Sample records for requirements vegetation types

  1. RNA Type III Secretion Signals that require Hfq. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that require Hfq. RNA Type III Secretion Signals that require Hfq. Abstract: effector proteins from the bacterium to a host cell; however, the secretion signal is poorly...

  2. Types of Cost Estimates - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CURRENT DOE G 430.1-1 Chp 4, Types of Cost Estimates by John Makepeace Functional areas: Procurement, Project Management The chapter describes the estimates required on...

  3. Types of Directives - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening aTurbulence may be key to "fastTwist SolvesTwoSingletTypes of

  4. Development of Regulatory Technical Requirements for the Advanced Integral Type Research Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jo, Jong Chull; Yune, Young Gill; Kim, Woong Sik; Kim, Hho Jung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Kusung-dong, Yusung-ku, Taejon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the current status of the study on the development of regulatory technical requirements for the licensing review of an advanced integral type research reactor of which the license application is expected in a few years. According to the Atomic Energy Act of Korea, both research and education reactors are subject to the technical requirements for power reactors in the licensing review. But, some of the requirements may not be applicable or insufficient for the licensing reviews of reactors with unique design features. Thus it is necessary to identify which review topics or areas can not be addressed by the existing requirements and to develop the required ones newly or supplement appropriately. Through the study performed so far, it has been identified that the following requirements need to be developed newly for the licensing review of SMART-P: the use of proven technology, the interfacial facility, the non-safety systems, and the metallic fuels. The approach and basis for the development of each of the requirements are discussed. (authors)

  5. Vegetable Soup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vegetable Soup 10 cups water 1/4 c tamari, salt reduced 2 potatoes, cut in medium 1 t basil sized chunks 1 t thyme 2 carrots, sliced 1 c string beans, cut in 1 in. ... About 15 minutes before end of cooking time, add cooked grains or spaghetti ...

  6. Vegetable Gardening in Containers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotner, Sam

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are indicated in Table 1. * Growing Media Synthetic "soils" are best suited for vegetable container gardening. These mixes may be composed of sawdust, wood chips, peat moss, perlite, ver miculite or almost any other type of media. Regardless of what... "soils" are available from gar den centers, or one can be pre pared by mixing horticultu ral grade vermiculite, peat moss, limestone, superphosphate, and garden fertilizer. To 1 bushel each of vermiculite and peat moss, add 10 tablespoons...

  7. Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Bear Snow Vegetation RhinoWater Vegetation Ground Water Ground Sky Sky Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Water Vegetation Ground Rhino Water Rhino Water Ground Ground Vegetation Water Rhino Vegetation Rhino Vegetation Ground Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky Rhino Vegetation Ground Sky

  8. Map of Erosion Risk (C2)3 Vegetation Indices and Map of Minimum Forested Area4 5&

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are required forest areas for Vietnam Erosion Risk Map Cover types C1 Natural Forests >1.7 Plantation forest.2 (ESRI, 2008), to generate a map of required protective forest area for Vietnam. (3) (4) (5Results Map of Erosion Risk (C2)3 Vegetation Indices and Map of Minimum Forested Area4 5& · Map

  9. Program Subject(S) required in Program tyPe addition to engliSh S ma mi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Program Subject(S) required in Program tyPe addition to engliSh S ma mi comPuter Science (bSc) Computer Science C x x x humanitieS (ba) Aboriginal Studies (J) x x x African Studies (J) x x x American Studies (J) x x x Celtic Studies x x x Christianity and Culture x x x Christianity and Education x Cinema

  10. SRS BUILDER 1.0: An Upper Type CASE Tool For Requirement Specification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandal, Ardhendu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Software (SW) development is a labor intensive activity. Modern software projects generally have to deal with producing and managing large and complex software products. Developing such software has become an extremely challenging job not only because of inherent complexity, but also mainly for economic constraints unlike time, quality, maintainability concerns. Hence, developing modern software within the budget still remains as one of the main software crisis. The most significant way to reduce the software development cost is to use the Computer-Aided Software Engineering (CASE) tools over the entire Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) process as substitute to expensive human labor cost. We think that automation of software development methods is a valuable support for the software engineers in coping with this complexity and for improving quality too. This paper demonstrates the newly developed CASE tools name "SRS Builder 1.0" for software requirement specification developed at our university laborato...

  11. Guide for Developing Integrated Aquatic Vegetation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guide for Developing Integrated Aquatic Vegetation Management Plans in Oregon Maribeth V. Gibbons is an integrated aquatic vegetation management plan? When is an IAVMP required? Part II: Developing a Plan Chapter and Reservoirs · Portland State University · Portland OR 97207 #12;Acknowledgements This manual benefited

  12. Classification of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Classification of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical Satellite and Inventory Data of Sweden's Forest and Alpine Vegetation Using Optical Satellite and Inventory Data. Abstract Creation of accurate vegetation maps from optical satellite data requires use of reference data to aid

  13. anthropogenic vegetation fires: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    types of input needed in the development of fire management programs for mediterranean climate on the vegetation in the mediterranean region of France. Vlez carries this...

  14. Update and Expand Existing Landcover Classification A landcover classification is a visual description of the type vegetation or ground cover in an area.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    due to natural or human impacts, such as hurricanes or dredging. Further, resource mapping be determined. It is less costly and time-consuming to map the benthic resources by major habitat type, although

  15. Hydrodynamics of vegetated channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    This paper highlights some recent trends in vegetation hydrodynamics, focusing on conditions within channels and spanning spatial scales from individual blades, to canopies or vegetation patches, to the channel reach. At ...

  16. Required Fields in Bold and Underlined. *Definitions & values in Definitions section of the CVS Field Guide. EntryTool 2.3 2012 Carolina Vegetation Survey. cvs.bio.unc.edu Form PLT45, ver 8.3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peet, Robert K.

    Field Guide. EntryTool 2.3 ©2012 Carolina Vegetation Survey. cvs.bio.unc.edu Plot X-Axis Bearing: _____º in the template below (2+ modules) or one on the right (1 module plot), using the key below. Edit shape if neededTool 2.3 ©2012 Carolina Vegetation Survey. cvs.bio.unc.edu WATER page 2 of 2 Form PLT45, ver 8.3 Project

  17. Vegetables: Selection, Care, Cooking. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reasonover, Frances; Mason, Louise; Tribble, Marie; Cox, Maeona

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    them well on absorbent paper; salt and serve them hot. How to Steam Vegetables A steamer is a pan with a rack and a tight cover. Place enough water in the steamer to form sufficient steam, but do not let the water touch the rack. Place... the vegetable on the rack, time is somewhat longer than for boiling. cover the steamer and let the water boil vigor- Steaming is more satisfactory for white, yel- ously. Since the vegetables are cooked entirely low and red vegetables than for green vege...

  18. Bonneville - Hood River Vegetation Management Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To maintain the reliability of its electrical system, BPA, in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service, needs to expand the range of vegetation management options used to clear unwanted vegetation on about 20 miles of BPA transmission line right-of-way between Bonneville Dam and Hood River; Oregon, within the Columbia Gorge National Scenic Area (NSA). We propose to continue controlling undesirable vegetation using a program of Integrated Vegetation Management (IVM) which includes manual, biological and chemical treatment methods. BPA has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1257) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

  19. Vegetation and sediment characteristics of created and natural Spartina alterniflora marshes in Lower Galveston Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albertson, Andrea Kai

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Five natural and ten created Spartina altemiflora marshes in the Lower Galveston Bay System, Texas, were compared to determine if there were significantly different vegetative and sediment characteristics associated with each marsh type. Vegetative...

  20. Previous Code Corner columns have covered conductor type markings (USE-2, NM, RHW-2, THW, etc.) required

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    markings required for environmental conditions, such as exposure to sunlight, temperature levels are available from many sources, such as auto parts stores, hardware stores, building supply stores, and welding ­ Thermoset insulation (synthetic rubber) W ­ Wet rated H 75°C High temperature HH 90°C Higher temperature N

  1. Vegetable Gardening in Containers. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotner, Sam

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    shade than those which bear fruit, such as cucumbers, peppers, toma toes and eggplant. One advan tage to container gardening is mobility. Container gardening makes it possible to position the vegetables in areas where they can receive the best...

  2. Native Vegetation Planting Guidelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yan

    1 Native Vegetation Planting Guidelines Based on Sustainability Goals for the Macquarie Campus #12.................................................................................................................................10 4.2.5 Shale-Sandstone soil transition...................................................................................................................................11 #12;3 1. Purpose This document provides a guideline for specific grounds management procedures

  3. Investigation of the effect of a circular patch of vegetation on turbulence generation and sediment deposition using four case studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Alejandra C

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study describes the spatial distribution of sediment deposition in the wake of a circular patch of model vegetation and the effect of the patch on turbulence and mean flow. Two difference types pf vegetation were used ...

  4. Vegetable Gardening in Containers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masabni, Joseph; Cotner, Sam

    2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    physical support in order to grow healthy plants. A good growing media must also drain well. Synthetic or soilless mixes are well suited for vegetable container gardening and may be composed of sawdust, wood chips, peat moss, perlite, or vermiculite... by mixing horticultural grade vermiculite, peat moss, limestone, superphosphate and garden fertilizer. To 1 bushel each of vermiculite and peat moss, add 10 tablespoons of limestone, 5 tablespoons of 0-20-0 (superphosphate) and 1 cup of garden fertil- izer...

  5. Overview of Opportunities for Co-Location of Solar Energy Technologies and Vegetation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.; Beatty, B.; Hill, G.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-scale solar facilities have the potential to contribute significantly to national electricity production. Many solar installations are large-scale or utility-scale, with a capacity over 1 MW and connected directly to the electric grid. Large-scale solar facilities offer an opportunity to achieve economies of scale in solar deployment, yet there have been concerns about the amount of land required for solar projects and the impact of solar projects on local habitat. During the site preparation phase for utility-scale solar facilities, developers often grade land and remove all vegetation to minimize installation and operational costs, prevent plants from shading panels, and minimize potential fire or wildlife risks. However, the common site preparation practice of removing vegetation can be avoided in certain circumstances, and there have been successful examples where solar facilities have been co-located with agricultural operations or have native vegetation growing beneath the panels. In this study we outline some of the impacts that large-scale solar facilities can have on the local environment, provide examples of installations where impacts have been minimized through co-location with vegetation, characterize the types of co-location, and give an overview of the potential benefits from co-location of solar energy projects and vegetation. The varieties of co-location can be replicated or modified for site-specific use at other solar energy installations around the world. We conclude with opportunities to improve upon our understanding of ways to reduce the environmental impacts of large-scale solar installations.

  6. Woody vegetation of the lower Navasota River watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Harriet Louise Gell

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WOODY VEGETATION OF THE LOWER NAVASOTA RIVER WATERSHED A Thesis by DIl 5~ HARRIET ?GELL ALLEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December... 1974 Major Subject: Range Science WOODY VEGETATION OF THE LOWER NAVASOTA RIVER WATERSHED A Thesis by HARRIET GELL ALLEN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) (Member) December 1974...

  7. Woody vegetation of the lower Navasota River watershed 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Harriet Louise Gell

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    characteristics: Upland, Transition, Bottomland and Ephemeral Stream. Within these habitat types, stands were grouped into dominance types based on the leading dominant(s). Nine dominance types were found: Post Oak, Post Oak-Hickory, Winged Elm, Cedar Elm..., Overcup Oak, Hackberry-Cedar Elm, Swamp Privet and Water Elm. Post oak was the most widespread upland dominant, while cedar elm dominated the bottomlands. The woody vegetation is best viewed as dominance types along a iv community continuum...

  8. Texas Home Vegetable Gardening Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masabni, Joseph

    2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    With this manual, home gardeners are sure to be successful growing vegetables. It includes information on garden planning, crop selection, soil preparation, fertilization, planting techniques, watering, pest control and harvesting. Tables show...

  9. Longitudinal dispersion in vegetated flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Enda

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetation is ubiquitous in rivers, estuaries and wetlands, strongly influencing both water conveyance and mass transport. The plant canopy affects both mean and turbulent flow structure, and thus both advection and ...

  10. Vegetable Crops Hotline index 2008 MANAGEMENT TIPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    's Wilt 489 Using Herbicides with Plastic Mulch 490 Midwest Vegetable Production Guide for Commercial

  11. The influence of vegetation on frost dynamics, infiltration rate and surface stability in Icelandic Andisolic rangelands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orradottir, Berglind

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    only occurred where vegetation cover was sparse. Seasonal changes in infiltration rates, measured with double-ring infiltrometers, varied with soil frost depth and type, as indicated by the depth of visible ice crystals and size and number of ice...

  12. Fire Regimes of the Southern Appalachian Mountains: Temporal and Spatial Variability and Implications for Vegetation Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flatley, William 1977-

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    influence of climate on past fire occurrence. Third, I sampled vegetation composition in four different stand types along a topographic moisture gradient, including mesic cove, sub-mesic white pine (Pinus strobus L.) hardwood, sub-xeric oak (Quercus L...

  13. Required Fields in Bold and Underlined. *Definitions & values in Definitions section of the CVS Field Guide. EntryTool2.2.6 2008 Carolina Vegetation Survey. cvs.bio.unc.edu Form PLT45, ver 8.3 Plot Data: CVS Levels 4 & 5 page 1 of 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peet, Robert K.

    Field Guide. EntryTool2.2.6 ©2008 Carolina Vegetation Survey. cvs.bio.unc.edu Form PLT45, ver 8.3 Plot of permanent posts Plot origin (0,0) point 2-10 module plot: PLOT DIAGRAM Fill in the template below (2Tool2.2.6 ©2008 Carolina Vegetation Survey. cvs.bio.unc.edu WATER page 2 of 2 Form PLT45, ver 8

  14. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation from a section of BPA's Ponderosa--Pilot Butte Transmission Line Right-of-way to facilitate relocation of structure 18/3. Work would begin in mid-March and end in April, 2001. (1) Description of right-of-way and vegetation management needed--The project involves cutting all tall growing trees and brush within BPA's 100-foot wide transmission line right-of-way. An encroachment by the City of Bend Sewer Treatment facility, and future expansion plans, compelled the relocation of this portion of the right-of-way. Structures 18/2 and 18/4 will be modified in place to accommodate the new angle of the right-of-way. Structure 18/3 will be moved approximately 300 feet westerly to allow for the expansion of the sewer treatment facility. Only vegetation within the new portion of the right-of-way, totaling approximately 3.5 acres, will be controlled. No herbicides will be used on this project. Vegetation to be controlled: Juniper trees are the only tall growing tree species within this portion of the right-of-way requiring treatment. The density of vegetation within the new right-of-way is light to medium. The right-of-way boundaries will be examined for danger trees and if found, danger trees will be marked and cut according to danger tree policy.

  15. Documentation Requirements for Sensory Impairments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Documentation Requirements for Sensory Impairments Vision and Hearing Students, faculty, staff documentation requirements: 1. Requirements of the PRACTITIONER: A) Ophthalmologists and optometrists of interest. C) Documentation must be typed, dated and signed by the evaluator and submitted to ODR

  16. Vegetation Change Analysis User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. J. Hansen; W. K. Ostler

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Diagnostic techniques are needed to identify thresholds of sustainable military use. A cooperative effort among U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Department of Defense, and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on developing new techniques for monitoring and mitigating military impacts in arid lands. This manual focuses on the development of new monitoring techniques that have been implemented at Fort Irwin, California. New mitigation techniques are described in a separate companion manual. This User's Manual is designed to address diagnostic capabilities needed to distinguish between various degrees of sustainable and nonsustainable impacts due to military training and testing and habitat-disturbing activities in desert ecosystems. Techniques described here focus on the use of high-resolution imagery and the application of image-processing techniques developed primarily for medical research. A discussion is provided about the measurement of plant biomass and shrub canopy cover in arid. lands using conventional methods. Both semiquantitative methods and quantitative methods are discussed and reference to current literature is provided. A background about the use of digital imagery to measure vegetation is presented.

  17. Environmental Effects of Woody Vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koford, Rolf R.

    . In rural loca- tions, woody vegetation provides for man's protection and preservation. Farm windbreaks in improv- ing human comfort by shielding people from direct solar radiation. What happens to the solar but significant amount is used for heating tree parts. The portion of solar radiation used in photosynthesis (food

  18. Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GTOS GTOS 55 Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Sampling and Data Submission Shashi Verma #12;(intentionally blank) #12;Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Forestry University, Bejing 100083, China 5 University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 6 Microsoft Research

  19. Spatiotemporal Monitoring of Urban Vegetation Christopher Small

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Christopher

    in vegetation abundance influence environmental conditions and energy fluxes by selective reflection and absorbtion of solar radiation, by modulation of evapotranspiration and by sequestration of pollutants of the urban/suburban environment. Vegetation influences urban environmental conditions and energy fluxes

  20. Vegetable Crops Hotline index 2005 MANAGEMENT TIPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    Labeled for Row Middle Use in Vegetable Crops 446 Kudzu Turning Over New Leaves in Indiana Counties 447

  1. Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-page fact sheet discussing the pitfalls of using straight vegetable oil (SVO) as a transportation fuel.

  2. EXAMINING VEGETATION AND CLIMATE INTERACTIONS: A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF DIFFERENT VEGETATION TYPES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    . The mechanisms responsible for influencing the climate away from the surface, into the atmosphere, and to remote reduction in latent cooling. In contrast, boreal deforestation causes a large surface temperature cooling

  3. arctic vegetation types: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ecosystems, June 22 of manpower and finance would be desirable. The classic Mediterranean climate features warm to hot dry summers Standiford, Richard B. 33 Reviewers Rapid...

  4. Growth response of selected vegetable species to plant residue of guar (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L.) Taub.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Debbie John

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GROWTH RESPONSE OF SELECTED VEGETABLE SPECIES TO PLANT RESIDUE OF GUAR (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L. ) Taub. ) A Thesis by DEBBIE JOHN REID Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1992 Major Subject: Horticulture GROWTH RESPONSE OF SELECTED VEGETABLE SPECIES TO PLANT RESIDUE OF GUAR (Cyamopsis tetragonoloba (L. ) Taub. ) A Thesis by DEBBIE JOHN REID Approved as to style...

  5. Vegetation response to burning thicketized live oak savannah on the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, David Mitchell

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VEGETATION RESPONSE TO BURNING THICKETIZED LIVE OAK SAVANNAH ON THE ARANSAS NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE A Thesi. s by DAVID MITCHELL KELLEY Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A 6 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... irma f Committee) (Head of Department) (Member) ( lambe-) (Member) Memos Memoerl '. !ay 98O ABSTRACT Vegetation Response to Burning Thicketized Live Oak Savannah on the Aransas National Wildlife Refuge (May 1980) David Mitchell Kelley, B. S...

  6. Dual frequency microwave radiometer measurements of soil moisture for bare and vegetated rough surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Siu Lim

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DUAL FREQUENCY MICROWAVE RADIOMETER MEASUREMENTS OF SOIL MOISTURE FOR BARE AND VEGETATED ROUGH SURFACES A Thesis by SIU LIM LEE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A(M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1974 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering DUAL FREQUENCY MICROWAVE RADIOMETER MEASUREMENTS OF' SOIL MOISTURE FOR BARE AND VEGETATED ROUGH SURFACES A Thesis by SIU LIM LEE Approved as to style and content by: (C rman...

  7. Vegetation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 - USAF Wind Power ProgramDeslippe, Helen He,o

  8. Vegetation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 - USAF Wind Power ProgramDeslippe, Helen

  9. Vegetation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1 - USAF Wind Power ProgramDeslippe, Helen/::vI

  10. The biopolitics of the vegetative subject

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelaprat, Etienne

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Michel. 1984. “Nietzsche, Genealogy, History. ” Pp. 76-100Michel. 2006. “On the Genealogy of Ethics: An Overview ofof life, death and the genealogy of the vegetative

  11. An application of predictive vegetation mapping to mountain vegetation in Sweden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Janet Alexis

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictive vegetation mapping was employed to predict the distribution of vegetation communities and physiognomies in the portion of the Scandinavian mountains in Sweden. This was done to address three main research questions: (1) what environmental...

  12. Vegetation of the Northern Korean Peninsula and its relation to Vegetation of Northeast Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tebbens, Jurjen Duintjer

    & Valachovic 1996); (4) vegetation of water bodies (Kolbek & Dostálek 1996); (5) nitrophilous ponds and river) and soya bean fields (Dostálek et al. 1990); (8) grassland vegetation (Srtek & Kolbek 1992, Blazková 1993

  13. Hazardous Waste Minimum Distance Requirements (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations set minimum distance requirements between certain types of facilities that generate, process, store, and dispose of hazardous waste and other land uses. The regulations require an...

  14. Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Fish and Vegetables in Foil Ingredients: 1 1/2 pounds fresh or frozen fish fillets or steaks 4 sodium) Directions 1. Rinse fish under cold water and pat dry. Place 4 individual portions of fish on 4 pieces of foil large enough to completely wrap around the fish and vegetables. 2. Diagonally slice

  15. International Workshop Responses of Vegetation and Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bern, Universität

    of southern Russia and climatic changes" 15.00 ­ Dr. A. Skorobogatov (Voronezh University, Russia). "TheInternational Workshop Responses of Vegetation and Human Society to Climatic Changes in Ukraine- Ukrainian team started to investigate Holocene climate changes and the resulting vegetation and human

  16. Interaction between flow, transport and vegetation spatial structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luhar, Mitul

    This paper summarizes recent advances in vegetation hydrodynamics and uses the new concepts to explore not only how vegetation impacts flow and transport, but also how flow feedbacks can influence vegetation spatial ...

  17. Conditions Required by Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed I.

    No No Sto H 2 NoIs it required by law "Violence on children"?164.512 (c) (1) H CE may disclose to government to LEO HCE may not disclose to LEO H No Yes No Required by law: "reporting certain type of injuries"? H disclose to LEO H 164.512 (f) (1) (ii) (C)(2) It provides that the request is specific and limited in scope

  18. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Record of Decision (ROD). Planning Steps 1. Identify facility and the vegetation management need. The work involved will be to clear tall growing vegetation that is...

  19. Special study on vegetative covers. [UMTRA Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions. 28 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. Vegetative covers: Special study. [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to (1) evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, (2) define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and (3) develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites (Shiprock, New Mexico; Burrell, Pennsylvania; and Clive, Utah) where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions.

  1. Remote sensing-based characterization of plant functional type distributions at the Barrow Environmental Observatory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest M.

    Arctic ecosystems have been observed to be warming faster than the global average and are predicted to experience accelerated changes in climate due to global warming. Arctic vegetation is particularly sensitive to warming conditions and likely to exhibit shifts in species composition, phenology and productivity under changing climate. Mapping and monitoring of changes in vegetation is essential to understand the effect of climate change on the ecosystem functions. Vegetation exhibits unique spectral characteristics which can be harnessed to discriminate plant types and develop quantitative vegetation indices. We have combined high resolution multi-spectral remote sensing from the WorldView 2 satellite with LIDAR-derived digital elevation models to characterize the tundra landscape on the North Slope of Alaska. Classification of landscape using spectral and topographic characteristics yields spatial regions with expectedly similar vegetation characteristics. A field campaign was conducted during peak growing season to collect vegetation harvests from a number of 1m x 1m plots in the study region, which were then analyzed for distribution of vegetation types in the plots. Statistical relationships were developed between spectral and topographic characteristics and vegetation type distributions at the vegetation plots. These derived relationships were employed to statistically upscale the vegetation distributions for the landscape based on spectral characteristics. Vegetation distributions developed are being used to provide Plant Functional Type (PFT) maps for use in the Community Land Model (CLM).

  2. Remote sensing-based characterization, 2-m, Plant Functional Type Distributions, Barrow Environmental Observatory, 2010

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Zachary Langford; Forrest Hoffman; Jitendra Kumar

    Arctic ecosystems have been observed to be warming faster than the global average and are predicted to experience accelerated changes in climate due to global warming. Arctic vegetation is particularly sensitive to warming conditions and likely to exhibit shifts in species composition, phenology and productivity under changing climate. Mapping and monitoring of changes in vegetation is essential to understand the effect of climate change on the ecosystem functions. Vegetation exhibits unique spectral characteristics which can be harnessed to discriminate plant types and develop quantitative vegetation indices. We have combined high resolution multi-spectral remote sensing from the WorldView 2 satellite with LIDAR-derived digital elevation models to characterize the tundra landscape on the North Slope of Alaska. Classification of landscape using spectral and topographic characteristics yields spatial regions with expectedly similar vegetation characteristics. A field campaign was conducted during peak growing season to collect vegetation harvests from a number of 1m x 1m plots in the study region, which were then analyzed for distribution of vegetation types in the plots. Statistical relationships were developed between spectral and topographic characteristics and vegetation type distributions at the vegetation plots. These derived relationships were employed to statistically upscale the vegetation distributions for the landscape based on spectral characteristics. Vegetation distributions developed are being used to provide Plant Functional Type (PFT) maps for use in the Community Land Model (CLM).

  3. Remote sensing-based characterization, 2-m, Plant Functional Type Distributions, Barrow Environmental Observatory, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachary Langford; Forrest Hoffman; Jitendra Kumar

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic ecosystems have been observed to be warming faster than the global average and are predicted to experience accelerated changes in climate due to global warming. Arctic vegetation is particularly sensitive to warming conditions and likely to exhibit shifts in species composition, phenology and productivity under changing climate. Mapping and monitoring of changes in vegetation is essential to understand the effect of climate change on the ecosystem functions. Vegetation exhibits unique spectral characteristics which can be harnessed to discriminate plant types and develop quantitative vegetation indices. We have combined high resolution multi-spectral remote sensing from the WorldView 2 satellite with LIDAR-derived digital elevation models to characterize the tundra landscape on the North Slope of Alaska. Classification of landscape using spectral and topographic characteristics yields spatial regions with expectedly similar vegetation characteristics. A field campaign was conducted during peak growing season to collect vegetation harvests from a number of 1m x 1m plots in the study region, which were then analyzed for distribution of vegetation types in the plots. Statistical relationships were developed between spectral and topographic characteristics and vegetation type distributions at the vegetation plots. These derived relationships were employed to statistically upscale the vegetation distributions for the landscape based on spectral characteristics. Vegetation distributions developed are being used to provide Plant Functional Type (PFT) maps for use in the Community Land Model (CLM).

  4. Remote sensing-based characterization of plant functional type distributions at the Barrow Environmental Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest M.

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic ecosystems have been observed to be warming faster than the global average and are predicted to experience accelerated changes in climate due to global warming. Arctic vegetation is particularly sensitive to warming conditions and likely to exhibit shifts in species composition, phenology and productivity under changing climate. Mapping and monitoring of changes in vegetation is essential to understand the effect of climate change on the ecosystem functions. Vegetation exhibits unique spectral characteristics which can be harnessed to discriminate plant types and develop quantitative vegetation indices. We have combined high resolution multi-spectral remote sensing from the WorldView 2 satellite with LIDAR-derived digital elevation models to characterize the tundra landscape on the North Slope of Alaska. Classification of landscape using spectral and topographic characteristics yields spatial regions with expectedly similar vegetation characteristics. A field campaign was conducted during peak growing season to collect vegetation harvests from a number of 1m x 1m plots in the study region, which were then analyzed for distribution of vegetation types in the plots. Statistical relationships were developed between spectral and topographic characteristics and vegetation type distributions at the vegetation plots. These derived relationships were employed to statistically upscale the vegetation distributions for the landscape based on spectral characteristics. Vegetation distributions developed are being used to provide Plant Functional Type (PFT) maps for use in the Community Land Model (CLM).

