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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Surveillance & Maintenance: The Requirements Based Surveillance and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surveillance & Maintenance: The Requirements Based Surveillance and Surveillance & Maintenance: The Requirements Based Surveillance and Maintenance Review Process (RBSM) Surveillance & Maintenance: The Requirements Based Surveillance and Maintenance Review Process (RBSM) Overall direction for surveillance and maintenance of excess facilities is addressed in DOE G 430.1-2, IMPLEMENTATION GUIDE FOR SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE DURING FACILITY TRANSITION AND DISPOSITION. In addition, the change in mission and operation of an excess facility should stimulate a review of surveillance and maintenance to determine what efficiencies can be gained as a result of the change. Such a review can be applied to facilities that undergoing stabilization, those intended for deactivation, and others destined for decommissioning. The material that follows provides

2

SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE RBSM The Requirements Based Surveillance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AND MAINTENANCE AND MAINTENANCE RBSM The Requirements Based Surveillance and Maintenance Review Process Surveillance and Maintenance Overview What is RBSM and why do I need this process? Who has used this process so far? A Summary of RBSM results across the DOE complex Viewing a sample RBSM report Performing RBSM at your facility RBSM Guidance package Surveillance and Maintenance Overview Overall direction for surveillance and maintenance of excess facilities is addressed in DOE G 430.1-2, IMPLEMENTATION GUIDE FOR SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE DURING FACILITY TRANSITION AND DISPOSITION. In addition, the change in mission and operation of an excess facility should stimulate a review of surveillance and maintenance to determine what efficiencies can be gained as a result of the change.

3

Requirements-Based Surveillance and Maintenance Review Guide...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Maintenance Review Guide Appendix A - Requirements-Based Surveillance and Maintenance Review Implementation Process, Process Flow Chart and the Flow Chart Footnotes...

4

Requirements-Based Surveillance and Maintenance Review Guide | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requirements-Based Surveillance and Maintenance Review Guide Requirements-Based Surveillance and Maintenance Review Guide Requirements-Based Surveillance and Maintenance Review Guide Use of the Guidance Manual This manual was developed to provide organizations with the knowledge and tools necessary to perform a disciplined and thorough Requirements-Based Surveillance and Maintenance (RBSM) review at any given facility or site in order to cost effectively manage S&M activities. Sections 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0 of this manual provide a brief explanation of what the RBSM review process is, why such a process is needed and the steps a facility or site should take to get organized and initiate an RBSM review. Sections 4.0 and 5.0 of this manual discuss the use of the data gained from the RBSM review process like the development of cost reduction strategies and the development of

5

REQUIREMENTS BASED SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE REVIEW PROCESS INTERVIEW FORM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REQUIREMENTS BASED SURVEILLANCE AND REQUIREMENTS BASED SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE REVIEW PROCESS INTERVIEW FORM General Information: A. Evaluator:_______________________ Organization:___________________ Ph:_________________ B. Interviewee:_____________________ Organization:____________________ Ph:_________________ C. Activity Name :_____________________________________________________ General/Administrative Support Mission/Facility Support (Circle One) D. Safety Related: _____Yes _____No E. Procedure #: _______________________________________________________ F. Charge Number: _____________________________________________________ G. Frequency for Conducting the Activity: (Circle One) Hourly Shiftly Daily Weekly Bi-weekly Monthly Quarterly Semi-Annually Annually

6

Surveillance Guide - NSS 18.2 Technical Safety Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TECHNICAL SAFETY REQUIREMENTS TECHNICAL SAFETY REQUIREMENTS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to examine the contractor's implementation of technical safety requirements. The surveillance does not address the development of these requirements since this activity is programmatic. The surveillance focuses on ensuring that the contractor has developed and implemented the necessary procedures and administrative controls to ensure that compliance with the Technical Safety Requirements is maintained. 2.0 References 2.1 10 CFR 830.205, Technical Safety Requirements 2.2 DOE 5480.20A Personnel Selection, Qualification, and Training Requirements for DOE Nuclear Facilities 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements NS-

7

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.14 Required Reading  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REQUIRED READING REQUIRED READING 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the facility required reading program and current status of required reading. This surveillance provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for required reading and for establishing compliance with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 2.2 DOE-STD-1033-92, Guide to Good Practices for Operations and Administration Updates Through Required Reading 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements of the Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual, Section 20, Operations, FRAM 4253, 4258, and 4261. These requirements are drawn

8

Surveillance Guide - ENS 7.1 Definition of Design Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEFINITION OF DESIGN REQUIREMENTS DEFINITION OF DESIGN REQUIREMENTS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's program to establish comprehensive design requirements for modifications or new installations before detailed design work commences. The Facility Representative verifies that appropriate design requirements have been established and that the contractor is complying with applicable DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4700.1, Project Management System 2.2 DOE 5700.6C, Quality Assurance 2.3 DOE 6430.1A, General Design Criteria 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance implements requirement EN-0008 from the RL S/RIDs. This requirement is contained in Secretary of Energy Notice

9

Functions and Requirements and Specifications for Replacement of the Computer Automated Surveillance System (CASS)  

SciTech Connect

Functional requirements and specifications document for system to replace tank farm computer automated waste tank surveillance system.

DOUKA, K.C.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

10

Activity based surveillance video content modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper tackles the problem of surveillance video content modelling. Given a set of surveillance videos, the aims of our work are twofold: firstly a continuous video is segmented according to the activities captured in the video; secondly a model ... Keywords: Activity recognition, Dynamic Bayesian networks, Dynamic scene modelling, Surveillance video segmentation, Unusual activity detection, Video content analysis

Tao Xiang; Shaogang Gong

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Functions and Requirements and Specifications for Replacement of the Computer Automated Surveillance System (CASS)  

SciTech Connect

This functions, requirements and specifications document defines the baseline requirements and criteria for the design, purchase, fabrication, construction, installation, and operation of the system to replace the Computer Automated Surveillance System (CASS) alarm monitoring.

SCAIEF, C.C.

1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

12

Information network and data base in clinical diagnosis and bacterial sensibility surveillance: a special requirement in acute diarrhoea control and monitoring into a regional area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Worldwide acute diarrhoea constitutes a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Acute diarrhoea is usually caused by infection, with viruses, bacteria, parasites. Bacteria involved in acute diarrhoea may be detected by culture from the stool of ill person. ... Keywords: acute diarrhoea, data base, information network

Scarneciu Camelia; Maria-Elena Cocuz; Scarneciu Ioan; Roxana Miclaus

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Neural network based system for equipment surveillance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system are disclosed for performing surveillance of transient signals of an industrial device to ascertain the operating state. The method and system involves the steps of reading into a memory training data, determining neural network weighting values until achieving target outputs close to the neural network output. If the target outputs are inadequate, wavelet parameters are determined to yield neural network outputs close to the desired set of target outputs and then providing signals characteristic of an industrial process and comparing the neural network output to the industrial process signals to evaluate the operating state of the industrial process. 33 figs.

Vilim, R.B.; Gross, K.C.; Wegerich, S.W.

1998-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

14

Neural network based system for equipment surveillance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for performing surveillance of transient signals of an industrial device to ascertain the operating state. The method and system involves the steps of reading into a memory training data, determining neural network weighting values until achieving target outputs close to the neural network output. If the target outputs are inadequate, wavelet parameters are determined to yield neural network outputs close to the desired set of target outputs and then providing signals characteristic of an industrial process and comparing the neural network output to the industrial process signals to evaluate the operating state of the industrial process.

Vilim, Richard B. (Aurora, IL); Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Wegerich, Stephan W. (Glendale Hts., IL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Low power image based triggering for extended operation surveillance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is desirable for many surveillance applications to have a portable high quality imaging system capable of continuous monitoring in remote locations, often for extended periods of time. Extended operation can be achieved ...

Waldon, Matthew C., 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Situating workplace surveillance: Ethicsand computer based performance monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the study of computer based performance monitoring (CBPM) in the workplace as an issue dominated by questions of ethics. Its central contention paper is that any investigation of ethical monitoring practice is inadequate if it ...

Kirstie S. Ball

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Handbook of methods for risk-based analysis of Technical Specification requirements  

SciTech Connect

Technical Specifications (TS) requirements for nuclear power plants define the Limiting Conditions for Operation (LCOs) and Surveillance Requirements (SRs) to assure safety during operation. In general, these requirements were based on deterministic analysis and engineering judgments. Experiences with plant operation indicate that some elements of the requirements are unnecessarily restrictive, while others may not be conducive to safety. Improvements in these requirements are facilitated by the availability of plant specific Probabilistic Safety Assessments (PSAs). The use of risk and reliability-based methods to improve TS requirements has gained wide interest because these methods can: quantitatively evaluate the risk impact and justify changes based on objective risk arguments. Provide a defensible basis for these requirements for regulatory applications. The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) Office of Research is sponsoring research to develop systematic risk-based methods to improve various aspects of TS requirements. The handbook of methods, which is being prepared, summarizes such risk-based methods. The scope of the handbook includes reliability and risk-based methods for evaluating allowed outage times (AOTs), action statements requiring shutdown where shutdown risk may be substantial, surveillance test intervals (STIs), defenses against common-cause failures, managing plant configurations, and scheduling maintenances. For each topic, the handbook summarizes methods of analysis and data needs, outlines the insights to be gained, lists additional references, and presents examples of evaluations.

Samanta, P.K.; Vesely, W.E.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

18

Supporting use case based requirements engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use Cases that describe possible interactions involving a system and its environment are increasingly being accepted as effective means for functional requirements elicitation and analysis. In the current practice, informal definitions of use cases are used and the analysis process is manual. In this paper, we present an approach supported by a tool for use cases based requirements engineering. Our approach includes use cases formalization, a restricted form of natural language for use cases description, and the derivation of an executable specification as well as a simulation environment from use cases. Key words: Use cases, domain modeling, UML, requirements engineering, prototyping

Stéphane S. Somé

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

A model of an intelligent video-based security surveillance system for general indoor/outdoor environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over a decade ago, simply recording a few minutes of CCTV footage required special hardware. Today, with the emergence of new sensors and improved processing hardware, a relatively inexpensive personal computer can process and store video in real-time, ... Keywords: background modelling, motion detection, object tracking, video surveillance

Wayne Chelliah Naidoo; Jules-Raymond Tapamo

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Efficient and effective automated surveillance agents using kernel tricks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many schemes have been presented over the years to develop automated visual surveillance systems. However, these schemes typically need custom equipment, or involve significant complexity and storage requirements. In this paper we present three software-based ... Keywords: agent, automated, camera, intrusion, kernel, surveillance

Tarem Ahmed, Xianglin Wei, Supriyo Ahmed, Al-Sakib Khan Pathan

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Reviving Telecommunications Surveillance Law  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for National Security Letters (NSLs). Even for these moreSurveillance Court of Review. b) NSLs. In addition to FISA,require judicial review. NSLs extend to financial records,

Schwartz, Paul M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Video surveillance-based insulator condition monitoring analysis for substation monitoring system (SMS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Video surveillance (VS) of electric power lines along with its accessories such as insulators has emerged as a potential alternative for the traditional practice of on-site physical detection. There has been a paradigm shift in electric substation ...

Velaga Sreerama Murthy; D. K. Mohanta; Sumit Gupta

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Bases for pump pit requirements calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A task team is preparing the Process Requirements for the interarea transfer pump pits at the Defense Waste Process Facility (DWPF). The team is developing requirements to prevent flammable mixtures from forming and requires values to use on the generation of various components such as benzene, hydrogen, and N20. The purpose of this memorandum is to document values to be used and to provide sample calculations using these values. There are no recommendations contained in this document.

Jacobs, R.A.

1992-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

24

WatchBot: A building maintenance and surveillance system based on autonomous robots  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing interest in the use of intelligent technologies in new buildings. An intelligent system should be designed in a manner that allows minimum human intervention during daily operation. However, large buildings need substantial manpower ... Keywords: Building automation system, Intelligent building, Maintenance, Mobile robot, Surveillance

J. López, Diego Pérez, Enrique Paz, Alejandro Santana

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

9975 SHIPPING PACKAGE LIFE EXTENSION SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM RESULTS SUMMARY  

SciTech Connect

Results from the 9975 Surveillance Program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) are summarized for justification to extend the life of the 9975 packages currently stored in the K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS) facility from 10 years to 15 years. This justification is established with the stipulation that surveillance activities will continue throughout this extended time to ensure the continued integrity of the 9975 materials of construction and to further understand the currently identified degradation mechanisms. The current 10 year storage life was developed prior to storage. A subsequent report was later used to extend the qualification of the 9975 shipping packages for 2 years for shipping plus 10 years for storage. However the qualification for the storage period was provided by the monitoring requirements of the Storage and Surveillance Program. This report summarizes efforts to determine a new safe storage limit for the 9975 shipping package based on the surveillance data collected since 2005 when the surveillance program began. KAMS is a zero-release facility that depends upon containment by the 9975 to meet design basis storage requirements. Therefore, to confirm the continued integrity of the 9975 packages while stored in KAMS, a 9975 Storage and Surveillance Program was implemented alongside the DOE required Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) for 3013 plutonium-bearing containers. The 9975 Storage and Surveillance Program performs field surveillance as well as accelerated aging tests to ensure any degradation due to aging, to the extent that could affect packaging performance, is detected in advance of such degradation occurring in the field. The Program has demonstrated that the 9975 package has a robust design that can perform under a variety of conditions. As such the primary emphasis of the on-going 9975 Surveillance Program is an aging study of the 9975 Viton(reg.sign) GLT containment vessel O-rings and the Celotex(reg.sign) fiberboard thermal insulation at bounding conditions of radiation and elevated temperatures. Other materials of construction, however, are also discussed.

Daugherty, W.; Dunn, K.; Hackney, B.; Hoffman, E.; Skidmore, E.

2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

26

XML-based requirements engineering for an electronic clearinghouse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present methods and tools to support XML-based requirements engineering for an electronic clearinghouse that connects trading partners in the telecommunications area. The original semi-structured requirements, locally known as business rules, were ... Keywords: Business rules, GUI, Message-processing, Requirements engineering, XML

Mariusz A. Fecko; Christopher M. Lott

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Surveillance Guides - Training Program Content  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRAINING PROGRAM CONTENT TRAINING PROGRAM CONTENT 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's program for establishing the content of training programs. The process to be evaluated includes (1) determining the tasks individuals must perform; (2) specifying the required knowledge, skills, and abilities for performing tasks; (3) selecting knowledge skills and abilities for training; and (4) selecting appropriate training settings. The Facility Representative reviews records and interviews personnel to evaluate the effectiveness of the process. The Facility Representative evaluates compliance with DOE requirements and implementation of best practices. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.18A, Accreditation of Performance-Based

28

Selection of 3013 Containers for Field Surveillance  

SciTech Connect

This report revises and combines three earlier reports dealing with the binning, statistical sampling, and sample selection of 3013 containers for field surveillance. It includes changes to the binning specification resulting from completion of the Savannah River Site packaging campaign and new information from the shelf-life program and field surveillance activities. The revised bin assignments result in changes to the random sample specification. These changes are necessary to meet the statistical requirements of the surveillance program. This report will be reviewed regularly and revised as needed. Section 1 of this report summarizes the results of an extensive effort to assign all of the current and projected 3013 containers in the Department of Energy (DOE) inventory to one of three bins (Innocuous, Pressure and Corrosion, or Pressure) based on potential failure mechanisms. Grouping containers into bins provides a framework to make a statistical selection of individual containers from the entire population for destructive and nondestructive field surveillance. The binning process consisted of three main steps. First, the packaged containers were binned using information in the Integrated Surveillance Program database and a decision tree. The second task was to assign those containers that could not be binned using the decision tree to a specific bin using container-by-container engineering review. The final task was to evaluate containers not yet packaged and assign them to bins using process knowledge. The technical basis for the decisions made during the binning process is included in Section 1. A composite decision tree and a summary table show all of the containers projected to be in the DOE inventory at the conclusion of packaging at all sites. Decision trees that provide an overview of the binning process and logic are included for each site. Section 2 of this report describes the approach to the statistical selection of containers for surveillance and consists of a revision of the earlier statistical sampling report. The requirement of 99.9% probability of observing at least one of the worst 5% (99.9/5%) of the containers with a potential for degradation is used to determine the number of containers in the random sample for the Pressure and Corrosion and the Pressure bins. Sampling requirements for the Innocuous bin are not based on the 99.9/5% requirement; rather, they are based on evaluating the assumption of no significant degradation of, or variability between, containers relative to corrosion or pressure generation within the Innocuous bin population as valid. Section 3 of this report focuses on the actual selection of 3013 containers for surveillance. Surveillance containers are identified by the year that the surveillance should be performed. In addition to the randomly selected containers, containers were selected from the entire population, based on engineering judgment for each of these years. The judgmental sampling targets containers with the greatest potential for gas generation and/or corrosion. The factors used for judgmental sample selection are documented in this section. A more detailed discussion of the FY 2005 sample selection process is contained in the previous FY 2005 sample selection report.

Larry Peppers, Elizabeth Kelly, James McClard, Gary Friday, Theodore Venetz, and Jerry Stakebade

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Surveillance Guides - Hazards Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hazards Control Hazards Control 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs and policy for establishing controls to mitigate hazards affecting the public, worker, and environment. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to verify implementation of DOE 450.4-1A Volume 2 Appendix E core expectation #3 (CE II-3). CE II-3: An integrated process has been established and is utilized to develop controls which mitigate the identified hazards present within a facility or activity. The set of controls ensure adequate protection of the public, worker, and the environment and are established as agreed upon by DOE.

30

Cylinder Surveillance and Maintenance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surveillance and Maintenance Cylinder Surveillance and Maintenance DOE has a Cylinder Management program in place to inspect and maintain depleted UF6 cylinders, and to improve...

31

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.4 Communications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

COMMUNICATIONS COMMUNICATIONS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of a facility's implementation of communications policies. This surveillance provides a basis for verifying that communications are effective during normal and abnormal conditions and are in compliance with DOE requirements and best practices. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 2.2 DOE-STD-1031-92, Guide to Good Practices for Communications 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements of the Functions, Responsibilities and Authorities Manual, Section 20, Operations, FRAM #s 4253, 4258, and 4261. These requirements are

32

Face occlusion detection for automated teller machine surveillance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Real time automatic alarm systems play an essential role in security management, as evidenced by the surveillance cameras installed in nearly all automated teller machines (ATMs). Whereas manual video surveillance requires constant staff monitoring, ...

Daw-Tung Lin; Ming-Ju Liu

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

studiVZ: social networking in the surveillance society  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents some results of a case study of the usage of the social networking platform studiVZ by students in Salzburg, Austria. The topic is framed by the context of electronic surveillance. An online survey that was based on questionnaire ... Keywords: Capitalism, Consumer surveillance, Critical theory, Economic surveillance, Privacy, Social networking sites, Surveillance, Surveillance society, Targeted advertising, Web 2.0, studiVZ

Christian Fuchs

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Surveillance Guides - RPS 11.1 ALARA Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

with applicable DOE requirements and best industry practices. 2.0 References 2.1 10 CFR 835, Occupational Radiation Protection 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance...

35

A service scenario generation scheme based on association rule mining for elderly surveillance system in a smart home environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More convenient smart home environments can be constructed by monitoring home appliances, if automated services are supported by their usage information. This paper proposes a scheme for translating association rules among appliances mined from their ... Keywords: Association rule mining, Service scenario, Surveillance system

Kyung Jin Kang; Borey Ka; Sung Jo Kim

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Surveillance Guides - Identification of Hazards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identification of Hazards Identification of Hazards 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs. Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety basis documentation (SARs, ISBs, BIOs, JCOs, HASPs etc) as well as activity level hazards identification via JHAs, AJHAs, JSAs etc.) 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 2.3 DOE O 5480.21, Unreviewed Safety Questions 2.4 DOE O 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance verifies implementation of guiding principle #5 and core value #2 as specified in 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 (b) (5) and (c) (2) respectively. Additionally, it verifies implementation of

37

3013/9975 Surveillance Program Interim Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The K-Area Materials Storage (KAMS) Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) requires a surveillance program to monitor the safety performance of 3013 containers and 9975 shipping packages stored in KAMS. The SRS surveillance program [Reference 1] outlines activities for field surveillance and laboratory tests that demonstrate the packages meet the functional performance requirements described in the DSA. The SRS program also supports the complexwide Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) [Reference 2] for 3013 containers. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the SRS portion of the surveillance program activities through fiscal year 2010 (FY10) and formally communicate the interpretation of these results by the Surveillance Program Authority (SPA). Surveillance for the initial 3013 container random sampling of the Innocuous bin and the Pressure bin has been completed and there has been no indication of corrosion or significant pressurization. The maximum pressure observed was less than 50 psig, which is well below the design pressure of 699 psig for the 3013 container [Reference 3]. The data collected during surveillance of these bins has been evaluated by the Materials Identification and Surveillance (MIS) Working Group and no additional surveillance is necessary for these bins at least through FY13. A decision will be made whether additional surveillance of these bins is needed during future years of storage and as additional containers are generated. Based on the data collected to date, the SPA concludes that 3013 containers in these bins can continue to be safely stored in KAMS. This year, 13 destructive examinations (DE) were performed on random samples from the Pressure & Corrosion bin. To date, DE has been completed for approximately 30% of the random samples from the Pressure & Corrosion bin. In addition, DE has been performed on 6 engineering judgment (EJ) containers, for a total of 17 to date. This includes one container that exceeded the 3013 Standard moisture limit which was opened at LANL. The container pieces and an oxide sample were sent to SRNL for examination in FY11. No significant pressurization has been observed for the Pressure & Corrosion bin containers. Relatively minor corrosion has been observed on some convenience containers and the inside of two inner containers. While the limited extent of corrosion does not jeopardize the integrity of the outer 3013 containers, it does highlight the importance of continuing to perform DE and the Shelf Life program to assure that the corrosion rate is not accelerating or changing to a different corrosion mechanism (e.g., stress corrosion cracking). Statistical sampling is currently scheduled to be completed in FY17, but there is a proposed reduction of the number of DE's per year for FY11 and beyond which may delay the completion date. Since 3013 containers are stored inside 9975 containers, surveillances of 9975 containers are performed in conjunction with 3013 container surveillances. Results of 9975 container nondestructive examinations (NDEs) and DEs indicate that the containers will provide adequate protection of the 3013 containers in K-Area storage for at least 15 years [Reference 4].

Dunn, K.; Hackney, B.; McClard, J.

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

38

Performance Analysis - Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance Analysis - Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Performance Analysis - Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control Programs Within the U.S. Department of Energy, October 2002 Performance Analysis - Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control Programs Within the U.S. Department of Energy, October 2002 This report documents the results of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) analysis of DOE environmental monitoring, surveillance, and control activities. The analysis is based primarily on DOE Headquarters independent oversight evaluations of environmental monitoring and surveillance activities that were conducted at 14 different sites across the DOE complex during fiscal years 1999 through 2002. Independent oversight evaluations determined that all sites had established

39

Long-Term Surveillance Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NRC in the referenced letter have been addressed and are reflected in this submittal. This Long Term Surveillance Plan (LTSP) is intended to satisfy the requirements set forth in 10 CFR 40.28 whereby the long-term custodian must provide an LTSP to the NRC as a step in the licensing/license termination process. Please call me at (970) 248-6037 if you have questions. Sincerely, Enclosures cc w/enclosure:

Mail Stop Ta; M. Plessinger Mactec-ers

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.11 Logkeeping  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LOGKEEPING LOGKEEPING 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that the contractor's operations staff are maintaining detailed logs to track the facility's status, document important events, and note any significant safety issues. The surveillance activities provide a basis to ensure that effective logs are maintained, and that the contractor is in compliance with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 2.2 DOE-STD-1035-93, Guide to Good Practices for Logkeeping 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements of the Functions, Responsibilities and Authorities Manual, Section 20, Operations, FRAM #s 4253, 4258, and 4261. These requirements are

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Long-Term Surveillance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Surveillance Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year 2013 Year-End Summary Report September 2013 LMS/ESL/S10692 ESL-RPT-2013-03 This page intentionally left blank LMS/ESL/S10692 ESL-RPT-2013-03 Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance Fiscal Year 2013 Year-End Summary Report September 2013 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance FY 2013 Year-End Summary Report September 2013 Doc. No. S10692 Page i Contents Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................. ii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1

42

PSYCHOSOCIAL ASSESSMENT AND SURVEILLANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disaster Preparedness, Response and Recovery #12;2 Louisiana State University Health Sciences CenterDISASTER PSYCHOSOCIAL ASSESSMENT AND SURVEILLANCE TOOLKIT (Disaster-PAST) Methods to Enhance

43

Groundwater surveillance plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 requires the preparation of environmental monitoring plans and implementation of environmental monitoring programs for all DOE facilities. The order identifies two distinct components of environmental monitoring, namely effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. In general, effluent monitoring has the objectives of characterizing contaminants and demonstrating compliance with applicable standards and permit requirements, whereas environmental surveillance has the broader objective of monitoring the effects of DOE activities on on- and off-site environmental and natural resources. The purpose of this document is to support the Environmental Monitoring Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) by describing the groundwater component of the environmental surveillance program for the DOE facilities on the ORR. The distinctions between groundwater effluent monitoring and groundwater surveillance have been defined in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Groundwater Surveillance Strategy. As defined in the strategy, a groundwater surveillance program consists of two parts, plant perimeter surveillance and off-site water well surveillance. This document identifies the sampling locations, parameters, and monitoring frequencies for both of these activities on and around the ORR and describes the rationale for the program design. The program was developed to meet the objectives of DOE Order 5400.1 and related requirements in DOE Order 5400.5 and to conform with DOE guidance on environmental surveillance and the Energy Systems Groundwater Surveillance Strategy.

Forstrom, J.M. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States); Smith, E.D.; Winters, S.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Haase, C.S.; King, H.L. [Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, TN (United States); McMaster, W.M. [McMaster (W.M.), Heiskell, TN (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Surveillance Guides - Work Control Process  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Work Control Process Work Control Process 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance guide is to provide lines of inquiry for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's work control process. Users should be cognizant that the lines of inquiry need to be further tailored to fit specific facilities or activities in accordance with contractual mechanisms such as Maintenance Implementation Plans, Conduct of Operations Implementation Plans, and the Integrated Safety Management System Description. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 2.3 DOE O 5480.19, Conduct of Operations 2.4 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to verify implementation of Core

45

Surveillance Guide - CMS 3.1 Configuration Management Implementation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT IMPLEMENTATION CONFIGURATION MANAGEMENT IMPLEMENTATION 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify implementation of configuration management requirements. These surveillance activities provide a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for implementation and control of configuration management and for establishing compliance with DOE requirements. References 2.1 DOE 430.1, Life Cycle Project Management 2.2 DOE-STD-1073-93, Guide for Operational Configuration Management 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements of the Functions, Responsiblities and Authorities Manual (FRAM), Section 2, Configuration Management, FRAM #s 3 and 4. These requirements are

46

Infant Brain Tumors: Incidence, Survival, and the Role of Radiation Based on Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Data  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the incidence of infant brain tumors and survival outcomes by disease and treatment variables. Methods and Materials: The Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program November 2008 submission database provided age-adjusted incidence rates and individual case information for primary brain tumors diagnosed between 1973 and 2006 in infants less than 12 months of age. Results: Between 1973 and 1986, the incidence of infant brain tumors increased from 16 to 40 cases per million (CPM), and from 1986 to 2006, the annual incidence rate averaged 35 CPM. Leading histologies by annual incidence in CPM were gliomas (13.8), medulloblastoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors (6.6), and ependymomas (3.6). The annual incidence was higher in whites than in blacks (35.0 vs. 21.3 CPM). Infants with low-grade gliomas had the highest observed survival, and those with atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRTs) or primary rhabdoid tumors of the brain had the lowest. Between 1979 and 1993, the annual rate of cases treated with radiation within the first 4 months from diagnosis declined from 20.5 CPM to <2 CPM. For infants with medulloblastoma, desmoplastic histology and treatment with both surgery and upfront radiation were associated with improved survival, but on multivariate regression, only combined surgery and radiation remained associated with improved survival, with a hazard ratio for death of 0.17 compared with surgery alone (p = 0.005). For ATRTs, those treated with surgery and upfront radiation had a 12-month survival of 100% compared with 24.4% for those treated with surgery alone (p = 0.016). For ependymomas survival was higher in patients treated in more recent decades (p = 0.001). Conclusion: The incidence of infant brain tumors has been stable since 1986. Survival outcomes varied markedly by histology. For infants with medulloblastoma and ATRTs, improved survival was observed in patients treated with both surgery and early radiation compared with those treated with surgery alone.

Bishop, Andrew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); McDonald, Mark W., E-mail: mwmcdona@iupui.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, IN (United States); Chang, Andrew L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, IN (United States); Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

A generic ontology-based approach for requirement analysis and its application in network management software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a generic ontology-based approach that eases the requirement analysis (RA) work. The approach enables the user to derive method-specific RA tools for different applications. The derivation process is based on a unified framework ... Keywords: Acquisition Ontology, Knowledge Acquisition, Knowledge-based Systems, Methodology Ontology, Requirement Analysis

Chau-Young Ivan Lin; Cheng-Seen Ho

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Operational Surveillance Testing Program for Fossil Generating Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operational surveillance test OST guideline can be used to develop a comprehensive surveillance testing program that enhances the testing performed by operations personnel. The OST programs observed at fossil generating stations contain inconsistencies in the content and in the effectiveness of operational testing. Some industry equipment failures can be attributed to the lack of effective surveillance testing. The bases for OSTs are similar to the bases for the plants preventive maintenance PM progr...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

49

Toward autonomous harbor surveillance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis we address the problem of drift-free navigation for underwater vehicles performing harbor surveillance and ship hull inspection. Maintaining accurate localization for the duration of a mission is important ...

Johannsson, Hordur

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.16 Procedure Content and Use  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROCEDURE CONTENT AND USE PROCEDURE CONTENT AND USE 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's program for development and use of procedures. The Facility Representative reviews selected operating, surveillance or testing, and maintenance procedures and observes use of the procedures in the facility. This surveillance provides the basis for evaluating contractor performance and for establishing compliance with specific DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements of the Functions, Requirements and Authorities Manual, Section 20, Operations, FRAM #s 4253, 4258, and 4261. These requirements are

51

Surveillance Metrics Sensitivity Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

Bierbaum, R; Hamada, M; Robertson, A

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Surveillance metrics sensitivity study.  

