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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Woodland Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects ® Version 1.2 July of group schemes 8 2.6 Monitoring 9 2.7 Carbon statements and reporting 9 2.8 Woodland Carbon Code trademark 10 3. Carbon sequestration 11 3.1 Units of carbon calculation 11 3.2 Carbon baseline 11 3.3 Carbon

2

Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Woodland Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects ® Version 1.1 July.6 Monitoring 8 2.7 Carbon statements and reporting 8 2.8 Woodland Carbon Code trademark 9 3. Carbon sequestration 10 3.1 Units of carbon calculation 10 3.2 Carbon baseline 10 3.3 Carbon leakage 11 3.4 Project

3

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Control Emissions Control Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Control Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Control Requirement Heavy-duty diesel vehicles used to perform federally funded state public works contracts must be powered by engines with Level 3 emissions control

4

Functional Requirements of Next Generation Control Center Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future electric grids will operate in an environment where there are increasing renewables, demand responses, and storage with aging infrastructures. Next generation control centers (NGCC) need enhanced and new monitoring, analysis, and control functions to help operators improve efficient, reliable, and low-carbon operation of the grid. This report reviews the status and trends in the integration of renewable generation, demand responses, and storage systems, and recommends requirements for NGCC functio...

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide EmissionsCarbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide EmissionsCarbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program...

6

Deep carbon reductions in California require electrification and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deep carbon reductions in California require electrification and Deep carbon reductions in California require electrification and integration across economic sectors Title Deep carbon reductions in California require electrification and integration across economic sectors Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Wei, Max, James H. Nelson, J. Greenblatt, Ana Mileva, Josiah Johnston, Michael K. Ting, Christopher Yang, Christopher M. Jones, James E. McMahon, and Daniel M. Kammen Journal Environmental Research Letters Volume 8 Issue 1 Abstract Meeting a greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction target of 80% below 1990 levels in the year 2050 requires detailed long-term planning due to complexity, inertia, and path dependency in the energy system. A detailed investigation of supply and demand alternatives is conducted to assess requirements for future California energy systems that can meet the 2050 GHG target. Two components are developed here that build novel analytic capacity and extend previous studies: (1) detailed bottom-up projections of energy demand across the building, industry and transportation sectors; and (2) a high-resolution variable renewable resource capacity planning model (SWITCH) that minimizes the cost of electricity while meeting GHG policy goals in the 2050 timeframe. Multiple pathways exist to a low-GHG future, all involving increased efficiency, electrification, and a dramatic shift from fossil fuels to low-GHG energy. The electricity system is found to have a diverse, cost-effective set of options that meet aggressive GHG reduction targets. This conclusion holds even with increased demand from transportation and heating, but the optimal levels of wind and solar deployment depend on the temporal characteristics of the resulting load profile. Long-term policy support is found to be a key missing element for the successful attainment of the 2050 GHG target in California.

7

Plasma Control Requirements and Concepts For ITER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Special Section: Plasma Control Issues for Tokamaks / Instrumentation Control and Data Handling

J. Wesley,* H.-W. Bartels; D. Boucher; A. Costley; L. De Kock; Yu. Gribov; M. Huguet; G. Janeschitz; P.-L. Mondino; V. Mukhovatov; A. Portone; M. Sugihara; I. Yonekawa

8

Frequency Control Performance Measurement and Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power systems operations could significantly influence primary frequency control.power system operations could not significantly influence primary frequency control.power system operations. Determination of frequency control

Illian, Howard F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

CARBON BED MERCURY EMISSIONS CONTROL FOR MIXED WASTE TREATMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (both radioactive and hazardous according tohe Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) wastes. Depending on regulatory requirements, the mercury in the off-gas must be controlled with sometimes very high efficiencies. Compliance to the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards can require off-gas mercury removal efficiencies up to 99.999% for thermally treating some mixed waste streams. Several test programs have demonstrated this level of off-gas mercury control using fixed beds of granular sulfur-impregnated activated carbon. Other results of these tests include: (a) The depth of the mercury control mass transfer zone was less than 15-30 cm for the operating conditions of these tests, (b) MERSORB carbon can sorb Hg up to 19 wt% of the carbon mass, and (c) the spent carbon retained almost all (98 99.99%) of the Hg; but when even a small fraction of the total Hg dissolves, the spent carbon can fail the TCLP test when the spent carbon contains high Hg concentrations. Localized areas in a carbon bed that become heated through heat of adsorption, to temperatures where oxidation occurs, are referred to as bed hot spots. Carbon bed hot spots must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Key to carbon bed hot spot mitigation are (a) designing for sufficient gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) monitoring and control of inlet gas flowrate, temperature, and composition, (c) monitoring and control of in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (d) most important, monitoring of bed outlet CO concentrations. An increase of CO levels in the off-gas downstream of the carbon bed to levels about 50-100 ppm higher than the inlet CO concentration indicate CO formation in the bed, caused by carbon bed hot spots. Corrective actions must be implemented quickly if bed hot spots are detected, using a graded approach and sequence starting with corrective actions that are simple, quick, cause the least impact to the process, and are easiest to recover from. Multiple high and high-high alarm levels should be used, with appropriate corrective actions for each level.

Nick Soelberg; Joe Enneking

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Carbon-dioxide-controlled ventilation study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The In-House Energy Management (IHEM) Program has been established by the U.S. Department of Energy to provide funds to federal laboratories to conduct research on energy-efficient technology. The Energy Sciences Department of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was tasked by IHEM to research the energy savings potential associated with reducing outdoor-air ventilation of buildings. By monitoring carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels in a building, outdoor air provided by the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system can be reduced to the percentage required to maintain satisfactory CO{sub 2} levels rather than ventilating with a higher outdoor-air percentage based on an arbitrary minimum outdoor-air setting. During summer months, warm outdoor air brought into a building for ventilation must be cooled to meet the appropriate cooling supply-air temperature, and during winter months, cold outdoor air must be heated. By minimizing the amount of hot or cold outdoor air brought into the HVAC system, the supply air requires less cooling or heating, saving energy and money. Additionally, the CO{sub 2} levels in a building can be monitored to ensure that adequate outdoor air is supplied to a building to maintain air quality levels. The two main considerations prior to implementing CO{sub 2}-based ventilation control are its impact on energy consumption and the adequacy of indoor air quality (IAQ) and occupant comfort. To address these considerations, six portable CO{sub 2} monitors were placed in several Hanford Site buildings to estimate the adequacy of office/workspace ventilation. The monitors assessed the potential for reducing the flow of outdoor-air to the buildings. A candidate building was also identified to monitor various ventilation control strategies for use in developing a plan for implementing and assessing energy savings.

McMordie, K.L.; Carroll, D.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Power System Backup Control Center Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) requested a reference document to aid control center managers in scoping, justifying, and planning backup control centers. This report serves as a guide for cost-effective implementation of a backup control center.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Density controlled carbon nanotube array electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

CNT materials comprising aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with pre-determined site densities, catalyst substrate materials for obtaining them and methods for forming aligned CNTs with controllable densities on such catalyst substrate materials are described. The fabrication of films comprising site-density controlled vertically aligned CNT arrays of the invention with variable field emission characteristics, whereby the field emission properties of the films are controlled by independently varying the length of CNTs in the aligned array within the film or by independently varying inter-tubule spacing of the CNTs within the array (site density) are disclosed. The fabrication of microelectrode arrays (MEAs) formed utilizing the carbon nanotube material of the invention is also described.

Ren, Zhifeng F. (Newton, MA); Tu, Yi (Belmont, MA)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

13

Emergency Diesel Generator Digital Control System Upgrade Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report documents the development of system requirements for a digital control system upgrade to the station emergency diesel generators (EDGs). Operators of nuclear power plants (NPPs) must be able to replace and upgrade equipment in a cost-effective manner while continuing to meet safety and reliability requirements and controlling modification costs. Upgrades to plant equipmentespecially instrumentation and control (I&C) systemstypically involve replacement of analog ...

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

14

Transient PrOx carbon monoxide measurement, control, and optimization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel processing systems for low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems require control of the carbon monoxide concentration to less than 100 ppm to 10 ppm in the anode feed. Conventional hydrocarbon fuel processors use a water-gas shift (WGS) reactor to react CO with water to form H2 and reduce the CO concentration. The CO conversion is limited by equilibrium at the outlet temperature of the WGS reactor. The WGS outlet CO concentration can range from over 1% to 2000 ppm depending on the system and its operating parameters. At these concentrations, CO poisons low temperature PEM fuel cells and the concentrations needs to be reduced further.

Inbody, M. A. (Michael A.); Borup, R. L. (Rodney L.); Tafoya, J. (Jose I.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Supercritical carbon dioxide cycle control analysis.  

SciTech Connect

This report documents work carried out during FY 2008 on further investigation of control strategies for supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle energy converters. The main focus of the present work has been on investigation of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle control and behavior under conditions not covered by previous work. An important scenario which has not been previously calculated involves cycle operation for a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) following a reactor scram event and the transition to the primary coolant natural circulation and decay heat removal. The Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Plant Dynamics Code has been applied to investigate the dynamic behavior of the 96 MWe (250 MWt) Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle following scram. The timescale for the primary sodium flowrate to coast down and the transition to natural circulation to occur was calculated with the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 computer code and found to be about 400 seconds. It is assumed that after this time, decay heat is removed by the normal ABTR shutdown heat removal system incorporating a dedicated shutdown heat removal S-CO{sub 2} pump and cooler. The ANL Plant Dynamics Code configured for the Small Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (SSTAR) Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) was utilized to model the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle with a decaying liquid metal coolant flow to the Pb-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchangers and temperatures reflecting the decaying core power and heat removal by the cycle. The results obtained in this manner are approximate but indicative of the cycle transient performance. The ANL Plant Dynamics Code calculations show that the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can operate for about 400 seconds following the reactor scram driven by the thermal energy stored in the reactor structures and coolant such that heat removal from the reactor exceeds the decay heat generation. Based on the results, requirements for the shutdown heat removal system may be defined. In particular, the peak heat removal capacity of the shutdown heat removal loop may be specified to be 1.1 % of the nominal reactor power. An investigation of the oscillating cycle behavior calculated by the ANL Plant Dynamics Code under specific conditions has been carried out. It has been found that the calculation of unstable operation of the cycle during power reduction to 0 % may be attributed to the modeling of main compressor operation. The most probable reason for such instabilities is the limit of applicability of the currently used one-dimensional compressor performance subroutines which are based on empirical loss coefficients. A development of more detailed compressor design and performance models is required and is recommended for future work in order to better investigate and possibly eliminate the calculated instabilities. Also, as part of such model development, more reliable surge criteria should be developed for compressor operation close to the critical point. It is expected that more detailed compressor models will be developed as a part of validation of the Plant Dynamics Code through model comparison with the experiment data generated in the small S-CO{sub 2} loops being constructed at Barber-Nichols Inc. and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). Although such a comparison activity had been planned to be initiated in FY 2008, data from the SNL compression loop currently in operation at Barber Nichols Inc. has not yet become available by the due date of this report. To enable the transient S-CO{sub 2} cycle investigations to be carried out, the ANL Plant Dynamics Code for the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle was further developed and improved. The improvements include further optimization and tuning of the control mechanisms as well as an adaptation of the code for reactor systems other than the Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR). Since the focus of the ANL work on S-CO{sub 2} cycle development for the majority of the current year has been on the applicability of the cycle to SFRs, work has started on modification of the ANL Plant Dynamics Code to allow

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

16

CARBON DIOXIDE MITIGATION THROUGH CONTROLLED PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research was undertaken to meet the need for a robust portfolio of carbon management options to ensure continued use of coal in electrical power generation. In response to this need, the Ohio Coal Research Center at Ohio University developed a novel technique to control the emissions of CO{sub 2} from fossil-fired power plants by growing organisms capable of converting CO{sub 2} to complex sugars through the process of photosynthesis. Once harvested, the organisms could be used in the production of fertilizer, as a biomass fuel, or fermented to produce alcohols. In this work, a mesophilic organism, Nostoc 86-3, was examined with respect to the use of thermophilic algae to recycle CO{sub 2} from scrubbed stack gases. The organisms were grown on stationary surfaces to facilitate algal stability and promote light distribution. The testing done throughout the year examined properties of CO{sub 2} concentration, temperature, light intensity, and light duration on process viability and the growth of the Nostoc. The results indicate that the Nostoc species is suitable only in a temperature range below 125 F, which may be practical given flue gas cooling. Further, results indicate that high lighting levels are not suitable for this organism, as bleaching occurs and growth rates are inhibited. Similarly, the organisms do not respond well to extended lighting durations, requiring a significant (greater than eight hour) dark cycle on a consistent basis. Other results indicate a relative insensitivity to CO{sub 2} levels between 7-12% and CO levels as high as 800 ppm. Other significant results alluded to previously, relate to the development of the overall process. Two processes developed during the year offer tremendous potential to enhance process viability. First, integration of solar collection and distribution technology from Oak Ridge laboratories could provide a significant space savings and enhanced use of solar energy. Second, the use of translating slug flow technology to cool the gas stream and enhance bicarbonate concentrations could both enhance organism growth rates and make the process one that could be applied at any fossil-fired power generation unit. These results were augmented by measurements of CO{sub 2} loss from the bioreactor test section. The corresponding mass balance was resolved to within 2%, which is remarkable for the low level of CO{sub 2} actually absorbed by the cyanobacteria. The net result was approximately 10.2 g of CO{sub 2} absorbed of the original 2.97 m{sup 3} of circulating flue gas, (or about 19% of the original CO{sub 2}). While this result in no way predicts the ability of the system to remove CO{sub 2} over the long term in a full-scale operating system, it appears to give credence to the workability of the system.

Unknown

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Carbon Technology III: Anode Quality Control - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fully automatic method for image analysis of porosity in baked carbon anodes has been developed. The method is based on optical microscopy, and is...

18

Server selection for carbon emission control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud owners are allowing their users to specify the level of resources being used in the different geographical locations that make up the cloud. The carbon emissions caused by powering these resources can vary greatly between different geographical ... Keywords: carbon emission, relative price function, subgradient method

Joseph Doyle; Donal O'Mahony; Robert Shorten

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Horizontal flow drilling requires focus on well control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Horizontal wells drilled underbalanced or while flowing must have surface equipment and a blow-out preventer stack specially designed for circulating operations. Functional well control methods for drilling horizontal wells have been developed in specific regions worldwide. Special safety equipment and procedures, however, are still required in most horizontal development applications. The challenge for horizontal drilling development and underbalanced drilling is to overcome the obstacles of government regulation, reduce pollution dangers, and improve personnel and equipment safety. Well control techniques tailored to the demands of each field can help overcome these challenges. Several well control elements must be addressed carefully on each horizontal well: drilling fluid requirements, well control procedures and equipment, and surface equipment and special considerations for handling hydrocarbons produced while drilling. The paper discusses each of these elements for underbalanced horizontal drilling.

Tangedahl, M.J. (RBOP Oil Tools International Inc., Houston, TX (United States))

1994-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

20

CARS Control Anomaly Recognition System: System Concept, Requirements, and Specifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents results of an initial study aimed at defining the system concept, principal requirements, and functional specification for a control anomaly recognition system (CARS) software tool. The purpose of the CARS software system is to assist nuclear power plant operators in the early detection of faults and anomalies in plant control systems before they cause reactor scrams or component damage. The diagnostic capability technology of CARS can support other process industries' applications b...

2002-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut

22

NERSC Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanocontrol of CO2 Nanocontrol of CO2 Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Goals * Collect experimental 2D-3D imaging data in order to investigate fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions; * Provide algorithms for better understanding of processes governing fluid-fluid and fluid-rock systems, related to geologic sequestration of CO2; * Develop image processing methods for analyzing experimental data and comparing it to simulations; * Detect/reconstruct material interfaces, quantify contact angles, derive contact angle distribution, etc. Impact * Unveil knowledge required for developing technology to store CO2 safely in deep surface rock formations, thus reducing amount of CO2 in atmosphere; More Personnel * CRD: Wes Bethel, Dani Ushizima, Gunther Weber (SciDAC-e award)

23

New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control October 4, 2013 - 4:23pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for carbon dioxide (CO2) demand ventilation control within the Federal sector. Benefits Demand ventilation control systems modulate ventilation levels based on current building occupancy, saving energy while still maintaining proper indoor air quality (IAQ). CO2 sensors are commonly used, but a multiple-parameter approach using total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), particulate matter (PM), formaldehyde, and relative humidity (RH) levels can also be used. CO2 sensors control the outside air damper to reduce the amount of outside air that needs to be conditioned and supplied to the building when

24

Aeroderivative Gas Turbines Can Meet Stringent NOx Control Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Turbines operating in the United States are required to meet federally mandated emission standards. This article will discuss how General Electric's LM industrial aeroderivative gas turbines are meeting NOx requirements as low as 25 parts per million using steam injection. The article will also describe the technical aspects of how water or steam injection can be used to supress NOx, what emission levels GE will guarantee and detail some recently obtained test results. The side benefits of water or steam injection for controlling NOx emissions will be discussed. Steam injection has a very favorable effect on engine performance raising both the power output and efficiency. As an example, full steam injection in the GE LM5000 gas turbine increases the power output from 34 MW to 52 MW while lowering the heat rate from 9,152 Btu/kWh to 7,684 Btu/kWh when fired on natural gas. Water injection increases power output at a slightly decreased thermal efficiency. When steam is injected, NOx can be controlled to 25 ppm (referenced to 15 percent O2) which is sufficient to comply with the most stringent requirements imposed in areas where water or steam injection is considered best available control technology (BACT). Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) systems are currently employed in areas with Lowest Achievable Emissions Requirements. SCRs have been proposed as BACT in several areas such as the Bay area of California and the state of New Jersey. These systems are expensive to install and operate, and this cost impact can cause many projects to become economically non-viable. Cost comparisons for NOx removal using an SCR in combination with the steam injection will demonstrate the large incremental cost incurred when NOx is controlled using an SCR. Lastly, a case will be made for not imposing SCR as BACT in that it would close the door on further research and development for better, cost-effective methods of NOx control.

Keller, S. C.; Studniarz, J. J.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Carbon Nanotube Materials for Substrate Enhanced Control of Catalytic Activity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon SWNTs are attractive materials for supporting electrocatalysts. The properties of SWNTs are highly tunable and controlled by the nanotube's circumferential periodicity and their surface chemistry. These unique characteristics suggest that architectures constructed from these types of carbon support materials would exhibit interesting and useful properties. Here, we expect that the structure of the carbon nanotube support will play a major role in stabilizing metal electrocatalysts under extreme operating conditions and suppress both catalyst and support degradation. Furthermore, the chemical modification of the carbon nanotube surfaces can be expected to alter the interface between the catalyst and support, thus, enhancing the activity and utilization of the electrocatalysts. We plan to incorporate discrete reaction sites into the carbon nanotube lattice to create intimate electrical contacts with the catalyst particles to increase the metal catalyst activity and utilization. The work involves materials synthesis, design of electrode architectures on the nanoscale, control of the electronic, ionic, and mass fluxes, and use of advanced optical spectroscopy techniques.

Heben, M.; Dillon, A. C.; Engtrakul, C.; Lee, S.-H.; Kelley, R. D.; Kini, A. M.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

NETL: Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

product. The FFR concept solves this problem. The technology increases the efficiency of NOx reduction in coal reburning and decreases carbon-in ash. FFR can achieve the same...

27

Environmental control technology for atmospheric carbon dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of fossil fuel use in the United States on worldwide CO/sub 2/ emissions and the impact of increased coal utilization on CO/sub 2/ emission rates are assessed. The aspects of CO/sub 2/ control are discussed as well as the available CO/sub 2/ control points (CO/sub 2/ removal sites). Two control scenarios are evaluated, one based on the absorption of CO/sub 2/ contained in power plant flue gas by seawater; the other, based on absorption of CO/sub 2/ by MEA (Mono Ethanol Amine). Captured CO/sub 2/ is injected into the deep ocean in both cases. The analyses indicate that capture and disposal by seawater is energetically not feasible, whereas capture and disposal using MEA is a possibility. However, the economic penalities of CO/sub 2/ control are significant. The use of non-fossil energy sources, such as hydroelectric, nuclear or solar energy is considered as an alternative for limiting and controlling CO/sub 2/ emissions resulting from fossil energy usage.

Steinberg, M.; Albanese, A.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Energy, Carbon-emission and Financial Savings from Thermostat Control  

SciTech Connect

Among the easiest approaches to energy, and cost, savings for most people is the adjustment of thermostats to save energy. Here we estimate savings of energy, carbon, and money in the United States of America (USA) that would result from adjusting thermostats in residential and commercial buildings by about half a degree Celsius downward during the heating season and upward during the cooling season. To obtain as small a unit as possible, and therefore the least likely to be noticeable by most people, we selected an adjustment of one degree Fahrenheit (0.56 degree Celsius) which is the gradation used almost exclusively on thermostats in the USA and is the smallest unit of temperature that has been used historically. Heating and/or cooling of interior building space for personal comfort is sometimes referred to as space conditioning, a term we will use for convenience throughout this work without consideration of humidity. Thermostat adjustment, as we use the term here, applies to thermostats that control the indoor temperature, and not to other thermostats such as those on water heaters. We track emissions of carbon only, rather than of carbon dioxide, because carbon atoms change atomic partners as they move through the carbon cycle, from atmosphere to biosphere or ocean and, on longer time scales, through the rock cycle. To convert a mass of carbon to an equivalent mass of carbon dioxide (thereby including the mass of the 2 oxygen atoms in each molecule) simply multiply by 3.67.

Blasing, T J [ORNL; Schroeder, Dana [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Electrospun Carbon Nanofiber Webs with Controlled Density of States for Sensor Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrospun carbon nanofiber (CNF) webs with controlled density of states (DOS) are synthesized through varying the carbonization conditions to manipulate the concentration of nanosized graphite domains. These materials ...

Mao, Xianwen

30

Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field TesTing oF AcTivATed cArbon Field TesTing oF AcTivATed cArbon injecTion opTions For Mercury conTrol AT TXu's big brown sTATion Background The 2005 Clean Air Mercury Rule will require significant reductions in mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. Lignite coal is unique because of its highly variable ash content (rich in alkali and alkaline-earth elements), high moisture levels, low chlorine content, and high calcium content. Unique to Texas lignite coals are relatively high iron and selenium concentrations. When combusting Texas lignite coals, up to 80 percent of the mercury in the flue gas is present as elemental mercury, which is not readily captured by downstream pollution control devices. To better understand the factors that influence mercury control at units firing

31

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Long-Term Carbon Injection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Long-Term Carbon Injection Field Test for > 90% Long-Term Carbon Injection Field Test for > 90% Mercury Removal for a PRB Unit with a Spray Drier and Fabric Filter The intent of DOE's Phase I and II field tests was to work with industry to evaluate the most promising mercury control technologies at full-scale in a variety of configurations. Although longer-term tests were conducted, the test period was not sufficient to answer many fundamental questions about long-term consistency of mercury removal and reliability of the system when integrated with plant processes. As the technologies move towards commercial implementation, it is critical to accurately define the mercury removal performance and costs so that power companies and policy makers can make informed decisions. Therefore, the overall objective of this Phase III project is to determine the mercury removal performance, long-term emissions variability, and associated O&M costs of activated carbon injection for >90% mercury control over a 10 to 12 month period on a unit that represents the combination of coal and emission control equipment that will be used for many new and existing power plants.

32

Solar power system requiring no active control device  

SciTech Connect

A solar power system has a photovoltaic array having a locus of peak power points for various insolation levels, a voltage-dependent variable resistance load such as a water electrolysis unit electrically connected to the array, and a demand-dependent variable resistance load such as a dc to ac inverter connected in parallel with the electrolysis unit. The electrolysis unit or other voltage-dependent variable resistance load has a voltage-current characteristic in which the operating point is displaced from the array's peak power point for most insolation levels. The characteristic is displaced towards higher voltage-lower current operating points. The inverter may move the operating point of the photovoltaic array toward its peak power point when the load requires power. The system may be designed so that the array operates within about 5 percent of its peak power point over a wide range of inverter power demands. A fuel cell may be connected in parallel with the array to provide power to the inverter at low insolation levels, at night or in low sunlight. The fuel cell may use the hydrogen produced by the electrolysis unit for fuel. The total photovoltaic power made available by the system of this invention is generally greater than 95 percent and often greater than 98 percent of the maximum power which the photovoltaic array may produce for many insolation levels.

Tison, R.R.

1982-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

33

Intelligent control aeration and external carbon addition for improving nitrogen removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuzzy logic can in several ways be applied to improve the control of the activated sludge system. In this paper, fuzzy logic based control strategies for external carbon flow in the anoxic zone and dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in the aerobic zone ... Keywords: Energy saving, External carbon addition, Fuzzy control, Nitrogen removal, Predenitrification process

M. Yong; P. Yong-zhen; W. Xiao-lian; W. Shu-ying

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Control of carbon balance in a silicon smelting furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a process for the carbothermic reduction of silicon dioxide to form elemental silicon. Carbon balance of the process is assessed by measuring the amount of carbon monoxide evolved in offgas exiting the furnace. A ratio of the amount of carbon monoxide evolved and the amount of silicon dioxide added to the furnace is determined. Based on this ratio, the carbon balance of the furnace can be determined and carbon feed can be adjusted to maintain the furnace in carbon balance.

Dosaj, V.D.; Haines, C.M.; May, J.B.; Oleson, J.D.

1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

35

Impacts of Low-NOX Combustion and Activated Carbon Injection on Particulate Control Device Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model study of the re-entrainment of carbon from the hoppers of a typical utility electrostatic precipitator (ESP). During earlier phases of this study, hopper re-entrainment was identified as the principle mechanism responsible for the low collection efficiency of carbon by ESPs. This statement was found to be true for both unburned carbon from the boiler and activated carbon injected for mercury control. The results indicate tha...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Interoperability requirements for a South African joint command and control test facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The South African National Defence Force is in the process of establishing a Joint Command and Control Test Facility at a National Research Institute. The goal with this facility is to provide an integrated environment for Joint Command and Control doctrine ... Keywords: architectures, interoperability requirements, joint command & control, service-orientated architectures, test facility

Willem H. le Roux

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Software requirements specification for the program analysis and control system risk management module  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TWR Program Analysis and Control System Risk Module is used to facilitate specific data processes surrounding the Risk Management program of the Tank Waste Retrieval environment. This document contains the Risk Management system requirements of the database system.

SCHAEFER, J.C.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

38

Integration of Distributed Resources in Electric Utility Systems: Functional Definition for Communication and Control Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accelerating commercialization of distributed resources (DR) has created the need for improved practices for integrating them with electric utility distribution systems. A functional definition of DR for defining communication and control requirements in electric utility distribution systems is provided. The report is a tool that readers can use in developing communication and control strategies for DR in specific distribution systems.

1998-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

39

Monitoring and control requirement definition study for dispersed storage and generation (DSG). Volume II. Final report, Appendix A: selected DSG technologies and their general control requirements  

SciTech Connect

A major aim of the US National Energy Policy, as well as that of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, is to conserve energy and to shift from oil to more abundant domestic fuels and renewable energy sources. Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG) is the term that characterizes the present and future dispersed, relatively small (<30 MW) energy systems, such as solar thermal electric, photovoltaic, wind, fuel cell, storage battery, hydro, and cogeneration, which can help achieve these national energy goals and can be dispersed throughout the distribution portion of an electric utility system. The purpose of this survey and identification of DSG technologies is to present an understanding of the special characteristics of each of these technologies in sufficient detail so that the physical principles of their operation and the internal control of each technology are evident. In this way, a better appreciation can be obtained of the monitoring and control requirements for these DSGs from a remote distribution dispatch center. A consistent approach is being sought for both hardware and software which will handle the monitoring and control necessary to integrate a number of different DSG technologies into a common distribution dispatch network. From this study it appears that the control of each of the DSG technologies is compatible with a supervisory control method of operation that lends itself to remote control from a distribution dispatch center.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Control strategies for supercritical carbon dioxide power conversion systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-C02) recompression cycle is a promising advanced power conversion cycle which couples well to numerous advanced nuclear reactor designs. This thesis investigates the dynamic simulation ...

Carstens, Nathan, 1978-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Addressing Control of Hazardous Energy (COHE) Requirements in a Laser Safety Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OSHA regulation 29CFR1910.147 specifies control of hazardous energy requirements for 'the servicing and maintenance of machines and equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the machines or equipment, or release of stored energy could cause injury to employees.' Class 3B and Class 4 laser beams must be considered hazardous energy sources because of the potential for serious eye injury; careful consideration is therefore needed to safely de-energize these lasers. This paper discusses and evaluates control of hazardous energy principles in this OSHA regulation, in ANSI Z136.1 ''Safe Use of Lasers,'' and in ANSI Z244.1 ''Control of Hazardous Energy, Lockout/Tagout and Alternative Methods.'' Recommendations are made for updating and improving CoHE (control of hazardous energy) requirements in these standards for their applicability to safe laser operations.

Woods, Michael; /SLAC

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Climate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the relationships between climate and carbon exchange by terrestrial ecosystems is critical to predict future levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide because of the potential accelerating effects of positive climate carbon cycle feedbacks. However, directly observed relationships between climate and terrestrial CO2 exchange with the atmosphere across biomes and continents are lacking. Here we present data describing the relationships between net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) and climate factors as measured using the eddy covariance method at 125 unique sites in various ecosystems over six continents with a total of 559 site-years. We find that NEE observed at eddy covariance sites is (1) a strong function of mean annual temperature at mid- and high-latitudes, (2) a strong function of dryness at mid- and low-latitudes, and (3) a function of both temperature and dryness around the mid-latitudinal belt (45 N). The sensitivity of NEE to mean annual temperature breaks down at ~ 16 C (a threshold value of mean annual temperature), above which no further increase of CO2 uptake with temperature was observed and dryness influence overrules temperature influence.

Ricciuto, Daniel M [ORNL; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Underwater robots require adequate guidance and control to perform useful tasks. Visual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Underwater robots require adequate guidance and control to perform useful tasks. Visual trained by reinforcement learn- ing our aim is to enable an underwater robot to hold station on a reef technologies for underwater exploration and obser- vation. Our objectives are to enable underwater robots

44

Sensing Requirements for Real-Time Monitoring and Control in Energy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of coal (syngas), requires physical and chemical sensors for exhaust gas monitoring as well as real-time control of the combustion process. Following a description of syngas production from coal, we outline species at 630 °C. Our SiC sensor can monitor the hydrogen concentration in a 350 °C simulated syngas

Ghosh, Ruby N.

45

Structural Synthesis Of Programs From Refined User Requirements (Programming boiler control in NUT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of using a declarative language as a tool for automated implementation of requirements written in a semiformal manner. The technique of structural synthesis of programs based on automatic proof search in intuitionistic propositional calculus implemented in the NUT system is used for solving the steam-boiler problem. The goal of the experiment is to bridge a gap between the language of requirements and an implementation. An appropriate set of concepts is developed for representing the problem, i.e. writing the requirements in a form understandable by the program synthesis tools. A complete implementation, including simulator of the actual steam-boiler and control panel, is written in NUT. 1.0 Introduction This paper concerns automatic application of formal methods in implementation of industrial control systems. The idea is to use an extensible very high level language, extending it with a set of concepts sufficient for writing req...