  5. Membrane degumming of crude vegetable oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Lan

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Crude vegetable oils contain various minor substances like phospholipids, coloring pigments, and free fatty acids (FFA) that may affect quality of the oil. Reduction of energy costs and waste disposal are major concerns for many oil refiners who...

  6. Quantifying Vegetation Recovery on Santa Rosa Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rentschlar, Elizabeth

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of recovery on barrier islands after hurricanes is not well understood, because the majority of studies have focused on the geomorphic impact of storms on barrier islands. Dune vegetation recovery is a vital component of barrier island...

  7. Safe Storage of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Amanda

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper storage of fresh fruits and vegetables can help consumers avoid foodborne illness. This publication explains how to safely store apples, bananas, berries, beets, broccoli, carrots, corn, grapes, herbs, lettuce and greens, melons, nectarines...

  8. Nonlinear Characteristics of Wave Propagation over Vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkattaramanan, Aravinda

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The attenuation of wave energy by submerged or near-emergent coastal vegetation is one of the prominent methods of energy dissipation in areas with significant presence of wetlands. In this thesis, the nature of this dissipation in nearshore random...

  9. The limited growth of vegetated shear layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghisalberti, M.

    In contrast to free shear layers, which grow continuously downstream, shear layers generated by submerged vegetation grow only to a finite thickness. Because these shear layers are characterized by coherent vortex structures ...

  10. CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS ON CALIFORNIA VEGETATION: PHYSIOLOGY, LIFE HISTORY, AND ECOSYSTEM CHANGE A White Paper from the California Energy Commission's California Climate Change Center of the uncertainties with climate change effects on terrestrial ecosystems is understanding where transitions

  11. Safe Handling of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Amanda

    2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    *Program Specialist, The Texas A&M System Fresh fruits and vegetables are an important part of a healthful diet. They provide vitamins, minerals and fiber to help keep your body healthy. Occasionally, fresh fruits and vegetables can become... contaminated with harmful bacteria or viruses, which are also known as pathogens. Examples of pathogens include Salmonella, E. coli 0157:H7 and Hepatitis A. This contamination can occur at any point from the field to your table. If eaten, contaminated...

  12. Vegetable GardenVegetable Gardengg BasicsBasics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    mulch Add complete fertilizer right at planting time (4-6-8 or 6-6-6) #12;Preparing SoilPreparing Soil chests Plastic bags Plastic bags Barrels and drums #12;Other ContainersOther Containers #12;Grow BoxesOrganic Gardening Certification required (if selling produce) Composting Mulching No synthetic chemicals (pesticides

  13. Effects of aridity and vegetation on plant-wax dD in modern lake sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polissar, Pratigya J.

    Effects of aridity and vegetation on plant-wax dD in modern lake sediments Pratigya J. Polissar Abstract We analyzed the deuterium composition of individual plant-waxes in lake sediments from 28 fractionation (ea) between plant-wax n-alkanes and precipitation differs with watershed ecosystem type

  14. RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bern, Universität

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Impacts of changing climate and land use on vegetation dynamics in a Mediterranean coast and in regions that are expected to experience a mediterranean-type climate in the future. Samartin Á O. Heiri Á W. Tinner Institute of Plant Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research

  15. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-09)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation from the rights of way and access roads for BPA's McNary-Santiam No. 1 Transmission Line, beginning in the summer of 2000 and ending in July, 2001. This Supplemental Analysis finds that: (1) the proposed actions are substantially consistent with the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285) and ROD; and (2) there are no new circumstances or information relevant to environmental concerns and bearing on the proposed actions or their impacts. Therefore, no further NEPA documentation is required.

  16. Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desjarlais, Andre Omer [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Atchley, Jerald Allen [ORNL; Ennis, Mike J [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetative roofing, otherwise known as green or garden roofing, has seen tremendous growth in the last decade in the United States. The numerous benefits that green roofs provide have helped to fuel their resurgence in industrial and urban settings. There are many environmental and economical benefits that can be realized by incorporating a vegetative roof into the design of a building. These include storm-water retention, energy conservation, reduction in the urban heat island effect, increased longevity of the roofing membrane, the ability of plants to create biodiversity and filter air contaminants, and beautification of the surroundings by incorporating green space. The vegetative roof research project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was initiated to quantify the thermal performance of various vegetative roofing systems relative to black and white roofs. Single Ply Roofing Institute (SPRI) continued its long-term commitment to cooperative research with ORNL in this project. Low-slope roof systems for this study were constructed and instrumented for continuous monitoring in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. This report summarizes the results of the annual cooling and heating loads per unit area of three vegetative roofing systems with side-by-side comparison to black and white roofing systems as well as a test section with just the growing media without plants. Results showed vegetative roofs reduced heat gain (reduced cooling loads) compared to the white control system due to the thermal mass, extra insulation, and evapo-transpiration associated with the vegetative roofing systems. The 4-inch and tray systems reduced the heat gain by approximately 61%, while the reduction with the 8-inch vegetative roof was found to be approximately 67%. The vegetative roofing systems were more effective in reducing heat gain than in reducing heat losses (heating loads). The reduction in heat losses for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 40% in the mixed climate of East Tennessee. It should be noted that these values are climate dependent. Vegetative roofs also reduced the temperature (heat exposure) and temperature fluctuations (thermal stress) experienced by the membrane. In the cooling season of East Tennessee, the average peak temperature of the 4-inch and tray systems was found to be approximately 94 F cooler than the control black roofing system. The average temperature fluctuations at the membrane for the 4-inch and tray systems were found to be approximately 10 F compared to 125 F for black and 64 F for white systems. As expected, the 8-inch vegetative roof had the lowest fluctuations at approximately 2 F. Future work will include modeling of the energy performance of vegetative roof panels in the test climate of East Tennessee. The validated model then will be used to predict energy use in roofs with different insulation levels and in climates different from the test climate.

  17. Equipment Operational Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

    2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

  18. Multi-Spectral imaging of vegetation for detecting CO2 leaking from underground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rouse, J.H.; Shaw, J.A.; Lawrence, R.L.; Lewicki, J.L.; Dobeck, L.M.; Repasky, K.S.; Spangler, L.H.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Practical geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration will require long-term monitoring for detection of possible leakage back into the atmosphere. One potential monitoring method is multi-spectral imaging of vegetation reflectance to detect leakage through CO{sub 2}-induced plant stress. A multi-spectral imaging system was used to simultaneously record green, red, and near-infrared (NIR) images with a real-time reflectance calibration from a 3-m tall platform, viewing vegetation near shallow subsurface CO{sub 2} releases during summers 2007 and 2008 at the Zero Emissions Research and Technology field site in Bozeman, Montana. Regression analysis of the band reflectances and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index with time shows significant correlation with distance from the CO{sub 2} well, indicating the viability of this method to monitor for CO{sub 2} leakage. The 2007 data show rapid plant vigor degradation at high CO{sub 2} levels next to the well and slight nourishment at lower, but above-background CO{sub 2} concentrations. Results from the second year also show that the stress response of vegetation is strongly linked to the CO{sub 2} sink-source relationship and vegetation density. The data also show short-term effects of rain and hail. The real-time calibrated imaging system successfully obtained data in an autonomous mode during all sky and daytime illumination conditions.

  19. Easy Gardening.....Harvesting and Handling Vegetables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotner, Sam; Masabni, Joseph; Wagner, Al

    2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Easy Gardening Joseph Masabni, Assistant Professor and Extension Horticulturist, The Texas A&M University System HARVESTING ? HANDLING ? STORING VEGETABLES -1- T ohelpensurethatthevegetables yougrowandprepareareofhigh quality.... Acknowledgments Thispublicationwasrevisedfromearlierversionswrittenby SamCotner,ProfessorEmeritusandformerExtension Horticulturist,andAlWagner,formerProfessorand ExtensionHorticulturist. -6- Produced by AgriLife Communications, The Texas A&M System Extension...

  20. Bringing fruit, vegetaBle and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molinari, Marc

    and the Canary Islands do not count as being part of the EU. P P fruits vegetables plant products #12; travelling, Canary Islands, Ceuta, Croatia, Cyprus (the area not effectively controlled by the Government the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands) For these purposes, EU countries also include: Andorra

  1. Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Uma

    of Plant Biology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan Received 7 December 2009; accepted 4Circumpolar Arctic Tundra Vegetation Change Is Linked to Sea Ice Decline Uma S. Bhatt*,1 Donald A Institute, and Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska

  2. Vegetation Indices to Aid Areal Evapotranspiration Estimations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    Vegetation Indices to Aid Areal Evapotranspiration Estimations Jozsef Szilagyi1 Abstract: Multiyear Seevers and Ottmann 1994; Nicholson et al. 1996; Sz- ilagyi et al. 1998; Szilagyi and Parlange 1999; Szilagyi 2000 . Different authors drew differing conclusions about the appli- cability of NDVI to estimate

  3. Interactions between currents and the spatial structure of aquatic vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rominger, Jeffrey T. (Jeffrey Tsaros)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetation is present in nearly all aquatic environments, ranging from meandering streams to constructed channels and rivers, as well as in lakes and coastal zones. This vegetation grows in a wide range of flow environments ...

  4. Momentum and scalar transport in vegetated shear flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghisalberti, Marco (Marco Andrea), 1976-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental aquatic flows are seldom free of vegetative influence. However, the impact of submerged vegetation on the hydrodynamics and mixing processes in aquatic flows remains poorly understood. In this thesis, I present ...

  5. Farmers Market Self-Help FormFarmers Market Self-Help Form Training, Certifications & Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    . We require vendors who sell milk to sell only milk that has been pasteurized. Land & Water Use We ask. We ask farmers/vendors if fruits and vegetables are cooled after harvest. YES NO

  6. Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel? (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discusses the use of straight vegetable oil as a diesel fuel and the use of biodiesel as a transportation fuel.

  7. Improving vegetable preference and consumption among preschool children: evaluating results from an educational intervention using vegetable gardening

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Saundra Gail

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    's exposure to a variety of vegetables through the incorporation of weekly gardening supplemented with classroom activities. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of vegetable gardening to improve preschool children's affective responses...

  8. Toward a mechanistic modeling of nitrogen limitation on vegetation dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Chonggang [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Fisher, Rosie [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cai, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); McDowell, Nathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrogen is a dominant regulator of vegetation dynamics, net primary production, and terrestrial carbon cycles; however, most ecosystem models use a rather simplistic relationship between leaf nitrogen content and photosynthetic capacity. Such an approach does not consider how patterns of nitrogen allocation may change with differences in light intensity, growing-season temperature and CO{sub 2} concentration. To account for this known variability in nitrogen-photosynthesis relationships, we develop a mechanistic nitrogen allocation model based on a trade-off of nitrogen allocated between growth and storage, and an optimization of nitrogen allocated among light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, and respiration. The developed model is able to predict the acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to changes in CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, and radiation when evaluated against published data of V{sub c,max} (maximum carboxylation rate) and J{sub max} (maximum electron transport rate). A sensitivity analysis of the model for herbaceous plants, deciduous and evergreen trees implies that elevated CO{sub 2} concentrations lead to lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation but higher allocation to storage. Higher growing-season temperatures cause lower allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation, due to higher nitrogen requirements for light capture pigments and for storage. Lower levels of radiation have a much stronger effect on allocation of nitrogen to carboxylation for herbaceous plants than for trees, resulting from higher nitrogen requirements for light capture for herbaceous plants. As far as we know, this is the first model of complete nitrogen allocation that simultaneously considers nitrogen allocation to light capture, electron transport, carboxylation, respiration and storage, and the responses of each to altered environmental conditions. We expect this model could potentially improve our confidence in simulations of carbon-nitrogen interactions and the vegetation feedbacks to climate in Earth system models.

  9. ?Aceite Vegetal Puro Como Combustible Diesel? (Straight Vegetable Oil as a Diesel Fuel? Spanish Version) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discusses the use of straight vegetable oil as a diesel fuel and the use of biodiesel as a transportation fuel.

  10. How to deal with radiologically contaminated vegetation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilde, E.W.; Murphy, C.E.; Lamar, R.T.; Larson, M.J.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the findings from a literature review conducted as part of a Department of Energy, Office of Technology Development Biomass Remediation Task. The principal objective of this project is to develop a process or group of processes to treat radiologically contaminated vegetation in a manner that minimizes handling, processing, and treatment costs. Contaminated, woody vegetation growing on waste sites at SRS poses a problem to waste site closure technologies that are being considered for these sites. It is feared that large sections of woody vegetation (logs) can not be buried in waste sites where isolation of waste is accomplished by capping the site. Logs or large piles of woody debris have the potential of decaying and leaving voids under the cap. This could lead to cap failure and entrance of water into the waste. Large solid objects could also interfere with treatments like in situ mixing of soil with grout or other materials to encapsulate the contaminated sediments and soils in the waste sites. Optimal disposal of the wood includes considerations of volume reduction, treatment of the radioactive residue resulting from volume reduction, or confinement without volume reduction. Volume reduction consists primarily of removing the carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen in the wood, leaving an ash that would contain most of the contamination. The only contaminant that would be released by volume reduction would by small amounts of the radioactive isotope of hydrogen, tritium. The following sections will describe the waste sites at SRS which contain contaminated vegetation and are potential candidates for the technology developed under this proposal. The description will provide a context for the magnitude of the problem and the logistics of the alternative solutions that are evaluated later in the review. 76 refs.

  11. Fire Regimes of the Southern Appalachian Mountains: Temporal and Spatial Variability and Implications for Vegetation Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flatley, William 1977-

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    explaining contemporary vegetation properties and is often an essential consideration for ecosystem restoration (Baker 1994, Foster et al. 1996, Ful? et al. 1997, Foster 2000). Fire is a particularly important source of disturbance that controls the global... distribution of fire-dependent ecosystems (Bond and Keeley 2005), the landscape-scale spatial arrangement of community types, and individual species establishment or persistence (Barton 1993). Extensive fire research has been carried out in coniferous...

  12. Influence of application methods and varying rates of uniconazol on the vegetative and reproductive response of pecan trees, Carya illinoensis (Wang) K. Koch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Charles Jordan

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    &M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Horticulture INFLUENCE OF APPLICATION METHODS AND VARYING RATES OF UNICONAZOL ON THE VEGETATIVE AND REPRODUCTIVE RESPONSE OF PECAN TREES... Influence of Application Methods and Varying Rates of Uniconazol on the Vegetative and Reproductive Response of Pecan Trees, Carya illinoensis (Wang) K. Koch. (May 1990) Charles Jordan Graham, B. S. , Texas ARM University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr...

  13. Vegetation Description, Rare Plant Inventory, and Vegetation Monitoring for Craig Mountain, Idaho.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancuso, Michael; Moseley, Robert

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Craig Mountain Wildlife Mitigation Area was purchased by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) as partial mitigation for wildlife losses incurred with the inundation of Dworshak Reservoir on the North Fork Clearwater River. Upon completion of the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) process, it is proposed that title to mitigation lands will be given to the Idaho Department of Fish and Game (IDFG). Craig Mountain is located at the northern end of the Hells Canyon Ecosystem. It encompasses the plateau and steep canyon slopes extending from the confluence of the Snake and Salmon rivers, northward to near Waha, south of Lewiston, Idaho. The forested summit of Craig Mountain is characterized by gently rolling terrain. The highlands dramatically break into the canyons of the Snake and Salmon rivers at approximately the 4,700 foot contour. The highly dissected canyons are dominated by grassland slopes containing a mosaic of shrubfield, riparian, and woodland habitats. During the 1993 and 1994 field seasons, wildlife, habitat/vegetation, timber, and other resources were systematically inventoried at Craig Mountain to provide Fish and Game managers with information needed to draft an ecologically-based management plan. The results of the habitat/vegetation portion of the inventory are contained in this report. The responsibilities for the Craig Mountain project included: (1) vegetation data collection, and vegetation classification, to help produce a GIS-generated Craig Mountain vegetation map, (2) to determine the distribution and abundance of rare plants populations and make recommendations concerning their management, and (3) to establish a vegetation monitoring program to evaluate the effects of Fish and Game management actions, and to assess progress towards meeting habitat mitigation goals.

  14. Graduation Requirements and Procedures Graduation Requirements and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Degree Audit (DARS) or contact the department offering the major. Graduation Average Requirement The minimum

  15. The effects of fall and spring burning on water quality and vegetative cover in the Post Oak Savannah of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garza, Nick Ernest

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRE EPFECTS OF FALL AND SPRING BURNING ON WATER QUALITY AND VEGETATIVE COVER IN TRE POST OAK SAVANNAH OF TEKAS A Thesis by NICK ERNEST GARZA Jr. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1983 Major Subject: Range Science THE EFFECTS OF FALL AND SPRING BURNING ON WATER QUALITY AND VEGETATIVE COVER IN THE POST OAK SAVANNAH OF TEXAS A Thesis by NICK ERNEST GARZA Jr. Approved as to style...

  16. Documentation Requirements for Learning Disabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Documentation Requirements for Learning Disabilities Students, faculty, staff, and campus guests wishing to request accommodations due to learning disabilities should refer to the following documentation of interest. C) Documentation must be typed, dated, signed by the evaluator and submitted to ODR

  17. arctic vegetation amplify: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dynamics in arctic vegetation Edinburgh, University of - Research Archive Summary: Rapid climate change in Arctic regions is of concern due to important feedbacks between the...

  18. african vegetation phenology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rainy season. Further research is needed to address interaction between groundwater under climate change. 1. Introduction "Vegetation phenology" refers to the periodic biological...

  19. african vegetation fires: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    vegetation and climate change recorded in alpine bog sediments from the Borreguiles de la Virgen, Sierra Nevada, southern Spain Geosciences Websites Summary: to heating of the...

  20. Local Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: alocally...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Incentive-Based Policy for Vegetable-Agroforestry: a locally-appropriate adaptation and mitigation action (LAAMA) to climate change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH...

  1. ambiental ceniza vegetal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    roadside vegetation management policies and practices include the encouragement of quick plant growth after construction (to avoid soil erosion), the control of invasive species,...

  2. affects arabidopsis vegetative: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The vegetation reacts with changes in species composition and a decrease in biodiversity. Artificial snowing modifies some of these impacts: The soil frost is mitigated due to an...

  3. arctic vegetation damage: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gradient. Here we examine the complex interrelationships between patterned ground, climate, vegetation and soil along a north-south transect through all five bioclimate...

  4. arctic tundra vegetation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of woody vegetation in arctic tundra? Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: 33124, USA. Global climate warming is projected to promote the increase of woody plants, especially of...

  5. Combining MSS and AVHRR imagery to assess vegetation biomass and dynamics in an arid pastoral ecosystem, Turkana District, Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellis, J.E.; Swift, D.M.; Hart, T.C.; Dick, O.B.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landsat multi-spectral scanner (MSS) imagery was used to develop a vegetation type-biomass map of the 84,000 Km/sup 2/ Turkana District, Kenya. NOAA satellite advanced very high resolution radiometry (AVHRR) imagery was overlaid on the MSS map to trace the seasonal and annual dynamics of vegetation communities used by Turkana pastoral nomads, 1981-1984. Four regions (sub-sectional territories) were compared with respect to peak herbaceous biomass, woody canopy cover, and seasonal fluxes in total green biomass. Results demonstrated major variations among regions and between wet and dry season ranges within regions. Pastoral land use patterns appear to minimize effects of seasonal vegetation fluxes on livestock herds.

  6. Final environmental assessment for vegetation control at VHF stations, microwave stations, electrical substations, and pole yards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Southwestern Power Adm. operates very high frequency (VHF) and microwave radio stations, electrical substations, and pole yards for electric power transmission throughout AR, MO, and OK. Vegetation growth at the stations must be suppressed for safety of operation and personnel. Southwestern has been using a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control for this purpose; Federally- mandated reductions in staff and budgetary resources require Southwestern to evaluate all potentially efficient methods for vegetation control. Three alternatives were examined: no action, mechanical/manual control, and (proposed) a combination of mechanical/manual and herbicide control. Environmental impacts on air and water quality, wetlands, wildlife, endangered species, archaeological and other resources, farmland, human health, transportation, etc. were evaluated.

  7. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-5) - Big Eddy-Ostrander Transmission Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation from the rights of way and access roads for BPA's Big Eddy-Ostrander Transmission Line, beginning April and ending in May, 2001. A Checklist was completed for this project in accordance to the requirements identified in the Bonneville Power Administrations Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285). The Checklist evaluated the following areas: (1) Description of right-of-way and vegetation management needed; (2) Vegetation to be controlled; (3) Surrounding land use and landowner; (4) Natural Resource; (5) Vegetation control methods; (6) Debris disposal; (7) Monitoring; and (8) Appropriate environmental documentation. In preparation of this Supplement Analysis, the Checklist was reviewed. Specific information regarding the areas as identified above are described the attached checklist. This Supplement Analysis finds that: (1) the proposed actions are substantially consistent with the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS0285) and ROD; and (2) there are no new circumstances or information relevant to environmental concerns and bearing on the proposed actions or their impacts. Therefore, no further NEPA documentation is required.

  8. Managing Insect and Mite Pests in Vegetable Gardens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackman, John A.

    2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Growing your own vegetables is a pleasant and satisfying way to enjoy nature and save money. But managing garden pest populations in the vegetable garden isn't always easy. This publication discusses ways to accomplish that goal. 38 pages and 3...

  9. Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    Translational genomics of Vegetable Crops Las Vegas, NV July 21, 2005 David Francis and Allen Van Deynze At the recent ASHS meetings in Las Vegas, a workshop "Translational Genomics of Vegetable Crops interventions" (Minna and Gazdar, 1996). In applied plant science, "translational genomics" implies

  10. Vegetable Oil from Leaves and Stems: Vegetative Production of Oil in a C4 Crop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PETRO Project: Arcadia Biosciences, in collaboration with the University of California-Davis, is developing plants that produce vegetable oil in their leaves and stems. Ordinarily, these oils are produced in seeds, but Arcadia Biosciences is turning parts of the plant that are not usually harvested into a source of concentrated energy. Vegetable oil is a concentrated source of energy that plants naturally produce and is easily separated after harvest. Arcadia Biosciences will isolate traits that control oil production in seeds and transfer them into leaves and stems so that all parts of the plants are oil-rich at harvest time. After demonstrating these traits in a fast-growing model plant, Arcadia Biosciences will incorporate them into a variety of dedicated biofuel crops that can be grown on land not typically suited for food production

  11. The vegetation of Yucca Mountain: Description and ecology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, was monitored over a six-year period, from 1989 through 1994. Yucca Mountain is located at the northern limit of the Mojave Desert and is the only location being studied as a potential repository for high-level nuclear waste. Site characterization consists of a series of multidisciplinary, scientific investigations designed to provide detailed information necessary to assess the suitability of the Yucca Mountain Site as a repository. This vegetation description establishes a baseline for determining the ecological impact of site characterization activities; it porvides input for site characterization research and modeling; and it clarifies vegetation community dynamics and relationships to the physical environment. A companion study will describe the impact of site characterization of vegetation. Cover, density, production, and species composition of vascular plants were monitored at 48 Ecological Study Plots (ESPs) stratified in four vegetation associations. Precipitation, soil moisture, and maximum and minimum temperatures also were measured at each study plot.

  12. ForPeerReview From vegetable oils to polyurethanes: synthetic routes to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ForPeerReview Only From vegetable oils to polyurethanes: synthetic routes to polyols and main Auvergne, Remi; ICGM CAILLOL, Sylvain; ICGM, IAM Boutevin, Bernard; ICGM Keywords: vegetable oils, biobased polyols, polyurethanes, epoxidized vegetable oils, commercial polyols URL: http

  13. Interactions among flow, sediment deposition and aquatic vegetation in a channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zong, Lijun

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aquatic vegetation is commonly present in rivers in many forms. This thesis consists of two studies, which examine the flow structure around a patch of emergent, rigid vegetation in a laboratory channel. The vegetation ...

  14. Analysis of Vegetative on Six Different Landfill Cover Profiles in an Arid Environment.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, Stephen F.; McClellan, Yvonne; Reavis, Bruce A.; Dwyer, Brian P.; Newman, Gretchen; Wolters, Gale

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large-scale field demonstration comparing final landfill cover designs was constructed and monitored at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. Two conventional designs (a RCRA Subtitle 'D' Soil Cover and a RCRA Subtitle 'C' Compacted Clay Cover) were constructed side-by-side with four alternative cover test plots designed for arid environments. The demonstration was intended to evaluate the various cover designs based on their respective water balance performance, ease and reliability of construction, and cost. A portion of this project involves the characterization of vegetation establishment and growth on the landfill covers. The various prototype landfill covers were expected to have varying flux rates (Dwyer et al 2000). The landfill covers were further expected to influence vegetation establishment and growth, which may impact site erosion potential and long-term site integrity. Objectives of this phase were to quantify the types of plants occupying each site, the percentage of ground covered by these plants, the density (number of plants per unit area) of plants, and the plant biomass production. The results of this vegetation analysis are presented in this report.3 DRAFT07/06/14AcknowledgementsWe would like to thank all technical and support staff from Sandia and the USDA Forest Service's Rocky Mountain Station not included in the authors' list of this document for their valuable contributions to this research. We would also like to acknowledge the Department of Energy's Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area for funding this work.4

  15. The requirements discovery process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahill, A.T. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Systems and Industrial Engineering; Dean, F.F. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirement process. This paper provides a high-level overview of the requirements discovery process.

  16. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS DOE/EIS-0285/SA-08

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Clearing C-trees along the south side of the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The project involves controlling all tall growing trees (C-Trees) within the right-of-way. All work is to be done on the south side of centerline. Target vegetation is the tall growing Firs along the edge of the ROW, all of which is located within the back yards of the property owners along the right-of-way. The density of vegetation is low and consists of C-Trees located within backyards, with the branches growing towards the lines. Due to lack of access and past verbal agreements with the landowners, permission/agreement has been difficult to obtain from the property owners. Permission has now been obtained to remove the C-Trees within their back yards which, will soon be a hazard to our transmission line facility. We are working with the landowners to get them to plant low growing scrubs and ornamentals within the right-of-way and adjacent to the right-of-way. A follow up herbicide treatment is not planned because the trees being cut will not re-sprout. This right-of-way or project area is on a three to four year maintenance schedule. Little or no treatment should be required in the immediate future.

  17. BER Requirements Review 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Attendees 2015 ASCR Requirements Review 2015 Previous Reviews Requirements Review Reports Case Studies News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet...

  18. ASCR Requirements Review 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Requirements Review 2015 ASCR Attendees 2015 Previous Reviews Requirements Review Reports Case Studies News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet...

  19. Pacific northwest region vegetation and inventory monitoring system. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Max, T.A.; Schreuder, H.T.; Hazard, J.W.; Oswald, D.D.; Teply, J.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A grid sampling strategy was adopted for broad-scale inventory and monitoring of forest and range vegetation on National Forest System lands in the Pacific Northwest Region, USDA Forest Service. This paper documents the technical details of the adopted design and discusses alternative sampling designs that were considered. The design is flexible and can be used with many types of maps. The theory of point and change estimation is described, as well as estimates of variation that assess the statistical precision of estimates.

  20. Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

    This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

  1. Fresh Vegetables: Getting the Most Nutrition for Your Money

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    be poisonous. E-28 5-00 Fresh Vegetables Getting the Most Nutrition For Your Money By Jenna Anding* *Extension Nutrition Specialist, The Texas A&M University System. If there is a concern about the presence of contaminants on the vegetables, simply peel off... the skin. Keep in mind that peeling reduces nutritional value. P r e p a c ka g e d, prewashed vegetables like lettuce and baby carrots should be rinsed before they are eaten just in case any con- tamination occurred during processing or packaging. If you...