SciTech Connect

In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

Hamada, Michael S. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Bierbaum, Rene Lynn; Robertson, Alix A. (Lawrence Livermore Laboratory)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.12 Operations Turnover  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OPERATIONS TURNOVER OPERATIONS TURNOVER 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the facility's practices for operations shift turnover. This surveillance provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's operations turnover program and for establishing compliance with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 2.2 DOE-STD-1038-93, Guide to Good Practices for Operations Turnover 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements of the Functions, Responsibilities and Authorities Manual, Section 20, Operations, FRAM #s 4253, 4258, and 4261. These requirements are drawn from DOE 5480.19. 4.0 Surveillance Activities

54

Surveillance Guide - CPS 8.1 Hoisting and Rigging  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HOISTING AND RIGGING HOISTING AND RIGGING 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to examine hoisting and rigging operations to ensure that safe equipment and work practices are being used. The surveillance includes verification that hoisting and rigging work is performed in accordance with DOE requirements and best practices. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE O 440.1A, Worker Protection Management For Doe Federal And Contractor Employees 2.2 DOE-RL-92-36, Hanford Site Hoisting and Rigging Manual NOTE The DOE Hoisting and Rigging Manual should be used as the primary reference for this surveillance. 1 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement the RL Functions, Responsibilities, and Authorities Manual (FRAM) item No. 2504. 4.0 Surveillance Activities

55

NP-3319, January 1984: Physically Based Regression Correlations of Embrittlement Data From Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first physically based model for forecasting the embrittlement behavior of irradiation-damaged steels proved much more accurate than earlier models. Thisadvance offers utilities greater precision in establishing operating pressure-temperature limits for PWRs and in assessing the ability of reactor vessels to withstand pressurized thermal shock transients.BackgroundBombardment by high-energy neutrons in the belt line of nuclear reactors can ...

1984-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

56

Presenting a day in the life of video-based requirements engineering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In today's global economy, innovation through technology is a key driver for a sustainable economic growth and competitiveness. Siemens as a global player possesses a tremendous portfolio of innovative technologies. In an effort to highlight some of ... Keywords: 3d animation models, mixed reality, multimedia, open-sim, requirements elicitation, second life, uml, video-based requirements engineering, virtual reality

Naoufel Boulila; Oliver Creighton; Georgi Markov; Steve Russell; Ronald Blechner

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

MARGINAL EXPENSE OIL WELL WIRELESS SURVEILLANCE MEOWS  

SciTech Connect

A marginal expense oil well wireless surveillance system to monitor system performance and production from rod-pumped wells in real time from wells operated by Vaquero Energy in the Edison Field, Main Area of Kern County in California has been successfully designed and field tested. The surveillance system includes a proprietary flow sensor, a programmable transmitting unit, a base receiver and receiving antenna, and a base station computer equipped with software to interpret the data. First, the system design is presented. Second, field data obtained from three wells is shown. Results of the study show that an effective, cost competitive, real-time wireless surveillance system can be introduced to oil fields across the United States and the world.

Mason M. Medizade; John R. Ridgely; Donald G. Nelson

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Surveillance Guide - CMS 3.2 Change Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CHANGE CONTROL CHANGE CONTROL 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate how effectively the contractor controls changes in the facility. The Facility Representative reviews recent plant activities to determine if change has been appropriately managed, to verify that DOE requirements have been met, and to examine implementation of best practices. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4700.1, Project Management System 2.2 DOE 5700.6C, Quality Assurance 2.3 DOE-STD-1073-93, Guide for Operational Configuration Management 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements CM-0009 and CM-0011 from the RL S/RID. These requirements are derived from DOE 4700.1. 4.0 Surveillance Activities This surveillance focuses on evaluating control over permanent

59

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.15 Timely Orders to Operators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TIMELY ORDERS TO OPERATORS TIMELY ORDERS TO OPERATORS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the facility program and practices for timely orders to operators. This surveillance provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's timely orders to operators program and for establishing compliance with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 2.2 DOE-STD-1034-93, Guide to Good Practices for Timely Orders to Operators 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement the requirements of DOE 5480.19, Attachment I, Chapter XV. 4.0 Surveillance Activities The Facility Representative reviews the facility index and file of orders to operators and observes operator activities to evaluate

60

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.1 Operations Organization and Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OPERATIONS ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OPERATIONS ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify that the operations organization has clearly defined roles and responsibilities and that those roles and responsibilities are understood by operations personnel. This surveillance also verifies that management goals and objectives with regard to safety and facility performance have been established and are understood by facility personnel. This surveillance provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for operations organization and administration and for establishing compliance with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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61

Secure Video Surveillance System (SVSS) for unannounced safeguards inspections.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Secure Video Surveillance System (SVSS) is a collaborative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC). The joint project addresses specific requirements of redundant surveillance systems installed in two South American nuclear facilities as a tool to support unannounced inspections conducted by ABACC and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The surveillance covers the critical time (as much as a few hours) between the notification of an inspection and the access of inspectors to the location in facility where surveillance equipment is installed. ABACC and the IAEA currently use the EURATOM Multiple Optical Surveillance System (EMOSS). This outdated system is no longer available or supported by the manufacturer. The current EMOSS system has met the project objective; however, the lack of available replacement parts and system support has made this system unsustainable and has increased the risk of an inoperable system. A new system that utilizes current technology and is maintainable is required to replace the aging EMOSS system. ABACC intends to replace one of the existing ABACC EMOSS systems by the Secure Video Surveillance System. SVSS utilizes commercial off-the shelf (COTS) technologies for all individual components. Sandia National Laboratories supported the system design for SVSS to meet Safeguards requirements, i.e. tamper indication, data authentication, etc. The SVSS consists of two video surveillance cameras linked securely to a data collection unit. The collection unit is capable of retaining historical surveillance data for at least three hours with picture intervals as short as 1sec. Images in .jpg format are available to inspectors using various software review tools. SNL has delivered two SVSS systems for test and evaluation at the ABACC Safeguards Laboratory. An additional 'proto-type' system remains at SNL for software and hardware testing. This paper will describe the capabilities of the new surveillance system, application and requirements, and the design approach.

Galdoz, Erwin G. (Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials (ABACC), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil); Pinkalla, Mark

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.9 Lockouts and Tagouts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LOCKOUTS AND TAGOUTS LOCKOUTS AND TAGOUTS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's lockout/tagout activities. Surveillance activities encompass preparation of the tagout, placement and documentation of the tagout, removal of the tagout, closeout documentation, and return to service of the equipment. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 2.2 DOE-STD-1030-92, Guide to Good Practices for Lockouts and Tagouts 2.3 OSHA Title 29 CFR 1910.147, The Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout) 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements of DOE 5480.19 and 29 CFR 1910.147. 4.0 Surveillance Activities

63

Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.2 Electrical Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ELECTRICAL SAFETY ELECTRICAL SAFETY 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify that contractor personnel are using safe work practices in completing electrical maintenance and modification work. Separate surveillances focus on the use of personal protective equipment and lockout/tagouts. Therefore, the activities included in this surveillance are directed toward other aspects of the electrical safety program. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE Electrical Safety Guidelines, May 1993 2.2 29 CFR 1910 2.3 National Electric Code NFPA-70 2.4 National Electric Safety Code ANSI C2 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements OS-0025 and OS-0027 from the RL S/RID. These requirements derive from DOE

64

Requirements for Commissioning HVAC Systems Using BEMS and Commissioning the BEMS Itself Based on Questionnaire Surveys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper the present status and requirements for commissioning of HVAC Systems using Building Energy Management Systems (BEMS) and commissioning the BEMS itself are investigated and summarized. The information presented is based on the results of the questionnaire and interview survey of experts which was carried out in four countries; Japan, the USA, France and Canada. This paper intends to clarify the requirements and future scope of the above issues by analyzing similarities and differences between the countries.

Yoshida, H.; Vaezi-Nejad, H.; Choiniere, D.; Wang, F.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Surveillance Guides - Continous Improvement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify that contractor personnel are effectively managing environment, safety, and health issues in a manner that fosters continuous improvement. The activities included in this surveillance help the Facility Representative determine whether safety issues identified through internal contractor, and external DOE or Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board evaluation programs are resolved consistent with the level of safety importance. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE O 414.1, Quality Assurance 2.2 DOE O 232.1, Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information 2.3 DOE-STD-1045-93, Guide to Good Practices for Notifications and Investigations of Abnormal Events 2.4 48 CFR 1970.5204, Department of Energy Acquisition

66

Facility Representative Program: Surveillance Guides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Assessment Tools Assessment Tools CRADs Manager's Guide for Safety and Health Walkthroughs Surveillance Guides CMS 3.1 Configuration Management Implementation CMS 3.2 Change Control CMS 3.3 Verification of System Configuration and Operations CMS 3.4 Temporary Changes CPS 8.1 Hoisting and Rigging CPS 8.2 Trenching and Excavation EMS 21.1 Emergency Preparedness ENS 7.1 Definition of Design Requirements ERS 14.1 Satellite Accumulation Ares (RCRA Compliance) ERS 14.2 Emmissions Monitoring ERS 14.3 Underground and Above Ground Diesel Fuel Storage Tanks FPS 12.1 Life Safety FPS 12.2 Fire Protection and Prevention MAS 10.1 Maintenance Activities MAS 10.2 Control of Measuring and Test Equipment MAS 10.3 Seasonal Preparation MSS 1.1 Corrective Action/Issue Management NSS 18.1 Criticality Safety

67

Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medical Surveillance...

68

Long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near Grand Junction, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney disposal site. The site is in Mesa County near Grand Junction, Colorado. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites are cared for in a manner that protects public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site may be licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the Cheney disposal site. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination that remedial action is complete and the NRC formally accepts this plan. This document describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure that the Cheney disposal site performs as designed. The program is based on site inspections to identify potential threats to disposal cell integrity. The LTSP is based on the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program guidance and meets the requirements of 10 CFR {section}40.27(b) and 40 CFR {section}192.03.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Surveillance Guide - ERS ERS 14.2 Emmissions Monitoring  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EMISSIONS MONITORING EMISSIONS MONITORING 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify that the contractor is monitoring emissions of radioactive materials and chemicals. The Facility Representative will verify operability of equipment and examine implementation of procedures and processes for collecting, analyzing and recording data. The Facility Representative evaluates compliance with applicable requirements from DOE and implementation of appropriate codes and standards. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance implements requirements RP-0028 and ER-0023 from the RL S/RIDs. Requirement RP-0028 relates to oversight of

70

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.18 Equipment and Piping Labeling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify that facility equipment and piping are labeled in a manner such that facility personnel are able to positively identify equipment they operate. This surveillance provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for labeling equipment and piping and for establishing compliance with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 2.2 DOE-STD-1044-93, Guide to Good Practices for Equipment and Piping Labeling 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements of the Functions, Requirements and Authorities Manual, Section 20,

71

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.10 Independent Verification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the conduct of selected independent verification activities. This surveillance provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's independent verifications programs and for establishing compliance with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 2.2 DOE-STD-1036-93, Guide to Good Practices for Independent Verification 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements of the Functions, Responsibilities and Authorities Manual, Section 20, Operations, FRAM #s 4253, 4258, and 4261. These requirements are drawn from DOE 5480.19.

72

Surveillance Guides - QAS 2.5 Design Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DESIGN CONTROL DESIGN CONTROL 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's design control program. The surveillance encompasses design input, design output, and design control. The Facility Representatives will evaluate implementation of the program as well as compliance with applicable DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5700.6C, Quality Assurance 2.2 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix B, Quality Assurance Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants and Fuel Reprocessing Plants. 2.3 NQA-1-1989, Quality Assurance Program Requirements for Nuclear Facilities 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirement QA-0009 from the RL S/RID. This requirement is extracted from DOE 5700.6C.

73

Illness and Injury Surveillance Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Illness and Injury Surveillance supports the DOE's only multi-site health information database linked to current workers. The program uses health and demographic data already...

74

Surveillance Guides - RPS 11.2 Radiological Work Practices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIOLOGICAL WORK PRACTICES RADIOLOGICAL WORK PRACTICES 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the practices of workers performing tasks in radiological controlled areas to ensure that these practices protect the safety and health of the workers and comply with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 10 CFR 835, Occupational Radiation Protection 2.2 DOE/EH-0256T, rev. 1, Radiological Control Manual 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirement RP-0024 from the RL S/RID. This requirement comes from the Radiological Control Manual. 4.0 Surveillance Activities The Facility Representative performs the following activities to evaluate the effectiveness of work practices by contractor personnel in minimizing exposure to radiological hazards.

75

Surveillance Guides - QAS 2.4 Instrument Calibration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INSTRUMENT CALIBRATION INSTRUMENT CALIBRATION 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the implementation of the contractor's program to routinely calibrate instruments, alarms, and sensors. The Facility Representative observes calibration testing of instruments and channels and reviews supporting documentation to verify compliance with applicable Department of Energy requirements and implementation of best industry practices. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5700.6C, Quality Assurance 2.2 DOE 4330.4B, Maintenance Management Program 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirement QA-0009 from the RL S/RID. This requirement is extracted from DOE 5700.6C. 4.0 Surveillance Activities

76

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.3 Control Area Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONTROL AREA ACTIVITIES CONTROL AREA ACTIVITIES 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify that standards for the professional conduct of operations personnel are established and followed so that operator performance meets the expectations of DOE and facility management. This surveillance provides a basis for evaluating watchstanding practices of operations personnel in the control area. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 2.2 DOE-STD-1042-93, Guide to Good Practices for Control Area Activities 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements of the Functions, Responsibilities and Authorities Manual, Section 20, Operations, FRAM #s 4253, 4258, and 4261. These requirements are

77

EVMS Self-Surveillance of Remote Handled Low Level Waste (RHLLW) Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE G 413.3-10A, Section 3.a states: “The Contractor has primary responsibility for implementing and maintaining a surveillance program to ensure continued compliance of the system with ANSI/EIA-748B. DOE O 413.3B requires the FPD to ensure the contractor conducts a Self-Surveillance annually. This annual Self-Surveillance,…should cover all 32 guidelines of the ANSI/EIA748B. Documentation of the Self-Surveillance is sent to the CO and the PMSO (copy to OECM) confirming the continued compliance of their EVMS ANSI/EIA748B...” This review, and the associated report, is deemed to satisfy this requirement.

Michael L. Nelson; Kimberly Case; Linda Hergesheimer; Maxine Johnson; Doug Parker; Rick Staten; Scott taylor

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.7 Ergonomics  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ERGONOMICS ERGONOMICS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the safety of current work practices and work stations to ensure that workers are not placed at undue risk of injury. The Facility Representative observes work in progress and working conditions to determine if the contractor is applying best practices to protect the safety and health of workers. In performing this surveillance, the Facility Representative should recognize that specific regulatory requirements for ergonomics in the work place have not been established nor in many cases, have applicable national consensus standards. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.4, Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Standards 2.2 DOE 5483.1A, Occupational Safety and Health Program

79

Chapter_9_Technical_Surveillance_Countermeasures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 9 Technical Surveillance Countermeasures This chapter covers the TSCM Program in place at DOE HQ to fulfill the requirements of DOE Manual 470.4-4A, Information Security Manual, Section D-Technical Surveillance Countermeasures (hereafter called the TSCM Manual), which is OUO and therefore is not available electronically through the DOE directives system website. A copy of the TSCM Manual is available through the Points of Contact listed below or by requesting a copy through the DOE directives system. It is distributed only to those authorized to receive OUO information. Certain TSCM procedures and activities are OUO or classified and thus are not included in the HQFMSP. The HQ Technical Security Program is assigned to HS-1.2. The TSCM Program Manager

80

Earned Value Management System (EVMS) Surveillance Standard Operating Procedure  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

System (EVMS) System (EVMS) Surveillance Standard Operating Procedure (ESSOP) Issued by Office of Acquisition and Project Management MA-63 September 30, 2013 V2 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Office of Acquisition and Project Management (OAPM) EVMS SURVEILLANCE SOP (ESSOP) SEPTEMBER 30, 2013 ii Earned Value Management System (EVMS) Surveillance Standard Operating Procedure (ESSOP) OPR: MA-63 Update V2: September 30, 2013 1. PURPOSE. This EVMS Surveillance Standard Operating Procedure (ESSOP) serves as a primary reference for OAPM MA-63 when conducting EVM System-level assessments. DOE Order (O) 413.3B, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-11, and the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) require implementation of an EVMS on DOE capital asset

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.1 Personal Protective Equipment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the use of personal protection equipment to mitigate hazards that workers encounter in performing their jobs. The surveillance activities provide a basis for determining if contractor management is ensuring the appropriate personal protective equipment is used, and that the contractor is complying with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.1B, Environment, Safety and Health Program for Department of Energy Operators 2.2 29 CFR 1926, Subpart E, Personal Protective Equipment and Life-Saving Equipment 2.3 29 CFR 1910, Subpart I, Personal Protective Equipment 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements OS-0025

82

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.6 Investigation of Abnormal Events  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INVESTIGATION OF ABNORMAL EVENTS INVESTIGATION OF ABNORMAL EVENTS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify that contractor personnel are effectively investigating abnormal events. The activities included in this surveillance provide a basis for determining whether the contractor has implemented a thorough review process to identify, investigate, and resolve abnormal events. The surveillance also provides a basis for ensuring that applicable DOE requirements are implemented. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 2.2 DOE-STD-1045-93, Guide To Good Practices for Notifications and Investigations of Abnormal Events 2.3 DOE 232.1A, Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information 3.0 Requirements Implemented

83

Surveillance Guide - CPS 8.2 Trenching and Excavation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TRENCHING AND EXCAVATION TRENCHING AND EXCAVATION 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that trenching and excavation activities performed by the contractor and subcontractors are performed safely and in accordance with DOE requirements. A key element is a joint walkthrough conducted with the contractor's representative who is responsible for daily monitoring of all excavation projects. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 440.1A, Worker Protection Management for DOE Federal and Contractor Employees 2.2 29 CFR 1926, Subpart P, Excavations 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to partially fulfill requirement 5.c.(1) of DOE O 440.1A. 4.0 Surveillance Activities The Facility Representative performs the following activities in

84

Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance at the Rocky Flats Site: Lessons Learned Based on the First Years Real Experiences From the Field  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance at Rocky Flats: Early Experiences and Lessons Learned - 8350 S. Surovchak U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management 11025 Dover Street, Suite 1000, Westminster, CO 80021 L. Kaiser, R. DiSalvo, J. Boylan, G. Squibb, J. Nelson, B. Darr, M. Hanson S.M. Stoller Corporation 11025 Dover Street, Suite 1000, Westminster, CO 80021 ABSTRACT The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Rocky Flats Site was established in 1951 as part of the United States' nationwide nuclear weapons complex to manufacture nuclear weapons components. In 1992 weapons production halted, and the Rocky Flats mission changed to include environmental investigations, cleanup, and site closure. In October 2005, DOE and its

85

Implementation of a Dual Containment/Surveillance System utilizing scene-change detection and radio frequency technology  

SciTech Connect

This paper will examine the implementation of scene-change detection and radio frequency technology within a Dual Containment/Surveillance (C/S) System. Additionally, this paper will examine the human performance factors in the operation of these systems. Currently, Westinghouse Savannah River Company utilizes the Continuous Item Monitoring and Surveillance System (CIMS) in the performance of Dual C/S to monitor special nuclear materials within International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards and Domestic Safeguards. CIMS is comprised of the Material Monitoring System (MMS) (R), a multi-media electronic surveillance system developed by Sandia National Laboratory which incorporates the use of active seals commonly called Radio Frequency Tamper Indicating Devices (RFTIDs), NT Vision (R) as developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory, a Microsoft Windows NT (R) based operating system providing for domestic scene-change detection and the Digital Multi-Camera Optical Surveillance System (DMOS) (R) which provides scene-change detection for IAEA. Although this paper will focus on the implementation of Dual C/S utilizing the Continuous Item Monitoring and Surveillance System, the necessity for a thorough review of Safeguards and Security requirements with organizations and personnel having minimal to no prior MPC&A training will also be covered. Successful Dual C/S implementation plans must consider not only system design and failure modes, but must also be accompanied with the appropriate ''mind shift'' within operations and technical personnel. This is required to ensure completion of both physical and electronic activities, and system design changes are performed conscientiously and with full awareness of MPC&A requirements.

FITZGERALD, ERIC; KOENIG, RICHARD

2005-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

86

Surveillance Guides - QAS 2.6 Quality Assurance Records  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

QUALITY ASSURANCE RECORDS QUALITY ASSURANCE RECORDS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's implementation of the program to identify, collect and maintain quality assurance records. The surveillance encompasses records associated with design, maintenance, and operations. In addition to evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's implementation, the Facility Representative also evaluates compliance with applicable DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5700.6C, Quality Assurance 2.2 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix B, Quality Assurance Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants and Fuel Reprocessing Plants. 2.3 NQA-1-1989, Quality Assurance Program Requirements for Nuclear Facilities

87

Polarimetry for Weather Surveillance Radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is an overview of weather radar polarimetry emphasizing surveillance applications. The following potential benefits to operations are identified: improvement of quantitative precipitation measurements, discrimination of hail from rain ...

Dusan S. Zrnic; Alexander V. Ryzhkov

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Surface Environmental Surveillance Procedures Manual  

SciTech Connect

Environmental surveillance data are used in assessing the impact of current and past site operations on human health and the environment, demonstrating compliance with applicable local, state, and federal environmental regulations, and verifying the adequacy of containment and effluent controls. SESP sampling schedules are reviewed, revised, and published each calendar year in the Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Master Sampling Schedule. Environmental samples are collected by SESP staff in accordance with the approved sample collection procedures documented in this manual.

RW Hanf; TM Poston

2000-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

89

Surveillance Guide - EMS 21.1 Emergency Preparedness  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to determine if facility contractor personnel have adequate background and training to ensure that appropriate actions are taken for an emergency event. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 151.1, Comprehensive Emergency Management Program 2.2 DOE/RL-94-02, Hanford Emergency Response Plan 2.3 DOE-0223, Emergency Plan Implementing Procedures 2.4 99-QSH-213, Letter, Facility Representative Implementation of Emergency Preparedness Interview Process 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements of letter 99-QSH-213, Facility Representative Implementation of Emergency Preparedness Interview Process. 4.0 Surveillance Activities

90

Fire Protection Equipment Surveillance Optimization and Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance-based analysis methods are finding widespread application in many industries, including the nuclear power industry, and in many areas, including design, maintenance, and operations. Fire protection surveillance tests and inspections are well suited for performance-based analysis and trending, so transitioning to a performance-based program is achievable and cost-effective for nuclear power plants.

2003-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

91

Environmental radiation dose criteria and assessment: pathway modeling and surveillance  

SciTech Connect

From nuclear science symposium; San Francisco, California, USA (14 Nov 1973). The controversy in recent years over the extent of the risk to the public from environmental radioactivity attributable to nuclear facilities (in particular nuclear power plants and fuel reprocessing facilities) has resulted in a lowering of previously acceptable environmental radiation levels. The proposal by the AEC to limit effluents from light-water-cooled nuclear reactors so that the exposure of any individual in the public would not exceed 5 mR/yr, and the pronouncement by the BEIR Committee that the current environmental radiation protection guides are unnecessarily high, are illustrative. In turn the AEC has issued a Safety Guide calling for considerable refinement in the measuring and reporting of effluents from nuclear power plants, and has only recently issued a counterpart dealing with the measuring and reporting of radioactivity in the environs of nuclear power plants. The EPA has also recently issued a guide for the surveillance of environmental radioactivity. Currently, power reactor operators are being required by the AEC Regulatory Staff to conduct detailed, sensitive environmental surveillance. Much of this appears to be based on extremely conservative assumptions throughout, including doseeffect relationships, exposure situations, pathway models, reconcentration factors and intakes, which cannot be substantiated when examined in the light of current experience in the vicinity of existing power reactors. The expenditures occasioned by the required additional in-plant features necessary to meet the currently proposed effluent release criteria appear difficult to justify on a reasonable basis. Environmental monitoring at the proposed concentration limits appear even more excessive in terms of dollars per man-rem of potential dose commitment. (auth)

Hull, A.P.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.4 Pressure Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PRESSURE SAFETY PRESSURE SAFETY 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the contractor's implementation of programs to ensure the integrity of pressure vessels and minimize risks from failure of vessels to the public and to workers. Facility Representatives will examine the installed configuration of pressure vessels, observe pressure testing and review documentation associated with maintenance or repair of pressure vessels. In performing the surveillance, Facility Representatives will examine implementation of applicable DOE requirements and best practices. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.4, Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Standards 2.2 DOE 5483.1A, Occupational Safety and Health Programs

93

Surveillance Guide - NSS 18.1 Criticality Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRITICALITY SAFETY CRITICALITY SAFETY 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that effective programs have been developed and implemented to protect the public and DOE's workers from unplanned criticality. The programs should minimize the potential for inadvertent criticality, provide appropriate training for personnel on criticality hazards and procedures for preventing inadvertent criticality, and provide appropriate systems to detect such criticalities and warn workers. The surveillance activities provide a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of policies, programs, and procedures and for reviewing compliance with specific DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.24, Nuclear Criticality Safety

94

Surveillance Guide - MAS 10.3 Seasonal Preparation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SEASONAL PREPARATION SEASONAL PREPARATION 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify that the contractor is implementing appropriate measures to protect equipment and systems from damage due to the effects of cold weather. The Facility Representative evaluates systems necessary for the protection of the public and workers to determine if they have been adequately prepared for cold weather. The Facility Representative also examines other preparations for cold weather to ensure that materials are properly stored, permanent and auxiliary heating systems are functional, and other appropriate preparations have been completed. During the surveillance, the Facility Representative ensures that applicable DOE requirements have been implemented.

95

Surveillance Guides - QAS 2.1 Nonconforming Conditions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NONCONFORMING CONDITIONS NONCONFORMING CONDITIONS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to examine the effectiveness of the contractor's implementation of programs to identify, analyze and correct conditions that are adverse to quality. Such conditions may include equipment that may not be able to perform its safety functions, procedures that contain errors, safety analyses with incorrect assumptions, designs that include errors or are incomplete, or materials that are different than those specified. The surveillance provides a basis for examining the effectiveness of existing contractor programs and evaluating whether implementation of the programs complies with applicable DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5700.6C, Quality Assurance

96

Surveillance Guide - FPS 12.2 Fire Protection and Prevention  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FIRE PROTECTION AND PREVENTION FIRE PROTECTION AND PREVENTION 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that the contractor is implementing an effective program to minimize the potential for fires that could threaten the health and safety of the public or DOE's workers, or produce significant losses. In addition, the surveillance examines the effectiveness of steps taken to mitigate any fires that might occur. Finally, the surveillance provides an opportunity to evaluate compliance with requirements and standards for fire prevention and mitigation established by DOE. 2.0 References DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection (or DOE O 420.1, Facility Safety) RLID 5480.7, Fire Protection (or RLID 420.1, Fire Protection) 29 CFR 1910 29 CFR 1926 DOE-HDBK-1062-96, "DOE Fire Protection Handbook (See this as well as other

97

REMOTE SURVEILLANCE OF FACILITIES AWAITING D AND D  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this investigation is to compile the remote surveillance needs of different DOE facilities and to design and build a system that can measure the required parameters (such as radiation field, temperature, roof leakage), and transmit the data to a base location. The base station with its transceiver, computer, and software will receive, store, retrieve, and manipulate the data so that the values can be graphically represented and trends predicted. It is also important that the components should be commercially available, so that they can be configured into a user-friendly system. Since the measurements need to be performed over extended periods, mostly unattended, the components and system should be able to withstand adverse conditions, such as varying temperatures and relative humidities, and corrosive and radioactive atmospheres. The integrated system will be tested at Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (FIU-HCET) and at a DOE site. Based on these tests, and cost-benefit analysis, plans for deployment of the system will be made. The closed facilities may not have main power and telephone lines. An alternative method of solar-powering the system with storage batteries has been considered, which would be capable of supplying power to the system for a week in cloudy conditions. RF module and RF radio will be used for transmission of data to the remote station and receipt at the base station.

M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

GPRS Video Streaming Surveillance System GVSS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future security measures will create comfortable living environments that are embedded with a wide range of intelligent functionalities including home computing, entertainment, health care and security. These place stringent requirements on the home networking architecture which integrates various existing technologies for monitoring and control for future high security needs. This paper discusses the design and implementation of a gvss gprs Video Streaming Surveillance System system, which integrates various existing technologies for providing security for smart home environments. This system provides security for office, home and other buildings where high security is required.This allows the mobile user to track the activities from a particular location. The system will send snapshots of the video and stores them in different formats. It is also possible to display the time with the image when it was captured in the gprs enabled mobiles. This system is implemented using J2me Technology

Pushpavathi, T P; Kumar, N R Shashi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Surveillance Guide - NSS 18.4 Un-reviewed Safety Questions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UNREVIEWED SAFETY QUESTIONS UNREVIEWED SAFETY QUESTIONS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to examine the contractor's implementation of the Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) Process. The surveillance focuses on verifying that the contractor has developed and implemented the necessary procedures and administrative controls to ensure compliance with USQ requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 10 CFR 830.203, Unreviewed Safety Question Process 2.2 DOE Guide 424.1-1, Implementation Guide For Use In Addressing Unreviewed Safety Question Requirements 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement the requirements of 10 CFR 830.203. 4.0 Surveillance Activities The Facility Representative completes the following activities

100

Surveillance and human-computer interaction applications of self-growing models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of the work is to build self-growing based architectures to support visual surveillance and human-computer interaction systems. The objectives include: identifying and tracking persons or objects in the scene or the interpretation of user gestures ... Keywords: Growing Neural Gas, Human-computer interaction, Self-growing models, Surveillance systems, Topology preservation

José García-Rodríguez; Juan Manuel García-Chamizo

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Cooperative Large Area Surveillance with a Team of Aerial Mobile Robots for Long Endurance Missions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a distributed approach to solve long duration area surveillance missions with a team of aerial robots, taking into account communication constraints. The system, based on "one-to-one" coordination, minimizes the probability that any ... Keywords: Area surveillance, Cooperation, Coordination, Decentralized systems, Long endurance missions, Multi-UAS systems

Jose Joaquin Acevedo; Begoña C. Arrue; Ivan Maza; Anibal Ollero

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Video surveillance with speckle imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A surveillance system looks through the atmosphere along a horizontal or slant path. Turbulence along the path causes blurring. The blurring is corrected by speckle processing short exposure images recorded with a camera. The exposures are short enough to effectively freeze the atmospheric turbulence. Speckle processing is used to recover a better quality image of the scene.

Carrano, Carmen J. (Livermore, CA); Brase, James M. (Pleasanton, CA)

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

103

Evaluation of Roof Bolting Requirements Based on In-Mine Roof Bolter Drilling  

SciTech Connect

Roof bolting is the most popular method for underground openings in the mining industry, especially in the bedded deposits such as coal. In fact, all U.S. underground coal mine entries are roof-bolted as required by law. However, roof falls still occur frequently in the roof bolted entries. The two possible reasons are: the lack of knowledge of and technology to detect the roof geological conditions in advance of mining, and lack of roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems. This research is to develop a method for predicting the roof geology and stability condition in real time during roof bolting operation. Based on this information, roof bolting design criteria for modern roof bolting systems will be developed for implementation in real time. For the prediction of roof geology and stability condition in real time, a micro processor was used and a program developed to monitor and record the drilling parameters of roof bolter. These parameters include feed pressure, feed flow (penetration rate), rotation pressure, rotation rate, vacuum pressure, oil temperature of hydraulic circuit, and signals for controlling machine. From the results of a series of laboratory and underground tests so far, feed pressure is found to be a good indicator for identifying the voids/fractures and estimating the roof rock strength. The method for determining quantitatively the location and the size of void/fracture and estimating the roof rock strength from the drilling parameters of roof bolter was developed. Also, a set of computational rules has been developed for in-mine roof using measured roof drilling parameters and implemented in MRGIS (Mine Roof Geology Information System), a software package developed to allow mine engineers to make use of the large amount of roof drilling parameters for predicting roof geology properties automatically. For the development of roof bolting criteria, finite element models were developed for tensioned and fully grouted bolting designs. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate the mechanisms of modern roof bolting systems including both the tension and fully grouted bolts. Parameters to be studied are: bolt length, bolt spacing, bolt size/strength, grout annulus, in-situ stress condition, overburden depth, and roof geology (massive strata, fractured, and laminated or thinly-bedded). Based on the analysis of the mechanisms of both bolting systems and failure modes of the bolted strata, roof bolting design criteria and programs for modern roof bolting systems were developed. These criterion and/or programs were combined with the MRGIS for use in conjunction with roof bolt installation.