M. Addibpour; E. Tyugu; M. Addibpour E. Tyugu [mattin

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Monitoring and control requirement definition study for dispersed storage and generation (DSG). Volume I. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG) is the term that characterizes the present and future dispersed, relatively small (<30 MW) energy systems, such as solar thermal electric, photovoltaic, wind, fuel cell, storage battery, hydro, and cogeneration, that can help achieve national energy conservation goals and can be dispersed throughout the distribution portion of an electric utility system. A study of trends reveals that the need for DSG monitoring and control equipment by 1990 to 2000 will be great, measured in tens of thousands. Criteria for assessing DSG integration have been defined and indicate that economic and institutional as well as technical and other factors must be included. The principal emphasis in this report is on the functional requirements for DSG monitoring and control in six major categories. Twenty-four functional requirements have been prepared under these six categories and serve to indicate how to integrate the DSGs with the distribution and other portions of the electric utility system. The results indicate that there are no fundamental technical obstacles to prevent the connection of dispersed storage and generation to the distribution system. However, a communication system of some sophistication will be required to integrate the distribution system and the dispersed generation sources for effective control. The large-size span of generators from 10 kW to 30 MW means that a variety of remote monitoring and control may be required. The results show that an increased effort is required to develop demonstration equipment to perform the DSG monitoring and control functions and to acquire experience with this equipment in the utility distribution environment.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Energy Requirement of Control: Comments on Maxwell's Demon and Szilard's Engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In mathematical physical analyses of Maxwell's demon and Szilard's engine, a general assumption (explicit or implicit) is that one can neglect the energy needed for driving the trap door in the Maxwell demon and for relocating the piston in the Szilard engine. If this basic assumption is wrong, then the conclusions of a vast literature on the implications of the Second Law of Thermodynamics and Landauer's erasure theorem are incorrect too. Our analysis indicates that the permitted errors in the control, the friction, the velocity versus the thermal velocity, and the quantization of electrical charge play crucial roles in determining the minimum energy requirement of velocity control. The analysis further indicates that the ultimate minimum energy requirements of continuous control of the trapdoor and the piston are much greater than the energy that the Maxwell demon and Szilard engine are able to produce even if all other sources of dissipation (measurement, decision, memory, etc) are neglected.

Kish, Laszlo B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Design and Implementation of Remote-Controlled Smart Home Network for Energy Saving and Carbon Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the lack of energy and greenhouse effect, how to building a smart home network for energy saving and carbon reduction is an important issue in the world. This paper presents a remote-control smart home energy conservation system with infrared ... Keywords: Energy saving, Smart Grid, Smart power controller, Energy Management

Ying-Chang Hsiao; Wen-Ping Chen; Jen-Chih Hsu; Yuan-Hsu Chang Chien

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Primary productivity control of simulated carbon cycle-climate feedbacks. Geophys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] Positive feedbacks between the terrestrial carbon cycle and climate represent an outstanding area of uncertainty in simulations of future climate change. Coupled climatecarbon cycle models have simulated widely divergent feedback magnitudes, and attempts to explain model differences have had only limited success. In this study, we demonstrate that the response of vegetation primary productivity to climate changes is a critical controlling factor in determining the strength of simulated carbon cycle-climate feedbacks. This conclusion sheds new light on coupled climate-carbon cycle model results, and highlights the need for improved model representation of photosynthesis processes so as to better constrain future projections of climate change. Citation: Matthews, H. D.,

H. Damon Matthews; Michael Eby; Andrew J. Weaver; Barbara J. Hawkins; M. Eby; A. J. Weaver; B. J. Hawkins

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Identification of Critical Voltage Control Areas and Determination of Required Reactive Power Reserves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research project is to investigate and devise a methodology for identifying areas in power systems that are prone to voltage instability under particular operating conditions and contingencies. These areas, which are prone to instability due to their lack of reactive power reserves, are referred to as critical voltage control areas (VCAs). Once VCAs are identified, methods of determining their adequate reactive power reserve requirements to ensure secure system operation under all c...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

51

Controlled deformation of critical truss members using magnetorheological dampers with reversed power requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A magnetorheological (MR) damper exhibits a variable damping coefficient depending on the strength of an accompanying magnetic field. A high magnetic field creates a nearly unyielding damper filled with a semi-solid fluid while no magnetic field produces an ordinary viscous damper. Presently, these dampers are being used in a variety of ways by supplying power to an electromagnet that causes stiffening of the damper. Reversing these power requirements allows development of new and innovative applications for MR dampers. For example, ephemeral deformation of critical truss members may be controlled through a reverse MR damper. The goal is to provide protection to truss structures during severe loading events. Implementation of a reverse damper for an application such as this presents two major tasks: (1) development of a control algorithm and (2) design of an MR damper with reverse power requirements. A control algorithm for dynamic response that uses fuzzy logic and neural networks is presented. A potential design for a reverse MR damper utilizing a combination of permanent magnets and electromagnets is also presented. It is further shown that design for MR dampers with reverse power requirements will be governed by minimization of detrimental effects due to creep of the damper under sustained static loading.

Dowd, Joseph A

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

''Conventional'' waste landfills emit methane, a potent greenhouse gas, in quantities such that landfill methane is a major factor in global climate change. Controlled landfilling is a novel approach to manage landfills for rapid completion of total gas generation, maximizing gas capture and minimizing emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated and brought to much earlier completion by improving conditions for biological processes (principally moisture levels) in the landfill. Gas recovery efficiency approaches 100% through use of surface membrane cover over porous gas recovery layers operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project's results at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California are, to date, highly encouraging. Two major controlled landfilling benefits would be the reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions.

Don Augenstein

1999-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

53

Genetic and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications for Terrestrial Ecosystems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications for Terrestrial Ecosystems G.A. Tuskan (tuskanga@ornl.gov; 865-576-8141) S.D. Wullschleger (wullschlegsd@ornl.gov; 865-574-7839) A.W. King (kingaw@ornl.gov; 865-576-3436) T.J. Tschaplinski (tschaplinstj@ornl.gov; 865-574-4597) L.E. Gunter (gunterle@ornl.gov; 865-574-4020) A.M. Silletti (sillettia@ornl.gov; 865-574-5397) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6422 M. Davis (Mark_Davis@nrel.gov; 303-384-6140) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401-3322 Introduction Carbon sequestration in terrestrial vegetation and soils is a poorly understood process, but ultimately represents a summation of biological activities including the initial incorporation of

54

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlled landfilling is an approach to manage solid waste landfills, so as to rapidly complete methane generation, while maximizing gas capture and minimizing the usual emissions of methane to the atmosphere. With controlled landfilling, methane generation is accelerated to more rapid and earlier completion to full potential by improving conditions (principally moisture, but also temperature) to optimize biological processes occurring within the landfill. Gas is contained through use of surface membrane cover. Gas is captured via porous layers, under the cover, operated at slight vacuum. A field demonstration project has been ongoing under NETL sponsorship for the past several years near Davis, CA. Results have been extremely encouraging. Two major benefits of the technology are reduction of landfill methane emissions to minuscule levels, and the recovery of greater amounts of landfill methane energy in much shorter times, more predictably, than with conventional landfill practice. With the large amount of US landfill methane generated, and greenhouse potency of methane, better landfill methane control can play a substantial role both in reduction of US greenhouse gas emissions and in US renewable energy. The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

Don Augenstein; Ramin Yazdani; Rick Moore; Michelle Byars; Jeff Kieffer; Professor Morton Barlaz; Rinav Mehta

2000-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

55

Application of Polymer Gels as Conformance Control Agents for Carbon Dioxide for Floods in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the production from mature oil fields declining, the increasing demand of oil urges towards more effective recovery of the available resources. Currently, the CO2 Floods are the second most applied EOR processes in the world behind steam injection. With more than 30 years of experience gained from CO2 flooding, successful projects have showed incremental oil recovery ranging from 7 to 15 % of the oil initially in place. Despite all of the anticipated success of CO2 floods, its viscosity nature is in heterogeneous and naturally fractured reservoirs is challenging; CO2 will flow preferentially through the easiest paths resulting in early breakthrough and extraction ineffectiveness leaving zones of oil intact. This research aims at investigating gel treatments and viscosified water-alternating-gas CO2 mobility control techniques. A set of experiments have been conducted to verify the effectiveness and practicality of the proposed mobility control approaches. Our research employed an imaging technique integrating an X-Ray CT scanner with a CT friendly aluminum coreflood cell. With the integrated systems, we were able to obtain real time images when processed provide qualitative and qualitative evaluations to the coreflood. The research studies included preliminary studies of CO2 and water injection performance in fractured and unfractured cores. These experiments provided a base performance to which the performances of the mobility control attempts were compared. We have applied the same methodology in evaluation of the experimental results to both conformance control gel treatments and viscosified water-alternating-gas CO2 mobility control. The gel conformance control studies showed encouraging results in minimizing the effect of heterogeneities directing the injected CO2 to extract more oil from the low permeability zones; the gel strength was evaluated in terms of breakdown and leakoff utilizing the production data aided with CT imaging analysis. The viscosified water coupled with CO2 investigations showed great promising results proving the superiority over neat CO2 injection. This research serves as a preliminary understanding to the applicability of tested mobility control approaches providing a base to future studies in this category of research.

Al Ali, Ali 1986-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

DOE/NETL's phase II mercury control technology field testing program: preliminary economic analysis of activated carbon injection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on results of field testing conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), this article provides preliminary costs for mercury control via conventional activated carbon injection (ACI), brominated ACI, and conventional ACI coupled with the application of a sorbent enhancement additive (SEA) to coal prior to combustion. The economic analyses are reported on a plant-specific basis in terms of the cost required to achieve low (50%), mid (70%), and high (90%) levels of mercury removal 'above and beyond' the baseline mercury removal achieved by existing emission control equipment. In other words, the levels of mercury control are directly attributable to ACI. Mercury control costs via ACI have been amortized on a current dollar basis. Using a 20-year book life, levelized costs for the incremental increase in cost of electricity (COE), expressed in mills per kilowatt-hour (mills/kWh), and the incremental cost of mercury control, expressed in dollars per pound of mercury removed ($/lb Hg removed), have been calculated for each level of ACI mercury control. For this analysis, the increase in COE varied from 0.14 mills/kWh to 3.92 mills/kWh. Meanwhile, the incremental cost of mercury control ranged from $3810/lb Hg removed to $166 000/lb Hg removed. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Andrew P. Jones; Jeffrey W. Hoffmann; Dennis N. Smith; Thomas J. Feeley III; James T. Murphy [National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

57

Diameter-controlled Growth of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes by Using Nano-Diamonds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diameter-controlled Growth of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes by Using Nano-Diamonds Shohei Chiashi diameter attract attention. Here, we perform CVD growth by using nano-diamond particles as the catalyst [1] and investigate the CVD condition dependence of SWNT tube diameter. The average diameter of the as-received nano

Maruyama, Shigeo

58

2010 EPRI-Southern Company Services Activated Carbon Mercury Control Workshop Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed a maximum achievable control technology ruling for air toxics on March 16, 2011. The proposed rule would impose new emission limits on mercury, acid gases, and particulate matter (as a surrogate for non-mercury metallic pollutants such as arsenic) from coal-fired power plants. These new limits are in addition to already existing mercury emissions limits imposed by many states. Activated carbon injection (ACI) is one of the leading control options to...

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

59

LANDFILL OPERATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND MAXIMUM METHANE EMISSION CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work described in this report, to demonstrate and advance this technology, has used two demonstration-scale cells of size (8000 metric tons [tonnes]), sufficient to replicate many heat and compaction characteristics of larger ''full-scale'' landfills. An enhanced demonstration cell has received moisture supplementation to field capacity. This is the maximum moisture waste can hold while still limiting liquid drainage rate to minimal and safely manageable levels. The enhanced landfill module was compared to a parallel control landfill module receiving no moisture additions. Gas recovery has continued for a period of over 4 years. It is quite encouraging that the enhanced cell methane recovery has been close to 10-fold that experienced with conventional landfills. This is the highest methane recovery rate per unit waste, and thus progress toward stabilization, documented anywhere for such a large waste mass. This high recovery rate is attributed to moisture, and elevated temperature attained inexpensively during startup. Economic analyses performed under Phase I of this NETL contract indicate ''greenhouse cost effectiveness'' to be excellent. Other benefits include substantial waste volume loss (over 30%) which translates to extended landfill life. Other environmental benefits include rapidly improved quality and stabilization (lowered pollutant levels) in liquid leachate which drains from the waste.

Don Augenstein

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Implementing Performance-Based Sustainability Requirements for the Low Carbon Fuel Standard Key Design Elements and Policy Considerations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. Wilhelm. 2008. Sustainable Biofuels Redux. Science 322 (Dileep K. Birur. 2008. Biofuels for all? Understanding theof carbon labels for biofuels in the UK. London, UK: Home

Yeh, Sonia; Sumner, Daniel A.; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Ogden, J; Jenkins, Bryan M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Implementing Performance-Based Sustainability Requirements for the Low Carbon Fuel Standard Key Design Elements and Policy Considerations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Land Clearing and the Biofuel Carbon Debt. Science 319 (Research Council. OECD. 2008. Biofuel Support Policies: An2007. Challenge of biofuel: filling the tank without

Yeh, Sonia; Sumner, Daniel A.; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Ogden, J; Jenkins, Bryan M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 5. Science Applications, Incorporated system requirements definition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report sets forth the system requirements for a Solar Controlled-Environment Agriculture System (SCEAS) Project. In the report a conceptual baseline system description for an engineering test facility is given. This baseline system employs a fluid roof/roof filter in combination with a large storage tank and a ground water heat exchanger in order to provide cooling and heating as needed. Desalination is accomplished by pretreatment followed by reverse osmosis. Energy is provided by means of photovoltaics and wind machines in conjunction with storage batteries. Site and climatic data needed in the design process are given. System performance specifications and integrated system design criteria are set forth. Detailed subsystem design criteria are presented and appropriate references documented.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Control requirements for cogen and microgen plants in a deregulated electricity industry  

SciTech Connect

The deregulation of the electricity production and distribution industry provides opportunities and concerns to the end-users as well as to the electricity producing companies. The end-user objective is to get a reliable source of electrical energy at the lowest rate possible. On the other hand, the primary objective of the three providing companies--generation, transmission, and local distribution--is to profit while satisfying their customers' needs. These three companies may compete for the same customer, and new competitors may enter the arena. The existing technology of the cogeneration plant and the emergence of the microgenerating plant will be used by all the providers and by the end-users to achieve their objectives. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the concept of operation of the microgenerating plant, to identify the requirements of each interested player, and to introduce control strategies.

Shavit, G.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Controls on isolated carbonate platform evolution and demise, Central Luconia Province, South China Sea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerous isolated carbonate platforms developed in the Central Luconia Province of offshore Sarawak (during Middle to Late Miocene time). Fault-bounded highs produced largely by extensional deformation and later overprinted by strike-slip deformation provided substrates for the platforms and affected their growth histories. Flooding of these structural highs at ~16.5 Ma initiated carbonate sedimentation nearly simultaneously across the area. Later, third-order sea-level fluctuations and extrinsic factors such as differential subsidence, paleowind patterns and siliciclastic influx then controlled the internal architecture of the platforms. 2-D regional seismic lines, publicdomain data and published literature were used to analyze growth patterns and demise of carbonate platforms across the study area. Five Growth Stages were recognized in the carbonate platforms based on seismic facies analysis and stratigraphic relationships between reflectors. Platforms from the southeastern part of Central Luconia are thicker and larger than platforms located toward the central and northwestern areas, which reflect greater long-term tectonic subsidence to the southeast. Additionally, northwestward prograding siliciclastic sediments from mainland Borneo caused additional flexural subsidence in the eastern part of the area and environmental deterioration for platforms located beyond the range of active siliciclastic sedimentation. Both of these factors reduced the growth potential of platforms and thus subdued carbonate development. Platform termination was regionally diachronous and was produced in two steps. The first platforms drowned (~12.5-9.7 Ma) were in the eastern parts of the study area which were affected by incoming siliciclastic sediments and high local subsidence. Platforms drowned later (~6.3-5.5 Ma) were caused by a rapid sea-level rise combined with an intense local subsidence. Carbonate accumulation rates were measured between intraplatform markers, resulting in a trend that indicates a decrease in sedimentation rate with the square root of time. Comparisons between Central Luconia carbonates and age-equivalent carbonate platforms elsewhere in East Natuna Basin showed that Central Luconia carbonate platforms were drowned earlier (latest late Miocene time) than East Natuna carbonate platforms (Early Pliocene time).

Olave Hoces, Sergio

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Plant control building design requirements specification (RADL Item 7-26)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The room areas required for the upper level of the building are identified and described. Architectural/structural and electrical requirements are stated, as are requirements for the space HVAC system. (LEW)

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

OFF-GAS MERCURY CONTROL USING SULFUR-IMPREGNATED ACTIVATED CARBON TEST RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Several laboratory and pilot-scale tests since the year 2000 have included demonstrations of off-gas mercury control using fixed bed, sulfur-impregnated activated carbon. These demonstrations have included operation of carbon beds with gas streams containing a wide range of mercury and other gas species concentrations representing off-gas from several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) mixed waste treatment processes including electrical resistance heated (joule-heated) glass melters, fluidized bed calciners, and fluidized bed steam reformers. Surrogates of various DOE mixed waste streams (or surrogates of offgas from DOE mixed waste streams) including INL sodium bearing waste (SBW), liquid low activity waste (LAW) from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and liquid waste from Savannah River National Laboratory (Tank 48H waste) have been tested. Test results demonstrate mercury control efficiencies up to 99.999%, high enough to comply with the Hazardous Waste (HWC) Combustor Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards even when the uncontrolled off-gas mercury concentrations exceed 400,000 ug/dscm (at 7% O2), and confirm carbon bed design parameters for such high efficiencies. Results of several different pilot-scale and engineering-scale test programs performed over several years are presented and compared.

Nick Soelberg

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

System requirements for one-time-use ENRAF control panel software  

SciTech Connect

An Enraf Densitometer is installed on tank 241-AY-102. The Densitometer will frequently be tasked to obtain and log density profiles. The activity can be effected a number of ways. Enraf Incorporated provides a software package called ''Logger18'' to its customers for the purpose of in-shop testing of their gauges. Logger18 is capable of accepting an input file which can direct the gauge to obtain a density profile for a given tank level and bottom limit. Logger18 is a complex, DOS based program which will require trained technicians and/or tank farm entries to obtain the data. ALARA considerations have prompted the development of a more user-friendly, computer-based interface to the Enraf densitometers. This document records the plan by which this new Enraf data acquisition software will be developed, reviewed, verified, and released. This plan applies to the development and implementation of a one-time-use software program, which will be called ''Enraf Control Panel.'' The software will be primarily used for remote operation of Enraf Densitometers for the purpose of obtaining and logging tank product density profiles.

HUBER, J.H.

1999-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

68

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Liquid addition has commenced in the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and the 6-acre anaerobic cell. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell is nearly complete with only the biofilter remaining and is scheduled to be complete by the end of August 2003. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Construction is complete on the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and liquid addition has commenced. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell is nearly complete with only the biofilter remaining and construction of the west-side 6-acre anaerobic cell is nearly complete with only the liquid addition system remaining. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Construction is complete on the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and liquid addition has commenced. Construction of the 2.5 acre aerobic cell is nearly complete with only the blower station and biofilter remaining. Waste placement and instrumentation installation is ongoing in the west-side 6-acre anaerobic cell. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Full Scale Bioreactor Landfill for Carbon Sequestration and Greenhouse Emission Control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works constructed a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective was to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entailed the construction of a 12-acre module that contained a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells were highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Liquid addition commenced in the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and the 6-acre anaerobic cell. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell and biofilter has been completed. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Kathy Sananikone; Don Augenstein

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

72

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition and maximum landfill gas generation and capture for carbon sequestration and greenhouse emission control. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Liquid addition has commenced in the 3.5-acre anaerobic cell and the 6-acre anaerobic cell. Construction of the 2.5-acre aerobic cell and biofilter has been completed. The remaining task to be completed is to test the biofilter prior to operation, which is currently anticipated to begin in January 2004. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Implementing Performance-Based Sustainability Requirements for the Low Carbon Fuel Standard Key Design Elements and Policy Considerations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

requirements for corn ethanol, cellulosic biofuel, andmoderate than those of corn ethanol (OECD 2008; Searchingergeneration biofuels such as corn ethanol, but at the cost of

Yeh, Sonia; Sumner, Daniel A.; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Ogden, J; Jenkins, Bryan M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Optimizing the Binding Energy of Hydrogen on Nanostructured Carbon Materials through Structure Control and Chemical Doping  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The second phase of the project involved developing a low-cost and scalable approach for the synthesis of microporous carbon materials with well-controlled pore sizes that would be suitable for hydrogen storage. The team studied several approaches, including the use of different zeolites as a template, the use of organic micelle structures as a template, and the slow oxidation of polymer precursors. Among them, the slow activation of Polyether ether ketone (PEEK) under either CO2 environment or H2O vapor produced microporous carbon with an average pore size of less than 2 nm. Initial testing at 77K at both NREL and the California Institute of Technology (CalTech) showed that these materials can store ~5.1 wt% hydrogen (excess) at 40 bar and 77K. The main feature to note with this material is that while the excess gravimetric capacities (>5 wt% at 77K) and specific surface areas (>3100 m2/g) are similar to AX-21 and other super activated commercial carbon sorbents at the same temperatures and pressures, due to the smaller pore sizes, bulk densities greater than 0.7 g/ml can be achieved, enabling excess volumetric capacities greater than 35 g/L; more than double that of AX-21.

Jie Liu

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Client Side Requirements for Data Acquisition and Control Subsystems for Distribution Automation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

International standards such as those emerging from the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) have more capability to not only execute power engineering applications but to assist in the management and security of the next generation of automation equipment. Development of products and equipment that build on open standards such as IEC 61850 requires these steps to define the initial requirements for equipment that can take advantage of the advanced capabilities of these standards. Development ...

2004-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

76

Open-cycle MHD power conditioning and control requirements definition. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In this report a generic inverter configuration is defined, and the relevant characteristics of line- and forced-commutated inverters are compared and evaluated for their suitability for MHD power applications. The interface requirements of an MHD channel inverter-utility interactive system are defined, and a forced-commutated inverter meeting these requirements is described. The results of a set of tests using this inverter are described along with recommendations for future work in this field.

Petty, S.; Williams, K.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Mechanisms controlling the production and transport of methane, carbon dioxide, and dissolved solutes within a boreal peatland  

SciTech Connect

Peatlands are one of the most important terrestrial reservoirs in the global cycle for carbon, and are a major source for atmospheric methane. However, little is known about the dynamics of these carbon reservoirs or their feedback mechanisms with the pool of atmospheric CO{sub 2} during the Holocene. Specifically, it is unknown whether large peat basins are sources, sinks, or steady-state reservoirs for the global carbon cycle. In particular, the production and transport of methane, carbon dioxide, and dissolved organic carbon form the deeper portions of these peatlands is unknown. Our DOE research program is to conduct an integrated ecologic and hydrogeochemical study of the Glacial Lake Agassiz peatlands (northern Minnesota) to better understand the carbon dynamics in globally significant peat basins. Specifically, our study will provide local and regional data on (1), rates of carbon accumulation and loss and fluxes of methane in the peat profiles; (2) the physical and botanical factors controlling the production of methane and carbon dioxide in the wetland; and (3) the role of hydrogeologic processes in controlling the fluxes of gases and solutes through the peat. We intend to use computer simulation models, calibrated to field data, to scale-up from local to regional estimates of methane and carbon dioxide within the basin. How gases and dissolved organic carbon escapes form peatlands in unknown. It has been suggested that the concentrations of methane produced in the upper peat are sufficient to produce diffusion gradients towards the surface. Alternatively, gas may move through the peat profile by groundwater advection.

Siegel, D.I.

1992-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

78

Control Center Application Program Interface (CCAPI) Project: API Standard Proposal Requirements for Generic Interface Definition (GID)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Control Center Application Program Interface (CCAPI) Task Force is charged with producing design criteria for international energy management system (EMS) standards. Their aim is to integrate independently developed EMS applications. The resulting standards will provide utilities with competitive choices in the design of their control systems, while offering less expensive applications to meet the needs of the rapidly changing electric power industry. The initial Task Force deliverable was the Common...

2001-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

79

Comparison of coal and iron requirements between bituminous coal hydrogenation and low temperature carbonization (L. T. C. ) followed by hydrogenation  

SciTech Connect

Plants producing 100,000 tons/yr aviation gasoline and 25,000 tons/yr of liquid petroleum gasoline (L.P.G.) by hydrogenation of coal and 100,000 tons/yr of aviation gasoline, 15,000 tons/yr L.P.G., and 912,000 tons/yr of excess L.T.C. coke by L.T.C. followed by hydrogenation of the L.T.C. tar are considered. Specific data are included on L.T.C., specific data for L.T.C. tar hydrogenation, and total coal requirement for L.T.C. of coal and hydrogenation of the L.T.C. tar. Information is also included on hydrogenation of bituminous coal and iron requirements. Three charts show differences between various bituminous coal conversion processes. The iron requirements for L.T.C. and tar hydrogenation was 100,500 tons and for bituminous coal hydrogenation it was 123,300 tons. An input of 1,480,000 tons of L.T.C. coal was calculated. The power coal requirement for L.T.C. and hydrogenation was 1,612,000 tons. The coal requirement for tar hydrogenation was 482,000 tons and 1,130,000 tons for surplus coke and gas. Therefore about 30% of the total coal was used for aviation gasoline and L.P.G. and about 70% for surplus coke and gas.

1943-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

80

Influence of Cycling and Low-Load Operation on Cycle Chemistry Control and Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purity of water and steam is central to ensuring component availability and reliability of electric steam generating equipment. The objective and focus of cycle chemistry is to prevent or control and reduce corrosion and the accumulation of deposits in the steam/water circuit of power plants. Current trends in electricity demand have resulted in changing load dispatch for coal- and gas-fired assets worldwide and in an increasing need to provide greater flexibility in the operating patterns of ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Identification of Critical Voltage Control Areas and Determination of Required Reactive Power Reserves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update reports on the development of a highly automated method for identifying Voltage Control Areas (VCAs), areas prone to voltage instability in practical power system models. For a wide range of system conditions and contingencies, the technique can identify the buses in each VCA and identify VCAs that are common for a set of contingencies and/or conditions. In addition, the method identifies the generators that are critical to maintaining stability for a given VCA. The methods develope...

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

82

Compliance of SLAC_s Laser Safety Program with OSHA Requirements for the Control of Hazardous Energy  

SciTech Connect

SLAC's COHE program requires compliance with OSHA Regulation 29CFR1910.147, 'The control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout)'. This regulation specifies lockout/tagout requirements during service and maintenance of equipment in which the unexpected energization or start up of the equipment, or release of stored energy, could cause injury to workers. Class 3B and Class 4 laser radiation must be considered as hazardous energy (as well as electrical energy in associated equipment, and other non-beam energy hazards) in laser facilities, and therefore requires careful COHE consideration. This paper describes how COHE is achieved at SLAC to protect workers against unexpected Class 3B or Class 4 laser radiation, independent of whether the mode of operation is normal, service, or maintenance.

Woods, Michael; /SLAC

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

83

EXPRESSION OF BRUCELLA GENES REQUIRED FOR LIPOPOLYSACCARIDE PRODUCTION UNDER THE CONTROL OF ARAC AND PTAC PROMOTERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Brucella spp. are gram-negative, facultative intracellular pathogen that causes an infectious and contagious bacterial disease, brucellosis, in humans and animals. Previous research showed that lipopolysaccaride (LPS) is a classically demonstrated virulence mechanism in Brucella. The main objective of this project was to design an inducible system that would allow or prevent the expression of LPS using the manBA genes which encode components of LPS through the regulation of different promoters, pTac and araC. This will allow us to better understand the significance of LPS expression and its link to virulence. If we are able to regulate the expression of LPS in smooth and rough strains, we will be able to further understand these differences and eventually help to create attenuated vaccines against brucellosis. Construction of manBA expression vectors using pTac and araC promoters was carried out in the E. coli strain, DH10B as well as the conditions required for induction of manBA expression. The constructs were transferred into a Brucella melitensis (16M) manBA deletion mutant to determine optimal induction conditions. During the induction, specific time points were monitored for variations in manBA expression. Methods used to detect manBA expression include: acriflavine agglutination, SDS-PAGE followed by staining and Western Blots. Results showed that LPS expression could be regulated by pTac and araC promoters under specified induction conditions. Although the pTac promoter was found to be leaky, we were able to induce LPS expression in Brucella melitensis with the addition of glucose to the growth medium. The araC promoter construct was more tightly regulated than the pTac promoter and required DMEM, a defined media for expression. Therefore, we have developed two inducible systems which would aid in the study of LPS virulence mechanism in Brucella. Future work will include infecting murine macrophages using the inducible Brucella constructs to study intracellular trafficking and survival of the transformed bacteria. Construction of manBA expression vectors using pTac and araC promoters was carried out in E. coli strain, DH10B The conditions required for induction of manBA expression were tested for the respective promoters in E. coli DH10B. The constructs were transferred into Brucella melitensis (16M) manBA-knockouts to carry out induction under experimentally determined conditions in Brucella. During the induction, specific time points were monitored for variations in manBA expression. Methods used to detect manBA expression include: Acriflavine agglutination, SDS-PAGE followed by staining and Western Blots. Results show that LPS expression can be regulated by pTac and araC promoters under specified induction conditions. Although the pTac promoter was leaky, we were able to induce LPS expression in Brucella melitensis with the help of glucose. The araC promoter construct was more tightly regulated than the pTac promoter and required DMEM, a defined media for expression. Therefore, we have developed two inducible systems which would aid in the study of LPS virulence mechanism in Brucella. We also used a special staining method of the SDS-PAGE to detect LPS production. Future work will include infecting murine macrophages using the inducible Brucella constructs to study intracellular trafficking and survival of the transformed bacteria.

Han, Shuo

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

84

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Recovery from Flue Gas using Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbents Carbon Dioxide Recovery from Flue Gas using Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbents Project No.: FG02-04ER83885 SBIR Virtual Depiction of a Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbent Virtual Depiction of a Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbent Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. has completed a small business innovative research (SBIR) project that initiated development of a novel sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) from combustion flue gas. The primary goal of this project wa s to develop a process using a supported amine for CO2 capture that exhibits better system efficiency, lower cost, and less corrosion than current aqueous amine-based processes. The project was to demonstrate performance of carbon-supported amine sorbents under simulated flue gas conditions. Three tasks were undertaken:

85

Plasma biasing to control the growth conditions of diamond-like carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. M. Bilek and A. Anders, Plasma Sources Sci. Technol. 8 (important for carbon films. The plasma bias principle isnot limited to carbon plasmas may also be applied to other

Anders, Andre; Pasaja, Nitisak; Lim, Sunnie H.N.; Petersen, Tim C.; Keast, Vicki J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

CONTROLLED GROWTH OF CARBON NANOTUBES ON CONDUCTIVE METAL SUBSTRATES FOR ENERGY STORAGE APPLICATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impressive mechanical and electronic properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) make them ideally suited for use in a variety of nanostructured devices, especially in the realm of energy production and storage. In particular, vertically-aligned CNT forests have been the focus of increasing investigation for use in supercapacitor electrodes and as hydrogen adsorption substrates. Vertically-aligned CNT growth was attempted on metal substrates by waterassisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD). CNT growth was catalyzed by iron-molybdenum (FeMo) nanoparticle catalysts synthesized by a colloidal method, which were then spin-coated onto Inconel foils. The substrates were loaded into a custom-built CVD apparatus, where CNT growth was initiated by heating the substrates to 750 C under the fl ow of He, H2, C2H4 and a controlled amount of water vapor. The resultant CNTs were characterized by a variety of methods including Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the growth parameters were varied in an attempt to optimize the purity and growth yield of the CNTs. The surface area and hydrogen adsorption characteristics of the CNTs were quantifi ed by the Brunauer- Emmett-Teller (BET) and Sieverts methods, and their capacitance was measured via cyclic voltammetry. While vertically-aligned CNT growth could not be verifi ed, TEM and SEM analysis indicated that CNT growth was still obtained, resulting in multiwalled CNTs of a wide range in diameter along with some amorphous carbon impurities. These microscopy fi ndings were reinforced by Raman spectroscopy, which resulted in a G/D ratio ranging from 1.5 to 3 across different samples, suggestive of multiwalled CNTs. Changes in gas fl ow rates and water concentration during CNT growth were not found to have a discernable effect on the purity of the CNTs. The specifi c capacitance of a CNT/FeMo/Inconel electrode was found to be 3.2 F/g, and the BET surface area of a characteristic CNT sample was measured to be 232 m2/g with a cryogenic (77K) hydrogen storage of 0.85 wt%. This level of hydrogen adsorption is slightly higher than that predicted by the Chahine rule, indicating that these CNTs may bind hydrogen more strongly than other carbonaceous materials. More work is needed to confi rm and determine the reason for increased hydrogen adsorption in these CNTs, and to test them for use as catalyst support networks. This study demonstrates the feasibility of producing CNTs for energy storage applications using water-assisted CVD.