  2. Plant community composition and vegetation height, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sloan, Victoria; Norby, Richard; Siegrist, Julia; Iversen, Colleen; Brooks, Jonathan; Liebig, Jennifer; Wood, Sarah

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This dataset contains i) the results of field surveys of plant community composition and vegetation height made between 17th and 29th July 2012 in 48, 1 x 1 m plots located in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska and ii) results of a mapping exercise undertaken in August 2013 using two perpendicular transects across each polygon containing vegetation plots to determine the boundaries of vegetation communities described in 2012.

  3. Lysimeter study of vegetative uptake from saltstone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, C.E. Jr.

    1990-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Savannah River Site, liquid, low-level nuclear waste will be disposed of by incorporating the waste in concrete, a wasteform called saltstone. Saltstone monoliths will then be buried in the earth. To study the potential uptake of radionuclides by trees and other plants growing in the soil in the area containing buried saltstone, a lysimeter study has been in progress since 1984. Thirty two lysimeters were designed, constructed, and filled with soil. Saltstone samples, containing the liquid, low-level supernate from the tank 50 in-tank precipitation demonstration, were buried in some of the lysimeters. Other lysimeters, not containing saltstone, were used as controls. Crops, grass, and trees were planted in the lysimeters and sampled periodically to determine radionuclide concentrations. Water samples were also collected from the lysimeter sumps and analyzed for radionuclide content. This report documents the results of vegetative and lysimeter sump water measurements from the beginning of the project in November of 1984 through September of 1989. 6 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Vegetation study in support of the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peace, Gerald (Jerry) L.; Goering, Timothy James (GRAM inc., Albuquerque, NM); Knight, Paul J. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM); Ashton, Thomas S. (Marron and Associates, Albuquerque, NM)

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vegetation study was conducted in Technical Area 3 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico in 2003 to assist in the design and optimization of vegetative soil covers for hazardous, radioactive, and mixed waste landfills at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico and Kirtland Air Force Base. The objective of the study was to obtain site-specific, vegetative input parameters for the one-dimensional code UNSAT-H and to identify suitable, diverse native plant species for use on vegetative soil covers that will persist indefinitely as a climax ecological community with little or no maintenance. The identification and selection of appropriate native plant species is critical to the proper design and long-term performance of vegetative soil covers. Major emphasis was placed on the acquisition of representative, site-specific vegetation data. Vegetative input parameters measured in the field during this study include root depth, root length density, and percent bare area. Site-specific leaf area index was not obtained in the area because there was no suitable platform to measure leaf area during the 2003 growing season due to severe drought that has persisted in New Mexico since 1999. Regional LAI data was obtained from two unique desert biomes in New Mexico, Sevilletta Wildlife Refuge and Jornada Research Station.

  5. Award Types

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041cloth DocumentationProductsAlternativeOperationalAugust AugustInstruments on theAward Types Types of

  6. 3. MATERIAL CERTIFICATIONS REQUIRED NO RADIOGRAPHY REQUIRED.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    SHALL BE DYE PENETRANT INSPECTED. ASME SECTION IX. NO CODE STAMP REQUIRED. 1. WELDING TO BE PERFORMED is property of 1. ALL DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES 2. INTERPRET DIMENSIONS AND TOLERANCES PER ASME Y14.5M 3

  7. EIS-0097: Bonneville Power Administration Transmission Facilities Vegetation Management Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration prepared this statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic implications of various alternatives associated with implementing a vegetation management program.

  8. Columbia River Gorge Vegetation Management Project Final Environmental...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    appreciate your addressing in the assessment '" . 1. Chemical Maintenance Off right+f-way mortality- i.e, how willBPA insure that no impacts will result to vegetation and prope...

  9. Spatial and Temporal Dynamics of Salt Marsh Vegetation across Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Daehyun

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Biogeographic patterns across a landscape are developed by the interplay of environmental processes operating at different spatial and temporal scales. This research investigated dynamics of salt marsh vegetation on the Skallingen salt marsh...

  10. Flow-induced reconfiguration of buoyant and flexible aquatic vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    Plant posture can play a key role in the health of aquatic vegetation, by setting drag, controlling light availability, and mediating the exchange of nutrients and oxygen. We study the flow-induced reconfiguration of ...

  11. Drag, turbulence, and diffusion in flow through emergent vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    Aquatic plants convert mean kinetic energy into turbulent kinetic energy at the scale of the plant stems and branches. This energy transfer, linked to wake generation, affects vegetative drag and turbulence intensity. ...

  12. Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley...

  13. Spatial distribution of deposition within a patch of vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zong, Lijun

    This laboratory study describes the spatial pattern of deposition observed in a patch of vegetation located at the wall of a channel. There are two sources of sediment flux to the patch: the advection of particles across ...

  14. Flow and Transport in Regions with Aquatic Vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    This review describes mean and turbulent flow and mass transport in the presence of aquatic vegetation. Within emergent canopies, the turbulent length scales are set by the stem diameter and spacing, and the mean flow is ...

  15. Final Report of the NPS Vegetation Mapping Project at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

    1 Final Report of the NPS Vegetation Mapping Project at Fire Island National Seashore Scott DServe Julie Lundgren The Nature Conservancy April 2002 CMI-GRS ­02-03 Conservation Management Institute GIS

  16. Assessment of the type of cycling infrastructure required to...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Public Transit Benefits and Costs: Best Practices Guidebook Technology Roadmap: Biofuels for Transport ... further results Find Another Tool FIND TRANSPORTATION TOOLS...

  17. Influence of metal process micronic and submicronic particles on vegetables quality and ecosystems.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    sativa) and parsley (Petroselinum crispum), vegetables currently cultivated in kitchen gardens with high

  18. Uncertainty analysis of vegetation distribution in the northern high latitudes during the 21st century with a dynamic vegetation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Yueyang

    This study aims to assess how high-latitude vegetation may respond under various climate scenarios during the 21st century with a focus on analyzing model parameters induced uncertainty and how this uncertainty compares ...

  19. Timely septation requires SNAD-dependent spindle pole body localization of the septation initiation network components in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jung-Mi; Zeng, Cui Jing Tracy; Nayak, Tania; Shao, Rongzhong; Huang, An-Chi; Oakley, Berl R.; Liu, Bo

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    appearance at the division site. Unlike their functional counterparts in fission yeast, SEPK and SNAD were not required for vegetative growth but only for timely septation. Furthermore, down-regulation of negative regulators of the SIN suppressed...

  20. FES Requirements Review 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Review 2014 FES Attendees 2014 BES Requirements Review 2014 Requirements Review Reports Case Studies Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638...

  1. BES Requirements Review 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Review 2014 BES Requirements Review 2014 BES Attendees 2014 Requirements Review Reports Case Studies Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638...

  2. Allocating Reserve Requirements (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of present and possible future ways to allocate and assign benefits for reserve requirements.

  3. BER Science Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management and analysis of geospatial data involvingmanipulation, analysis, and display of geospatial data,Analysis and interpretation require mapping geospatial

  4. FES Science Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    FES Science Network Requirements Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted March 13 and 14, 2008 #12;FES Science Network Requirements Workshop Fusion Energy Sciences Program Office, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network Gaithersburg, MD ­ March 13 and 14, 2008 ESnet

  5. Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aspden, Andrew J; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50A-1148, Berkeley, CA 94720 (Authors 1, 2 & 3); Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (Author 4); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (Author 5)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae A. J. Aspden 1 , J. B.involved in type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) requires the use of ?generated by RT in type Ia supernovae should obey Bolgiano-

  6. Vegetable Gardening in South Central Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L GE organic matter improves drain age and aeration and allows for better root development. Ifthe soil is a sandy type, adding li beral amounts oforganic matter helps it hold water and nut rients'. Organic matter also serves as a food source... Globe', White Icicle; (Winter) Black Spanish, White Chinese Rutabaga - American Purple Top Spinach - Early Hybrid 7, Dixie Savoy, Bloomsdale; (summer production) New Zealand, Malabar (Basella alba) Squash - Early Prolific Straightneck, Goldneck, Dixie...

  7. Soil respiration at mean annual temperature predicts annual total across vegetation types and biomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3.0 License. Biogeosciences Soil respiration at mean annualI. L. , and Carvalho, J. E. M. : Effects of soil watercontent on soil res- piration in forests and cattle pastures

  8. Nutrient release from combustion residues of two contrasting herbaceous vegetation types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    (muffle and flame burning) to combust herbaceous biomass from contrasting nutrient level sites to estimate combustion methods yielded contrasting results, where temperatures greatly affected nutrient quantity by a variety of parame- ters such as fuel load quantity and quality, moisture content, ambient air temperature

  9. Nutritional requirements of sesame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eller, Joe C

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L)&RARYi ~st t~6~ 0F TEXACO NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS OF SESAME A Thesis By JOE C. ELLER Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in. partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of M... AS TER 0 F SCIENC E January 1958 Major Subject: Agronomy NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS OF SESAME A Thesis JOE C. ELLER Approved. as to style and content by. ' Chairman of Committee Head qg Department January 1958 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The author wishes...

  10. RPAM & Energy Order Requirements

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    430.1C, Real Property Asset Management and DOE O 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management Requirements, Overlap & Differences Office of...

  11. Required Annual Notices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Required Annual Notices The Women's Health and Cancer Rights Act of 1998 (WHCRA) The medical programs sponsored by LANS will not restrict benefits if you or your dependent...

  12. Transuranic Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

  13. Growing Fall Vegetables and Annuals in South Central Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsons, Jerry; Cotner, Sam; Johnson, Jerral; Janne, Everett; Stewart, J. W.; Roberts, Roland; Johnson, Shirley

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetable Variety Selection.. . . . . .. .. . . .. .. .. 7 Micro-Gardens for Mini-Places ............... 18 Establishing Vegetables in Summer Heat ....... 8 Compost Pile Valuable ...................... 19 Watering...-Sept. 1 Radish Aug. 1-Nov. 1 Aug. 13-Nov. 25 Aug. 30-Dec. 1 Spinach Aug. 15-Sept. 30 Sept. 1-0ct. 15 Sept. 15-Dec. 1 Squash, summer July 30-Aug. 30 Aug. 13-Sept. 10 Sept. 1-0ct. 1 Squash, winter July 1-July 30 July 10-Aug. 10 Aug. 1-Sept. 1 Tomato...

  14. E-print Network Topics: V

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cells vegetative compatibility groups vegetative compatibility types vegetative covers umtra vegetative cutting capacity vegetative filter strips vegetative growth yield...

  15. General Responsibilities and Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The material presented in this guide provides suggestions and acceptable ways of implementing DOE M 435.1-1 and should not be viewed as additional or mandatory requirements. The objective of the guide is to ensure that responsible individuals understand what is necessary and acceptable for implementing the requirements of DOE M 435.1-1.

  16. Novel Bioplastics and biocomposites from Vegetable Oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillip H. Henna

    2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymeric materials have been prevalent in our everyday lives for quite a long time. Most of today's polymeric materials are derived from nonrenewable petroleum-based feedstocks. Instabilities in the regions where petroleum is drilled, along with an increased demand in petroleum, have driven the price of crude oil to record high prices. This, in effect, increases the price of petroleum-based polymeric materials, which has caused a heightened awareness of renewable alternatives for polymeric feedstocks. Cellulose, starch, proteins and natural oils have all been examined as possible polymeric feedstocks. Natural oils are commercially available on a large scale and are relatively cheap. It is projected that the U.S. alone will produce 21 billion pounds of soybean oil in the period 2008/2009. Natural oils also have the advantages of inherent biodegradability, low toxicity, high purity and ready availability. Most natural oils possess a triglyceride structure as shown in Figure 1. Most natural oils have a unique distribution of fatty acid side chains, along with varying degrees of unsaturation per triglyceride. Common fatty acid side chains in naturally occurring oils are palmitic acid (C16:0), a 16 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; stearic acid (C18:0), an 18 carbon fatty acid with no unsaturation; oleic acid (C18:1), an 18 carbon fatty acid with one double bond; linoleic acid (C18:2), an 18 carbon fatty acid with two double bonds; and linolenic acid (C18:3), an 18 carbon fatty acid with three double bonds. Of course, there are other fatty acids with varying degrees of unsaturation, but their abundance is usually minimal. All of the unsaturated fatty acids mentioned have naturally occurring cis double bonds, which is common for most unsaturated fatty acids. In addition, the afore mentioned fatty acids have the first double bond at the position of carbon 9 (C9), followed by carbon 12 (C12), if there are two degrees of unsaturation, then at carbon 15 (C15), if there are three degrees of unsaturation. In addition, the double bonds are not in conjugation. Table 1 gives the fatty acid make-up of linseed oil. It can be seen that linseed oil has an average of 6.0 double bonds per triglyceride. Its fatty acid content consists of 5.4% palmitic acid (C16:0), 3.5% stearic acid (C18:0), 19% oleic acid (C18:1), 24 % linoleic acid (C18:2) and 47% linolenic (C18:3). Table 1 also gives the fatty acid composition and varying degrees of unsaturation for various other naturally-occurring natural vegetable oils. The regions of unsaturation in natural oils allow for interesting polymer chemistry to take place. Some of this interesting polymer science, however, involves chemical modification of the regions of unsaturation. Acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO) is prepared by epoxidation of the double bonds, followed by ring opening with acrylic acid. The resulting oil has both acrylate groups and hydroxyl groups. Wool and colleagues have further reacted the hydroxyl groups within the oil with maleic anhydride to produce maleated acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (MAESO). The MAESO has been copolymerized with styrene free radically to produce promising thermosetting sheet molding resins. Petrovi? and co-workers have directly ring opened the epoxidized oil to produce polyols that produce promising polyurethanes through condensation polymerization with diisocyanates. Our group's work initially focused on direct cationic copolymerization of the double bonds or conjugated double bonds of natural oils with monomers, such as styrene and divinylbenzene, to produce promising thermosetting resins. The only modification of the oils that was carried out in these studies was conjugation of the double bonds to enhance the reactivity of the oil. This work has been expanded recently with the incorporation of glass fiber to produce promising composites. We have also explored thermal polymerization techniques to make novel thermosets. This dissertation is divided into four chapters. The first chapter discusses the synthesis and characterization of biobased

  17. Site vegetation report: Terrestrial vegetation survey (1993--1995) for the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Ecological Monitoring Program (EcMP) was designed to investigate the long-term ecological trends in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems at the US Department of energy`s (DOE`s) Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) (DOE 1993). Field sampling was conducted during 1993, 1994, and 1995, until the program was terminated in late 1995. This report presents the terrestrial vegetation data that were gathered by the EcMP. The site is located on the Colorado Piedmont, east of the Front Range, between Boulder and Golden, approximately 25 km (16 miles) northwest of Denver. The topography and proximity of the Site to the mountain front result in an interesting mixture of prairie and mountain plant species. The Site is one of the few large, relatively undisturbed areas of its kind that remains along the Colorado Piedmont. Until 1989, the primary mission of the Site was the production of nuclear weapons components (DOE 1993). After production ceased, Site personnel shifted their focus to cleanup and closure.

  18. 9 Towards Adaptive Management of Native Vegetation in Regional Landscapes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgman, Mark

    management remains widely cited as the most logical and elegant frame- work for continuous improvement9 Towards Adaptive Management of Native Vegetation in Regional Landscapes David H Duncan1 of the `adaptive management' paradigm to natural resource man- agement, using regional management of native

  19. Global longterm passive microwave satellitebased retrievals of vegetation optical depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    with those observed in the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Normalized Difference Vegetation the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) extending back to 1981. The NDVI is derived by subtracting in the hydrological, energy and carbon cycles, through influences of land cover change on hydrologic responses

  20. RAPID SEPARATION OF ACTINIDES AND RADIOSTRONTIUM IN VEGETATION SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides and radiostrontium in vegetation samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis. The actinides in vegetation method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride matrix removal step, and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Lanthanum was separated rapidly and effectively from Am and Cm on DGA Resin. Alpha emitters are prepared using rare earth microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The purified {sup 90}Sr fractions are mounted directly on planchets and counted by gas flow proportional counting. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. The actinide and {sup 90}Sr in vegetation sample analysis can be performed in less than 8 h with excellent quality for emergency samples. The rapid fusion technique is a rugged sample digestion method that ensures that any refractory actinide particles or vegetation residue after furnace heating is effectively digested.

  1. Vegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    urbanization effects on the water cycle. Although there are many stormwater best management practices (BMPs (ET) and soil media water storage between storm events. Lazzarin et al. (2005) estimated that ET ratesVegetated Roof Water-Balance Model: Experimental and Model Results James A. Sherrard Jr.1

  2. Influence of Vegetation Management on Yield and Quality Surface Runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smeins, F. E.

    of this study was to determine the influence of vegetation characteristics, grazing systems and precipitation on surface runoff from rangeland on the Edwards Plateau region of Texas. Water yield, organic-N, N03-N, NH4-N, N02-N, total and ortho-P, Ca, Mg, K, p...

  3. Carbonaceous aerosol particles from common vegetation in the Grand Canyon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hallock, K.A.; Mazurek, M.A. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Cass, G.R. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Engineering Science)

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of visibility reduction in the Grand Canyon due to fine organic aerosol particles in the atmosphere has become an area of increased environmental concern. Aerosol particles can be derived from many emission sources. In this report, we focus on identifying organic aerosols derived from common vegetation in the Grand Canyon. These aerosols are expected to be significant contributors to the total atmospheric organic aerosol content. Aerosol samples from living vegetation were collected by resuspension of surface wax and resin components liberated from the leaves of vegetation common to areas of the Grand Canyon. The samples were analyzed using high-resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Probable identification of compounds was made by comparison of sample spectra with National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) mass spectral references and positive identification of compounds was made when possible by comparison with authentic standards as well as NIST references. Using these references, we have been able to positively identify the presence of n-alkane and n-alkanoic acid homolog series in the surface waxes of the vegetation sampled. Several monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, and diterpenes were identified also as possible biogenic aerosols which may contribute to the total organic aerosol abundance leading to visibility reduction in the Grand Canyon.

  4. Fire Feedbacks with Vegetation and Alternative Stable States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckage, Brian

    landscape composition and that (ii) hurricane disturbances can mediate the frequency of fire that leads frequency. Our results indicate that gradual changes in global climate that influence disturbance frequency.Beckage@uvm.edu Positive feedbacks between vegetation and fire disturbance may lead to nonlinear ecosystem responses

  5. Vegetarian Chili 2 tbsp. olive or vegetable oil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    stock 2 cups water (plus more if too thick) 1 (32oz) can crushed tomatoes 1 (14oz) can black beans 1 (14-5 minutes to soften vegetables. Deglaze pan with broth and water, add tomatoes, beans, lentils, and barleyoz) can of garbanzo beans 1 (14oz) can of dark red kidney beans 1 (14oz) can of green lentils

  6. Beyond Biodiesel Running on Straight Vegetable Oil (SVO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaye, Jason P.

    20 Beyond Biodiesel ­ Running on Straight Vegetable Oil (SVO) The green tree has many branches in the development and promotion of biodiesel for nearly two decades. Technologies based on the use of hydrogen in a low-percentage mixture with petroleum fuel. Hence the development of biodiesel. Paul Trella, New

  7. Sweet potatoes are a warm-weather vegetable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweet potatoes are a warm- weather vegetable related to the morning glory family.Although Louisiana sweet potatoes are often referred to as yams, they truly are sweet potatoes. The Louisiana producers began calling the orange-fleshed sweet potatoes grown in Louisiana"yams" to distinguish them from

  8. Promulgating Nuclear Safety Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Applies to all Nuclear Safety Requirements Adopted by the Department to Govern the Conduct of its Nuclear Activities. Cancels DOE P 410.1. Canceled by DOE N 251.85.

  9. BES Science Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedOffice of Basic Energy Sciences. This is LBNL report LBNL-BES Science Network Requirements Report of the Basic Energy

  10. Timeline for Net Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x By July 31 of each Forecast Year, BPA publishes all Load Following customers' Net Requirements data for the two years of the upcoming Rate Period. 17.6.1 7312010 Yes...

  11. Effects of Hurricane Katrina on the Mammalian and Vegetative Communities of the Barrier Islands of Mississippi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scoggin, Annaliese K.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The barrier islands of the gulf coast of the U.S. have been shaped and changed by hurricanes for centuries. These storms can alter the vegetation of the barrier islands by redistributing sediments, scouring off vegetation, physical damage...

  12. The role of vegetation in the CO[subscript 2] flux from a tropical urban neighbourhood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velasco, E.

    Urban surfaces are usually net sources of CO[subscript 2]. Vegetation can potentially have an important role in reducing the CO[subscript 2] emitted by anthropogenic activities in cities, particularly when vegetation is ...

  13. Bales away... Hay baler can be used to roll up plastic used for vegetables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    compress plastic used for growing vegetables into a 4-feet by 5-feet ball, saving growers money in labor's dirty, often with vegetable material left in and it's black, not usually favored by recycling companies

  14. Optimization of Geoscience Laser Altimeter System waveform metrics to support vegetation measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefsky, Michael

    Optimization of Geoscience Laser Altimeter System waveform metrics to support vegetation GLAS Optimization Remote sensing Vegetation structure The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) has optimized a noise coefficient which could be constant or vary according to observation period or noise

  15. Best Management Practices for Aquatic Vegetation Management Principal Investigator: Joseph E. Morris

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koford, Rolf R.

    . Develop educational materials related to aquatic plant identification and their specific managementBest Management Practices for Aquatic Vegetation Management Principal Investigator: Joseph E vegetation management with the ultimate goal of producing the best management practices protocol in Iowa

  16. Requirements | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS September 9,Award RecipientsActMission to ChinaRequirements Requirements

  17. The effects of nutrition education on attitudes and behaviors of children regarding fruits and vegetables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Sharon Elaine, 1976-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 1997). This questionnaire has also been used in a study involving Junior Girl Scouts and similar reliabilities of alpha=0. 74 for the vegetable portion and alpha=0. 72 for the fruit portion were reported (Cullen et al. , 1997). The questionnaire... for interventions to change nutrition behavior (Cullen et. al. , 1997). Importance of Eating Fruits and Vegetables Diets lacking in fruits and vegetables can contribute to chronic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and some cancers. Fruits and vegetables...

  18. Thin-layer drying behavior of vegetable wastes from wholesale market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.; Iguaz, A.; Esnoz, A.; Virseda, P.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thin-layer drying behavior of vegetable wastes (as a mix of lettuce and cauliflower leaves) from wholesale market for a temperature range of 50--150 C was determined. Drying of this material was found to take part only in the falling-rate period. The experimental data were fitted to the simple exponential model and the Page model. Both models have good prediction capability. Effective diffusion coefficient varied from 6.03 x 10{sup {minus}9} to 3.15 x 10{sup {minus}8} m{sup 2}/s with an activation energy of diffusion of 19.82 kJ/mol. The temperature dependence of the effective diffusion coefficient was expressed by an Arrhenius-type relationship.

  19. Trends in vegetation activity and their climatic correlates: China 1982 to 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    suggests an increasing carbon stock in forest biomass in China, which supports previous studies basedTrends in vegetation activity and their climatic correlates: China 1982 to 1998 JINGFENG XIAO in vegetation activity and their correlation with climate variability in China between 1982 and 1998. Vegetation

  20. Similar effects of residential and non-residential vegetation on bird diversity in suburban neighbourhoods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Jeff W.

    Similar effects of residential and non-residential vegetation on bird diversity in suburban the Queen in Right of Canada 2013 Abstract Estimating the relative importance of vegetation on residential land (gardens, yards, and street-trees) and vegetation on non-residential land (parks and other large

  1. Sensing vegetation growth with reflected GPS signals Eric E. Small,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Kristine

    Vegetative Index (NDVI) to gauge vegetation status. NDVI is inversely correlated with the magnitude- drological hypotheses [RodriguezIturbe, 2000]. Remote sensing using microwave radar is one approach for doc- umenting vegetation growth. Unlike optical methods, radar measurements are not hindered by cloud cover

  2. A vegetational analysis of an East Texas bottomland hardwood area with special emphasis on wood duck habitat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrill, William Irl

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in each of 5 activities during each hour of the day. 46 LIST OF FIGURES Figures Page Map of the Angelina-Neches Scientific Area in Jasper County, Texas, showing the four vegetative types and the major water bodies including the Angelina and Neches...) with days at each level on a line and the average designated by a dashed line. 7 Nap of the Angelina-Neches Scientific Area in Jasper County, Texas, showing the ten sloughs (shaded) that wood duck activity transects were run on marked by a number...

  3. Soil and vegetation response to soil compaction and forest floor removal after aspen harvesting. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alban, D.H.; Host, G.E.; Elioff, J.D.; Shadis, D.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reduced soil porosity and organic matter removal have been identified as common factors associated with loss of forest productivity (Powers et al. 1990). In both agriculture and forestry, management activities can modify soil porosity and organic matter with resultant impacts on vegetative growth. As part of a nationwide long-term soil productivity (LTSP) study soil porosity and organic matter are being experimentally manipulated on large plots to determine the impacts of such manipulations on growth and species diversity for a wide range of forest types.

  4. Runoff water quality and vegetation production on reclaimed mine spoil in the Post Oak Savannah of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Losensky, Karen Mae

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    since the 1970's. This increase is due to a switch from the reliance on oil and gas to coal by private industries and public utilites. Texas has 110 billion tons of lignite of which 10. 4 billion tons can be recovered by strip mining. This means more...RUNOFF WATER QUALITY AND VEGETATION PRODUCTION ON RECLAIMED MINE SPOIL IN THE POST OAK SAVANNAH OF TEXAS A Thesis by KAREN MAE LOSENSKY Submitted to rhe Graduate College of Texas AAM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

  5. Requirements Definition Stage

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter addresses development of a Software Configuration Management Plan to track and control work products, analysis of the system owner/users' business processes and needs, translation of those processes and needs into formal requirements, and planning the testing activities to validate the performance of the software product.

  6. Requirements for Xenon International

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  7. Assignment Types UTS LIBRARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    Assignment Types UTS LIBRARY February 2013 Academic Writing Guide Part 2 ­ Assignment Types: This section outlines the basic types of written assignments, providing structural elements and examples. #12;2 II. Assignment Types 1. Essay Writing

  8. Activity of polymerized trichloroacetic acid for highway vegetation control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiedenfeld, R. P

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mem r ember Play 1/74 ABSTRACT Activity of Polymer- zed Trichloroacetic Acid for Highway Vegetation Control. (May 1/74) Hobert Phillip Wieaenfeld, B. S. , California State University, Humboldt Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Wayne G. Mc... applied to highway roadsides near Fort Worth, Lufkin and Yoakum, Texas in the spring of 1g'7$. Two polymerizing activates which differed in their solubility were used. TCA polymerized with the more soluble activate and applied at a rate of '3 lbs...

  9. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  10. Vegetation survey of Pen Branch and Four Mile Creek wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One hundred-fifty plots were recently sampled (vegetational sampling study) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive characterization of the vascular flora, in four predetermined strata (overstory, Understory, shrub layer, and ground cover), was undertaken to determine dominance, co-dominance, and the importance value (I.V.) of each species. These results will be used by the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) to evaluate the environmental status of Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, and two upland pine stands. Objectives of this study were to: Describe in detail the plant communities previously mapped with reference to the topography and drainage, including species of plants present: Examine the successional trends within each sampling area and describe the extent to which current vegetation communities have resulted from specific earlier vegetation disturbances (e.g., logging and grazing); describe in detail the botanical field techniques used to sample the flora; describe the habitat and location of protected and/or rare species of plants; and collect and prepare plant species as herbarium quality specimens. Sampling was conducted at Four Mile Creek and Pen Branch, and in two upland pine plantations of different age growth.