Syd S. Peng

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Research on Requirement Forecasting of Raw Materials for Boiler Manufacturing Enterprise Based on Exponential Smoothing Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The best purchases of raw materials of manufacturing enterprises can be determined by accurate requirement forecasting to decide order quantities. According to the characteristics of the boiler manufacturers, the weighted coefficients and initial values ... Keywords: manufacturing enterprises, raw materials, requirement forecasting, exponential smoothing, weighting coefficients

Du Yanwei

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Risk effectiveness evaluation of surveillance testing  

SciTech Connect

In nuclear power plants surveillance tests are required to detect failures in standby safety system components as a means of assuring their availability in case of an accident. However, the performance of surveillance tests at power may have adverse impact on safety as evidenced by the operating experience of the plants. The risk associated with a test includes two different aspects: (1) a positive aspect, i.e., risk contribution detected by the test, that results from the detection of failures which occur between tests and are detected by the test, and (2) a negative aspect, i.e., risk contribution caused by the test, that includes failures and degradations which are caused by the test or are related to the performance of the test. In terms of the two different risk contributions, the risk effectiveness of a test can be simply defined as follows: a test is risk effective if the risk contribution detected by the test is greater than the risk contribution caused by the test; otherwise it is risk ineffective. The methodology presentation will focus on two important kinds of negative test risk impacts, that is, the risk impacts of test-caused transients and equipment wear-out. The evaluation results of the risk effectiveness of the test will be presented in the full paper along with the risk assessment methodology and the insights from the sensitivity analysis. These constitute the core of the NUREG/CR-5775.

Martorell, S.; Kim, I.S. (Universidad Politecnica de Valencia (Spain). Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica y Nuclear); Samanta, P.K. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Vesely, W.E. (Science Applications International Corp., Columbus, OH (United States))

1992-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

106

Decentralized rate control for tracking and surveillance networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a duality-based method for decentralized communication resource management in the context of networked tracking and surveillance systems. This method shares communication resources according to the joint utility provided by information of particular types. By formulating the problem as an optimization of the joint utility of information flow rates, the dual of the problem can be understood to provide prices for particular routes. Decentralized rate control is accomplished using primal–dual iterations in combination with communication of these route prices and marginal utility values. We build on previous work on the subject in a few important ways. First, we consider utility functions that are jointly dependent on flow rates, to properly account for geometric synergy that can occur in sensor fusion problems. Second, we do not require that the rate-update algorithms have explicit knowledge of utility functions. Instead, our update algorithms only require transmission of marginal utility values. We provide a proof of the convergence of the algorithm, and present simulation results to demonstrate its effectiveness.

Edwin K. P. Chong; Brian E. Brewington

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Storage and network requirements of a low-cost computer-based virtual classroom  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we investigate the network and storage requirements of a virtual classroom. The virtual classroom replaces traditional class methodologies by using the computer as the sole instrument for all class activity. The instructor and the students ...

Paul Juell; Daniel Brekke; Ronald Vetter; John Wasson

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites More Documents & Publications Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of...

109

Long-Term Surveillance Plan...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AL/62350-235 AL/62350-235 REV. 1 LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN FOR THE ESTES GULCH DISPOSAL SITE NEAR RIFLE, COLORADO November 1997 DOE and DOE contractors can obtain copies of this report from: Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (615) 576-8401 This report is publicly available from: National Technical Information Service Department of Commerce 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 (703) 487-4650 Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Estes Gulch Disposal Site Near Rifle... http://lts1.lm.doe.gov/documents/rfl/ltsp.html 1 of 25 5/20/2009 1:38 PM Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Division UMTRA Project Team Albuquerque, New Mexico Prepared by Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Albuquerque, New Mexico

110

Mining Surveillance and Maintenance Dollars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating site cleanup to reduce facility risks to the workers, the public and the environment during a time of declining federal budgets represents a significant technical and economic challenge to U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Operations Offices and their respective contractors. A significant portion of a facility's recurring annual expenses are associated with routine, long-term surveillance and maintenance (S&M) activities. However, ongoing S&M activities do nothing to reduce risks and basically spend money that could be reallocated towards facility deactivation. This paper discusses the background around DOE efforts to reduce surveillance and maintenance costs, one approach used to perform cost reviews, lessons learned from field implementation and what assistance is available to assist DOE sites in performing these evaluations.

MARTINEZ, R.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

N reactor standby program plan: Part 3, Standby and surveillance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The N Reactor Standby Program Summary Plan is a description of the general policy and guidelines to be followed in placing the N Reactor in cold standby status. That Plan defines a number of objectives and activities necessary to achieve this goal. One of these activities is to layup the N Reactor operating systems in a cost-effective manner such that its safe restart may be assured. The Program Summary Plan has defined this activity as Standby and Surveillance and has directed that a Standby and Surveillance Program Plan be prepared to define and plan all of the activities necessary to accomplish this objective. This Plan responds to that commitment and supports the related policies and guidelines contained in the referenced Plan. In a manner similar to the referenced Program Plan, the Standby and Surveillance Program Plan is a description of the policies, guidelines, and methods of implementation to layup the N Reactor systems for cold standby. Accordingly, this Plan: Provides mission and objectives to guide system layup activities; Provides assumptions and criteria for layup; Defines the methodology for formulating the Program; Defines Program Baselines; Defines the method of performance of the Program; Provides for management, administrative control, and reporting requirements. Supporting details to these major elements of the Standby and Surveillance Program Plan are contained in the following sections.

NONE

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

BWRVIP-86, Revision 1-A: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Updated BWR Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) Implementation Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the boiling water reactor (BWR) Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP). Based on recommendations from BWR Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) utilities, it was concluded that combining all separate BWR surveillance programs into a single integrated program would be beneficial. In the integrated program, representative materials chosen for a specific reactor pressure vessel (RPV) can be materials from another plant surveillance program or other source that better represents the ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Refrigeration requirements for fusion reactors based upon the theta-pinch concept  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two refrigeration systems applicable to the theta-pinch fusion concept are described. The first is a 1100 W, 4.5 K refrigerator which will be used for testing superconducting NbTi Magnetic Energy Transfer and Storage (METS) coil systems. This unit is currently being installed and is to be operational by April 1977. The second unit is applicable to the Syllac Fusion Test Reactor (SFTR) and has been conceptually designed. This liquefier-refrigerator is about 22 times larger than those in existence at present and will require 12-MW input electrical power. It will provide 3045 kg/h of liquid helium at 4.5 K.

Williamson, K.D. Jr.; King, C.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Surveillance Guide - CMS 3.3 Verification of System Configuration and Operations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VERIFICATION OF SYSTEM CONFIGURATION AND OPERATIONS VERIFICATION OF SYSTEM CONFIGURATION AND OPERATIONS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is for the Facility Representative to verify that the facility's configuration and operations are consistent with facility design basis documentation. These surveillance activities provide a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for implementing design basis requirements and for ensuring compliance with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4700.1, Project Management System 2.2 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 2.3 DOE 5480.23, Safety Analysis Reports 2.4 DOE-STD-1073-93, Guide for Operational Configuration Management 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements CM-0009

115

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.8 Control of Equipment and System Status  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONTROL OF EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEM STATUS CONTROL OF EQUIPMENT AND SYSTEM STATUS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify that the contractor has established and implemented an effective program to control equipment and system status. The surveillance activities provide a basis for verifying the effectiveness of the contractor's program as well as compliance with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 2.2 DOE-STD-1039-93, Guide to Good Practices for Control of Equipment and System Status 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements of the Functions, Responsibilities and Authorities Manual, Section 20, Operations, FRAM #s 4253, 4258, and 4261. These requirements are

116

Containment & Surveillance Systems Laboratory (CSSL) | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Containment & Surveillance Systems Laboratory Containment & Surveillance Systems Laboratory May 30, 2013 The Containment and Surveillance Systems Laboratory is an arm of the highly acclaimed ORNL Safeguards Technology Integration Center. This lab is used to evaluate and develop custom technology, as well as integrate, mock up, and stage equipment for evaluation deployments for a variety of containment and surveillance applications. Activities in this lab focus on integrating technology for sealing, monitoring, and tracking nuclear material in a variety of environments. It is well suited for developing, integrating, and deploying active and passive tamper-indicating devices and enclosures, unattended and remote monitoring systems, and wired and wireless attribute-monitoring systems. Applications

117

Medical Surveillance and Nanotechnology Workers.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Workers Peter D. Lichty, MD MOH FACOEM July 2008 Outline * Principles of Medical Surveillance * Sensitivity and Specificity of Medical Tests * Variability of Medical...

118

Technologies for Real-Time Monitoring and Surveillance of High-Valued Assets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been working on technologies that can provide real-time monitoring and surveillance of high-valued assets. It is hoped through effective system design that some of these technologies can be utilized as the technical equivalent for the "two person rule" (required for many domestic safeguards operations). The major efforts associated with this work to date involve the integration and adaptation of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radio frequency-based technologies into basic system elements that can be effectively layered into integrated unobtrusive monitoring systems that are specifically designed to detect unauthorized asset movements. Each system element is designed to provide real-time monitoring and surveillance of both protected assets and the people who have access to them. The goal is to accomplish up-to-the-minute status of monitored assets using site-specific, rules-based algorithms. The overall system concepts focus on early detection (of theft or diversion) at the asset, followed by appropriate alarms or notifications that can be used to initiate appropriate response(s).

Pickett, Chris A [ORNL; Richardson, Dave [ORNL; Stinson, Brad J [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Systems Modeling, Simulation and Material Operating Requirements for Chemical Hydride Based Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on ammonia borane (AB, NH3BH3) has shown it to be a promising material for chemical hydride based hydrogen storage. AB was selected by DOE's Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence (HSECoE) as the initial chemical hydride of study because of its high hydrogen storage capacity (up to 19.6% by weight for the release of {approx}2.5 molar equivalents of hydrogen gas) and its stability under typical ambient conditions. A new systems concept based on augers, ballast tank, hydrogen heat exchanger and H2 burner was designed and implemented in simulation. In this design, the chemical hydride material was assumed to produce H2 on the augers itself, thus minimizing the size of ballast tank and reactor. One dimensional models based on conservation of mass, species and energy were used to predict important state variables such as reactant and product concentrations, temperatures of various components, flow rates, along with pressure, in various components of the storage system. Various subsystem components in the models were coded as C language S-functions and implemented in Matlab/Simulink environment. The control variable AB (or alane) flow rate was determined through a simple expression based on the ballast tank pressure, H2 demand from the fuel cell and hydrogen production from AB (or alane) in the reactor. System simulation results for solid AB, liquid AB and alane for both steady state and transient drive cycle cases indicate the usefulness of the model for further analysis and prototype development.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Brooks, Kriston P.; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Evaluating requirements for gaze-based interaction in a see-through head mounted display  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study suggests an approach to the evaluation of gaze-based interaction with information displayed on a see-through HMD. For these purposes, a mock-up system consisting of a head-mounted eye tracker and a see-through HMD was developed. In a series ... Keywords: eye tracking, gaze control, head-mounted displays, human computer interaction

Sven-Thomas Graupner; Michael Heubner; Sebastian Pannasch; Boris M. Velichkovsky

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Surveillance of Site A and Plot M report for 2010.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the environmental surveillance program conducted at Site A/Plot M in the Palos Forest Preserve area for Calendar Year 2010 are presented. Based on the results of the 1976-1978 radiological characterization of the site, a determination was made that a surveillance program be established. The characterization study determined that very low levels of hydrogen-3 (as tritiated water) had migrated from the burial ground and were present in two nearby hand-pumped picnic wells. The current surveillance program began in 1980 and consists of sample collection and analysis of surface and subsurface water. The results of the analyses are used to monitor the migration pathway of hydrogen-3 contaminated water from the burial ground (Plot M) to the hand-pumped picnic wells and monitor for the presence of radioactive materials in the environment of the area. Hydrogen-3 in the Red Gate Woods picnic wells was still detected this year, but the average and maximum concentrations were significantly less than found earlier. Hydrogen-3 continues to be detected in a number of wells, boreholes, dolomite holes, and a surface stream. Analyses since 1984 have indicated the presence of low levels of strontium-90 in water from a number of boreholes next to Plot M. The results of the surveillance program continue to indicate that the radioactivity remaining at Site A/Plot M does not endanger the health or safety of the public visiting the site, using the picnic area, or living in the vicinity.

Golchert, N. W. (ESQ)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Surveillance Guide - MAS 10.2 Control of Measuring and Test Equipment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONTROL OF MEASURING AND TEST EQUIPMENT CONTROL OF MEASURING AND TEST EQUIPMENT 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify that the contractor maintains adequate control of tools, gauges, instruments, devices or systems used to inspect, test, calibrate, measure or troubleshoot safety related alarms, sensors, and detectors. Surveillance activities provide a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program as well as compliance with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B, Maintenance Management Program 2.2 DOE 5700.6C, Quality Assurance 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements MA-0003 and MA-0004 from the RL S/RID. These requirements are drawn from DOE 4330.4B.

123

"Sousveillance": inverse surveillance in multimedia imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a personal narrative that began 30 years ago as a childhood hobby, of wearing and implanting various sensors, effectors, and multimedia computation in order to re-define personal space and modify sensory perception computationally. This work ... Keywords: computer mediated reality, cyborglog, equiveillance, eyetap, inverse surveillance, sousveillance, surveillance, weblog

Steve Mann

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

DOTS: support for effective video surveillance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOTS (Dynamic Object Tracking System) is an indoor, real-time, multi-camera surveillance system, deployed in a real office setting. DOTS combines video analysis and user interface components to enable security personnel to effectively monitor views of ... Keywords: multiple video streams, person tracking, security cameras, video surveillance

Andreas Girgensohn; Don Kimber; Jim Vaughan; Tao Yang; Frank Shipman; Thea Turner; Eleanor Rieffel; Lynn Wilcox; Francine Chen; Tony Dunnigan

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.8 Heat Stress  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HEAT STRESS HEAT STRESS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of actions taken by the contractor to protect workers from the effects of heat stress. The Facility Representative will observe work where heat stress is a risk and examine implementation of applicable administrative controls. The surveillance provides a basis for evaluating compliance with applicable DOE requirements and implementation of best industry practices. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.4, Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Standards 2.2 DOE 5483.1A, Occupational Safety and Health Program for DOE Contractor Employees at Government-Owned Contractor- Operated Facilities 2.3 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Publication

126

Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.12 Chemical Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CHEMICAL SAFETY CHEMICAL SAFETY 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that practices for handling, storing, and using chemicals provides effective protection for the health and safety of employees. The surveillance includes evaluation of compliance with chemical safety standards and requirements applicable to operations at DOE facilities. 2.0 References DOE 5480.4, Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Standards DOE O 440.1A, Worker Protection Management for DOE Federal and Contractor Employees DOE G 440.1-1, Worker Protection Management for DOE Federal and Contractor Employees Guide DOE G 440.1-3, Occupational Exposure Assessment Implementing Guide DOE-HDBK-1100-96, Chemical Hazard Analysis DOE-HDBK-1101-96, Process Safety Management for Highly Hazardous

127

Selection of 3013 containers for field surveillance: LA-14310, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document is the fifth in a series of reports that document the binning, statistical sampling, and sample selection of 3013 containers for field surveillance. 1,2,3,39 Revisions to binning assignments documented in this report are primarily a result of new prompt gamma data. This report also documents changes to the random sample specification resulting from these binning changes and identifies and provides the rationale for the engineering judgment sample items for Fiscal Year (FY) 2008 and 2009. This revision also updates the changes to the previous surveillance sample resulting from changes to the order that specific containers undergo surveillance. This report will continue to be reviewed regularly and revised as needed to meet the requirements of the surveillance program.

Peppers, Larry; Kelly, Elizabeth; McClard, James; Friday, Gary; Venetz, Theodore; Stakebake, Jerry

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

POST-DEACTIVATION SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE PLANNING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

POST-DEACTIVATION SURVEILLANCE AND POST-DEACTIVATION SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE PLANNING Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning Dependence of End-Points Planning on S&M Planning Primary Surveillance Concerns Typical Deactivation S&M Plan Contents Example of a Post-Deactivation S&M Plan Dependence of End-Points Planning on S&M Planning One of the key elements of end-point planning is knowing what the post-deactivation S&M activities will be so that conditions can be established to support them. The post-deactivation S&M plan specifies the surveillance, inspection, and maintenance of the facility in the deactivated state. It should address the activities, the locations in which they will be conducted, and their frequency. Part of the S&M planning is

129

ORISE: Illness and Injury Surveillance, Radiation Exposure, and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surveillance Data, December 2012 (PDF) Technical Report: Health Surveillance of Rocky Flats Radiation Workers, April 2006 (PDF) Technical Basis Document for the Neutron Dose...

130

Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance at Rocky Flats: Early...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

at Rocky Flats: Early Experiences and Lessons Learned Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance at Rocky Flats: Early Experiences and Lessons Learned Long-Term Surveillance and...

131

V-202: Cisco Video Surveillance Manager Bugs Let Remote Users...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Cisco Video Surveillance Manager Bugs Let Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information V-202: Cisco Video Surveillance Manager Bugs Let Remote Users Obtain Potentially...

132

Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.9 Industrial Hygiene  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of programs implemented by the contractor to anticipate, recognize, evaluate, and control environmental factors or stresses that may adversely affect the health of the Department's workers. The Facility Representative conducts walkthroughs, observes activities, and reviews records to determine if the implementation of the contractor's Industrial Hygiene Program is achieving required results. The Facility Representative evaluates compliance with DOE requirements and implementation of best practices. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.4, Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Standards 2.2 DOE 5480.10, Contractor Industrial Hygiene Program

133

Long-Term Surveillance Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

~- ~- 1 .. I I . I I I ' I I I I I t I ' 1 .. ~ * -. . * * , . -. * . - l' ** ... * . DOE/Al/62350-60F ~--- - · ---,~REV. 1 CONTROLLED COPY NO. United States Department of Energy LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN fOR THE SHIPROCK DISPOSAL SITE; SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO September 1994 Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project INTENDED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE This report has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available in paper copy and microfiche. Number of pages in this report: 1 1 3 DOE and DOE contractors can obtain copies of this report from: Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (615) 576-8401 This report is publicly available from: National Technical Information Service Department of Commerce

134

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.2 Shift Routines and Operating Practices  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SHIFT ROUTINES AND OPERATING PRACTICES SHIFT ROUTINES AND OPERATING PRACTICES Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify that standards for the professional conduct of operations personnel are established and followed so that operator performance meets the expectations of DOE and facility management. This surveillance provides a basis for evaluating watchstanding practices of operations personnel external to the control area in various plant locations. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 2.2 DOE-STD-1041-93, Guide to Good Practices for Shift Routines and Operating Practices 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements of the Functions, Responsibilities and Authorities Manual, Section 20,

135

Northeast Regional Cancer Institute's Cancer Surveillance and Risk Factor Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OBJECTIVES The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute is conducting a program of ongoing epidemiologic research to address cancer disparities in northeast Pennsylvania. Of particular concern are disparities in the incidence of, stage at diagnosis, and mortality from colorectal cancer. In northeast Pennsylvania, age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates for colorectal cancer are higher, and a significantly smaller proportion of new colorectal cancer cases are diagnosed with local stage disease than is observed in comparable national data. Further, estimates of the prevalence of colorectal cancer screening in northeast Pennsylvania are lower than the US average. The Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s research program supports surveillance of common cancers, investigations of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors, and the development of resources to further cancer research in this community. This project has the following specific objectives: I. To conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor incidence and mortality for all common cancers, and colorectal cancer, in particular, and b. To document changes in the stage at diagnosis of colorectal cancer in this high-risk, underserved community. II. To conduct a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior in a six county region of northeast Pennsylvania. a. To monitor and document changes in colorectal cancer screening rates, and b. To document the prevalence of cancer risk factors (especially factors that increase the risk of colorectal cancer) and to identify those risk factors that are unusually common in this community. APPROACH Cancer surveillance was conducted using data from the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute’s population-based Regional Cancer Registry, the Pennsylvania Cancer Registry, and NCI’s SEER program. For common cancers, incidence and mortality were examined by county within the region and compared to data for similar populations in the US. For colorectal cancer, the stage at diagnosis of cases diagnosed in northeast Pennsylvania was compared to data from prior years. A population-based interview study of healthy adults was conducted to document the status of cancer screening and to estimate the prevalence of established cancer risk factors in this community. This study is similar in design to that used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS). EXPERIMENTAL METHODS AND PROCEDURES: This program includes two distinct but related projects. The first project uses existing data to conduct cancer surveillance in northeast Pennsylvania, and the second is a population-based study of cancer risk factors and cancer screening behaviors in this same population. HUMAN SUBJECTS CONSIDERATIONS This program includes two projects: cancer surveillance and a population-based study of cancer risk factors and screening behavior. The cancer surveillance project involves only the use of existing aggregate data or de-identified data. As such, the surveillance project is exempt from human subjects considerations. The study of cancer risk factors and screening behaviors includes data from a random sample of adult residents of northeast Pennsylvania who are 18 or more years of age. All races, ethnicities and both sexes are included in proportion to their representation in the population. Subjects are interviewed anonymously by telephone; those who are unable to complete an interview in English are ineligible. This project has been reviewed and approved by the Scranton-Temple Residency Program IRB (IRB00001355), which is the IRB for the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute.

Lesko, Samuel M.

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Environmental surveillance data report for the first quarter of 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Surveillance and Protection Section within the Office of Environmental Compliance and Documentation at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is responsible for the development and implementation of an envirorunental program to (1) ensure compliance with all federal, state, and Department of Energy (DOE) reporting requirements to quantitatively demonstrate prevention, control, and abatement of environmental pollution; (2) monitor the adequacy of containment and effluent controls; and (3) assess impacts of releases from ORNL facilities on the environment. Environmental monitoring, as defined by the Regulatory Guide, consists of two major activities: effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. Effluent monitoring is the collection and analysis of samples or measurements of liquid and gaseous effluents. Environmental surveillance is the collection and analysis of samples, or direct measurements of air, water, soil, foodstuff, biota, and other media from DOE sites and their environs. Monthly or quarterly summaries are presented in this report for each medium sampled. All data are rounded to two significant digits. The summary tables generally give the number of samples collected during the period and the maximum, minimum, average, and standard error of the mean (SE) values of parameters for which determinations were made.

Gheesling, S.E.; Gideon, J.C.; Gregory, S.M.; Hamilton, L.V.; Horwedel, B.M.; Loffman, R.S.; Salmons, M.C.; Stevens, M.M.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Mobile remote surveillance system for the CERN LHC cryogenic system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis documents the research, planning and partial implementation of a remote surveillance system for use in the CERN LHC machine tunnel. The system is planned to provide surveillance of the cryogenic system in the LHC, eliminating the need for the personnel to go personally to look at a piece of possible faulty equipment. For this project, the complete system is planned. The system will be controlled via an Ethernet connection. This is fed into a 400V power line as a powerline communication signal, and picked up by the surveillance system. Then it is decoded into an Ethernet signal again, and sent to a camera with an on board web server. The power is transported by the same powered rail as used for communication, so that the system can take power and communication along the whole tunnel. The thesis describes the goals of the system and explains the requirements it needs to meet. Several solutions, especially technologies for communication, are considered, and details about them are described. A solutio...

Torbjørn, Houge

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Requirements for Computer Based-Procedures for Nuclear Power Plant Field Operators Results from a Qualitative Study  

SciTech Connect

Although computer-based procedures (CBPs) have been investigated as a way to enhance operator performance on procedural tasks in the nuclear industry for almost thirty years, they are not currently widely deployed at United States utilities. One of the barriers to the wide scale deployment of CBPs is the lack of operational experience with CBPs that could serve as a sound basis for justifying the use of CBPs for nuclear utilities. Utilities are hesitant to adopt CBPs because of concern over potential costs of implementation, and concern over regulatory approval. Regulators require a sound technical basis for the use of any procedure at the utilities; without operating experience to support the use CBPs, it is difficult to establish such a technical basis. In an effort to begin the process of developing a technical basis for CBPs, researchers at Idaho National Laboratory are partnering with industry to explore CBPs with the objective of defining requirements for CBPs and developing an industry-wide vision and path forward for the use of CBPs. This paper describes the results from a qualitative study aimed at defining requirements for CBPs to be used by field operators and maintenance technicians.

Katya Le Blanc; Johanna Oxstrand

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Relief Request CR-36, Alternative Requirements to Appendix VIII, Supplement 4, "Qualification Requirements for the Clad/Base Metal Interface of Reactor Vessel"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

amended 10 CFR 50.55a to require licensees to implement performance demonstration methods for ultrasonic examination systems. Licensees are required to implement either Appendix VIII, "Performance Demonstration for Ultrasonic Examination Systems", to Section XI, 1995 Edition with the 1996 Addenda, or Appendix VIII as executed by Performance Demonstration Initiative (PDI). Section 50.55a(g)(6)(ii)(C) of the final rule incorporates a phased implementation of Appendix VIII over a three-year period. Quad Cities Nuclear Power Station is submitting this Relief Request in accordance with 10 CFR 50.55a(a)(3)(i) on the basis that the proposed alternative would provide an acceptable level of quality and safety. The proposed relief request is provided as an attachment to this letter and is needed prior to the start of our next Unit 2 refueling outage which is currently scheduled to start February 2, 2002. Should you have any questions concerning his letter, please contact

T. Othy J. Tulon

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

LANL to certify automated influenza surveillance system  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LANL to certify automated influenza surveillance system LANL to certify automated influenza surveillance system LANL to certify automated influenza surveillance system A compact automated system for surveillance and screening of potential pandemic strains of influenza and other deadly infectious diseases is a step closer to reality. January 31, 2011 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Two Years of Operational Hurricane Synoptic Surveillance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1997, the National Hurricane Center and the Hurricane Research Division began operational synoptic surveillance missions with the Gulfstream IV-SP jet aircraft to improve the numerical guidance for hurricanes that threaten the continental ...

Sim D. Aberson

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Distributed Surveillance and Control on Freeways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surveillance, Response time can be given as, RTd = Tw + Tc +T'n + Td + Tr Where, RTd = response time under distributeddecision processes. Hence, RTd - RTc = T'n - Tn T'n is the

Coifman, Benjamin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Tank Farm Operations Surveillance Automation Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Operations Project Services identified the need to improve manual tank farm surveillance data collection, review, distribution and storage practices often referred to as Operator Rounds. This document provides the analysis in terms of feasibility to improve the manual data collection methods by using handheld computer units, barcode technology, a database for storage and acquisitions, associated software, and operational procedures to increase the efficiency of Operator Rounds associated with surveillance activities.

MARQUEZ, D.L.

2000-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

144

Enhanced surveillance program FY1998 accomplishments  

SciTech Connect

This report highlights the accomplishments of the Enhanced Surveillance Program (ESP), the highest-priority research and development effort in stockpile management today. This is volume one of eleven, the unclassified summary of selected program highlights. These highlights fall into the following focus areas: pits, high explosives, organics, dynamics, diagnostics, systems, secondaries, materials-aging models, non-nuclear components, and routine surveillance testing system upgrades. Principal investigators from around the DOE complex contributed to this report.

Kass, J

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Microsoft Word - S07566_Requirements.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 2012 LMS/FUSRAP/S07566 Rev. 1 This page intentionally left blank LMS/FUSRAP/S07566 Rev. 1 Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites This document supersedes DOE-LM/GJ1242-2006, Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Needs Assessment for the 25 DOE FUSRAP Sites (S01649), December 2006 March 2012 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy LTS&M Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites March 2012 Doc. No. S07566, Rev. 1 Page i Contents Executive Summary ....................................................................................................................... iii 1.0 Acid/Pueblo Canyon, New Mexico, Site ...............................................................................1

146

Technical safety requirements for the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) identify the operational conditions, boundaries, and administrative controls for the safe operation of the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, in compliance with 10 CFR 830, 'Nuclear Safety Management.' The bases for the TSRs are established in the AHCF Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), which was issued in compliance with 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, 'Safety Basis Requirements.' The AHCF Limiting Conditions of Operation (LCOs) apply only to the ventilation system, the high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters, and the inventory. Surveillance Requirements (SRs) apply to the ventilation system, HEPA filters, and associated monitoring equipment; to certain passive design features; and to the inventory. No Safety Limits are necessary, because the AHCF is a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility.

Seylar, Roland F.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for Waste Receiving & Processing (WRAP) facility  

SciTech Connect

These Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) define the Administrative Controls required to ensure safe operation of the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP). As will be shown in the report, Safety Limits, Limiting Control Settings, Limiting Conditions for Operation, and Surveillance Requirements are not required for safe operation of WRAP.

TOMASZEWSKI, T.A.

2001-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

148

Use of video surveillance to assess wildlife behavior and use of wildlife underpasses in Arizona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used integrated, four-camera video surveillance systems tothis fencing was erected. Video surveillance constitutes aare to (1) discuss the use of video surveillance to monitor

Gagnon, Jeffrey W.; Schweinsburg, Raymond E.; Dodd, Norris L.; Manzo, Amanda L.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Can you see me now? sensor positioning for automated and persistent surveillance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most existing camera placement algorithms focus on coverage and/or visibility analysis, which ensures that the object of interest is visible in the camera's field of view (FOV). However, visibility, which is a fundamental requirement of object tracking, ... Keywords: camera handoff, camera placement, coverage analysis, multi-camera surveillance, sensor placement

Yi Yao; Chung-Hao Chen; Besma Abidi; David Page; Andreas Koschan; Mongi Abidi

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Environmental regulatory guide for radiological effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance  

SciTech Connect

Under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, the US Department of Energy (DOE) is obligated to regulate its own activities so as to provide radiation protection for both workers and the public.'' Presidential Executive Order 12088, Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards,'' further requires the heads of executive agencies to ensure that all Federal facilities and activities comply with applicable pollution control standards and to take all actions necessary for the prevention, control, and abatement of environmental pollution. This regulatory guide describes the elements of an acceptable effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance program for DOE sites involving radioactive materials. These elements are applicable to all DOE and contractor activities for which the DOE exercises environmental, safety, and health responsibilities, and are intended to be applicable over the broad range of DOE facilities and sites. In situations where the high-priority elements may not provide sufficient coverage of a specific monitoring or surveillance topic, the document provides additional guidance. The high-priority elements are written as procedures and activities that should'' be performed, and the guidance is written as procedures and activities that should'' be performed. The regulatory guide both incorporates and expands on requirements embodied in DOE 5400.5 and DOE 5400.1. 221 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near Grand Junction, Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney Disposal Site near Grand Junction, Colorado. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Cheney Disposal Site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Interim long-term surveillance plan for the Cheney disposal site near, Grand Junction, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

This interim long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Cheney Disposal Site in Mesa County near Grand Junction, Colorado. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Cheney disposal site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control Programs Within the U. S. Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control Programs Within the U. S. Department of Energy Performance Analysis Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance U. S. Department of Energy OVERSIGHT Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .............................................................. 1 1.0 PURPOSE AND EVALUATION APPROACH ........................4 2.0 DOE REQUIREMENTS AND PROGRAMS..........................4 3.0 PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS .................................................7 3.1 Groundwater Monitoring and Protection...........................7 3.2 Environmental Radiological Program Management ........ 11 3.3 Environmental Radiological Monitoring and Surveillance ...............................................................15 3.4 Radiological Air Emissions

154

Enhanced Video Surveillance (EVS) with speckle imaging  

SciTech Connect

Enhanced Video Surveillance (EVS) with Speckle Imaging is a high-resolution imaging system that substantially improves resolution and contrast in images acquired over long distances. This technology will increase image resolution up to an order of magnitude or greater for video surveillance systems. The system's hardware components are all commercially available and consist of a telescope or large-aperture lens assembly, a high-performance digital camera, and a personal computer. The system's software, developed at LLNL, extends standard speckle-image-processing methods (used in the astronomical community) to solve the atmospheric blurring problem associated with imaging over medium to long distances (hundreds of meters to tens of kilometers) through horizontal or slant-path turbulence. This novel imaging technology will not only enhance national security but also will benefit law enforcement, security contractors, and any private or public entity that uses video surveillance to protect their assets.