Brown, P.; Engtrakul, C.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Project No.: FC26-02NT41440 Pilot Plant at the University of Texas Pilot Plant at the University of Texas The University of Texas at Austin investigated an improved process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption that uses an alternative solvent, aqueous potassium carbonate (K2CO3) promoted by piperazine (PZ). If successful, this process would use less energy for CO2 capture than the conventional monoethanolamine (MEA) scrubbing process. An improved capture system would mean a relative improvement in overall power plant efficiency. The project developed models to predict the performance of absorption/stripping of CO2 using the improved solvent and perform a pilot plant study to validate the process models and define the range of feasible

88

Carbon Nanostructure-Based Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Functionalization.M. S. Characterizing carbon nanotube samples with resonancewith a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Capacitor. Science

Sarkar, Tapan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Enhancing Carbon Reactivity in Mercury Control in Lignite-Fired Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was awarded through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory Program Solicitation DE-PS26-03NT41718-01. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) led a consortium-based effort to resolve mercury (Hg) control issues facing the lignite industry. The EERC team-the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); the URS Corporation; the Babcock & Wilcox Company; ADA-ES; Apogee; Basin Electric Power Cooperative; Otter Tail Power Company; Great River Energy; Texas Utilities; Montana-Dakota Utilities Co.; Minnkota Power Cooperative, Inc.; BNI Coal Ltd.; Dakota Westmoreland Corporation; the North American Coal Corporation; SaskPower; and the North Dakota Industrial Commission-demonstrated technologies that substantially enhanced the effectiveness of carbon sorbents to remove Hg from western fuel combustion gases and achieve a high level ({ge} 55% Hg removal) of cost-effective control. The results of this effort are applicable to virtually all utilities burning lignite and subbituminous coals in the United States and Canada. The enhancement processes were previously proven in pilot-scale and limited full-scale tests. Additional optimization testing continues on these enhancements. These four units included three lignite-fired units: Leland Olds Station Unit 1 (LOS1) and Stanton Station Unit 10 (SS10) near Stanton and Antelope Valley Station Unit 1 (AVS1) near Beulah and a subbituminous Powder River Basin (PRB)-fired unit: Stanton Station Unit 1 (SS1). This project was one of three conducted by the consortium under the DOE mercury program to systematically test Hg control technologies available for utilities burning lignite. The overall objective of the three projects was to field-test and verify options that may be applied cost-effectively by the lignite industry to reduce Hg emissions. The EERC, URS, and other team members tested sorbent injection technologies for plants equipped with electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and spray dryer absorbers combined with fabric filters (SDAs-FFs). The work focused on technology commercialization by involving industry and emphasizing the communication of results to vendors and utilities throughout the project.

Chad Wocken; Michael Holmes; John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Katie Brandt; Brandon Pavlish; Dennis Laudal; Kevin Galbreath; Michelle Olderbak

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

The potential for control of carbon dioxide emissions from integrated gasification/combined-cycle systems  

SciTech Connect

Initiatives to limit carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions have drawn considerable interest to integrated gasification/combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation, a process that reduces CO{sub 2} production through efficient fuel used is amenable to CO{sub 2} capture. This paper presents a comparison of energy systems that encompass fuel supply, an IGCC system, CO{sub 2} recovery using commercial technologies, CO{sub 2} transport by pipeline, and land-based sequestering in geological reservoirs. The intent is to evaluate the energy-efficiency impacts of controlling CO{sub 2} in such systems and to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an to equivalent CO{sub 2}`` budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps. The value used for the ``equivalent CO{sub 2}`` budget is 1 kg/kWh CO{sub 2}. The base case for the comparison is a 457-MW IGCC system that uses an air-blown Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse (KRW) agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, preparation, and transportation of the coal and limestone result in a net system electric power production of 454 MW with a 0.835 kg/kwh CO{sub 2} release rate. For comparison, the gasifier output is taken through a water-gas shift to convert CO to CO{sub 2} and then processed in a glycol-based absorber unit to recover CO{sub 2} Prior to the combustion turbine. A 500-km pipeline then transports the CO{sub 2} for geological sequestering. The net electric power production for the system with CO{sub 2} recovery is 381 MW with a 0.156 kg/kwh CO{sub 2} release rate.

Livengood, C.D.; Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Berry, G.F.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Chemical, mechanical, and thermal control of substrate-bound carbon nanotube growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are long molecules having exceptional properties, including several times the strength of steel piano wire at one fourth the density, at least five times the thermal conductivity of pure copper, and ...

Hart, Anastasios John, 1979-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Modeling and control of a silicon substrate heater for carbon nanotube growth experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The precision engineering research group at MIT is working on carbon nanotube growth experiments on silicon substrates and in microfabricated silicon devices, to try to produce improved bulk nanotube growth. For this thesis, ...

Held, David (David A.)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

System and method for controlling hydrogen elimination during carbon nanotube synthesis from hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for producing carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition includes a catalyst support having first and second surfaces. The catalyst support is capable of hydrogen transport from the first to the second surface. A catalyst is provided on the first surface of the catalyst support. The catalyst is selected to catalyze the chemical vapor deposition formation of carbon nanotubes. A fuel source is provided for supplying fuel to the catalyst.

Reilly, Peter T. A. (Knoxville, TN)

2010-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

94

Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the project was to evaluate the long-term feasibility of using activated carbon injection (ACI) options to effectively reduce mercury emissions from Texas electric generation plants in which a blend of lignite and subbituminous coal is fired. Field testing of ACI options was performed on one-quarter of Unit 2 at TXU's Big Brown Steam Electric Station. Unit 2 has a design output of 600 MW and burns a blend of 70% Texas Gulf Coast lignite and 30% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal. Big Brown employs a COHPAC configuration, i.e., high air-to-cloth baghouses following cold-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), for particulate control. When sorbent injection is added between the ESP and the baghouse, the combined technology is referred to as TOXECON{trademark} and is patented by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States. Key benefits of the TOXECON configuration include better mass transfer characteristics of a fabric filter compared to an ESP for mercury capture and contamination of only a small percentage of the fly ash with AC. The field testing consisted of a baseline sampling period, a parametric screening of three sorbent injection options, and a month long test with a single mercury control technology. During the baseline sampling, native mercury removal was observed to be less than 10%. Parametric testing was conducted for three sorbent injection options: injection of standard AC alone; injection of an EERC sorbent enhancement additive, SEA4, with ACI; and injection of an EERC enhanced AC. Injection rates were determined for all of the options to achieve the minimum target of 55% mercury removal as well as for higher removals approaching 90%. Some of the higher injection rates were not sustainable because of increased differential pressure across the test baghouse module. After completion of the parametric testing, a month long test was conducted using the enhanced AC at a nominal rate of 1.5 lb/Macf. During the time that enhanced AC was injected, the average mercury removal for the month long test was approximately 74% across the test baghouse module. ACI was interrupted frequently during the month long test because the test baghouse module was bypassed frequently to relieve differential pressure. The high air-to-cloth ratio of operations at this unit results in significant differential pressure, and thus there was little operating margin before encountering differential pressure limits, especially at high loads. This limited the use of sorbent injection as the added material contributes to the overall differential pressure. This finding limits sustainable injection of AC without appropriate modifications to the plant or its operations. Handling and storage issues were observed for the TOXECON ash-AC mixture. Malfunctioning equipment led to baghouse dust hopper plugging, and storage of the stagnant material at flue gas temperatures resulted in self-heating and ignition of the AC in the ash. In the hoppers that worked properly, no such problems were reported. Economics of mercury control at Big Brown were estimated for as-tested scenarios and scenarios incorporating changes to allow sustainable operation. This project was funded under the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory project entitled 'Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program--Phase II'.

John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Lucinda Hamre

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

95

Soil moisture surpasses elevated CO2 and temperature as a control on soil carbon dynamics in a multi-factor climate change experiment  

SciTech Connect

Some single-factor experiments suggest that elevated CO2 concentrations can increase soil carbon, but few experiments have examined the effects of interacting environmental factors on soil carbon dynamics. We undertook studies of soil carbon and nitrogen in a multi-factor (CO2 x temperature x soil moisture) climate change experiment on a constructed old-field ecosystem. After four growing seasons, elevated CO2 had no measurable effect on carbon and nitrogen concentrations in whole soil, particulate organic matter (POM), and mineral-associated organic matter (MOM). Analysis of stable carbon isotopes, under elevated CO2, indicated between 14 and 19% new soil carbon under two different watering treatments with as much as 48% new carbon in POM. Despite significant belowground inputs of new organic matter, soil carbon concentrations and stocks in POM declined over four years under soil moisture conditions that corresponded to prevailing precipitation inputs (1,300 mm yr-1). Changes over time in soil carbon and nitrogen under a drought treatment (approximately 20% lower soil water content) were not statistically significant. Reduced soil moisture lowered soil CO2 efflux and slowed soil carbon cycling in the POM pool. In this experiment, soil moisture (produced by different watering treatments) was more important than elevated CO2 and temperature as a control on soil carbon dynamics.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [ORNL; Norby, Richard J [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Large Point Sources Carbon Dioxide Capture from Large Point Sources Project No.: FG02-04ER83925 SBIR CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE Commercial hollow fiber membrane cartridge [6" (D) X 17" (L)] Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. developed and tested a carbon dioxide (CO2) removal system for flue gas streams from large point sources that offers improved mass transfer rates compared to conventional technologies. The project fabricated perfluorinated membranes on hydrophobic hollow fiber membrane contactors, demonstrated CO2 removal from a simulated flue gas mixture via amine absorption using the fabricated membranes, examine chemical compatibility of the membrane with amines, and demonstrate enhanced stability of the perfluoro-coated membranes. In addition, an economic analysis was performed to demonstrate that the perfluoro-coated

97

Control of the smoldering front temperature in a carbon- and carbonate-containing porous medium in order to limit CO2 emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??La thse sintresse au contrle de la temprature dun front de combustion propag dans un milieu poreux contenant du carbone fixe et des carbonates (CaCO3). (more)

Sennoune, Mohamed

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Carbon dioxide sequestration in cement kiln dust through mineral carbonation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration through the formation of carbonates is a potential means to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Alkaline industrial solid wastes typically have high mass fractions of reactive oxides that may not require preprocessing, making them an attractive source material for mineral carbonation. The degree of mineral carbonation achievable in cement kiln dust (CKD) under ambient temperatures and pressures was examined through a series of batch and column experiments. The overall extent and potential mechanisms and rate behavior of the carbonation process were assessed through a complementary set of analytical and empirical methods, including mass change, thermal analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The carbonation reactions were carried out primarily through the reaction of CO{sub 2} with Ca(OH){sub 2}, and CaCO{sub 3} was observed as the predominant carbonation product. A sequestration extent of over 60% was observed within 8 h of reaction without any modifications to the waste. Sequestration appears to follow unreacted core model theory where reaction kinetics are controlled by a first-order rate constant at early times; however, as carbonation progresses, the kinetics of the reaction are attenuated by the extent of the reaction due to diffusion control, with the extent of conversion never reaching completion. 35 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Deborah N. Huntzinger; John S. Gierke; S. Komar Kawatra; Timothy C. Eisele; Lawrence L. Sutter [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Paper-mediated controlled densification and low temperature transfer of carbon nanotube forests for electronic interconnect application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the fabrication and characterization of densified and transferred carbon nanotube forests for electronic interconnect application. A simple, low cost and quality method is developed for densifying vertically-aligned carbon nanotube (VA-CNTs) ... Keywords: Carbon nanotube, Carbon nanotube resistance, Carbon nanotube transfer, Densification, Post-growth processing, Young's modulus

Di Jiang; Teng Wang; Si Chen; Lilei Ye; Johan Liu

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Robust control of entanglement in a Nitrogen-vacancy centre coupled to a Carbon-13 nuclear spin in diamond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We address a problem of generating a robust entangling gate between electronic and nuclear spins in the system of a single nitrogen-vacany centre coupled to a nearest Carbon-13 atom in diamond against certain types of systematic errors such as pulse-length and off-resonance errors. We analyse the robustness of various control schemes: sequential pulses, composite pulses and numerically-optimised pulses. We find that numerically-optimised pulses, produced by the gradient ascent pulse engineering algorithm (GRAPE), are more robust than the composite pulses and the sequential pulses. The optimised pulses can also be implemented in a faster time than the composite pulses.

R. S. Said; J. Twamley

2009-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Femtosecond laser control of induced anisotropy in a liquid: selective spectroscopy of intramolecular vibrations of carbon tetrachloride  

SciTech Connect

Two-pulse control of time-dependent anisotropy in liquid carbon tetrachloride at room temperature is implemented by using femtosecond polarisation spectroscopy. The liquid is excited by a train of two linearly polarised laser pulses, and the state of anisotropy is probed by a weak third pulse with registration of the optical Kerr effect. It is shown that by varying the delay between the exciting pulses and their relative intensity, selection of contributions of individual intramolecular modes into the recorded signal is achieved.

Nikiforov, V G; Shmelev, A G; Safiullin, G M; Lobkov, Vladimir S [E. K. Zavoisky Physical-Technical Institute, Kazan Scientific Center, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kazan (Russian Federation)

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

102

Potential Impact of Carbon Dioxide on Potable Groundwater: A Controlled Release Experiment: 2013 Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Separating carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gases emitted by power stations that burn fossil fuels and injecting the CO2 deep underground is one method being considered on a commercial-scale to prevent emissions from reaching the atmosphere. Although full-scale commercial deployment of CO2 capture and storage (CCS) from a power station has not been performed to date, small-scale pilot projects have demonstrated that CCS is technically feasible. The high cost of ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

103

Quantitative laboratory measurements of biogeochemical processes controlling biogenic calcite carbon sequestration.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this LDRD was to generate data that could be used to populate and thereby reduce the uncertainty in global carbon cycle models. These efforts were focused on developing a system for determining the dissolution rate of biogenic calcite under oceanic pressure and temperature conditions and on carrying out a digital transcriptomic analysis of gene expression in response to changes in pCO2, and the consequent acidification of the growth medium.

Zendejas, Frank; Lane, Todd W.; Lane, Pamela D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Potential Impact of Carbon Dioxide on Potable Groundwater: A Controlled Release Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources and injecting them deep underground in geologic formations is one of several options being considered to offset the effects of CO2 emissions. To provide information about geologic storage of CO2 to the public and regulators, industry needs to carefully study all potential environmental risks, including the potential for CO2 movement from deep storage sites into shallow aquifers containing ...

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

106

Instrumentation and Control, Human System Interface, and Information Technology Requirements Project Plan for Nuclear Power Plant Lo ng-Term Operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plant owners are looking to extend the operating life of their plants to 80 years and potentially longer. Instrumentation and control, human system interface, and information technologies have changed drastically since the plants were built and will change even more drastically before the plants reach the end of their operating life. A project plan to develop requirements for these technologies is defined here. These requirements will enable plants to better identify future solutions that w...

2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

107

Mechanisms controlling the production and transport of methane, carbon dioxide, and dissolved solutes within a boreal peatland. Progress report, January 15, 1991--July 14, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Peatlands are one of the most important terrestrial reservoirs in the global cycle for carbon, and are a major source for atmospheric methane. However, little is known about the dynamics of these carbon reservoirs or their feedback mechanisms with the pool of atmospheric CO{sub 2} during the Holocene. Specifically, it is unknown whether large peat basins are sources, sinks, or steady-state reservoirs for the global carbon cycle. In particular, the production and transport of methane, carbon dioxide, and dissolved organic carbon form the deeper portions of these peatlands is unknown. Our DOE research program is to conduct an integrated ecologic and hydrogeochemical study of the Glacial Lake Agassiz peatlands (northern Minnesota) to better understand the carbon dynamics in globally significant peat basins. Specifically, our study will provide local and regional data on (1), rates of carbon accumulation and loss and fluxes of methane in the peat profiles; (2) the physical and botanical factors controlling the production of methane and carbon dioxide in the wetland; and (3) the role of hydrogeologic processes in controlling the fluxes of gases and solutes through the peat. We intend to use computer simulation models, calibrated to field data, to scale-up from local to regional estimates of methane and carbon dioxide within the basin. How gases and dissolved organic carbon escapes form peatlands in unknown. It has been suggested that the concentrations of methane produced in the upper peat are sufficient to produce diffusion gradients towards the surface. Alternatively, gas may move through the peat profile by groundwater advection.

Siegel, D.I.

1992-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

108

Can ASHRAE Standard 62-1989 Requirements be Satisfied while Maintaining Moisture Control using Stock HVAC Equipment in Hot, Humid Climates?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outdoor air intake rates are studied to determine their impacts on moisture control in buildings, especially in hot, humid climates. Key impacts of outdoor air intake rates can be readily modeled and studied using computer simulations of building energy costs. Increased ventilation rates create real capital and operating costs for building owners and operators, with implications beyond energy costs relating to increased ventilation requirements. In hot, humid climates, increased ventilation rates increase latent loads more than sensible loads, requiring lower sensible heat ratios. Stock HVAC package units and split systems are not available with the requisite sensible heat ratios, and cannot maintain moisture control in small commercial buildings without costly modifications.

Turner, S. C.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Control of Proteobacterial Central Carbon Metabolism by the HexR Transcriptional Regulator. A Case Study in Shewanella oneidensis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bacteria exploit multiple mechanisms for controlling central carbon metabolism (CCM). Thus, a bioinformatic analysis together with some experimental data implicated HexR transcriptional factor as a global CCM regulator in some lineages of Gammaproteobacteria operating as a functional replacement of Cra regulator characteristic of Enterobacteriales. In this study we combined a large-scale comparative genomic reconstruction of HexRcontrolled regulons in 87 species of Proteobacteria with the detailed experimental analysis of HexR regulatory network in Shewanella oneidensis model system. Although nearly all of the HexR-controlled genes are associated with CCM, remarkable variations were revealed in the scale (from 1-2 target operons in Enterobacteriales up to 20 operons in Aeromonadales) and gene content of HexR regulons between 11 compared lineages. A predicted 17-bp pseudo-palindrome with a consensus tTGTAATwwwATTACa, was confirmed as HexR-binding motif for 15 target operons (comprising 30 genes) by in vitro binding assays. The negative effect of the key CCM intermediate, 2-keto-3-deoxy-6- phosphogluconate, on the DNA-regulator complex formation was verified. A dual mode of HexR action on various target promoters, repression of genes involved in catabolic pathways and activation of gluconeogenic genes, was for the first time predicted by the bioinformatc analysis and experimentally verified by changed gene expression pattern in S. oneidensis AhexR mutant. Phenotypic profiling revealed the inability of this mutant to grow on lactate or pyruvate as a single carbon source. A comparative metabolic flux analysis of wild-type and mutant strains of S. oneidensis using 13Clactate labeling and GC-MS analysis confirmed the hypothesized HexR role as a master regulator of gluconeogenic flux from pyruvate via the transcriptional activation of phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PpsA).

Leyn, Semen; Li, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Qijing; Novichkov, Pavel; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Yang, Chen; Osterman, Andrei L.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

2011-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

110

Application of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) for controlling subsurface fire area: Indian context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In bord and pillar method of mining, the panels are sealed off after depillaring. Depending upon the site specific condition, 40 to 45 % coal are left in depillared panel as stook, loose coal left in goaf, hard coal on floor and roof of the panel. The left out coals in goaf area start oxidation, and this leads to spontaneous heating in side sealed off area. For assessment of fire in underground coal mines, thermo-compositional monitoring plays an important role. This paper presents scientific relevance and selective criteria for use of inert gas for control of subsurface fire. Finally the paper discusses spontaneous heating problem in sealed off area and application of inertisation technology by using CO, to prevent and control sealed off fire at Haripur Colliery, Kenda Area, ECL, India.

Mohalik, N.K.; Singh, V.K.; Singh, R.V.K. [Central Institute of Mining & Fuel Research, Dhanbad (India)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 2. Battelle Columbus Laboratories system requirements definition and system analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

System specifications, design criteria, and representative weather data necessary for the system evolution and preliminary design are generated. A detailed analysis and evaluation of the commercial-sized controlled environment agriculture system coupled with a solar energy system was conducted. A simulation model to test the performance of the greenhouse is presented. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Whitings as a Potential Mechanism for Controlling Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect

Species of cyanobacteria in the genera Synechococcus and Synechocystis are known to be the catalysts of a phenomenon called "whitings", which is the formation and precipitation of fine-grained CaCO3 particles. Whitings occur when the cyanobacteria fix atmospheric CO2 through the formation of CaCO3 on their cell surfaces which leads to precipitation to the ocean floor and subsequent entombment in mud. Whitings represent one potential mechanism for CO2 sequestration. Research was performed to determine the ability of various strains of Synechocystis and Synechococcus to calcify when grown in microcosms amended with 2.5 mM HCO3- and 3.4 mM Ca2+. Results indicated that while all strains tested have the ability to calcify, only two, Synechococcus species, strains PCC 8806 and PCC 8807, were able to calcify to the extent that CaCO3 was precipitated. Enumeration of the cyanobacterial cultures during testing indicated that cell density did not appear to have an effect on calcification. Factors that had the greatest effect on calcification were CO2 removal and subsequent generation of alkaline pH. As CO2 was removed, growth medium pH increased and soluble Ca2+ was removed from solution. The largest increases in growth medium pH occurred when CO2 levels dropped below 400 ppmv. Precipitation of CaCO3 catalyzed by the growth and physiology of cyanobacteria in the Genus Synechococcus represents a potential mechanism for sequestration of atmospheric CO2 produced during the burning of coal for power generation. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 and Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8807 were tested in microcosm experiments for their ability to calcify when exposed to a fixed calcium concentration of 3.4 mM and dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations of 0.5, 1.25 and 2.5 mM. Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8806 removed calcium continuously over the duration of the experiment producing approximately 18.6 mg of solid-phase calcium. Calcium removal occurred over a two-day time period when Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 8807 was tested and only 8.9 mg of solid phase calcium was produced. The ability of the cyanobacteria to create an alkaline growth environment appeared to be the primary factor responsible for CaCO3 precipitation in these experiments. These research results demonstrate the potential of using cyanobacterial catalyzed whitings as a method to sequester CO2 from the atmosphere.

Brady D. Lee; William A. Apel; Michelle R. Walton

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Dynamic behavior and control requirements of an atmospheric fluidized-bed coal combustion power plant: A conceptual study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first-principles model of a nominal 20-MW atmospheric-pressure fluidized-bed coal combustion (AFBC) power plant was developed to provide insight into fundamental dynamic behavior of fluidized-bed systems. The control system included major loops for firing rate, steam pressure and temperature, forced and induced draft air flow, SO/sub 2/ emission, drum water level, evaporator recirculation, and bed level. The model was used to investigate system sensitivity to design features such as the distribution of heat transfer surface among the bed boiler and superheater and the out-of-bed superheater. Also calculated were the sensitivities of temperatures, pressures, and flow rates to changes in throttle, attemperator, and feedwater valve settings and forced and induced draft damper settings. The large bed mass, accounting for approx.40% of the active heat capacity, may vary under load change and could impact controller tuning. Model analysis indicated, however, that for the design studied, the change in bed mass does not appear to significantly affect controller tuning even if the bed mass varies appreciably under load-following conditions. Several bed designs are being considered for AFBC plants, some with partitions between bed sections and some without, and these differences may significantly affect the load-following capability of the plant. The results indicated that the slumping mode of operation can cause distortion of the heat source/sink distribution in the bed such that the load-following capability (rate of load change) of the plant may be reduced by as much as a factor of 5 compared with the mode in which tube surface is exposed. 9 refs., 13 figs., 6 tabs.

Smith, O.L.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

HAN System Security Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, "Home Area Network (HAN) Security Requirements," identifies and discusses the key cyber security requirements for different interfaces of HAN-based systems. These cyber security requirements for HAN interfaces are derived from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) "Catalog of Control Systems Security," which provides an excellent checklist of general security requirements.

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

115

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches while providing superior environmental protection. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition, maximum landfill gas generation and capture, and minimum long-term environmental consequences. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches while providing superior environmental protection. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition, maximum landfill gas generation and capture, and minimum long-term environmental consequences. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

FULL SCALE BIOREACTOR LANDFILL FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND GREENHOUSE EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Yolo County Department of Planning and Public Works is constructing a full-scale bioreactor landfill as a part of the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Project XL program to develop innovative approaches while providing superior environmental protection. The overall objective is to manage landfill solid waste for rapid waste decomposition, maximum landfill gas generation and capture, and minimum long-term environmental consequences. Waste decomposition is accelerated by improving conditions for either the aerobic or anaerobic biological processes and involves circulating controlled quantities of liquid (leachate, groundwater, gray water, etc.), and, in the aerobic process, large volumes of air. The first phase of the project entails the construction of a 12-acre module that contains a 6-acre anaerobic cell, a 3.5-acre anaerobic cell, and a 2.5-acre aerobic cell at the Yolo County Central Landfill near Davis, California. The cells are highly instrumented to monitor bioreactor performance. Construction is complete on the 3.5 acre anaerobic cell and liquid addition has commenced. Construction of the 2.5 acre aerobic cell is nearly complete with only the blower station and biofilter remaining. Waste placement and instrumentation installation is ongoing in the west-side 6-acre anaerobic cell. The current project status and preliminary monitoring results are summarized in this report.

Ramin Yazdani; Jeff Kieffer; Heather Akau

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Science Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Requirements About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network...

119

Requirements Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Earth: Weather, Carbon Cycle ... energy, dark matter, planets around other suns 5 ... Total Cost Plus Fee $51,959 $49,001 $65,680 $49,001 $38,146 ...

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

120

Recommendations to the NRC on acceptable standard format and content for the Fundamental Nuclear Material Control (FNMC) Plan required for low-enriched uranium enrichment facilities  

SciTech Connect

A new section, 10 CFR 74.33, has been added to the material control and accounting (MC A) requirements of 10 CFR Part 74. This new section pertains to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-licensed uranium enrichment facilities that are authorized to produce and to possess more than one effective kilogram of special nuclear material (SNM) of low strategic significance. The new section is patterned after 10 CFR 74.31, which pertains to NRC licensees (other than production or utilization facilities licensed pursuant to 10 CFR Part 50 and 70 and waste disposal facilities) that are authorized to possess and use more than one effective kilogram of unencapsulated SNM of low strategic significance. Because enrichment facilities have the potential capability of producing SNM of moderate strategic significance and also strategic SNM, certain performance objectives and MC A system capabilities are required in 10 CFR 74.33 that are not contained in 10 CFR 74.31. This document recommends to the NRC information that the licensee or applicant should provide in the fundamental nuclear material control (FNMC) plan. This document also describes methods that should be acceptable for compliance with the general performance objectives. While this document is intended to cover various uranium enrichment technologies, the primary focus at this time is gas centrifuge and gaseous diffusion.

Moran, B.W.; Belew, W.L. (Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)); Hammond, G.A.; Brenner, L.M. (21st Century Industries, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Developing microbe-plant interactions for applications in plant-growth promotion and disease control, production of useful compounds, remediation, and carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remediation, and Carbon Sequestration References Anderson,Remediation, and Carbon Sequestration rhizosphere byRemediation, and Carbon Sequestration Figure 1. Examples of

Bernard, S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Mitigation Action Implementation Plan To Implement Mitigation Requirements for Cheyenne-Miracle Mile and Ault-Cheyenne Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Carbon, Albany and Laramie Counties, Wyoming, and Weld County, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mitigation Action Plan Mitigation Action Plan To Implement Mitigation Requirements for Cheyenne-Miracle Mile and Ault-Cheyenne Transmission Line Rebuild Project, Carbon, Albany, and Laramie Counties, Wyoming, and Weld County, Colorado September 2006 CH-MM and AU-CH Mitigation Action Plan Sept. 2006 1 Action Plan for Standard Project Practices and Mitigation Mitigation Action Identifier Resources for Which the Mitigation Will Be Implemented Responsible Party for Implementing Mitigation Action Party Responsible for Monitoring and Ensuring Compliance Land use, transportation Construction Contractor Western Maintenance The contractor will limit the movement of crews and equipment to the ROW, including access routes. The contractor will limit movement on the ROW to minimize damage to

123

System to Continuously Produce Carbon Fiber via Microwave-Assisted ...  

Biomass and Biofuels; Building ... Carbon and graphite fibers are conventionally produced through the controlled pyrolysis of fibrous organic carbon precursors ...

124

Demonstration of Demand Control Ventilation Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Demand Control Ventilation (DCV) is one of the control strategies that can be used modulate the amount of ventilation air for space conditioning in commercial buildings. DCV modulates the amount of ventilation air introduced into the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system based on carbon dioxide levels sensed in the areas served. The carbon dioxide level is a proxy for the number of people within the space, from which the required quantity of ventilation air is determined. By using this ...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Background Although alkanolamine solvents, such as monoethanolamine (MEA), and solvent blends have been developed as commercially-viable options for the absorption of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from waste gases, natural gas, and hydrogen streams, further process improvements are required to cost-effectively capture CO 2 from power plant flue gas. The promotion of potassium carbonate (K

126

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 6.1 (July 2011) Chapter 6.1 (July 2011) 1 Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 6.3. Documentation justifying the use of any of these exceptions is required. The exception, with supporting documentation, must be certified and approved at certain levels that vary according to the dollar value of the

127

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

----------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------- Chapter 6.1 (February 2011) 1 Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 6.3. Documentation justifying the use of any of these exceptions is required. The exception, with supporting documentation, must

128

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 6.1 (April 2010) Chapter 6.1 (April 2010) 1 Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 6.3. Documentation justifying the use of any of these exceptions is required. The exception, with supporting documentation, must be certified and approved at certain levels that vary according to the dollar value of the acquisition. The information that must be included in each justification is identified in FAR

129

Required Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Required Documents Required Documents Required Documents All foreign nationals, including students and postdocs, must select the foreign nationals employment category to complete the new-hire process. Contact (505) 665-7158 Email Complete following forms before New-Hire Orientation Be sure to bring the forms with you for the orientation event, but do not sign and date: Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification (pdf) - original, unexpired documents for verification of employment eligibility. Please refer to the I-9 verification form titled, "Lists of Acceptable Documents", which was included with your offer letter. (Laminated documents or hospital/temporary birth certificates are not accepted.) Note: Failure to provide required documents will result in delay and/or

130

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 6.1 (April 2009) Chapter 6.1 (April 2009) Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in FAR Part 6. Documentation justifying the use of any of these exceptions is required. The exception, with supporting documentation, must be certified and approved at certain levels that vary according to the dollar value of the acquisition. The information that must be included in each justification is

131

School requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a smooth surface and no "lip". Some presentations require AV equipment such as LCD or overhead projectors. A wireless microphone and sound system may be helpful to ensure that...