  11. An inventory of the original vegetation of the Palmetto Bend Reservoir site in Jackson County, Texas with respect to potential eutrophication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crocker, Benjamin Rush

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    left on the bottom of the reservoir (1) (2). Leentvaar reported on a study of Lake Brokopondo in Surinam, South America (3). Within 3 to 4 weeks after filling, dissolved oxygen con- centrations were zero below 4 meters and large scale H S production... boundaries. They were ran- domly distributed throughout the vegetative population. With this method, all of the plants inside the boundaries of the quadrat were catalogued and measured, a time-consuming process usually requiring a great deal of equipment...

  12. Mineral Requirements of Sheep.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1918-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    constituents in feed, residues, and excrements were estimated. In connection with other digestion experiments, estimates were made of certain ash constituents in feeds, excrements and urine. The results of this work throw light upon the mineral requirements...,11 grams phosphoric acid. The ratio of lime to phosphoric acid in tri- calcium phosphate is 1 :0.80. Table 7.-Average magnesia eaten and digested. BALANCE EXPEBIMENTS In twenty tests with ten rations, the urine was analyzed in addition to the feeds...

  13. LEGACY MANAGEMENT REQUIRES INFORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CONNELL, C.W.; HILDEBRAND, R.D.

    2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ''Legacy Management Requires Information'' describes the goal(s) of the US Department of Energy's Office of Legacy Management (LM) relative to maintaining critical records and the way those goals are being addressed at Hanford. The paper discusses the current practices for document control, as well as the use of modern databases for both storing and accessing the data to support cleanup decisions. In addition to the information goals of LM, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the ''Tri-Party Agreement'' (TPA) is one of the main drivers in documentation and data management. The TPA, which specifies discrete milestones for cleaning up the Hanford Site, is a legally binding agreement among the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The TPA requires that DOE provide the lead regulatory agency with the results of analytical laboratory and non-laboratory tests/readings to help guide them in making decisions. The Agreement also calls for each signatory to preserve--for at least ten years after the Agreement has ended--all of the records in its or its contractors, possession related to sampling, analysis, investigations, and monitoring conducted. The tools used at Hanford to meet TPA requirements are also the tools that can satisfy the needs of LM.

  14. BER Science Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2010 ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research, of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the science programs funded by BER. The requirements identified at the workshop are summarized and described in more detail in the case studies and the Findings section. A number of common themes emerged from the case studies and workshop discussions. One is that BER science, like many other disciplines, is becoming more and more distributed and collaborative in nature. Another common theme is that data set sizes are exploding. Climate Science in particular is on the verge of needing to manage exabytes of data, and Genomics is on the verge of a huge paradigm shift in the number of sites with sequencers and the amount of sequencer data being generated.

  15. Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining% accuracy. ­ 2-5% of pre-production capital Types of Cost Estimates #12;3. Definitive ­ Based on definitive-even $ Production Level Fixed Cost Break-even $ Production Level Cost-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or

  16. STOMP Sparse Vegetation Evapotranspiration Model for the Water-Air-Energy Operational Mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Anderson L.; White, Mark D.; Freeman, Eugene J.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Water-Air-Energy (WAE) Operational Mode of the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) numerical simulator solves the coupled conservation equations for water mass, air mass, and thermal energy in multiple dimensions. This addendum describes the theory, input file formatting, and application of a soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) scheme for STOMP that is based on a sparse vegetation evapotranspiration model. The SVAT scheme is implemented as a boundary condition on the upper surface of the computational domain and has capabilities for simulating evaporation from bare surfaces as well as evapotranspiration from sparsely vegetated surfaces populated with single or multiple plant species in response to meteorological forcings. With this extension, the model calculates water mass, air mass and thermal energy across a boundary surface in addition to root-water transport between the subsurface and atmosphere. This mode represents the barrier extension of the WAE mode and is designated as STOMP-WAE-B. Input for STOMP-WAE-B is specified via three input cards and include: atmospheric conditions through the Atmospheric Conditions Card; time-invariant plant species data through the Plant Properties Card; and time varying plant species data through the Boundary Conditions Card. Two optional cards, the Observed Data and UCODE Control Cards allow use of STOMP-WAE with UCODE in an inverse mode to estimate model parameters. STOMP-WAE was validated by solving a number of test problems from the literature that included experimental observations as well as analytical or numerical solutions. Several of the UNSAT-H verification problems are included along with a benchmark simulation derived from a recently published intercode comparison for barrier design tools. Results show that STOMP is able to meet, and in most cases, exceed performance of other commonly used simulation codes without having to resort to may of their simplifying assumptions. Use of the fully coupled STOMP simulator to guide barrier design will result in optimized designs with reduced construction costs; reduced environmental impacts at borrow sites; and minimized post-closure care and monitoring needs, while meeting regulatory requirements.

  17. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of fresh in California for power could plant require coolingCapacity in California for 1985 Power Plant Type Electricityfor the mix of power plants the California pro;ected by the

  18. Water Requirements for Future Energy production in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathaye, J.A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for 1985 Power Plant Type Electricity Generation (1015BTU)Electricity Generation and Capacity for Po'". :cr Plant Typeelectricity generation energy will form the major por- tion of water requirements Since coast, almost all the power for future plants

  19. BES Science Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian; Dart, Eli; Biocca, A.; Carlson, R.; Chen, J.; Cotter, S.; Dattoria, V.; Davenport, J.; Gaenko, A.; Kent, P.; Lamm, M.; Miller, S.; Mundy, C.; Ndousse, T.; Pederson, M.; Perazzo, A.; Popescu, R.; Rouson, D.; Sekine, Y.; Sumpter, B.; Wang, C.-Z.; Whitelam, S.; Zurawski, J.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivityfor the US Department of Energy Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office ofScience programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years.

  20. NERSC Requirements Workshop November

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif Directorate - Events -ExascalemadeArchivalRequirements

  1. Requirements Review Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliability TechnologyRenewalReportReportsJ.TO9Complex

  2. The effects of soil type and chemical treatment on nickel speciation in refinery enriched soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The effects of soil type and chemical treatment on nickel speciation in refinery enriched soils Aerial deposition of Ni from a refinery in Port Colborne, Ontario, Canada has resulted in the enrichment in vegetable crops grown in the vicinity of the refinery. Conversely, dolomitic lime- stone additions resulted

  3. Number Plastic Type Common Items Number of Items (tally) 1 polyethylene terephthalate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    End Time: Number Plastic Type Common Items Number of Items (tally) 1 polyethylene terephthalate Soft drink, water and beer bottles; mouthwash bottles; peanut butter containers; salad dressing and vegetable oil containers; ovenable food trays. 2 high density polyethylene Milk jugs, juice bottles; bleach

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES Plan Requirements Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES Plan Requirements Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group Career: GPH RQ = Requirement Program: 01848 LN = Line Plan: 3200MPH RG 5298 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES REQUIREMENTS, 643, 653, 675, 677 or 695 LN 0030 - Environmental Health Sciences: EHS 501, 506, 507 or 508 LN 0040

  5. Nutrient leaching characteristics of vegetation common to Texas reservoir sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weldon, Clark Pierce

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    decomposition of vegetation and the higher rate of nitrogen release that was observed. The fact that oxygen depletion was greatest when nitrogen 80 S 60 o m bO o 4 4J Distilled Water Lake Somerville Yegua Creek 40 20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13... Lake Somerville Yegua Creek 20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Time in Days Figure 6: K)eldahl Nitrogen Release with Time for Coastal Bermuda Grass Using Three Different Leaching Solutions Under Aeration (Test Series 1) m 6 c Distilled Water...

  6. Types of Commissioning

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Several commissioning types exist to address the specific needs of equipment and systems across both new and existing buildings. The following commissioning types provide a good overview.

  7. ENGINEERING PHYSICS BSE Plan Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    ENGINEERING PHYSICS BSE Plan Requirements 1 Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group Career: UENG RQ = Requirement Program: LN = Line Plan: 2990BSE RG 6394 ENGINEERING PHYSICS MAJOR REQUIREMENTS Effective FA12/1910 (09/04/2012) RQ 4925 Physics Technical Subjects (C or higher) Effective FA12/1910 (09/04/2012) LN 0010

  8. Some dry season plants recommended as edible vegetables in Anyigba, Kogi State, Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taiga, AKPOVUGHAYE Dr.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vegetables cultivated in Nigeria are: cabbage, lettuce,Community in Kogi State, Nigeria, there are inadequateGovernment Area, Kogi State, Nigeria. Each of the fresh

  9. ASCR Science Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

    2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2009 ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by ASCR. The ASCR facilities anticipate significant increases in wide area bandwidth utilization, driven largely by the increased capabilities of computational resources and the wide scope of collaboration that is a hallmark of modern science. Many scientists move data sets between facilities for analysis, and in some cases (for example the Earth System Grid and the Open Science Grid), data distribution is an essential component of the use of ASCR facilities by scientists. Due to the projected growth in wide area data transfer needs, the ASCR supercomputer centers all expect to deploy and use 100 Gigabit per second networking technology for wide area connectivity as soon as that deployment is financially feasible. In addition to the network connectivity that ESnet provides, the ESnet Collaboration Services (ECS) are critical to several science communities. ESnet identity and trust services, such as the DOEGrids certificate authority, are widely used both by the supercomputer centers and by collaborations such as Open Science Grid (OSG) and the Earth System Grid (ESG). Ease of use is a key determinant of the scientific utility of network-based services. Therefore, a key enabling aspect for scientists beneficial use of high performance networks is a consistent, widely deployed, well-maintained toolset that is optimized for wide area, high-speed data transfer (e.g. GridFTP) that allows scientists to easily utilize the services and capabilities that the network provides. Network test and measurement is an important part of ensuring that these tools and network services are functioning correctly. One example of a tool in this area is the recently developed perfSONAR, which has already shown its usefulness in fault diagnosis during the recent deployment of high-performance data movers at NERSC and ORNL. On the other hand, it is clear that there is significant work to be done in the area of authentication and access control - there are currently compatibility problems and differing requirements between the authentication systems in use at different facilities, and the policies and mechanisms in use at different facilities are sometimes in conflict. Finally, long-term software maintenance was of concern for many attendees. Scientists rely heavily on a large deployed base of software that does not have secure programmatic funding. Software packages for which this is true include data transfer tools such as GridFTP as well as identity management and other software infrastructure that forms a critical part of the Open Science Grid and the Earth System Grid.

  10. 488-D Ash Basin Vegetative Cover Treatibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, Christopher; Marx, Don; Blake, John; Adriano, Domy; Koo, Bon-Jun; Czapka, Stephen

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 488-D Ash Basin is an unlined containment basin that received ash and coal reject material from the operation of a powerhouse at the USDOE's Savannah River Site, SC. They pyretic nature of the coal rejects has resulted in the formation of acidic drainage (AD), which has contributed to groundwater deterioration and threatens biota in down gradient wetlands. Establishment of a vegetative cover was examined as a remedial alternative for reducing AD generation within this system by enhanced utilization of rainwater and subsequent non-point source water pollution control. The low nutrient content, high acidity, and high salinity of the basin material, however, was deleterious to plant survivability. As such, studies to identify suitable plant species and potential adaptations, and pretreatment techniques in the form of amendments, tilling, and/or chemical stabilization were needed. A randomized block design consisting of three subsurface treatments (blocks) and five duplicated surface amendments (treatments) was developed. One hundred inoculated pine trees were planted on each plot. Herbaceous species were also planted on half of the plots in duplicated 1-m2 beds. After two growing seasons, deep ripping, subsurface amendments and surface covers were shown to be essential for the successful establishment of vegetation on the basin. This is the final report of the study.

  11. Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boisvert, Jeff

    05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or first cost or capital investment): ­ Expenditures made to acquire or develop capital assets ­ Three main classes of capital costs: 1. Depreciable Investment: · Investment allocated

  12. Effects of various uranium leaching procedures on soil: Short-term vegetation growth and physiology. Progress report, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, N.T.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant volumes of soil containing elevated levels of uranium exist in the eastern United States. The contamination resulted from the development of the nuclear industry in the United States requiring a large variety of uranium products. The contaminated soil poses a collection and disposal problem of a magnitude that justifies the development of decontamination methods. Consequently, the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development formed the Uranium Soils Integrated Demonstration (USID) program to address the problem. The fundamental goal of the USID task group has been the selective extraction/leaching or removal of uranium from soil faster, cheaper, and safer than what can be done using current conventional technologies. The objective is to selectively remove uranium from soil without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics and without generating waste that is difficult to manage and/or dispose of. However, procedures developed for removing uranium from contaminated soil have involved harsh chemical treatments that affect the physicochemical properties of the soil. The questions are (1) are the changes in soil properties severe enough to destroy the soil`s capacity to support and sustain vegetation growth and survival? and (2) what amendments might be made to the leached soil to return it to a reasonable vegetation production capacity? This study examines the vegetation-support capacity of soil that had been chemically leached to remove uranium. The approach is to conduct short-term germination and phytotoxicity tests for evaluating soils after they are subjected to various leaching procedures followed by longer term pot studies on successfully leached soils that show the greatest capacity to support plant growth. This report details the results from germination and short-term phytotoxicity testing of soils that underwent a variety of leaching procedures at the bench scale at ORNL and at the pilot plant at Fernald.

  13. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONOPS, collection parameters and processor settings. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications

  14. Application of Reinforcement Learning to Requirements Engineering: Requirements Tracing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Jane E.

    of the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) can be appreciated by the customers who request and expect delivery the phases of the SDLC, a number of steps can be taken. Requirements tracing ensures that requirements

  15. Mapping swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) seed productivity using spectral values and vegetation indices in managed wetlands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahilly, P.J.A.; Li, D.; Guo, Q.; Zhu, J.; Ortega, R.; Quinn, N.W.T.; Harmon, T.C.

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work examines the potential to predict the seed productivity of a key wetland plant species using spectral reflectance values and spectral vegetation indices. Specifically, the seed productivity of swamp timothy (Cripsis schenoides) was investigated in two wetland ponds, managed for waterfowl habitat, in California's San Joaquin Valley. Spectral reflectance values were obtained and associated spectral vegetation indices (SVI) calculated from two sets of high resolution aerial images (May 11, 2006 and June 9, 2006) and were compared to the collected vegetation data. Vegetation data were collected and analyzed from 156 plots for total aboveground biomass, total aboveground swamp timothy biomass, and total swamp timothy seed biomass. The SVI investigated included the Simple Ratio (SR), Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI), Transformed Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (TSAVI), Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index (MSAVI), and Global Environment Monitoring Index (GEMI). We evaluated the correlation of the various SVI with in situ vegetation measurements for linear, quadratic, exponential and power functions. In all cases, the June image provided better predictive capacity relative to May, a result that underscores the importance of timing imagery to coincide with more favorable vegetation maturity. The north pond with the June image using SR and the exponential function (R{sup 2}=0.603) proved to be the best predictor of swamp timothy seed productivity. The June image for the south pond was less predictive, with TSAVI and the exponential function providing the best correlation (R{sup 2}=0.448). This result was attributed to insufficient vegetal cover in the south pond (or a higher percentage of bare soil) due to poor drainage conditions which resulted in a delay in swamp timothy germination. The results of this work suggest that spectral reflectance can be used to estimate seed productivity in managed seasonal wetlands.

  16. Beryllium7 in soils and vegetation along an arid precipitation gradient in Owens Valley, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmore, Andrew J.

    Beryllium7 in soils and vegetation along an arid precipitation gradient in Owens Valley, California; revised 29 March 2011; accepted 1 April 2011; published 7 May 2011. [1] Beryllium7 is a potentially potential as a sediment tracer in desert environments. Beryllium7 in vegetation and the upper few cm of soil

  17. Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme and implementation of a new numerical scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moelders, Nicole

    ii Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme and implementation of a new.S. Fairbanks, Alaska August 2005 #12;iii Abstract The Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil-Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS........................................................................................................................... 24 Evaluation of snow depth and soil temperatures predicted by the Hydro- Thermodynamic Soil

  18. Arctic Region Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moelders, Nicole

    Arctic Region Evaluation of the Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS) Pamela Spier, University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK Abstract This paper presents an evaluation of the Hydro. Introduction and Motivation The Hydro-Thermodynamic Soil Vegetation Scheme (HTSVS, Kramm et al. 1996, Mölders

  19. Comparing Optical and Microwave Remote Sensing-based Vegetation Density over Mongolia for 1988-2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    Vegetation Index (NDVI), derived from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) series.vandijk@csiro.au Abstract ­ Vegetation density plays an important role in water and energy balance. Satellite-based optical product (Tucker et al., 2005). It can provide a relatively high spatial resolution product (up to 1km

  20. Shrub thicket vegetation on tropical granitic inselbergs (French Guiana) Sarthou, Corinne1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Shrub thicket vegetation on tropical granitic inselbergs (French Guiana) Sarthou, Corinne1@mnhn.fr Abstract. In French Guiana, inselbergs are granite outcrops rising abruptly from the surrounding rain substrate. Shrub granitic vegetation, organised in thickets on open exposed rocks of inselbergs

  1. Climate, Livestock, and Vegetation: What Drives Fire Increase in the Arid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    : burning; arid ecosystems; livestock; climate; broad-scale climate; Southern Russia; socio-economic change by decreasing livestock numbers, vegetation changes, climate change, or interactions of these factors. OurClimate, Livestock, and Vegetation: What Drives Fire Increase in the Arid Ecosystems of Southern

  2. VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER DATA AT C-BAND AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER DATA AT C-BAND AND KU for submission to the university library. Date Dr. David Long Chair, Graduate Committee Accepted of Engineering and Technology #12;ABSTRACT VEGETATION CLASSIFICATION USING SEASONAL VARIATIONS OF SCATTEROMETER

  3. VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH WATERSHED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    VEGETATED ROOFS FOR URBAN ECOSYSTEM REMEDIATION: PERFORMANCE AND POLICY IN THE TANYARD BRANCH the urbanization process. This study evaluated the performance and feasibility of using vegetated or green roof systems for urban ecosystem remediation. The stormwater retention performance of a thin-layer green roof

  4. Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems Andre O. Desjarlais, Abdi Zaltash, and Jerald A. Atchley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Thermal Performance of Vegetative Roofing Systems Andre O. Desjarlais, Abdi Zaltash, and Jerald A purposes. #12;ABSTRACT Vegetative roofing, otherwise known as green or garden roofing, has seen tremendous growth in the last decade in the United States. The numerous benefits that green roofs provide have

  5. The Potential for Reducing Urban Air Temperatures and Energy Consumption Through Vegetative Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Consumption Through Vegetative Coolingt Dan M. Kurn, Sarah E. Bretz, Benson Huang*, Hashem Akbari Heat Island Consumption Through Vegetative Cooling May 1994 Dan M. Kum, Sarah E. Bretz, Benson Huang, and Hashem Akbari in obtaining the data used in this study. Disclaimer The research reported here was funded in part

  6. P.M. Vermeersch (ed.) 3 -WOODY VEGETATION AND ITS USE DURING THE NEOLITHIC AT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinova, Elena

    because they have been submitted for 14 C dating. The site is located in a tributary wadi of the wadi). The modern arboreal vegetation of the Tree Shelter wadi is limited to a lonely Acacia tree at the en- trance of the wadi. The modern vegetation in the broad area of the Red Sea coastal land between wadi Qena

  7. Vegetation responses in Alaskan arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    by insulating vegetation from winter wind and temperature extremes, modifying winter soil temperaturesVegetation responses in Alaskan arctic tundra after 8 years of a summer warming and winter snow ) open-topped fiberglass chambers (OTCs) to study the effects of changes in winter snow cover and summer

  8. Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements, originally presented on June 25, 2013.

  9. The consequences of pleistocene climate change on lowland neotropical vegetation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Oliveira, P.E.; Colinvaux, P.A. (Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama City (Panama))

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Palynological reconstructions indicate that lowland tropical America was subject to intense cooling during the last ice-age. The descent of presently montane taxa into the lowlands of Amazonia and Minas Gerais indicate temperature depressions ranging from 5[degrees]C to 9[degrees]C cooler-than-present. The strengthened incursion of southerly airmasses caused a reassortment of vegetation throughout Amazonia. Presently allopatric species are found to have been sympatric as novel forest assemblages and formed and dissolved. Modest drying, perhaps a 20% reduction in precipitation, accounts for all the records that show a Pleistocene expansion of savanna. No evidence is found to support the fragmentation of Amazonian forests during glacial times, and the hypothesis of forest refuges as an explanation of tropical speciation is rejected on empirical grounds.

  10. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-10)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. BPA plans to conduct vegetation control with the goal of removing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission line. BPA's overall goal is to have low-growing plant communities along the rights-of-way to control the development of potentially threatening vegetation. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

  11. Mapping of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation Using Autonomous Underwater Vehicles in Nearshore Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Mark E.; Miller, Lee M.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Ewert, Daniel W.

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) equipped with sidescan sonar was investigated for determining the boundaries of nearshore submerged aquatic vegetation beds, specifically eelgrass (Zostera marina). Shifts in eelgrass bed morphology, size, and distribution are used as indicators in monitoring programs to measure the impacts of coastal development and environmental stressors on eelgrass and to establish the efficacy of restoration programs. However, many monitoring programs necessarily extend over multiple-year time periods. Therefore, techniques that are easily reproducible, accurate, and cost-effective can demonstrate distinct advantages over some of the more traditional and labor-intensive methods, such as diver assessments and transects of shoot counts. Remote monitoring of eelgrass beds using satellite and aerial imagery has been demonstrated with moderate success, but requires groundtruthing, which can be costly and which frequently cannot delineate the deeper boundaries of eelgrass beds. One possible means for low-cost mapping is the use of AUVs equipped with acoustic imaging hardware. AUVs provide an ideal platform, because they can be deployed by small teams (two people), they are highly maneuverable, they can cover large areas over a relatively short time period (3knot operational speed), and they are equipped with multiple oceanographic instruments for correlated data collection. This paper describes the use of sidescan-equipped AUV technology deployed over multiple time periods at the same location where imagery of eelgrass beds was obtained and analyzed for comparative purposes.

  12. Modeled Impacts of Cover Crops and Vegetative Barriers on Corn Stover Availability and Soil Quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian J. Bonner; David J. Muth Jr.; Joshua B. Koch; Douglas L. Karlen

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmentally benign, economically viable, and socially acceptable agronomic strategies are needed to launch a sustainable lignocellulosic biofuel industry. Our objective was to demonstrate a landscape planning process that can ensure adequate supplies of corn (Zea mays L.) stover feedstock while protecting and improving soil quality. The Landscape Environmental Assessment Framework (LEAF) was used to develop land use strategies that were then scaled up for five U.S. Corn Belt states (Nebraska, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, and Minnesota) to illustrate the impact that could be achieved. Our results show an annual sustainable stover supply of 194 million Mg without exceeding soil erosion T values or depleting soil organic carbon [i.e., soil conditioning index (SCI)?>?0] when no-till, winter cover crop, and vegetative barriers were incorporated into the landscape. A second, more rigorous conservation target was set to enhance soil quality while sustainably harvesting stover. By requiring erosion to be <1/2 T and the SCI-organic matter (OM) subfactor to be >?0, the annual sustainable quantity of harvestable stover dropped to148 million Mg. Examining removal rates by state and soil resource showed that soil capability class and slope generally determined the effectiveness of the three conservation practices and the resulting sustainable harvest rate. This emphasizes that sustainable biomass harvest must be based on subfield management decisions to ensure soil resources are conserved or enhanced, while providing sufficient biomass feedstock to support the economic growth of bioenergy enterprises.

  13. VEGETATION COVER ANALYSIS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES IN UTAH AND ARIZONA USING HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrato, M.; Jungho, I.; Jensen, J.; Jensen, R.; Gladden, J.; Waugh, J.

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote sensing technology can provide a cost-effective tool for monitoring hazardous waste sites. This study investigated the usability of HyMap airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data (126 bands at 2.3 x 2.3 m spatial resolution) to characterize the vegetation at U.S. Department of Energy uranium processing sites near Monticello, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Grass and shrub species were mixed on an engineered disposal cell cover at the Monticello site while shrub species were dominant in the phytoremediation plantings at the Monument Valley site. The specific objectives of this study were to: (1) estimate leaf-area-index (LAI) of the vegetation using three different methods (i.e., vegetation indices, red-edge positioning (REP), and machine learning regression trees), and (2) map the vegetation cover using machine learning decision trees based on either the scaled reflectance data or mixture tuned matched filtering (MTMF)-derived metrics and vegetation indices. Regression trees resulted in the best calibration performance of LAI estimation (R{sup 2} > 0.80). The use of REPs failed to accurately predict LAI (R{sup 2} < 0.2). The use of the MTMF-derived metrics (matched filter scores and infeasibility) and a range of vegetation indices in decision trees improved the vegetation mapping when compared to the decision tree classification using just the scaled reflectance. Results suggest that hyperspectral imagery are useful for characterizing biophysical characteristics (LAI) and vegetation cover on capped hazardous waste sites. However, it is believed that the vegetation mapping would benefit from the use of 1 higher spatial resolution hyperspectral data due to the small size of many of the vegetation patches (< 1m) found on the sites.

  14. A threshold type Cerenkov radiation detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winningham, John David

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A THRESHOLD TYPE CERENKOV RADIATION DETECTOR A Thesis By JOHN DAVID WINNINGHAN Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of NASTER OF SCIENCE May, 1965 Ha/or Sub...)ect: Physics A THRESHOLD TYPE CERENKOV RADIATION DETECTOR A Thesis By JOHN DAVID WINNINGHAM Approved as to style and content by: 3 v (Chairman of Committee) j' ) Heqd of Department) (Member) (Member) May, 1965 i. '. 11648 ACKNOWLEDGEIKNTS I wish...

  15. Types of Reuse

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following provides greater detail regarding the types of reuse pursued for LM sites. It should be noted that many actual reuses combine several types of the uses listed below.

  16. Fruit and Vegetable Servings in Local Farm-Sourced and Standard Lunches Offered to Children in a Head Start Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Amy M.

    2010-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    . Independent-samples t-tests were performed using SPSS. There were no significant differences in either fruit or vegetable consumption between conventional lunches and locally-sourced lunches. Even though there was more variety of fruit and vegetable offerings...

  17. Types of Cost Estimates

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The chapter describes the estimates required on government-managed projects for both general construction and environmental management.

  18. The Water-Wise Vegetable Garden: An Analysis of the Potential for Irrigation through Rainwater Harvesting in Sunny Northern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Adrienne; Esterer-Vogel, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vegetables spinach and cabbage have a lower water demandmelons, spinach and yellow corn are among the most water-

  19. Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee : Guidelines for Requirements...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee : Guidelines for Requirements Management Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee : Guidelines for Requirements Management Requirements...

  20. Trace element geochemistry of ordinary chondrite chondrules: the type I/type II chondrule dichotomy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Gounelle, Matthieu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report trace element concentrations of silicate phases in chondrules from LL3 ordinary chondrites Bishunpur and Semarkona. Results are similar to previously reported data for carbonaceous chondrites, with rare earth element (REE) concentrations increasing in the sequence olivine ~ 10 K/h) than type I chondrules. Appreciable Na concentrations (3-221 ppm) are measured in olivine from both chondrule types; type II chondrules seem to have behaved as closed systems, which may require chondrule formation in the vicinity of protoplanets or planetesimals. At any rate, higher solid concentrations in type II chondrule forming regions may explain the higher oxygen fugacities they record compared to type I chondrules. Type I and type II chondrules formed in different environments and the correlation between high solid concentrations and/or oxygen fugacities with rapid cooling rates is a key constraint that chondrule formation models must account for.