Carrano, C J

2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

155

Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.5 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS AND EMERGENCY RESPONSE 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that workers who are performing activities associated with characterizing, handling, processing, storing or transporting hazardous wastes are adequately protected. The surveillance also evaluates the effectiveness of programs implemented to protect the health and safety of emergency response personnel who may be called upon to mitigate upset conditions at a facility where hazardous waste operations are conducted. Finally, the surveillance includes evaluations of the contractor's compliance with specific requirements regarding hazardous waste operations and emergency response. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5483.1A, Occupational Safety and Health Program

156

Expert system for surveillance and diagnosis of breach fuel elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are disclosed for surveillance and diagnosis of breached fuel elements in a nuclear reactor. A delayed neutron monitoring system provides output signals indicating the delayed neutron activity and age and the equivalent recoil area of a breached fuel element. Sensors are used to provide outputs indicating the status of each component of the delayed neutron monitoring system. Detectors also generate output signals indicating the reactor power level and the primary coolant flow rate of the reactor. The outputs from the detectors and sensors are interfaced with an artificial intelligence-based knowledge system which implements predetermined logic and generates output signals indicating the operability of the reactor. 2 figs.

Gross, K.C.

1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

157

Expert system for surveillance and diagnosis of breach fuel elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are disclosed for surveillance and diagnosis of breached fuel elements in a nuclear reactor. A delayed neutron monitoring system provides output signals indicating the delayed neutron activity and age and the equivalent recoil areas of a breached fuel element. Sensors are used to provide outputs indicating the status of each component of the delayed neutron monitoring system. Detectors also generate output signals indicating the reactor power level and the primary coolant flow rate of the reactor. The outputs from the detectors and sensors are interfaced with an artificial intelligence-based knowledge system which implements predetermined logic and generates output signals indicating the operability of the reactor.

Gross, Kenny C. (Lemont, IL)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Enforcing semantics-aware security in multimedia surveillance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Continuous audio-visual surveillance is utilized to ensure the physical safety of critical infrastructures such as airports, nuclear power plants and national laboratories. In order to do so, traditional surveillance systems place cameras, microphones ...

Naren Kodali; Csilla Farkas; Duminda Wijesekera

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.3 Confined Space Entry  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONFINED SPACE ENTRY CONFINED SPACE ENTRY 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that the practices of workers performing activities in confined spaces protect the safety and health of the workers and comply with DOE and OSHA requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.1B, Environment, Safety and Health Program for Department of Energy Operations 2.2 DOE 5480.4, Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Standards 2.3 29 CFR 1910.120, Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response 2.4 29 CFR 1910.146, Permit-Required Confined Spaces 2.5 29 CFR 1910.147, Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout) 2.6 29 CFR 1910, Subpart I, Personal Protective Equipment 2.7 29 CFR 1910, Subpart Q, Welding, Cutting and Brazing

160

LONG TERM AGING AND SURVEILLANCE OF 9975 PACKAGE COMPONENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission of the 9975 package, originally designed only for transportation of radioactive materials, has been broadened to include storage at the Savannah River Site. Two components of this package, namely the containment vessel O-rings and fiberboard overpack, require continued integrity assessment under the storage conditions. The performance of the components over time is being evaluated using accelerated-aging studies. Compression stress relaxation (CSR) and leak testing are being used to measure the performance of O-rings. The performance of the fiberboard is being evaluated using compression strength, thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity and other physical properties. Models developed from the data collected provide an initial prediction of service life for the two components, and support the conclusion that normal service conditions will not degrade the performance of the package beyond specified functional requirements for the first assessment interval. Increased confidence in this conclusion is derived from field surveillance data and destructive evaluation of packages removed from storage.

Hoffman, E.; Skidmore, E.; Daugherty, W.; Dunn, K.

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Implementing Performance-Based Sustainability Requirements for the Low Carbon Fuel Standard – Key Design Elements and Policy Considerations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requirements for corn ethanol, cellulosic biofuel, andmoderate than those of corn ethanol (OECD 2008; Searchingergeneration biofuels such as corn ethanol, but at the cost of

Yeh, Sonia; Sumner, Daniel A.; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Ogden, J; Jenkins, Bryan M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Is workplace surveillance legal in Canada?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the results of a research project into employer practices with respect to workplace privacy, funded by the Federal Privacy Commissioner of Canada's Contributions Program. The paper discusses the variety of privacy invasive technologies ... Keywords: monitoring, privacy, surveillance, work

Avner Levin

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Tracking Vehicles in traffic Surveillance Video  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a system for detecting and tracking vehicles in surveillance video. Our algorithm uses a simple motion model to determine salient regions in a sequence of video frames. Similar regions are associated between frames and clustered to yield coherent final tracks. The entire process is automatic and uses computation time that scales according to the size of the input video sequence.

Maire, M; Kamath, C

2005-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

164

Surveillance of video signals over computer networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, multimedia communication services, such as video conferencing and voice over IP, have been rapidly spread. H.323 is an international standard that specifies the components, protocols and procedures that provide multimedia communication services ... Keywords: H.225, H.323, multimedia, multimedia communication, telecommunication protocols, video surveillance system simulation

Hassan H. Soliman; Hazem M. El-Bakry; Mona Reda

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Waterflood surveillance techniques; A reservoir management approach  

SciTech Connect

The reservoir management aspects of waterflooding span the time before the start of waterflood to the time when the secondary recovery either is uneconomic or is changed to an enhanced recovery. This paper reviews waterflood techniques and reports on surveillance techniques in the management of waterflooding of oil wells.

Thakur, G.C. (Chevron USA Inc. (US))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Marginal Expense Oil Well Wireless Surveillance (MEOWWS)  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to identify and field test a new, low cost, wireless oil well surveillance system. A variety of suppliers and technologies were considered. One supplier and system was chosen that was low cost, new to the oil field, and successfully field tested.

Nelson, Donald G.

2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

167

Private sector video surveillance in Toronto: not privacy compliant!  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the findings of a fieldwork study conducted on private sector video surveillance and signage in the Toronto area. The presence and operation of over 140 video surveillance camera schemes by large service providing corporations, in 2 major ... Keywords: PIPEDA, privacy, private sector, regulation, video surveillance

Andrew Clement; Joseph Ferenbok; Roxanna Dehghan; Laura Kaminker; Simeon Kanev

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

High Level Requirements for the Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), has been tasked with the important mission of ensuring that nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy source in the U.S. The motivations behind this mission include cost-effectively meeting the expected increases in the power needs of the country, reducing carbon emissions and reducing dependence on foreign energy sources. In the near term, to ensure that nuclear power remains a key element of U.S. energy strategy and portfolio, the DOE-NE will be working with the nuclear industry to support safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants. In the long term, to meet the increasing energy needs of the U.S., the DOE-NE will be investing in research and development (R&D) and working in concert with the nuclear industry to build and deploy new, safer and more efficient nuclear power plants. The safe and efficient operations of existing nuclear power plants and designing, licensing and deploying new reactor designs, however, will require focused R&D programs as well as the extensive use and leveraging of advanced modeling and simulation (M&S). M&S will play a key role in ensuring safe and efficient operations of existing and new nuclear reactors. The DOE-NE has been actively developing and promoting the use of advanced M&S in reactor design and analysis through its R&D programs, e.g., the Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) and Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) programs. Also, nuclear reactor vendors are already using CFD and CSM, for design, analysis, and licensing. However, these M&S tools cannot be used with confidence for nuclear reactor applications unless accompanied and supported by verification and validation (V&V) and uncertainty quantification (UQ) processes and procedures which provide quantitative measures of uncertainty for specific applications. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base that will provide technical services and resources for V&V and UQ of M&S in nuclear energy sciences and engineering. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the public and will help ensure the safe, economical and reliable operation of existing and future nuclear reactors. From its inception, NE-KAMS will directly support nuclear energy research, development and demonstration programs within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), including the CASL, NEAMS, Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS), Small Modular Reactors (SMR), and Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) programs. These programs all involve M&S of nuclear reactor systems, components and processes, and it is envisioned that NE-KAMS will help to coordinate and facilitate collaboration and sharing of resources and expertise for V&V and UQ across these programs.

Rich Johnson; Hyung Lee; Kimberlyn C. Mousseau

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Decontamination and decommissioning surveillance and maintenance report for FY 1991  

SciTech Connect

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Program has three distinct phases: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S M); (2) decontamination and removal of hazardous materials and equipment (which DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., calls Phase I of remediation); and (3) decommissioning and ultimate disposal, regulatory compliance monitoring, and property transfer (which DOE Headquarters calls Phase II of remediation). A large part of D D is devoted to S M at each of the sites. Our S M activities, which are performed on facilities awaiting decommissioning, are designed to minimize potential hazards to human health and the environment by: ensuring adequate containment of residual radioactive and hazardous materials; and, providing physical safety and security controls to minimize potential hazards to on-site personnel and the general public. Typically, we classify maintenance activities as either routine or special (major repairs). Routine maintenance includes such activities as painting, cleaning, vegetation control, minor structural repairs, filter changes, and building system(s) checks. Special maintenance includes Occupational Safety and Health Act facility upgrades, roof repairs, and equipment overhaul. Surveillance activities include inspections, radiological measurements, reporting, records maintenance, and security (as required) for controlling and monitoring access to facilities. This report summarizes out FY 1991 S M activities for the Tennessee plant sites, which include the K-25 Site, the Gas Centrifuge facilities, ORNL, and the Y-12 Plant.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Science Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Requirements About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network...

171

HAN System Security Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, "Home Area Network (HAN) Security Requirements," identifies and discusses the key cyber security requirements for different interfaces of HAN-based systems. These cyber security requirements for HAN interfaces are derived from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) "Catalog of Control Systems Security," which provides an excellent checklist of general security requirements.

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

172

Surveillance Guide - CMS 3.3 CMS 3.4 Temporary Changes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TEMPORARY CHANGES TEMPORARY CHANGES 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's program for controlling temporary changes to the facility. Such changes include temporary modifications, temporary procedure changes, and tests or experiments. The Facility Representative reviews the status of temporary modifications, distribution of temporary procedure changes, and examines tests or experiments. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5700.6C, Quality Assurance 2.2 DOE-STD-1073-93, Guide for Operational Configuration Management 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements CM-0009 and CM-0011 from the RL S/RID. These requirements are derived from

173

Medical Surveillance in Occupational Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Occupational in Occupational Health Mary L. Doyle, MPH, RN, COHN-S/CM The Johns Hopkins UniversHy Bloomberg School of Public Health + Compliance with legal requirements + Early detection (preclinical) and therapy - many established occupational diseases are not curable + Prevention of disease in co-worl

174

Avian and Bat Surveillance and Assessment Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Avian and Bat Surveillance and Assessment Plan Avian and Bat Surveillance and Assessment Plan Timeline and Deliverables Prepared Pursuant to the Mitigation Action Plan for the University of Delaware Lewes Campus Onsite Wind Energy Project, DOE/EA-1782 March 7, 2011 Introduction The University of Delaware, College of Earth Ocean and Environment (hereinafter CEOE) has constructed a 2MW Gamesa G90 Wind Turbine immediately adjacent to the College's Lewes, Delaware campus. Prior to construction of the turbine, CEOE commissioned an evaluation of the impact of a single turbine in the dredge spoil area adjacent to our campus. The conclusion of that evaluation was that "impacts are likely to be minimal and not biologically significant."

175

Integrated monitoring and surveillance system demonstration project: Phase I accomplishments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present the results of the Integrated Monitoring and Surveillance System (IMSS) demonstration project Phase I efforts. The rationale behind IMSS development is reviewed and progress in each of the 5 basic tasks is detailed. Significant results include decisions to use Echelon LonWorks networking protocol and Microsoft Access for the data system needs, a preliminary design for the plutonium canning system glovebox, identification of facilities and materials available for the demonstration, determination of possibly affected facility documentation, and a preliminary list of available sensor technologies. Recently imposed changes in the overall project schedule and scope are also discussed and budgetary requirements for competition of Phase II presented. The results show that the IMSS demonstration project team has met and in many cases exceeded the commitments made for Phase I deliverables.

Aumeier, S.E.; Walters, B.G.; Crawford, D.C. [and others

1997-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Surveillance of industrial processes with correlated parameters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for surveillance of an industrial process are disclosed. The system and method includes a plurality of sensors monitoring industrial process parameters, devices to convert the sensed data to computer compatible information and a computer which executes computer software directed to analyzing the sensor data to discern statistically reliable alarm conditions. The computer software is executed to remove serial correlation information and then calculate Mahalanobis distribution data to carry out a probability ratio test to determine alarm conditions. 10 figs.

White, A.M.; Gross, K.C.; Kubic, W.L.; Wigeland, R.A.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

177

Surveillance of industrial processes with correlated parameters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for surveillance of an industrial process. The system and method includes a plurality of sensors monitoring industrial process parameters, devices to convert the sensed data to computer compatible information and a computer which executes computer software directed to analyzing the sensor data to discern statistically reliable alarm conditions. The computer software is executed to remove serial correlation information and then calculate Mahalanobis distribution data to carry out a probability ratio test to determine alarm conditions.

White, Andrew M. (Skokie, IL); Gross, Kenny C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Kubic, William L. (Sante Fe, NM); Wigeland, Roald A. (Olympia Fields, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Sensors for Screening and Surveillance  

SciTech Connect

Much attention, in fact an entire session at this conference, is being devoted to protecting the United States against human threats--individuals who may pose a danger by their mere presence on US soil. However, tomorrow's terrorists will employ weapons in their attacks, and we must also be diligent in preventing these weapons from reaching their targets. Sensors can play an important role in detecting these weapons before they achieve their desired effects. A sensor system can best be understood as a way of automating search techniques that would normally be carried out by a human's touch and vision senses, or by a dog's sniffing capabilities. The list of potential threats is long, including nuclear, biological, chemical and radiological weapons, and each presents its own challenges. However, any effective system must meet the following requirements: (1) Sensor systems must be operationally practical. Delays must be kept to a minimum. The systems must be safe to operate. Individual privacy and corporate proprietary information must be protected. The systems must be part of a viable concept of operations; i.e., they must provide information that can enable effective, preemptive actions to be taken. (2) Sensors systems must be highly sensitive, providing a low probability of missed detections (false negatives). Our adversaries will conceal their device from detection, and they will likely probe our defenses for any weaknesses. Our systems must be robust against these techniques. (3) Sensor systems must give a low probability of false alarms (false positives). Our response to the detection of such a weapon will marshal substantial resources and, in many scenarios, be highly disruptive to the general population. Thus a system that gives frequent false alarms will soon be ignored.

Dye, D.H.

2002-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

179

Surveillance Guide - MAS 10.1 Implementation of the Integrated Safety Management System Process in Maintenance Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Implementation of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Process in Implementation of the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Process in Maintenance Activities 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's ISMS process with regard to maintenance activities. Surveillance activities encompass work planning and control, equipment status control, performance of maintenance, return to service, and closeout documentation. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 DOE 5480.19 Conduct of Operations for DOE Facilities 2.3 48 CFR 970.5204-2 Implementation of Environment, Safety, and Health into Work Planning and Execution 2.4 10 CFR 830.120 Quality Assurance 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements of the

180

Barriers to the Implementation of Surveillance for Stage I Testicular Seminoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Postorchiectomy adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) for Stage I seminoma can be associated with long-term toxicity, and management strategies with a lower treatment burden achieve the same excellent cure rate. Because studies suggest that radiation oncologists in the United States continue to recommend RT for these patients, we sought to identify factors associated with management recommendations. Methods and Materials: We conducted a one-time internet-based survey among 491 randomly selected American radiation oncologists self-described as specializing in genitourinary oncology. Results: Response rate was 53% (n = 261). Forty-nine percent of respondents worked in university-affiliated practices. Sixty-two percent of respondents always/usually recommended adjuvant RT for patients with Stage I seminoma, whereas 21% always/usually recommended surveillance and 3% always/usually recommended chemotherapy. One third (33%) expressed concerns that patients who experienced relapse during surveillance could not be salvaged. Although 88% of physicians were aware of an increased risk of second malignant neoplasms (SMN) after adjuvant RT, 85% underestimated its magnitude. Compared with physicians not typically recommending RT, physicians who always/usually recommended RT were more likely to believe that patients might not be salvaged at relapse during surveillance (p = 0.008) and were less aware of the association between RT and SMN (p = 0.04). Conclusions: Respondents who always/usually recommend postorchiectomy RT for patients with Stage I seminoma are more likely to underestimate late RT morbidity and to believe that surveillance is associated with increased mortality. Given the equivalent efficacy and reduced morbidity of surveillance compared with RT, our findings underscore the need for ongoing physician education to increase appropriate clinical implementation of surveillance strategies.

Arvold, Nils D. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Catalano, Paul J. [Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, and Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, Harvard School of Public Health, and Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Sweeney, Christopher J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hoffman, Karen E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Nguyen, Paul L.; Balboni, Tracy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Fossa, Sophie D. [Department of Clinical Research, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University, Oslo (Norway)] [Department of Clinical Research, Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo University, Oslo (Norway); Travis, Lois B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Beard, Clair J., E-mail: cbeard@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Issued to Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC related to Failure to Perform Required  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issued to Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC related to Failure to Perform Issued to Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC related to Failure to Perform Required Surveillances at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, August 2, 2000 Issued to Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC related to Failure to Perform Required Surveillances at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, August 2, 2000 This letter refers to the Department of Energy's (DOE) evaluation of potential noncompliances with the requirements of 10 CFR 830.120 (Quality Assurance Rule). The potential noncompliances involved inadequate implementation of work controls, specifically failure to perform required combustible gas surveillances. The failure to fully perform the required surveillances was identified by the contractor during a comprehensive Kaiser-Hill (KHLL) Implementation Validation Review

182

Surveillance Guide - ERS 14.3 Underground and Above Ground Diesel Fuel Storage Tanks  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UNDERGROUND AND ABOVE GROUND DIESEL FUEL STORAGE TANKS UNDERGROUND AND ABOVE GROUND DIESEL FUEL STORAGE TANKS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify underground and above ground diesel storage tanks are maintained, monitored, configured and marked as required. These surveillance activities provide a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for implementation of appropriate controls and compliance with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 1. DOE O 440.1A, Worker Protection Management For DOE Federal And Contractor Employees [http://www.explorer.doe.gov:1776/cgi-bin/w3vdkhgw?qryBGD07_rSj;doe- 1261] 1. 29CFR1910.1200, Subpart Z, Hazard Communication [Access http://www.osha-slc.gov/OshStd_data/1910_1200.html ] 2. 29CFR1910.106, Subpart H, Flammable And Combustible Liquids [Access at

183

Surveillance Guide - ERS 14.1 Satellite Accumulation Ares (RCRA Compliance)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SATELLITE ACCUMULATION AREAS SATELLITE ACCUMULATION AREAS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's management of hazardous and mixed wastes in satellite accumulation areas. The Facility Representative evaluates compliance with DOE requirements as well as requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and the Washington State Administrative Code. During this surveillance, the Facility Representative conducts a walk through of a satellite accumulation area and reviews the pertinent records. 2.0 References 2.1 40 CFR 260-270 2.2 Washington Administrative Code, Chapters 173-303 2.3 DOE 5400.3, Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste Program 2.4 DOE 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management. 2.5 DOE/EH - 0333, Management of Hazardous Waste

184

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for October 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter 1, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for December 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter I, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for January 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter I, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for November 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter I. Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for November 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter 1, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for June 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter I, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Tank Farm surveillance and waste status summary report for September 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations. This report is intended to meet the requirement of US Department of Energy-Richland Operations Office Order 5820.2A, Chapter 1, Section 3.e. (3) (DOE-RL, 1990, Radioactive Waste Management, US Department of Energy-Richland Operation Office, Richland, Washington) requiring the reporting of waste inventories and space utilization for Hanford Tank Farm Tanks.

Hanlon, B.M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Analysis of ISO NE Balancing Requirements: Uncertainty-based Secure Ranges for ISO New England Dynamic Inerchange Adjustments  

SciTech Connect

The document describes detailed uncertainty quantification (UQ) methodology developed by PNNL to estimate secure ranges of potential dynamic intra-hour interchange adjustments in the ISO-NE system and provides description of the dynamic interchange adjustment (DINA) tool developed under the same contract. The overall system ramping up and down capability, spinning reserve requirements, interchange schedules, load variations and uncertainties from various sources that are relevant to the ISO-NE system are incorporated into the methodology and the tool. The DINA tool has been tested by PNNL and ISO-NE staff engineers using ISO-NE data.

Etingov, Pavel V.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Wu, Di; Hou, Zhangshuan; Sun, Yannan; Maslennikov, S.; Luo, X.; Zheng, T.; George, S.; Knowland, T.; Litvinov, E.; Weaver, S.; Sanchez, E.

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Surveillance Guides - PTS 13.2 Packaging and Preparation for Shipment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PACKAGING AND PREPARATION FOR SHIPMENT PACKAGING AND PREPARATION FOR SHIPMENT 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs for packaging radioactive and hazardous wastes for shipment. The Facility Representative examines packages ready for shipment, observes preparation of packages, and reviews documents that establish the acceptability of packages. The Facility Representative verifies compliance with DOE requirements including requirements established by the Department of Transportation and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.3, Safety Requirements for the Packaging and Transportation of Hazardous Materials, Hazardous Substances, and Hazardous Wastes

193

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 6.1 (July 2011) Chapter 6.1 (July 2011) 1 Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 6.3. Documentation justifying the use of any of these exceptions is required. The exception, with supporting documentation, must be certified and approved at certain levels that vary according to the dollar value of the

194

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

----------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------- Chapter 6.1 (February 2011) 1 Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 6.3. Documentation justifying the use of any of these exceptions is required. The exception, with supporting documentation, must

195

Microsoft Word - Milestone Report-Assessment of Surveillance...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ORNLLTR-2011172 Reactor Pressure Vessel Task of Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Assessment of High Value Surveillance Materials June 2011 Prepared by R.K. Nanstad,...

196

Training Program EHS 745 ~ Hepatitis B Medical Surveillance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

45 Hepatitis B Medical Surveillance Course Syllabus Subject Category: Bio Safety Course Prerequisite: EHS 735 Course Length: 10 minutes Medical Approval: No Delivery Mode: Online...

197

Law and technologyKeeping track of telecommunications surveillance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The creation of a statistical index of U.S. telecommunications surveillance activities and their results will benefit both civil liberties and law enforcement.

Paul M. Schwartz

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Computer-Based Procedures for Field Workers in Nuclear Power Plants: Development of a Model of Procedure Usage and Identification of Requirements  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear industry is constantly trying to find ways to decrease the human error rate, especially the human errors associated with procedure use. As a step toward the goal of improving procedure use performance, researchers, together with the nuclear industry, have been looking at replacing the current paper-based procedures with computer-based procedure systems. The concept of computer-based procedures is not new by any means; however most research has focused on procedures used in the main control room. Procedures reviewed in these efforts are mainly emergency operating procedures and normal operating procedures. Based on lessons learned for these previous efforts we are now exploring a more unknown application for computer based procedures - field procedures, i.e. procedures used by nuclear equipment operators and maintenance technicians. The Idaho National Laboratory and participants from the U.S. commercial nuclear industry are collaborating in an applied research effort with the objective of developing requirements and specifications for a computer-based procedure system to be used by field workers. The goal is to identify the types of human errors that can be mitigated by using computer-based procedures and how to best design the computer-based procedures to do so. This paper describes the development of a Model of Procedure Use and the qualitative study on which the model is based. The study was conducted in collaboration with four nuclear utilities and five research institutes. During the qualitative study and the model development requirements and for computer-based procedures were identified.

Katya Le Blanc; Johanna Oxstrand

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Real-time wideband holographic surveillance system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wideband holographic surveillance system including a transceiver for generating a plurality of electromagnetic waves; antenna for transmitting the electromagnetic waves toward a target at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; the transceiver also receiving and converting electromagnetic waves reflected from the target to electrical signals at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; a computer for processing the electrical signals to obtain signals corresponding to a holographic reconstruction of the target; and a display for displaying the processed information to determine nature of the target. The computer has instructions to apply a three dimensional backward wave algorithm. 28 figs.

Sheen, D.M.; Collins, H.D.; Hall, T.E.; McMakin, D.L.; Gribble, R.P.; Severtsen, R.H.; Prince, J.M.; Reid, L.D.

1996-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

200

Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 2007  

SciTech Connect

Each year, LANL produces an Environmental Surveillance Report (ESR) in compliance with a Department of Energy (DOE) order. The ESR aims to summarize the environmental impacts of the Laboratory, the efforts to minimize these impacts, and LANL’s compliance with environmental regulations. This Summary Report presents the methods and results of environmental monitoring done in 2007 in a form that is more understandable and inviting to the public. Though other DOE sites have done Summary Reports in the past, this is LANL’s first for the ESR, and the authors were privileged to write this report from the perspective of students.

Lynch, Michelle; Brady, Doug

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Required Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Required Documents Required Documents Required Documents All foreign nationals, including students and postdocs, must select the foreign nationals employment category to complete the new-hire process. Contact (505) 665-7158 Email Complete following forms before New-Hire Orientation Be sure to bring the forms with you for the orientation event, but do not sign and date: Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification (pdf) - original, unexpired documents for verification of employment eligibility. Please refer to the I-9 verification form titled, "Lists of Acceptable Documents", which was included with your offer letter. (Laminated documents or hospital/temporary birth certificates are not accepted.) Note: Failure to provide required documents will result in delay and/or

202

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 6.1 (April 2009) Chapter 6.1 (April 2009) Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in FAR Part 6. Documentation justifying the use of any of these exceptions is required. The exception, with supporting documentation, must be certified and approved at certain levels that vary according to the dollar value of the acquisition. The information that must be included in each justification is

203

School requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a smooth surface and no "lip". Some presentations require AV equipment such as LCD or overhead projectors. A wireless microphone and sound system may be helpful to ensure that...

204

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 6.1 (April 2010) Chapter 6.1 (April 2010) 1 Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 6.3. Documentation justifying the use of any of these exceptions is required. The exception, with supporting documentation, must be certified and approved at certain levels that vary according to the dollar value of the acquisition. The information that must be included in each justification is identified in FAR

205

Towards automatic power line detection for a UAV surveillance system using pulse coupled neural filter and an improved Hough transform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spatial information captured from optical remote sensors on board unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) has great potential in automatic surveillance of electrical infrastructure. For an automatic vision-based power line inspection system, detecting power ... Keywords: Hough transform, Knowledge-based system, Power line inspection system, Pulse coupled neural filter, Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)

Zhengrong Li; Yuee Liu; Rodney Walker; Ross Hayward; Jinglan Zhang

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Enabling Syndromic Surveillance in Pakistan Ross Maciejewski1*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Enabling Syndromic Surveillance in Pakistan Ross Maciejewski1* , Shehzad Afzal2 , Adam J. Fairfield/exercise planning capabilities for Lahore, Pakistan. The objective of this work is to address the infectious disease surveillance challenges (specific to developing countries such as Pakistan) and develop a collaborative

Maciejewski, Ross

207

Mound Laboratory's Air Surveillance System  

SciTech Connect

A comprehensive air surveillance system was developed. The system includes surveillance of the source, transport conditions, and concentration at the receptor sites. An unusual aspect of the system is the implementation of off-site sampling programs through local governmental agencies. Background levels of radioactivity are routinely determined.

Carfagno, D. G.

1974-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

208

Government Surveillance and Political Participation on the Internet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although more is probably known about the causes of political participation than any other political behavior, the research program suffers in that it generally assumes citizens operate within an unproblematic surveillance context. This article argues ... Keywords: Internet, Michel Foucault, political participation, privacy, resistance, social control, surveillance

Brian S. Krueger

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Surveillance Guide - MSS 1.1 Corrective Action/Issue Management and Continuous Improvement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CORRECTIVE ACTION/ISSUE MANAGEMENT & CONTINUOUS IMPROVMENT CORRECTIVE ACTION/ISSUE MANAGEMENT & CONTINUOUS IMPROVMENT 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify that contractor personnel are effectively managing environment, safety, and health issues. The activities included in this surveillance help the Facility Representative determine whether safety issues identified through internal contractor, and external DOE or Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board evaluation programs are resolved consistent with the level of safety importance. It further verifies continuous improvement programs are in place and functional. 2.0 References 2.1 10 CFR 830.120, Quality Assurance Requirements 2.2 DOE O 414.1A, Quality Assurance 2.3 DOE O 232.1A, Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information

210

Guidance for implementing the long-term surveillance program for UMTRA Project Title I Disposal Sites  

SciTech Connect

This guidance document has two purposes: it provides guidance for writing site-specific long-term surveillance plans (LTSP) and it describes site surveillance, monitoring, and long-term care techniques for Title I disposal sites of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) (42 USC Section 7901 et seq.). Long-term care includes monitoring, maintenance, and emergency measures needed to protect public health and safety and the environment after remedial action is completed. This document applies to the UMTRCA-designated Title I disposal sites. The requirements for long-term care of the Title I sites and the contents of the LTSPs are provided in U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations (10 CFR Section 40.27) provided in Attachment 1.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

--------------------------- Chapter 6.5 (January 2011) 1 Competition Advocate Responsibilities [Reference: FAR 6.5, FAR 7 and DEAR 906.501] Overview This section discusses the competition advocate requirements and provides a Federal Procurement Data System-New Generation (FPDS-NG) coding assistance sheet and screen shots for the FPDS-NG Competition Report. Background FAR Part 6.5, -Competition Advocates,‖ implements section 20 of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act, which requires the head of each executive agency to designate an Agency Competition Advocate and Procuring Activity Advocates (hereafter referred to as Activity Competition Advocates). In accordance with DEAR 906.501, the Secretary of

212

Final Report: Mobile Surveillance and Wireless Communication Systems Field Operational Test; Volume 1: Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design and Operation The mobile surveillance and wirelessAND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION SYSTEM DESIGN AND OPERATION.with camera operation. Mobile Surveillance and Wireless

Klein, Lawrence

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Radiological surveillance of Remedial Action activities at the processing site, Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, April 12--16, 1993. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project`s Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) performed a radiological surveillance of the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC), MK-Ferguson and CWM Federal Environmental Services, Inc., at the processing site in Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. The requirements and attributes examined during the audit were developed from reviewing working-level procedures developed by the RAC. Objective evidence, comments, and observations were verified based on investigating procedures, documentation, records located at the site, personal interviews, and tours of the site. No findings were identified during this audit. Ten site-specific observations, three good practice observations, and five programmatic observations are presented in this report. The overall conclusion from the surveillance is that the radiological aspects of the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico, remedial action program are performed adequately. The results of the good practice observations indicate that the site health physics (HP) staff is taking the initiative to address and resolve potential issues, and implement suggestions useful to the UMTRA Project. However, potential exists for improving designated storage areas for general items, and the RAC Project Office should consider resolving site-specific and procedural inconsistencies.