132

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

--------------------------- Chapter 6.5 (January 2011) 1 Competition Advocate Responsibilities [Reference: FAR 6.5, FAR 7 and DEAR 906.501] Overview This section discusses the competition advocate requirements and provides a Federal Procurement Data System-New Generation (FPDS-NG) coding assistance sheet and screen shots for the FPDS-NG Competition Report. Background FAR Part 6.5, -Competition Advocates,‖ implements section 20 of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act, which requires the head of each executive agency to designate an Agency Competition Advocate and Procuring Activity Advocates (hereafter referred to as Activity Competition Advocates). In accordance with DEAR 906.501, the Secretary of

133

Carbon Sequestration - Public Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Meeting Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Public Meeting May 18, 2004 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy Scott Klara Carbon Sequestration Technology Manager Carbon Sequestration Program Overview * What is Carbon Sequestration * The Fossil Energy Situation * Greenhouse Gas Implications * Pathways to Greenhouse Gas Stabilization * Sequestration Program Overview * Program Requirements & Structure * Regional Partnerships * FutureGen * Sources of Information What is Carbon Sequestration? Capture can occur: * at the point of emission * when absorbed from air Storage locations include: * underground reservoirs * dissolved in deep oceans * converted to solid materials * trees, grasses, soils, or algae Capture and storage of CO 2 and other Greenhouse Gases that

134

NETL: Carbon Storage - Infrastructure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Infrastructure Carbon Storage Infrastructure The Infrastructure Element of DOE's Carbon Storage Program is focused on research and development (R&D) initiatives to advance geologic CO2 storage toward commercialization. DOE determined early in the program's development that addressing CO2 mitigation on a regional level is the most effective way to address differences in geology, climate, population density, infrastructure, and socioeconomic development. This element includes the following efforts designed to support the development of regional infrastructure for carbon capture and storage (CCS). Click on Image to Navigate Infrastructure Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) - This

135

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Chapter 5.2 (April 2008) - Chapter 5.2 (April 2008) Synopsizing Proposed Non-Competitive Contract Actions Citing the Authority of FAR 6.302-1 [Reference: FAR 5 and DEAR 905] Overview This section discusses publicizing sole source actions as part of the approval of a Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC) using the authority of FAR 6.302-1. Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in FAR Part 6. One exception permits contracting without full and open competition when the required supplies or services are available from only one responsible source (FAR 6.302-1). This exception is

136

Technical Safety Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Requirements Safety Requirements FUNCTIONAL AREA GOAL: Contractor has developed, maintained, and received DOE Field Office Approval for the necessary operating conditions of a facility. The facility has also maintained an inventory of safety class and safety significant systems and components. REQUIREMENTS:  10 CFR 830.205, Nuclear Safety Rule.  DOE-STD-3009-2002, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses.  DOE-STD-1186-2004, Specific Administrative Controls. Guidance:  DOE G 423.1-1, Implementation Guide for Use in Developing Technical Safety Requirements.  NSTP 2003-1, Use of Administrative Controls for Specific Safety Functions. Performance Objective 1: Contractor Program Documentation

137

Environmental control technology for atmospheric carbon dioxide. Quarterly progress report No. 1, June 20, 1977--September 30, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of the subject program is to assess the potential options for controlling atmospheric CO/sub 2/. Accordingly, CO/sub 2/ control scenarios based on conventional technology and applied to the larger industrial emitters will be prepared. The studies will include preliminary cost estimates of selected processes, to identify fruitful areas for environmental control technology (ECT) programmatic development as related to CO/sub 2/ release control. BNL's prior experience in this area includes the development and evaluation of a number of processes for removing CO/sub 2/ from the atmosphere for the purpose of producing synthetic carbonaceous fuels including methanol, gasoline, and methane. Background information from other DOE programs will be used to determine the limitations for the control studies. This progress report presents background information on: (1) the concentration levels of CO/sub 2/ in the atmosphere during the last one hundred years; (2) the possible effects of rising CO/sub 2/ levels; (3) the impact of fossil fuel use in the United States on overall worldwide CO/sub 2/ emissions; (4) the impact of increased coal utilization on CO/sub 2/ emissions; and (5) process considerations for controlling CO/sub 2/.

Steinberg, M.; Albanese, A.S.; Dang, V.D.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

ITPA Joint Meeting on Control, St. Petersburg, Russia, 14/07/2003 R. A. Pitts, Centre de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas Some requirements and possibilities for the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ITPA Joint Meeting on Control, St. Petersburg, Russia, 14/07/2003 R. A. Pitts, Centre de Recherches de Recherches en Physique des Plasmas #12;ITPA Joint Meeting on Control, St. Petersburg, Russia, 14 factors, pumping Materials · Erosion and redeposition, tritium inventory #12;ITPA Joint Meeting on Control

139

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission Requirements (Ohio) Carbon Monoxide, Ozone, Hydrocarbon Air Quality Standards, and Related Emission...

140

Carbon Sequestration 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D Overview R&D Overview Office of Fossil Energy Justin "Judd" R. Swift Asst. Secretary for International Affairs Office of Fossil Energy U.S. Department of Energy 2 nd U.S/China CO 2 Emission Control Science & Technology Symposium May 28-29, 2008 Hangzhou, China Office of Fossil Energy Technological Carbon Management Options Improve Efficiency Sequester Carbon  Renewables  Nuclear  Fuel Switching  Demand Side  Supply Side  Capture & Store  Enhance Natural Sinks Reduce Carbon Intensity All options needed to:  Affordably meet energy demand  Address environmental objectives Office of Fossil Energy DOE's Sequestration Program Structure Infrastructure Regional Carbon Sequestration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine-C composite containing continuous PAN T300 fibers · SWB: Chopped Fiber Composite containing SWB fibers Crush

Rollins, Andrew M.

142

First Proof of Ferromagnetic Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a way to understand and control magnetism in nanodevices such as graphene sheets and carbon nanotubes. Ferromagnetism is an "ordering phenomenon" in which the spins of...

143

Influence of stand age on the magnitude and seasonality of carbon fluxes in Canadian forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimating annual carbon dioxide eddy ?uxes using open-pathJ. , 2010. Ecosystem carbon dioxide ?uxes after disturbanceEnvironmental controls over carbon dioxide and water vapor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reduction Emissions Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reduction Requirements Recognizing the impact of carbon-emitting fuels on climate change and to

145

Extrasolar Carbon Planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest that some extrasolar planets carbon compounds. Pulsar planets and low-mass white dwarf planets are especially good candidate members of this new class of planets, but these objects could also conceivably form around stars like the Sun. This planet-formation pathway requires only a factor of two local enhancement of the protoplanetary disk's C/O ratio above solar, a condition that pileups of carbonaceous grains may create in ordinary protoplanetary disks. Hot, Neptune-mass carbon planets should show a significant paucity of water vapor in their spectra compared to hot planets with solar abundances. Cooler, less massive carbon planets may show hydrocarbon-rich spectra and tar-covered surfaces. The high sublimation temperatures of diamond, SiC, and other carbon compounds could protect these planets from carbon depletion at high temperatures.

Marc J. Kuchner; S. Seager

2005-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

146

CARBON TETRACHLORIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This fact sheet answers the most frequently asked health questions (FAQs) about carbon tetrachloride.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

NETL: Carbon Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Programmatic Points of Contact Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Coordinator Carbon Storage...

148

Development of the ANL plant dynamics code and control strategies for the supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle and code validation with data from the Sandia small-scale supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle test loop.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant progress has been made in the ongoing development of the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Plant Dynamics Code (PDC), the ongoing investigation and development of control strategies, and the analysis of system transient behavior for supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycles. Several code modifications have been introduced during FY2011 to extend the range of applicability of the PDC and to improve its calculational stability and speed. A new and innovative approach was developed to couple the Plant Dynamics Code for S-CO{sub 2} cycle calculations with SAS4A/SASSYS-1 Liquid Metal Reactor Code System calculations for the transient system level behavior on the reactor side of a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) or Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR). The new code system allows use of the full capabilities of both codes such that whole-plant transients can now be simulated without additional user interaction. Several other code modifications, including the introduction of compressor surge control, a new approach for determining the solution time step for efficient computational speed, an updated treatment of S-CO{sub 2} cycle flow mergers and splits, a modified enthalpy equation to improve the treatment of negative flow, and a revised solution of the reactor heat exchanger (RHX) equations coupling the S-CO{sub 2} cycle to the reactor, were introduced to the PDC in FY2011. All of these modifications have improved the code computational stability and computational speed, while not significantly affecting the results of transient calculations. The improved PDC was used to continue the investigation of S-CO{sub 2} cycle control and transient behavior. The coupled PDC-SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code capability was used to study the dynamic characteristics of a S-CO{sub 2} cycle coupled to a SFR plant. Cycle control was investigated in terms of the ability of the cycle to respond to a linear reduction in the electrical grid demand from 100% to 0% at a rate of 5%/minute. It was determined that utilization of turbine throttling control below 50% load improves the cycle efficiency significantly. Consequently, the cycle control strategy has been updated to include turbine throttle valve control. The new control strategy still relies on inventory control in the 50%-90% load range and turbine bypass for fine and fast generator output adjustments, but it now also includes turbine throttling control in the 0%-50% load range. In an attempt to investigate the feasibility of using the S-CO{sub 2} cycle for normal decay heat removal from the reactor, the cycle control study was extended beyond the investigation of normal load following. It was shown that such operation is possible with the extension of the inventory and the turbine throttling controls. However, the cycle operation in this range is calculated to be so inefficient that energy would need to be supplied from the electrical grid assuming that the generator could be capable of being operated in a motoring mode with an input electrical energy from the grid having a magnitude of about 20% of the nominal plant output electrical power level in order to maintain circulation of the CO{sub 2} in the cycle. The work on investigation of cycle operation at low power level will be continued in the future. In addition to the cycle control study, the coupled PDC-SAS4A/SASSYS-1 code system was also used to simulate thermal transients in the sodium-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchanger. Several possible conditions with the potential to introduce significant changes to the heat exchanger temperatures were identified and simulated. The conditions range from reactor scram and primary sodium pump failure or intermediate sodium pump failure on the reactor side to pipe breaks and valve malfunctions on the S-CO{sub 2} side. It was found that the maximum possible rate of the heat exchanger wall temperature change for the particular heat exchanger design assumed is limited to {+-}7 C/s for less than 10 seconds. Modeling in the Plant Dynamics Code has been compared with available data from the Sandia Natio

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

149

Carbon Dioxide: Threat or Opportunity?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past century, fossil fuel consumption has added carbon dioxide to the atmosphere at rapidly increasing rates. The prospect of further acceleration of this rate by turning from petroleum to coal has alarmed climatologists because of possible catastrophic long term effects on world climate. An alternative to discharging carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is to find new uses. One possible use is in 'Biofactories'. Biofactories may be achieved by exploiting two new developing technologies: Solar (Photosynthesis) energy, and genetic engineering. Some exciting new developments in genetic engineering will be touched on together with established bio-engineering-aquaculture, hydroponics, yeast, pharmaceutical production, fermentation, single cell protein, etc. A 'bio-factory' will be described, with a feed stream of carbon dioxide, water, nutrients containing sulfur, nitrogen, phosphorus and trace elements, and living culture interacting with light under controlled conditions to yield food and raw materials. Candidate products will be suggested and a few of the problems anticipated. Engineering and logistic requirements will be outlined and the economic impact assessed.

McKinney, A. R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

RF CONTROL REQUIREMENTS FOR THE CEBAF ENERGY UPGRADE C. Hovater, J. Delayen, L. Merminga, T. Powers, C. Reece, Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arXiv:physics/000908727Sep2000 MEASURING AND CONTROLLING ENERGY SPREAD IN CEBAF G. A. Krafft, J spread from a CEBAF-type machine to be relatively small; the measured energy spread from CEBAF at 4 Ge, the various subsystems contributing to the energy spread of a CEBAF-type accel- erator are reviewed, as well

151

Nonlinear model identification and adaptive control of CO2 sequestration process in saline aquifers using artificial neural networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, storage of carbon dioxide (CO"2) in saline aquifers has gained intensive research interest. The implementation, however, requires further research studies to ensure it is safe and secure operation. The primary objective is to secure ... Keywords: Carbon dioxide sequestration, Extended Kalman filter (EKF), GAP-RBF neural network, Nonlinear model predictive control (NMPC), System identification, Unscented Kalman filter (UKF)

Karim Salahshoor; Mohammad Hasan Hajisalehi; Morteza Haghighat Sefat

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Integrating Security RMF with Requirements Management J ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Integrating Security RMF with Requirements Management J Peeler ... Security controls at Low Risk are risk accepted & may not need mitigation. ...

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

153

Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle Carbon Cycle Latest Global Carbon Budget Estimates Including CDIAC Estimates Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Consumption and Cement Manufacture, (2011) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Isomass (δ 13C) of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) AmeriFlux - Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Balance Measurements Estimates of Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values

154

Carbon Isotopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Carbon Isotopes Gateway Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of Various Isotopic Species from Ice Cores Carbon-13 13C in CO Measurements from Niwot Ridge, Colorado and Montana de Oro, California (Tyler) 13C in CO2 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (White and Vaughn) CSIRO GASLAB Flask Network (Allison, Francey, and Krummel) CSIRO in situ measurements at Cape Grim, Tasmania (Francey and Allison) Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Keeling et al.) 13C in CH4 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (Miller and White) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Quay and Stutsman) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Stevens)

155

Ultra low friction carbon/carbon composites for extreme temperature applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbon/carbon composite in which a carbon matrix containing a controlled amount of boron or a boron compound is reinforced with carbon fiber exhibits a low coefficient of friction, i.e., on the order of 0.04 to 0.1 at temperatures up to 600.degree. C., which is one of the lowest frictional coefficients for any type of carbonaceous material, including graphite, glassy carbon, diamond, diamond-like carbon and other forms of carbon material. The high degree of slipperiness of the carbon composite renders it particularly adapted for limiting friction and wear at elevated temperatures such as in seals, bearings, shafts, and flexible joints

Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL); Busch, Donald E. (Hinsdale, IL); Fenske, George R. (Downers Grove, IL); Lee, Sam (Gardena, CA); Shepherd, Gary (Los Alamitos, CA); Pruett, Gary J. (Cypress, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Reliable and cost-effective monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) techniques are an important part of making geologic sequestration a safe, effective, and acceptable method for greenhouse gas control. MVA of geologic storage sites is expected to serve several purposes, including addressing safety and environmental concerns; inventory verification; project and national accounting of greenhouse gas emissions reductions at geologic storage sites; and evaluating potential regional, national, and international greenhouse gas reduction goals. The goal of our program area is to develop and demonstrate a broad portfolio of technologies, applications, and accounting requirements that

157

The Evaluation of Fly Ash Carbon and Coal Additives for Mercury Control at AmerenUE's Labadie and Meramec Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests at AmerenUE's Labadie and Meramec Power Plants evaluated the effectiveness of the bromine-based coal additive, KNX (Alstom), on mercury removal and speciation. The effect of carbon content in the ash, both unburned and from activated carbon injection, was also evaluated. These plants fire a variety of coals from the Powder River Basin (PRB) that typically contain low level of halogens. The unburned carbon in the fly ash at Labadie was < 0.5%, which was lower than at Meramec where it was 0.86 8212 2...

2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

158

Argonne Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Data from Batvia Prairie and Agricultural Sites  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide fluxes and stocks in terrestrial ecosystems are key measurements needed to constrain quantification of regional carbon sinks and sources and the mechanisms controlling them. This information is required to produce a sound carbon budget for North America. This project examines CO2 and energy fluxes from agricultural land and from restored tallgrass prairie to compare their carbon sequestration potentials. The study integrates eddy covariance measurements with biometric measurements of plant and soil carbon stocks for two systems in northeastern Illinois: 1) long-term cultivated land in corn-soybean rotation with conventional tillage, and 2) a 15 year-old restored prairie that represents a long-term application of CRP conversion of cultivated land to native vegetation. The study contributes to the North American Carbon Program (NACP) by providing information on the magnitude and distribution of carbon stocks and the processes that control carbon dynamics in cultivated and CRP-restored land in the Midwest. The prairie site has been functioning since October 2004 and the agricultural site since July 2005. (From http://www.atmos.anl.gov/ FERMI/index.html)

Matamala, Roser [ANL; Jastrow, Julie D.; Lesht, Barry [ANL; Cook, David [ANL; Pekour, Mikhail [ANL; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A. [University of Illinois at Chicago

159

Effect of the on/off cycling modulation time ratio of C2H2/SF6 flows on the formation of geometrically controlled carbon coils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon coils could be synthesized using C2H2/H2 as source gases and SF6 as an incorporated additive gas under thermal chemical vapor deposition system. Nickel catalyst layer deposition and then hydrogen plasma ...

Young-Chul Jeon; Jun-Ho Eum; Sung-Hoon Kim; Jung-Chul Park; Sung Il Ahn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon Nanotubes. Sponsored by: TMS Electronic, Magnetic and Photonic Materials Division Date and Time: Sunday, February 13, 2005 ~ 8:30 am-5:00 pm

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Carbon Nanomaterials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012 ... The graphene film was spin-coated using carbon nanotubes to form the cathode of the field emission device. A phosphor coated graphene-PET...

162

NETL: Carbon Storage - Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSLF Carbon Storage Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum CSLF Logo The Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) is a voluntary climate initiative of industrially developed and...

163

How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated Carbon dioxide emissions are the main component of greenhouse gas emissions caused by human activity. Carbon dioxide is emitted mostly as a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels for energy, although certain industrial processes (e.g., cement manufacture) also emit carbon dioxide. The estimates of energy-related carbon emissions require both data on the energy use and carbon emissions coefficients relating energy use to the amount of carbon emitted. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the main source of data on U.S. energy use. Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 used annual data provided by energy suppliers. However, to obtain more detail on how different sectors use energy, the emissions estimates in Energy and GHG Analysis rely data from on surveys of energy users, such as manufacturing establishments and commercial buildings.

164

Changes in Soil Carbon Following Afforestation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report No. 20, Australian Greenhouse Office. Paule et al. (2003) Predicted change in soil carbon following afforestation or reforestation, and analysis of controlling factors by...

165

Frequency Control Performance Measurement and Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ECAR EMS EPRI ERCOT ERO FALs FERC FRLs FRM FRR FTLs Hz IEEERegulatory Commission (FERC) made compliance with NERCswhich had been given to FERC by Congress through the Energy

Illian, Howard F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Frequency Control Performance Measurement and Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Variable Renewable Energy Resources into the Smart Grid,Smart Grids, Carnegie Mellon Conference on the Electricity

Illian, Howard F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Carbide-Derived Carbons with Tunable Porosity Optimized for Hydrogen Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On-board hydrogen storage is a key requirement for fuel cell-powered cars and trucks. Porous carbon-based materials can in principle adsorb more hydrogen per unit weight at room temperature than liquid hydrogen at -176 oC. Achieving this goal requires interconnected pores with very high internal surface area, and binding energies between hydrogen and carbon significantly enhanced relative to H2 on graphite. In this project a systematic study of carbide-derived carbons, a novel form of porous carbon, was carried out to discover a high-performance hydrogen sorption material to meet the goal. In the event we were unable to improve on the state of the art in terms of stored hydrogen per unit weight, having encountered the same fundamental limit of all porous carbons: the very weak interaction between H2 and the carbon surface. On the other hand we did discover several strategies to improve storage capacity on a volume basis, which should be applicable to other forms of porous carbon. Further discoveries with potentially broader impacts include Proof that storage performance is not directly related to pore surface area, as had been previously claimed. Small pores (supercapacitors with record high specific capacitance, and perm-selective membranes which bind cytokines for control of infections and possibly hemodialysis filters.

Fisher, John E.; Gogotsi, Yury; Yildirim, Taner

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

168

Salt Lake City- High Performance Buildings Requirement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Salt Lake City's mayor issued an executive order in July 2005 requiring that all public buildings owned and controlled by the city be built or renovated to meet the requirements of LEED "silver"...

169

Photosynthesis and calcification at cellular, organismal and community levels in coral reefs: A review on interactions and control by carbonate chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SYNOPSIS. Photosynthesis and calcification in zooxanthellate scleractinian corals and coral reefs are reviewed at several scales: cellular (pathways and transport mechanisms of inorganic carbon and calcium), organismal (interaction between photosynthesis and calcification, effect of light) and ecosystemic (community primary production and calcification, and air-sea CO2 exchanges). The coral host plays a major role in supplying carbon for the photosynthesis by the algal symbionts through a system similar to the carbon-concentrating mechanism described in free living algal cells. The details of carbon supply to the calcification process are almost unknown, but metabolic CO2 seems to be a significant source. Calcium supply for calcification is diffusional through oral layers, and active membrane transport only occurs between the calicoblastic cells and the site of calcification. Photosynthesis and calcification are tightly coupled in zooxanthellate scleractinian corals and coral reef communities. Calcification is, on average, three times higher in light than in darkness. The recent suggestion that calcification is dark-repressed rather than light-enhanced is not supported by the literature.

Jean-pierre Gattuso; Denis Allemand; Michel Frankignoullej

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Developing microbe-plant interactions for applications in plant-growth promotion and disease control, production of useful compounds, remediation, and carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Interactions between plants and microbes are an integral part of our terrestrial ecosystem. Microbe-plant interactions are being applied in many areas. In this review, we present recent reports of applications in the areas of plant-growth promotion, biocontrol, bioactive compound and biomaterial production, remediation and carbon sequestration. Challenges, limitations and future outlook for each field are discussed.

Wu, C.H.; Bernard, S.; Andersen, G.L.; Chen, W.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Extrasolar Carbon Planets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We suggest that some extrasolar planets ? 60 M ? will form substantially from silicon carbide and other carbon compounds. Pulsar planets and low-mass white dwarf planets are especially good candidate members of this new class of planets, but these objects could also conceivably form around stars like the Sun. This planet-formation pathway requires only a factor of two local enhancement of the protoplanetary disks C/O ratio above solar, a condition that pileups of carbonaceous grains may create in ordinary protoplanetary disks. Hot, Neptunemass carbon planets should show a significant paucity of water vapor in their spectra compared to hot planets with solar abundances. Cooler, less massive carbon planets may show hydrocarbon-rich spectra and tar-covered surfaces. The high sublimation temperatures of diamond, SiC, and other carbon compounds could protect these planets from carbon depletion at high temperatures. Subject headings: astrobiology planets and satellites, individual (Mercury, Jupiter) planetary systems: formation pulsars, individual (PSR 1257+12)

Marc J. Kuchner; S. Seager

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Electrical Properties of Carbon Fiber Support Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon fiber support structures have become common elements of detector designs for high energy physics experiments. Carbon fiber has many mechanical advantages but it is also characterized by high conductivity, particularly at high frequency, with associated design issues. This paper discusses the elements required for sound electrical performance of silicon detectors employing carbon fiber support elements. Tests on carbon fiber structures are presented indicating that carbon fiber must be regarded as a conductor for the frequency region of 10 to 100 MHz. The general principles of grounding configurations involving carbon fiber structures will be discussed. To illustrate the design requirements, measurements performed with a silicon detector on a carbon fiber support structure at small radius are presented. A grounding scheme employing copper-kapton mesh circuits is described and shown to provide adequate and robust detector performance.

W. Cooper; C. Daly; M. Demarteau; J. Fast; K. Hanagaki; M. Johnson; W. Kuykendall; H. Lubatti; M. Matulik; A. Nomerotski; B. Quinn; J. Wang

2005-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

173

Electrical Properties of Carbon Fiber Support Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon fiber support structures have become common elements of detector designs for high energy physics experiments. Carbon fiber has many mechanical advantages but it is also characterized by high conductivity, particularly at high frequency, with associated design issues. This paper discusses the elements required for sound electrical performance of silicon detectors employing carbon fiber support elements. Tests on carbon fiber structures are presented indicating that carbon fiber must be regarded as a conductor for the frequency region of 10 to 100 MHz. The general principles of grounding configurations involving carbon fiber structures will be discussed. To illustrate the design requirements, measurements performed with a silicon detector on a carbon fiber support structure at small radius are presented. A grounding scheme employing copper-kapton mesh circuits is described and shown to provide adequate and robust detector performance.

Cooper, W; Demarteau, M; Fast, J; Hanagaki, K; Johnson, M; Kuykendall, W; Lubatti, H; Matulik, M; Nomerotski, A; Quinn, B; Wang, J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Carbon dioxide and climate: a bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography with abstracts presents 394 citations retrieved from the Energy Data Base of the Department of Energy Technical Information Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The citations cover all aspects of the climatic effects of carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. These include carbon cycling, temperature effects, carbon dioxide control technologies, paleoclimatology, carbon dioxide sources and sinks, mathematical models, energy policies, greenhouse effect, and the role of the oceans and terrestrial forests.

Ringe, A.C. (ed.)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Quantifying requirements volatility effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an organization operating in the bancassurance sector we identified a low-risk IT subportfolio of 84 IT projects comprising together 16,500 function points, each project varying in size and duration, for which we were able to quantify its requirements ... Keywords: ?-ratio, ?-ratio, Compound monthly growth rate, IT dashboard, IT portfolio management, Quantitative IT portfolio management, Requirements churn, Requirements creep, Requirements metric, Requirements scrap, Requirements volatility, Requirements volatility dashboard, Scope creep, Volatility benchmark, Volatility tolerance factor

G. P. Kulk; C. Verhoef

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Expanding Robust HCCI Operation with Advanced Valve and Fuel Control Technologies Pub ID 38707 Title Expanding Robust HCCI Operation with Advanced Valve and Fuel Control Technologies Status Distributed Communication Type ORNL report ORNL Review? Scientific communication that requires ORNL review Information Category Protected CRADA Information ORNL Report Classification Final Expanding Robust HCCI Operation with Advanced Valve and Fuel Control Technologies  

SciTech Connect

Delphi Automotive Systems and ORNL established this CRADA to advance the commercialization potential of the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) advanced combustion strategy for gasoline engine platforms. HCCI combustion has been shown by others to produce high diesel-like efficiency on a gasoline engine platform while simultaneously producing low NOX and particulate matter emissions. However, the commercialization barriers that face HCCI combustion are significant, with requirements for a more active engine control system, likely with next-cycle closed-loop feedback control, and with advanced valve train technologies to enable negative valve overlap conditions. In the partnership between Delphi and ORNL, each organization brought a unique and complementary set of skills to the project. Delphi has made a number of breakthroughs with production-intent valve train technologies and controls in recent years to make a part time production-intent HCCI engine plausible. ORNL has extensive knowledge and expertise with HCCI combustion, and also has a versatile research engine with hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) that is useful for guiding production of a cam-based HCCI system. Partnering these knowledge bases and capabilities was essential towards making progress to better understand HCCI combustion and the commercialization barriers that it faces. ORNL and Delphi maintained strong collaboration throughout the project. Meetings were held regularly, with additional reports, presentations, and meetings as necessary to maintain progress. Delphi provided guidance to ORNL regarding operational strategies to investigate on their single-cylinder research engine with HVA and data from their experimental multi-cylinder engine for modeling. ORNL provided single-cylinder engine data and modeling results.

Szybist, J.P.; Confer, K. (Delphi Automotive Systems)

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

177

The Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle Print E-mail U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program The U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program, in consultation with the Carbon Cycle...

178

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Carbon Fuel Low Carbon Fuel Standard to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel Standard on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Low Carbon Fuel Standard Low Carbon Fuel Standard California's Low Carbon Fuel Standard (LCFS) Program requires a reduction in the carbon intensity of transportation

179

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David a. Lang David a. Lang Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4881 david.lang@netl.doe.gov andrew chizmeshya Arizona State University Center for Solid State Science Tempe, AZ 85287-1704 480-965-6072 chizmesh@asu.edu A Novel ApproAch to MiNerAl cArboNAtioN: eNhANciNg cArboNAtioN While AvoidiNg MiNerAl pretreAtMeNt process cost Background Carbonation of the widely occurring minerals of the olivine group, such as forsterite (Mg 2 SiO 4 ), is a potential large-scale sequestration process that converts CO 2 into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO 3 ). Because the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is the key to economic viability. Previous

180

NETL: Demonstration of a Novel Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Demonstration of a Novel Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Utilizing Pressurized Oxy-Combustion in Conjunction with Cryogenic Compression Project No.: DE-FE0009395 Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) is developing a novel supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) advanced power system utilizing pressurized oxy-combustion in conjunction with cryogenic compression. The proposed power system offers a leap in overall system efficiency while producing an output stream of sequestration ready CO2 at pipeline pressures. The system leverages developments in pressurized oxy-combustion technology and recent developments in sCO2 power cycles to achieve high net cycle efficiencies and produce CO2 at pipeline pressures without requiring additional compression of the flue gas.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Streamlined carbon footprint computation : case studies in the food industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the greatest barriers in product Carbon Footprinting is the large amount of time and effort required for data collection across the supply chain. Tesco's decision to downsize their carbon footprint project from the ...

Lee, Yin Jin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Structural studies of metalloenzyme complexes in acetogenic carbon fixation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Acetogenic bacteria use the Wood-Ljungdahl carbon fixation pathway to produce cellular carbon from CO?. This process requires several metalloenzymes that employ transition metals such as iron, nickel, and cobalt towards ...

Kung, Yan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

BER Requirements Review 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network Requirements...

184

ASCR Requirements Review 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network Requirements...

185

TVDG Training Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training Requirements TVDG Training Requirements information is now located at: http:www.bnl.govuserscenterTrainingtandem.asp. You will automatically be taken to the new...

186

Transport Models for Radioactive Carbon Dioxide at RWMC  

SciTech Connect

Radioactive carbon dioxide (formed by oxidation of carbon-14) is a highly mobile, radioactive contaminant released from solid wastes buried at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Radioactive CO2 is chemically active in the environment, volatile, water soluble, and subject to adsorption on solids. For this reason, its fate must be understood and controlled to meet radiological requirements (protection of the atmosphere, aquifer, vadose zones, plants and animals). In the present work, the migration of carbon-14 as dissolved bicarbonate was studied using miscible displacement experiments in water-saturated columns containing sediments from RWMC. Dissolved carbon-14 was retarded relative to the movement of water by a factor of about 3.6, which translates to a partition coefficient (Kd) of 0.8 ml/g. Two different adsorption sites were identified, with one site possibly having a nonlinear adsorption isotherm. A conservative tracer gas, sulfur hexafluoride, was used to measure the tortuosity of sedimentary material for gaseous diffusion. The tortuosity of the RWMC sediment (Spreading Area B sediment) was determined to be 3.2, which is slightly greater than predicted by the commonly used Millington-Quirk equation. In terms of affecting the migration of carbon-14 to the aquifer, the relative importance of the parameters studied is: (1) natural moisture content of the sediments, (2) sediment tortuosity to gas-phase diffusion, and (3) adsorption onto solid phases.

Hull, Laurence Charles; Hohorst, Frederick August

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

INFLUENCE OF CARBON AEROGEL TEXTURE ON PEMFC PERFORMANCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INFLUENCE OF CARBON AEROGEL TEXTURE ON PEMFC PERFORMANCES M. BRIGAUDET1, * , S. BERTHON-FABRY1 , C texture, carbon aerogels were used as catalyst supports in PEM fuel cell cathodes. Three carbon aerogels performances. By contrast, carbon aerogels present a controllable texture [1,2,3] and are thus suitable PEMFC

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

188

Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and...

189

Natural materials for carbon capture.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Naturally occurring clay minerals provide a distinctive material for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. Swelling clay minerals, such as the smectite variety, possess an aluminosilicate structure that is controlled by low-charge layers that readily expand to accommodate water molecules and, potentially, carbon dioxide. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the efficacy of intercalating carbon dioxide in the interlayer of layered clays but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the process and the extent of carbon capture as a function of clay charge and structure. A series of molecular dynamics simulations and vibrational analyses have been completed to assess the molecular interactions associated with incorporation of CO2 in the interlayer of montmorillonite clay and to help validate the models with experimental observation.

Myshakin, Evgeniy M. (National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA); Romanov, Vyacheslav N. (National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA); Cygan, Randall Timothy

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Poster CATALYST SULPHUR ADDITIVES IN THE GROWTH OF CARBON NANOTUBES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scientific community have recently focused especial attention on carbon nanomaterials, specially on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), because of their fascinating physical properties and potential applications [1]. Some of these applications, such as gas and energy storage, require high yields of well-defined qualities, what makes Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) one of the most appropriate methods for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes as it is easily scalable and makes the synthesis economically available. CVD is a versatile and promising method for CNTs synthesis as it offers the possibility of controlling a high yield synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with specific properties by only controlling the different parameters taking place in the furnace during the hydrocarbon feedstock decomposition over a metal catalyst [2]. This communication explores the growth of CNTs by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from methane decomposition over different catalysts prepared by the sol-gel technique, using MgO as support [3, 4] and varying the transition metal (active element in the catalyst). The aim of this work is to study the influence of additives, especially sulphur in different forms, on the activity of this kind of supported catalysts and how do the yield, morphology and physical

C. Valls; M. Prez-mendoza; G. Legac; W. K. Maser; M. T. Martnez; A. M. Benito

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Carbon supercapacitors  

SciTech Connect

Carbon supercapacitors are represented as distributed RC networks with transmission line equivalent circuits. At low charge/discharge rates and low frequencies these networks approximate a simple series R{sub ESR}C circuit. The energy efficiency of the supercapacitor is limited by the voltage drop across the ESR. The pore structure of the carbon electrode defines the electrochemically active surface area which in turn establishes the volume specific capacitance of the carbon material. To date, the highest volume specific capacitance reported for a supercapacitor electrode is 220F/cm{sup 3} in aqueous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (10) and {approximately}60 F/cm{sup 3} in nonaqueous electrolyte (8).