  1. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-15)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. Work also includes clearing of a small (<1/4 mile) section of access road. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. See Section 1.1 of the attached checklist for detailed information on each section of the referenced transmission lines. BPA will conduct the vegetation control with the goal of removing tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission lines and where possible to promote low-growing plant communities in the right-of-way. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD). The vegetation needing control is mainly Douglas Fir, Alder, and blackberries as indicated in Section 1.2 of the attached checklist. The work involved in the ROW includes: clearing tall growing vegetation that is currently or will soon pose a hazard to the lines; treating the associated stumps and re-sprouts with herbicide to ensure that the roots are killed preventing new sprouts; and selectively eliminating tall growing vegetation before it reaches a height or density to begin competing with low-growing vegetation. All work will take place in existing rights-of-ways and around transmission structures. All work will be accomplished by selective vegetation control methods to assure that there is little potential harm to non-target vegetation and to low-growing plants. The work will provide system reliability and fire protection. Also, all off right-of-way trees that are potentially unstable and will fall within a minimum distance or into the zone where the conductors swing will be removed. Access roads will be treated using mowing and herbicide applications. The work will provide system reliability. The subject transmission lines range from 115kV to 230kV and are made up of accompanying access roads, steel and wooden transmission line structures and associated switching platforms. The minimum clearance ranges from 21 feet for 115kV lines to 23 feet for 230kV lines. ROW easement widths vary along the length of the project. Vegetation control for this project is designed to provide a 3 year maintenance free interval. In summary, the overall vegetation management scheme will be to selectively remove tall growing vegetation then apply selective herbicide treatment using cut stump applications.

  2. POLISSAR & FREEMAN, EFFECTS OF ARIDITY AND VEGETATION ON PLANT-WAX D EA-1 ,Page 1 of 21

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polissar, Pratigya J.

    POLISSAR & FREEMAN, EFFECTS OF ARIDITY AND VEGETATION ON PLANT-WAX D EA-1 ,Page 1 of 21 Polissar & Freeman (2010) Effects of Aridity and Vegetation on Plant-wax D in Modern Lake Sediments Electronic annex. References 6. Supplemental Figures #12;POLISSAR & FREEMAN, EFFECTS OF ARIDITY AND VEGETATION ON PLANT-WAX D

  3. Managing System of Systems Requirements with a Requirements Screening Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald R. Barden

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figuring out an effective and efficient way to manage not only your Requirement’s Baseline, but also the development of all your individual requirements during a Program’s/Project’s Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages can be both daunting and difficult. This is especially so when you are dealing with a complex and large System of Systems (SoS) Program with potentially thousands and thousands of Top Level Requirements as well as an equal number of lower level System, Subsystem and Configuration Item requirements that need to be managed. This task is made even more overwhelming when you have to add in integration with multiple requirements’ development teams (e.g., Integrated Product Development Teams (IPTs)) and/or numerous System/Subsystem Design Teams. One solution for tackling this difficult activity on a recent large System of Systems Program was to develop and make use of a Requirements Screening Group (RSG). This group is essentially a Team made up of co-chairs from the various Stakeholders with an interest in the Program of record that are enabled and accountable for Requirements Development on the Program/Project. The RSG co-chairs, often with the help of individual support team, work together as a Program Board to monitor, make decisions on, and provide guidance on all Requirements Development activities during the Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages of a Program/Project. In addition, the RSG can establish and maintain the Requirements Baseline, monitor and enforce requirements traceability across the entire Program, and work with other elements of the Program/Project to ensure integration and coordination.

  4. Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Division, and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences. This isFusion Energy Sciences NetworkRequirements Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Energy

  5. Bonneville Power Administration Transmission System Vegetation Management Program - Final Environmental Impact Statement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonneville is responsible for maintaining a network of 24,000 kilometers (km) or 15,000 miles (mi.) of electric transmission lines and 350 substations in a region of diverse vegetation. This vegetation can interfere with electric power flow, pose safety problems for us and the public, and interfere with our ability to maintain these facilities. We need to (1) keep vegetation away from our electric facilities; (2) increase our program efficiency and consistency; (3) review herbicide use (under increased public scrutiny); and (4) maximize the range of tools we can use while minimizing environmental impact (Integrated Vegetation Management). This Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) establishes Planning Steps for managing vegetation for specific projects (to be tiered to this Environmental Impact Statement (EIS)). In addition to No Action (current practice), alternatives are presented for Rights-of-way, Electric Yards, and Non-electric Facilities (landscaping, work yards). Four vegetation control methods are analyzed manual, mechanical, herbicide, and biological. Also evaluated are 23 herbicide active ingredients and 4 herbicide application techniques (spot, localized, broadcast, and aerial). For rights-of-way, we consider three sets of alternatives: alternative management approaches (time-driven or establishing low-growing plant communities); alternative method packages; and, if herbicides are in a methods package, alternative vegetation selections (noxious weeds, deciduous, or any vegetation). For electric yards, one herbicide-use alternative is considered. For non-electric facilities, two method package alternatives are considered. For rights-of-way, the environmentally preferred alternative(s) would use manual, mechanical, and biological control methods, as well as spot and localized herbicide applications for noxious and deciduous plant species; the BPA-preferred alternative(s) would add broadcast and aerial herbicide applications, and would use herbicides on any vegetation. Both would favor a management approach that fosters low-growing plant communities.

  6. Vegetative covers: Special study. [Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the findings of a special study on the use of vegetative covers to stabilize tailings piles for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The principal rationale for using plants would be to establish a dynamic system for controlling water balance. Specifically, vegetation would be used to intercept and transpire precipitation to the atmosphere, rather than allowing water to drain into the tailings and mobilize contaminants. This would facilitate compliance with groundwater standards proposed for the UMTRA Project by the Environmental Protection Agency. The goals of the study were to (1) evaluate the feasibility of using vegetative covers on UMTRA Project piles, (2) define the advantages and disadvantages of vegetative covers, and (3) develop general guidelines for their use when such use seems reasonable. The principal method for the study was to analyze and apply to the UMTRA Project the results of research programs on vegetative covers at other US Department of Energy (DOE) waste management facilities. The study also relied upon observations made of existing stabilized piles at UMTRA Project sites (Shiprock, New Mexico; Burrell, Pennsylvania; and Clive, Utah) where natural vegetation is growing on the rock-covered surfaces. Water balance and erosion models were also used to quantify the long-term performance of vegetative covers planned for the topslopes of stabilized piles at Grand Junction and Durango, Colorado, two UMTRA Project sites where the decision was made during the course of this special study to use vegetative covers. Elements in the design and construction of the vegetative covers at these two sites are discussed in the report, with explanations of the differing features that reflect differing environmental conditions.

  7. Organic Vegetable Organic Vegetable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    concentrates on natural processes and how to manage them. Other materials and products are additions to .......................................6 Safety ................................................................6 Insect Management ...........................................7 Disease Management ......................................10 Weed Management

  8. Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 % A PB 2 7 7 2 x>16Forms of1, 2

  9. Thesis and Dissertation Required Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    /dissertation documents have a uniform appearance and are suitable for archiving. The requirements follow the guidelines to the following guidelines are acceptable. · All margins must be at least 1.25" and may not be more than 1/dissertation should be double-spaced. #12;Thesis and Dissertation Required Elements 2012 version Paragraph Indentation

  10. Calibration Requirements and Procedures for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuceryan, Mihran

    Calibration Requirements and Procedures for Augmented Reality Mihran Tuceryan Douglas S. Greer Ross Graphics, Sept 1995) Calibration Requirements and Procedures for Augmented Reality Mihran Tuceryan Douglas of calibration procedures are necessary so that the location and parameters of each of the system components

  11. MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March 2006 MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL INFORMATION AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS: FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD (FIPS) 200 APPROVED BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE Shirley Radack, EditorShirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division

  12. Humidity requirements in WSCF Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, R.A.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to develop and document a position on Relative Humidity (RH) requirements in the WSCF Laboratories. A current survey of equipment vendors for Organic, Inorganic and Radiochemical laboratories indicate that 25% - 80% relative humidity may meet the environmental requirements for safe operation and protection of all the laboratory equipment.

  13. Invasive Plant-Soil Feedbacks and Ecosystem Resistance and Resilience: A Comparison of Three Vegetation Types in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickens, Sara Jo Myrtle

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    mining area under subtropical conditions. Applied Soil Ecologymining area under subtropical conditions. Applied Soil Ecology

  14. Invasive Plant-Soil Feedbacks and Ecosystem Resistance and Resilience: A Comparison of Three Vegetation Types in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickens, Sara Jo Myrtle

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over the functioning of ecosystems. Science Chatterjee, A. ,inertia and resilience of ecosystems. Bioscience White, D.inertia and resilience of ecosystems. Bioscience White, D.

  15. Surface energy partitioning over four dominant vegetation types across the United States in a coupled regional climate model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kueppers, Lara M.

    Slopes Model (PRISM) data) and to standard WRF model output. We found that WRF3-CLM3.5 can capture and Forecasting Model 3­Community Land Model 3.5 (WRF3-CLM3.5), by comparing model output to observations (Ameri simulation of downward solar radiation could reduce the energy flux and temperature biases. After adding

  16. Transmission Vegetation Management NERC Standard FAC-003-2 Technical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    background to the requirements of the Standard. The intentions of the Standard Drafting Team in developing many key areas of this Revision are also explained in this document. The...

  17. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -- Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing/332996 -- Fabricated Pipe and Pipe Fitting Manufacturing Synopsis Materials. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications and opening and closing dates will appear

  18. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NAICS Code: 332 -- Fabricated Metal Product Manufacturing/332322 -- Sheet Metal Work Manufacturing Storage Container. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications and opening and closing dates

  19. 3. MATERIAL CERTIFICATIONS REQUIRED. 100% DYE PENETRANT INSPECTION REQUIRED.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    WELDS SHOULD BE MINIMIZED. NO CODE STAMP REQUIRED. IN ACCORDANCE WITH ASME SECTION IX. 1. WELDING and applicable 1. ALL DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES 2. INTERPRET DIMENSIONS AND TOLERANCES PER ASME Y14.5M 3. MACHINED

  20. An Experimental Investigation of Microexplosion in Emulsified Vegetable-Methanol Blend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Hyungseok

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of shock waves characteristic of explosions at larger scales. However, little is known about how emulsion composition and droplet size affect the micro-explosion process. Through this research, methanol-in-vegetable oil emulsion has been studied from...

  1. The coupled development of terrain and vegetation : the case of semiarid grasslands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Cervantes, Javier Homero, 1977-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of vegetation in semiarid landscapes organizes as a function of moisture availability, which is often mediated by the form of the land surface. Simultaneously the processes that shape the land surface are ...

  2. NAME: Restoration of Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV) on the Seaside of Virginia's Eastern Shore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    been shown to be more cost-effective than planting vegetative parts. A SAV restoration program sedimentation and ameliorate siltation of navigation channels, thereby reducing the necessity of dredging

  3. A Comparison of Vegetation in Artificially Isolated Wetlands on West Galveston Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Ashley

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to compare vegetation systems among three artificially isolated wetlands on the west end of Galveston Island. Sample sites were identified as isolated wetlands and anthropogenic impact was observed. Wetland plant...

  4. Feedbacks between flow, vegetation, deposition, and the implications for landscape development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kondziolka, John M. (John Michael)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow and sedimentation around patches of vegetation are important to landscape evolution, and a better understanding of these processes would facilitate more effective river restoration and wetlands engineering. In wetlands ...

  5. Original Texas Land Survey as a Source for Pre-European Settlement Vegetation Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srinath, Indumathi

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , coordinates were calculated and species classified according to their National Wetland Indicator’ (NWI) status. Indicator kriging was performed to create a continuous vegetation cover of Brazos County by interpolating the point biogeographical data (i...

  6. The expansion of woody riparian vegetation, and subsequent stream restoration, influences the metabolism of prairie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dodds, Walter

    The expansion of woody riparian vegetation, and subsequent stream restoration, influences, the restoration allowed recovery of some features of open-canopy prairie streams. Woody expansion apparently. Keywords: macroalgae, microalgae, primary production, restoration, streams Introduction North American

  7. Effects of dynamic vegetation and topography on hydrological processes in semi-arid areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Valeri Yuryevich, 1974-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystems of dry climates represent a particularly interesting object for ecohydrological studies, as water is generally considered to be the key limiting resource. This work focuses on vegetation-water-energy dynamics ...

  8. Impact of vegetation properties on U.S. summer weather prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Y; Fennessy, M; sellers, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Meteorological Center, Mon. Weather Rev. , 108, 1279-1292,VEGETATION IN U.S. SUMMER WEATHER model (SIB) for use withinConference on Numerical Weather Prediction, pp. 726 -733,

  9. Contribution of vegetation and peat fires to particulate air pollution in Southeast Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reddington, C L

    Smoke haze, caused by vegetation and peat fires in Southeast Asia, is of major concern because of its adverse impact on regional air quality. We apply two different methods (a chemical transport model and a Lagrangian ...

  10. Summer fire impacts and isotopic assessment of vegetation dynamics in Texas coastal Quercus virginiana communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Kelley Ann

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in thickets suggest some thickets may be recent at Kenedy. []¹?N of plants and soils did not enhance interpretation of vegetation dynamics at either site, but may provide insights regarding the N-cycle of these oak communities....

  11. Momentum and mass transport by coherent structures in a shallow vegetated shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Brian L., 1975-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many aquatic systems, from tidal creeks with fringing mangroves to rivers and associated floodplains, there exists an interface between dense vegetation and a high conveyance channel. A shear flow develops across this ...

  12. Investigation of the utility of the vegetation condition index (VCI) as an indicator of drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganesh, Srinivasan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between the satellite-based Vegetation Condition Index (VCI) and frequently used agricultural drought indices like Palmer Drought Severity Index, Palmer’s Z-index, Standard Precipitation Index, percent normal and deciles...

  13. Relationships of exotic plant communities with native vegetation, environmental factors, disturbance, and landscape ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abella, Scott R.

    ecosystems in numerous ways. Theories on relation- ships of exotic species invasions with native vegetation strongly related to the eco- system classification. For example, mean exotic cover ranged from

  14. Harmonic propagation of variability in surface energy balance within a coupled soil-vegetation-atmosphere system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentine, P.

    [1] The response of a soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum model to incoming radiation forcing is investigated in order to gain insights into the coupling of soil and atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) states and fluxes. The ...

  15. Shipping and nitrogen toning effects on postharvest shelf life of vegetative annuals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beach, Shannon Elizabeth

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetative annuals are currently popular in the ornamental horticulture industry. Many crops are newly domesticated species and little is known about how they perform during shipping or in the retail environment. Nine species and 21 cultivars were...

  16. An Experimental Investigation of Microexplosion in Emulsified Vegetable-Methanol Blend 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Hyungseok

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of shock waves characteristic of explosions at larger scales. However, little is known about how emulsion composition and droplet size affect the micro-explosion process. Through this research, methanol-in-vegetable oil emulsion has been studied from...

  17. Using mobile technology to impact fruit and vegetable consumption in low-income youth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheson, Tresza Denae

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The benefits of fruits and vegetables (FV) include supplying nutrients and fiber to the diet, reducing risk of disease, and assisting in weight maintenance by increasing satiety and decreasing energy density of the diet. FV intake has been...

  18. Detector Requirements to Curb Nuclear Smuggling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erickson, S A

    2001-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of stopping nuclear smuggling of terrorist nuclear devices is a complex one, owing to the variety of pathways by which such a device can be transported. To fashion new detection systems that improve the chances of detecting such a device, it is important to know the various requirements and conditions that would be imposed on them by both the types of devices that might be smuggled and by the requirement that it not overly interfere with the transportation of legitimate goods. Requirements vary greatly from low-volume border crossings to high-volume industrial container ports, and the design of systems for them is likely to be quite different. There is also a further need to detect these devices if they are brought into a country via illicit routes, i.e., those which do not pass through customs posts, but travel overland though open space or to a smaller, unguarded airport or seaport. This paper describes some generic uses of detectors, how they need to be integrated into customs or other law enforcement systems, and what the specifications for such detectors might be.

  19. Typed Self-Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Matt

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    type T y[O]. The operator IsIs is self-applicative, in thatargument t is any of Is[O] or IsIs, and otherwise behavesproof constant introduced by IsIs proves that the type of t

  20. A study of historical vegetation in Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Gwendolyn Ann

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    documentation against which past and future changes can be evaluated and to provide information to guide iv management decisions concerning the historic landscape. The results of the study provide vegetation ini'ormation for inter preting both the natural... LITERATURE Historical Overview of Landscape Preservation Landscape Preservation and Restoration Methods Environmental and Cultural Effects on the Landscape Vegetation oi' the Edwards Plateau of Texas Lyndon B. Johnson National Hi. storical Park...

  1. Long-wave infrared imaging of vegetation for detecting leaking CO2 gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    Long-wave infrared imaging of vegetation for detecting leaking CO2 gas Jennifer E. Johnson Joseph A for detecting leaking CO2 gas Jennifer E. Johnson,a Joseph A. Shaw,a Rick Lawrence,b Paul W. Nugent,a Laura M of these calibrated imagers is imaging of vegetation for CO2 gas leak detection. During a four-week period

  2. Use of vegetation to ameliorate building microclimates: an assessment of energy-conservation potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchison, B.A.; Taylor, F.G.; Wendt, R.L.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The space-conditioning energy conservation potentials of landscapes designed to ameliorate building microclimates are evaluated. The physical bases for vegetative modifications of climate are discussed, and results of past study of the effects of vegetation on space-conditioning energy consumption in buildings are reviewed. The state-of-the-art of energy-conserving landscape designs is assessed and recommendations are presented for further research.

  3. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : 334 -- Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing/334516 -- Analytical Laboratory Instrument Manufacturing Synopsis: Added: Sep 03, 2014 2:31 pm The Naval Research Laboratory has a requirement for 1 each/N: 999800.528. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications and opening and closing dates will appear

  4. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : 334 -- Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing/334516 -- Analytical Laboratory Instrument Manufacturing Synopsis: Added: Sep 05, 2014 8:59 am The Naval Research Laboratory has a requirement for 1 each P IE required). Additional specifications and opening and closing dates will appear in the RFQ

  5. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    components NAICS Code: 334 -- Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing/334417 -- Electronic Connector Manufacturing Synopsis: Added: Aug 14, 2014 4:06 pm The Naval Research Laboratory has a requirement for 576 each MM4S-13420 MM4S Female 50-OHM Termination. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications

  6. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    components NAICS Code: 334 -- Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing/334419 -- Other Electronic Component Manufacturing Synopsis: Added: Sep 03, 2014 2:53 pm The Naval Research Laboratory has a requirement for 1 each 6-18 GHz Activity Detection Module P/N: N13-4167. (Microsoft IE required). Additional

  7. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : 334 -- Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing/334516 -- Analytical Laboratory Instrument Manufacturing Synopsis: Added: Sep 05, 2014 1:20 pm The Naval Research Laboratory has a requirement for 1 each. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications and opening and closing dates will appear in the RFQ

  8. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    components NAICS Code: 334 -- Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing/334413 -- Semiconductor and Related Device Manufacturing Synopsis: Added: Sep 05, 2014 8:45 am The Naval Research Laboratory has a requirement for 1 each P/N: NUU102E UV Laser Engineering Module. (Microsoft IE required). Additional

  9. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : 334 -- Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing/334419 -- Other Electronic Component Manufacturing Synopsis: Added: Jul 02, 2014 1:54 pm The Naval Research Laboratory has a requirement for 1 each No: 12072-2-RFB. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications and opening and closing dates

  10. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    equipment NAICS Code: 334 -- Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing/334111 -- Electronic Computer Manufacturing Synopsis: Added: Sep 03, 2014 2:47 pm The Naval Research Laboratory has a requirement for 2 each-1-1-1-1. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications and opening and closing dates will appear in the RFQ

  11. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : 334 -- Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing/334516 -- Analytical Laboratory Instrument Manufacturing Synopsis: Added: Aug 21, 2014 2:43 pm The Naval Research Laboratory has a requirement for 1 each i-00105. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications and opening and closing dates will appear in the RFQ

  12. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    components NAICS Code: 334 -- Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing/334111 -- Electronic Computer Manufacturing Synopsis: Added: Sep 03, 2014 9:57 am The Naval Research Laboratory has a requirement for 2 each S required). Additional specifications and opening and closing dates will appear in the RFQ. The proposed

  13. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , 2014 3:11 pm The Naval Research Laboratory has a requirement for a contractor to Provide Screens to Chilled Water Plant Cooling Towers Bldg A-47. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications this solicitation. Note: Vendors will be ineligible for award unless they have registered in the System for Award

  14. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-07)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetation Management on section of three ROWs. The ROWs include selected sections of the McNary Powerhouse, the present and proposed new sections of the McNary-Roundup and the McNary Switchyard South Transmission lines. BPA proposes to clear unwanted vegetation in the rights-of-ways and around tower structures that may impede the operation and maintenance of the subject transmission lines. All work will be in accordance with the National Electrical Safety Code and BPA standards. See Section 1.1 of the attached checklist for pertinent information on each section of referenced transmission line. BPA would conduct the vegetation control with the goal of removing tall-growing vegetation that is currently or will soon be a hazard to the transmission lines and to promote low-growing plant communities in the right-of-way and to clear vegetation from new rights-of-way corridors. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

  15. Establishing Design Requirements for Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Programming defines details about the project, including square footage, types of building space, and use. The team should make decisions to define the energy needs of the building. Beyond...

  16. Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau, Don C.

    Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2 National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse #12;#12;Your Guide to Diabetes: Type 1 and Type 2 #12;#12;Contents Learn about Diabetes ............................................................ 1 What is diabetes? .............................................................. 2 What

  17. Meeting Federal Energy Security Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the opportunity to increase the scope of federal-utility partnerships for meeting energy security requirements.

  18. Fusion technology status and requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the status of fusion technology and discusses the requirements to be met in order to build a demonstration fusion plant. Strategies and programmatic considerations in pursuing engineering feasibility are also outlined.

  19. POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES Procedures and Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannatham, Aditya K.

    Engineering, Materials Science, Mechanical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering and Technology and Photonics Statistics), Mechanical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering and Technology, Photonics Science and Engineering(1) POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES Procedures and Requirements INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY KANPUR

  20. HTS wire requirements for SMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenung, S.; Schafer, W.J.

    1994-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation/paper gives an overview of the Sandia National Lab`s sponsorship of W.J. Schafer Associates, Inc. to examine the following topics: the refrigeration savings possible by using high temperature superconductors (HTS) in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES), the impact of duty cycle on refrigeration requirements, and outline the required HTS wire performance. Included are specifications for SMES applications, advantages, cost components, assumed conductor performance parameters, and the effects of duty cycle and conductor twist pitch.

  1. Requirements for GNEP Transmutation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. C. Crawford; M. K. Meyer; S. L. Hayes

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide a baseline set of requirements to guide fuel fabrication development and irradiation testing performed as part of the AFCRD Transmutation Fuel Development Program. This document can be considered a supplement to the GNEP TRU Fuel Development and Qualification Plan, and will be revised as necessary to maintain a documented set of fuel testing objectives and requirements consistent with programmatic decisions and advances in technical knowledge.

  2. Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements (Text Version) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Requirements (Text Version) Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements (Text Version) Below is the text version of the webinar titled "Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements,"...

  3. Texas High Plains Vegetable & Weed Control Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    of Plastic Mulch Type on Tomato Vigor and Yield (2004) 60 Effects of Postemergence Herbicides on Crop Injury (2005) 102 CROP PRODUCTION AND VARIETY TRIALS Transplanted Watermelon Production with Colored Plastic Mulches on the Texas High Plains (2005) 106 Yield and Quality Evaluation for Selected Tomato Varieties

  4. Fejer-type inequalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitroi, F C

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this paper is to present some new Fejer-type results for convex functions. Improvements of Young's inequality (the arithmetic-geometric mean inequality) and other applications to special means are pointed as well.

  5. Document Type: Subject Terms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Major, Arkady

    Title: Authors: Source: Document Type: Subject Terms: Abstract: Full Text Word Count: ISSN at creating team results. In fact, it's priceless. Managers in Western corporations have received a lifetime

  6. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : 334 -- Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing/334513 -- Instruments and Related Products Manufacturing for Measuring, Displaying, and Controlling Industrial Process Variables Synopsis: Added: Jul 19 QUADRUPOLE Mass Spectrometer. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications and opening and closing

  7. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    radiation equipment NAICS Code: 334 -- Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing/334511 -- Search, Detection, Navigation, Guidance, Aeronautical, and Nautical System and Instrument Manufacturing Synopsis. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications and opening and closing dates will appear in the RFQ

  8. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -- Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing/334515 -- Instrument Manufacturing for Measuring and Testing Polarization P/N: WS-AA-2000S-ZZ-H. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications and opening and closing

  9. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : 334 -- Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing/334515 -- Instrument Manufacturing for Measuring-SMU and 1 each Ultra-Fast I-V Module P/N: 4225-PMU. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications

  10. Satellite image analysis for surveillance, vegetation and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, D Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, many studies have provided abundant evidence to show the trend of tree mortality is increasing in many regions, and the cause of tree mortality is associated with drought, insect outbreak, or fire. Unfortunately, there is no current capability available to monitor vegetation changes, and correlate and predict tree mortality with CO{sub 2} change, and climate change on the global scale. Different survey platforms (methods) have been used for forest management. Typical ground-based forest surveys measure tree stem diameter, species, and alive or dead. The measurements are low-tech and time consuming, but the sample sizes are large, running into millions of trees, covering large areas, and spanning many years. These field surveys provide powerful ground validation for other survey methods such as photo survey, helicopter GPS survey, and aerial overview survey. The satellite imagery has much larger coverage. It is easier to tile the different images together, and more important, the spatial resolution has been improved such that close to or even higher than aerial survey platforms. Today, the remote sensing satellite data have reached sub-meter spatial resolution for panchromatic channels (IKONOS 2: 1 m; Quickbird-2: 0.61 m; Worldview-2: 0.5 m) and meter spatial resolution for multi-spectral channels (IKONOS 2: 4 meter; Quickbird-2: 2.44 m; Worldview-2: 2 m). Therefore, high resolution satellite imagery can allow foresters to discern individual trees. This vital information should allow us to quantify physiological states of trees, e.g. healthy or dead, shape and size of tree crowns, as well as species and functional compositions of trees. This is a powerful data resource, however, due to the vast amount of the data collected daily, it is impossible for human analysts to review the imagery in detail to identify the vital biodiversity information. Thus, in this talk, we will discuss the opportunities and challenges to use high resolution satellite imagery and machine learning theory to monitor tree mortality at the level of individual trees.

  11. Disposal requirements for PCB waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a class of organic chemicals that had become widely used in industrial applications due to their practical physical and chemical properties. Historical uses of PCBs include dielectric fluids (used in utility transformers, capacitors, etc.), hydraulic fluids, and other applications requiring stable, fire-retardant materials. Due to findings that PCBs may cause adverse health effects and due to their persistence and accumulation in the environment, the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), enacted on october 11, 1976, banned the manufacture of PCBs after 1978 [Section 6(e)]. The first PCB regulations, promulgated at 40 CFR Part 761, were finalized on February 17, 1978. These PCB regulations include requirements specifying disposal methods and marking (labeling) procedures, and controlling PCB use. To assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in its efforts to comply with the TSCA statute and implementing regulations, the Office of Environmental Guidance has prepared the document ``Guidance on the Management of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs).`` That document explains the requirements specified in the statute and regulations for managing PCBs including PCB use, storage, transport, and disposal. PCB materials that are no longer in use and have been declared a waste must be disposed of according to the requirements found at 40 CFR 761.60. These requirements establish disposal options for a multitude of PCB materials including soil and debris, liquid PCBs, sludges and slurries, containers, transformers, capacitors, hydraulic machines, and other electrical equipment. This Information Brief supplements the PCB guidance document by responding to common questions concerning disposal requirements for PCBs. It is one of a series of Information Briefs pertinent to PCB management issues.