NONE

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the environmental surveillance program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) during 1995. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive and nonradioactive materials at (or on) Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring result to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1995 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Using comparisons with standards, regulations, and background levels, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the environmental surveillance program at Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1992. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive and nonradioactive materials at (or on) Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring results to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1992 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and liquid effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Using comparisons with standards, regulations, and background levels, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, laboratory employees, or the environment.

Kohen, K.; Stoker, A.; Stone, G. [and others

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Illness and Injury Surveillance Program Guidelines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1190-2007 DOE-STD-1190-2007 DOE STANDARD ILLNESS AND INJURY SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM GUIDELINES U.S. Department of Energy AREA OCSH Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1190-2007 Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-STD-1190-2007 Foreword 1. Use of this standard is not mandatory. Users should review the document and determine if it meets their purpose. 2. Comments (recommendations, additions, and deletions) that may be of use in improving this document should be addressed to: U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, c/o Dr. Cliff

217

Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1979  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the environmental surveillance program conducted by the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) in 1979. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical substances was conducted on the Laboratory site and in the surrounding region to determine compliance with appropriate standards and permit early identification of possible undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of the data for 1979 on penetrating radiation, chemical and radiochemical quality of ambient air, surface and ground water, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, food, and airborne and liquid effluents are included. Comparisons with appropriate standards and regulations or with background levels from natural or other non-LASL sources provide a basis for concluding that environmental effects attributable to LASL operations are minor and cannot be considered likely to result in any hazard to the population of the area. Results of several special studies provide documentation of some unique environmental conditions in the LASL environs.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1989  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the environmental surveillance program conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1989. Routine monitoring for radiation and radioactive or chemical materials is conducted on the Laboratory site as well as in the surrounding region. Monitoring results are used to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to permit early identification of potentially undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of data for 1989 cover external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface and ground waters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Comparisons with appropriate standards, regulations, and background levels provide the basis for concluding that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. 58 refs., 31 figs., 39 tabs.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Chapter 5.2 (April 2008) - Chapter 5.2 (April 2008) Synopsizing Proposed Non-Competitive Contract Actions Citing the Authority of FAR 6.302-1 [Reference: FAR 5 and DEAR 905] Overview This section discusses publicizing sole source actions as part of the approval of a Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC) using the authority of FAR 6.302-1. Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in FAR Part 6. One exception permits contracting without full and open competition when the required supplies or services are available from only one responsible source (FAR 6.302-1). This exception is

220

Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) Code Verification and Validation Data Standards and Requirements: Fluid Dynamics Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

V&V and UQ are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of M&S and, hence, to establish confidence in M&S. Though other industries are establishing standards and requirements for the performance of V&V and UQ, at present, the nuclear industry has not established such standards or requirements. However, the nuclear industry is beginning to recognize that such standards are needed and that the resources needed to support V&V and UQ will be very significant. In fact, no single organization has sufficient resources or expertise required to organize, conduct and maintain a comprehensive V&V and UQ program. What is needed is a systematic and standardized approach to establish and provide V&V and UQ resources at a national or even international level, with a consortium of partners from government, academia and industry. Specifically, what is needed is a structured and cost-effective knowledge base that collects, evaluates and stores verification and validation data, and shows how it can be used to perform V&V and UQ, leveraging collaboration and sharing of resources to support existing engineering and licensing procedures as well as science-based V&V and UQ processes. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base to provide V&V and UQ resources for M&S for nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear power. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the public and will help ensure the safe, economical and reliable operation of existing and future nuclear reactors.

Greg Weirs; Hyung Lee

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

1995 Annual epidemiologic surveillance report for Brookhaven National Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) conduct of epidemiologic surveillance provides an early warning system for health problems among workers. This program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of five or more consecutive workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers. This report summarizes epidemiologic surveillance data collected from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. The data were collected by a coordinator at BNL and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and data analyses were carried out.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

222

Hazelwood Interim Storage Site environmental surveillance report for calendar year 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of environmental surveillance activities conducted at the Hazelwood Interim Storage Site (HISS) during calendar year 1993. It includes an overview of site operations, the basis for monitoring for radioactive and non-radioactive parameters, summaries of environmental program at HISS, a summary of the results, and the calculated hypothetical radiation dose to the offsite population. Environmental surveillance activities were conducted in accordance with the site environmental monitoring plan, which describes the rationale and design criteria for the surveillance program, the frequency of sampling and analysis, specific sampling and analysis procedures, and quality assurance requirements. The US Department of Energy (DOE) began environmental monitoring of HISS in 1984, when the site was assigned to DOE by Congress through the energy and Water Development Appropriations Act and subsequent to DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remediation Action Program (FUSRAP). Contamination at HISS originated from uranium processing work conducted at Mallinckrodt Chemical Works at the St. Louis Downtown Site (SLDS) from 1942 through 1957.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Colonie Interim Storage Site environmental surveillance report for calendar year 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of environmental surveillance activities conducted at the Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS) during calendar year 1993. It includes an overview of site operations, the basis for radiological and nonradiological monitoring, dose to the offsite population, and summaries of environmental programs at CISS. Environmental surveillance activities were conducted in accordance with the site environmental monitoring plan, which describes the rationale and design criteria for the surveillance program, the frequency of sampling and analysis, specific sampling and analysis procedures, and quality assurance requirements. Appendix A contains a discussion of the nature of radiation, the way it is measured, and common sources of it. The primary environmental guidelines and limits applicable to CISS are given in US Department of Energy (DOE) orders and mandated by six federal acts: the Clean Air Act; the Clean Water Act; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); the Toxic Substances Control Act; the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); and the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). DOE began environmental monitoring of CISS in 1984 when DOE was authorized by Congress through the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act to conduct a decontamination research and development program at the site. The site was subsequently assigned to DOE`s Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP).

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Experimental Analysis of the Integration of Mixed Surveillance Frequency into Oceanic Air Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technical capabilities for improved surveillance over the oceans are currently available through the use of satellites.

Forest, Laura Major

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

PRELIMINARY NUCLEAR CRITICALITY NUCLEAR SAFETY EVLAUATION FOR THE CONTAINER SURVEILLANCE AND STORAGE CAPABILITY PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

Washington Safety Management Solutions (WSMS) provides criticality safety services to Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) at the Savannah River Site. One activity at SRS is the Container Surveillance and Storage Capability (CSSC) Project, which will perform surveillances on 3013 containers (hereafter referred to as 3013s) to verify that they meet the Department of Energy (DOE) Standard (STD) 3013 for plutonium storage. The project will handle quantities of material that are greater than ANS/ANSI-8.1 single parameter mass limits, and thus required a Nuclear Criticality Safety Evaluation (NCSE). The WSMS methodology for conducting an NCSE is outlined in the WSMS methods manual. The WSMS methods manual currently follows the requirements of DOE-O-420.1B, DOE-STD-3007-2007, and the Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) SCD-3 manual. DOE-STD-3007-2007 describes how a NCSE should be performed, while DOE-O-420.1B outlines the requirements for a Criticality Safety Program (CSP). The WSRC SCD-3 manual implements DOE requirements and ANS standards. NCSEs do not address the Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) of non-reactor nuclear facilities that may be affected by overt or covert activities of sabotage, espionage, terrorism or other security malevolence. Events which are beyond the Design Basis Accidents (DBAs) are outside the scope of a double contingency analysis.

Low, M; Matthew02 Miller, M; Thomas Reilly, T

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

226

Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning One of the key elements of end-point planning is knowing what the post-deactivation S&M activities will be so that conditions can be established to support them. The post-deactivation S&M plan specifies the surveillance, inspection, and maintenance of the facility in the deactivated state. It should address the activities, the locations in which they will be conducted, and their frequency. Part of the S&M planning is deciding which spaces must be accessed and which equipment must be operated. This should be agreed upon with the organization that will receive the facility for subsequent S&M and, where needed to meet a stakeholder, regulatory, and tribal nations commitment.

227

10 Years of Hurricane Synoptic Surveillance (1997–2006)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1997, the National Hurricane Center and the Hurricane Research Division began operational synoptic surveillance missions with the Gulfstream IV-SP jet aircraft to improve the numerical guidance for hurricanes that threaten the continental ...

Sim D. Aberson

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Calendar Year 2013 October 2013 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Site Quarterly Report of Site Surveillance and Maintenance Activities-2nd...

229

A review of public health syndromic surveillance systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to the critical need of early detection of potential infectious disease outbreaks or bioterrorism events, public health syndromic surveillance systems have been rapidly developed and deployed in recent years. This paper surveys major research ...

Ping Yan; Daniel Zeng; Hsinchun Chen

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Site Transition Framework for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Site Transition Framework (STF) provides a framework for all U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities and sites where DOE may have anticipated long-term surveillance and maintenance (LTS&...

231

Imaging sonar-aided navigation for autonomous underwater harbor surveillance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we address the problem of drift-free navigation for underwater vehicles performing harbor surveillance and ship hull inspection. Maintaining accurate localization for the duration of a mission is important ...

Johannsson, Hordur

232

Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning Post-Deactivation Surveillance and Maintenance Planning One of the key elements of end-point planning is knowing what the post-deactivation S&M activities will be so that conditions can be established to support them. The post-deactivation S&M plan specifies the surveillance, inspection, and maintenance of the facility in the deactivated state. It should address the activities, the locations in which they will be conducted, and their frequency. Part of the S&M planning is deciding which spaces must be accessed and which equipment must be operated. This should be agreed upon with the organization that will receive the facility for subsequent S&M and, where needed to meet a stakeholder, regulatory, and tribal nations commitment.

233

2010 Savannah River Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

234

2009 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

235

2008 Idaho National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

236

2009 Hanford Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

2009 Argonne National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2010-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

238

2010 Hanford Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

239

2010 Idaho National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

240

2010 Pantex Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

2009 Pantex Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

2010 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

243

2008 Savannah River Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

244

2010 Idaho National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

245

2010 Pantex Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

246

2010 Savannah River Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

247

2010 Hanford Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

248

2010 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

249

2010 Argonne National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

250

2010 Kansas City Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

251

2010 Sandia National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

252

2007 Pantex Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

2006 Pantex Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

254

2010 Kansas City Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

255

2007 Kansas City Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

256

2008 Kansas City Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

257

2006 Kansas City Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

258

2010 Sandia National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

259

2008 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

260

2007 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 43.2 (June 2010) Chapter 43.2 (June 2010) 1 Change Order Template References FAR Subpart 43.2, "Change Orders" Policy Flash 2008-39, "Contract Change Order Administration of Department of Energy (DOE) Prime Contracts" Acquisition Guide 15.4-1, "Pricing Contract Modifications" Acquisition Guide 37.2, "Performance Based Service Acquisition" Overview This section provides a change order template to expedite the contracting process by helping assure a consistent application of the contract terms for various change order modifications to

262

Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the ORNL Decontamination and Decommissioning Program FY 1993--2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration D D program. The purpose and objectivesof this program include: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S M) of facilities awaiting decommissioning; (2) planning for the orderly decommissioning of these facilities; and (3) implementation of a program to accomplish facility disposition in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner. Participating D D contractors are required to prepare formal plans that document the S M programs established for each site. This report has been prepared to provide this documentation for those facilities included in the ORNL D D Program.

Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Long-term surveillance plan for the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico disposal site  

SciTech Connect

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Ambrosia Lake disposal site in McKinley County, New Mexico, describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the disposal site. The DOE will carry out this program to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Long-term surveillance plan for the Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico disposal site  

SciTech Connect

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Ambrosia Lake disposal site in McKinley County, New Mexico, describes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the disposal site. The DOE will carry out this program to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Video Surveillance Technologies for Retail Security  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... is done by predictive analysis, using software ... databases and alternatively creating scenarios, based on ... remains in developing scenario based data ...

2011-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

266

Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Requirements for Remediated FUSRAP Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document summarizes radiological conditions at sites remediated under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) and transferred to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for...

267

Burrell, Pennsylvania, vicinty property Long-Term Surveillance Plan. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to establish elements of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Long-Term Surveillance Plan (LTSP) for the Burrell, Pennsylvania, vicinity property. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) will use this plan to support the issuance of a license for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of the Burrell vicinity property. The DOE and the NRC previously reached agreement regarding the issuance of a license for the Burrell vicinity property. This is a departure from the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, which requires the licensing only of disposal sites, not vicinity properties. However, given the unusually large volume of wastes and the distance from the Canonsburg disposal cell of the Burrell vicinity property, it was agreed that a license for a designed disposal cell with surveillance requirements constituted a reasonable and prudent approach in keeping with the spirit of UMTRCA. The Burrell vicinity property covers approximately 29 hectares (72 acres). Disposal of the 10,500 tonnes (I 1,600 tons) of residual radioactive material (RRM) removed from the Canonsburg Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site took place within an approximately 0.6-hectare (1.6-acre) section in the western portion and an approximately 0.6-hectare (1.6-acre) section in the eastern portion of the Burrell vicinity property. The RRM was brought in as fill for under the ConRail railroad tracks. The excess RRM was placed in a storage location adjacent to the Conemaugh River at Burrell, which was later added to the disposal area. The disposal area contains a total of 78,000 tonnes (86,000 tons) of RRM.

NONE

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Surface Environmental Surveillance Project: Locations Manual Volume 1 – Air and Water Volume 2 – Farm Products, Soil & Vegetation, and Wildlife  

SciTech Connect

This report describes all environmental monitoring locations associated with the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. Environmental surveillance of the Hanford site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sampling is conducted to evaluate levels of radioactive and nonradioactive pollutants in the Hanford environs, as required in DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, and DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. The environmental surveillance sampling design is described in the Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring Plan, United States Department of Energy, Richland Operation Office (DOE/RL-91-50). This document contains the locations of sites used to collect samples for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP). Each section includes directions, maps, and pictures of the locations. A general knowledge of roads and highways on and around the Hanford Site is necessary to successfully use this manual. Supplemental information (Maps, Gazetteer, etc.) may be necessary if user is unfamiliar with local routes. The SESP is a multimedia environmental surveillance effort to measure the concentrations of radionuclides and chemicals in environmental media to demonstrate compliance with applicable environmental quality standards and public exposure limits, and assessing environmental impacts. Project personnel annually collect selected samples of ambient air, surface water, agricultural products, fish, wildlife, and sediments. Soil and vegetation samples are collected approximately every 5 years. Analytical capabilities include the measurement of radionuclides at very low environmental concentrations and, in selected media, nonradiological chemicals including metals, anions, volatile organic compounds, and total organic carbon.

Fritz, Brad G.; Patton, Gregory W.; Stegen, Amanda; Poston, Ted M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.7 Notifications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

response to an event pursuant to established guidelines. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 2.2 DOE-STD-1045-93, Guide to Good...

270

NDIA_PMSC_SurveillanceGuide_Oct2004.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Defense Industrial Association (NDIA) National Defense Industrial Association (NDIA) Program Management Systems Committee (PMSC) Surveillance Guide October 2004 Edition © 2004 National Defense Industrial Association (NDIA) Program Management Systems Committee (PMSC). NDIA PMSC Surveillance Guide October 2004 Edition Permission to copy and distribute this document is hereby granted provided that this notice is retained on all copies, that copies are not altered, and that the NDIA PMSC is credited when the material is used to form other copyright policies. National Defense Industrial Association 2111 Wilson Blvd., Suite 400 Arlington, VA 22201 (703) 522-1820 Fax: (703) 522-1885 www.ndia.org NDIA PMSC Surveillance Guide i October 2004 CONTENTS 1 INTRODUCTION

271

Global health response more accurate with automated influenza surveillance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global health response more accurate with automated influenza Global health response more accurate with automated influenza surveillance Global health response more accurate with automated influenza surveillance Public health officials will be able to determine whether an outbreak of an infectious disease comes from a pandemic strain or one less virulent. January 31, 2011 Lance Green of LANL tests an earlier version of a modular laboratory like the ones that will be part of the High-Throughput Laboratory Network Lance Green of LANL tests an earlier version of a modular laboratory like the ones that will be part of the High-Throughput Laboratory Network-a series of compact, self-contained, automated systems for surveillance and screening of potential pandemic strains of influenza and other deadly infectious diseases.

272

External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing Iridium-192  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing Iridium-192 External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing Iridium-192 Radiography Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: External Surveillance of Geothermal Scale Deposits Employing Iridium-192 Radiography Abstract Iridium-192 radiography has been successfully tested as a technique for externally monitoring geothermal scale deposits in piping at the Brawley, CA geothermal field. This technique is applied to piping that handles flowing brine to provide in situ scale deposition observations without the disadvantage of dismantling piping for visual scale inspection. Exposure times and film orientations have been optimized to yield excellent agreement between radiographically detected scale thicknesses and actual

273

1995 Annual epidemiologic surveillance report for Pantex Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a summary of epidemiologic surveillance data collected from the Pantex Plant from January 1, 1995 through December 31,1995. The data were collected by a coordinator at Pantex and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center,located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and data analyses were carried out. The data presented apply only to Pantex. The main sections of the report are the same as in previous years; the 1995 report provides additional information describing the work force by age and occupational groups.

NONE

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Handbook of methods for risk-based analyses of technical specifications  

SciTech Connect

Technical Specifications (TS) requirements for nuclear power plants define the Limiting Conditions for Operation (LCOs) and Surveillance Requirements (SRs) to assure safety during operation. In general, these requirements are based on deterministic analysis and engineering judgments. Experiences with plant operation indicate that some elements of the requirements are unnecessarily restrictive, while a few may not be conducive to safety. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) Office of Research has sponsored research to develop systematic risk-based methods to improve various aspects of TS requirements. This handbook summarizes these risk-based methods. The scope of the handbook includes reliability and risk-based methods for evaluating allowed outage times (AOTs), scheduled or preventive maintenance, action statements requiring shutdown where shutdown risk may be substantial, surveillance test intervals (STIs), and management of plant configurations resulting from outages of systems, or components. For each topic, the handbook summarizes analytic methods with data needs, outlines the insights to be gained, lists additional references, and gives examples of evaluations.

Samanta, P.K.; Kim, I.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Mankamo, T. [Avaplan Oy, Espoo (Finland); Vesely, W.E. [Science Applications International Corp., Dublin, OH (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Final Report for LDRD Project 02-FS-009 Gigapixel Surveillance Camera  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The threats of terrorism and proliferation of weapons of mass destruction add urgency to the development of new techniques for surveillance and intelligence collection. For example, the United States faces a serious and growing threat from adversaries who locate key facilities underground, hide them within other facilities, or otherwise conceal their location and function. Reconnaissance photographs are one of the most important tools for uncovering the capabilities of adversaries. However, current imaging technology provides only infrequent static images of a large area, or occasional video of a small area. We are attempting to add a new dimension to reconnaissance by introducing a capability for large area video surveillance. This capability would enable tracking of all vehicle movements within a very large area. The goal of our project is the development of a gigapixel video surveillance camera for high altitude aircraft or balloon platforms. From very high altitude platforms (20-40 km altitude) it would be possible to track every moving vehicle within an area of roughly 100 km x 100 km, about the size of the San Francisco Bay region, with a gigapixel camera. Reliable tracking of vehicles requires a ground sampling distance (GSD) of 0.5 to 1 m and a framing rate of approximately two frames per second (fps). For a 100 km x 100 km area the corresponding pixel count is 10 gigapixels for a 1-m GSD and 40 gigapixels for a 0.5-m GSD. This is an order of magnitude beyond the 1 gigapixel camera envisioned in our LDRD proposal. We have determined that an instrument of this capacity is feasible.

Marrs, R E; Bennett, C L

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

276

Surveillance Guide - NSS 18.3 Verification of Authorization Basis Documentation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

VERIFICATION OF AUTHORIZATION BASIS DOCUMENTATION VERIFICATION OF AUTHORIZATION BASIS DOCUMENTATION 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is for the Facility Representative to verify that the facility's configuration and operations remain consistent with the authorization basis. As defined in DOE Notice 411.1-1B, the authorization basis consists of those aspects of the facility design basis and operational requirements relied upon by DOE to authorize operation. These aspects are considered to be important to the safety of the facility operations. The authorization basis is described in documents such as the facility safety analysis report and other documented safety analyses; hazard classification documents, and the Technical Safety Requirements, DOE- issued safety evaluation reports, and facility-specific commitments made in

277

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.13 Operations Aspects of Facility Chemistry and Unique Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OPERATIONS ASPECTS OF FACILITY CHEMISTRY AND UNIQUE PROCESSES OPERATIONS ASPECTS OF FACILITY CHEMISTRY AND UNIQUE PROCESSES 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that the contractor has provided for an effective interface between facility operations personnel and personnel responsible for operation of individual processes. The Facility Representative interviews facility and process operations personnel, observes ongoing work activities including shift rounds, and evaluates procedures and training for responding to off-normal or emergency conditions. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 2.2 DOE-STD-1032-93, Guide to Good Practices for Operations Aspects of Unique Processes 3.0 Requirements Implemented

278

Materials Reliability Program: Material Selection for the PWR Supplemental Surveillance Program (PSSP) (MRP-364)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of the methodical selection of previously irradiated and tested pressurized water reactor (PWR) surveillance specimens for use in a PWR Supplemental Surveillance Program (PSSP). The PSSP will consist of two supplemental surveillance capsules that will be irradiated in host PWR plants, thereby increasing the fluence of the surveillance specimens. When tested in ~2025, the PSSP capsules will yield a significant amount of high-fluence transition temperature shift (TTS) ...

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

279

1995 annual epidemiologic surveillance report for Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. A number of DOE sites participate in the Epidemiologic Surveillance Program. This program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of five or more consecutive workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, disabilities and deaths among current workers. This report provides a summary of epidemiologic surveillance data collected from the Hanford Site from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. The data were collected by a coordinator at Hanford and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and data analyses were carried out. The information in the main body of the report provides a descriptive analysis of the data collected from the site, and the appendices provides additional detail. The report also contains an expanded Glossary and an Explanation of Diagnostic Categories which gives examples of health conditions in each of the diagnostic categories.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

Advances in noise analysis for nuclear plant surveillance and diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

An automated surveillance and baseline noise signature acquisition system is being demonstrated at Sequoyah-1. A nonperturbing method is also being developed for monitoring the subcritical reactivity during initial core loading in LWRs, in fuel storage and processing facilities, and during postaccident recovery operations such as Three Mile Island-2. (DLC)

Fry, N.; Clapp, N.E. Jr.; Sides, W.H. Jr.; Mihalczo, J.T.; King, W.T.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Radioactivity in the environment: Sources, distribution and surveillance  

SciTech Connect

Radioactivity in the Environment provides the background and techniques necessary for understanding and monitoring today's radiological environment. It presents an overview of the entire field, including both natural and manmade sources of radiation, radiation distribution, and methods of environmental dose assessment, surveillance and measurement.

Kathren, R.L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

SURVEILLANCE OF PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS USING METEOSAT DERIVED IRRADIANCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which allow for a cheap and reliable check of the power production of grid connected PV systems. These checks are done by calculating the estimated output of the PV system with a simulation-model. The model Utrecht ABSTRACT In this paper, we describe a surveillance procedure for grid connected photovoltaic (PV

Heinemann, Detlev

283

A new paradigm for urban surveillance with vehicular sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider a new application paradigm of vehicular sensor networks (VSN). Currently, vehicles are equipped with forward facing cameras to assist forensic investigations of events by proactive image-capturing from streets and roads. Due to content redundancy ... Keywords: Cooperative storage, Intelligent transportation system, Mobile surveillance, Vehicular sensor networks

Xu Li; Hongyu Huang; Xuegang Yu; Wei Shu; Minglu Li; Min-You Wu

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Decontamination and decommissioning surveillance and maintenance report for FY 1991. Environmental Restoration Program  

SciTech Connect

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program has three distinct phases: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S&M); (2) decontamination and removal of hazardous materials and equipment (which DOE Headquarters in Washington, D.C., calls Phase I of remediation); and (3) decommissioning and ultimate disposal, regulatory compliance monitoring, and property transfer (which DOE Headquarters calls Phase II of remediation). A large part of D&D is devoted to S&M at each of the sites. Our S&M activities, which are performed on facilities awaiting decommissioning, are designed to minimize potential hazards to human health and the environment by: ensuring adequate containment of residual radioactive and hazardous materials; and, providing physical safety and security controls to minimize potential hazards to on-site personnel and the general public. Typically, we classify maintenance activities as either routine or special (major repairs). Routine maintenance includes such activities as painting, cleaning, vegetation control, minor structural repairs, filter changes, and building system(s) checks. Special maintenance includes Occupational Safety and Health Act facility upgrades, roof repairs, and equipment overhaul. Surveillance activities include inspections, radiological measurements, reporting, records maintenance, and security (as required) for controlling and monitoring access to facilities. This report summarizes out FY 1991 S&M activities for the Tennessee plant sites, which include the K-25 Site, the Gas Centrifuge facilities, ORNL, and the Y-12 Plant.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Y-12 Plant Decontamination and Decommissioning Program. Surveillance and Maintenance Plan, FY 1992--2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant is part of the Environmental Restoration (ER) and Waste Management (WM) Programs (ERWM). The objective of the ER Program is to provide Y-12 the capability to meet applicable environmental regulations through facility development activities and site remedial actions. The WM Program supports the ER program. The D and D Program provides collective management of sites within the Plant which are in need of decontamination and decommissioning efforts, prioritizes those areas in terms of health, safety, and environmental concerns, and implements the appropriate level of remedial action. The D and D Program provides support to identifiable facilities which formerly served one or more of the many Plant functions. Program activities include (1) surveillance and maintenance of facilities awaiting decommissioning; (2) planning safe and orderly facility decommissioning; and (3) implementing a program to accomplish facility disposition in a safe, cost effective, and timely manner. In order to achieve the first objective, a formal plan which documents the surveillance and maintenance needs for each facility has been prepared. This report provides this documentation for the Y-12 facilities currently included in the D and D Program, as well as those planned for future inclusion in the Program, and includes projected resource requirements for the planning period of FY 1993 through FY 2000.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

SUPPORTING SAFE STORAGE OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING MATERIALS THROUGH SCIENCE, ENGINEERING AND SURVEILLANCE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reductions in the size of the U. S. nuclear weapons arsenal resulted in the need to store large quantities of plutonium-bearing metals and oxides for prolonged periods of time. To assure that the excess plutonium from the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites was stored in a safe and environmentally friendly manner the plutonium-bearing materials are stabilized and packaged according to well developed criteria published as a DOE Standard. The packaged materials are stored in secure facilities and regular surveillance activities are conducted to assure continuing package integrity. The stabilization, packaging, storage and surveillance requirements were developed through extensive science and engineering activities including those related to: plutonium-environment interactions and container pressurization, corrosion and stress corrosion cracking, plutonium-container material interactions, loss of sealing capability and changes in heat transfer characteristics. This paper summarizes some of those activities and outlines ongoing science and engineering programs that assure continued safe and secure storage of the plutonium-bearing metals and oxides.

Dunn, K.; Chandler, G.; Gardner, C.; Louthan, M.; Mcclard, J.

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

287

Continuous Graph Partitioning for Camera Network Surveillance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Science's education programs, like the Workforce Development for Teachers and Scientists (WDTS that will prepare us to address energy and environmental challenges. WDTS aims to recruit and train a pipeline. To this end, WDTS sponsors workforce training and education programs, often based at DOE's national

Bullo, Francesco

288

Poisson Regression Analysis of Illness and Injury Surveillance Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) uses illness and injury surveillance to monitor morbidity and assess the overall health of the work force. Data collected from each participating site include health events and a roster file with demographic information. The source data files are maintained in a relational data base, and are used to obtain stratified tables of health event counts and person time at risk that serve as the starting point for Poisson regression analysis. The explanatory variables that define these tables are age, gender, occupational group, and time. Typical response variables of interest are the number of absences due to illness or injury, i.e., the response variable is a count. Poisson regression methods are used to describe the effect of the explanatory variables on the health event rates using a log-linear main effects model. Results of fitting the main effects model are summarized in a tabular and graphical form and interpretation of model parameters is provided. An analysis of deviance table is used to evaluate the importance of each of the explanatory variables on the event rate of interest and to determine if interaction terms should be considered in the analysis. Although Poisson regression methods are widely used in the analysis of count data, there are situations in which over-dispersion occurs. This could be due to lack-of-fit of the regression model, extra-Poisson variation, or both. A score test statistic and regression diagnostics are used to identify over-dispersion. A quasi-likelihood method of moments procedure is used to evaluate and adjust for extra-Poisson variation when necessary. Two examples are presented using respiratory disease absence rates at two DOE sites to illustrate the methods and interpretation of the results. In the first example the Poisson main effects model is adequate. In the second example the score test indicates considerable over-dispersion and a more detailed analysis attributes the over-dispersion to extra-Poisson variation. The R open source software environment for statistical computing and graphics is used for analysis. Additional details about R and the data that were used in this report are provided in an Appendix. Information on how to obtain R and utility functions that can be used to duplicate results in this report are provided.

Frome E.L., Watkins J.P., Ellis E.D.

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

289

Health Surveillance Outcomes in Former Rocky Flats Radiation Workers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surveillance of Rocky Flats Radiation Workers Surveillance of Rocky Flats Radiation Workers Janice P. Watkins 1 , Elizabeth D. Ellis 1 , F. Joseph Furman 2 , Roger B. Falk 2 , Joe M. Aldrich 2 , and Donna L. Cragle 1 ORAU Technical Report # 2006-0408 1 Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Center for Epidemiologic Research; P.O. Box 117; Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0117 2 Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Center for Epidemiologic Research; 9950 W. 80 th Avenue, Suite 17; Arvada, CO 80005-3914 This report was funded by Department of Energy Environmental Health Division under contract number DE-AC05-00OR22750. Table of Contents List of Figures.................................................................................................................2 List of Tables

290

Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Data Report for Calendar Year 2008  

SciTech Connect

Environmental surveillance on and around the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The environmental surveillance data collected for this report provide a historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and Hanford Site operations. Data were also collected to monitor several chemicals and metals in Columbia River water, sediment, and wildlife. These data are included in this appendix. This report is the first of two appendices that support "Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2008" (PNNL-18427), which describes the Hanford Site mission and activities, general environmental features, radiological and chemical releases from operations, status of compliance with environmental regulations, status of programs to accomplish compliance, Hanford Site cleanup and remediation efforts, and environmental monitoring activities and results.