Delnick, F.M.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Carbon particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Development in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Development in Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Development in the People's Republic of China Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Development in the People's Republic of China Agency/Company /Organization: Asian Development Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Industry Topics: Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type: Publications, Case studies/examples Website: www.adb.org/documents/studies/carbon-efficiency-prc/carbon-efficiency- Country: China UN Region: Eastern Asia Coordinates: 35.86166°, 104.195397° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.86166,"lon":104.195397,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

194

Equipment Operational Requirements  

SciTech Connect

The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

195

Carbon microtubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbon microtube comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the microtube has a diameter of from about 10 .mu.m to about 150 .mu.m, and a density of less than 20 mg/cm.sup.3. Also described is a carbon microtube, having a diameter of at least 10 .mu.m and comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the porous wall comprises a plurality of voids, said voids substantially parallel to the length of the microtube, and defined by an inner surface, an outer surface, and a shared surface separating two adjacent voids.

Peng, Huisheng (Shanghai, CN); Zhu, Yuntian Theodore (Cary, NC); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

196

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate dry, regenerable, alkali carbonate-based sorbents for the capture of CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Electrobalance, fixed-bed and fluid-bed reactors were used to examine both the CO{sub 2} capture and sorbent regeneration phases of the process. Sodium carbonate-based sorbents (calcined sodium bicarbonate and calcined trona) were the primary focus of the testing. Supported sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate sorbents were also tested. Sodium carbonate reacts with CO{sub 2} and water vapor contained in flue gas at temperatures between 60 and 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate, or an intermediate salt (Wegscheider's salt). Thermal regeneration of this sorbent produces an off-gas containing equal molar quantities of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The low temperature range in which the carbonation reaction takes place is suited to treatment of coal-derived flue gases following wet flue gas desulfurization processes, but limits the concentration of water vapor which is an essential reactant in the carbonation reaction. Sorbent regeneration in an atmosphere of CO{sub 2} and water vapor can be carried out at a temperature of 160 C or higher. Pure CO{sub 2} suitable for use or sequestration is available after condensation of the H{sub 2}O. Flue gas contaminants such as SO{sub 2} react irreversibly with the sorbent so that upstream desulfurization will be required when sulfur-containing fossil fuels are used. Approximately 90% CO{sub 2} capture from a simulated flue gas was achieved during the early stages of fixed-bed reactor tests using a nominal carbonation temperature of 60 C. Effectively complete sorbent carbonation is possible when the fixed-bed test is carried out to completion. No decrease in sorbent activity was noted in a 15-cycle test using the above carbonation conditions coupled with regeneration in pure CO{sub 2} at 160 C. Fluidized-bed reactor tests of up to five cycles were conducted. Carbonation of sodium carbonate in these tests is initially very rapid and high degrees of removal are possible. The exothermic nature of the carbonation reaction resulted in a rise in bed temperature and subsequent decline in removal rate. Good temperature control, possibly through addition of supplemental water and evaporative cooling, appears to be the key to getting consistent carbon dioxide removal in a full-scale reactor system. The tendency of the alkali carbonate sorbents to cake on contact with liquid water complicates laboratory investigations as well as the design of larger scale systems. Also their low attrition resistance appears unsuitable for their use in dilute-phase transport reactor systems. Sodium and potassium carbonate have been incorporated in ceramic supports to obtain greater surface area and attrition resistance, using a laboratory spray dryer. The caking tendency is reduced and attrition resistance increased by supporting the sorbent. Supported sorbents with loading of up to 40 wt% sodium and potassium carbonate have been prepared and tested. These materials may improve the feasibility of large-scale CO{sub 2} capture systems based on short residence time dilute-phase transport reactor systems.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry Regenerable Sorbents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory studies were conducted to investigate dry, regenerable, alkali carbonate-based sorbents for the capture of CO{sub 2} from power plant flue gas. Electrobalance, fixed-bed and fluid-bed reactors were used to examine both the CO{sub 2} capture and sorbent regeneration phases of the process. Sodium carbonate-based sorbents (calcined sodium bicarbonate and calcined trona) were the primary focus of the testing. Supported sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate sorbents were also tested. Sodium carbonate reacts with CO{sub 2} and water vapor contained in flue gas at temperatures between 60 and 80 C to form sodium bicarbonate, or an intermediate salt (Wegscheider's salt). Thermal regeneration of this sorbent produces an off-gas containing equal molar quantities of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. The low temperature range in which the carbonation reaction takes place is suited to treatment of coal-derived flue gases following wet flue gas desulfurization processes, but limits the concentration of water vapor which is an essential reactant in the carbonation reaction. Sorbent regeneration in an atmosphere of CO{sub 2} and water vapor can be carried out at a temperature of 160 C or higher. Pure CO{sub 2} suitable for use or sequestration is available after condensation of the H{sub 2}O. Flue gas contaminants such as SO{sub 2} react irreversibly with the sorbent so that upstream desulfurization will be required when sulfur-containing fossil fuels are used. Approximately 90% CO{sub 2} capture from a simulated flue gas was achieved during the early stages of fixed-bed reactor tests using a nominal carbonation temperature of 60 C. Effectively complete sorbent carbonation is possible when the fixed-bed test is carried out to completion. No decrease in sorbent activity was noted in a 15-cycle test using the above carbonation conditions coupled with regeneration in pure CO{sub 2} at 160 C. Fluidized-bed reactor tests of up to five cycles were conducted. Carbonation of sodium carbonate in these tests is initially very rapid and high degrees of removal are possible. The exothermic nature of the carbonation reaction resulted in a rise in bed temperature and subsequent decline in removal rate. Good temperature control, possibly through addition of supplemental water and evaporative cooling, appears to be the key to getting consistent carbon dioxide removal in a full-scale reactor system. The tendency of the alkali carbonate sorbents to cake on contact with liquid water complicates laboratory investigations as well as the design of larger scale systems. Also their low attrition resistance appears unsuitable for their use in dilute-phase transport reactor systems. Sodium and potassium carbonate have been incorporated in ceramic supports to obtain greater surface area and attrition resistance, using a laboratory spray dryer. The caking tendency is reduced and attrition resistance increased by supporting the sorbent. Supported sorbents with loading of up to 40 wt% sodium and potassium carbonate have been prepared and tested. These materials may improve the feasibility of large-scale CO{sub 2} capture systems based on short residence time dilute-phase transport reactor systems.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P. Gupta; William J. McMichael; Thomas Nelson; Santosh Gangwal; Ya Liang; Tyler Moore; Margaret Williams; Douglas P. Harrison

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

198

Requirements Uncertainty in a Software Product Line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A complex system's requirements almost always remain uncertain late into its software development. In gas turbine engine control systems at Rolls-Royce, for a traditional project (non-product line) typically 50% of requirements will change between Critical ... Keywords: Requirements, Uncertainty, Software Product Lines

Andy J. Nolan; Silvia Abrahao; Paul C. Clements; Andy Pickard

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas ...  

Organoclay Sorbent for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas ... required for sequestration, an area of research identified as a high priority

200

Admission Requirements Admission Requirements for Graduate Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

required reports. Such a candidate may, for a nominal fee and with the approval of his/her graduate advisor://www.utdallas.edu/admissions/graduate/degrees/ There is a $50.00 nonrefundable application fee. Applicants are advised to carefully review the program a bachelor's degree. Test Scores (GMAT, GRE) Standardized test scores must be official and reported directly

O'Toole, Alice J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Requirement-Reviews.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Published 3 h%p:www.nersc.govsciencerequirements---reviews final---reports * Compurequirements f or 20132014 * Execurequirements * Case s...

202

Allocating Reserve Requirements (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of present and possible future ways to allocate and assign benefits for reserve requirements.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Collaborative Requirements Engineering Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... dependencies, safety, and environmental requirements) is essential to the ... Construction, and Operation of Constructed Facilities, March 2012. ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

204

Carbon | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Sector Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCarbon&oldid271960" Categories: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

205

Emergency Medical Treatment Required  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emergency Medical Treatment Required Non-Emergency Medical Treatment Required If possible, get help present if possible OptaComp will complete the "First Report of Injury or Illness" and authorize medical Investigation Report" to Environmental Health & Safety within 48 hours Emergency Medical Treatment Required

Weston, Ken

206

FES Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FES Science Network Requirements Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted March 13 and 14, 2008 #12;FES Science Network Requirements Workshop Fusion Energy Sciences Program Office, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network Gaithersburg, MD ­ March 13 and 14, 2008 ESnet

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

207

PIT Coating Requirements Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

MINTEER, D.J.

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

208

Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 CarbonFix Standard (CFS) 28 Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standard (CCBS) 28 Forest Carbon Standard (FCS) 28

209

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel and Fuel-Efficient Vehicle  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Low Carbon Fuel and Low Carbon Fuel and Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Acquisition Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel and Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Acquisition Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel and Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Acquisition Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel and Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Acquisition Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel and Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Acquisition Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel and Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Acquisition Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Low Carbon Fuel and Fuel-Efficient Vehicle Acquisition Requirement on AddThis.com...

210

Definition, Capabilities, and Components of a Terrestrial Carbon Monitoring System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research efforts for effectively and consistently monitoring terrestrial carbon are increasing in number. As such, there is a need to define carbon monitoring and how it relates to carbon cycle science and carbon management. There is also a need to identify intended capabilities of a carbon monitoring system and what system components are needed to develop the capabilities. This paper is intended to promote discussion on what capabilities are needed in a carbon monitoring system based on requirements for different areas of carbon-related research and, ultimately, for carbon management. While many methods exist to quantify different components of the carbon cycle, research is needed on how these methods can be coupled or integrated to obtain carbon stock and flux estimates regularly and at a resolution that enables attribution of carbon dynamics to respective sources. As society faces sustainability and climate change conerns, carbon management activities implemented to reduce carbon emissions or increase carbon stocks will become increasingly important. Carbon management requires moderate to high resolution monitoring. Therefore, if monitoring is intended to help inform management decisions, management priorities should be considered prior to development of a monitoring system.

West, Tristram O.; Brown, Molly E.; Duran, Riley M.; Ogle, Stephen; Moss, Richard H.

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

211

Transportation System Requirements Document  

SciTech Connect

This Transportation System Requirements Document (Trans-SRD) describes the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of this document is to define the system-level requirements for Transportation consistent with the CRWMS Requirement Document (CRD). These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presents an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. The interface identification and description are published in the CRWMS Interface Specification.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Carbide-Derived Carbons with Tunable Porosity Optimized for Hydrogen Storage  

SciTech Connect

On-board hydrogen storage is a key requirement for fuel cell-powered cars and trucks. Porous carbon-based materials can in principle adsorb more hydrogen per unit weight at room temperature than liquid hydrogen at -176 oC. Achieving this goal requires interconnected pores with very high internal surface area, and binding energies between hydrogen and carbon significantly enhanced relative to H2 on graphite. In this project a systematic study of carbide-derived carbons, a novel form of porous carbon, was carried out to discover a high-performance hydrogen sorption material to meet the goal. In the event we were unable to improve on the state of the art in terms of stored hydrogen per unit weight, having encountered the same fundamental limit of all porous carbons: the very weak interaction between H2 and the carbon surface. On the other hand we did discover several strategies to improve storage capacity on a volume basis, which should be applicable to other forms of porous carbon. Further discoveries with potentially broader impacts include Proof that storage performance is not directly related to pore surface area, as had been previously claimed. Small pores (< 1.5 nm) are much more effective in storing hydrogen than larger ones, such that many materials with large total surface areas are sub-par performers. Established that the distribution of pore sizes can be controlled during CDC synthesis, which opens the possibility of developing high performance materials within a common family while targeting widely disparate applications. Examples being actively pursued with other funding sources include methane storage, electrode materials for batteries and supercapacitors with record high specific capacitance, and perm-selective membranes which bind cytokines for control of infections and possibly hemodialysis filters.

Fisher, John E.; Gogotsi, Yury; Yildirim, Taner

2010-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

213

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-4966 jose.figueroa@netl.doe.gov Kevin o'Brien Principal Investigator SRI International Materials Research Laboratory 333 Ravenswood Avenue Menlo Park, AK 94025 650-859-3528 kevin.obrien@sri.com Fabrication and Scale-Up oF polybenzimidazole - baSed membrane SyStem For pre - combUStion captUre oF carbon dioxide Background In order to effectively sequester carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from a gasification plant, there must be an economically viable method for removing the CO 2 from other gases. While CO 2 separation technologies currently exist, their effectiveness is limited. Amine-based separation technologies work only at low temperatures, while pressure-swing absorption and cryogenic distillation consume significantly

214

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

andrea Mcnemar andrea Mcnemar National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-2024 andrea.mcnemar@netl.doe.gov Gregory J. Elbring Principal Investigator Sandia National Laboratory P.O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185 505-844-4904 gjelbri@sandia.gov GeoloGic SequeStration of carbon DioxiDe in a DepleteD oil reServoir: a comprehenSive moDelinG anD Site monitorinG project Background The use of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to enhance oil recovery (EOR) is a familiar and frequently used technique in the United States. The oil and gas industry has significant experience with well drilling and injecting CO 2 into oil-bearing formations to enhance production. While using similar techniques as in oil production, this sequestration field

215

Global warming and the future of coal carbon capture and storage  

SciTech Connect

The paper considers how best to change the economic calculus of power plant developers so they internalize CCS costs when selecting new generation technologies. Five policy tools are analyzed: establishing a greenhouse gas cap-and-trade program; imposing carbon taxes; defining CCS systems as a so-called Best Available Control Technology for new power plants under the USA Clean Air Act's New Source Review program; developing a 'low carbon portfolio' standard that requires utilities to provide an increasing proportion of power from low-carbon generation sources over time; and requiring all new coal power plants to meet an 'emission performance' standard that limits CO{sub 2} emissions to levels achievable with CCS systems. Each of these tools has advantages and drawbacks but an emission performance standard for new power plants is likely to be most effective in spurring broad-scale adoption of CCS systems. Chapter headings are: global warming and the future of coal; new coal-fired power plants threaten all other efforts to combat global warming; a potential path to zero emissions through carbon capture and storage; CO{sub 2} capture at coal plants: the promise of IGCC and other technologies; barriers to commercialization of IGCC technology; crossing the chasm: a new policy framework to push ccs implementation forward; encouraging CCS systems with carbon caps and trading programs; using the existing Clean Air Act to require CCS systems for new coal plants; retail low carbon portfolio standard; carbon tax; emission performance standards for new coal power plants; and conclusions. 16 figs.

Ken Berlin; Robert M. Sussman [Skadden Arps, Slate, Meagher and Flom (United States)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

216

ASCR Science Network Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2009 ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by ASCR. The ASCR facilities anticipate significant increases in wide area bandwidth utilization, driven largely by the increased capabilities of computational resources and the wide scope of collaboration that is a hallmark of modern science. Many scientists move data sets between facilities for analysis, and in some cases (for example the Earth System Grid and the Open Science Grid), data distribution is an essential component of the use of ASCR facilities by scientists. Due to the projected growth in wide area data transfer needs, the ASCR supercomputer centers all expect to deploy and use 100 Gigabit per second networking technology for wide area connectivity as soon as that deployment is financially feasible. In addition to the network connectivity that ESnet provides, the ESnet Collaboration Services (ECS) are critical to several science communities. ESnet identity and trust services, such as the DOEGrids certificate authority, are widely used both by the supercomputer centers and by collaborations such as Open Science Grid (OSG) and the Earth System Grid (ESG). Ease of use is a key determinant of the scientific utility of network-based services. Therefore, a key enabling aspect for scientists beneficial use of high performance networks is a consistent, widely deployed, well-maintained toolset that is optimized for wide area, high-speed data transfer (e.g. GridFTP) that allows scientists to easily utilize the services and capabilities that the network provides. Network test and measurement is an important part of ensuring that these tools and network services are functioning correctly. One example of a tool in this area is the recently developed perfSONAR, which has already shown its usefulness in fault diagnosis during the recent deployment of high-performance data movers at NERSC and ORNL. On the other hand, it is clear that there is significant work to be done in the area of authentication and access control - there are currently compatibility problems and differing requirements between the authentication systems in use at different facilities, and the policies and mechanisms in use at different facilities are sometimes in conflict. Finally, long-term software maintenance was of concern for many attendees. Scientists rely heavily on a large deployed base of software that does not have secure programmatic funding. Software packages for which this is true include data transfer tools such as GridFTP as well as identity management and other software infrastructure that forms a critical part of the Open Science Grid and the Earth System Grid.

Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

217

Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) for Waste Receiving & Processing (WRAP) facility  

SciTech Connect

These Technical Safety Requirements (TSRs) define the Administrative Controls required to ensure safe operation of the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP). As will be shown in the report, Safety Limits, Limiting Control Settings, Limiting Conditions for Operation, and Surveillance Requirements are not required for safe operation of WRAP.

TOMASZEWSKI, T.A.

2001-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

218

AVESTAR® - Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Control Control AVESTAR control system efforts are focused on development of computational approaches for simulation and advanced controls for energy systems. Power generation technologies are growing more sophisticated and require control strategies and systems to be updated to allow plant owners to take full advantage of their increased capabilities. A well designed control system can provide the ability to hit and maintain setpoints without oscillation for optimum power plant operation. Implementation of complex control systems developed through advanced computational approaches will increase efficiency and reduce emissions. The AVESTAR team is focusing on the following three areas of process control research: 1) Plant-wide control system design, 2) Advanced regulatory control, and 3) Advanced process control. Process control models, methods, and tools are developed and applied to a wide variety of energy systems ranging from smart plant to smart grid.

219

Mandatory Supervisory Training Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Supervisory Training Requirements Mandatory Supervisory Training Requirements All DOE supervisors, managers, and executives will comply with mandatory supervisory training requirements (5 CFR 412; 5 CFR 315.801; 5 CFR 315.901; DOE O 360.1; and DOE O 320.1): * New supervisors: 80 hours of supervisory training, with 40 hours required to be completed during the supervisory probationary period. * Experienced supervisors: minimum of 8 hours of supervisory training each year. The Office of Learning and Workforce Development has developed an inventory of training and developmental activities that will meet the supervisory training requirements. The DOE courses Supervisory Essentials (32 hours) and Navigating the Federal Hiring Process (8 hours) are required to fulfill the first year 40-hour training

220

Carbon Capture & Sequestration Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Laboratory Battelle Memorial Institute CARBON CAPTURE & SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES J. Edmonds, J.J. Dooley, and S.H. Kim Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Battelle Memorial Institute Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Battelle Memorial Institute THE ROADMAP * Greenhouse gas emissions may not control themselves. * Climate policy may happen.--There are smart and dumb ways to proceed. The smart ways involve getting both the policy and the technology right--the GTSP. * There are no silver bullets--Expanding the set of options to include carbon capture and sequestration can help limit the cost of any ceiling on CO 2 concentrations. * Managing greenhouse emissions means managing carbon. * Carbon can be captured, transported, and sequestered in many ways.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Management requirements for accreditation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... handbook, shall be defined in the quality manual. ... It is a fundamental requirement that the results ... NIST Handbook 150 (and ISO/IEC 17025) details ...

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

222

Public Safety Network Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... need excellent situational awareness in order to do their jobs effectively. ... performance requirements as shown in Figure 2. This analysis was used ...

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

223

CCI: Program Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Your Arrival Your First Day Weekly Activities Program Requirements Checkout FAQ The DOE WDTS site has comprehensive information on Participant Obligations. Consult that site for...

224

Public Safety Network Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Usage scenario. ... imposed by public safety applications and usage scenarios is key in ... requirements as shown in Figure 2. This analysis was used as ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

225

ASCR Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASCR Science Network Requirements Office of AdvancedScientific Computing Research, DOE Office of ScienceEnergy Sciences Network Gaithersburg, MD April 15 and 16,

Dart, Eli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

New Employee Training Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

All New Employees New Supervisors New Employee Training Requirements Welcome to Berkeley Lab We value you and the talents that you bring to our workplace. The training listed...

227

Amorphous carbon thin films for optoelectric device application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thin films of amorphous carbon (a-C and a-C:H) have been deposited using different carbon precursor materials such as camphor--a natural source, graphite and CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} mixture by different deposition methods, such as ion beam sputtering, pyrolysis, pulsed laser deposition and r.f. plasma CVD. The films are subjected to various standard characterization techniques in order to tailor the required structural and opto-electrical properties for device applications. The effects of deposition parameters and annealing temperatures on the properties of carbon thin films have been investigated. Both p- and n- type of carbon films have been obtained either through controlling the deposition parameters of a particular method or by doping. Solar cells of various configurations, such as n-C/p-Si, p-C/n-Si and n-C/p-C/p-Si, have been fabricated and their photoresponse characteristics are studied. An efficiency of 1.52% has been obtained, so far, for the cell of configuration n-C/p-C/p-Si. Effects of substrate temperature on the photovoltaic properties are also outlined in brief.

Soga, T.; Jimbo, T.; Krishna, K.M.; Umeno, M.

2000-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

228

Nanostructuring of Microporous Carbons with Carbon Nanotubes for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Nanostructuring of Microporous Carbons with Carbon Nanotubes for Efficient Carbon Dioxide Capture. Author(s), Stephen C. Hawkins, ...

229

Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of published...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of published data and implications for climate forcing Title Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of...

230

Carbon Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Corrosion rates of carbon steel at various locations...Vancouver Island, BC, Canada Rural marine 13 0.5 Detroit, MI Industrial 14.5 0.57 Fort Amidor Pier, CZ Marine 14.5 0.57 Morenci, MI Urban 19.5 0.77 Potter County, PA Rural 20 0.8 Waterbury, CT Industrial 22.8 0.89 State College, PA Rural 23 0.9 Montreal, QC, Canada Urban 23 0.9 Durham, NH Rural 28 1.1...

231

Integrated Management Requirements mapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains five appendices documenting how Sandia implemented the DOE Conduct of Operations (5480.19) and DOE Quality Assurance (5700.6C) orders. It provides a mapping of the Sandia integrated requirements to the specific requirements of each Order and a mapping to Sandia's approved program for implementing the Conduct of Operations Order.

Holmes, J.T.; Andrews, N.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport, and Storage Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport, and Storage Project Summary Full Title: Techno-Economic Models for Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport, and Storage & Correlations for Estimating Carbon Dioxide Density and Viscosity Project ID: 195 Principal Investigator: David McCollum Brief Description: This project addresses several components of carbon capture and storage (CCS) costs, provides technical models for determining the engineering and infrastructure requirements of CCS, and describes some correlations for estimating CO2 density and viscosity. Keywords: Pipeline, transportation, greenhouse gases (GHG), costs, technoeconomic analysis Purpose Estimate costs of carbon dioxide capture, compression, transport, storage, etc., and provide some technical models for determining the engineering and

233

Modeling shallow marine carbonate depositional systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geological Process Models (GPMs) have been used in the past to simulate the distinctive stratigraphies formed in carbonate sediments, and to explore the interaction of controls that produce heterogeneity. Previous GPMs have only indirectly included the ... Keywords: Carbonate, Geological process model, Numerical modeling, Reef, Supersaturation

Jon Hill; Daniel Tetzlaff; Andrew Curtis; Rachel Wood

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Desalination with carbon aerogel electrodes  

SciTech Connect

An electrically regenerated electrosorption process known as carbon aerogel CDI was developed for continuously removing ionic impurities from aqueous streams. A salt solution flows in a channel formed by pairs of parallel carbon aerogel electrodes. Each electrode has a very high BET surface area and very low resistivity. After polarization, anions and cations are removed from electrolyte by the electric field and electrosorbed onto the carbon aerogel. The solution is thus separated into two streams, brine and water. Based on this, carbon aerogel CDI appears to be an energy-efficient alternative to evaporation, electrodialysis, and reverse osmosis. The energy required by this process is about QV/2, plus losses. Estimated energy requirement for sea water desalination is 18-27 Wh gal{sup -1}, depending on cell voltage and flow rate. The requirement for brackish water desalination is less, 1.2-2.5 Wh gal{sup -1} at 1600 ppM. This is assuming that stored electrical energy is reclaimed during regeneration.

Farmer, J.C.; Richardson, J.H.; Fix, D.V.

1996-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

235

Integrated Estimates of Global Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Assessing the contribution of terrestrial carbon sequestration to international climate change mitigation requires integration across scientific and disciplinary boundaries. As part of a scenario analysis for the US Climate Change Technology Program, measurements and geographic data were used to develop terrestrial carbon sequestration estimates for agricultural soil carbon, reforestation and pasture management. These estimates were then applied in the MiniCAM integrated assessment model to evaluate mitigation strategies within policy and technology scenarios aimed at achieving atmospheric CO2 stabilization by 2100. Adoption of terrestrial sequestration practices is based on competition for land and economic markets for carbon. Terrestrial sequestration reach a peak combined rate of 0.5 to 0.7 Gt carbon yr-1 in mid-century with contributions from agricultural soil (0.21 Gt carbon yr-1), reforestation (0.31 Gt carbon yr-1) and pasture (0.15 Gt carbon yr-1). Sequestration rates vary over time period and with different technology and policy scenarios. The combined contribution of terrestrial sequestration over the next century ranges from 31 to 41 GtC. The contribution of terrestrial sequestration to mitigation is highest early in the century, reaching up to 20% of total carbon mitigation. This analysis provides insight into the behavior of terrestrial carbon mitigation options in the presence and absence of climate change mitigation policies.

Thomson, Allison M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Electricity Load and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: Effects of a Carbon Price in the Short Term  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

acceptable levels will require a dramatic de-carbonization of the electric generation sector in the U.S. One increasingly discussed way to meet this policy goal is to put an explicit price on carbon emissions, either through a tax or a trading scheme. ...

Adam Newcomer; Seth Blumsack; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave; M. Granger Morgan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Carbon taxes and India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the Indian module of the Second Generation Model 9SGM, we explore a reference case and three scenarios in which greenhouse gas emissions were controlled. Two alternative policy instruments (carbon taxes and tradable permits) were analyzed to determine comparative costs of stabilizing emissions at (1) 1990 levels (the 1 X case), (2) two times the 1990 levels (the 2X case), and (3) three times the 1990 levels (the 3X case). The analysis takes into account India`s rapidly growing population and the abundance of coal and biomass relative to other fuels. We also explore the impacts of a global tradable permits market to stabilize global carbon emissions on the Indian economy under the following two emissions allowance allocation methods: (1) {open_quotes}Grandfathered emissions{close_quotes}: emissions allowances are allocated based on 1990 emissions. (2) {open_quotes}Equal per capita emissions{close_quotes}: emissions allowances are allocated based on share of global population. Tradable permits represent a lower cost method to stabilize Indian emissions than carbon taxes, i.e., global action would benefit India more than independent actions.

Fisher-Vanden, K.A.; Pitcher, H.M.; Edmonds, J.A.; Kim, S.H. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Shukla, P.R. [Indian Institute of Management, Ahmedabad (India)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Full SPP Partnership Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partnership Requirements: Partnership Requirements: ENERGY STAR Partnership for Commercial & Industrial Service and Product Providers (SPP) Eligible Organizations Companies providing energy efficiency services and products to commercial buildings and industrial manufacturing facilities/plants are eligible for the Service and Product Provider (SPP) partnership, but must meet certain requirements as specified below. Types of eligible companies include: architecture, distributor, energy consultant/energy management services, energy improvement contractor, energy information services, energy services company (ESCO), engineering, equipment manufacturer, financial services, on-site energy production services, unregulated energy retailer and marketer, or other supplier of standard energy-efficient products and/or services for commercial buildings and/or

239

Coal Ash Carbon Removal Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Market resistance to the use of ash containing elevated levels of carbon and/or ammonia has become a major concern for coal-fired facilities in recent years as a result of increased use of nitrogen oxide (NOx) reduction environmental control technologies. EPRI initiated this state of practice assessment to help power producers evaluate alternatives for ash beneficiation.

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

NETL: Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment (CARE)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Control Carbon Absorber Retrofit Equipment (CARE) Project No.: DE-FE0007528 Spray Jet Array for Neustream-C Nozzle Technology Spray Jet Array for Neustream-C Nozzle...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

BES Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedOffice of Basic Energy Sciences. This is LBNL report LBNL-BES Science Network Requirements Report of the Basic Energy

Dart, Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

NSLS II: Authentication Required  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Pages Login Access to this area of the NSLS-II website requires a valid username and password. Username: Password: Next > Last Modified: April 2, 2013 Please forward all...

243

Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Home > Technologies > Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Carbon Storage 2011 Carbon Storage Project Portfolio Table of Contents CARBON STORAGE OVERVIEW Carbon Storage Program Contacts [PDF-26KB] Carbon Storage Projects National Map [PDF-169KB] State Projects Summary Table [PDF-39KB] Carbon Storage Program Structure [PDF-181KB] Selected Carbon Sequestration Program Papers and Publications The U.S. Department of Energy's R&D Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions Through Beneficial Uses of Carbon Dioxide (2011) [PDF-3.3MB] Greenhouse Gas Science and Technology Carbon Capture and Sequestration: The U.S. Department of Energy's R&D Efforts to Characterize Opportunities for Deep Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Offshore Resources (2011) [PDF-445KB]

244

Photophysics of carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis reviews the recent advances made in optical studies of single-wall carbon nanotubes. Studying the electronic and vibrational properties of carbon nanotubes, we find that carbon nanotubes less than 1 nm in ...

Samsonidze, Georgii G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Carbon Dioxide (CO2)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Gateway Pages to Carbon Dioxide Data Modern records and ice core records back 2000 years 800,000 year records from ice cores Other...

246

Institutional Controls  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Institutional Controls Institutional Controls Many major Federal laws (e.g., Atomic Energy Act (AEA), Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA), Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA)), Executive Orders, regulations and various other drivers influence the use of institutional controls at DOE sites. Some drivers directly authorize or require the use of institutional controls, while others do not. DOE also uses institutional controls when no specific statutory requirement exists to supplement active remediation, pollution control, public and resource protection, and physical security, or to bolster the integrity of engineered remedies. DOE and its predecessor agencies have conducted activities for over 50 years, using land ownership and access control, environmental monitoring and surveillance, and other tools to support protection efforts at operational and inactive facilities, including radioactive waste burial grounds.

247

Geothermal chemical control and monitoring instrumentation: an overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accurate knowledge of the geothermal fluid chemistry at operating temperature is needed to optimize operation, prevent corrosion, increase equipment service life and maximize profit and use. Available electrochemical sensors do not survive at the temperatures encountered in geothermal fluids; and new developments in this area are required. Chemical control and monitoring instruments for measuring in situ characteristics of geothermal fluids are under development. Progress in the development of electrochemical sensors to measure pH, carbonate and sulfide-sulfur is discussed.

Jensen, G.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Mechanisms controlling the production and transport of methane, carbon dioxide, and dissolved solutes within a boreal peatland. Progress report, July 15, 1992--July 14, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The role of freshwater peatlands in the global methane cycle remains uncertain. Field measurements of methane emissions tend to be highly variable across a peatland and exhibit sharp seasonal fluctuations. The process of extrapolating these variable measurements to regional estimates is further complicated by rudimentary knowledge of the environmental controls can the production and emissions of methane from peat. The distribution of methanogenesis within the peat profile will strongly influence the response of methane emissions to potential climatic changes. During the summers of 1990 and 1991 we conducted a study on the mechanisms for the production, transport, and storage of methane within the Glacial Lake Agassiz peatland region as the regional climate shifted from extreme drought to a period of normal rainfall. This natural experiment provided unexpected insights on the linkages among climate, hydrology, and the methane cycle in large peat basins. This report presents project progress for period July 15, 1992--July 14, 1993

Siegel, D.I.