  12. Johnson Noise Thermometry System Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britton Jr, Charles L [ORNL; Roberts, Michael [ORNL; Ezell, N Dianne Bull [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is intended to capture the requirements for the architecture of the developmental electronics for the ORNL-lead drift-free Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) project conducted under the Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) research pathway of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Research and Development (R&D) program. The requirements include not only the performance of the system but also the allowable measurement environment of the probe and the allowable physical environment of the associated electronics. A more extensive project background including the project rationale is available in the initial project report [1].

  13. Project X functional requirements specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, S.D.; Henderson, S.D.; Kephart, R.; Kerby, J.; Kourbanis, I.; Lebedev, V.; Mishra, S.; Nagaitsev, S.; Solyak, N.; Tschirhart, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project X is a multi-megawatt proton facility being developed to support a world-leading program in Intensity Frontier physics at Fermilab. The facility is designed to support programs in elementary particle and nuclear physics, with possible applications to nuclear energy research. A Functional Requirements Specification has been developed in order to establish performance criteria for the Project X complex in support of these multiple missions, and to assure that the facility is designed with sufficient upgrade capability to provide U.S. leadership for many decades to come. This paper will briefly review the previously described Functional Requirements, and then discuss their recent evolution.

  14. Formal Type Soundness for Cyclone's Region System Dan Grossman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Michael

    collector. To support separate compilation, Cyclone requires programmers to write some explicit regionFormal Type Soundness for Cyclone's Region System Dan Grossman Greg Morrisett Trevor Jim Mike Hicks Yanling Wang James Cheney November 2001 Abstract Cyclone is a polymorphic, type-safe programming language

  15. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Requirements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requirements Management Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Requirements Management Checklist The following checklist is intended to provide system owners,...

  16. New frontiers in oilseed biotechnology: meeting the growing global demand for vegetable oils for food, feed, biofuel, and industrial uses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, C; Napier, JA; Clemente, TE; Cahoon, EB

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetable oils have historically been a valued commodity for food use and to a lesser extent for non-edible applications such as detergents and lubricants. The increasing reliance on biodiesel as a transportation fuel has contributed to rising demand and higher prices for vegetable oils. Biotechnology offers a number of solutions to meet the growing need for affordable vegetable oils and vegetable oils with improved fatty acid compositions for food and industrial uses. New insights into oilseed metabolism and its transcriptional control are enabling biotechnological enhancement of oil content and quality. Alternative crop platforms and emerging technologies for metabolic engineering also hold promise for meeting global demand for vegetable oils and for enhancing nutritional, industrial, and biofuel properties of vegetable oils. Here, we highlight recent advances in our understanding of oilseed metabolism and in the development of new oilseed platforms and metabolic engineering technologies.

  17. Investigation of the Structure and Function of Type III Secretion Needle and Tip Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Lingling

    2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Many Gram-negative pathogens possess type III secretion systems as part of their required virulence factor repertoire. The type III secretion apparatus (TTSA) spans the bacterial inner and outer membranes and resembles a ...

  18. Upgrading the ampacity of HPFF pipe-type cable circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aabo, T.; Lawson, W.G. [Power Technologies, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)] [Power Technologies, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States); Pancholi, S.V. [Potomac Electric Power Co., Washington, DC (United States)] [Potomac Electric Power Co., Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The upgrading of several 69 kV pipe-type cable feeders on the Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCO) ion cable system is The methods used for the ampacity calculation are described. The fluid circulation approach required to meet the feeder emergency load requirements are For the feeders that were in service for approximately 40 years, a system life evaluation was performed.

  19. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    DEGREE REQUIREMENTS BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY The curriculum in the technology programs must satisfy the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS for the technology programs are listed by subject matter in three major categories: (A) Basic Subjects, (B) Advanced

  20. APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: Admission Applica on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    basis. An interview may be required. MS Educa onal Technology Program: A state issued teaching cer: State issued teaching cer ficate. Three years of professional experience as a teacher:_____________ ­ __________ ­ ________________ Sex: Male Female Street Address Town or City County State Zip Code Home Telephone

  1. SRS control system upgrade requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, L.F.

    1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines requirements for an upgrade of the Sodium Removal System (SRS) control system. The upgrade is being performed to solve a number of maintainability and operability issues. The upgraded system will provide the same functions, controls and interlocks as the present system, and in addition provide enhanced functionality in areas discussed in this document.

  2. Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadok, Erez

    Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist ­ Fall 2008 Computer Science Courses Course Gr. Sem. Comments CSE 114 Computer Science I [prerequisite: CSE 110] CSE 214 Computer Science II CSE 215 Foundations of Computer Science CSE 219 Computer Science III CSE 220 Computer Organization CSE 300 Writing

  3. Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadok, Erez

    Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist ­ Fall 2009 Computer Science Courses Course Gr. Sem. Comments CSE 114 Computer Science I [prerequisite: CSE 110] CSE 214 Computer Science II CSE 215 Foundations of Computer Science CSE 219 Computer Science III CSE 220 Computer Organization CSE 300 Writing

  4. AMS vs. NWS: Educational Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Reconstruction of past climates · Climate models · Causes of past and future climate change #12;Capstone methods · Oral, written, and multimedia communication ­ Ability to create and deliver scientific ­ Ability to effectively communicate with technical and lay audiences using scientific evidence #12;Required

  5. ALLOCATION OF REACTIVE SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, George

    the voltage setting point s kV of each bus Qk and the voltage profile for the buses c j Q . Recall that Q for these transactions so that all bus voltages meet the specified voltage profile requirements. Consequently load is locally met at the bus. In other words, we assume that at each load bus the power factor is 1

  6. Radionuclide concentrations in vegetation at radioactive-waste disposal Area G during the 1994 growing season

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fresquez, P.R.; Biggs, J.B.; Bennett, K.D.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Overstory (pinon pine) and understory (grass and forb) vegetation samples were collected within and around selected points at Area G-a low-level radioactive solid-waste disposal facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory-for the analysis of tritium ({sup 3}H), strontium ({sup 90}Sr), plutonium ({sup 238} Pu and {sup 239}Pu), cesium ({sup 137}Cs), americium ({sup 241}Am), and total uranium. In general, most vegetation samples collected within and around Area G contained radionuclide levels in higher concentrations than vegetation collected from background areas. Tritium, in particular, was detected as high as 5,800 pCi/mL in overstory vegetation collected outside the fence just west of the tritium shafts; this suggests that tritium is migrating from this waste repository through subsurface pathways. Also, understory vegetation collected north of the transuranic (TRU) pads (outside the fence of Area G) contained the highest values of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am, and may be a result of surface holding, storage, or disposal activities.

  7. Detecting vegetation-precipitation feedbacks in mid-Holocene North Africa from two climate models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yi; Notaro, Michael; Liu, Zhengyu; Gallimore, Robert; Levis, Samuel; Kutzbach, John E.

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using two climate-vegetation model simulations from the Fast Ocean Atmosphere Model (FOAM) and the Community Climate System Model (CCSM, version 2), we investigate vegetation-precipitation feedbacks across North Africa during the mid-Holocene. From mid-Holocene snapshot runs of FOAM and CCSM2, we detect a negative feedback at the annual timescale with our statistical analysis. Using the Monte- Carlo bootstrap method, the annual negative feedback is further confirmed to be significant in both simulations. Additional analysis shows that this negative interaction is partially caused by the competition between evaporation and transpiration in North African grasslands. Furthermore, we find the feedbacks decrease with increasing timescales, and change signs from positive to negative at increasing timescales in FOAM. The proposed mechanism for this sign switch is associated with the different persistent timescales of upper and lower soil water contents, and their interactions with vegetation and atmospheric precipitation.

  8. Vegetative response and cattle activities following patterned herbicide application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Robert Blaine

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Big Williams Pasture (Fig. 4) (USDA, 1967'. ). The major sire, clay loam:, occurs on. about 65/ of the pasture. The other rarge sites are: tight sandy 1oam (16X), gray sandy loam (9X), clay tlat. (6X), sandy loam (3X), and loamy sand (1X). Major... soil type. s of the clay loam range site are Ramadero clay loam and Zavco ilty clay loam (Fig. 5) (USDA, 1972). These soils are deep with a clay loam surface and a clayey subsoil. Permea'oility of. the A horizon i. s moderate, whi' e the E horizon...

  9. Direct effects of increasing carbon dioxide on vegetation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strain, B R; Cure, J D [eds.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO/sub 2/ is an essential environmental resource. It is required as a raw material of the orderly development of all green plants. As the availability of CO/sub 2/ increases, perhaps reaching two or three times the concentration prevailing in preindustrial times, plants and all other organisms dependent on them for food will be affected. Humans are releasing a gaseous fertilizer into the global atmosphere in quantities sufficient to affect all life. This volume considers the direct effects of global CO/sub 2/ fertilization on plants and thus on all other life. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  10. Requirements | Photosynthetic Antenna Research Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliability

  11. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a requirement for 1 each Selective Laser Sintering 3D Printer System P/N: 1201-7001 includes: 1 each Laser to this date you will not be able to access this solicitation. Selective Laser Sintering 3D Printer System

  12. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    components NAICS Code: 334 -- Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing/334413 -- Semiconductor and Related Device Manufacturing Synopsis: Added: Sep 03, 2014 9:36 am The Naval Research Laboratory has-39-FC/APC-V-1. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications and opening and closing dates

  13. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    radiation equipment NAICS Code: 334 -- Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing/334220 -- Radio and Television Broadcasting and Wireless Communications Equipment Manufacturing Synopsis: Added: Aug 25, 2014 6 Assembly P/N: 130-314700. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications and opening and closing dates

  14. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NAICS Code: 333 -- Machinery Manufacturing/333415 -- Air-Conditioning and Warm Air Heating Equipment and Commercial and Industrial Refrigeration Equipment Manufacturing Synopsis: Added: Jul 03, 2014 2:13 pm and Outdoor Condenser. ( Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications and opening and closing dates

  15. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    components NAICS Code: 334 -- Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing/334413 -- Semiconductor and Related Device Manufacturing Synopsis: Added: Sep 05, 2014 8:20 am The Naval Research Laboratory has System P/N: ATC-2200-HY. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications and opening and closing dates

  16. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    radiation equipment NAICS Code: 334 -- Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing/334220 -- Radio and Television Broadcasting and Wireless Communications Equipment Manufacturing Synopsis: Added: Jul 25, 2014 6 1x4) Multicouple 30 MHz to 6 GHz M/N: 8MDP-206000E. (Microsoft IE required). Additional

  17. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    equipment NAICS Code: 334 -- Computer and Electronic Product Manufacturing/334516 -- Analytical Laboratory Instrument Manufacturing Synopsis: Added: Apr 16, 2014 9:24 am The Naval Research Laboratory has a requirement for 1 each Multiplexed Broadly Tunable Laser System (up to Four Tuning Modules, Pulsed Output

  18. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -- Machinery Manufacturing/333314 -- Optical Instrument and Lens Manufacturing Synopsis: Added: Jul 08, 2014 2:34 pm The Naval Research Laboratory has a requirement for 1 each Laser Tune pulsed, mid-infrared, widely tunable source based on a next generation Quantum Cascade Laser (QCL). Wavelength range covered - 7

  19. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : 333 -- Machinery Manufacturing/333314 -- Optical Instrument and Lens Manufacturing Synopsis: Added-switched Nd: YAG Laser, 1 each TH Option Two output ports, 1 each FH Option Two output ports, 1 each Installation for NL200 series Laser. (Microsoft IE required). Additional specifications and opening and closing

  20. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    components NAICS Code: 335 -- Electrical Equipment, Appliance, and Component Manufacturing/335999 -- All Other Miscellaneous Electrical Equipment and Component Manufacturing Synopsis: Added: Jul 25, 2014 6:43 am The Naval Research Laboratory has a requirement for Multiple (20 total) 40mW DFB laser: 2 each P

  1. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : 333 -- Machinery Manufacturing/333912 -- Air and Gas Compressor Manufacturing Synopsis: Added: Jul 25 Gas Compressor System, 3 each Pre-cooler,1 each Tie rod measuring tool, 1 each Explosion-proof hydrogen detector, 1 each Spare parts kits for C15-40FX/SSEXT-H2. (Microsoft IE required). Additional

  2. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    350W AC Config 1 Power Supply P/N: PWR-C1-350-WAC Included, 1 each Config 1 Power Supply Blank P/N: PWR-C1-Blank Included, 2 each 10GBASE-SR SFP Module P/N: SFP-10G-SR=. (Microsoft IE required

  3. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooling Towers that are installed on the roof of Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC, Building 210D-Conditioning Contractors Synopsis: Added: Sep 30, 2014 10:49 am The Naval Research Laboratory has a requirement: Vendors will be ineligible for award unless they have registered in the System for Award Management 1

  4. Velocity requirements for causality violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Modanese

    2015-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We re-examine the "Regge-Tolman paradox" with reference to some recent experimental results. It is straightforward to find a formula for the velocity v of the moving system required to produce causality violation. This formula typically yields a velocity very close to the speed of light (for instance, v/c > 0.97 for X-shaped microwaves), which raises some doubts about the real physical observability of the violations. We then compute the velocity requirement introducing a delay between the reception of the primary signal and the emission of the secondary. It turns out that in principle for any delay it is possible to find moving observers able to produce active causal violation. This is mathematically due to the singularity of the Lorentz transformations for beta to 1. For a realistic delay due to the propagation of a luminal precursor, we find that causality violations in the reported experiments are still more unlikely (v/c > 0.989), and even in the hypothesis that the superluminal propagation velocity goes to infinity, the velocity requirement is bounded by v/c > 0.62. We also prove that if two macroscopic bodies exchange energy and momentum through superluminal signals, then the swap of signal source and target is incompatible with the Lorentz transformations; therefore it is not possible to distinguish between source and target, even with reference to a definite reference frame.

  5. Evaluation of vegetative cover on reclaimed land by color infrared videography relative to soil properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfordresher, Anne Augusta

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were collected in three reclaimed portions of the Martin Lake mine near Tatum, Texas. Analysis of the video imagery indicated that 11% of the A2 area, 8% of the B area and 15% of the C2 area were poorly vegetated by bermudagrass. Areas totally devoid... as bare soil in these two mine areas are known to be actively used haul roads. Sparsely vegetated areas account for 7. 8'4 of the A2, 4. 8% of the B and 13% of the C2 areas. These values were significantly different at the 5% confidence level...

  6. Canned and Frozen Vegetables: Getting the Most Nutrition for Your Money

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    and Suggested Uses of Selected Canned and Frozen Vegetables Vegetable Availability Key Nutrients Comments/Uses Asparagus canned,frozen Vitamin C and Folate Expensive. Use as a side dish. Beans,Baked canned Protein, Fiber,Thiamin, Low cost. Use as a main or side... dish. Magnesium, Potassium, Zinc and Phosphorus Beans,Green canned,frozen Fiber (F) and Vitamin C Use cut beans in salads and mixed dishes. or Wax Beans,Lima canned,frozen Protein, Fiber,Vitamins Available in white, green and yellow...

  7. Assessment of Pen Branch delta and corridor vegetation changes using multispectral scanner data 1992--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Airborne multispectral scanner data were used to monitor natural succession of wetland vegetation species over a three-year period from 1992 through 1994 for Pen Branch on the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. Image processing techniques were used to identify and measure wetland vegetation communities in the lower portion of the Pen Branch corridor and delta. The study provided a reliable means for monitoring medium- and large-scale changes in a diverse environment. Findings from the study will be used to support decisions regarding remediation efforts following the cessation of cooling water discharge from K reactor at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site in South Carolina.

  8. The Mixed Carload in Distribution of Vegetables from the Lower Rio Grande Valley of Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulson, W. E. (William E.)

    1934-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry: Farm and Ranch Economics: G. S. Fraps, Ph. D., Chief; State Chemist L. P. Gabbard, M. S.. Chief S. E. Asbury, 31. S., Chemist W. E. Paulson, Ph. D., Marketing J. F. Fudge, Ph. D., Chemist C. A. Bonnen, M. S., Farm Management E. C. Carlyle, M..., since it facilitates shipments of new vegetables to the markets of the United States and Canada. Furthermore, after the production of a wide variety of vegetables had been established, the mixed carload offered and continues to offer the means...

  9. Compendium of Regulatory Requirements Governing Underground Injection of Drilling Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puder, Markus G.; Bryson, Bill; Veil, John A.

    2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a comprehensive compendium of the regulatory requirements governing the injection processes used for disposing of drilling wastes; in particular, for a process referred to in this report as slurry injection. The report consists of a narrative discussion of the regulatory requirements and practices for each of the oil- and gas-producing states, a table summarizing the types of injection processes authorized in each state, and an appendix that contains the text of many of the relevant state regulations and policies.

  10. Dust around Type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lifan

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dust around Type Ia supernovae Lifan Wang 1,2 LawrenceIa. Subject headings: Supernovae: General, Dust, Extinctionline) bands for Type Ia supernovae. (a), upper panel, shows

  11. Biodiversity Analysis of Vegetation on the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. K. Ostler; D. J. Hansen

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) located in south central Nevada encompasses approximately 3,561 square kilometers and straddles two major North American deserts, Mojave and Great Basin. Transitional areas between the two desert types have been created by gradients in elevation, precipitation, temperature, and soils. From 1996-1998, more than 1,500 ecological landform units were sampled at the NTS for numerous biotic and abiotic parameters. These data provide a basis for spatial evaluations of biodiversity over landscape scales at the NTS. Species diversity maps (species richness vs. species abundance) have been produced. Differences in ecosystem diversity at the ecoregion, alliance, association, and ecological landform unit levels are presented. Spatial distribution maps of species presence and abundance provide evidence of where transition zones occur and the resulting impact on biodiversity. The influences of abiotic factors (elevation, soil, precipitation) and anthropogenic disturbance on biodiversity are assessed.

  12. Wolter type i LAMAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catura, R.C.; Joki, E.G.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observational objectives for the LAMAR and their influence on the instrument design are discussed. It is concluded that the most important design parameter is the angular resolution of the LAMAR modules since it so strongly influences sensitivity, optical identifications, source confusion, spectral resolution for objective gratings and the ability to resolve small extended sources. A high resolution Wolter Type I LAMAR module is described, its hardware status discussed, and the performance of a LAMAR observatory presented. A promising technique for enhancing the reflectivity of Wolter Type I X-ray optics in a selected bandpass at high energy has been investigated and the performance of the LAMAR module, utilizing this method, has been calculated.

  13. Rappels: 4) Piles Types abstraits de donnes (Abstract Data Type)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamel, Sylvie

    Rappels: 4) Piles #12;Types abstraits de données (Abstract Data Type) IFT2015, A2009, Sylvie Hamel Université de Montréal 1Piles Type de données Un ensemble de valeurs Un ensemble d'opérations Structure de Université de Montréal 2Piles #12;Type abstrait de données PILE (§4.2) Garde en mémoire des objets

  14. Determination of locational error associated with global positioning system (GPS) radio collars in relation to vegetation and topography in north-central New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.; Fresquez, P.R.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1996, a study was initiated to assess seasonal habitat use and movement patterns of Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) using global positioning system (GPS) radio collars. As part of this study, the authors attempted to assess the accuracies of GPS (non-differentially corrected) positions under various vegetation canopies and terrain conditions with the use of a GPS ``test`` collar. The test collar was activated every twenty minutes to obtain a position location and continuously uplinked to Argos satellites to transfer position data files. They used a Telonics, Inc. uplink receiver to intercept the transmission and view the results of the collar in real time. They placed the collar on a stand equivalent to the neck height of an adult elk and then placed the stand within three different treatment categories: (1) topographical influence (canyon and mesa tops), (2) canopy influence (open and closed canopy), and (3) vegetation type influence (ponderosa pine and pinion pine-juniper). The collar was kept at each location for one hour (usually obtaining three fixes). In addition, the authors used a hand-held GPS to obtain a position of the test collar at the same time and location.

  15. Chemical and Oil Spill/Release Clean-Up and Reporting Requirements Chemicals and oils are used throughout Penn State University. Chemicals may be loosely defined as any material

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    Chemical and Oil Spill/Release Clean-Up and Reporting Requirements Chemicals and oils are used, reactive, flammable, or toxic. This can include, for example, oil-based paints, alcohol, WD-40, and any number of laboratory materials. Oils include petroleum products, vegetable oils, hydraulic and mineral

  16. SUN Regulates Vegetative and Reproductive Organ Shape by Changing Cell Division Patterns1[C][W][OA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Knaap, Esther

    SUN Regulates Vegetative and Reproductive Organ Shape by Changing Cell Division Patterns1[C controlling the elongated fruit shape of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is SUN. In this study, we explored the roles of SUN in vegetative and reproductive development using near isogenic lines (NILs) that differ

  17. The temporal mapping of riparian vegetation at Leon Creek in Bexar County, Texas from 1987 to 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummins, Karen Leigh

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and urban zones. Results for both Image Difference Calculation and Percent Area Calculation suggest that for the total watershed, there are higher rates of decreases in vegetation occurring in rural and urban zones. Less vegetation overall in the 0.5 mi...

  18. Seismic Performance Requirements for WETF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hans Jordan

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report develops recommendations for requirements on the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) performance during seismic events. These recommendations are based on fragility estimates of WETF structures, systems, and components that were developed by LANL experts during facility walkdowns. They follow DOE guidance as set forth in standards DOE-STD-1021-93, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Categorization Guidelines for Structures, Systems, and Components'' and DOE-STD-1020-94, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities''. Major recommendations are that WETF institute a stringent combustible loading control program and that additional seismic bracing and anchoring be provided for gloveboxes and heavy equipment.

  19. Stellar Astrophysics Requirements NERSC Forecast

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep Slope Calculator Estimates Cooling andRequirements

  20. Notice Type: Presolicitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a requirement for 1 each EMC VNX 5300 - NAS - 18 TB - Rack-Mountable - Serial Attached SCSI 2 - HD 3 TB X 6 - Raid 0,1,3,5,6,10 - 8GB Fiber Channel - ISCSI - 3U P/N: VNX53D153T72M, 5 each EMC Drive Enclosure - Rack-Mountable - 15 X Total Bay - 15 X 3.5" P/N: V31-DAE-N- 15, 1 each EMC VNX Second Control Station

  1. Physics Degree Requirements 2008 -2010 Bulletin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Physics Degree Requirements 2008 -2010 Bulletin Professional Option Student: __________________________ Advisor: ____________________________ Updated 2/8/08 Physics Required Cr Gr Taken PHYS 137 1 ___ ______ PHYS 461 4 ___ ______ PHYS 490 3 ___ ______ Subtotal 47 (C- or better required) Physics Electives (8 cr

  2. HEP/NP Requirements Review 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FES Requirements Review 2014 BES Requirements Review 2014 Requirements Review Reports Case Studies Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638...

  3. DOE-STD-1104 Requirements Crosswalk

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    09 to DOE-STD-1104-2014 Requirements Matrix - 1 - No. Section Page Number DOE-STD-1104-2009 Requirement DOE-STD-1104-2014 Requirements Comment Gen DOE-STD-1104-2009 was broadly...

  4. A Requirements Analyst's Apprentice: A Proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reubenstein, Howard

    The Requirements Analyst's APprentice (RAAP) partially automates the modeling process involved in creating a software requirement. It uses knowledge of the specific domain and general experience regarding software requirements ...

  5. Information requirements of self-managing teams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Aken, E.M.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the significant challenges organizations face today, many managers have put in place continuous improvement efforts to help the organization on enhance its competitive position. A key element of continuous improvement efforts is employee involvement, and one of the most complex, mature, and effective forms of employee involvement is self-managing teams. A self-managing team is a group of employees, usually eight to fifteen, which is responsible for planning, implementing, controlling, and improving work processes. There are many characteristics of self-managing teams which are discussed frequently in the literature and are common topics of seminars and workshops on SMTs, including the role of the first-line supervisor, the structure of teams, the training necessary, and the pay system for SMTs. However, one area which has not been as widely researched is the role of information - what types of information do self-managing teams need? This paper addresses this question. Results from a multiple case study research project focusing on the information requirements of SMTs are presented. Specifically, seven types of information SMTs need are identified, as well as general characteristics of the information system. By information system, I mean very broadly, the system (both formal and informal) which provides information of any kind to a self-managing team. The results of this research can be thought of as ``design features`` for an information system to support SMTs. Practicing managers can use these design features in two ways: they can design them into beginning SMT efforts; or, for SMTs already established, managers can compare them to the existing information system and adjust accordingly.

  6. Information requirements of self-managing teams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Aken, E.M.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the significant challenges organizations face today, many managers have put in place continuous improvement efforts to help the organization on enhance its competitive position. A key element of continuous improvement efforts is employee involvement, and one of the most complex, mature, and effective forms of employee involvement is self-managing teams. A self-managing team is a group of employees, usually eight to fifteen, which is responsible for planning, implementing, controlling, and improving work processes. There are many characteristics of self-managing teams which are discussed frequently in the literature and are common topics of seminars and workshops on SMTs, including the role of the first-line supervisor, the structure of teams, the training necessary, and the pay system for SMTs. However, one area which has not been as widely researched is the role of information - what types of information do self-managing teams need This paper addresses this question. Results from a multiple case study research project focusing on the information requirements of SMTs are presented. Specifically, seven types of information SMTs need are identified, as well as general characteristics of the information system. By information system, I mean very broadly, the system (both formal and informal) which provides information of any kind to a self-managing team. The results of this research can be thought of as design features'' for an information system to support SMTs. Practicing managers can use these design features in two ways: they can design them into beginning SMT efforts; or, for SMTs already established, managers can compare them to the existing information system and adjust accordingly.

  7. Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities to Inform Federal Smart Grid Policies- Public Meeting Studying the Communications Requirements of Electric Utilities...

  8. Microsoft Word - Requirements_list.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SELECTED LIST OF REQUIREMENTS DESCRIPTION REQUIREMENT APPLICABILITY 1. Federal Motor Carrier Registration 49 CFR 390.19; 390.21 Motor carriers that conduct commercial motor vehicle...

  9. Required Training for Users | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Required Training for Users All APS users, including APS staff, resident users, general users, etc., must complete the required "core" courses listed below before participating in...

  10. Bioinformatics and Genomics Degree Requirements Booklet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dePamphilis, Claude

    Bioinformatics and Genomics Degree Requirements Booklet Fall 2010 #12;Contents Course Requirements Bioinformatics and Genomics Curriculum -------------------------------------------------------8 General #12;Bioinformatics and Genomics Option (BG

  11. Cold vacuum drying facility design requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IRWIN, J.J.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the detailed design requirements for the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project Cold Vacuum Drying Facility. Process, safety, and quality assurance requirements and interfaces are specified.

