tracer transport model to advect and convect CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere. The tracer model the authors used was developed at the Goddard institute for Space Studies (GISS) and is derived from the GISS atmospheric general circulation model. A special run of the GCM is made to save high-frequency winds and mixing statistics for the tracer model.

  17. Extraction of Freshwater and Energy from Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Author offers and researches a new, cheap method for the extraction of freshwater from the Earth atmosphere. The suggected method is fundamentally dictinct from all existing methods that extract freshwater from air. All other industrial methods extract water from a saline water source (in most cases from seawater). This new method may be used at any point in the Earth except Polar Zones. It does not require long-distance freshwater transportation. If seawater is not utilized for increasing its productivity, this inexpensive new method is very environment-friendly. The author method has two working versions: (1) the first variant the warm (hot) atmospheric air is lifted by the inflatable tube in a high altitude and atmospheric steam is condenced into freswater: (2) in the second version, the warm air is pumped 20-30 meters under the sea-surface. In the first version, wind and solar heating of air are used for causing air flow. In version (2) wind and propeller are used for causing air movment. The first method...

  18. Extraction of Freshwater and Energy from Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-04-19

    Author offers and researches a new, cheap method for the extraction of freshwater from the Earth atmosphere. The suggected method is fundamentally dictinct from all existing methods that extract freshwater from air. All other industrial methods extract water from a saline water source (in most cases from seawater). This new method may be used at any point in the Earth except Polar Zones. It does not require long-distance freshwater transportation. If seawater is not utilized for increasing its productivity, this inexpensive new method is very environment-friendly. The author method has two working versions: (1) the first variant the warm (hot) atmospheric air is lifted by the inflatable tube in a high altitude and atmospheric steam is condenced into freswater: (2) in the second version, the warm air is pumped 20-30 meters under the sea-surface. In the first version, wind and solar heating of air are used for causing air flow. In version (2) wind and propeller are used for causing air movment. The first method does not need energy, the second needs a small amount. Moreover, in variant (1) the freshwater has a high pressure (>30 or more atm.) and can be used for production of energy such as electricity and in that way the freshwater cost is lower. For increasing the productivity the seawater is injected into air and solar air heater may be used. The solar air heater produces a huge amount of electricity as a very powerful electricity generation plant. The offered electricity installation in 100 - 200 times cheaper than any common electric plant of equivalent output. Key words: Extraction freshwater, method of getting freshwater, receiving energy from atmosphere, powerful renewal electric plant.

  19. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY - RESPONSE TO HUMAN INFLUENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LOGAN, J; PRATHER, M; WOFSY, S; MCELROY, M

    1978-01-01

    Trans. II 70, 253. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY Clyne, M. A. A. &data for modelling atmospheric chemistry. NBS Technical NoteChem. 80, 2711. ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY Sanadze, G. A. 1963 On

  20. IMPROVED QUASISTEADYSTATEAPPROXIMATION METHODS FOR ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY INTEGRATION #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay, Laurent O.

    IMPROVED QUASI­STEADY­STATE­APPROXIMATION METHODS FOR ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY INTEGRATION # L. O. JAY QSSA are presented. Key words. atmospheric chemistry, sti# ordinary di#erential equations, quasi PII. S1064827595283033 1. Introduction. As our scientific understanding of atmospheric chemistry