1993-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

249

NETL: Carbon Storage - Program Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Overview Program Overview Carbon Storage Program Overview The Carbon Storage Program involves three key elements for technology development: Core Research and Development (Core R&D), Infrastructure, and Global Collaborations. The image below displays the relationship among the three elements and provides a means for navigation throughout NETL's Storage Program Website. Click on Image to Navigate Storage Website Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player NETL's Carbon Storage Program Structure CORE R&D Core R&D is driven by industry's technology needs and segregates those needs into focus areas to more efficiently obtain solutions that can then be tested and deployed in the field. The Core R&D Element contains four

250

Method of making carbon-carbon composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

BIOMINERALIZATION FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION T. J. Phelps and Y. Roh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the controlling factors, rate and extent of carbonate mineral precipitation will significantly advance our while carbon dioxide is liberated to the atmosphere. While previous strategies dealt the sulfur in the coal) and/or reject kiln dust. Carbon dioxide from the plant could be bubbled through

252

Edgewood Carbon Holdings LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Edgewood Carbon Holdings LLC Edgewood Carbon Holdings LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Edgewood Carbon Holdings LLC Place Cornwall, Vermont Zip 57530 Sector Carbon Product Edgewood Carbon Holdings LLC is active worldwide in the evolving commercialization of carbon recovery. Coordinates 50.443321°, -4.93986° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":50.443321,"lon":-4.93986,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

253

Renaissance Carbon Investment Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renaissance Carbon Investment Ltd Renaissance Carbon Investment Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Renaissance Carbon Investment Ltd. Place Shanghai, China Zip 200052 Sector Carbon Product Renaissance Carbon Investment (RCI) is the carbon investment and trading arm of Pivoton International. Coordinates 31.247709°, 121.472618° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.247709,"lon":121.472618,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

254

CarbonMicro | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CarbonMicro CarbonMicro Jump to: navigation, search Name CarbonMicro Place Irvine, California Zip CA 92618 Sector Carbon Product Carbon Micro Battery Corporation has a unique technology of creating micro and nanoscale carbon structures. Coordinates 41.837752°, -79.268594° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.837752,"lon":-79.268594,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

255

Carbon Markets: A Potential Source of Income for Farmers and Ranchers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural producers may be able to increase their earnings by selling carbon credits to large carbon emitters. This publication explains the origins of the carbon market, the types of projects agriculturists can undertake, and the steps and requirements for participating in the carbon credits marketplace. 9 pp., 2 tables, 2 figures

Ribera, Luis; Zenteno, Joaquin; McCarl, Bruce

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

256

DOE Carbon Sequestration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Program Charles E. Schmidt Carbon Sequestration Product Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory David J. Beecy Director, Office of Environmental Systems...

257

Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites, Methods of Making Carbon ...  

This technology describes methods to fabricate supercapacitors using aligned carbon nanotubes that are decorated with metal oxide or nitride ...

258

Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

Narasayya, Vivek

259

INCCA: Integrated Climate and Carbon  

SciTech Connect

The INCCA (Integrated Climate and Carbon) initiative will develop and apply the ability to simulate the fate and climate impact of fossil fuel-derived carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and aerosols on a global scale. Coupled climate and carbon cycle modeling like that proposed for INCCA is required to understand and predict the future environmental impacts of fossil fuel burning. At present, atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations are prescribed, not simulated, in large climate models. Credible simulations of the entire climate system, however, need to predict time-evolving atmospheric greenhouse forcing using anthropogenic emissions as the fundamental input. Predicting atmospheric COS concentrations represents a substantial scientific advance because there are large natural sources and sinks of carbon that are likely to change as a result of climate change. Both terrestrial (e.g., vegetation on land) and oceanic components of the carbon cycle are known to be sensitive to climate change. Estimates of the amount of man-made CO{sub 2} that will accumulate in the atmosphere depend on understanding the carbon cycle. For this reason, models that use CO{sub 2} emissions, not prescribed atmospheric concentrations, as fundamental inputs are required to directly address greenhouse-related questions of interest to policymakers. INCCA is uniquely positioned to make rapid progress in this high-priority area of global change modeling and prediction because we can leverage previous and ongoing LLNL developments, and use existing component models that are well-developed and published. The need for a vastly improved carbon dioxide prediction capability is appreciated by the DOE. As the US Accelerated Climate Prediction Initiative (ACPI) progresses, we expect the DOE will emphasize the carbon cycle as the next major department-level earth science focus. INCCA will position LLNL for substantial additional funding as this new focus is realized. In the limited time since our LDRD funding was first received (1 November 2000) we have made good progress in acquisition and testing of component models, applications of the terrestrial biosphere model, enhancements to the ocean carbon cycle model and development of the fossil fuel aerosol model.

Thompson, S L

2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

260

Seismic Performance Requirements for WETF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops recommendations for requirements on the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) performance during seismic events. These recommendations are based on fragility estimates of WETF structures, systems, and components that were developed by LANL experts during facility walkdowns. They follow DOE guidance as set forth in standards DOE-STD-1021-93, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Categorization Guidelines for Structures, Systems, and Components'' and DOE-STD-1020-94, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities''. Major recommendations are that WETF institute a stringent combustible loading control program and that additional seismic bracing and anchoring be provided for gloveboxes and heavy equipment.

Hans Jordan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Regulators, Requirements, Statutes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulators, Requirements, Statutes Regulators, Requirements, Statutes Regulators, Requirements, Statutes The Laboratory must comply with environmental laws and regulations that apply to Laboratory operations. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Environmental laws and regulations LANL complies with more than 30 state and federal regulations and policies designed to protect human health and the environment. Regulators Regulators Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) EPA Homepage EPA - Region VI U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) DOE Homepage DOE Environmental Policy DOE Citizen's Advisory Board U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) Southwest Region 2 New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) NMED Homepage NMED DOE Oversight Office

262

VFP: Program Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Requirements Program Requirements Home Welcome Researcher! Preparing for Your Visit Your Arrival Your First Day Weekly Activities Program Requirements Checkout FAQ The DOE WDTS site has comprehensive information on Participant Obligations. Consult that site for more information on all deliverables except the Fermilab Summer Interns website. Attendance: Complete the full ten-week program and attend all scheduled events including lectures, tours and group activities. Entrance Survey: Complete the entrance survey within your first week at Fermilab. One-page Peer Review Provide a one-page written peer review of another SULI intern' talk or poster. Abstract for General Audience Complete and submit an abstract summarizing your research experience. Oral or Poster Presentation: Deliver an oral or poster presentation to mentors and peers the final week

263

BER Science Network Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Network Network Requirements Report of the Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements Workshop Conducted July 26 and 27, 2007 BER Science Network Requirements Workshop Biological and Environmental Research Program Office, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network Bethesda, MD - July 26 and 27, 2007 ESnet is funded by the US Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program. Dan Hitchcock is the ESnet Program Manager. ESnet is operated by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, which is operated by the University of California for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. This work was supported by the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Facilities Division, and the Office of Biological &

264

SULI: Program Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Requirements Program Requirements Home Welcome Intern! Preparing for Your Internship Your Arrival Your First Day Weekly Activities Program Requirements Checkout FAQ The DOE WDTS site has comprehensive information on Participant Obligations. Consult that site for more information on all deliverables except the Fermilab Summer Interns website. Attendance: Complete the full ten-week program and attend all scheduled events including lectures, tours and group activities. Entrance Survey: First create an account by following the link, educationLink New Account Setup. After creating the account, you can login to the educationLink site. Complete the entrance survey posted on your EduLink site within your first week at Fermilab. One-page Peer Review Provide a one-page written peer review of another SULI intern' talk or

265

Federal Metering Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Metering Requirements Metering Requirements FUPWG - May 23, 2013 Brad Gustafson Federal Energy Management Program 2 42 USC 8253 - ENERGY MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENT (e) Metering By October 1, 2012, in accordance with guidelines established by the Secretary under paragraph (2), all Federal buildings shall, for the purposes of efficient use of energy and reduction in the cost of electricity used in such buildings, be metered. Each agency shall use, to the maximum extent practicable, advanced meters or advanced metering devices that provide data at least daily and that measure at least hourly consumption of electricity in the Federal buildings of the agency. Not later than October 1, 2016, each agency shall provide for equivalent metering of natural gas and steam, in accordance with guidelines established by the Secretary

266

CO/sub 2/ EOR requires corrosion  

SciTech Connect

Oil fields being converted to CO/sub 2/ floods for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) will experience increasing corrosion attack as the concentration of carbon dioxide in the produced gas stream increases. Entrained salt water, hydrogen sulfide, and oxygen contamination will aggravate the problem. Established corrosion control measures such as inhibition, alloys, plastic coating, and plastic liners are available to utilize in existing systems. Plastic pipe calls for consideration in new systems. In addition, effective corrosion-monitoring methods can be used to assure the operator that CO/sub 2/ corrosion is under control in the production and gas gathering system.

Bradley, B.W.

1986-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

267

Composite carbon foam electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Composite carbon foam electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

269

Requirements engineering with ORM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The number of IT project overspends and failures suggest that many IT projects do not conform to requirements. Despite decades of development the IT industry still seems to lack an effective method of ensuring that a project will be right first time. ...

Ken Evans

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Requirements for Xenon International  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

271

Training requirements. - 19...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z www.OSHA.gov Regulations (Standards - 29 CFR) Training requirements. - 1926.454 Regulations (Standards - 29 CFR) - Table of Contents * Part...

272

Landscape level differences in soil carbon and nitrogen: implications for soil carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research was to understand how land cover and topography act, independently or together, as determinants of soil carbon and nitrogen storage over a complex terrain. Such information could help to direct land management for the purpose of carbon sequestration. Soils were sampled under different land covers and at different topographic positions on the mostly forested 14,000 ha Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, USA. Most of the soil carbon stock, to a 40-cm soil depth, was found to reside in the surface 20 cm of mineral soil. Surface soil carbon and nitrogen stocks were partitioned into particulate ({ge}53 {micro}m) and mineral-associated organic matter (<53 {micro}m). Generally, soils under pasture had greater nitrogen availability, greater carbon and nitrogen stocks, and lower C:N ratios than soils under transitional vegetation and forests. The effects of topography were usually secondary to those of land cover. Because of greater soil carbon stocks, and greater allocation of soil carbon to mineral-associated organic matter (a long-term pool), we conclude that soil carbon sequestration, but not necessarily total ecosystem carbon storage, is greater under pastures than under forests. The implications of landscape-level variation in soil carbon and nitrogen for carbon sequestration are discussed at several different levels: (1) nitrogen limitations to soil carbon storage; (2) controls on soil carbon turnover as a result of litter chemistry and soil carbon partitioning; (3) residual effects of past land use history; and (4) statistical limitations to the quantification of soil carbon stocks.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5003: Carbon Displacement Using Net-Zero Carbon Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Date: January 4, 2006 3 Date: January 4, 2006 Title: Carbon Displacement Using Net-Zero Carbon Sources Originator: Elvin Yuzugullu Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: April 4, 2006 Item: "... if 175 billion kWh of grid electricity (10% of the growth of the electric generation market in 2025) is replaced by fuel cells operating on hydrogen at 50% LHV efficiency, about 10.5 million tons of hydrogen would be needed. If this hydrogen were made from a non-carbon (e.g. nuclear) or net-zero carbon (e.g. biomass, coal with carbon sequestration) source, then it could potentially displace about 27.5 million tons of carbon." Calculations/References: Analysis by TIAX for DOE, August 24, 2005: * "10.5 million tons of hydrogen" Required H 2 = 175 billion kWhe

274

Autonomous observations of the ocean biological carbon pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prediction of the substantial biologically mediated carbon flows in a rapidly changing and acidifying ocean requires model simulations informed by observations of key carbon cycle processes on the appropriate space and time scales. From 2000 to 2004, the National Oceanographic Partnership Program (NOPP) supported the development of the first low-cost fully-autonomous ocean profiling Carbon Explorers that demonstrated that year-round real-time observations of particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration and sedimentation could be achieved in the world's ocean. NOPP also initiated the development of a sensor for particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) suitable for operational deployment across all oceanographic platforms. As a result, PIC profile characterization that once required shipboard sample collection and shipboard or shore based laboratory analysis, is now possible to full ocean depth in real time using a 0.2W sensor operating at 24 Hz. NOPP developments further spawned US DOE support to develop the Carbon Flux Explorer, a free-vehicle capable of following hourly variations of particulate inorganic and organic carbon sedimentation from near surface to kilometer depths for seasons to years and capable of relaying contemporaneous observations via satellite. We have demonstrated the feasibility of real time - low cost carbon observations which are of fundamental value to carbon prediction and when further developed, will lead to a fully enhanced global carbon observatory capable of real time assessment of the ocean carbon sink, a needed constraint for assessment of carbon management policies on a global scale.

Bishop, James K.B.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Canada, carbon dioxide and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

One of the major contributors to the greenhouse effect is carbon dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas. Even with its low population density, Canada, on a per capita basis, has the dubious distinction of being the world's fourth largest producer of carbon from carbon dioxide. This paper considers the impact of Canadian carbon dioxide emissions on the greenhouse effect in light of the 1988 Conference on the Changing Atmosphere's recommendations. A computer model has been developed that, when using anticipated Canadian fossil fuel demands, shows that unless steps are taken immediately, Canada will not be able to meet the conference's proposed carbon dioxide reduction of 20 percent of 1988 levels by the year 2005, let alone meet any more substantial cuts that may be required in the future.

Hughes, L.; Scott, S. (Dept. of Mathematics and Computing Science, Saint Mary' s Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3C3 (CA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions For additional terms, refer to: the Glossary of Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 for additional greenhouse gas related terms, the Glossary of Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 for additional manufacturing terms, and Appendix F of Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 for descriptions of the major industry groups. British Thermal Unit: The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 pound of water by 1 degree Fahrenheit. One quadrillion Btu is 1015 Btu, or 1.055 exajoules. Btu: See British Thermal Unit. Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless, non-poisonous gas that is a normal part of Earth's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is a product of fossil-fuel combustion as well as other processes. It is considered a greenhouse gas as it traps heat radiated into the atmosphere and thereby contributes to the potential for global warming.

277

Nitrogen Controls on Climate Model Evapotranspiration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most evapotranspiration over land occurs through vegetation. The fraction of net radiation balanced by evapotranspiration depends on stomatal controls. Stomates transpire water for the leaf to assimilate carbon, depending on the canopy carbon ...

Robert E. Dickinson; Joseph A. Berry; Gordon B. Bonan; G. James Collatz; Christopher B. Field; Inez Y. Fung; Michael Goulden; William A. Hoffmann; Robert B. Jackson; Ranga Myneni; Piers J. Sellers; Muhammad Shaikh

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

The Woodland Carbon Code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Woodland Carbon Code While society must continue to make every effort to reduce greenhouse gas a role by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The potential of woodlands to soak up carbon to help compensate for their carbon emissions. But before investing in such projects, people want to know

279

Mechanomutable Carbon Nanotube Arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Polymer Nanocomposites. Presentation Title, Mechanomutable Carbon...

280

Acetylenic carbon allotrope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein.

Lagow, Richard J. (6204 Shadow Mountain Dr., Austin, TX 78731)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Acetylenic carbon allotrope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein. 17 figs.

Lagow, R.J.

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

282

Acetylenic carbon allotrope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein.

Lagow, Richard J. (6204 Shadow Mountain Dr., Austin, TX 78731)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Corrosion testing of carbon steel in aereated geothermal brine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two major problems are associated with the use of cooled geothermal water as coolant for the 5 MW(e) Pilot Power Plant at Raft River. They are: (1) a scaling potential owing to the chemical species present in solution, and (2) the corrosive nature of the geothermal water on carbon steel. A water treatment test program was established to reduce or eliminate these problems. Data show that scale can be prevented by a combination of dispersants and controlling the concentration of scaling species in the circulating water. Corrosion cannot be controlled without a pretreatment of tubing material. With the pretreatment, a protective gamma iron oxide film is laid down on the tube surface, that with proper corrosion inhibitor additives, significantly reduces both general and pitting corrosion. However, longer term testing is required to determine protection of pitting corrosion.

Suciu, D.F.; Wikoff, P.M.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Carbon nanotubes on a substrate  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes carbon nanotubes whose hollow cores are 100% filled with conductive filler. The carbon nanotubes are in uniform arrays on a conductive substrate and are well-aligned and can be densely packed. The uniformity of the carbon nanotube arrays is indicated by the uniform length and diameter of the carbon nanotubes, both which vary from nanotube to nanotube on a given array by no more than about 5%. The alignment of the carbon nanotubes is indicated by the perpendicular growth of the nanotubes from the substrates which is achieved in part by the simultaneous growth of the conductive filler within the hollow core of the nanotube and the densely packed growth of the nanotubes. The present invention provides a densely packed carbon nanotube growth where each nanotube is in contact with at least one nearest-neighbor nanotube. The substrate is a conductive substrate coated with a growth catalyst, and the conductive filler can be single crystals of carbide formed by a solid state reaction between the substrate material and the growth catalyst. The present invention further provides a method for making the filled carbon nanotubes on the conductive substrates. The method includes the steps of depositing a growth catalyst onto the conductive substrate as a prepared substrate, creating a vacuum within a vessel which contains the prepared substrate, flowing H2/inert (e.g. Ar) gas within the vessel to increase and maintain the pressure within the vessel, increasing the temperature of the prepared substrate, and changing the H2/Ar gas to ethylene gas such that the ethylene gas flows within the vessel. Additionally, varying the density and separation of the catalyst particles on the conductive substrate can be used to control the diameter of the nanotubes.

Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA; Liu, Jun [West Richland, WA

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

285

Patterned functional carbon fibers from polyethylene  

SciTech Connect

Patterned, continuous carbon fibers with controlled surface geometry were produced from a novel melt-processible carbon precursor. This portends the use of a unique technique to produce such technologically innovative fibers in large volume for important applications. The novelties of this technique include ease of designing and fabricating fibers with customized surface contour, the ability to manipulate filament diameter from submicron scale to a couple of orders of magnitude larger scale, and the amenable porosity gradient across the carbon wall by diffusion controlled functionalization of precursor. The geometry of fiber cross-section was tailored by using bicomponent melt-spinning with shaped dies and controlling the melt-processing of the precursor polymer. Circular, trilobal, gear-shaped hollow fibers, and solid star-shaped carbon fibers of 0.5 - 20 um diameters, either in self-assembled bundle form, or non-bonded loose filament form, were produced by carbonizing functionalized-polyethylene fibers. Prior to carbonization, melt-spun fibers were converted to a char-forming mass by optimizing the sulfonation on polyethylene macromolecules. The fibers exhibited distinctly ordered carbon morphologies at the outside skin compared to the inner surface or fiber core. Such order in carbon microstructure can be further tuned by altering processing parameters. Partially sulfonated polyethylene-derived hollow carbon fibers exhibit 2-10 fold surface area (50-500 m2/g) compared to the solid fibers (10-25 m2/g) with pore sizes closer to the inside diameter of the filaments larger than the sizes on the outer layer. These specially functionalized carbon fibers hold promise for extraordinary performance improvements when used, for example, as composite reinforcements, catalyst support media, membranes for gas separation, CO2 sorbents, and active electrodes and current collectors for energy storage applications.

Hunt, Marcus A [ORNL; Saito, Tomonori [ORNL; Brown, Rebecca H [ORNL; Kumbhar, Amar S [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Naskar, Amit K [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Sequestration: The fixation of atmospheric carbon dioxide in a carbon sink through biological or physical processes. Carbon Sink: ...

287

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation Carbon Capture and Storage Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration...

288

NERSC Requirements Workshop November  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements Requirements Workshop November 2009 Lattice gauge theory and some other HE theory Doug Toussaint (University of Arizona) Help from: Paul Mackenzie (Fermilab) Crude comparison of lattice hadron spec- trum to the real world. Lattice Gauge Theory First-principles computations in QCD Also, computations in other strongly coupled field theories * Find hadronic factors to get fundamental physics from experi- ments * Understand structure and interactions of hadrons, maybe even nuclei * Understand QCD: confinement and chiral symmetry breaking * Other strongly interacting theories (what if we don't find the Higgs?) * Quark-gluon matter at high temeratures (RHIC, LHC, early uni- verse) or high densities (neutron stars) HEP theory projects at NERSC now: * Production and analysis of QCD configurations with dynamical quarks, (Doug Toussaint) (MILC collaboration) * Heavy quarks, using

289

Monitoring and control requirement definition study for dispersed storage and generation (DSG). Volume IV. Final report, Appendix C: identification from utility visits of present and future approaches to integration of DSG into distribution networks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A major aim of the US National Energy Policy, as well as that of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, is to conserve energy and to shift from oil to more abundant domestic fuels and renewable energy sources. Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG) is the term that characterizes the present and future dispersed, relatively small (<30 MW) energy systems, such as solar thermal electric, photovoltaic, wind, fuel cell, storage battery, hydro, and cogeneration, which can help achieve these national energy goals and can be dispersed throughout the distribution portion of an electric utility system. As a result of visits to four utilities concerned with the use of DSG power sources on their distribution networks, some useful impressions of present and future approaches to the integration of DSGs into electrical distribution network have been obtained. A more extensive communications and control network will be developed by utilities for control of such sources for future use. Different approaches to future utility systems with DSG are beginning to take shape. The new DSG sources will be in decentralized locations with some measure of centralized control. The utilities have yet to establish firmly the communication and control means or their organization. For the present, the means for integrating the DSGs and their associated monitoring and control equipment into a unified system have not been decided.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Support Requirements for Synfuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Producing synfuels from coal is technically feasible. Projects have a high probability of success but risks do exist (technical, marketing, environmental delays, regulatory and political changes, etc.). The various segments of the developing synfuels industry are identified. For each segment its characteristics, uncertainties and risks are discussed, as well as the type of support of guarantee required to develop this portion of the synfuels industry.

Hyland, M. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Kinetics of beneficiated fly ash by carbon burnout  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The presence of carbon in fly ash requires an increase in the dosage of the air-entraining admixture for concrete mix, and may cause the admixture to lose efficiency. Specifying authorities for the concrete producers have set maximum allowable levels of residual carbon. These levels are the so called Loss On Ignition (LOI). The concrete producers` day-to-day purchasing decisions sets the LOI at 4%. The objective of the project is to investigate the kinetics of oxidation of residual carbon present in coal fly ash as a possible first step toward producing low-carbon fly ash from high-carbon, low quality fly ash.

Okoh, J.M.; Dodoo, J.N.D.; Diaz, A. [Univ. of Maryland Eastern Shore, Princess Anne, MD (United States). Dept. of Natural Sciences; Ferguson, W.; Udinskey, J.R. Jr.; Christiana, G.A. [Delmarva Power, Wilmington, DE (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Marking Requirements | Scientific and Technical Information Program  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Submittal Basics Submittal Basics Marking Requirements Print page Print page Email page Email page Categories of Controlled Unclassified STI DOE and Major Site/Facility Management Contractors Sample Cover and Title Page for Unclassified Unlimited STI Sample Cover and Title Page for Controlled Unclassified STI Financial Assistance Recipients and Non-major Contractors Sample Cover and Title Page for Unclassified Unlimited STI Sample Cover and Title Page for Controlled Unclassified STI Resources for classified and controlled unclassified marking requirements: DOE CMPC Marking Resource DOE O 475.2A, Identifying Classified Information 10 CFR 1017, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information DOE M 471.3-1, Manual for Identifying and Protecting Official Use

293

BER Science Network Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2010 ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research, of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the science programs funded by BER. The requirements identified at the workshop are summarized and described in more detail in the case studies and the Findings section. A number of common themes emerged from the case studies and workshop discussions. One is that BER science, like many other disciplines, is becoming more and more distributed and collaborative in nature. Another common theme is that data set sizes are exploding. Climate Science in particular is on the verge of needing to manage exabytes of data, and Genomics is on the verge of a huge paradigm shift in the number of sites with sequencers and the amount of sequencer data being generated.

Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Electron Microscopy of Carbon Nanotube Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron Microscopy of Carbon Nanotube Composites. Summary: Carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs ...

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

The use of carbon aerogel electrodes for deionizing water and treating aqueous process wastes  

SciTech Connect

A wide variety of ionic contaminants can be removed from aqueous solutions by electrosorption on carbon aerogel electrodes. Carbon aerogel is an ideal electrode material because of its low electrical resistivity (< 40 m{Omega}-cm), high specific surface area (400 to 1100 m{sup 2}/g), and controllable pore size distribution (< 50 nm). This approach may avoid the generation of a substantial amount of secondary waste associated with ion exchange processing. Ion exchange resins require concentrated solutions of acid, base, or salt for regeneration, whereas carbon aerogel electrodes require only electrical discharge or reverse polarization. Aqueous solutions of NaCl, NaNO{sub 3}, NH{sub 4}ClO{sub 4}, Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}, Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4} have been separated into concentrate and high-purity product streams. The deionization of a 100 {mu}S/cm NaCl solution with two parallel stacks of carbon aerogel electrodes in a potential-swing mode is discussed in detail. The selective removal of Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Cr, Mn, Co and U from a variety of process solutions and natural waters has also been demonstrated. Feasibility tests indicate that the remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated ground water may be possible.

Farmer, J.C.; Mack, G.V.; Fix, D.V.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Vehicle Technologies Office: Emission Control R&D  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emission Control R&D Emission Control R&D The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports research and development of aftertreatment technologies to control advanced combustion engine exhaust emissions. All engines that enter the vehicle market must comply with the Environmental Protection Agency's emissions regulations. Harmful pollutants in these emissions include: Carbon monoxide Nitrogen oxides Unburned hydrocarbons Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) Particulate matter The energy required for emission control often reduces vehicle fuel economy and increases vehicle cost. VTO's Emission Control R&D focuses on developing efficient, durable, low-cost emission control systems that complement new combustion strategies while minimizing efficiency losses. VTO often leverages the national laboratories' unique capabilities and facilities to conduct this research.

297

Controlling Defect Density in Polymer-Fullerene Bulk Heterojunction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controlling Defect Density in Polymer-Fullerene Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells by Optimizing ... Engineering Carbon Nanomaterials for Energy Application.

298

Michael Heine, SGL Group - The Carbon Company, Carbon Fibers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Fibers in Lightweight Systems for Wind Energy and Automotive Applications: Availability and Challenges for the Future Michael Heine, SGL Group - The Carbon Company, Carbon...

299

Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Developmen...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Development in the People's Republic of China Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction...

300

Framework for Grading Procurement Requirements for Power Delivery Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determining how to apply cyber security requirements for new power delivery systems requires cyber security experts, power system engineers, and procurement organizations to work together with vendors to select, implement, and maintain cyber security controls. Improper or incomplete implementations of security controls due to a lack of adequate requirements and/or division of responsibilities between the utility and vendor can often result in costly back fit to meet requirements.This ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

BES Science Network Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivityfor the US Department of Energy Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office ofScience programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years.

Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian; Dart, Eli; Biocca, A.; Carlson, R.; Chen, J.; Cotter, S.; Dattoria, V.; Davenport, J.; Gaenko, A.; Kent, P.; Lamm, M.; Miller, S.; Mundy, C.; Ndousse, T.; Pederson, M.; Perazzo, A.; Popescu, R.; Rouson, D.; Sekine, Y.; Sumpter, B.; Wang, C.-Z.; Whitelam, S.; Zurawski, J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Arreon Carbon Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Arreon Carbon Ltd Arreon Carbon Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Arreon Carbon Ltd Place Beijing, Beijing Municipality, China Zip 100022 Sector Carbon Product Beijing-based firm that originates and purchases carbon credits in the Chinese market. Coordinates 39.90601°, 116.387909° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.90601,"lon":116.387909,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

303

Carbon Ion Pump for Carbon Dioxide Removal  

coal fired power plants; oil or gas fired power plants; cement production; bio-fuel combustion; Separation of carbon dioxide from other combustion ...

304

Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

305

Carbon Management and Carbon Dioxide Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost-Effective Gas Stream Component Analysis Techniques and Strategies for Carbon Capture Systems from Oxy-Fuel Combustion (An Overview).

306

Repository seals requirements study  

SciTech Connect

The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. This report presents the results of a repository sealing requirements study. Sealing is defined as the permanent closure of the shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes. Sealing includes those components that would reduce potential inflows above the repository, or that would divert flow near the repository horizon to allow vertical infiltration to below the repository. Sealing of such features as emplacement drifts was not done in this study because the current capability to calculate fracture flow into the drifts is not sufficiently mature. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

NONE

1997-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

307

Controlled Synthesis and Functionalization of Carbon ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and ever-increasing human reliance on energy-based appliances, there is a pressing need for the development of clean and renewable energy alternatives.

308

Metallic carbon materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel metallic forms of planar carbon are described, as well as methods of designing and making them. Nonhexagonal arrangements of carbon are introduced into a graphite carbon network essentially without destroying the planar structure. Specifically a form of carbon comprising primarily pentagons and heptagons, and having a large density of states at the Fermi level is described. Other arrangements of pentagons and heptagons that include some hexagons, and structures incorporating squares and octagons are additionally disclosed. Reducing the bond angle symmetry associated with a hexagonal arrangement of carbons increases the likelihood that the carbon material will have a metallic electron structure.

Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA); Crespi, Vincent Henry (Darien, IL); Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng (Berkeley, CA); Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

NETL: Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RCSP Carbon Storage Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded cooperative agreements to seven Regional Carbon Sequestration...

310

Repository seals requirement study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

NONE

1997-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

311

Method for making carbon super capacitor electrode materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for making near-net-shape, monolithic carbon electrodes for energy storage devices. The method includes the controlled pyrolysis and activation of a pressed shape of methyl cellulose powder with pyrolysis being carried out in two stages; pre-oxidation, preferably in air at a temperature between 200.degree.-250.degree. C., followed by carbonization under an inert atmosphere. An activation step to adjust the surface area of the carbon shape to a value desirable for the application being considered, including heating the carbon shape in an oxidizing atmosphere to a temperature of at least 300.degree. C., follows carbonization.

Firsich, David W. (Dayton, OH); Ingersoll, David (Albuquerque, NM); Delnick, Frank M. (Dexter, MI)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Method for making carbon super capacitor electrode materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for making near-net-shape, monolithic carbon electrodes for energy storage devices. The method includes the controlled pyrolysis and activation of a pressed shape of methyl cellulose powder with pyrolysis being carried out in two stages; pre-oxidation, preferably in air at a temperature between 200--250 C, followed by carbonization under an inert atmosphere. An activation step to adjust the surface area of the carbon shape to a value desirable for the application being considered, including heating the carbon shape in an oxidizing atmosphere to a temperature of at least 300 C, follows carbonization. 1 fig.

Firsich, D.W.; Ingersoll, D.; Delnick, F.M.

1998-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

313

Method of making carbon-carbon composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making a carbon-carbon composite having a combination of high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizable woven cloth are covered with petroleum or coal tar pitch and pressed at a temperature a few degrees above the softening point of the pitch to form a green laminated composite. The green composite is restrained in a suitable fixture and heated slowly to carbonize the pitch binder. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnation step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3000.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced pressure for approximately one hundred and fifty (150) hours.

Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Thief Carbon Catalyst for Oxidation of Mercury in Effluent Stream  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Catalyst for Oxidation of Mercury in Effluent Carbon Catalyst for Oxidation of Mercury in Effluent Stream Contact NETL Technology Transfer Group techtransfer@netl.doe.gov January 2012 Significance * Oxidizes heavy metal contaminants, especially mercury, in gas streams * Uses partially combusted coal ("Thief" carbon) * Yields an inexpensive catalyst * Cheap enough to be a disposable catalyst * Cuts long-term costs * Simultaneously addresses oxidation and adsorption issues Applications * Any process requiring removal of heavy

315

Terrestrial Carbon Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Accumulation with Cropland Management Influence of Agricultural Management on Soil Organic Carbon: A Compendium and Assessment of Canadian Studies (VandenBygaart et al., Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada) Soil Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis (West and Post, Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Preliminary Estimates of the Potential for Carbon Mitigation in European Soils Through No-Till Farming (Smith et al., University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom) Potential for Carbon Sequestration in European Soils: Preliminary Estimates for Five Scenarios Using Results from Long-Term Experiments (Smith et al., University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom) Carbon Accumulation with Grassland Management

316

Quantifying Carbon Cycle Feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perturbations to the carbon cycle could constitute large feedbacks on future changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate. This paper demonstrates how carbon cycle feedback can be expressed in formally similar ways to climate feedback, ...