Bisping, Lynn E.

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

291

The Westinghouse Electric Corporation Reactor Vessel Radiation Surveillance Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Westinghouse recognized that the disruption of the atomic lattice of metals by collision from energetic neutrons could alter the properties of the metals to such an extent that the changes could be of engineering significance. Furthermore, it was recognized that a physical-metallurgical phenomenon such as aging, both thermal and mechanical, also could alter the properties of a metal over its service life. Because of the potential changes in properties, reactor vessel radiation surveillance programs to monitor the effect of neutron radiation and other environmental factors on the reactor vessel materials during operational conditions over the life of the plant were initiated for Westinghouse plants with the insertion of reactor vessel material radiation surveillance capsules into the Yankee Atomic Company's Yankee Rowe plant in 1961.

Mayer, T.R.; Anderson, S.L.; Yanichko, S.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Hanford Site Environmental Surveillance Data Report for Calendar Year 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental surveillance on and around the Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington State, is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, which is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy. The environmental surveillance data collected for this report provide a historical record of radionuclide and radiation levels attributable to natural causes, worldwide fallout, and Hanford Site operations. Data were also collected to monitor several chemicals and metals in Columbia River water, sediment, and wildlife. These data are included in this appendix. This report is the first of two appendices that support "Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007" (PNNL-17603), which describes the Hanford Site mission and activities, general environmental features, radiological and chemical releases from operations, status of compliance with environmental regulations, status of programs to accomplish compliance, Hanford Site cleanup and remediation efforts, and environmental monitoring activities and results.

Bisping, Lynn E.

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

293

Enhanced surveillance program FY97 accomplishments. Progress report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report is one volume of the Enhanced Surveillance Program (ESP) FY97 Accomplishments. The complete accomplishments report consists of 11 volumes. Volume 1 includes an ESP overview and a summary of selected unclassified FY97 program highlights. Volume 1 specifically targets a general audience, reflecting about half of the tasks conducted in FY97 and emphasizing key program accomplishments and contributions. The remaining volumes of the accomplishments report are classified, organized by program focus area, and present in technical detail the progress achieved in each of the 104 FY97 program tasks. Focus areas are as follows: pits; high explosives; organics; dynamics; diagnostics; systems; secondaries; nonnuclear materials; nonnuclear components; and Surveillance Test Program upgrades.

Mauzy, A. [ed.; Laake, B. [comp.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Surveillance Guide - FPS 12.1 Life Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

LIFE SAFETY LIFE SAFETY 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is for the Facility Representative to verify that conditions in the plant provide an appropriate level of life safety for workers conducting operations in the plant. The surveillance also helps the Facility Representative evaluate the degree of compliance on the contractor's part with the DOE standards referenced below. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5483.1A, Occupational Safety and Health Programs for DOE Contractor Employees at Government-Owned Contractor- Operated Facilities 29 CFR 1910.37, Means of Egress 29 CFR 1910.38, Employee Emergency Plans and Fire Prevention Plans. DOE 5480.7A, Fire Protection (or DOE O 440.1A, Worker Protection Management ement for DOE Federal and Contractor Employees)

295

Surveillance Guide - OSS 19.11 Injury and Illness Record Keeping  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INJURY AND ILLNESS RECORDKEEPING INJURY AND ILLNESS RECORDKEEPING 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the contractor's process for identifying and recording data pertaining to occupational injuries and illnesses. The Facility Representative will benchmark the existing records regarding injuries and illnesses, against the source data maintained by individual field medical facilities. In addition, the Facility Representative will evaluate the contractor's compliance with the Department of Energy's (DOE) key requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE N 231.1, Environmental, Safety and Health Reporting Notice 2.2 DOE M 231.1, Environmental, Safety, and Health Reporting Manual 2.3 DOE Order 440.1A "Worker Protection Management for

296

Surveillance Guides - PTS 13.1 Radioactive And Hazardous Material Transportation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RADIOACTIVE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION RADIOACTIVE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TRANSPORTATION 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's programs, policies, and procedures to transport radioactive and hazardous materials off-site or to receive such materials for routine operations, treatment, storage, or disposal. The Facility Representative observes preparation of materials for shipment and receipt of materials and reviews specific documents to determine compliance with requirements imposed by DOE and by applicable regulations from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Department of Transportation. 2.0 References DOE O 460.1A, Packaging and Transportation Safety DOE O 460.2, Chg1, Departmental Materials Transportation and Packaging

297

Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the ORNL Decontamination and Decommissioning Program FY 1993--2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration D&D program. The purpose and objectivesof this program include: (1) surveillance and maintenance (S&M) of facilities awaiting decommissioning; (2) planning for the orderly decommissioning of these facilities; and (3) implementation of a program to accomplish facility disposition in a safe, cost-effective, and timely manner. Participating D&D contractors are required to prepare formal plans that document the S&M programs established for each site. This report has been prepared to provide this documentation for those facilities included in the ORNL D&D Program.

Ford, M.K.; Holder, L. Jr.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps. This system provides a means for early detection of pump or sensor degradation. Degradation is determined through the use of a statistical analysis technique, sequential probability ratio test, applied to information from several sensors which are responsive to differing physical parameters. The results of sequential testing of the data provide the operator with an early warning of possible sensor or pump failure.

Gross, Kenny C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Singer, Ralph M. (Naperville, IL); Humenik, Keith E. (Columbia, MD)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report describes an expert system for online surveillance of nuclear reactor coolant pumps. This system provides a means for early detection of pump or sensor degradation. Degradation is determined through the use of a statistical analysis technique, sequential probability ratio test, applied to information from several sensors which are responsive to differing physical parameters. The results of sequential testing of the data provide the operator with an early warning of possible sensor or pump failure.

Gross, K.C.; Singer, R.M.; Humenik, K.E.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

300

RELATIVE HUMIDITY TESTS IN SUPPORT OF THE 3013 STORAGE AND SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

Techniques to control the initial relative humidity over oxide/salt mixtures have been developed using cerium oxide as a surrogate for plutonium oxide. Such control is required to validate certain assumptions in the Department of Energy Standard DOE-STD-3013, and to provide essential information to support field surveillance at the storage sites for excess plutonium oxides. Concern over the validity of the assumption that corrosion induced degradation in 3013 containers could be controlled by assuring that the moisture content of any stored oxide/salt mixture was below 0.5 w t% arose when stress corrosion cracks were found in test samples exposed at room temperature to plutonium oxide/salt mixtures having a moisture content only marginally above 0.5 wt %. Additionally, analysis of the stress corrosion cracking observations suggests that the initial relative humidity over the oxide/salt mixture may play a major role in the cracking process. The investigations summarized in this report provide the procedures necessary to control the initial relative humidity to selected values within the range of 16 to 50% by controlling the loading relative humidity (18 to 60%) and the oxide/salt mixture water content (0.05 to 0.45 wt %). The studies also demonstrated that the initial relative humidity may be estimated by calculations using software EQ3/6. Cerium oxide/salt mixtures were used in this study because qualification tests with non-radioactive materials will reduce costs while increasing the breadth of the test programs required to support field surveillances of stored 3013 containers.

Mickalonis, J.; Duffey, J.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Sherwood Project (UMTRCA Title II) Reclamation Cell, Wellpinit, Washington, February 2001  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Maintenance Program and Maintenance Program Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the DOE Sherwood Project (UMTRCA Title II) Reclamation Cell Wellpinit, Washington February 2001 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC 01-06 Document Number S00204 DOE/Grand Junction Office Sherwood LTSP February 2001 Page iii Contents 1.0 Introduction............................................................................................................... 1-1 1.1 Purpose ..................................................................................................................... 1-1 1.2 Legal and Regulatory Requirements ........................................................................

302

Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Site A/Plot M Sites, Palos Forest Preserve, Cook COunty, Illinois  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Site A/Plot M Sites Palos Forest Preserve, Cook County, Illinois September 1999 Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Grand Junction Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-96GJ87335 Task Order Number MAC 99-06 Document Number S00218 DOE/Grand Junction Office Site A/Plot M LTSP September 1999 Page iii Contents 1.0 Introduction......................................................................................................................... 1- 1 1.1 Purpose....................................................................................................................... 1- 1 1.2 Legal and Regulatory Requirements.......................................................................... 1- 1

303

Quantifying requirements volatility effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an organization operating in the bancassurance sector we identified a low-risk IT subportfolio of 84 IT projects comprising together 16,500 function points, each project varying in size and duration, for which we were able to quantify its requirements ... Keywords: ?-ratio, ?-ratio, Compound monthly growth rate, IT dashboard, IT portfolio management, Quantitative IT portfolio management, Requirements churn, Requirements creep, Requirements metric, Requirements scrap, Requirements volatility, Requirements volatility dashboard, Scope creep, Volatility benchmark, Volatility tolerance factor

G. P. Kulk; C. Verhoef

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites (November 2012) Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites More Documents & Publications Title I Disposal Sites Annual Report Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Title II Disposal Sites Annual Report

305

Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites (November 2012) Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites More Documents & Publications Title I Disposal Sites Annual Report Process for Transition of Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites to the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management for Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Title II Disposal Sites Annual Report

306

Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance (LTS-O&M) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance (LTS-O&M) Long-Term Surveillance - Operations and Maintenance (LTS-O&M) Long-Term Surveillance – Operations and Maintenance (LTS-O&M) DOE established the Environmental Sciences Laboratory (ESL) in Grand Junction, Colorado, in 1991 to support its programs. ESL scientists perform applied research and laboratory-scale demonstrations of soil and groundwater remediation and treatment technologies. Capabilities Installation, monitoring, and operation of permeable reactive barriers Research of permeable reactive barriers and treatment cells Performance assessment and optimization of groundwater remediation systems Groundwater characterization Coupled hydrogeochemical modeling for groundwater remediation

307

Use of INSAR in surveillance and control of a large field project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Depositional Settings, South Belridge Field, Kern County,Surveillance of South Belridge Diatomite. in Proceedings ofSubsidence in the South Belridge Oil Field, California. in

Patzek, T.W.; Silin, D.B.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Use of INSAR in surveillance and control of a large field project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characterization and Waterflood Monitoring. in 2000 SPET. W. SPE 59295: Waterflood surveillance and supervisoryI NTRODUCTION A successful waterflood depends on the proper

Patzek, T.W.; Silin, D.B.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

BER Requirements Review 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network Requirements...

310

ASCR Requirements Review 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network Requirements...

311

TVDG Training Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training Requirements TVDG Training Requirements information is now located at: http:www.bnl.govuserscenterTrainingtandem.asp. You will automatically be taken to the new...

312

Real-time wideband cylindrical holographic surveillance system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A wideband holographic cylindrical surveillance system is disclosed including a transceiver for generating a plurality of electromagnetic waves; antenna for transmitting the electromagnetic waves toward a target at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; the transceiver also receiving and converting electromagnetic waves reflected from the target to electrical signals at a plurality of predetermined positions in space; a computer for processing the electrical signals to obtain signals corresponding to a holographic reconstruction of the target; and a display for displaying the processed information to determine nature of the target. The computer has instructions to apply Fast Fourier Transforms and obtain a three dimensional cylindrical image. 13 figs.

Sheen, D.M.; McMakin, D.L.; Hall, T.E.; Severtsen, R.H.

1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

313

Using Web and Social Media for Influenza Surveillance  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of Google influenza-like-illness (ILI) search queries has shown a strongly correlated pattern with Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and Prevention seasonal ILI reporting data.Web and social media provide another resource to detect increases in ILI. This paper evaluates trends in blog posts that discuss influenza. Our key finding is that from 5-October 2008 to 31-January 2009 a high correlation exists between the frequency of posts, containing influenza keywords, per week and CDC influenza-like-illness surveillance data.

Corley, Courtney D.; Cook, Diane; Mikler, Armin R.; Singh, Karan P.

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

314

Repository seals requirements study  

SciTech Connect

The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. This report presents the results of a repository sealing requirements study. Sealing is defined as the permanent closure of the shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes. Sealing includes those components that would reduce potential inflows above the repository, or that would divert flow near the repository horizon to allow vertical infiltration to below the repository. Sealing of such features as emplacement drifts was not done in this study because the current capability to calculate fracture flow into the drifts is not sufficiently mature. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

NONE

1997-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

315

Repository seals requirement study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

NONE

1997-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

316

Equipment Operational Requirements  

SciTech Connect

The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

317

1996 Savannah River Site annual epidemiologic surveillance report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of epidemiologic surveillance data collected from Savannah River Site from January 1, 1996 through December 31, 1996. The data were collected by a coordinator at Savannah River Site and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and preliminary data analyses were carried out. The analyses were interpreted and the final report prepared by the DOE Office of Epidemiologic Studies. The information in this report provides highlights of the data analyses conducted on the 1996 data collected from Savannah River Site. The main sections of the report include: work force characteristics; absences due to injury or illness lasting 5 or more consecutive workdays; workplace illnesses, injuries, and deaths that were reportable to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (''OSHA-recordable'' events); and disabilities and deaths among current workers. The 1996 report includes a new section on time trends that provides comparative information on the health of the work force from 1994 through 1996.

None

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

1997 Savannah River Site annual epidemiologic surveillance report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a summary of epidemiologic surveillance data collected from Savannah River Site from January 1, 1997 through December 31, 1997. The data were collected by a coordinator at Savannah River Site and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and preliminary data analyses were carried out. The analyses were interpreted and the final report prepared by the DOE Office of Epidemiologic Studies. The information in this report provides highlights of the data analyses conducted on the 1997 data collected from Savannah River Site. The main sections of the report include: work force characteristics; absences due to injury or illness lasting 5 or more consecutive workdays; workplace illnesses, injuries, and deaths that were reportable to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (''OSHA-recordable'' events); and disabilities and deaths among current workers. The 199 7 report includes a section on time trends that provides comparative information on the health of the work force from 1994 through 1997.

None

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Annual report for Brookhaven National Laboratory 1994 epidemiologic surveillance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Epidemiologic surveillance at DOE facilities consists of regular and systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on absences due to illness and injury in the work force. Its purpose is to provide an early warning system for health problems occurring among employees at participating sites. Data are collected by coordinators at each site and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and analyses are carried out. Rates of absences and rates of diagnoses associated with absences are analyzed by occupation and other relevant variables. They may be compared with the disease experience of different groups within the DOE work force and with populations that do not work for DOE to identify disease patterns or clusters that may be associated with work activities. In this annual report, the 1994 morbidity data for BNL are summarized. These analyses focus on absences of 5 or more consecutive workdays occurring among workers aged 16-80 years. They are arranged in five sets of tables that present: (1) the distribution of the labor force by occupational category and salary status; (2) the absences per person, diagnoses per absence, and diagnosis rates for the whole work force; (3) diagnosis rates by type of disease or injury; (4) diagnosis rates by occupational category; and (5) relative risks for specific types of disease or injury by occupational category.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Long-term underwater camera surveillance for monitoring and analysis of fish populations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Long-term underwater camera surveillance for monitoring and analysis of fish populations Bastiaan J Laboratories, Taiwan Abstract Long-term monitoring of the underwater environ- ment is still labour intensive work. Using underwater surveillance cameras to monitor this environment has the potential advantage

Fisher, Bob

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Survey and analysis of multimodal sensor planning and integration for wide area surveillance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although sensor planning in computer vision has been a subject of research for over two decades, a vast majority of the research seems to concentrate on two particular applications in a rather limited context of laboratory and industrial workbenches, ... Keywords: Sensor planning, cooperative sensing, multimodal sensing, persistent surveillance, threat object recognition, ubiquitous surveillance, wireless sensor network

Besma R. Abidi; Nash R. Aragam; Yi Yao; Mongi A. Abidi

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Sink placement on a 3D terrain for border surveillance in wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With their distributed nature and redundant operation capability, wireless sensor networks are very suitable for border surveillance scenarios that track intruders trying to breach to a safe side. In such scenarios, keeping the operation going on for ... Keywords: Border surveillance, Discrete event simulation, Genetic algorithms, Sink placement, Three dimensional terrain, Wireless sensor networks

Rabun Kosar; Cem Ersoy

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

BWRVIP-239: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Updated Evaluation of the Integrated Surveillance Program (ISP) Capsule Withdrawal Sch edule  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates updated reactor pressure vessel and surveillance capsule fluence data for potential impacts on the Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project Integrated Surveillance Program (BWRVIP ISP) capsule withdrawal schedule.

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

324

V-202: Cisco Video Surveillance Manager Bugs Let Remote Users Obtain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Cisco Video Surveillance Manager Bugs Let Remote Users 2: Cisco Video Surveillance Manager Bugs Let Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information V-202: Cisco Video Surveillance Manager Bugs Let Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information July 25, 2013 - 2:52am Addthis PROBLEM: A remote user can obtain potentially sensitive information and modify some configuration settings. A remote user can exploit this to create, modify, and remove camera feeds, archives, logs, and users. PLATFORM: Cisco Video Surveillance Manager 7.1, 7.5 ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in Cisco Video Surveillance Manager REFERENCE LINKS: Security Tracker Alert ID: 1028827 CVE-2013-3429 CVE-2013-3430 CVE-2013-3431 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: The vulnerability is due to an access control error that occurred. The

325

Follow-up Audit on Stockpile Surveillance Testing, IG-0744 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Follow-up Audit on Stockpile Surveillance Testing, IG-0744 Follow-up Audit on Stockpile Surveillance Testing, IG-0744 Follow-up Audit on Stockpile Surveillance Testing, IG-0744 Significant backlogs existed in each of the three types of tests Surveillance Testing conducted in the Surveillance Testing Program---laboratory tests, flight tests, and component tests---as of September 30? 2005. Laboratory tests are conducted on weapons' non-nuclear systems to detect defects due to handling, aging, manufacturing, or design. Flight tests involve dropping or launching a weapon, with its nuclear components removed, to assess performance and reliability. Component tests involve the destructive analysis of the five primary weapon components: pits, secondaries, detonators, cable assemblies, and the gas transfer valves systems

326

Follow-up Audit on Stockpile Surveillance Testing, IG-0744 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Follow-up Audit on Stockpile Surveillance Testing, IG-0744 Follow-up Audit on Stockpile Surveillance Testing, IG-0744 Follow-up Audit on Stockpile Surveillance Testing, IG-0744 Significant backlogs existed in each of the three types of tests Surveillance Testing conducted in the Surveillance Testing Program---laboratory tests, flight tests, and component tests---as of September 30? 2005. Laboratory tests are conducted on weapons' non-nuclear systems to detect defects due to handling, aging, manufacturing, or design. Flight tests involve dropping or launching a weapon, with its nuclear components removed, to assess performance and reliability. Component tests involve the destructive analysis of the five primary weapon components: pits, secondaries, detonators, cable assemblies, and the gas transfer valves systems

327

Admission Requirements Admission Requirements for Graduate Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

required reports. Such a candidate may, for a nominal fee and with the approval of his/her graduate advisor://www.utdallas.edu/admissions/graduate/degrees/ There is a $50.00 nonrefundable application fee. Applicants are advised to carefully review the program a bachelor's degree. Test Scores (GMAT, GRE) Standardized test scores must be official and reported directly

O'Toole, Alice J.

328

Final Report: Mobile Surveillance and Wireless Communication Systems Field Operational Test Volume 2: FOT Objectives, Organization, System Design, Results, Conclusions and Recommendations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for operation Mobile Surveillance and Wireless CommunicationDesign and Operation The mobile surveillance and wirelessAND WIRELESS COMMUNICATION SYSTEM DESIGN AND OPERATION .

Klein, Lawrence

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Requirement-Reviews.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Published 3 h%p:www.nersc.govsciencerequirements---reviews final---reports * Compurequirements f or 20132014 * Execurequirements * Case s...

330

Allocating Reserve Requirements (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of present and possible future ways to allocate and assign benefits for reserve requirements.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Collaborative Requirements Engineering Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... dependencies, safety, and environmental requirements) is essential to the ... Construction, and Operation of Constructed Facilities, March 2012. ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

332

Emergency Medical Treatment Required  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emergency Medical Treatment Required Non-Emergency Medical Treatment Required If possible, get help present if possible OptaComp will complete the "First Report of Injury or Illness" and authorize medical Investigation Report" to Environmental Health & Safety within 48 hours Emergency Medical Treatment Required

Weston, Ken

333

FES Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FES Science Network Requirements Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted March 13 and 14, 2008 #12;FES Science Network Requirements Workshop Fusion Energy Sciences Program Office, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network Gaithersburg, MD ­ March 13 and 14, 2008 ESnet

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

334

PIT Coating Requirements Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

MINTEER, D.J.

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

335

A Latent Model to Detect Multiple Spatial Clusters with Application in a Mobile Sensor Network for Surveillance of Nuclear Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surveillance of nuclear materials in major cities. The network consists of a large number of vehicles on which for Surveillance of Nuclear Materials Jerry Cheng, Minge Xie, Rong Chen and Fred Roberts1 Abstract Nuclear attacks to infrastructure. To deter such threats, it becomes increasingly vital to have sophisticated nuclear surveillance

336

DESIGN AND DEPLOYMENT OF A MOBILE SENSOR NETWORK FOR THE SURVEILLANCE OF NUCLEAR MATERIALS IN METROPOLITAN AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surveillance of nuclear materials in major cities. Specifically, the network consists of a large numberDESIGN AND DEPLOYMENT OF A MOBILE SENSOR NETWORK FOR THE SURVEILLANCE OF NUCLEAR MATERIALS, Rutgers University Piscataway, NJ 08854 Piscataway, NJ 08854 Key Words: Nuclear Detection and Surveillance

337

Former Worker Medical Screening Program Surveillance Case Definitions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8/11 8/11 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Surveillance case definitions Asbestosis without pleural disease: a reported history of exposure to asbestos, or job title with a reasonable likelihood of asbestos exposure plus a B-reading of standard PA chest film demonstrating bilateral irregular parenchymal opacities (shape and size: s,t,u) with profusion score of 1/0 or greater absence of a B-reader notation of findings of unilateral or bilateral pleural thickening consistent with pneumoconiosis not likely attributable to another agent known to cause pneumoconiosis Asbestosis with pleural disease: a reported history of exposure to asbestos, or job title with a reasonable likelihood of asbestos exposure plus a B-reading of standard PA chest film demonstrating bilateral irregular

338

NDLGS: Technology to enhance surveillance | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NDLGS: Technology to ... NDLGS: Technology to ... NDLGS: Technology to enhance surveillance Posted: February 11, 2013 - 2:54pm | Y-12 Report | Volume 9, Issue 2 | 2013 A new technology, created to assess gases within a weapon component without destroying the part, is expected to save taxpayers millions of dollars and to benefit multiple industries outside the Nuclear Security Enterprise. A new technology, created to assess gases within a weapon component without destroying the part, is expected to save taxpayers millions of dollars and to benefit multiple industries outside the Nuclear Security Enterprise. Scientists and engineers from Los Alamos National Laboratory, Y-12 and the Pantex Plant have collaboratively fashioned a new process to sample gases within a weapon component. This process, called the nondestructive

339

Epidemiologic surveillance. Annual report for Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Epidemiologic surveillance at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities consists of regular and systematic collection, analysis, and interpretation of data on absences due to illness and injury in the work force. Its purpose is to provide an early warning system for health problems occurring among employees at participating sites. In this annual report, the 1994 morbidity data for the Savannah River Site (SRS) are summarized. These analyses focus on absences of 5 or more consecutive workdays occurring among workers aged 16-75 years. They are arranged in five sets of tables that present: (1) the distribution of the labor force by occupational category and salary status; (2) the absences per person, diagnoses per absences, and diagnosis rates for the whole work force; (3) diagnosis rates by type of disease or injury; (4) diagnosis rates by occupational category; and (5) relative risks for specific types of disease or injury by occupational category.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1991. Environmental protection group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the environmental surveillance program conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory during 1991. Routine monitoring for radiation and for radioactive and chemical materials is conducted on the Laboratory site as well as in the surrounding region. Monitoring results are used to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to permit early identification of potentially undesirable trends. Results and interpretation of data for 1991 cover external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions and effluents; concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs; and environmental compliance. Comparisons with appropriate standards, regulations, and background levels provide the basis for concluding that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment.

Dewart, J.; Kohen, K.L. [comps.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Former Worker Medical Screening Program Surveillance Case Definitions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8/11 8/11 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Surveillance case definitions Asbestosis without pleural disease: a reported history of exposure to asbestos, or job title with a reasonable likelihood of asbestos exposure plus a B-reading of standard PA chest film demonstrating bilateral irregular parenchymal opacities (shape and size: s,t,u) with profusion score of 1/0 or greater absence of a B-reader notation of findings of unilateral or bilateral pleural thickening consistent with pneumoconiosis not likely attributable to another agent known to cause pneumoconiosis Asbestosis with pleural disease: a reported history of exposure to asbestos, or job title with a reasonable likelihood of asbestos exposure plus a B-reading of standard PA chest film demonstrating bilateral irregular

342

Transportation System Requirements Document  

SciTech Connect

This Transportation System Requirements Document (Trans-SRD) describes the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of this document is to define the system-level requirements for Transportation consistent with the CRWMS Requirement Document (CRD). These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presents an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. The interface identification and description are published in the CRWMS Interface Specification.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

ASCR Science Network Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2009 ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by ASCR. The ASCR facilities anticipate significant increases in wide area bandwidth utilization, driven largely by the increased capabilities of computational resources and the wide scope of collaboration that is a hallmark of modern science. Many scientists move data sets between facilities for analysis, and in some cases (for example the Earth System Grid and the Open Science Grid), data distribution is an essential component of the use of ASCR facilities by scientists. Due to the projected growth in wide area data transfer needs, the ASCR supercomputer centers all expect to deploy and use 100 Gigabit per second networking technology for wide area connectivity as soon as that deployment is financially feasible. In addition to the network connectivity that ESnet provides, the ESnet Collaboration Services (ECS) are critical to several science communities. ESnet identity and trust services, such as the DOEGrids certificate authority, are widely used both by the supercomputer centers and by collaborations such as Open Science Grid (OSG) and the Earth System Grid (ESG). Ease of use is a key determinant of the scientific utility of network-based services. Therefore, a key enabling aspect for scientists beneficial use of high performance networks is a consistent, widely deployed, well-maintained toolset that is optimized for wide area, high-speed data transfer (e.g. GridFTP) that allows scientists to easily utilize the services and capabilities that the network provides. Network test and measurement is an important part of ensuring that these tools and network services are functioning correctly. One example of a tool in this area is the recently developed perfSONAR, which has already shown its usefulness in fault diagnosis during the recent deployment of high-performance data movers at NERSC and ORNL. On the other hand, it is clear that there is significant work to be done in the area of authentication and access control - there are currently compatibility problems and differing requirements between the authentication systems in use at different facilities, and the policies and mechanisms in use at different facilities are sometimes in conflict. Finally, long-term software maintenance was of concern for many attendees. Scientists rely heavily on a large deployed base of software that does not have secure programmatic funding. Software packages for which this is true include data transfer tools such as GridFTP as well as identity management and other software infrastructure that forms a critical part of the Open Science Grid and the Earth System Grid.

Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

344

Mandatory Supervisory Training Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Supervisory Training Requirements Mandatory Supervisory Training Requirements All DOE supervisors, managers, and executives will comply with mandatory supervisory training requirements (5 CFR 412; 5 CFR 315.801; 5 CFR 315.901; DOE O 360.1; and DOE O 320.1): * New supervisors: 80 hours of supervisory training, with 40 hours required to be completed during the supervisory probationary period. * Experienced supervisors: minimum of 8 hours of supervisory training each year. The Office of Learning and Workforce Development has developed an inventory of training and developmental activities that will meet the supervisory training requirements. The DOE courses Supervisory Essentials (32 hours) and Navigating the Federal Hiring Process (8 hours) are required to fulfill the first year 40-hour training

345

Management requirements for accreditation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... handbook, shall be defined in the quality manual. ... It is a fundamental requirement that the results ... NIST Handbook 150 (and ISO/IEC 17025) details ...

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

346

Public Safety Network Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... need excellent situational awareness in order to do their jobs effectively. ... performance requirements as shown in Figure 2. This analysis was used ...

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

347

CCI: Program Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Your Arrival Your First Day Weekly Activities Program Requirements Checkout FAQ The DOE WDTS site has comprehensive information on Participant Obligations. Consult that site for...

348

Public Safety Network Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Usage scenario. ... imposed by public safety applications and usage scenarios is key in ... requirements as shown in Figure 2. This analysis was used as ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

349

ASCR Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASCR Science Network Requirements Office of AdvancedScientific Computing Research, DOE Office of ScienceEnergy Sciences Network Gaithersburg, MD — April 15 and 16,

Dart, Eli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

New Employee Training Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

All New Employees New Supervisors New Employee Training Requirements Welcome to Berkeley Lab We value you and the talents that you bring to our workplace. The training listed...

351

Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) System Security Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report identifies key cyber security requirements and suggests basic security approaches for safeguarding the many interfaces of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) systems. These requirements, which were developed through a clearly defined security assessment procedure, are generic; but they can be used to develop more specific security requirements based on actual configurations and environments.

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

352

LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN FOR THE GREEN RIVER, UTAH DISPOSAL SITE Ttable of Contents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN FOR THE LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN FOR THE GREEN RIVER, UTAH DISPOSAL SITE Ttable of Contents DOE/AL/62350-89 May 20, 1998 REV. 1 VER.4 08914TOC.DOC (GRN) i TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Page 1.0 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................. 1-1 1.1 Background .................................................................................................... 1- 2 1.2 Licensing process ........................................................................................ 1-2 1.3. Acquisition .............................................................................................. 1-2 1.4 Long-term surveillance plan .................................................................... 1-3

353

Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance at Rocky Flats: Early Experiences and Lessons Learned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Rocky Flats Site was established in 1951 as part of the United States' nationwide nuclear weapons complex to manufacture nuclear weapons components. In 1992 weapons production halted, and the Rocky Flats mission changed to include environmental investigations, cleanup, and site closure. In October 2005, DOE and its contractor completed an accelerated 10-year, $7 billion cleanup of chemical and radiological contamination left from nearly 50 years of production. The cleanup required the decommissioning, decontamination, demolition, and removal of more than 800 structures; removal of more than 500,000 cubic meters of low-level radioactive waste; and remediation of more than 360 potentially contaminated environmental sites. The final remedy for the site was selected in September 2006 and included institutional controls, physical controls, and continued monitoring for the former industrial portion of the site. The remainder of the site, which served as a buffer zone surrounding the former industrial area, was transferred to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in July 2007 for a national wildlife refuge. DOE's Office of Legacy Management is responsible for the long-term surveillance and maintenance of Rocky Flats, which includes remedy implementation activities and general site maintenance. Several factors have complicated the transition from closure to post-closure at Rocky Flats. The early experiences associated with the two years since the physical cleanup and closure work were completed have led to several valuable lessons learned. (authors)

Surovchak, S. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management, Westminster, CO (United States); Kaiser, L.; DiSalvo, R.; Boylan, J.; Squibb, G.; Nelson, J.; Darr, B.; Hanson, M. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Westminster, CO (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Integrated Management Requirements mapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains five appendices documenting how Sandia implemented the DOE Conduct of Operations (5480.19) and DOE Quality Assurance (5700.6C) orders. It provides a mapping of the Sandia integrated requirements to the specific requirements of each Order and a mapping to Sandia's approved program for implementing the Conduct of Operations Order.