  12. Genome Sequencing and Mapping Reveal Loss of Heterozygosity as a Mechanism for Rapid Adaptation in the Vegetable Pathogen Phytophthora capsici

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamour, Kurt H.; Mudge, Joann; Gobena, Daniel; Hurtado-Gonzales, Oscar P.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Kuo, Alan; Miller, Neil A.; Rice, Brandon J.; Raffaele, Sylvain; Cano, Liliana M.; Bharti, Arvind K.; Donahoo, Ryan S.; Finely, Sabra; Huitema, Edgar; Hulvey, Jon; Platt, Darren; Salamov, Asaf; Savidor, Alon; Sharma, Rahul; Stam, Remco; Sotrey, Dylan; Thines, Marco; Win, Joe; Haas, Brian J.; Dinwiddie, Darrell L.; Jenkins, Jerry; Knight, James R.; Affourtit, Jason P.; Han, Cliff S.; Chertkov, Olga; Lindquist, Erika A.; Detter, Chris; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Kamoun, Sophien; Kingsmore, Stephen F.

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The oomycete vegetable pathogen Phytophthora capsici has shown remarkable adaptation to fungicides and new hosts. Like other members of this destructive genus, P. capsici has an explosive epidemiology, rapidly producing massive numbers of asexual spores on infected hosts. In addition, P. capsici can remain dormant for years as sexually recombined oospores, making it difficult to produce crops at infested sites, and allowing outcrossing populations to maintain significant genetic variation. Genome sequencing, development of a high-density genetic map, and integrative genomic or genetic characterization of P. capsici field isolates and intercross progeny revealed significant mitotic loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in diverse isolates. LOH was detected in clonally propagated field isolates and sexual progeny, cumulatively affecting >30percent of the genome. LOH altered genotypes for more than 11,000 single-nucleotide variant sites and showed a strong association with changes in mating type and pathogenicity. Overall, it appears that LOH may provide a rapid mechanism for fixing alleles and may be an important component of adaptability for P. capsici.

  13. Applying Scaled Vegetation Greenness Metrics to Constrain Simulated Transpiration Anomalies: A Study over Australia*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Jason

    , Climate Change Research Centre, Level 4 Mathews Building, University of New South Wales, Sydney NSW 2052: A Study over Australia* MARK DECKER, ANDY J. PITMAN, AND JASON EVANS Climate Change Research CentreApplying Scaled Vegetation Greenness Metrics to Constrain Simulated Transpiration Anomalies

  14. Improved estimates of forest vegetation structure and biomass with a LiDAR-optimized sampling design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radeloff, Volker C.

    and Spies, 1992; Jakubauskas and Price, 1997], and forest biomass [Fassnacht et al., 1997; Gower et alImproved estimates of forest vegetation structure and biomass with a LiDAR-optimized sampling, to estimate forest structure and biomass across a 53,600 ha study area in northeastern Wisconsin. Additionally

  15. Modeling Potential Equilibrium States of Vegetation and Terrestrial Water Cycle of Mesoamerica under Climate Change Scenarios*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    precipitation, the impacts of climate change on vegetation and water cycle are predicted with relatively low under Climate Change Scenarios* PABLO IMBACH,1 LUIS MOLINA,1 BRUNO LOCATELLI,# OLIVIER ROUPSARD,1,@ GIL MAHE´ ,& RONALD NEILSON,**,&& LENIN CORRALES,11 MARKO SCHOLZE,## AND PHILIPPE CIAIS @@ 1 Climate Change

  16. Effects of interactive vegetation phenology on the 2003 summer Marc Stfanon,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Andrea, Fabio

    , associated with an increase of the temperature mean and variability in the context of global warming its impacts on the economic and ecological sys- tems, through reduction in productivity of natural and culti- vated vegetation [Ciais et al., 2005; COPA-COGECA, 2003], lower energy supply and electricity

  17. Vegetative and reproductive innovations of early land plants: implications for a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nickrent, Daniel L.

    Vegetative and reproductive innovations of early land plants: implications for a uni ed phylogeny Karen Sue Renzaglia1 , R. Joel Du¡1 {, Daniel L. Nickrent1 and David J. Garbary2 1Department of Plant (renzaglia@plant.siu.edu) 2 Department of Biology, St Francis Xavier University, Antigonish, Nova Scotia

  18. One-dimensional snow water and energy balance model for vegetated surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    One-dimensional snow water and energy balance model for vegetated surfaces Jiming Jin,2 Xiaogang heat ¯ux (W mÀ2 ) Iprec heat ¯ux of precipitation (W mÀ2) I5 s downwelling solar radiation (W mÀ2, USA. Email: jjm@hwr.arizona.edu or gao@hwr.arizona.edu Contract grant sponsor: NASA

  19. Storage of water on vegetation under simulated rainfall of varying intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keim, Richard

    Storage of water on vegetation under simulated rainfall of varying intensity R.F. Keim a,*, A Little is understood about how storage of water on forest canopies varies during rainfall, even though storage changes intensity of throughfall and thus affects a variety of hydrological processes

  20. The Earth as an extrasolar planet: The vegetation spectral signature today and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Earth as an extrasolar planet: The vegetation spectral signature today and during the last in an unresolved extrasolar Earth-like planet integrated reflectance spectrum. Here we investigate the potential during these extrema when 1 hal-00351408,version1-9Jan2009 #12;Earth's climate and biomes maps were

  1. The Earth as an extrasolar planet: the vegetation spectral signature today

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Luc

    The Earth as an extrasolar planet: the vegetation spectral signature today and during the last extrasolar Earth-like planet integrated reflectance spectrum. Here, we investigate the potential during these extrema, when Earth's climate and biomes maps were different from today, we are able to test

  2. Geomorphic controls on hydrology and vegetation in an arid basin: Turkana district, northern Kenya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coppinger, K.D.; Doehring, D.O.; Schimel, D.S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a broad ecological study of Kenyan pastoralist adaptation to periodic drought, a study was done to determine how arid region geomorphology affects hydrology and subsequently vegetative patterns. In this study area, 100 kilometers south of Lake Turkana, it appears that irregular precipitation is stored in bajada sediments and is available to deeply rooted vegetation over long periods of time. This vegetation provides a relatively constant food source for people's herds of browsers, the camels and goats, whereas cattle, which graze mainly on grasses, are significant producers only during wet seasons. Field observations suggest that the mountain and abutting pediment soils are too shallow to store appreciable water. However, greater quantities of water are stored in the deeper bajada sediments adjacent to the pediment where pastoralists dig temporary wells in ephemeral channels during wet seasons. Density of tree growth is greater along channels, and highest canopy cover values are found about the pediment-bajada interface. Geohydrologic processes in this area provide the basis for continuous occupation by the desert people, in contrast to recurring famines in adjacent areas, by enhancing the growth of woody vegetation.

  3. I. Abstract Vegetation plays an important role in the surface energy and water balance of wetlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    55 I. Abstract Vegetation plays an important role in the surface energy and water balance or reverse the downward trend in streamflow. In this study, we investigated the energy and water balance had been sprayed with herbicide (and remained only as dead, standing biomass). Energy balance

  4. Low-cost multispectral vegetation imaging system for detecting leaking CO2 gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    Low-cost multispectral vegetation imaging system for detecting leaking CO2 gas Justin A. Hogan,1 sequestration sites for possible leaks of the CO2 gas from underground reservoirs, a low-cost multispectral are then flagged for closer inspection with in-situ CO2 sensors. The system is entirely self

  5. Postdoctoral research associate position on vegetation remote sensing at the Free University of Berlin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to 100% of the German TV-L13 salary scale. Title of the post Analysis of global maps of terrestrial vegetation: part of the energy absorbed by chlorophyll is not used for carbon fixation but emitted at longer of GOSAT-FTS spaceborne measurements in the 750-770 nm window. Solar Fraunhofer lines superposed to the Fs

  6. -Establishment of Norway spruce seedlings -681 Journal of Vegetation Science 7: 681-684, 1996

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leps, Jan "Suspa"

    - Establishment of Norway spruce seedlings - 681 Journal of Vegetation Science 7: 681-684, 1996 abandoned for half a century and are sur- rounded by Picea abies (Norway spruce) forests. The causes of inhibition of establishment of Norway spruce seedlings in the meadows were tested experimentally

  7. Vegetation changes on an abandoned rice field following herbicide and fertilizer treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cwik, Michael Joseph

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ass (pa icum ~v(r turn L. ), a d rownseed nasn I (~nas alum plicat I ~ Michx. ). In co treat, vegetation of abend ed rice land is composed principally of annual forbs intermixed with three-awns (Aristida spp. ). Forbs, as used in this paper, wili...

  8. A satellite-based biosphere parameterization for net ecosystem CO2 exchange: Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, John Chun-Han

    Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM) Pathmathevan Mahadevan,1 Steven C. Wofsy,1 Daniel M. Matross,1 12 April 2008. [1] We present the Vegetation Photosynthesis and Respiration Model (VPRM), a satellite of ecosystem photosynthesis, and annual sum of NEE at all eddy flux sites for which it is optimized

  9. Herbicidal Activity of Mustard Seed Meal on Weed and Vegetable Emergence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xi

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    to determine the herbicidal activity of MSMs (Sinapis alba ‘IdaGold’ and Brassica juncea ‘Pacific Gold’) on weed and vegetable emergence. In Expt. 1, MSMs were applied at 0, 50, 100, 200 or 300 g/m2 to the bottom of petri dishes and covered with germination mix...

  10. Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yang

    Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes Yonghoon Choi and Yang Wang Department of Geological Sciences, Florida State. Measurements of stable carbon isotopic ratios as well as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) contents

  11. Cattle Selection for Aspen and Meadow Vegetation: Implications for Restoration Bobette E. Jones,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tate, Kenneth

    Cattle Selection for Aspen and Meadow Vegetation: Implications for Restoration Bobette E. Jones,1 95616, USA. Abstract There is concern over the decline of aspen and the lack of successful regeneration due to excessive browsing of aspen suckers by cattle and other wild and domestic ungulates. We

  12. Characterizing the molecular composition of epicuticular waxes of vegetation and in surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Characterizing the molecular composition of epicuticular waxes of vegetation and in surface MBL Street, Woods Hole, MA 02543 #12;Abstract: Epicuticular plant waxes are nearly omnipresent of origin. These waxes can provide that information in real time when collected in aerosols, or from

  13. Hydraulic Effects of Changes in Bottom-Land Vegetation on Three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydraulic Effects of Changes in Bottom-Land Vegetation on Three Major Floods, Gila RiverKelvey, Director Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data Burkham, D. E. 1927 Hydraulic effects 19.16:655-J 1. Gila River-Floods. 2. Hydraulics. 3. Botany-Ecology-Gila River. 1. Title: Hydraulic

  14. Theoretical Population Biology 71 (2007) 111 Nonlinear dynamics and pattern bifurcations in a model for vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherratt, Jonathan A.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are typical, running parallel to the contours. Previously, Klausmeier [1999. Regular and irregular patterns of vegetation up to 250 m wide, separated by gaps of up to 1 km, running along the contours. These patterns zffl}|ffl{ plant loss þ k3@2 U=@X2 zfflfflfflfflfflfflfflffl}|fflfflfflfflfflfflfflffl{ dispersal , (1a

  15. Relationship between satellite-derived vegetation indices and aircraft-based CO2 measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cihlar, J.; Caramori, P.H.; Schuepp, P.H.; Desjardins, R.L.; Macpherson, J.I. (Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, Ottawa (Canada) McGill Univ., Montreal (Canada) Agriculture Canada, Centre for Land and Biological Resources Research, Ottawa (Canada) National Research Council of Canada, Inst. for Aerospace Research, Ottawa (Canada))

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between satellite-derived vegetation indices and CO2 uptake, as an initial step in exploring the possibility of using a satellite-derived vegetation index as a measure of net photosynthesis. The study area included the First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment (FIFE) site located on the Konza prairie and adjacent area as well as a transect between Manhattan and Salina. One third of the transect exhibited vegetation and terrain characteristics similar to those on the FIFE site, whereas cultivated land predominated in the remaining portion of the 75-km-long flight line. In June, July, August, and October 1987, several CO2 data sets were obtained using the National Research Council of Canada's Twin Otter research aircraft. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and the simple ratio (SR) were computed from NOAA AVHRR data acquired as part of FIFE. Aircraft and satellite data were processed to obtain spatially coincident and locally representative flux values. Results show a linear relationship between NDVI and CO2 uptake during a single day; however, a nonlinear relationship emerged when all data sets were combined. The data from FIFE and the regional transect were consistent for one date but differed for other periods. Overall, about 60 percent of total variability in CO2 flux was accounted for by the NDVI and 74 percent by the SR. 14 refs.

  16. Normalized Microwave Reflection Index: A Vegetation Measurement Derived From GPS Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Eric

    is known as Normalized Differ- ence Water Index (NDWI) [12]. It is calculated using reflectance in two near infrared (NIR) channels. Similar indices have been proposed that use reflectance at other NIR wavelengthsNormalized Microwave Reflection Index: A Vegetation Measurement Derived From GPS Networks Kristine

  17. Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Comparison of Long-Wave Infrared Imaging and Visible/Near-Infrared Imaging of Vegetation using spectral imaging. This has been accom- plished with both visible/near-infrared (Vis/NIR) sunlight reflection and long-wave infrared (LWIR) thermal emission. During a 4-week period in summer 2011

  18. MODELLING MODIFIED ATMOSPHERE PACKAGING FOR FRUITS AND VEGETABLES USING MEMBRANE SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinze, Thomas

    of polymeric film in or- der to modify the O2 and CO2 concentrations inside the package, reducing metabolic are not fully under- stood. As examples we can refer to the little knowl- edge about the effect of CO2MODELLING MODIFIED ATMOSPHERE PACKAGING FOR FRUITS AND VEGETABLES USING MEMBRANE SYSTEMS Gabi

  19. A flow resistance model for assessing the impact of vegetation on flood routing mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katul, Gabriel

    control in urban storm water runoff [Kirby et al., 2005], and linking tidal hydrodynamic forcing to flow and field studies. The proposed model asymptotically recovers the flow resistance formulation when the waterA flow resistance model for assessing the impact of vegetation on flood routing mechanics Gabriel G

  20. Derivation of pasture biomass in Mongolia from AVHRR-based vegetation health indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gitelson, Anatoly

    Derivation of pasture biomass in Mongolia from AVHRR-based vegetation health indices F. KOGAN, Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia (Received 28 April 2003; in final form 8 March 2004 ) Abstract. Early drought detection and impact assessment on the amount of pasture biomass are important in Mongolia, whose economy strongly

  1. Sensitivity of Mesoscale Surface Dynamics to Surface Soil and Vegetation Contrasts over the Carolina Sandhills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman, Sethu

    Sensitivity of Mesoscale Surface Dynamics to Surface Soil and Vegetation Contrasts over in mesoscale summertime precipitation over this region. Numerical simulations are analyzed to investigate the relationships between mesoscale surface dynamics and the transition from clay to sandy soils over this region

  2. Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleyer, Michael

    Plant species richness, vegetation structure and soil resources of urban brownfield sites linked September 2008 # Springer Science + Business Media, LLC 2008 Abstract Brownfield sites contribute of a chronosequence of urban brownfield sites in Bremen and Berlin, Germany. These parameters were linked

  3. Self-consistent photothermal techniques: Application for measuring thermal diffusivity in vegetable oils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandelis, Andreas

    of Mathematics, Av. Acueducto S/N, Col. Barrio la Laguna, C. P. 07340, Del. Gustavo A. Madero, Me´xico, D. F., Me´xico importance because they can be used as fuel alternatives and lubricants.1,2 Used extensively in the 19th century as base lubricants, vegetable oils were gradually replaced by mineral oils mainly for economic

  4. MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review paper Riparian vegetation research in Mediterranean-climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stella, John C.

    MEDITERRANEAN CLIMATE STREAMS Review paper Riparian vegetation research in Mediterranean-climate are from land-use conversion to agriculture, streamflow regulation, nutrient enrichment, and climate change editors: N. Bonada & V. H. Resh / Streams in Mediterranean climate regions: lessons learned from the last

  5. Holocene vegetation and fire dynamics in the supra-mediterranean belt of the Nebrodi Mountains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bern, Universität

    and the Mediterranean region. Copyright # 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. KEYWORDS: climate change; human impact; Ilex TINNER1 1 Institute of Plant Sciences and Oeschger Centre for Climate Change Research, University of BernHolocene vegetation and fire dynamics in the supra-mediterranean belt of the Nebrodi Mountains

  6. Global latitudinal-asymmetric vegetation growth trends and their driving mechanisms: 1982-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Jiafu [ORNL; Shi, Xiaoying [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Zhu, Zaichun [Boston University; Myneni, Ranga B. [Boston University

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a recent Leaf Area Index (LAI) dataset and the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4), we investigate percent changes and controlling factors of global vegetation growth for the period 1982 to 2009. Over that 28-year period, both the remote-sensing estimate and model simulation show a significant increasing trend in annual vegetation growth. Latitudinal asymmetry appeared in both products, with small increases in the Southern Hemisphere (SH) and larger increases at high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH). The south-to-north asymmetric land surface warming was assessed to be the principal driver of this latitudinal asymmetry of LAI trend. Heterogeneous precipitation functioned to decrease this latitudinal LAI gradient, and considerably regulated the local LAI change. CO2 fertilization during the last three decades, was simulated to be the dominant cause for the enhanced vegetation growth. Our study, though limited by observational and modeling uncertainties, adds further insight into vegetation growth trends and environmental correlations. These validation exercises also provide new quantitative and objective metrics for evaluation of land ecosystem process models at multiple spatio-temporal scales.

  7. Ris Energy Report 2 Biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils that have been

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    6.2 Risø Energy Report 2 Biodiesel is produced from vegetable oils that have been chemically (canola) oil with methanol. Biodiesel can be burned directly in diesel engines. Robert Diesel himself, but it was not until the oil crisis of the 1970s that biofuels attracted serious interest. Biodiesel is reported

  8. Interaction of Vegetation and Atmospheric Dynamical Mechanisms in the Mid-Holocene African Monsoon*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neelin, J. David

    that the problem is highly sensitive to the atmospheric dynamics of each model employed. In other work, dynamical mechanisms have been hypothesized to affect monsoon poleward extent, particularly ventilation, by import of low-moist static energy air to the continent. Here, interactive vegetation and the ventilation

  9. Resilience and recovery potential of duneland vegetation in the southern Kalahari

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to changes in wind power and rainfall. However, in modern times disturbances associated with land use unclear whether the region is poised at a tipping point between its current state (i.e., vegetated fixed linear dunes), and a ``degraded'' state (i.e., barren and active dunes). Here we investigate the ability

  10. Vegetation History And Logging Disturbance: Effects On Rain Forest In The Lope Reserve, Gabon (With Special Emphasis On Elephants and Apes) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Lee JT

    An investigation of the effects of commercial mechanised selective logging on rain forest vegetation and mammals, was undertaken in the Lope Reserve, central Gabon, between January 1989 to July 1991. Vegetation in Lope ...

  11. RESERVATION APPLICATION CHECKLIST Required documents key for different efficiency incentive types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be pulled before or up to 60 days after certificate of occupancy was issued. NSHP PV1/CF1RPV to be performed; · Quantity, make and model of the modules, inverters, and meters to be installed at each

  12. Assessment of the type of cycling infrastructure required to attract new

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTriWildcatAntrimArkansasAshford,Asotin County,Resource |cyclists | Open

  13. Postdoc Appointment Types

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project Office Press ReleasesPost-Closure BenefitsAppointment Types

  14. Fundamentals of Requirements Engineering 2003-4 Steve Easterbrook and Bashar Nuseibeh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Easterbrook, Steve

    and an iterative development model. · Summarize the key stages in the lifecycle of a requirement. · Contrast of engineering itself, and compare the engineering of software- intensive systems with other types of engineering types of model: lifecycle models and process models. Lifecycle models are ecological descriptions

  15. World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis report presents the projected requirements for uranium concentrate and uranium enrichment services to fuel the nuclear power plants expected to be operating under three nuclear supply scenarios. Two of these scenarios, the Lower Reference and Upper Reference cases, apply to the United States, Canada, Europe, the Far East, and other countries with free market economies (FME countries). A No New Orders scenario is presented only for the United States. These nuclear supply scenarios are described in Commercial Nuclear Power 1990: Prospects for the United States and the World (DOE/EIA-0438(90)). This report contains an analysis of the sensitivities of the nuclear fuel cycle projections to different levels and types of projected nuclear capacity, different enrichment tails assays, higher and lower capacity factors, changes in nuclear fuel burnup levels, and other exogenous assumptions. The projections for the United States generally extend through the year 2020, and the FME projections, which include the United States, are provided through 2010. The report also presents annual projections of spent nuclear fuel discharges and inventories of spent fuel. Appendix D includes domestic spent fuel projections through the year 2030 for the Lower and Upper Reference cases and through 2040, the last year in which spent fuel is discharged, for the No New Orders case. These disaggregated projections are provided at the request of the Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management.

  16. Logical Structure Extraction from Software Requirements Documents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czarnecki, Krzysztof

    Documents I. INTRODUCTION Requirements management (RM) tools store and manipu- late software requirementsLogical Structure Extraction from Software Requirements Documents Rehan Rauf, Michal Antkiewicz,mantkiew,kczarnec}@gsd.uwaterloo.ca Abstract--Software requirements documents (SRDs) are often authored in general-purpose rich-text editors

  17. Grantee Checklist for the Inspection & Monitoring Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document walks Grantees through the Inspection and Monitoring requirement of the Quality Work Plan.

  18. Rappels: 4) Piles Types abstraits de donnes (Abstract Data Type)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamel, Sylvie

    Rappels: 4) Piles Types abstraits de données (Abstract Data Type) IFT2015, A2009, Sylvie Hamel Université de Montréal 1Piles Type de données Un ensemble de valeurs Un ensemble d'opérations Structure de Université de Montréal 2Piles Type abstrait de données PILE (§4.2) Garde en mémoire des objets arbitraires

  19. Using ownership types to support library aliasing boundaries Luke Wagner Jaakko Jarvi Bjarne Stroustrup

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wrigstad, Tobias

    Using ownership types to support library aliasing boundaries Luke Wagner Jaakko J¨arvi Bjarne types. Based on the positive experience with the concurrency library, this paper considers a family of the aliasing boundaries required by the library with those expressed with own- ership types; (3) describes

  20. Boost type PWM HVDC transmission system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ooi, B.T.; Wang, X. (McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that conventional HVdc is built around the mercury arc rectifier or the thyristor which requires line commutation. The advances of fast, high power GTO's and future devices such as MCT's with turn off capabilities, are bringing PWM techniques within the range of HVdc applications. By combining PWM techniques to the boost type bridge topology, one has an alternate system of HVdc Transmission. On the ac side, the converter station has active controls over: the voltage amplitude, the voltage angle and the frequency. On the dc side, parallel connections facilitate multi-terminal load sharing by simple local controls so that redundant communication channels are not required. Bidirectional power through each station is accomplished by the reversal of the direction of dc current flow. These claims have been substantiated by experimental results from laboratory size multi-terminal models.

  1. Upgrading the ampacity of HPFF pipe-type cable circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aabo, T.; Lawson, W.G. [Power Technologies, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States); Pancholi, S.V. [Potomac Electric Power Co., Washington, DC (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The upgrading of several 69 kV pipe-type cable feeders on the Potomac Electric Power Company (PEPCo) transmission cable system is discussed. The methods used for the ampacity calculation are described. The fluid circulation approach required to meet the feeder emergency load requirements are discussed. For the feeders that were in service for approximately 40 years, a system life evaluation was performed.

  2. Mechanism design with approximate types

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Zeyuan Allen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In mechanism design, we replace the strong assumption that each player knows his own payoff type exactly with the more realistic assumption that he knows it only approximately: each player i only knows that his true type ...

  3. Types of Farming in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonnen, C. A.

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .......... .......-.----------------------. 8 Labor -..-.....-----...------------------------------------------------. 9 Land Tenure .--.----....---....--------------------------------- 9 Number and Size of Farms ....----...----.-._--------- 10 Capital... -------------...-------.---------------------------- 21 Hogs -......-....--------------------------------------------------- 22 Poultry .-.---.-.....--.-..------.---------------------------------- 22 Horses and Mules ---..-....---..--..------------------------ 23 Types of Farming and Type-of-farming...

  4. UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE (UAV) HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING FOR DRYLAND VEGETATION MONITORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nancy F. Glenn; Jessica J. Mitchell; Matthew O. Anderson; Ryan C. Hruska

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    UAV-based hyperspectral remote sensing capabilities developed by the Idaho National Lab and Idaho State University, Boise Center Aerospace Lab, were recently tested via demonstration flights that explored the influence of altitude on geometric error, image mosaicking, and dryland vegetation classification. The test flights successfully acquired usable flightline data capable of supporting classifiable composite images. Unsupervised classification results support vegetation management objectives that rely on mapping shrub cover and distribution patterns. Overall, supervised classifications performed poorly despite spectral separability in the image-derived endmember pixels. Future mapping efforts that leverage ground reference data, ultra-high spatial resolution photos and time series analysis should be able to effectively distinguish native grasses such as Sandberg bluegrass (Poa secunda), from invasives such as burr buttercup (Ranunculus testiculatus) and cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum).

  5. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-06)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2001-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    BPA proposes to apply selected herbicides to control annual weeds that are competing with native grasses that were seeded two years ago. Herbicides will also be applied at the base of the existing wooden transmission line poles located in the pasture area. BPA would conduct the vegetation control with the goal of promoting native grass growth and to provide fire protection for the wooden transmission line poles. The pasture area is, for the most part, flat with elevation increasing towards the northwest corner. Slopes are not steep in that area. This project meets the standards and guidelines for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) and Record of Decision (ROD).

  6. Tornado type wind turbines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, Cheng-Ting (Ames, IA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A tornado type wind turbine has a vertically disposed wind collecting tower with spaced apart inner and outer walls and a central bore. The upper end of the tower is open while the lower end of the structure is in communication with a wind intake chamber. An opening in the wind chamber is positioned over a turbine which is in driving communication with an electrical generator. An opening between the inner and outer walls at the lower end of the tower permits radially flowing air to enter the space between the inner and outer walls while a vertically disposed opening in the wind collecting tower permits tangentially flowing air to enter the central bore. A porous portion of the inner wall permits the radially flowing air to interact with the tangentially flowing air so as to create an intensified vortex flow which exits out of the top opening of the tower so as to create a low pressure core and thus draw air through the opening of the wind intake chamber so as to drive the turbine.

  7. Modeling of sorption isotherms of dried vegetable wastes from wholesale market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.; Iguaz, A.; Esnoz, A.; Virseda, P.

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The moisture sorption isotherms of dried vegetable wastes (based on green leaves and fruits) from wholesale market were determined at 25, 40, 60 and 90 C by the static gravimetric method. Experimental data were fit by using several mathematical models. The G.A.B. and the Halsey model gave the minimum mean square error. G.A.B. parameters were related with temperature by Arrhenius expressions.

  8. A study of historical vegetation in Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Gwendolyn Ann

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SCIENCE DECEMBER 1966 Major Subject: Recreation and Resource Development A STUDY OF HISTORICAL VEGETATION IN LYNDON B. JOHNSON NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK A Thesis by GWENDOLYN ANN GARDNER Approved as to style and content by: E. Glenn Carls... Historical Park. (December 1986) Gwendolyn Ann Gardner, B. S. , Texas AAH University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. E. Glenn Car ls Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Par k (LYJO) is located in Blanco and Gillespie Counties, Texas, in a...

  9. Laboratory experiments and numerical modeling of wave attenuation through artificial vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augustin, Lauren Nicole

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ). The first hydrodynamic model developed by Price et al. (1968) simulated the effects of seaweed as a high viscous layer. Mork (1996) extended the idea of the high viscous layer and developed a theory for kelp plants that took into account not only viscous... has been validated by artificial laboratory kelp experiments for the species Laminaria Hyperborea, and is assumed appropriate for representing wave transformation and damping over submerged vegetative fields of variable depths. Mork (1996) studied...