J. M. Gregory; C. D. Jones; P. Cadule; P. Friedlingstein

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protect yourself and your family from the deadly effects of carbon monoxide--a colorless, odorless poisonous gas. This publication describes the warning signs of carbon monoxide exposure and includes a home safety checklist.

Shaw, Bryan W.; Garcia, Monica L.

1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

318

NETL: Carbon Storage Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Carbon Storage Newsletter PDF-571KB has been posted. 08.27.2013 Publications August 2013 Carbon Storage Newsletter PDF-1.1MB has been posted. 08.15.2013 News Ancient...

319

Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Lin, Yuehe (Richland, WA); Yantasee, Wassana (Richland, WA); Liu, Guodong (Fargo, ND); Lu, Fang (Burlingame, CA); Tu, Yi (Camarillo, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

320

Carbon Footprint and Carbon Deficit Analysis of Iron and Steel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Energy Technologies and Carbon Dioxide Management. Presentation Title ... Study on Capture, Recovery and Utilization of Carbon Dioxide.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Carbon Fibers and Carbon Nanotubes - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 17, 2010 ... Polymer Nanocomposites: Carbon Fibers and Carbon Nanotubes Sponsored by: The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society Program...

322

Carbon Dioxide Compression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. C opyright 2009 Carbon Dioxide Compression DOE EPRI NIST ... Greenhouse gas sequestration Page 5. 5 C opyright 2009 ...

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

323

Carbon Mitigation Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... sustainable technologies such as CO 2 capture and sequestration (CCS ... property diagnostic tools (under realistic conditions for carbon capture from ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

324

Big Sky Carbon Atlas  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

(Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership, Big Sky [BSCSP; ,

325

Electrocatalysts on Carbon Nanoparticles  

Carbon nanostructures offer extremely high surface areas and so are attractive candidates to support dispersed catalysts. These nanostructures, ...

326

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

land-use changes. When biofuel production increases, land ison carbon releases. If biofuel production does not result in

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

NETL: Mercury Emissions Control Technologies - Evaluation of Sorbent  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control Evaluation of Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control ADA Environmental Solutions will evaluate injection of activated carbon and other sorbents to remove mercury for a variety of coal and air pollution control equipment configurations. The scope of work is for 36 months and intended to gather operating data that will document actual performance levels and accurate cost information to assess the costs of controlling mercury from coal fired utilities. Testing will be conducted at four different host sites that represent a significant percentage of unit configurations. The subsequent cost analyses will include capital costs, by-product utilization issues, sorbent usage, any necessary enhancements, such as SO3 control or flue gas conditioning, balance of plant, manpower requirements and waste issues. The host sites are Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station, Ontario Power Generation's Nanticoke Station, AmerenUE's Meramec Station and American Electric Power's (AEP) Conesville Station.

328

Simulations of carbon fiber composite delamination tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of mode I interlaminar fracture toughness tests of a carbon-reinforced composite material (BMS 8-212) were conducted with LSDYNA. The fracture toughness tests were performed by U.C. Berkeley. The simulations were performed to investigate the validity and practicality of employing decohesive elements to represent interlaminar bond failures that are prevalent in carbon-fiber composite structure penetration events. The simulations employed a decohesive element formulation that was verified on a simple two element model before being employed to perform the full model simulations. Care was required during the simulations to ensure that the explicit time integration of LSDYNA duplicate the near steady-state testing conditions. In general, this study validated the use of employing decohesive elements to represent the interlaminar bond failures seen in carbon-fiber composite structures, but the practicality of employing the elements to represent the bond failures seen in carbon-fiber composite structures during penetration events was not established.

Kay, G

2007-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

329

Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During this quarter a general forest monitoring program was conducted to measure treatment effects on above ground and below ground carbon C and Nitrogen (N) pools for the tree planting areas. Detailed studies to address specific questions pertaining to Carbon cycling was initiated with the development of plots to examine the influence of mycorrhizae, spoil chemical and mineralogical properties, and use of amendment on forest establishment and carbon sequestration. Efforts continued during this period to examine decomposition and heterotrophic respiration on C cycling in the reforestation plots. Projected climate change resulting from elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide has given rise to various strategies to sequester carbon in various terrestrial ecosystems. Reclaimed surface mine soils present one such potential carbon sink where traditional reclamation objectives can complement carbon sequestration. New plantings required the modification and design and installation on monitoring equipment. Maintenance and data monitoring on past and present installations are a continuing operation. The Department of Mining Engineering continued the collection of penetration resistance, penetration depth, and bulk density on both old and new treatment areas. Data processing and analysis is in process for these variables. Project scientists and graduate students continue to present results at scientific meetings, tours and field days presentations of the research areas are being conducted on a request basis.

Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

2005-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

330

Conductive Carbon Coatings for Electrode Materials  

SciTech Connect

A simple method for optimizing the carbon coatings on non-conductive battery cathode material powders has been developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The enhancement of the electronic conductivity of carbon coating enables minimization of the amount of carbon in the composites, allowing improvements in battery rate capability without compromising energy density. The invention is applicable to LiFePO{sub 4} and other cathode materials used in lithium ion or lithium metal batteries for high power applications such as power tools and hybrid or plug-in hybrid electric vehicles. The market for lithium ion batteries in consumer applications is currently $5 billion/year. Additionally, lithium ion battery sales for vehicular applications are projected to capture 5% of the hybrid and electric vehicle market by 2010, and 36% by 2015 (http://www.greencarcongress.com). LiFePO{sub 4} suffers from low intrinsic rate capability, which has been ascribed to the low electronic conductivity (10{sup -9} S cm{sup -1}). One of the most promising approaches to overcome this problem is the addition of conductive carbon. Co-synthesis methods are generally the most practical route for carbon coating particles. At the relatively low temperatures (<800 C) required to make LiFePO{sub 4}, however, only poorly conductive disordered carbons are produced from organic precursors. Thus, the carbon content has to be high to produce the desired enhancement in rate capability, which decreases the cathode energy density.

Doeff, Marca M.; Kostecki, Robert; Wilcox, James; Lau, Grace

2007-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

331

Low Cost Carbon Fiber From Renewable Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles has shown that, by lowering overall weight, the use of carbon fiber composites could dramatically decrease domestic vehicle fuel consumption. For the automotive industry to benefit from carbon fiber technology, fiber production will need to be substantially increased and fiber price decreased to $7/kg. To achieve this cost objective, alternate precursors to pitch and polyacrylonitrile (PAN) are being investigated as possible carbon fiber feedstocks. Additionally, sufficient fiber to provide 10 to 100 kg for each of the 13 million cars and light trucks produced annually in the U.S. will require an increase of 5 to 50-fold in worldwide carbon fiber production. High-volume, renewable or recycled materials, including lignin, cellulosic fibers, routinely recycled petrochemical fibers, and blends of these components, appear attractive because the cost of these materials is inherently both low and insensitive to changes in petroleum price. Current studies have shown that a number of recycled and renewable polymers can be incorporated into melt-spun fibers attractive as carbon fiber feedstocks. Highly extrudable lignin blends have attractive yields and can be readily carbonized and graphitized. Examination of the physical structure and properties of carbonized and graphitized fibers indicates the feasibility of use in transportation composite applications.

Compere, A.L.

2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

332

NON-DESTRUCTIVE SOIL CARBON ANALYZER.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the feasibility, calibration, and safety considerations of a non-destructive, in situ, quantitative, volumetric soil carbon analytical method based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The method can quantify values as low as 0.018 gC/cc, or about 1.2% carbon by weight with high precision under the instrument's configuration and operating conditions reported here. INS is safe and easy to use, residual soil activation declines to background values in under an hour, and no radiological requirements are needed for transporting the instrument. The labor required to obtain soil-carbon data is about 10-fold less than with other methods, and the instrument offers a nearly instantaneous rate of output of carbon-content values. Furthermore, it has the potential to quantify other elements, particularly nitrogen. New instrumentation was developed in response to a research solicitation from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE LAB 00-09 Carbon Sequestration Research Program) supporting the Terrestrial Carbon Processes (TCP) program of the Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The solicitation called for developing and demonstrating novel techniques for quantitatively measuring changes in soil carbon. The report includes raw data and analyses of a set of proof-of-concept, double-blind studies to evaluate the INS approach in the first phase of developing the instrument. Managing soils so that they sequester massive amounts of carbon was suggested as a means to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Quantifying changes in the soils' carbon stocks will be essential to evaluating such schemes and documenting their performance. Current methods for quantifying carbon in soil by excavation and core sampling are invasive, slow, labor-intensive and locally destroy the system being observed. Newly emerging technologies, such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, offer soil-carbon analysis; however, these also are invasive and destructive techniques. The INS approach permits quantification in a relatively large volume of soil without disrupting the measurement site. The technique is very fast and provides nearly instantaneous results thereby reducing the cost, and speeding up the rate of analysis. It also has the potential to cover large areas in a mobile scanning mode. These capabilities will significantly advance the tracking carbon sequestration and offer a tool for research in agronomy, forestry, soil ecology and biogeochemistry.

WIELOPOLSKI,L.MITRA,S.HENDREY,G.ORION,I.ROGERS,H.TORBERT,A.PRIOR,S.RUNION,B.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

NETL: ARRA Regional Carbon Sequestration Training Centers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ARRA Regional Carbon Sequestration Training Centers ARRA Regional Carbon Sequestration Training Centers ARRA Logo Projects in this area are funded, in whole or in part, with funds appropriated by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) and will train personnel in the implementation of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology. While CCS technologies offer great potential for reducing CO2 emissions and mitigating potential climate change, deploying these technologies will require a significantly expanded workforce trained in the various specialties that are currently underrepresented in the United States. Education and training activities undertaken in this area are developing a future generation of geologists, scientists, and engineers that will provide the human capital and skills required for implementing CCS technologies.

334

Match Pumps to System Requirements  

SciTech Connect

BestPractices Program tip sheet discussing pumping system efficiency matching pumps to system requirements

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Formation of Carbon Dwarfs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the formation of dwarf carbon stars via accretion from a carbon AGB companion in light of the new 107 object sample of Downes et al. (2004). This sample is now large enough to allow good mass determination via comparison of a composite spectrum to theoretical atmospheric models. Carbon dwarfs of spectral type M are indeed main sequence M dwarfs with enhanced metallicity and carbon abundance. We also calculate the predicted abundance of both M and of F/G carbon dwarfs, and show that the latter should be falsifiable in the near future.

Charles L. Steinhardt; Dimitar D. Sasselov

2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

336

Monitoring and control requirement definition study for dispersed storage and generation (DSG). Volume III. Final report, Appendix B: state of the art, trends, and potential growth of selected DSG technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A major aim of the US National Energy Policy, as well as that of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, is to conserve energy and to shift from oil to more abundant domestic fuels and renewable energy sources. Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG) is the term that characterizes the present and future dispersed, relatively small (<30 MW) energy systems, such as solar thermal electric, photovoltaic, wind, fuel cell, storage battery, hydro, and cogeneration, which can help achieve these national energy goals and can be dispersed throughout the distribution portion of an electric utility system. The purpose of this document is to identify the present status, trends, potential growth for selected DSGs, and implications on DSG monitoring and control. Based on current projections, it appears that DSG electrical energy will comprise only a small portion, from 4 to 10%, of the national total by the end of this century. In general, the growth potential for DSG seems favorable in the long term because of finite fossil energy resources and increasing fuel prices. Recent trends, especially in the institutional and regulatory fields, have favored greater use of DSGs for the future. This study has assimilated the considered estimates and opinions of others, for the DSG markets and the DSG's ability to serve them. So far as possible a cross section of various sources has been included in composite projections.

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Study of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon fiber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon Accepted 14 January 2010 Available online 20 January 2010 A B S T R A C T Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) membranes (buckypaper) and carbon nanofiber (CNF) paper

Das, Suman

338

Requirements for status for volume fuel cell manufacturing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status for Volume Status for Volume Fuel Cell Manufacturing DOE Hydrogen Program, Washington, DC July 13-14, 2005 Requirements for Manufactured Fuel Cells Customer Requirements: Commercial Plant Study - Volume: 250,000 fuel stacks per year - Cost: $30/kw net Requirements for Manufactured Fuel Cells Commercial Volume Manufacturing - Material Utilization: >85% - Controlled Environments (Humidity, temperature, dust) - Environmentally safe direct and indirect materials - Hydrogen safety - Make or Buy Decisions on non/proprietary unit cell components - Integrated strategic supply chain - Design for Manufacturing, Assembly, and Service Requirements for Manufactured Fuel Cells Quality Control & Assurance - Accelerated tests and process parameters correlated to key product requirements (QFD)

339

Goodbye to carbon neutral: Getting biomass footprints right  

SciTech Connect

Most guidance for carbon footprinting, and most published carbon footprints or LCAs, presume that biomass heating fuels are carbon neutral. However, it is recognised increasingly that this is incorrect: biomass fuels are not always carbon neutral. Indeed, they can in some cases be far more carbon positive than fossil fuels. This flaw in carbon footprinting guidance and practice can be remedied. In carbon footprints (not just of biomass or heating fuels, but all carbon footprints), rather than applying sequestration credits and combustion debits, a 'carbon-stock change' line item could be applied instead. Not only would this make carbon footprints more accurate, it would make them consistent with UNFCCC reporting requirements and national reporting practice. There is a strong precedent for this change. This same flaw has already been recognised and partly remedied in standards for and studies of liquid biofuels (e.g. biodiesel and bioethanol), which now account for land-use change, i.e. deforestation. But it is partially or completely missing from other studies and from standards for footprinting and LCA of solid fuels. Carbon-stock changes can be estimated from currently available data. Accuracy of estimates will increase as Kyoto compliant countries report more land use, land use change and forestry (LULUCF) data.

Johnson, Eric [Atlantic Consulting, Obstgartenstrasse 14, CH-8136 Gattikon (Switzerland)], E-mail: ejohnson@ecosite.co.uk

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Variability of building environmental assessment tools on evaluating carbon emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With an increasing importance of sustainability in construction, more and more clients and designers employ building environmental assessment (BEA) tools to evaluate the environmental friendliness of their building facilities, and one important aspect of evaluation in the BEA models is the assessment of carbon emissions. However, in the absence of any agreed framework for carbon auditing and benchmarking, the results generated by the BEA tools might vary significantly which could lead to confusion or misinterpretation on the carbon performance of a building. This study thus aims to unveil the properties of and the standard imposed by the current BEA models on evaluating the life cycle carbon emissions. The analyses cover the (i) weighting of energy efficiency and emission levels among various environmental performance indicators; (ii) building life cycle stages in which carbon is taken into consideration; (iii) objectiveness of assessment; (iv) baseline set for carbon assessment; (v) mechanism for benchmarking the emission level; and (v) limitations of the carbon assessment approaches. Results indicate that the current BEA schemes focus primarily on operational carbon instead of the emissions generated throughout the entire building life cycle. Besides, the baseline and benchmark for carbon evaluation vary significantly among the BEA tools based on the analytical results of a hypothetical building. The findings point to the needs for a more transparent framework for carbon auditing and benchmarking in BEA modeling. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon emission evaluation in building environmental assessment schemes are studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Simulative carbon emission is modeled for building environmental assessment schemes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon assessments focus primarily on operational stage instead of entire lifecycle. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Baseline and benchmark of carbon assessment vary greatly among BEA schemes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A more transparent and comprehensive framework for carbon assessment is required.

Ng, S. Thomas, E-mail: tstng@hkucc.hku.hk; Chen Yuan, E-mail: chenyuan4@gmail.com; Wong, James M.W., E-mail: jmwwong@hku.hk

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

carbon footprinting | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

footprinting footprinting Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides NOx

342

Device for staged carbon monoxide oxidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for selectively oxidizing carbon monoxide in a hydrogen rich feed stream. The method comprises mixing a feed stream consisting essentially of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, water and carbon monoxide with a first predetermined quantity of oxygen (air). The temperature of the mixed feed/oxygen stream is adjusted in a first the heat exchanger assembly (20) to a first temperature. The mixed feed/oxygen stream is sent to reaction chambers (30,32) having an oxidation catalyst contained therein. The carbon monoxide of the feed stream preferentially absorbs on the catalyst at the first temperature to react with the oxygen in the chambers (30,32) with minimal simultaneous reaction of the hydrogen to form an intermediate hydrogen rich process stream having a lower carbon monoxide content than the feed stream. The elevated outlet temperature of the process stream is carefully controlled in a second heat exchanger assembly (42) to a second temperature above the first temperature. The process stream is then mixed with a second predetermined quantity of oxygen (air). The carbon monoxide of the process stream preferentially reacts with the second quantity of oxygen in a second stage reaction chamber (56) with minimal simultaneous reaction of the hydrogen in the process stream. The reaction produces a hydrogen rich product stream having a lower carbon monoxide content than the process stream. The product stream is then cooled in a third heat exchanger assembly (72) to a third predetermined temperature. Three or more stages may be desirable, each with metered oxygen injection.

Vanderborgh, Nicholas E. (Los Alamos, NM); Nguyen, Trung V. (College Station, TX); Guante, Jr., Joseph (Denver, CO)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Global Distribution of Total Inorganic Carbon and Total Alkalinity below the Deepest Winter Mixed Layer Depths  

SciTech Connect

Modeling the global ocean-atmosphere carbon dioxide system is becoming increasingly important to greenhouse gas policy. These models require initialization with realistic three-dimensional (3-D) oceanic carbon fields. This report presents an approach to establishing these initial conditions from an extensive global database of ocean carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) system measurements and well-developed interpolation methods.

Goyet, C.; Healy, R.; Ryan, J.; Kozyr, A.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Requirements dependencies: the emergence of a requirements network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We believe that the requirements at the leaf-node level of the requirements tree structure cannot be viewed in isolation and that dependencies between them exist. We pursued this notion in order to find a coherent set of requirement dependencies that ...

Vishwajeet Kulshreshtha; John Boardman; Dinesh Verma

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Portable controls experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiments for controls classes like MIT's 2.004 require large lab setups and expensive equipment such as oscilloscopes and function generators. We developed a series of controls experiments based on National Instruments' ...

Larson, Richard Winston

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Carbon dioxide sensor  

SciTech Connect

The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Carbon Solutions Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Group Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Solutions Group Place Chicago, Illinois Zip 60601 Sector Carbon Product Carbon Solutions Group collaborates with project developers to obtain environmental finance ,grants, feed-in ,tax-credits and subsidies.Carbon Solutions Group also procures energy generation technologies. Coordinates 41.88415°, -87.632409° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.88415,"lon":-87.632409,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

348

Carbon Capture Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Capture Corporation Carbon Capture Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Capture Corporation Address 7825 Fay Avenue Place La Jolla, California Zip 92037 Sector Carbon Product Developing ways to use algae to absorb CO2 emitted from gas- and coal-fired power plants Website http://www.carbcc.com/ Coordinates 32.845391°, -117.275033° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.845391,"lon":-117.275033,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

349

Carbon budget and carbon chemistry in Photon Dominated Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a study of small carbon chains and rings in Photon Dominated Regions (PDRs) performed at millimetre wavelengths. Our sample consists of the Horsehead nebula (B33), the rho,Oph L1688 cloud interface, and the cometary-shaped cloud IC63. Using the IRAM 30-m telescope, the SEST and the Effelsberg 100-m teles cope at Effelsberg., we mapped the emission of \\cch, c-C3H2 and C4H, and searched for heavy hydrocarbons such as c-C3H, l-C3H, l-C3H2, l-C4H2 and C6H. The large scale maps show that small hydrocarbons are present until the edge of all PDRs, which is surprising as they are expected to be easily destroyed by UV radiation. Their spatial distribution reasonably agrees with the aromatic emission mapped in mid-IR wavelength bands. Their abundances relative to H2 are relatively high and comparable to the ones derived in dark clouds such as L134N or TMC-1, known as efficient carbon factories. In particular, we report the first detection of C6H in a PDR. We have run steady-state PDR models using several gas-phase chemical networks (UMIST95 and the New Standard Model) and conclude that both networks fail in reproducing the high abundances of some of these hydrocarbons by an order of magnitude. The high abundance of hydrocarbons in the PDR may suggest that the photo-erosion of UV-irradiated large carbonaceous compounds could efficiently feed the ISM with small carbon clusters or molecules. This new production mechanism of carbon chains and rings could overcome their destruction by the UV radiation field. Dedicated theoretical and laboratory measurements are required in order to understand and implement these additional chemical routes.

D. Teyssier; D. Fosse; M. Gerin; J. Pety; A. Abergel; E. Roueff

2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

4.5 Audit Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Audit Requirements Audit Requirements Audit requirements are now contained in 2 separate sub-sections. Subsection 4.5.1 contains the audit requirements for States, Local Governments and Non-Profit Organizations while subsection 4.5.2 contains the audit requirements for For-Profit Organizations. 4.5.1 Audit Requirements for States, Local Governments and Non-Profit Organizations (a) General. All States, Local Governments and Non-Profit Organizations that expend over $500,000 in Federal funds in any year are required to have a single audit conducted in accordance with OMB Circular A-133. This requirement flows down to subrecipients that meet the dollar threshold. An independent auditor shall perform the audit in accordance with the Government Auditing Standards and must: 1) audit and provide opinions on the fair presentation of the

351

SG Network System Requirements Specification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SG Network System Requirements Specification SG Network System Requirements Specification Interim Release 3 5/17/2010 - 2 - Table of Contents Document History ....................................................................................................................................... - 3 - Revision History .......................................................................................................................................... - 3 - Preface........................................................................................................................................................ - 4 - Authors........................................................................................................................................................ - 6 -

352

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

353

NETL: Carbon Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Storage Technologies Carbon Storage (formerly referred to as the "Carbon Sequestration Program") Program Overview For quick navigation of NETL's Carbon Storage Program website, please click on the image. NETL's Carbon Storage Program Fossil fuels are considered the most dependable, cost-effective energy source in the world. The availability of these fuels to provide clean, affordable energy is essential for domestic and global prosperity and security well into the 21st century. However, a balance is needed between energy security and concerns over the impacts of concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere - particularly carbon dioxide (CO2). NETL's Carbon Storage Program is developing a technology portfolio of safe, cost-effective, commercial-scale CO2 capture, storage, and mitigation

354

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

355

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

356

The Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Carbon Cycle The Carbon Cycle The global carbon cycle involves the carbon in and exchanging between the earth's atmosphere, fossil fuels, the oceans, and the vegetation and soils of the earth's terrestrial ecosystems. image Each year, the world's terrestrial ecosystems withdraw carbon from the atmosphere through photosynthesis and add it again through respiration and decay. A more detailed look at the global carbon cycle for the 1990s is shown below. The main annual fluxes in GtC yr-1 are: pre-industrial "natural" fluxes in black and "anthropogenic" fluxes in red (modified from Sarmiento and Gruber, 2006, with changes in pool sizes from Sabine et al., 2004a). The net terrestrial loss of -39 GtC is inferred from cumulative fossil fuel emissions minus atmospheric increase minus ocean storage. The loss of

357

Mesoporous carbon materials  

SciTech Connect

The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

358

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Emissions Control - Program Goals and Targets The Clean Coal Research Program (CCRP) is currently pursuing the demonstration of 1st-Generation Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)...

359

Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

No 52-2013 Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry halshs-00870689,version1-7Oct2013 #12;Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy The efficiency of unilateral climate policies may be hampered by carbon leakage and competitiveness losses

Recanati, Catherine

360

Development of a CO2 Sequestration Module by Integrating Mineral Activation and Aqueous Carbonation  

SciTech Connect

Mineral carbonation is a promising concept for permanent CO{sub 2} sequestration due to the vast natural abundance of the raw materials and the permanent storage of CO{sub 2} in solid form as carbonates. The sequestration of CO{sub 2} through the employment of magnesium silicates--olivine and serpentine--is beyond the proof of concept stage. For the work done in this project, serpentine was chosen as the feedstock mineral due to its abundance and availability. Although the reactivity of olivine is greater than that of serpentine, physical and chemical treatments have been shown to increase greatly the reactivity of serpentine. The primary drawback to mineral carbonation is reaction kinetics. To accelerate the carbonation, aqueous processes are preferred, where the minerals are first dissolved in solution. In aqueous carbonation, the key step is the dissolution rate of the mineral, where the mineral dissolution reaction is likely to be surface-controlled. The relatively low reactivity of serpentine has warranted research into physical and chemical treatments that have been shown to greatly increase its reactivity. The use of sulfuric acid as an accelerating medium for the removal of magnesium from serpentine has been investigated. To accelerate the dissolution process, the mineral can be ground to very fine particle size, <37 {micro}m, but this is a very energy-intensive process. Previous work in our laboratory showed that chemical surface activation helps to dissolve magnesium from the serpentine (of particle size {approx} 100 {micro}m) and that the carbonation reaction can be conducted under mild conditions (20 C and 4.6 MPa) compared to previous studies that required >185 C, >13 MPa, and <37 {micro}m particle size. This work also showed that over 70% of the magnesium can be extracted at ambient temperature, leaving an amorphous silica with surface area of about 330 m{sup 2}/g. The overall objective of this research program is to optimize the active carbonation process to design an integrated CO{sub 2} sequestration module. A parametric study was conducted to optimize conditions for mineral activation, in which serpentine and sulfuric acid were reacted. The study focused on the effects of varying the acid concentration, particle size, and reaction time. The reaction yield was as high as 48% with a 5 M acid concentration, with lower values directly corresponding to lower acid concentrations. Significant improvements in the removal of moisture, as well as in the dissolution, can be realized with comminution of particles to a D{sub 50} less than 125 ?m. A minimum threshold of 3 M concentration of sulfuric acid was found to exist in terms of removal of moisture from serpentine. The effect of reaction time was insignificant. The treated serpentine had low BET surface areas. Results demonstrated that acid concentration provided primary control on the dissolution via the removal of water, which is closely correlated with the extraction of magnesium from serpentine. Single-variable experimentation demonstrated dissolution enhancements with increased reaction time and temperature. An increase in magnesium dissolution of 46% and 70%, relative to a baseline test, occurred for increased reaction time and temperature, respectively. In addition to the challenges presented by the dissolution of serpentine, another challenge is the subsequent carbonation of the magnesium ions. A stable hydration sphere for the magnesium ion reduces the carbonation kinetics by obstructing the formation of the carbonation products. Accordingly, this research has evaluated the solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solution, the interaction between the dissociation products of carbon dioxide, and the carbonation potential of the magnesium ion.

George Alexander; Parvana Aksoy; John Andresen; Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Harold Schobert

2006-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Building security requirements with CLASP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, security requirements have been derived in an ad hoc manner. Recently, commercial software development organizations have been looking for ways to produce effective security requirements.In this paper, we show how to build security ... Keywords: application security, security process, security requirements

John Viega

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

A monitoring and diagnostic expert system for carbon dioxide capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research objective is to design and construct a knowledge-based decision support system for monitoring, control and diagnosis of the carbon dioxide capture process, which is a complicated task involving manipulation of sixteen components and their ... Keywords: Carbon dioxide capture, Diagnosis, Knowledge-based decision support system, Monitoring

Q. Zhou; C. W. Chan; P. Tontiwachiwuthikul

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Adsorption of DDT by Activated Carbon Fiber Electrode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DDT is detected in many river and lake in Zhejiang Province. As a kind of POPs and priority controlled substances of China, it is necessary to study how to dechlorinate it and treat it. This thesis discusses the absorption of DDT by activated carbon ... Keywords: DDT, activated carbon fiber electrode, adsorption

Yaping Guo; Jun Li; Chunmian Lin; JinRong Chen

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Activated carbon material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Activated carbon particles for use as iodine trapping material are impregnated with a mixture of selected iodine and potassium compounds to improve the iodine retention properties of the carbon. The I/K ratio is maintained at less than about 1 and the pH is maintained at above about 8.0. The iodine retention of activated carbon previously treated with or coimpregnated with triethylenediamine can also be improved by this technique. Suitable flame retardants can be added to raise the ignition temperature of the carbon to acceptable standards.

Evans, A. Gary (North Augusta, SC)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Carbon Sequestration 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cement Production Refineries Etc.... C Capture & Storage, Austin, TX Nov. 13-15, 2007 Carbon Sequestration Program Goals * Deliver technologies & best practices that validate:...

366

Carbon Capture & Sequestration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Learn about the Energy Department's work to capture and transport CO2 into underground geologic formations, also known as carbon capture and sequestration.

367

Carbon Storage Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel power plants as viable, clean sources of electric power. The program is focused on developing technologies that can achieve 99 percent of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage...

368

Carbon Fiber Electronic Interconnects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carbon fiber is an emerging material in electrical and electronics industry. It has been used as contact in many applications, such as switch, potentiometer, and (more)

Deng, Yuliang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

Ren, Zhifen (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian Guo (Newton, MA); Lao, Jing Y. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Li, Wenzhi (Brookline, MA)

2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

370

Carbon Nanomaterials and Heterostructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012 ... This presentation aims to capture those recent research efforts in synthesis and applications of carbon nanotubes in Li-ion battery, bioelectronic...

371

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Does CCS really make a difference for the environment? Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is one of several options, including the use of renewables, nuclear energy, alternative...

372

NETL: Carbon Storage - Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage Reference Shelf Below are links to Carbon Storage Program documents and reference materials. Each of the 10 categories has a variety of documents posted for easy access to current information - just click on the category link to view all related materials. RSS Icon Subscribe to the Carbon Storage RSS Feed. Carbon Storage Collage 2012 Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas IV Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap Public Outreach and Education for Carbon Storage Projects Carbon Storage Technology Program Plan Carbon Storage Newsletter Archive Impact of the Marcellus Shale Gas Play on Current and Future CCS Activities Site Screening, Selection, and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geologic Formations Carbon Storage Systems and Well Management Activities Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations

373

Shale caprock integrity under carbon sequestration conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration technology requires injection and storage of large volumes of carbon dioxide ( CO 2 ) in subsurface geological formations. Shale caprock which constitutes more than 60% of effective seals for geologic hydrocarbon bearing formations are therefore of considerable interest in underground CO 2 storage into depleted oil and gas formations. This study investigated experimentally shale caprocks geophysical and geochemical behavior when in contact with aqueous CO 2 over a long period of time. The primary concern is a potential increase in hydraulic conductivity of clay-rich rocks as a result of acidic brine-rock minerals geochemical interactions. Both

Abiola Olabode; Lauren Bentley; Mileva Radonjic

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Y. Li, M. Daskin. 2009. Carbon Footprint and the ManagementJ. van Houtum. 2011. E?ect of carbon emission regulations onStreamlined Enterprise Carbon Footprinting. Environmental

Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Bioengineering Aspects of Inorganic Carbon Supply to Mass Algal Cultures: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regardless of the application, the basic biotechnology of large-scale outdoor cultures involves many common features, particularly in the requirement for adequate nutrients such as carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus to ensure that light is the sole limiting yield determinant. Whereas the required quantities of nitrogen and phosphorus are fairly simple, to estimate, those for inorganic carbon are far more complex.

Goldman, J. C.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Data Requirements from NERSC Requirements Reviews Richard Gerber...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Scientists represented by the NERSC user community have growing requirements for data storage, IO bandwidth, networking bandwidth, and data software and services. Over the...

377

Surveillance Guide - NSS 18.2 Technical Safety Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TECHNICAL SAFETY REQUIREMENTS TECHNICAL SAFETY REQUIREMENTS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to examine the contractor's implementation of technical safety requirements. The surveillance does not address the development of these requirements since this activity is programmatic. The surveillance focuses on ensuring that the contractor has developed and implemented the necessary procedures and administrative controls to ensure that compliance with the Technical Safety Requirements is maintained. 2.0 References 2.1 10 CFR 830.205, Technical Safety Requirements 2.2 DOE 5480.20A Personnel Selection, Qualification, and Training Requirements for DOE Nuclear Facilities 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements NS-

378

Carbon Capture and Storage at Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines different scenarios for how the nascent carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) industry might evolve through an examination of the emergence and growth of three analog industries: liquefied natural gas (LNG), SO2 controls for power plants, and nuclear power.

2010-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

379

AMI Risk Assessment and Security Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) is a transforming technology that has broad impact on the energy market and its consumers. AMI allows utilities to balance supply, demand, and capacity making a smarter, more efficient, grid by pushing aspects of grid monitoring and control out to the endpoints of delivery. Stakeholders are implementing the systems and technologies required to deploy AMI today. AMI systems promise to provide advanced energy monitoring and recording, sophisticated tariff/rate program...