Holmes, J.T.; Andrews, N.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

WATER REQUIREMENTS FOR A RADIOCHEMICAL PROCESSING PLANT  

SciTech Connect

A survey of the water requirements is presented for a hypothetical plant to process all the fuel from a 15,000Mwe nuclear economy. For each processing plant, specific requirements must be based on a detailed water survey which includes water quality, process requirements, and in-plant conservation plans. These considerations are discussed and the quantitative requirements are listed. (J.R.D.)

Harrington, F.E.

1962-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

356

GAO-05-274 Contract Management: Opportunities to Improve Surveillance on Department of Defense Service Contracts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary of Defense Secretary of Defense March 2005 CONTRACT MANAGEMENT Opportunities to Improve Surveillance on Department of Defense Service Contracts GAO-05-274 What GAO Found United States Government Accountability Office Why GAO Did This Study Highlights Accountability Integrity Reliability www.gao.gov/cgi-bin/getrpt?GAO-05-274. To view the full product, including the scope and methodology, click on the link above. For more information, contact David E. Cooper at (617) 788-0555 or cooperd@gao.gov. Highlights of GAO-05-274, a report to the Secretary of Defense March 2005 CONTRACT MANAGEMENT Opportunities to Improve Surveillance on Department of Defense Service Contracts Surveillance varied on the 90 contracts we reviewed. Surveillance was insufficient on 26 of the contracts we reviewed but was sufficient on

357

EA-1782: Avian and Bat Surveillance and Assessment Plan Timeline and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

82: Avian and Bat Surveillance and Assessment Plan Timeline 82: Avian and Bat Surveillance and Assessment Plan Timeline and Deliverables EA-1782: Avian and Bat Surveillance and Assessment Plan Timeline and Deliverables Avian and Bat Surveillance and Assessment Plan Timeline and Deliverables The University of Delaware, College of Earth Ocean and Environment (hereinafter CEOE) has constructed a 2MW Gamesa G90 Wind Turbine immediately adjacent to the College's Lewes, Delaware campus. Prior to construction of the turbine, CEOE commissioned an evaluation of the impact of a single turbine in the dredge spoil area adjacent to our campus. The conclusion of that evaluation was that "impacts are likely to be minimal and not biologically significant." (Phase I Avian Risk Assessment, Kerlinger and Guarnaccia, January 2010, incorporated as Appendix D to DOE

358

Surface Environmental Surveillance Procedures Manual, PNL-MA-580, Rev. 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This manual contains the procedures that are used for the collection of routine Surface Environmental Surveillance Project environmental samples and field measurements on and around the Hanford Site. Specific responsibilities for project personnel are also defined.

Hanf, Robert W.; Poston, Ted M.; Bisping, Lynn E.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

The Next-Generation Multimission U.S. Surveillance Radar Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Government operates seven distinct radar networks, providing weather and aircraft surveillance for public weather services, air traffic control, and homeland defense. In this paper, we describe a next-generation multimission phased-array ...

Mark E. Weber; John Y. N. Cho; Jeffrey S. Herd; James M. Flavin; William E. Benner; Garth S. Torok

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Large Forecast Degradations due to Synoptic Surveillance during the 2004 and 2005 Hurricane Seasons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Though operational tropical cyclone synoptic surveillance generally leads to smaller track forecast errors in the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Global Forecasting System (GFS) than would occur otherwise, not every case is ...

Sim D. Aberson

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

An evidential fusion architecture for people surveillance in wide open areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new evidential fusion architecture is proposed to build an hybrid artificial intelligent system for people surveillance in wide open areas. Authorized people and intruders are identified and localized thanks to the joint employment of cameras and RFID ...

M. Fornaciari; D. Sottara; A. Prati; P. Mello; R. Cucchiara

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

The wired wilderness : electronic surveillance and environmental values in wildlife biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the second half of the twentieth century, American wildlife biologists incorporated Cold War-era surveillance technologies into their practices in order to render wild animals and their habitats legible and manageable. ...

Benson, Etienne Samuel

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Full SPP Partnership Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partnership Requirements: Partnership Requirements: ENERGY STAR Partnership for Commercial & Industrial Service and Product Providers (SPP) Eligible Organizations Companies providing energy efficiency services and products to commercial buildings and industrial manufacturing facilities/plants are eligible for the Service and Product Provider (SPP) partnership, but must meet certain requirements as specified below. Types of eligible companies include: architecture, distributor, energy consultant/energy management services, energy improvement contractor, energy information services, energy services company (ESCO), engineering, equipment manufacturer, financial services, on-site energy production services, unregulated energy retailer and marketer, or other supplier of standard energy-efficient products and/or services for commercial buildings and/or

364

2006 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

365

2010 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

366

2008 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

367

2007 Oak Ridge National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

368

2010 East Tennessee Technology Park Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

369

2010 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

370

2010 Y-12 National Security Complex Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

2010 Nevada National Security Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

372

2009 Y-12 National Security Complex Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

373

2008 Y-12 National Security Complex Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

374

2007 Los Alamos National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

375

2008 East Tennessee Technology Park Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

376

2008 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

377

2010 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

378

2010 Nevada National Security Site Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

379

2010 Y-12 National Security Complex Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

380

2010 East Tennessee Technology Park Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

2003 Pantex Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Pantex Plant. DOE is commited to assuring the health and safety of its workers. This includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

382

Tank farm surveillance and waste status summary report for May 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

2003 Kansas City Plant Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007  

SciTech Connect

Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the Kansas City Plant. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2007-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

384

Outpatient physician billing data for age and setting specific syndromic surveillance of influenza-like illnesses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Syndromic surveillance is a novel automated approach to monitoring influenza activity, but there is no consensus regarding the most informative data sources for use within such a system. By comparing physician billing data from Quebec, Canada and hospital ... Keywords: ACIP, ARIMA, Age factors, Ambulatory care, CCF, CDC, ED, Epidemiology, ICD-9, ILI, Immunization programs, Influenza, Human, Medical Records Systems, Computerized, P&I, Population surveillance, RAMQ, RSV, Seasons, Syndrome

Emily H. Chan; Robyn Tamblyn; Katia M. L. Charland; David L. Buckeridge

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Tank Farm surveillance and waste status summary report for April 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is the official inventory for radioactive waste stored in underground tanks in the 200 Areas at the Hanford Site. Data that depict the status of stored radioactive waste and tank vessel integrity are contained within the report. This report provides data on each of the existing 177 large underground waste storage tanks and 49 smaller catch tanks and special surveillance facilities, and supplemental information regarding tank surveillance anomalies and ongoing investigations.

Hanlon, B.M.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

2003 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007  

SciTech Connect

Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Brookhaven National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

387

Technical Safety Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Requirements Safety Requirements FUNCTIONAL AREA GOAL: Contractor has developed, maintained, and received DOE Field Office Approval for the necessary operating conditions of a facility. The facility has also maintained an inventory of safety class and safety significant systems and components. REQUIREMENTS:  10 CFR 830.205, Nuclear Safety Rule.  DOE-STD-3009-2002, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses.  DOE-STD-1186-2004, Specific Administrative Controls. Guidance:  DOE G 423.1-1, Implementation Guide for Use in Developing Technical Safety Requirements.  NSTP 2003-1, Use of Administrative Controls for Specific Safety Functions. Performance Objective 1: Contractor Program Documentation

388

BES Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedOffice of Basic Energy Sciences. This is LBNL report LBNL-BES Science Network Requirements Report of the Basic Energy

Dart, Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

NSLS II: Authentication Required  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Pages Login Access to this area of the NSLS-II website requires a valid username and password. Username: Password: Next > Last Modified: April 2, 2013 Please forward all...

390

Summary of environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995  

SciTech Connect

Linking the Rio Grande Valley and the Jemez Mountains, New Mexico`s Pajarito Plateau is home to a world-class scientific institution. Los Alamos National Laboratory (or the Laboratory), managed by the Regents of the University of California, is a government-owned, Department of Energy-supervised complex investigating all areas of modern science for the purposes of national defense, health, conservation, and ecology. The Laboratory was founded in 1943 as part of the Manhattan Project, whose members assembled to create the first nuclear weapon. Occupying the campus of the Los Alamos Ranch School, American and British scientists gathered on the isolated mesa tops to harness recently discovered nuclear power with the hope of ending World War II. In July 1945, the initial objective of the Laboratory, a nuclear device, was achieved in Los Alamos and tested in White Sands, New Mexico. Today the Laboratory continues its role in defense, particularly in nuclear weapons, including developing methods for safely handling weapons and managing waste. For the past twenty years, the Laboratory has published an annual environmental report. This pamphlet offers a synopsis that briefly explains important concepts, such as radiation and provides a summary of the monitoring results and regulatory compliance status that are explained at length in the document entitled Environmental Surveillance at Los Alamos during 1995.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Weighting and Bayes Nets for Rollup of Surveillance Metrics  

SciTech Connect

The LANL IKE team proposes that the surveillance metrics for several data stream that are used to detect the same failure mode be weighted. Similarly, the failure mode metrics are weighted to obtain a subsystem metric. E.g., if there n data streams (nodes 1-n), the failure mode (node 0) metric is obtained as M{sub 0} = w{sub 1}M{sub 1} + {hor_ellipsis} + w{sub n}M{sub n}, where {Sigma}{sub i=1}{sup n} w{sub i} = 1. This proposal has been implemented with Bayes Nets using the Netica/IKE software by specifying an appropriate conditional probability table (CPT). This CPT is calculated using the same form as (1), where the data stream metrics for the true (T) and false (F) states are replaced by 1 and 0, respectively. Then using this CPT, the failure mode metric calculated by Netica/IKE equals (1). This result has two nice features. First, the rollup Bayes nets is doing can be easily explained. Second, because Bayes Nets can implement this rollup using Netica/IKE, then data marshalling (allocating next year's budget) can be studied. A proof that the claim 'failure mode metric calculated by Netica/IKE equals (1)' for n = 2 and n = 3 follows as well as the sketch of a proof by induction for general n.

Henson, Kriste [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sentz, Kari [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hamada, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

392

PROCEDURES AND GENERAL REQUIREMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... system, or an environmental management system. ... record- keeping, and data base management. ... eg, word processing, database and statistical ...

2010-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

393

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement The owner or operator of a diesel powered vehicle must limit the length of time their vehicle remains idle. The limit is based on the outside

394

Regulators, Requirements, Statutes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulators, Requirements, Statutes Regulators, Requirements, Statutes Regulators, Requirements, Statutes The Laboratory must comply with environmental laws and regulations that apply to Laboratory operations. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Environmental laws and regulations LANL complies with more than 30 state and federal regulations and policies designed to protect human health and the environment. Regulators Regulators Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) EPA Homepage EPA - Region VI U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) DOE Homepage DOE Environmental Policy DOE Citizen's Advisory Board U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) Southwest Region 2 New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) NMED Homepage NMED DOE Oversight Office

395

VFP: Program Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Requirements Program Requirements Home Welcome Researcher! Preparing for Your Visit Your Arrival Your First Day Weekly Activities Program Requirements Checkout FAQ The DOE WDTS site has comprehensive information on Participant Obligations. Consult that site for more information on all deliverables except the Fermilab Summer Interns website. Attendance: Complete the full ten-week program and attend all scheduled events including lectures, tours and group activities. Entrance Survey: Complete the entrance survey within your first week at Fermilab. One-page Peer Review Provide a one-page written peer review of another SULI intern' talk or poster. Abstract for General Audience Complete and submit an abstract summarizing your research experience. Oral or Poster Presentation: Deliver an oral or poster presentation to mentors and peers the final week

396

BER Science Network Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Network Network Requirements Report of the Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements Workshop Conducted July 26 and 27, 2007 BER Science Network Requirements Workshop Biological and Environmental Research Program Office, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network Bethesda, MD - July 26 and 27, 2007 ESnet is funded by the US Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program. Dan Hitchcock is the ESnet Program Manager. ESnet is operated by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, which is operated by the University of California for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. This work was supported by the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Facilities Division, and the Office of Biological &

397

SULI: Program Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Requirements Program Requirements Home Welcome Intern! Preparing for Your Internship Your Arrival Your First Day Weekly Activities Program Requirements Checkout FAQ The DOE WDTS site has comprehensive information on Participant Obligations. Consult that site for more information on all deliverables except the Fermilab Summer Interns website. Attendance: Complete the full ten-week program and attend all scheduled events including lectures, tours and group activities. Entrance Survey: First create an account by following the link, educationLink New Account Setup. After creating the account, you can login to the educationLink site. Complete the entrance survey posted on your EduLink site within your first week at Fermilab. One-page Peer Review Provide a one-page written peer review of another SULI intern' talk or

398

Federal Metering Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Metering Requirements Metering Requirements FUPWG - May 23, 2013 Brad Gustafson Federal Energy Management Program 2 42 USC 8253 - ENERGY MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENT (e) Metering By October 1, 2012, in accordance with guidelines established by the Secretary under paragraph (2), all Federal buildings shall, for the purposes of efficient use of energy and reduction in the cost of electricity used in such buildings, be metered. Each agency shall use, to the maximum extent practicable, advanced meters or advanced metering devices that provide data at least daily and that measure at least hourly consumption of electricity in the Federal buildings of the agency. Not later than October 1, 2016, each agency shall provide for equivalent metering of natural gas and steam, in accordance with guidelines established by the Secretary

399

Traffic flow wide-area surveillance system definition  

SciTech Connect

Traffic Flow Wide-Area Surveillance (TFWAS) is a system for assessing the state of traffic flow over a wide area for enhanced traffic control and improved traffic management and planning. The primary purpose of a TFWAS system is to provide a detailed traffic flow description and context description to sophisticated traffic management and control systems being developed or envisioned for the future. A successful TFWAS system must possess the attributes of safety, reconfigurability, reliability, and expandability. The primary safety premise of TFWAS is to ensure that no action or failure of the TFWAS system or its components can result in risk of injury to humans. A wide variety of communication techniques is available for use with TFWAS systems. These communication techniques can be broken down into two categories, landlines and wireless. Currently used and possible future traffic sensing technologies have been examined. Important criteria for selecting TFWAS sensors include sensor capabilities, costs, operational constraints, sensor compatibility with the infrastructure, and extent. TFWAS is a concept that can take advantage of the strengths of different traffic sensing technologies, can readily adapt to newly developed technologies, and can grow with the development of new traffic control strategies. By developing innovative algorithms that will take information from a variety of sensor types and develop descriptions of traffic flows over a wide area, a more comprehensive understanding of the traffic state can be provided to the control system to perform the most reasonable control actions over the entire wide area. The capability of characterizing the state of traffic over an entire region should revolutionize developments in traffic control strategies.

Allgood, G.O.; Ferrell, R.K.; Kercel, S.W.; Abston, R.A.; Carnal, C.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Moynihan, P.I. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Requirements engineering with ORM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The number of IT project overspends and failures suggest that many IT projects do not conform to requirements. Despite decades of development the IT industry still seems to lack an effective method of ensuring that a project will be right first time. ...

Ken Evans

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Requirements for Xenon International  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

402

Training requirements. - 19...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z www.OSHA.gov Regulations (Standards - 29 CFR) Training requirements. - 1926.454 Regulations (Standards - 29 CFR) - Table of Contents * Part...

403

Furniture Compliance Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... (PCR). PCRs help meet the growing demand for science-based support to verify environmental product claims and eliminate green washing. ...

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

404

Functional Requirements and Use Cases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iously also beneficial in information systems development, staging core functionality for early releases and adding features over the course of several subsequent releases. In many industries, companies produce product lines with different cost/feature variations per product in the line, and product families that include a number of product lines targeted at somewhat different markets or usage situations. What makes these product lines part of a family, are some common elements of functionality and identity. A platform-based development approach leverages this commonality, utilizing a set of reusable assets across the family. These strategies have important implications for software architecture. In particular, it is not just the functional requirements of the first product or release that must be supported by the architecture. The functional requirements of early (nearly concurrent) releases need to be explicitly taken into account. Later releases are accommodated through architectu

System Has Properties; Ruth Malan; Dana Bredemeyer

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Long Term Storage with Surveillance of Canadian Prototype Nuclear Power Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) was originally formed by the government of Canada in 1952 to perform research in radiation and nuclear areas. In the mid 1950's Canada decided to limit itself to peaceful uses of nuclear energy and AECL embarked on several research and development programs, one of them being the development of nuclear power plants. This led to the development of the CANDU{sup TM} design of heavy water power reactors, of which there are now 29 operating around the world. This presentation discusses the present state of the first two CANDU{sup TM} prototype reactors and a prototype boiling light water reactor and lessons learnt after being in a long-term storage with surveillance state for more than 20 years. AECL facilities undergo decommissioning by either a prompt or a deferred removal approach. Both approaches are initiated after an operating facility has been declared redundant and gone through final operational shutdown. For the deferred approach, initial decommissioning activities are performed to put the facility into a sustainable, safe, shutdown state to minimize the hazards and costs of the ensuing extended storage with surveillance (SWS) or Safestor phase. At the appropriate time, the facility is dismantled and removed, or put into a suitable condition for re-use. AECL has a number of facilities that were built during its history, and some of these are now redundant or will become redundant in the near future. The deferred removal approach is part of AECL's decommissioning strategy for several reasons: 1. Reduction in radiation doses to workers during the final dismantling, 2. No facilities are available yet in Canada for the management of quantity of wastes arising from decommissioning, 3. Financial constraints presented by the number of facilities that will undergo decommissioning, compared to the availability of funds to carry out the work. This has led to the development of a comprehensive decommissioning plan that includes all of AECL's redundant and presently operating facilities. Several significant issues have arisen over the decades these reactors have been in the SWS phase. With the long time frames encompassed by this approach to decommissioning, the storage and maintenance of facility information for future decommissioning, and the knowledge and training of successive generations of staff to perform facility inspections and maintenance are major issues. Complacency of both staff and management is a potential issue. The problem arises primarily because these facilities have been put into a comparatively low hazard state, are remotely located, and not much changes over time and changes are slow. During the period that these facilities have been in this state, regulatory scrutiny and expectations have increased. This along with continuing changes in regulatory staff requires a continuous education and communication activity with the regulator. Because of the long time frames involved, the building structures continue to deteriorate slowly, and repairs and maintenance are required upon occasion. The costs can be significant, for example, to replace a roof. When these occasions arise, the balance of cost and benefit is always questioned, i.e., 'Wouldn't it be better to spend the money on dismantling rather than fixing?'. One positive note is that ancillary buildings that either have very low radiation hazards or were decontaminated during the initial decommissioning activities have been used for several alternate uses. This has helped to defray costs, and also keeps an interest in maintaining the building structures and systems in good condition during the SWS phase. Over the past few years, the lessons learnt from these and other facilities in SWS, have been addressed in a holistic manner by moving from a short-term, project-oriented approach to a comprehensive, long term stewardship approach. Key to this approach was the development of an integrated plan to decommission all of AECL's facilities. One of the prime results of the implementation of this plan was the development of an organiza

Janzen, Rick [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

NERSC Requirements Workshop November  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements Requirements Workshop November 2009 Lattice gauge theory and some other HE theory Doug Toussaint (University of Arizona) Help from: Paul Mackenzie (Fermilab) Crude comparison of lattice hadron spec- trum to the real world. Lattice Gauge Theory First-principles computations in QCD Also, computations in other strongly coupled field theories * Find hadronic factors to get fundamental physics from experi- ments * Understand structure and interactions of hadrons, maybe even nuclei * Understand QCD: confinement and chiral symmetry breaking * Other strongly interacting theories (what if we don't find the Higgs?) * Quark-gluon matter at high temeratures (RHIC, LHC, early uni- verse) or high densities (neutron stars) HEP theory projects at NERSC now: * Production and analysis of QCD configurations with dynamical quarks, (Doug Toussaint) (MILC collaboration) * Heavy quarks, using

407

Support Requirements for Synfuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Producing synfuels from coal is technically feasible. Projects have a high probability of success but risks do exist (technical, marketing, environmental delays, regulatory and political changes, etc.). The various segments of the developing synfuels industry are identified. For each segment its characteristics, uncertainties and risks are discussed, as well as the type of support of guarantee required to develop this portion of the synfuels industry.

Hyland, M. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

BER Science Network Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2010 ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research, of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the science programs funded by BER. The requirements identified at the workshop are summarized and described in more detail in the case studies and the Findings section. A number of common themes emerged from the case studies and workshop discussions. One is that BER science, like many other disciplines, is becoming more and more distributed and collaborative in nature. Another common theme is that data set sizes are exploding. Climate Science in particular is on the verge of needing to manage exabytes of data, and Genomics is on the verge of a huge paradigm shift in the number of sites with sequencers and the amount of sequencer data being generated.

Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

New WEBGIS technologies for geolocation of epidemiological data: an application for the surveillance of the risk of Lyme borrelliosis disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a technology for the accurate and fast geo-location of medical data and the creation of central data archives, specifically designed for the development of disease risk maps and of other functions for modern epidemiology and surveillance. A WEBGIS system is configured as an Internet web service integrated with connectivity to a Geographical Information System (GIS). We developed for the ULSS Belluno a WEBGIS for the accurate mapping of tick-borne diseases, with specific attention to Lyme borreliosis, which may cause cardiac manifestations as atrioventricular conduction abnormalities, complete atrioventricular block, myocarditis and dilated cardiomiopathy. A first tree-based predictive model has been developed for risk classification of tick bites from 256 samples (data gathered through the Belluno Lyme WEBGIS), with a descriptive accuracy of 81.9% and a predictive accuracy of 75.1% . An experimental risk GIS map was therefore obtained from the model by considering altitude, week of sampling and vegetation type as predictor variables.

C. Furlanello; Cesare Furlanello; S. Merler; S. Mancuso; S. Menegon; Sebastiano Mancuso; G. Bertiato

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Deriving Quantified Safety Requirements in Complex Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of hazard analysis techniques have been proposed for software-based systems but individually the techniques are limited in their ability to cope with system complexity, or to derive and prioritise component safety requirements. There is also ...

Peter A. Lindsay; John A. McDermid; David J. Tombs

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Seismic Performance Requirements for WETF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops recommendations for requirements on the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) performance during seismic events. These recommendations are based on fragility estimates of WETF structures, systems, and components that were developed by LANL experts during facility walkdowns. They follow DOE guidance as set forth in standards DOE-STD-1021-93, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Categorization Guidelines for Structures, Systems, and Components'' and DOE-STD-1020-94, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities''. Major recommendations are that WETF institute a stringent combustible loading control program and that additional seismic bracing and anchoring be provided for gloveboxes and heavy equipment.

Hans Jordan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Plutonium uranium extraction (PUREX) end state basis for interim operation (BIO) for surveillance and maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Basis for Interim Operation (BIO) was developed for the PUREX end state condition following completion of the deactivation project. The deactivation project has removed or stabilized the hazardous materials within the facility structure and equipment to reduce the hazards posed by the facility during the surveillance and maintenance (S and M) period, and to reduce the costs associated with the S and M. This document serves as the authorization basis for the PUREX facility, excluding the storage tunnels, railroad cut, and associated tracks, for the deactivated end state condition during the S and M period. The storage tunnels, and associated systems and areas, are addressed in WHC-SD-HS-SAR-001, Rev. 1, PUREX Final Safety Analysis Report. During S and M, the mission of the facility is to maintain the conditions and equipment in a manner that ensures the safety of the workers, environment, and the public. The S and M phase will continue until the final decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) project and activities are begun. Based on the methodology of DOE-STD-1027-92, Hazards Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, the final facility hazards category is identified as hazards category This considers the remaining material inventories, form and distribution of the material, and the energies present to initiate events of concern. Given the current facility configuration, conditions, and authorized S and M activities, there are no operational events identified resulting in significant hazard to any of the target receptor groups (e.g., workers, public, environment). The only accident scenarios identified with consequences to the onsite co-located workers were based on external natural phenomena, specifically an earthquake. The dose consequences of these events are within the current risk evaluation guidelines and are consistent with the expectations for a hazards category 2 facility.

DODD, E.N.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

413

Investigating immune surveillance, tolerance, and therapy in cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Maximizing the potential of cancer immunotherapy requires model systems that closely recapitulate human disease to study T cell responses to tumor antigens and to test immune therapeutic strategies. Current model systems ...

Cheung, Ann F

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

BES Science Network Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivityfor the US Department of Energy Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office ofScience programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years.

Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian; Dart, Eli; Biocca, A.; Carlson, R.; Chen, J.; Cotter, S.; Dattoria, V.; Davenport, J.; Gaenko, A.; Kent, P.; Lamm, M.; Miller, S.; Mundy, C.; Ndousse, T.; Pederson, M.; Perazzo, A.; Popescu, R.; Rouson, D.; Sekine, Y.; Sumpter, B.; Wang, C.-Z.; Whitelam, S.; Zurawski, J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Surveillance Guides - QAS 2.2 Staging/Storage of Components  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STAGING/STORAGE OF COMPONENTS STAGING/STORAGE OF COMPONENTS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that before components or consumables are used in maintenance and repair of equipment and systems, or before new components and systems are installed, they are stored in ways that prevent deterioration. The surveillance also examines the contractor's practices in staging materials, and the use of effective quality control to ensure materials and components are stored and staged properly. Finally, the surveillance provides an opportunity for the Facility Representative to verify that the contractor is complying with performance objectives established by the Department of Energy. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5700.6C, Quality Assurance

416

Decision Support Tool for Prioritization of Resources Dedicated to Surveillance and Maintenance Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Florida International University Tennessee Florida Decision Support Tool for Prioritization of Resources Dedicated to Surveillance and Maintenance Activities Challenge The Department of Energy (DOE) currently faces a difficult task in the disposition of excess facilities. Many of these facilities are large and complex and contain potentially hazardous substances. Operational experience shows that once buildings have been declared excess and are transferred to surveillance and maintenance (S&M), maintenance budgets are reduced since the planned demolition of the building is used as a justification for not spending money to make repairs on it. One need identified at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and

417

BWRVIP-54: Post-NMCA Materials and Fuel Surveillance Program at Duane Arnold Energy Center First Surveillance Report for 1996-1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NobleMetalChemicalAddition(NMCA)treatment increases the effectiveness of hydrogeninjection, and can increase the lifetime of the reactor internals and allow reduction of radiation exposure to plant personnel. A cooperative effort to demonstrate NMCA was undertaken by General Electric, IES Utilities and the BWR Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP) and EPRI. This report describes the results of the first year of the materials and fuel surveillance program following NMCA treatment at the Duane Arnold Energ...

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

418

The EBR-II materials-surveillance program. 5: Results of SURV-5.  

SciTech Connect

In March of 1965, a set of surveillance (SURV) samples was placed in the EBR-II reactor to determine the effect of irradiation, thermal aging, and sodium corrosion on reactor materials. Eight subassemblies were placed into row 12 positions of EBR-II to determine the effect of irradiation at 370 C. Two subassemblies were placed into the primary sodium basket to determine the effect of thermal aging at 370 C. One half of all samples were exposed to primary system sodium while one half were sealed in capsules with a helium atmosphere. Fifteen different structural materials were tested in the SURV program. In this work, the properties of these materials irradiated at 370 C to a total fluence of 3.2 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} were determined. These materials are the fifth set of irradiated subassemblies to be examined as part of the SURV program (SURV-5). The properties analyzed were weight, density, microstructure, hardness, tensile and yield strength, and fracture resistance. Of all the alloys examined in SURV-5, only Berylco-25 showed any significant weight loss. Stainless steel (both 304 and 347) had the largest density decrease, although the density decrease from irradiation for all alloys was less than 0.4 percent. The microstructure of both Berylco-25 and the aluminum-bronze alloy was altered significantly. Iron- and nickel-base alloys showed little change in microstructure. Austenitic steels (304 and 347) harden with irradiation. The hardness of Inconel X750 did not change significantly with irradiation. The ultimate tensile strength of Inconel X750, 304 stainless steel, 420 stainless steel and welded 304 changed little due to a fluence increase from 2.2 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (the maximum fluence of the SURV-4 samples) to 3.2 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}.

Ruther, W.E.; Staffon, J.D.; Carlson, B.G.; Allen, T.R.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Amchitka, Alaska, Site  

SciTech Connect

This Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan describes how the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) intends to fulfill its mission to maintain protection of human health and the environment at the Amchitka, Alaska, Site1. Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island. The U.S. Department of Defense, in conjunction with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), conducted the first nuclear test (Long Shot) to provide data that would improve the United States' capability of detecting underground nuclear explosions. The second nuclear test (Milrow) was a weapons-related test conducted by AEC as a means to study the feasibility of detonating a much larger device. The final nuclear test (Cannikin), the largest United States underground test, was a weapons-related test. Surface disturbances associated with these tests have been remediated. However, radioactivity remains deep below the surface, contained in and around the test cavities, for which no feasible remediation technology has been identified. In 2006, the groundwater model (Hassan et al. 2002) was updated using 2005 data collected by the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation. Model simulation results indicate there is no breakthrough or seepage of radionuclides into the marine environment within 2,000 years. The Amchitka conceptual model is reasonable; the flow and transport simulation is based on the best available information and data. The simulation results are a quantitative prediction supported by the best available science and technology. This Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan is an additional step intended for the protection of human health and the environment. This plan may be modified from time to time in the future consistent with the mission to protect human health

None

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

PERSISTENT SURVEILLANCE FOR PIPELINE PROTECTION AND THREAT INTERDICTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investment in lab facilities (Omega-EP, Z/PW,NIF and smaller facilities (Titan, Trident Upgrade relevant conditions FIREX-1 ZR and Petawatt NIF/ARC Omega-EP #12;FI benefits from international R&D effortsChallenge is to be ready -- an ignition/gain experiment in 2012 on NIF requires successful sub ignition on Omega EP

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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421

Verification experiment on the downblending of high enriched uranium (HEU) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Digital video surveillance of the HEU feed stations  

SciTech Connect

As part of a Safeguards Agreement between the US and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Piketon, Ohio, was added to the list of facilities eligible for the application of IAEA safeguards. Currently, the facility is in the process of downblending excess inventory of HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU) from US defense related programs for commercial use. An agreement was reached between the US and the IAEA that would allow the IAEA to conduct an independent verification experiment at the Portsmouth facility, resulting in the confirmation that the HEU was in fact downblended. The experiment provided an opportunity for the DOE laboratories to recommend solutions/measures for new IAEA safeguards applications. One of the measures recommended by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and selected by the IAEA, was a digital video surveillance system for monitoring activity at the HEU feed stations. This paper describes the SNL implementation of the digital video system and its integration with the Load Cell Based Weighing System (LCBWS) from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The implementation was based on commercially available technology that also satisfied IAEA criteria for tamper protection and data authentication. The core of the Portsmouth digital video surveillance system was based on two Digital Camera Modules (DMC-14) from Neumann Consultants, Germany.