  10. Coastal Marsh Vegetation Dynamics of the East Bay of Galveston Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jeremy Scott

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    marshes form partly as a function of relatively little elevation variability, where a gently sloped tidal mudflat is inhabited by marsh vegetation (Mitsch and Gosselink 1986). Because of the small elevation gradient and the disproportionately high... by Connell and Slatyer (1977), facilitation is the theory of positive interactions between two or more species. The basic premise of facilitation in coastal marshes is the trapping of sediment on bare tidal mudflats by pioneer species that leads...

  11. Impact of trail use on the soils and vegetation of Petit Jean State Park, Arkansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Elizabeth Anne

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Magill & Nord, 1963). STUDY AREA Petit Jean State Park is located on Petit Jean Mountain. This is one flat-topped ridge among many such ridges along the Arkansas River Valley. It is located in the southwest corner of Conway County, Arkansas... closed canopy E. A sparse ground vegetative cover II. Upland Woodland exhibited the following biotic and physical characteristics (Fig. 5): A. A ridge top or exposed slope location B. A drier environment than that along streams C. An oak...

  12. Vegetation component of geothermal EIS studies: Introduced plants, ecosystem stability, and geothermal development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper contributes new information about the impacts from introduced plant invasions on the native Hawaiian vegetation as consequences of land disturbance and geothermal development activities. In this regard, most geothermal development is expected to act as another recurring source of physical disturbance which favors the spread and maintenance of introduced organisms throughout the region. Where geothermal exploration and development activities extend beyond existing agricultural and residential development, they will become the initial or sole source of disturbance to the naturalized vegetation of the area. Kilauea has a unique ecosystem adapted to the dynamics of a volcanically active landscape. The characteristics of this ecosystem need to be realized in order to understand the major threats to the ecosystem and to evaluate the effects of and mitigation for geothermal development in Puna. The native Puna vegetation is well adapted to disturbances associated with volcanic eruption, but it is ill-adapted to compete with alien plant species in secondary disturbances produced by human activities. Introduced plant and animal species have become a major threat to the continued presence of the native biota in the Puna region of reference.

  13. Physics Degree Requirements 2008-2010 Bulletin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    Physics Degree Requirements 2008-2010 Bulletin Interdisciplinary Option Student: ___________________ Advisor: ________________ Option: ________________ Updated 2/8/08 Physics Required Cr Gr Taken PHYS 137 1) Physics Electives (3 cr; 253 and 300) PHYS _____ ___ ___ ______ PHYS _____ ___ ___ ______ PHYS

  14. Salt Lake City- High Performance Buildings Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Salt Lake City's mayor issued an executive order in July 2005 requiring that all public buildings owned and controlled by the city be built or renovated to meet the requirements of LEED "silver"...

  15. City of Dubuque- Solar Thermal Licensing Requirement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of Dubuque requires a Solar Thermal License in order for a person to install a solar thermal project on a home or business. The requirement does not apply to solar photovoltaics. The...

  16. Requirements, possible alternatives & international NEUTRON SCATTERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimeo, Robert M.

    Requirements, possible alternatives & international NEUTRON SCATTERING DETECTORS for Rob Dimeo NIST neutron scattering instruments are the most demanding require background low #12;#12;The Helium-3 Supply Crisis ­ Alternative Techniques to Helium-3 based Detectors for Neutron Scattering Applications

  17. A dependent nominal type theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheney, James

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nominal abstract syntax is an approach to representing names and binding pioneered by Gabbay and Pitts. So far nominal techniques have mostly been studied using classical logic or model theory, not type theory. Nominal extensions to simple, dependent and ML-like polymorphic languages have been studied, but decidability and normalization results have only been established for simple nominal type theories. We present a LF-style dependent type theory extended with name-abstraction types, prove soundness and decidability of beta-eta-equivalence checking, discuss adequacy and canonical forms via an example, and discuss extensions such as dependently-typed recursion and induction principles.

  18. Brush types of the Nueces River watershed as related to soil, climatic and geological factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huss, Donald Lee

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Savanna . 21 3. Mesquite-Chaparral 23 4. Mesquite Woodland 28 5. Switch Mesquite 29 6. Running Mesquite 30 7. Scrub Mesquite 31 Communities with Live oak dominant 32 8. Live oak-Mesquite Savanna 32 9. Mesquite-Live oak-Chaparral 33 10. Live oak...-Guajillo Chaparral 34 11. Live oak-Post oak-Mesquite Woodland 35 Communities with Post oak dominant 35 12. Post oak-Blackjack oak Woodland 37 CHAPARRAL SHRUB COMMUNITIES 37 13. Guajillo Chaparral 39 14. Blackbrush Chaparral 39 SUFFRUTESCENT VEGETATIONAL TYPES...

  19. Brush types of the Nueces River watershed as related to soil, climatic and geological factors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huss, Donald Lee

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Savanna . 21 3. Mesquite-Chaparral 23 4. Mesquite Woodland 28 5. Switch Mesquite 29 6. Running Mesquite 30 7. Scrub Mesquite 31 Communities with Live oak dominant 32 8. Live oak-Mesquite Savanna 32 9. Mesquite-Live oak-Chaparral 33 10. Live oak...-Guajillo Chaparral 34 11. Live oak-Post oak-Mesquite Woodland 35 Communities with Post oak dominant 35 12. Post oak-Blackjack oak Woodland 37 CHAPARRAL SHRUB COMMUNITIES 37 13. Guajillo Chaparral 39 14. Blackbrush Chaparral 39 SUFFRUTESCENT VEGETATIONAL TYPES...

  20. Compendium of regulatory requirements governing underground injection of drilling waste.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puder, M. G.; Bryson, B.; Veil, J. A.

    2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Large quantities of waste are produced when oil and gas wells are drilled. The two primary types of drilling wastes include used drilling fluids (commonly referred to as muds), which serve a variety of functions when wells are drilled, and drill cuttings (rock particles ground up by the drill bit). Some oil-based and synthetic-based muds are recycled; other such muds, however, and nearly all water-based muds, are disposed of. Numerous methods are employed to manage drilling wastes, including burial of drilling pit contents, land spreading, thermal processes, bioremediation, treatment and reuse, and several types of injection processes. This report provides a comprehensive compendium of the regulatory requirements governing the injection processes used for disposing of drilling wastes; in particular, for a process referred to in this report as slurry injection. The report consists of a narrative discussion of the regulatory requirements and practices for each of the oil- and gas-producing states, a table summarizing the types of injection processes authorized in each state, and an appendix that contains the text of many of the relevant state regulations and policies. The material included in the report was derived primarily from a review of state regulations and from interviews with state oil and gas regulatory officials.

  1. Potential influence of climate-induced vegetation shifts on future land use and associated land carbon fluxes in Northern Eurasia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kicklighter, D W

    Climate change will alter ecosystem metabolism and may lead to a redistribution of vegetation and changes in fire regimes in Northern Eurasia over the 21st century. Land management decisions will interact with these ...

  2. OVERWEIGHT AND OBESITY AT 5 YEARS OF AGE IN RELATION TO FRUIT AND VEGETABLE INTAKE OVER TIME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cody, Claire McCaslin

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Childhood overweight and obesity has increased as American diets have evolved to include fewer fruits and vegetables. It is important to evaluate the effect of dietary components on childhood overweight and obesity. Objective...

  3. Vegetation classification and the efficacy of plant dominance-based classifications in predicting the occurrence of plant and animal species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yantis, James Hugh

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . Vegetation associations are often distinguished on the basis of the dominant plant species. Associations with markedly different dominants (e.g., evergreen and deciduous trees) are expected to indicate high complementarity. In this study I evaluated...

  4. The Water-Wise Vegetable Garden: An Analysis of the Potential for Irrigation through Rainwater Harvesting in Sunny Northern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Adrienne; Esterer-Vogel, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    water-use vegetables” that can be grown in California are “Cylindra beets, Tepary beans,beans, carrots and peppers. The first five of these crops have somewhat lower water

  5. The wake structure behind a porous obstruction and its implications for deposition near a finite patch of emergent vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhengbing

    This experimental study describes the mean and turbulent flow structure in the wake of a circular array of cylinders, which is a model for a patch of emergent vegetation. The patch diameter, D, and patch density, a (frontal ...

  6. Responses of soil microbial and nematode communities to aluminum toxicity in vegetated oil-shale-waste lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Responses of soil microbial and nematode communities to aluminum toxicity in vegetated oil-shale and total Al concentrations showed a significant decrease after planting S. cumini plantation onto the shale

  7. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Information requirements analysis for holonic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE Information requirements analysis for holonic manufacturing systems in a virtual and development of holonic manu- facturing systems requires careful, and sometimes risky, decision making, the authors propose a methodology for a holonic manufacturing systems requirement analysis that is based

  8. FCEDS General Education Requirements (Updated 2013)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayfield, John

    FCEDS General Education Requirements (Updated 2013) This proposal outlines a plan that would allow a transfer student to apply an Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree to meet the General Education requirements of the Family and Consumer Sciences Education and Studies (FCEDS) curriculum. The required

  9. Deriving Security Requirements from Crosscutting Threat Descriptions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haley, Charles B.

    Deriving Security Requirements from Crosscutting Threat Descriptions Charles B. Haley, Robin C representing threats as crosscutting concerns aids in determining the effect of security requirements on the functional requirements. Assets (objects that have value in a system) are first enumerated, and then threats

  10. Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EPA'S Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Emissions Rulemaking Reid J. Rosnick requirements for operating uranium mill tailings (Subpart W) Status update on Subpart W activities Outreach/Communications #12;3 EPA Regulatory Requirements for Operating Uranium Mill Tailings (Clean Air Act) · 40 CFR 61

  11. SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Results for Custom Reaction Intensity and Total Dead Fuels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Lloyd A. [Leading Solutions, LLC.; Paresol, Bernard [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland, OR.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report of the geostatistical analysis results of the fire fuels response variables, custom reaction intensity and total dead fuels is but a part of an SRS 2010 vegetation inventory project. For detailed description of project, theory and background including sample design, methods, and results please refer to USDA Forest Service Savannah River Site internal report “SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Report”, (Edwards & Parresol 2013).

  12. A newsletter for commercial vegetable growers prepared by the Purdue University Cooperative Extension Service April 03, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzel, Matthew

    ://www.btny.purdue.edu/pubs/vegcrop> Vegetable Crops Hotline 1 IN THIS ISSUE · Powdery Mildew of MuskMelon · using Herbicides witH Plastic MulcH application. using Herbicides witH Plastic MulcH - (Liz Maynard and Steve Weller) - Herbicides combined with plastic mulch are used to control weeds on many vegetable farms. Improper use of herbicides under or over

  13. On the asymptotic homotopy type of inductive limit Type ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In this note we exhibit large classes of (projeetionless) stable, nuclear C*- algebras whose asymptotic homotopy type is determined by K-theoretical data.

  14. Surface Environmental Surveillance Project: Locations Manual Volume 1 – Air and Water Volume 2 – Farm Products, Soil & Vegetation, and Wildlife

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, Brad G.; Patton, Gregory W.; Stegen, Amanda; Poston, Ted M.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes all environmental monitoring locations associated with the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. Environmental surveillance of the Hanford site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The environmental surveillance sampling design is described in the Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operation Office (DOE/RL-91-50). This document contains the locations of sites used to collect samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP). Each section includes directions, maps, and pictures of the locations. A general knowledge of roads and highways on and around the Hanford Site is necessary to successfully use this manual. Supplemental information (Maps, Gazetteer, etc.) may be necessary if user is unfamiliar with local routes. The SESP is a multimedia environmental surveillance effort to measure the concentrations of radionuclides and chemicals in environmental media to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental quality standards and public exposure limits, and assessing environmental impacts. Project personnel annually collect selected samples of ambient air, surface water, agricultural products, fish, wildlife, and sediments. Soil and vegetation samples are collected approximately every 5 years. Analytical capabilities include the measurement of radionuclides at very low environmental concentrations and, in selected media, nonradiological chemicals including metals, anions, volatile organic compounds, and total organic carbon.

  15. FY 2012 Real Property Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    More Documents & Publications FY 2013 Real Property Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance Reporting Requirement Real Property Maintenance Reporting Requirement Memorandum...

  16. Type of Space Bulb Type #/House Fixture Style Greenhouse #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Type of Space Bulb Type #/House Fixture Style Greenhouse # 1 Lu 430/Lu 400 24 White box style 2 Lu No bulbs 0 N/A Seed harvest room F32 T8/TL 841 90 bulbs VIGS Room F032 /741/ECO 60 bulbs Chamber Model Bulb

  17. On the Strategy and Requirements for Neutronics Testing in ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youssef, M.Z. [University of California-Los Angeles (United States); Sawan, M.E. [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutronics testing is among the several types of fusion technology testing scheduled to be performed in ITER. The three ports assigned for testing will test several blanket concepts proposed by the various parties with test blanket modules (TBM) that utilize different breeders and coolants. Nevertheless, neutronics issues to be resolved in ITER-TBM are generic in nature and are important to each TBM type. Dedicated neutronics tests specifically address the accuracy involved in predicting key neutronics parameters such as tritium production rate, TPR, volumetric heating rate, induced activation and decay heat, and radiation damage to the reactor components. In this paper, we address some strategies for performing the neutronics tests. Tritium self-sufficiency cannot be confirmed by testing in ITER, however, the testing can provide valuable information regarding the main parameters needed to assess the feasibility of achieving tritium self-sufficiency. The paper also addresses the operational requirement (i.e. flux and fluence) as well as the geometrical requirement of the test module (i.e. minimum size) in order to have meaningful and useful tests. Measured neutronics data require high spatial resolution. This necessitates that the measured quantity be as flat as possible in the innermost locations inside the test module. This requirement has been confirmed in the present work based on results from two-dimensional calculations. The US and Japan solid breeder test blanket modules are placed inside half a port in ITER. The R-{theta} model used accounts for the presence of the ITER shielding blanket and the surrounding frame of the port.

  18. FY 2013 Real Property Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Real Property Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance Reporting Requirement FY 2013 Real Property Deferred, Actual, and Required Maintenance Reporting Requirement FY 2013 DARM...

  19. Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Standard identifies safety requirements for magnetic fusion facilities. Safety functions are used to define outcomes that must be achieved to ensure that exposures to radiation, hazardous materials, or other hazards are maintained within acceptable limits. Requirements applicable to magnetic fusion facilities have been derived from Federal law, policy, and other documents. In addition to specific safety requirements, broad direction is given in the form of safety principles that are to be implemented and within which safety can be achieved.

  20. SCHOOL OF DENTAL HYGIENE Program Requirements Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    SCHOOL OF DENTAL HYGIENE Program Requirements Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group Career: UDH RQ = Requirement Program: 00005 LN = Line RG 4337 SCHOOL OF DENTAL HYGIENE REQUIREMENTS Effective FA04/1510 (09 Optional Pass/Fail (make no exceptions here) RQ 4003 Courses Transferred to the School of Dental Hygiene

  1. Core Science Requirement Final Document Page 1 THE CORE SCIENCE REQUIREMENT and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lagalante, Anthony F.

    Core Science Requirement ­ Final Document ­ Page 1 THE CORE SCIENCE REQUIREMENT and MENDEL SCIENCE EXPERIENCE COURSES Core requirement of 2 semesters of science with laboratory; requirement to be met by the end of the sophomore year Rationale Science literacy is an integral part of the intellectual

  2. Building HVAC Requirements Overview Page 4-1 4 Building HVAC Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Building HVAC Requirements ­ Overview Page 4-1 4 Building HVAC Requirements 4.1 Overview 4 conditioning (HVAC) systems. The requirements are presented in this chapter so that it may serve as a single. 2008 Residential Compliance Manual August 2009 #12;Page 4-2 Building HVAC Requirements ­ Overview 4

  3. Automotive Turbocharging: Industrial Requirements and Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    performance will be difficult to achieve requires a proper understanding of the trade-offs and engine effects and impacts must be part of turbocharger development...

  4. The Schedule - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    funds are required. This chapter will briefly discuss some scheduling basics. g4301-1chp12.pdf -- PDF Document, 60 KB Writer: John Makepeace Subjects: Administration Management...

  5. Network Requirements Workshop - Documents and Background Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Requirements Review Reports Case Studies News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Blog ESnet Live Home Science Engagement...

  6. Goals and Requirements | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    sustainable procurement requirements Ensure 15% of building stock meet sustainability principles by 2015 Design new facilities to reach net-zero energy use by 2030 Back to Top...

  7. Requirements Governing Water Quality Standards (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This rule establishes the requirements governing the discharge or deposit of sewage, industrial wastes and other wastes into waters and establishes water quality standards.

  8. Allocating Variability and Reserve Requirements (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.; King, J.; Milligan, M.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes how you could conceivably allocate variability and reserve requirements, including how to allocate aggregation benefits. Conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Aggregation provides benefits because individual requirements are not 100% correlated; (2) Method needed to allocate reduced requirement among participants; (3) Differences between allocation results are subtle - (a) Not immediately obvious which method is 'better'; (b) Many are numerically 'correct', they sum to the physical requirement; (c) Many are not 'fair', Results depend on sub-aggregation and/or the order individuals are included; and (4) Vector allocation method is simple and fair.

  9. Supervisory Training Requirements | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Requirements The Office of Learning and Workforce Development has developed an inventory of training and developmental activities that will meet the supervisory training...

  10. The Access Almanac: Solar Parking Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoup, Donald

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    these requirements. Solar panels in parking lots will startto install solar panels on their parking lots the option tosupport solar panels. Therefore, parking lots will generate

  11. DOE Office of Science Exascale Requirements Reviews

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2020-2025 The three DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing (ASCR) High Performance Computing (HPC) Facilities are conducting a series of six Exascale Requirements...

  12. NERSC/DOE FES Requirements Workshop Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Presentations Workshop Presentations Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences An FES ASCR NERSC Workshop August 3-4, 2010 Sort by: Default |...

  13. Federal / State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Issues Federal and State Blending Restrictions Action by ASTM NCWM to address higher ethanol blends Federal State Legislative & Regulatory Changes Required for Introduction of...

  14. Biosafety Facilities - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G 151.1-5, Biosafety Facilities by David Freshwater Functional areas: Defense Nuclear Facility Safety and Health Requirement, Safety and Security, The Guide assists DOENNSA field...

  15. FEMINIST STUDIES MAJOR REQUIREMENTS Name _______________________________________ Email_____________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    of intended graduation ____________________ Feminist Studies students must complete 11 courses within year) FMST 195 (required for Thesis or Project) Indicate topic: 9/17/12 #12;

  16. Personnel Security - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    72.2 Chg 1, Personnel Security by Mark Pekrul Functional areas: Personnel Security, Security, Human Capital The order establishes requirements that will enable DOE to operate a...

  17. NERSC/DOE NP Requirements Workshop Participants

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics May 26-27, 2011 Name Organization Area DOE Program Managers Ted Barnes DOE Office of Nuclear Physics Nuclear...

  18. Transmission Reassignment Reporting Requirement - April 2, 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CommitteesTeams Customer Training Interconnection Notices Rates Standards of Conduct Tariff TF Web Based Training Transmission Reassignment Reporting Requirement This notice...

  19. Facility Safety - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Change, Safety, The order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety,...

  20. International Development Studies Additional Requirement Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Development Studies Additional Requirement Form The IDS additional program email. You may find additional scheduled possibilities by looking at the International Programs

  1. NERSC/DOE FES Requirements Workshop Logistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Logistics Workshop Logistics Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences An FES ASCR NERSC Workshop August 3-4, 2010 Goals This workshop is being...

  2. NERSC/DOE NP Requirements Workshop Logistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hotel Hotel Arrangements Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics May 26-27, 2011 Location The workshop will be held at Hyatt Regency Bethesda One...

  3. NERSC/DOE ASCR Requirements Workshop Logistics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Logistics Workshop Logistics Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific Computing Research January 5-6, 2011 Location The workshop will be held at...

  4. NERSC/DOE NP Requirements Workshop Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agenda Workshop Agenda Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics May 26-27, 2011 Chesapeak Suites Wireless Network: Hyatt Bethesda Meeting Room Meeting...

  5. NERSC/DOE ASCR Requirements Workshop Agenda

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Agenda Workshop Agenda Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Advanced Scientific Computing Research ASCR NERSC Workshop January 5-6, 2011 >> Download and View these...

  6. Microsoft Word - Directives Requiring Additional Documentation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Review and Approval of Nuclear Facility Safety Basis Documents (Documented Safety Analysis and Technical Safety Requirements 10 DOE-STD-1186-2004 Specific...

  7. Cooperating Agencies in Implementing the Procedural Requirements...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Federal and non-federal cooperating agencies in the preparation of analyses and documentation required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), and to ensure that...

  8. Documentation Requirements for Pressurized Experiment Equipment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Documentation Requirements for Pressurized Experiment Apparatus PSSC NOTE01 15-Jan-2013 When bringing a piece of apparatus to the APS for an experiment that will involve pressure,...

  9. Radionuclide concentrations in terrestrial vegetation and soil on and around the Hanford Site, 1983 through 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poston, T.M.; Antonio, E.J.; Cooper, A.T.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews concentrations of {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, U isotopes, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am in soil and vegetation samples collected from 1983 through 1993 during routine surveillance of the Hanford Site. Sampling locations were grouped in study areas associated with operational areas on the Site. While radionuclide concentrations were very low and representative of background concentrations from historic fallout, some study areas on the Site contained slightly elevated concentrations compared to other study areas onsite and offsite. The 100 Areas had concentrations of {sup 60}Co comparable to the minimum detectable concentration of 0.02 pCi/g in soil. Concentrations of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am in 200 Area soils were slightly elevated. The 300 Area had a slight elevation of U in soil. These observations were expected because many of the sampling locations were selected to monitor specific facilities or operations at the operational areas. Generally, concentrations of the radionuclides studied were greater and more readily measured in soil samples compared to vegetation samples. The general pattern of concentrations of radionuclide concentrations in vegetation by area mirrored that observed in soil. Declines in {sup 90}Sr in soil appear to be attributed to radioactive decay and possibly downward migration out of the sampling horizon. The other radionuclides addressed in this report strongly sorb to soil and are readily retained in surface soil. Because of their long half-lives compared to the length of the study period, there was no significant indication that concentrations of U isotopes and Pu isotopes were decreasing over time.

  10. Generalized Information Architecture for Managing Requirements in IBM?s Rational DOORS(r) Application.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aragon, Kathryn M.; Eaton, Shelley M.; McCornack, Marjorie T.; Shannon, Sharon A.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When a requirements engineering effort fails to meet expectations, often times the requirements management tool is blamed. Working with numerous project teams at Sandia National Laboratories over the last fifteen years has shown us that the tool is rarely the culprit; usually it is the lack of a viable information architecture with well- designed processes to support requirements engineering. This document illustrates design concepts with rationale, as well as a proven information architecture to structure and manage information in support of requirements engineering activities for any size or type of project. This generalized information architecture is specific to IBM's Rational DOORS (Dynamic Object Oriented Requirements System) software application, which is the requirements management tool in Sandia's CEE (Common Engineering Environment). This generalized information architecture can be used as presented or as a foundation for designing a tailored information architecture for project-specific needs. It may also be tailored for another software tool. Version 1.0 4 November 201

  11. New approaches for modeling type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zingale, Michael; Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Rendleman, Charles A.; Woosley, Stan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    runaway in Type Ia supernovae: How to run away? oIgnition in Type Ia Supernovae. II. A Three- dimensionalnumber modeling of type Ia supernovae. I. hydrodynamics.

  12. The effects of cattle on shoreline vegetation of ponds and tanks in south Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whyte, Richard John

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ Hilvy !1 s udy wa conducted to determine the eft'ects of cattle on pond and ', ink shorelj. ne vegetation in south Texas from June i977 to Nay L)78. F iur 'I! . . wore selectedi on the Rob end Bessie welder Wildlife Foundation Reiuge near Hinton... ~: most grat ofu 1. Dr. L. J. Folse contributed. a real taler t fox making ocmlactor run smoothly. I acv grateful to the Rob and Bessie Melclex Wxldlife Four dation for *"onerously fun~!. g this study and for the 15 mor, ths accommodation cluxin. , my...

  13. Retention by vegetation of radionuclides deposited in rainfall: A literature summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anspaugh, L.R.

    1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data include the results of experiments with artificial tracers and information from direct measurements of naturally occurring and fallout-produced radionuclides washed out or rained out by storms. Individual measurements of retention varied from negative to over 100%. The conclusion is that a value of 0.4 to 0.5 would be appropriate for average retention, and a value of 1.0 would not be unreasonable if one wished to be conservative, particularly where high vegetation densities might be expected. 35 refs., 16 tabs.

  14. Influence of physiography and vegetation on small mammals at the Naval Petroleum Reserves, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cypher, B.L.

    1995-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Influence of physiography and vegetation on small mammal abundance and species Composition was investigated at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in California to assess prey abundance for Federally endangered San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica) and to assess the distribution of two Federal candidate species, San Joaquin antelope squirrels (Ammospermophilus nelsoni) and short-nosed kangaroo rats (Dinodomys nitratoides brevinasus). The specific objectives of this investigation were to determine whether small mammal abundance and community composition varied with north-south orientation, terrain, ground cover, and Cypher shrub density, and whether these factors influenced the distribution and abundance of San Joaquin antelope squirrels and short-nosed kangaroo rats.

  15. Crop and vegetative growth impact on water infiltration into gulf coast soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Dwayne Jack

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Advisory Committee: Dr. Lloyd R. Hossner Water infiltration rates and the time to initial runoff (TTIR) of water were determined using a rainfall simulator on two select rice land soils in the Texas Gulf Coast. Non-vegetated (control), rice, and soybean... in the infiltration rate were due to variations in soil moisture content. The TTIR on the control plots decreased significantly during the course of the growing seasons on the Nada soil. The TTIR on the rice and soybean plots did not significantly change...

  16. Spring 1995 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the 1994 and 1995 wildlife and vegetation surveys were to gather data to be used for various applications including: (1) basewide Environmental Risk Assessment (ERA) Work Plan (Scoping Document), (2) the completion of the basewide ERA, (3) determining remedial activities, and (4) determining the distribution of state and federal list plant and animal species on Norton AFB. Data gathering included an inventory of plant and animal species present, the identification of potential ecological receptors, mapping of habitats, and constructing the ecological food web present on or near the IRP sites of concern.

  17. Influence of Rock Types on Seismic Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Carbonate Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mammadova, Elnara

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ) techniques such as high pressure CO2 injection may normally be required to recover oil in place in carbonate reservoirs. This study addresses how different rock types can influence the seismic monitoring of CO2 sequestration in carbonates. This research...

  18. Influence of Rock Types on Seismic Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Carbonate Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mammadova, Elnara

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ) techniques such as high pressure CO2 injection may normally be required to recover oil in place in carbonate reservoirs. This study addresses how different rock types can influence the seismic monitoring of CO2 sequestration in carbonates. This research...

  19. Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1990-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    "To provide requirements and guidelines for Departmental Elements, including the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), to use in developing directives, plans, and/or procedures relating to the conduct of operations at DOE facilities. The implementation of these requirements and guidelines should result in improved quality and uniformity of operations. Change 2, 10-23-2001. Canceled by DOE O 422.1.

  20. Humidity Implications for Meeting Residential Ventilation Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 LBNL-62182 Humidity Implications for Meeting Residential Ventilation Requirements Iain S. Walker for Meeting Residential Ventilation Requirements ABSTRACT In 2003 ASHRAE approved the nation's first residential ventilation standard, ASHRAE Standard 62.2. Because meeting this standard can significantly change