Martinez, R.L.; Tolk, K. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Whiting, N. [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Castleberry, K.; Lenarduzzi, R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

ANL-10/01 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ANL-10/01 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M Report for 2009 Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Assurance Division Availability of This Report This report is available, at no cost, at http://www.osti.gov/bridge. It is also available

423

The impact of a realistic packet traffic model on the performance of surveillance wireless sensor networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is quite common to see that classical periodic or Poisson packet traffic models are used for evaluating the performance of wireless sensor networks (WSNs). However, these models may not be appropriate for modeling the data traffic resulting from a ... Keywords: Intrusion detection applications, Packet traffic model, Surveillance sensor networks, Wireless sensor networks

Ilker Demirkol; Cem Ersoy; Fatih Alagöz; Hakan Deliç

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Marking the Close analysis in Thai Bond Market Surveillance using association rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the opportunity of employing data mining techniques as a supplement to traditional techniques, such as economic modeling, to detect misconduct in the Thai Bond Market. In the study, association rules are used to detect ''Mark ... Keywords: Association rules, Bond Market Surveillance system, Data mining, Mark the Close analysis, e-Administration

Janjao Mongkolnavin; Sunti Tirapat

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Waterflood surveillance in the Kuparuk River Unit with computerized pattern analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the computer-aided waterflood surveillance method used in the Kuparuk River field. The flood is monitored pattern by pattern, with production and injection allocations verified by comparison of measured field pressures with pressures calculated by material balance. The resulting detailed knowledge about waterflood progress has led to operational changes and workovers to optimize waterflood performance.

Chapman, L.R.; Thompson, R.R.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Inspection of surveillance equipment and activities at DOE Field Office, Richland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this inspection was to review surveillance activities by the Department of Energy's (DOE) Field Office, Richland (RL) and contractor employees at the RL Hanford site for efficiency and economy and compliance with laws and regulations. The scope included surveillance activities, procedures, training, types of surveillance equipment, and management controls over the equipment and activities. We also looked at Departmental policies and procedures regarding the equipment and activities. Allegations of illegal surveillance that came to our attention during the course of this inspection were referred to the Department of Justice. As part of our review, inspectors were on-site at RL from February 11, 1991, through March 1, 1991. Follow-up trips to RL were also made in April, May, and June 1991. We also conducted interviews at Albuquerque, Savannah River, and Germantown of former RL employees and RL contractors who were on travel. Officials from DOE's Office of General Counsel (OGC), Office of Security Affairs, and Office of Safeguards and Security (S S) were also interviewed regarding the Department's purchase and possession of wiretapping and eavesdropping devices. We obtained 75 signed sworn statements from 55 individuals during the course of the inspection. 1 fig., 1 tab.

Not Available

1991-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

427

A Latent Source Model to Detect Multiple Spatial Clusters with Application in a Mobile Sensor Network for Surveillance of Nuclear Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to have sophisticated nuclear surveillance and detection systems deployed in major cities in the U and models to provide consistent and pervasive surveillance of nuclear materials in major cities. The network Network for Surveillance of Nuclear Materials Jerry Cheng, Minge Xie, Rong Chen and Fred Roberts 1

Xie, Minge

428

Requirements for Predictive Analytics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is important to have a clear understanding of how traditional Business Intelligence (BI) and analytics are different and how they fit together in optimizing organizational decision making. With tradition BI, activities are focused primarily on providing context to enhance a known set of information through aggregation, data cleansing and delivery mechanisms. As these organizations mature their BI ecosystems, they achieve a clearer picture of the key performance indicators signaling the relative health of their operations. Organizations that embark on activities surrounding predictive analytics and data mining go beyond simply presenting the data in a manner that will allow decisions makers to have a complete context around the information. These organizations generate models based on known information and then apply other organizational data against these models to reveal unknown information.

Troy Hiltbrand

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Match Pumps to System Requirements  

SciTech Connect

BestPractices Program tip sheet discussing pumping system efficiency matching pumps to system requirements

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Facility Decontamination and Decommissioning Program Surveillance and Maintenance Plan, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This Surveillance and Maintenance (S&M) Plan describes the activities performed between deactivation and final decommissioning of the following facilities located on the Nevada National Security Site, as documented in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order under the Industrial Sites program as decontamination and decommissioning sites: ? Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (EMAD) Facility: o EMAD Building (Building 25-3900) o Locomotive Storage Shed (Building 25-3901) ? Test Cell C (TCC) Facility: o Equipment Building (Building 25-3220) o Motor Drive Building (Building 25-3230) o Pump Shop (Building 25-3231) o Cryogenic Lab (Building 25-3232) o Ancillary Structures (e.g., dewars, water tower, piping, tanks) These facilities have been declared excess and are in various stages of deactivation (low-risk, long-term stewardship disposition state). This S&M Plan establishes and implements a solid, cost-effective, and balanced S&M program consistent with federal, state, and regulatory requirements. A graded approach is used to plan and conduct S&M activities. The goal is to maintain the facilities in a safe condition in a cost-effective manner until their final end state is achieved. This plan accomplishes the following: ? Establishes S&M objectives and framework ? Identifies programmatic guidance for S&M activities to be conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) ? Provides present facility condition information and identifies hazards ? Identifies facility-specific S&M activities to be performed and their frequency ? Identifies regulatory drivers, NNSA/NFO policies and procedures, and best management practices that necessitate implementation of S&M activities ? Provides criteria and frequencies for revisions and updates ? Establishes the process for identifying and dispositioning a condition that has not been previously identified or documented ? Provides instructions for implementing annual S&M inspections and activities The following facilities that were included in Revision 1 of this plan have reached final disposition and are no longer in the S&M program: ? Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility, Building 25-3110 ? Test Cell A Facility, Building 25-3113 ? TCC Facility, Building 25-3210 ? Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 26-2201 ? Super Kukla Facility, Building 27-5400

Poderis, Reed J. [NSTec] [NSTec; King, Rebecca A. [NSTec] [NSTec

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

431

Quality Assurance requirements - Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging. An effective approach in developing QA requirements  

SciTech Connect

Application of QA requirements for packaging and transportation of radioactive materials should not be solely based on safety-related considerations. The operability of items, components, and systems must be considered as equally important. The nuclear industry has begun to recognize operability considerations along with safety concerns. This has resulted in a new approach in establishing QA requirements for packaging.

Fabian, R.R.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Potentiometric Sensor for Real-Time Remote Surveillance of Actinides in Molten Salts  

SciTech Connect

A potentiometric sensor is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for real-time remote surveillance of actinides during electrorefining of spent nuclear fuel. During electrorefining, fuel in metallic form is oxidized at the anode while refined uranium metal is reduced at the cathode in a high temperature electrochemical cell containing LiCl-KCl-UCl3 electrolyte. Actinides present in the fuel chemically react with UCl3 and form stable metal chlorides that accumulate in the electrolyte. This sensor will be used for process control and safeguarding of activities in the electrorefiner by monitoring the concentrations of actinides in the electrolyte. The work presented focuses on developing a solid-state cation conducting ceramic sensor for detecting varying concentrations of trivalent actinide metal cations in eutectic LiCl-KCl molten salt. To understand the basic mechanisms for actinide sensor applications in molten salts, gadolinium was used as a surrogate for actinides. The ß?-Al2O3 was selected as the solid-state electrolyte for sensor fabrication based on cationic conductivity and other factors. In the present work Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 was prepared by ion exchange reactions between trivalent Gd3+ from GdCl3 and K+-, Na+-, and Sr2+-ß?-Al2O3 precursors. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used for characterization of Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 samples. Microfocus X-ray Diffraction (µ-XRD) was used in conjunction with SEM energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to identify phase content and elemental composition. The Gd3+-ß?-Al2O3 materials were tested for mechanical and chemical stability by exposing them to molten LiCl-KCl based salts. The effect of annealing on the exchanged material was studied to determine improvements in material integrity post ion exchange. The stability of the ß?-Al2O3 phase after annealing was verified by µ-XRD. Preliminary sensor tests with different assembly designs will also be presented.

Natalie J. Gese; Jan-Fong Jue; Brenda E. Serrano; Guy L. Fredrickson

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Vision-Based Target Geolocation and Optimal Surveillance on an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ground vehicles include Hanford and Long,3 Hanford et al.4 and Janrathitikarn and Long.5 One important

434

Mobile and Stationary Computer Vision based Traffic Surveillance Techniques for Advanced ITS Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

more robust and reliable computer vision techniques areIEEE International Conference on Computer Vision and PatternProc. 3 rd Eur.Conf. Computer Vision, 1994 [32] H.

Cao, Meng

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Nuclear safety surveillance and control of National Nuclear Safety Administration of PRC during commissioning and operation of nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the method of nuclear safety surveillance and control of National Nuclear Safety Administration (NNSA) of PRC during commissioning and operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs) and the practice for Qinshan NPP and for Guangdong Daya Bay NPP (GNPS). The results of the practice show that the surveillance models set up for Qinshan NPP and for GNPS commissioning were effective and the surveillance has played an important role for ensuring the quality and safety of the commissioning testing and consequently the nuclear safety of these two plants.

Feng, W.; Zhang, C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

436

Requirements dependencies: the emergence of a requirements network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We believe that the requirements at the leaf-node level of the requirements tree structure cannot be viewed in isolation and that dependencies between them exist. We pursued this notion in order to find a coherent set of requirement dependencies that ...

Vishwajeet Kulshreshtha; John Boardman; Dinesh Verma

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Environmental surveillance and compliance at Los Alamos during 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report presents environmental data that characterize environmental performance and addresses compliance with environmental standards and requirements at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) during 1996. The Laboratory routinely monitors for radiation and for radioactive nonradioactive materials at Laboratory sites as well as in the surrounding region. LANL uses the monitoring results to determine compliance with appropriate standards and to identify potentially undesirable trends. Data were collected in 1996 to assess external penetrating radiation; quantities of airborne emissions; and concentrations of chemicals and radionuclides in ambient air, surface waters and groundwaters, the municipal water supply, soils and sediments, and foodstuffs. Using comparisons with standards and regulations, this report concludes that environmental effects from Laboratory operations are small and do not pose a demonstrable threat to the public, Laboratory employees, or the environment. Laboratory operations were in compliance with all major environmental regulations.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

An Innovative Approach for Data Collection and Handling to Enable Advancements in Micro Air Vehicle Persistent Surveillance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The success of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) in the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts has led to increased interest in further digitalization of the United States armed forces. Although unmanned systems have been a tool of the military for several decades, only recently have advances in the field of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) technology made it possible to develop systems capable of being transported by an individual soldier. These miniature unmanned systems, more commonly referred to as micro air vehicles (MAV), are envisioned by the Department of Defense as being an integral part of maintaining America?s military superiority. As researchers continue to make advances in the miniaturization of flight hardware, a new problem with regard to MAV field operations is beginning to present itself. To date, little work has been done to determine an effective means of collecting, analyzing, and handling information that can satisfy the goal of using MAVs as tools for persistent surveillance. Current systems, which focus on the transmission of analog video streams, have been very successful on larger UAVs such as the RQ-11 Raven but have proven to be very demanding of the operator. By implementing a new and innovative data processing methodology, currently existing hardware can be adapted to effectively present critical information with minimal user input. Research currently being performed at Texas A&M University in the areas of attitude determination and image processing has yielded a new application of photographic projection. By replacing analog video with spatially aware high-resolution images, the present MAV handheld ground control stations (GCS) can be enhanced to reduce the number of functional manpower positions required during operation. Photographs captured by an MAV can be displayed above pre-existing satellite imagery to give an operator a lasting reference to the location of objects in his vicinity. This newly generated model also increases the functionality of micro air vehicles by allowing for target tracking and energy efficient perch and stare capabilities, both essential elements of persistent surveillance.

Goodnight, Ryan David

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) Dynamic-Tracking Directional Wireless Antennas for Low Powered Applications that Require Reliable Extended Range Operations in Time Critical Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proven value of DOD Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) will ultimately transition to National and Homeland Security missions that require real-time aerial surveillance, situation awareness, force protection, and sensor placement. Public services first responders who routinely risk personal safety to assess and report a situation for emergency actions will likely be the first to benefit from these new unmanned technologies. ‘Packable’ or ‘Portable’ small class UAVs will be particularly useful to the first responder. They require the least amount of training, no fixed infrastructure, and are capable of being launched and recovered from the point of emergency. All UAVs require wireless communication technologies for real- time applications. Typically on a small UAV, a low bandwidth telemetry link is required for command and control (C2), and systems health monitoring. If the UAV is equipped with a real-time Electro-Optical or Infrared (EO/Ir) video camera payload, a dedicated high bandwidth analog/digital link is usually required for reliable high-resolution imagery. In most cases, both the wireless telemetry and real-time video links will be integrated into the UAV with unity gain omni-directional antennas. With limited on-board power and payload capacity, a small UAV will be limited with the amount of radio-frequency (RF) energy it transmits to the users. Therefore, ‘packable’ and ‘portable’ UAVs will have limited useful operational ranges for first responders. This paper will discuss the limitations of small UAV wireless communications. The discussion will present an approach of utilizing a dynamic ground based real-time tracking high gain directional antenna to provide extend range stand-off operation, potential RF channel reuse, and assured telemetry and data communications from low-powered UAV deployed wireless assets.

Scott G. Bauer; Matthew O. Anderson; James R. Hanneman

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

4.5 Audit Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Audit Requirements Audit Requirements Audit requirements are now contained in 2 separate sub-sections. Subsection 4.5.1 contains the audit requirements for States, Local Governments and Non-Profit Organizations while subsection 4.5.2 contains the audit requirements for For-Profit Organizations. 4.5.1 Audit Requirements for States, Local Governments and Non-Profit Organizations (a) General. All States, Local Governments and Non-Profit Organizations that expend over $500,000 in Federal funds in any year are required to have a single audit conducted in accordance with OMB Circular A-133. This requirement flows down to subrecipients that meet the dollar threshold. An independent auditor shall perform the audit in accordance with the Government Auditing Standards and must: 1) audit and provide opinions on the fair presentation of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

SG Network System Requirements Specification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SG Network System Requirements Specification SG Network System Requirements Specification Interim Release 3 5/17/2010 - 2 - Table of Contents Document History ....................................................................................................................................... - 3 - Revision History .......................................................................................................................................... - 3 - Preface........................................................................................................................................................ - 4 - Authors........................................................................................................................................................ - 6 -

442

Building security requirements with CLASP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, security requirements have been derived in an ad hoc manner. Recently, commercial software development organizations have been looking for ways to produce effective security requirements.In this paper, we show how to build security ... Keywords: application security, security process, security requirements

John Viega

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Operational Awareness Rerview of a Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Fire Protection Surveillance, April 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HIAR-RL-2013-04-08 HIAR-RL-2013-04-08 Site: DOE-Richland Operations Office Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Fire Protection Surveillance Dates of Activity : 04/08/2013 - 04/11/2013 Report Preparer: Jake Wechselberger Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed an onsite operational awareness review of a DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) fire protection surveillance. Result: During the period April 8-11, 2013, an HSS representative participated in DOE-RL tours of various site facilities to review

444

ORISE: Beryllium Testing and Surveillance for the U.S. Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beryllium Testing and Surveillance Beryllium Testing and Surveillance Beryllium Testing Laboratory worker Beryllium, a metal used in many industries, including aerospace, defense and nuclear weapons production, can have harmful health effects when inhaled as dust or fumes from machining or manufacturing activities. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) manages one of only four laboratories in the country that perform the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT), which detects the worker's sensitization to beryllium and helps identify workers who have or are at risk of developing chronic beryllium disease (CBD). The laboratory is certified under the Clinical Laboratory Improvement Act (CLIA) guidelines and has been awarded the prestigious College of American Pathologists (CAP) certification.

445

H FINAL REPORT OF OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE FOR THE FAULTLESS EVENT,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

WRHL-Slr WRHL-Slr i, ' H FINAL REPORT OF OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE FOR THE FAULTLESS EVENT, January 19. 1968 by the Southwe stern Radiological Health Laboratory Department of Health, Education. and Welfare Public Health Service Consume r Protection and Environmental Health Service April 1969 This surveillance perforrned under a Memorandum of Understanding (No. SF 54 373) for the U. S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of Government sponsored work. Neither the United States, nor the Atomic Energy Commission, nor any person acting on behalf of the Commission: A. makes any warranty or representation, expressed or implied, with respect to the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of the in- formation contained in this report, or that the use of any information, apparatus, method, or process disclosed in this report may not in- fringe privately owned

446

Operational Awareness Rerview of a Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Fire Protection Surveillance, April 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HIAR-RL-2013-04-08 HIAR-RL-2013-04-08 Site: DOE-Richland Operations Office Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for the Department of Energy Richland Operations Office Fire Protection Surveillance Dates of Activity : 04/08/2013 - 04/11/2013 Report Preparer: Jake Wechselberger Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed an onsite operational awareness review of a DOE Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) fire protection surveillance. Result: During the period April 8-11, 2013, an HSS representative participated in DOE-RL tours of various site facilities to review

447

Comment and response document for the long-term surveillance plan for the Shiprock, New Mexico, disposal site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains comments and responses regarding the long-term surveillance plan for the Shiprock, New Mexico uranium mine tailings disposal site. Discrepencies and errors within the plan document are noted and corrections are recorded.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Investigation of T cell-mediated immune surveillance against tumor-specific antigens in genetically engineered mouse models of cancer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The association of tumor cells and lymphocytes has led to the hypothesis that our immune system actively inhibits the formation and progression of cancer, a phenomenon called tumor immune surveillance. T cells specific to ...

Du Page, Michel Justin Porter

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

THE REQUIREMENTS OF A FUSION DEMONSTRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, that are predicted by theory but are not yet well established experimentally. The two reactors will have the same of the commercial nuclear power business or construction of a new production reactor based on HTGR technology#12;THE REQUIREMENTS OF A FUSION DEMONSTRATION REACTOR AND THE STARLITE STUDY Robert W. Conn

Najmabadi, Farrokh

450

Mining anomalous events against frequent sequences in surveillance videos from commercial environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the UK alone there are currently over 4.2 million operational CCTV cameras, that is virtually one camera for every 14th person, and this figure is increasing at a fast rate throughout the world (especially after the tragic events of 9/11 and 7/7) ... Keywords: Anomalous events mining, Business intelligence, Data mining, Knowledge discovery, Periodicity mining, Sequential pattern mining, Surveillance videos, Video mining

Fahad Anwar; Ilias Petrounias; Tim Morris; Vassilis Kodogiannis

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Occupational Health and Safety Database, 1995-2011: Injury Surveillance Highlights 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Descriptive highlights are presented from the 2012 data reporting year of the Electric Power Research Institute’s Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program as a preliminary assessment of this long-term injury and illness surveillance program for the electric sector. OHSD provides the capability for monitoring trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and conducting research on occupational health and safety issues. OHSD currently integrates 17 years of personnel, ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

452

Radiation detectors as surveillance monitors for IAEA safeguards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation detectors used for personnel dosimetry are examined for use under IAEA Safeguards as monitors to confirm the passage or nonpassage (YES/NO) of plutonium-bearing nuclear material at barrier penetrations declared closed. In this application where backgrounds are ill defined, no advantage is found for a particular detector type because of intrinsic efficiency. Secondary considerations such as complexity, ease of tamper-proofing, and ease of readout are used to recommend specific detector types for routine monitoring and for data-base measurements. Recommendations are made for applications, data acquisition, and instrument development.

Fehlau, P.E.; Dowdy, E.J.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Data Requirements from NERSC Requirements Reviews Richard Gerber...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Scientists represented by the NERSC user community have growing requirements for data storage, IO bandwidth, networking bandwidth, and data software and services. Over the...

454

Managing System of Systems Requirements with a Requirements Screening Group  

SciTech Connect

Figuring out an effective and efficient way to manage not only your Requirement’s Baseline, but also the development of all your individual requirements during a Program’s/Project’s Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages can be both daunting and difficult. This is especially so when you are dealing with a complex and large System of Systems (SoS) Program with potentially thousands and thousands of Top Level Requirements as well as an equal number of lower level System, Subsystem and Configuration Item requirements that need to be managed. This task is made even more overwhelming when you have to add in integration with multiple requirements’ development teams (e.g., Integrated Product Development Teams (IPTs)) and/or numerous System/Subsystem Design Teams. One solution for tackling this difficult activity on a recent large System of Systems Program was to develop and make use of a Requirements Screening Group (RSG). This group is essentially a Team made up of co-chairs from the various Stakeholders with an interest in the Program of record that are enabled and accountable for Requirements Development on the Program/Project. The RSG co-chairs, often with the help of individual support team, work together as a Program Board to monitor, make decisions on, and provide guidance on all Requirements Development activities during the Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages of a Program/Project. In addition, the RSG can establish and maintain the Requirements Baseline, monitor and enforce requirements traceability across the entire Program, and work with other elements of the Program/Project to ensure integration and coordination.

Ronald R. Barden

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Hazard surveillance for workplace magnetic fields. 1: Walkaround sampling method for measuring ambient field magnitude; 2: Field characteristics from waveform measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent epidemiologic research has suggested that exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MF) may be associated with leukemia, brain cancer, spontaneous abortions, and Alzheimer`s disease. A walkaround sampling method for measuring ambient ELF-MF levels was developed for use in conducting occupational hazard surveillance. This survey was designed to determine the range of MF levels at different industrial facilities so they could be categorized by MF levels and identified for possible subsequent personal exposure assessments. Industries were selected based on their annual electric power consumption in accordance with the hypothesis that large power consumers would have higher ambient MFs when compared with lower power consumers. Sixty-two facilities within thirteen 2-digit Standard Industrial Classifications (SIC) were selected based on their willingness to participate. A traditional industrial hygiene walkaround survey was conducted to identify MF sources, with a special emphasis on work stations.

Methner, M.M.; Bowman, J.D.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Sequence-Length Requirements for Phylogenetic Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the sequence lengths required by neighbor-joining, greedy parsimony, and a phylogenetic reconstruction method (DCM NJ +MP) based on disk-covering and the maximum parsimony criterion. We use extensive simulations based on random birth-death trees, with controlled deviations from ultrametricity, to collect data on the scaling of sequence-length requirements for each of the three methods as a function of the number of taxa, the rate of evolution on the tree, and the deviation from ultrametricity. Our experiments show that DCM NJ +MP has consistently lower sequence-length requirements than the other two methods when trees of high topological accuracy are desired, although all methods require much longer sequences as the deviation from ultrametricity or the height of the tree grows. Our study has significant implications for large-scale phylogenetic reconstruction (where sequence-length requirements are a crucial factor), but also for future performance analyses in phylogenetics (since deviations from ultrametricity are proving pivotal).

Bernard M. E. Moret; Usman Roshan; Tandy Warnow; Y Warnow

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Project X functional requirements specification  

SciTech Connect

Project X is a multi-megawatt proton facility being developed to support intensity frontier research in elementary particle physics, with possible applications to nuclear physics and nuclear energy research, at Fermilab. A Functional Requirements Specification has been developed in order to establish performance criteria for the Project X complex in support of these multiple missions. This paper will describe the Functional Requirements for the Project X facility and the rationale for these requirements.

Holmes, S.D.; Henderson, S.D.; Kephart, R.; Kerby, J.; Mishra, S.; Nagaitsev, S.; Tschirhart, R.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Protocol, Required Reading - June 2012 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Required Reading - June 2012 Required Reading - June 2012 Protocol, Required Reading - June 2012 June 2012 Protocol for Required Reading The purpose of this protocol is to establish the requirements and responsibilities for conducting and managing the Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations (HS-45) required reading program. The required reading program provides a methodology to ensure that the HS-45 staff members are informed and up-to-date with Department of Energy (DOE), the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), and office-specific requirements, processes, and guidance as well as to support continuous improvement. The required reading program will also be used to supplement staff training. This required reading program is based on DOE 0 422.1 Conduct of Operations Attachment 2, Appendix A and DOE-STD-1033-92 Guide to

459

Requirements Specifications For Hybrid Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper is to present a formal framework for representing and reasoning about the requirements of hybrid systems. As background, the paper briefly reviews an abstract model for specifying system and software requirements, called the Four Variable Model [12], and a related requirements method, called SCR (Software Cost Reduction) [10, 1]. The paper then introduces a special discrete version of the Four Variable Model, the SCR requirements model [8] and proposes an extension of the SCR model for specifying and reasoning about hybrid systems. 2 Background

Constance Heitmeyer

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Security Requirements Engineering: A Framework for Representation and Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security Requirements Engineering: A Framework for Representation and Analysis Charles B. Haley Abstract--This paper presents a framework for security requirements elicitation and analysis. The framework is based on constructing a context for the system, representing security requirements as constraints

Haley, Charles B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "requirements based surveillance" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

An integrative approach to requirements analysis: How task models support requirements reuse in a user-centric design framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many software systems fail to address their intended purpose because of a lack of user involvement and requirements deficiencies. This paper discusses the elaboration of a requirements-analysis process that integrates a critical-parameter-based approach ... Keywords: Critical parameters, Requirements engineering, Reuse, Task modeling

Cyril Montabert; D. Scott McCrickard; Woodrow W. Winchester; Manuel A. Pérez-Quiñones

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures for the Chemistry Graduate Program PLEASE NOTE: This version of the Handbook must be used by students who start during or after the Spring 2012 semester is a central activity. 1.2 Purpose and Content of the Handbook. A detailed account of the academic requirements

Kounaves, Samuel P.

463

Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures for the Chemistry Graduate Program PLEASE NOTE: This version of the Handbook can be used by students who started during or before the Fall 2011 semester activity. 1.2 Purpose and Content of the Handbook. A detailed account of the academic requirements

Kounaves, Samuel P.

464

Humidity requirements in WSCF Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to develop and document a position on Relative Humidity (RH) requirements in the WSCF Laboratories. A current survey of equipment vendors for Organic, Inorganic and Radiochemical laboratories indicate that 25% - 80% relative humidity may meet the environmental requirements for safe operation and protection of all the laboratory equipment.

Evans, R.A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 2006 MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL INFORMATION AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS: FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD (FIPS) 200 APPROVED BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE Shirley Radack, EditorShirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division

466

Satellite image analysis for surveillance, vegetation and climate change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, many studies have provided abundant evidence to show the trend of tree mortality is increasing in many regions, and the cause of tree mortality is associated with drought, insect outbreak, or fire. Unfortunately, there is no current capability available to monitor vegetation changes, and correlate and predict tree mortality with CO{sub 2} change, and climate change on the global scale. Different survey platforms (methods) have been used for forest management. Typical ground-based forest surveys measure tree stem diameter, species, and alive or dead. The measurements are low-tech and time consuming, but the sample sizes are large, running into millions of trees, covering large areas, and spanning many years. These field surveys provide powerful ground validation for other survey methods such as photo survey, helicopter GPS survey, and aerial overview survey. The satellite imagery has much larger coverage. It is easier to tile the different images together, and more important, the spatial resolution has been improved such that close to or even higher than aerial survey platforms. Today, the remote sensing satellite data have reached sub-meter spatial resolution for panchromatic channels (IKONOS 2: 1 m; Quickbird-2: 0.61 m; Worldview-2: 0.5 m) and meter spatial resolution for multi-spectral channels (IKONOS 2: 4 meter; Quickbird-2: 2.44 m; Worldview-2: 2 m). Therefore, high resolution satellite imagery can allow foresters to discern individual trees. This vital information should allow us to quantify physiological states of trees, e.g. healthy or dead, shape and size of tree crowns, as well as species and functional compositions of trees. This is a powerful data resource, however, due to the vast amount of the data collected daily, it is impossible for human analysts to review the imagery in detail to identify the vital biodiversity information. Thus, in this talk, we will discuss the opportunities and challenges to use high resolution satellite imagery and machine learning theory to monitor tree mortality at the level of individual trees.

Cai, D Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

467

Program on Technology Innovation: Utility Requirements Document - Revision 9  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Revision 9 updates the Utility Requirements Document (URD) with a comprehensive set of detailed requirements for new light water reactor (LWR) designs. The revision is based on industry research and development (R&D) accomplished since the document's last revision. By providing plant designers with a thorough set of industry requirements, the URD allows designers to better understand utility expectations and provide compliant nuclear plant designs. Due to the large number of requirements and the need to ...

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

468

World nuclear fuel cycle requirements 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear fuel cycle consists of mining and milling uranium ore, processing the uranium into a form suitable for generating electricity, burning'' the fuel in nuclear reactors, and managing the resulting spent nuclear fuel. This report presents projections of domestic and foreign requirements for natural uranium and enrichment services as well as projections of discharges of spent nuclear fuel. These fuel cycle requirements are based on the forecasts of future commercial nuclear power capacity and generation published in a recent Energy Information Administration (EIA) report. Also included in this report are projections of the amount of spent fuel discharged at the end of each fuel cycle for each nuclear generating unit in the United States. The International Nuclear Model is used for calculating the projected nuclear fuel cycle requirements. 14 figs., 38 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

469

NBP RFI: Communications Requirements | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NBP RFI: Communications Requirements NBP RFI: Communications Requirements NBP RFI: Communications Requirements Cleco Corporation greatly appreciates the opportunity to provide information to the Department of Energy (DOE) on the communications needs of utilities. Cleco is an energy services company based in central Louisiana, serving approximately 276,000 residential, commercial and industrial customers since 1934. Cleco manages over 3,000 megawatts of electric capacity through its regulated Cleco Power LLC and unregulated Cleco Midstream Resources LLC businesses, utilizing a diverse fuel mix of lignite, coal, petcoke and natural gas. With 1,300 employees, Cleco manages and operates 70 transmission substations connected via 1,300 miles of transmission lines, together feeding over 350 distribution substations,

470

Stack Height Requirements (Ohio) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Stack Height Requirements (Ohio) Stack Height Requirements (Ohio) Stack Height Requirements (Ohio) < Back Eligibility Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Ohio Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Ohio Environmental Protection Agency This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides regulations for stacks for industrial facilities. "Stack" means any chimney, flue, conduit or duct arranged to conduct any emissions to the ambient air, excluding flares. "Stack height" means the distance from the ground-level elevation at the base of the stack to the crown of the stack. If a stack arises from a building or other structure, the ground-level elevation of that building or structure will be

471

Home: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

content. | Skip to navigation content. | Skip to navigation Site Map Contact Us Current Documents Archived Documents Entire Site only in current section Advanced Search... U.S. Department of Energy Office of Management Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Sections Home Directives Current Directives Draft Directives Archives Delegations Current Delegations Current Designations Rescinded Organizations' Assignment of Responsibility Development & Review RevCom Writers' Tools DPC Corner References News and Updates Help Personal tools You are here: Office of Management » Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Info Home Directives are the Department of Energy's primary means of establishing policies, requirements, responsibilities, and procedures for Departmental elements and contractors. Directive

472

Cyber Security Issues and Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program (SGIG) Cyber Security Issues and Requirements Jeff Dagle November 19, 2009 Communication and Information Technology will be Central to Smart Grid Deployment Final Interim Smart Grid Roadmap, prepared by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) for the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Cyber Security Requirements Associated with ARRA Projects Proposals were required to include:  Discussion of how cyber security risks will be mitigated  What criteria will be used for vendor and technology selection  Relevant cyber security standards that will be followed (or industry best practices)  How emerging smart grid cyber security standards that are currently being developed will be adopted Cyber Security Objectives for Smart

473

The Practice of Parking Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cost of the required parking is thus $20 per square foot$40 per square foot of floor area, or twice the cost in aper 1,000 square feet in a TOD, and the developer's cost of

Shoup, Donald C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474