2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

380

Surface Anchoring of Nematic Phase on Carbon Nanotubes: Nanostructure of Ultra-High Temperature Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear energy is a dependable and economical source of electricity. Because fuel supply sources are available domestically, nuclear energy can be a strong domestic industry that can reduce dependence on foreign energy sources. Commercial nuclear power plants have extensive security measures to protect the facility from intruders [1]. However, additional research efforts are needed to increase the inherent process safety of nuclear energy plants to protect the public in the event of a reactor malfunction. The next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) is envisioned to utilize a very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design with an operating temperature of 650-1000?°C [2]. One of the most important safety design requirements for this reactor is that it must be inherently safe, i.e., the reactor must shut down safely in the event that the coolant flow is interrupted [2]. This next-generation Gen IV reactor must operate in an inherently safe mode where the off-normal temperatures may reach 1500?°C due to coolant-flow interruption. Metallic alloys used currently in reactor internals will melt at such temperatures. Structural materials that will not melt at such ultra-high temperatures are carbon/graphtic fibers and carbon-matrix composites. Graphite does not have a measurable melting point; it is known to sublime starting about 3300?°C. However, neutron radiation-damage effects on carbon fibers are poorly understood. Therefore, the goal of this project is to obtain a fundamental understanding of the role of nanotexture on the properties of resulting carbon fibers and their neutron-damage characteristics. Although polygranular graphite has been used in nuclear environment for almost fifty years, it is not suitable for structural applications because it do not possess adequate strength, stiffness, or toughness that is required of structural components such as reaction control-rods, upper plenum shroud, and lower core-support plate [2,3]. For structural purposes, composites consisting of strong carbon fibers embedded in a carbon matrix are needed. Such carbon/carbon (C/C) composites have been used in aerospace industry to produce missile nose cones, space shuttle leading edge, and aircraft brake-pads. However, radiation-tolerance of such materials is not adequately known because only limited radiation studies have been performed on C/C composites, which suggest that pitch-based carbon fibers have better dimensional stability than that of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) based fibers [4]. The thermodynamically-stable state of graphitic crystalline packing of carbon atoms derived from mesophase pitch leads to a greater stability during neutron irradiation [5]. The specific objectives of this project were: (i) to generating novel carbonaceous nanostructures, (ii) measure extent of graphitic crystallinity and the extent of anisotropy, and (iii) collaborate with the Carbon Materials group at Oak Ridge National Lab to have neutron irradiation studies and post-irradiation examinations conducted on the carbon fibers produced in this research project.

Ogale, Amod A

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Radiological Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1098-2008 October 2008 ------------------------------------- Change Notice 1 May 2009 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1098-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://www.standards.doe.gov/ iii DOE-STD-1098-2008 Change Notice 1: DOE-STD-1098-2008, Radiological Control Standard Section/page/paragraph Change Section 211, page 2-3, paragraph 1 Add new paragraph 1: "Approval by the appropriate Secretarial Officer or designee should be required

382

Managing System of Systems Requirements with a Requirements Screening Group  

SciTech Connect

Figuring out an effective and efficient way to manage not only your Requirements Baseline, but also the development of all your individual requirements during a Programs/Projects Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages can be both daunting and difficult. This is especially so when you are dealing with a complex and large System of Systems (SoS) Program with potentially thousands and thousands of Top Level Requirements as well as an equal number of lower level System, Subsystem and Configuration Item requirements that need to be managed. This task is made even more overwhelming when you have to add in integration with multiple requirements development teams (e.g., Integrated Product Development Teams (IPTs)) and/or numerous System/Subsystem Design Teams. One solution for tackling this difficult activity on a recent large System of Systems Program was to develop and make use of a Requirements Screening Group (RSG). This group is essentially a Team made up of co-chairs from the various Stakeholders with an interest in the Program of record that are enabled and accountable for Requirements Development on the Program/Project. The RSG co-chairs, often with the help of individual support team, work together as a Program Board to monitor, make decisions on, and provide guidance on all Requirements Development activities during the Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages of a Program/Project. In addition, the RSG can establish and maintain the Requirements Baseline, monitor and enforce requirements traceability across the entire Program, and work with other elements of the Program/Project to ensure integration and coordination.

Ronald R. Barden

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Growth and deterministic assembly of single stranded carbon nanotube  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to control the shape, position, alignment, length and assembly of carbon nanotubes over large areas has become an essential but very difficult goal in the field of nanotechnology. Current assembly efforts for ...

Doddabasanagouda, Sunil

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Influence of Deformation on the Properties of carbon-Fiber ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It was found that the distribution of carbon fibers changed from the random state before ... Under the temperature range in control, the increase of rolling and extruding ... Effects of Surface Modifications on SCW Corrosion Resistance Effects of...

385

Lead carbonate scintillator materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

Derenzo, Stephen E. (Pinole, CA); Moses, William W. (Berkeley, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Carbon Films Produced from Ionic Liquid Carbon Precursors ...  

The invention is directed to a method for producing a film of porous carbon, the method comprising carbonizing a film of an ionic liquid, wherein the ...

387

Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion ...  

Biomass and Biofuels; Building Energy Efficiency; ... Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures United States Patent ...

388

Fiber Bridging Model for Reinforced-Carbon-Carbon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Professor K. K. Chawla Honorary Symposium on Fibers, Foams and ... fiber bridging and resistance-curve behavior in reinforced-carbon-carbon (

389

Stabilization and carbonization studies of polyacrylonitrile /carbon nanotube composite fibers .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carbon fibers contain more than 90 wt. % carbon. They have low density, high specific strength and modulus, and good temperature and chemical resistance. Therefore, (more)

Liu, Yaodong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Novel method for carbon nanofilament growth on carbon fibers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carbon nanofilaments were grown on the surface of microscale carbon-fibers at relatively low temperature using palladium as a catalyst to create multiscale fiber reinforcing structures (more)

Garcia, Daniel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Synthesis of Carbon-Carbon Composite via Infiltration Process of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The carbon frame was first pyrolyzed from the wood template. The final composites were then obtained by infiltrating molten coal tar pitch into the carbon frame...

392

CARBON COATED (CARBONOUS) CATALYST IN EBULLATED BED REACTOR FOR PRODUCTION OF OXYGENATED CHEMICALS FROM SYNGAS/CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are a number of exothermic chemical reactions which might benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. A particularly promising area is production of oxygenated chemicals, such as alcohols and ethers, from synthesis gas, which can be economically produced from coal or biomass. The ebullated bed operation requires that the small-diameter ({approx}1/32 inch) catalyst particles have enough mechanical strength to avoid loss by attrition. However, all of the State Of The Art (SOTA) catalysts and advanced catalysts for the purpose are low in mechanical strength. The patented carbon-coated catalyst technology developed in our laboratory converts catalyst particles with low mechanical strength to strong catalysts suitable for ebullated bed application. This R&D program is concerned with the modification on the mechanical strength of the SOTA and advanced catalysts so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO{sub 2} efficiently and economically. The objective of this R&D program is to study the technical and economic feasibility of selective production of high-value oxygenated chemicals from synthesis gas and CO{sub 2} mixed feed in an ebullated bed reactor using carbon-coated catalyst particles.

Peizheng Zhou

2001-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

393

CARBON COATED (CARBONOUS) CATALYST IN EBULLATED BED REACTOR FOR PRODUCTION OF OXYGENATED CHEMICALS FROM SYNGAS/CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are a number of exothermic chemical reactions which might benefit from the temperature control and freedom from catalyst fouling provided by the ebullated bed reactor technology. A particularly promising area is production of oxygenated chemicals, such as alcohols and ethers, from synthesis gas, which can be economically produced from coal or biomass. The ebullated bed operation requires that the small-diameter ({approx} 1/32 inch) catalyst particles have enough mechanical strength to avoid loss by attrition. However, all of the State Of The Art (SOTA) catalysts and advanced catalysts for the purpose are low in mechanical strength. The patented carbon-coated catalyst technology developed in our laboratory converts catalyst particles with low mechanical strength to strong catalysts suitable for ebullated bed application. This R&D program is concerned with the modification on the mechanical strength of the SOTA and advanced catalysts so that the ebullated bed technology can be utilized to produce valuable oxygenated chemicals from syngas/CO{sub 2} efficiently and economically. The objective of this R&D program is to study the technical and economic feasibility of selective production of high-value oxygenated chemicals from synthesis gas and CO{sub 2} mixed feed in an ebullated bed reactor using carbon-coated catalyst particles.

Peizheng Zhou

2000-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

394

carbon | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

carbon Home Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(2002) Super contributor 9 January, 2014 - 13:12 Suburbs offset Low Carbon Footprint of major U.S. Cities carbon cities CO2...

395

Nonlinearity of Carbon Cycle Feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coupled climatecarbon models have shown the potential for large feedbacks between climate change, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, and global carbon sinks. Standard metrics of this feedback assume that the response of land and ocean carbon uptake ...

Kirsten Zickfeld; Michael Eby; H. Damon Matthews; Andreas Schmittner; Andrew J. Weaver

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Carbon-free generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon-free generation Carbon-free generation Carbon-free central generation of electricity, either through fossil fuel combustion with carbon dioxide capture and storage or development of renewable sources such as solar, wind, and/or nuclear power, is key to our future energy portfolio. Brookhaven also provides tools and techniques for studying geological carbon dioxide sequestration and analyzing safety issues for nuclear systems. Our nation faces grand challenges: finding alternative and cleaner energy sources and improving efficiency to meet our exponentially growing energy needs. Researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory are poised to meet these challenges with basic and applied research programs aimed at advancing the effective use of renewable energy through improved conversion,

397

2013 Global Carbon Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Global Carbon Project 2013 Global Carbon Project DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2013_V1.1 image 2013 Budget v1.1 (November 2013) image 2013 Budget v1.3 (December 2013, contains typographical corrections to 2011 Australia emissions from v1.1 and corrections to the 2011 Australia transfer and consumption emissions from v1.2) image image image image Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions to Reach 36 Billion Tonnes in 2013 Global emissions of carbon dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels will reach 36 billion tonnes for the year 2013. "This is a level unprecedented in human history," says CSIRO's Dr Pep Canadell, Executive-Director of the Global Carbon Project (GCP) and co-author of a new report. Global emissions due to fossil fuel alone are set to grow this year at a slightly lower pace of 2.1% than the average 3.1% since 2000, reaching 36

398

Project X functional requirements specification  

SciTech Connect

Project X is a multi-megawatt proton facility being developed to support intensity frontier research in elementary particle physics, with possible applications to nuclear physics and nuclear energy research, at Fermilab. A Functional Requirements Specification has been developed in order to establish performance criteria for the Project X complex in support of these multiple missions. This paper will describe the Functional Requirements for the Project X facility and the rationale for these requirements.

Holmes, S.D.; Henderson, S.D.; Kephart, R.; Kerby, J.; Mishra, S.; Nagaitsev, S.; Tschirhart, R.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this quarterly report, we present a preliminary comparison of the carbon sequestration potential of forests growing on 14 mined sites in a seven-state region in the Midwestern and Eastern Coalfields. Carbon contents of these forests were compared to adjacent forests on non-mined land. The study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each location. The treatments include three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Soil samples were collected from each plot to characterize the sites prior to treatment. Analysis of soil samples was completed and these data are being used to prepare fertilizer prescriptions. Fertilizer prescripts will be developed for each site. Fertilizer will be applied during the second quarter 2004. Data are included as appendices in this report. As part of our economic analysis of mined land reforestation, we focused on the implications of a shift in reforestation burden from the landowner to the mine operator. Results suggest that the reforestation of mined lands as part of the mining operation creates a viable and profitable forest enterprise for landowners with greater potential for carbon sequestration.

J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

400

Desalination with carbon aerogel electrodes. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Electrically regenerated electrosorption process (carbon aerogel CDI) was developed by LLNL for continuously removing ionic impurities from aqueous streams. A salt solution flows in a channel formed by numerous pairs of parallel carbon aerogel electrodes. Each electrode has a very high BET surface area (2-5.4x10{sup 6}ft{sup 2}lb{sup -1} or 400-1100 m{sup 2}g{sup -1}) and very low electrical resistivity ({le}40 m{Omega}). Ions are removed from the electrolyte by the electric field and electrosorbed onto the carbon aerogel. It is concluded that carbon aerogel CDI may be an energy-efficient alternative to electrodialysis and reverse osmosis for desalination of brackish water ({le}5000 ppM). The intrinsic energy required by this process is about QV/2, where Q is the stored electrical charge and V is the voltage between the electrodes, plus losses. Estimated requirement for desalination of a 2000 ppM feed is -0.53-2.5 Wh/gal{sup -1} (0.5-2.4 kJ L{sup -1}), depending on voltage, flow rate, cell dimensions, aerogel density, recovery ratio, etc. This assumes that 50-70% of the stored electrical energy is reclaimed during regeneration (electrical discharge). Though the energy requirement for desalination of sea water is also low, this application will be much more difficult. Additional work will be required for desalination of streams that contain more than 5000 ppM total dissolved solids (2000 ppM will require electrochemical cells with extremely tight, demanding tolerances). At this present time, the process is best suited for streams with dilute impurities, as recently demonstrated during a field test at LLNL Treatment Facility C.

Farmer, J.C.; Richardson, J.H.; Fix, D.V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Thomson, S.L.; May, S.C. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1996-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Requirements Specifications For Hybrid Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper is to present a formal framework for representing and reasoning about the requirements of hybrid systems. As background, the paper briefly reviews an abstract model for specifying system and software requirements, called the Four Variable Model [12], and a related requirements method, called SCR (Software Cost Reduction) [10, 1]. The paper then introduces a special discrete version of the Four Variable Model, the SCR requirements model [8] and proposes an extension of the SCR model for specifying and reasoning about hybrid systems. 2 Background

Constance Heitmeyer

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Geothermal chemical control and monitoring instrumentation - an overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors must have accurate knowledge of the geothermal fluid chemistry at operating temperature if they are to optimize operation, prevent corrosion, increase equipment service life and maximize profit and use. Available electrochemical sensors do not survive at the temperatures encountered in geothermal fluids; and new developments in this area are required. In order to fill this gap in technology, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is developing chemical control and monitoring instruments for measuring in situ characteristics of geothermal fluids. Progress in the development of electrochemical sensors to measure pH, carbonate and sulfide-sulfur is discussed.

Jensen, G.A.

1982-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

403

Multi-Scale Reinforced Carbon Fiber Nanocomposites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon fiber polymer composites are utilized in many industries including in commercial and military aircraft and space vehicles because of their lighter weight and superior strength compared to aluminum and steel. Due to the insulating nature of epoxy-based polymer composites and the dielectric breakdown of the epoxy, catastrophic failure may occur when subjected to high voltages (as in a lightning strike). The addition of carbon nanofibers and carbon nanotubes to the epoxy resin has the potential to improve electrical deficiencies and enhance mechanical characteristics, as well as add self-sensing and actuation capabilities to the original composite. The focus of the present research is to modify the epoxy in traditional carbon fiber composites through addition of carbon nanofibers. As a first step, this study aims to develop an effective technique to disperse carbon nanofibers in the epoxy using mechanical stirring along with sonication, and characterize cured composite samples of various nanomaterial concentrations by optical microscopy, and mechanical and electrical characterization. Once the dispersion procedure is finalized, the nanofibers must be aligned in a desired direction to maximize the extent to which they enhance the original composite. This is achieved by placing electrodes on opposite sides of the material to apply an electric field while the epoxy cures, as secondary bonding joins the aligned nanofibers together. The Vacuum Assisted Resin Transfer Molding (VARTM) process is currently used in industry and serves as a basis to add the modified epoxy resin to the carbon fiber fabric. Results will be tested and compared to a standard carbon fiber composite to optimize the overall procedure. With greater understanding and control of nanoparticles, it will be possible to design composites for specific applications in the not-so-distant future.

VanRooyen, Ainsley

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

404

Sequence-Length Requirements for Phylogenetic Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the sequence lengths required by neighbor-joining, greedy parsimony, and a phylogenetic reconstruction method (DCM NJ +MP) based on disk-covering and the maximum parsimony criterion. We use extensive simulations based on random birth-death trees, with controlled deviations from ultrametricity, to collect data on the scaling of sequence-length requirements for each of the three methods as a function of the number of taxa, the rate of evolution on the tree, and the deviation from ultrametricity. Our experiments show that DCM NJ +MP has consistently lower sequence-length requirements than the other two methods when trees of high topological accuracy are desired, although all methods require much longer sequences as the deviation from ultrametricity or the height of the tree grows. Our study has significant implications for large-scale phylogenetic reconstruction (where sequence-length requirements are a crucial factor), but also for future performance analyses in phylogenetics (since deviations from ultrametricity are proving pivotal).

Bernard M. E. Moret; Usman Roshan; Tandy Warnow; Y Warnow

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership Presented to: Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Annual Review Meeting Development Phase Field Tests Pittsburgh, PA October 5, 2010...

406

Nanostructured Carbide Derived Carbon (CDC)  

... can be grown at rates up to 100 micrometers per hour and is composed of graphite, diamond, amorphous carbon and carbon "nano-onions" ...

407

Microfluidic Analysis for Carbon Management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis focuses on applying microfluidic techniques to analyze two carbon management methods; underground carbon sequestration and enhanced oil recovery. The small scale nature of (more)

Sell, Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Carbon International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Place London, United Kingdom Zip NW1 8LH Sector Carbon Product London-based energy and communications agency specialising in low carbon energy and climate change....

409

NETL: Carbon Dioxide 101 FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the process through which carbon is cycled through the air, ground, plants, animals, and fossil fuels. People and animals inhale oxygen from the air and exhale carbon dioxide...

410

Carbon Trust | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

company funded by the UK government to help business and the public sector cut carbon emissions and capture the commercial potential of low carbon technologies....

411

Carbon Capture Research and Development  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Research Institute of Innovative Energy Carbon Capture Research and Development Carbon capture and storage from fossil-based power...

412

Mercury Control Update 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has been evaluating cost-effective methods for reducing mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants. This report summarizes the current status of mercury control technologies and offers detailed discussion of boiler bromide addition balance-of-plant impacts and activated carbon injection (ACI) tests at selected sites.

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

413

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > CO2 Emissions Control Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > CO2 Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants CO2 Emissions Control RD&D Roadmap Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program Accomplishments DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Presentations DOE/NETL's Monthly Carbon Sequestration Newsletter Program Goals and Targets Pre-Combustion CO2 Control Post-Combustion CO2 Control Advanced Combustion CO2 Compression Other Systems Analysis Regulatory Drivers Reference Shelf Carbon capture involves the separation of CO2 from coal-based power plant flue gas or syngas. There are commercially available 1st-Generation CO2

414

Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures for the Chemistry Graduate Program PLEASE NOTE: This version of the Handbook must be used by students who start during or after the Spring 2012 semester is a central activity. 1.2 Purpose and Content of the Handbook. A detailed account of the academic requirements

Kounaves, Samuel P.

415

Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures for the Chemistry Graduate Program PLEASE NOTE: This version of the Handbook can be used by students who started during or before the Fall 2011 semester activity. 1.2 Purpose and Content of the Handbook. A detailed account of the academic requirements

Kounaves, Samuel P.

416

Humidity requirements in WSCF Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to develop and document a position on Relative Humidity (RH) requirements in the WSCF Laboratories. A current survey of equipment vendors for Organic, Inorganic and Radiochemical laboratories indicate that 25% - 80% relative humidity may meet the environmental requirements for safe operation and protection of all the laboratory equipment.

Evans, R.A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 2006 MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL INFORMATION AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS: FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD (FIPS) 200 APPROVED BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE Shirley Radack, EditorShirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division

418

Supercritical CO2Brayton Cycle Control Strategy for Autonomous Liquid Metal-Cooled Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation discusses a supercritical carbon dioxide brayton cycle control strategy for autonomous liquid metal-cooled reactors.

Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J.J.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

419

Method for fabricating light weight carbon-bonded carbon fiber composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ultralight carbon-bonded carbon fiber composites of densities in the range of about 0.04 to 0.10 grams per cubic centimeter are fabricated by forming an aqueous slurry of carbonaceous fibers which include carbonized fibers and 0-50 weight percent fugitive fibers and a particulate thermosetting resin precursor. The slurry is brought into contact with a perforated mandrel and the water is drained from the slurry through the perforations at a controlled flow rate of about 0.03 to 0.30 liters per minutes per square inch of mandrel surface. The deposited billet of fibers and resin precursor is heated to cure the resin precursor to bind the fibers together, removed from the mandrel, and then the resin and fugitive fibers, if any, are carbonized.

Wrenn, Jr., George E. (Clinton, TN); Abbatiello, Leonard A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lewis, Jr., John (Oak Ridge, TN)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Method for fabricating light weight carbon-bonded carbon fiber composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is directed to the fabrication of ultralight carbon- bonded carbon fiber composites of densities in the range of about 0. 04 to 0.10 grams per cubic centimeter. The composites are fabricated by forming an aqueous slurry of carbonaceous fibers which include carbonized fibers and 0-50 weight percent fugitive fibers and a particulate thermosetting resin precursor. The slurry is brought into contact with a perforated mandrel and the water is drained from the slurry through the perforations at a controlled flow rate of about 0. 03 to 0.30 liters per minutes per square inch of a mandrel surface. The deposited billet of fibers and resin precursor is heated to cure the resin precursor to bind the fibers together, removed from the mandrel, and then the resin and fugitive fibers, if any, are carbonized.

Wrenn, G.E. Jr.; Abbatiello, L.A.; Lewis, J. Jr.

1987-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

PCB spill response and notification requirements  

SciTech Connect

Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a class of organic chemicals that had become widely used in industrial applications due to their practical physical and chemical properties. Historical uses of PCBs include dielectric fluids (used in utility transformers, capacitors, etc.), hydraulic fluids, and other applications requiring stable, fire-retardant materials. Due to findings that PCBs may cause adverse health effects and due to their persistence and accumulation in the environment. The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), enacted on october 11, 1976, banned the manufacture of PCBs after 1978 [Section 6(e)]. The first PCB regulations, promulgated at 40 CFR Part 761, were finalized on February 17, 1978. These PCB regulations include requirements specifying disposal methods and marking (labeling) procedures, and controlling PCB use. To assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in its efforts to comply with the TSCA statute and implementing regulations, the Office of Environmental Guidance has prepared the document ``Guidance on the Management of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs).`` That document explains the requirements specified in the statute and regulations for managing PCBs including PCB use, storage, transport, and disposal. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established regulations at 40 CFR 761 Subpart G for the reporting and cleanup of spills resulting from the release of any quantity of material containing PCBs at concentrations of {ge} 50 ppm. The regulations, known collectively as the TSCA Spill Cleanup Policy, contain requirements for the notification, cleanup, decontamination verification, and recordkeeping of PCB spills. This Information Brief supplements the PCB guidance document by responding to common questions concerning PCB spill response and notification requirements. It is one of a series of Information Briefs pertinent to PCB management issues.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Carbon sequestration, optimum forest rotation and their environmental impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to their large biomass forests assume an important role in the global carbon cycle by moderating the greenhouse effect of atmospheric pollution. The Kyoto Protocol recognises this contribution by allocating carbon credits to countries which are able to create new forest areas. Sequestrated carbon provides an environmental benefit thus must be taken into account in cost-benefit analysis of afforestation projects. Furthermore, like timber output carbon credits are now tradable assets in the carbon exchange. By using British data, this paper looks at the issue of identifying optimum felling age by considering carbon sequestration benefits simultaneously with timber yields. The results of this analysis show that the inclusion of carbon benefits prolongs the optimum cutting age by requiring trees to stand longer in order to soak up more CO{sub 2}. Consequently this finding must be considered in any carbon accounting calculations. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbon sequestration in forestry is an environmental benefit. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It moderates the problem of global warming. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It prolongs the gestation period in harvesting. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper uses British data in less favoured districts for growing Sitka spruce species.

Kula, Erhun, E-mail: erhun.kula@bahcesehir.edu.tr [Department of Economics, Bahcesehir University, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey); Gunalay, Yavuz, E-mail: yavuz.gunalay@bahcesehir.edu.tr [Department of Business Studies, Bahcesehir University, Besiktas, Istanbul (Turkey)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon Print Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon Print We are accustomed to observing carbon in its elemental form as a solid, ranging from the soft "lead" in pencils to the precious gemstone in diamond rings. While considerable attention has been focused on solid forms of carbon, the properties of liquid carbon are much more difficult to measure accurately. The very strong bonding between carbon atoms that gives diamonds their hardness also makes carbon very difficult to melt, requiring temperatures above 5000 K at pressures above 100 bar. Maintaining such conditions in a laboratory is a challenge that has hampered efforts to fully understand the chemical bonding properties of this biologically, industrially, and environmentally important element. At the ALS, researchers have found a way to rapidly heat a carbon sample and contain the resulting liquid long enough to perform picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The technique provides a way to measure the bonding properties of liquid carbon at near-solid densities that can then be compared with results from molecular dynamics simulations.

424

Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time-Resolved Study of Bonding Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon Print Wednesday, 28 September 2005 00:00 We are accustomed to observing carbon in its elemental form as a solid, ranging from the soft "lead" in pencils to the precious gemstone in diamond rings. While considerable attention has been focused on solid forms of carbon, the properties of liquid carbon are much more difficult to measure accurately. The very strong bonding between carbon atoms that gives diamonds their hardness also makes carbon very difficult to melt, requiring temperatures above 5000 K at pressures above 100 bar. Maintaining such conditions in a laboratory is a challenge that has hampered efforts to fully understand the chemical bonding properties of this biologically, industrially, and environmentally important element. At the ALS, researchers have found a way to rapidly heat a carbon sample and contain the resulting liquid long enough to perform picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The technique provides a way to measure the bonding properties of liquid carbon at near-solid densities that can then be compared with results from molecular dynamics simulations.

425

Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon Print Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon Print We are accustomed to observing carbon in its elemental form as a solid, ranging from the soft "lead" in pencils to the precious gemstone in diamond rings. While considerable attention has been focused on solid forms of carbon, the properties of liquid carbon are much more difficult to measure accurately. The very strong bonding between carbon atoms that gives diamonds their hardness also makes carbon very difficult to melt, requiring temperatures above 5000 K at pressures above 100 bar. Maintaining such conditions in a laboratory is a challenge that has hampered efforts to fully understand the chemical bonding properties of this biologically, industrially, and environmentally important element. At the ALS, researchers have found a way to rapidly heat a carbon sample and contain the resulting liquid long enough to perform picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The technique provides a way to measure the bonding properties of liquid carbon at near-solid densities that can then be compared with results from molecular dynamics simulations.

426

Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon Print Time-Resolved Study of Bonding in Liquid Carbon Print We are accustomed to observing carbon in its elemental form as a solid, ranging from the soft "lead" in pencils to the precious gemstone in diamond rings. While considerable attention has been focused on solid forms of carbon, the properties of liquid carbon are much more difficult to measure accurately. The very strong bonding between carbon atoms that gives diamonds their hardness also makes carbon very difficult to melt, requiring temperatures above 5000 K at pressures above 100 bar. Maintaining such conditions in a laboratory is a challenge that has hampered efforts to fully understand the chemical bonding properties of this biologically, industrially, and environmentally important element. At the ALS, researchers have found a way to rapidly heat a carbon sample and contain the resulting liquid long enough to perform picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The technique provides a way to measure the bonding properties of liquid carbon at near-solid densities that can then be compared with results from molecular dynamics simulations.

427

Radiological Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1098-2008 October 2008 DOE STANDARD RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ii DOE-STD-1098-2008 This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Website at http://www.standards.doe.gov/ DOE-STD-1098-2008 Radiological Control DOE Policy October 2008 iii Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) has developed this Standard to assist line managers in meeting their responsibilities for implementing occupational radiological control programs. DOE has established regulatory requirements for occupational radiation protection in Title 10 of the Code of Federal

428

IMPACCT: Carbon Capture Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: IMPACCTs 15 projects seek to develop technologies for existing coal-fired power plants that will lower the cost of carbon capture. Short for Innovative Materials and Processes for Advanced Carbon Capture Technologies, the IMPACCT Project is geared toward minimizing the cost of removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plant exhaust by developing materials and processes that have never before been considered for this application. Retrofitting coal-fired power plants to capture the CO2 they produce would enable greenhouse gas reductions without forcing these plants to close, shifting away from the inexpensive and abundant U.S. coal supply.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Carbon Aerogels for Hydrogen Storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This effort is focused on the design of new nanostructured carbon-based materials that meet the DOE 2010 targets for on-board vehicle hydrogen storage. Carbon aerogels (CAs) are a unique class of porous materials that possess a number of desirable structural features for the storage of hydrogen, including high surface areas (over 3000 m{sup 2}/g), continuous and tunable porosities, and variable densities. In addition, the flexibility associated with CA synthesis allows for the incorporation of modifiers or catalysts into the carbon matrix in order to alter hydrogen sorption enthalpies in these materials. Since the properties of the doped CAs can be systematically modified (i.e. amount/type of dopant, surface area, porosity), novel materials can be fabricated that exhibit enhanced hydrogen storage properties. We are using this approach to design new H{sub 2} sorbent materials that can storage appreciable amounts of hydrogen at room temperature through a process known as hydrogen spillover. The spillover process involves the dissociative chemisorption of molecular hydrogen on a supported metal catalyst surface (e.g. platinum or nickel), followed by the diffusion of atomic hydrogen onto the surface of the support material. Due to the enhanced interaction between atomic hydrogen and the carbon support, hydrogen can be stored in the support material at more reasonable operating temperatures. While the spillover process has been shown to increase the reversible hydrogen storage capacities at room temperature in metal-loaded carbon nanostructures, a number of issues still exist with this approach, including slow kinetics of H{sub 2} uptake and capacities ({approx} 1.2 wt% on carbon) below the DOE targets. The ability to tailor different structural aspects of the spillover system (i.e. the size/shape of the catalyst particle, the catalyst-support interface and the support morphology) should provide valuable mechanistic information regarding the critical aspects of the spillover process (i.e. kinetics of hydrogen dissociation, diffusion and recombination) and allow for optimization of these materials to meet the DOE targets for hydrogen storage. In a parallel effort, we are also designing CA materials as nanoporous scaffolds for metal hydride systems. Recent work by others has demonstrated that nanostructured metal hydrides show enhanced kinetics for reversible hydrogen storage relative to the bulk materials. This effect is diminished, however, after several hydriding/dehydriding cycles, as the material structure coarsens. Incorporation of the metal hydride into a porous scaffolding material can potentially limit coarsening and, therefore, preserve the enhanced kinetics and improved cycling behavior of the nanostructured metal hydride. Success implementation of this approach, however, requires the design of nanoporous solids with large accessible pore volumes (> 4 cm{sup 3}/g) to minimize the gravimetric and volumetric capacity penalties associated with the use of the scaffold. In addition, these scaffold materials should be capable of managing thermal changes associated with the cycling of the incorporated metal hydride. CAs are promising candidates for the design of such porous scaffolds due to the large pore volumes and tunable porosity of aerogel framework. This research is a joint effort with HRL Laboratories, a member of the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence. LLNL's efforts have focused on the design of new CA materials that can meet the scaffolding requirements, while metal hydride incorporation into the scaffold and evaluation of the kinetics and cycling performance of these composites is performed at HRL.

Baumann, T F; Worsley, M; Satcher, J H

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

430

Lower Cost, Higher Performance Carbon Fiber  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David (Dave) Warren David (Dave) Warren Field Technical Manager Transportation Materials Research Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2009, M/S 8050 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-8050 Phone: 865-574-9693 Fax: 865-574-0740 Email: WarrenCD@ORNL.GOV Lower Cost, Higher Performance Carbon Fiber 14 February 2011 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Presentation_name Questions for Today Materials How can the cost of carbon fiber suitable for higher performance applications (H 2 Storage) be developed? H 2 Storage requirements implies Aerospace grade fibers. Can we build off of work previously done for more modest structural applications? To accurately answer: We need to know the minimum performance and maximum cost requirements of the fiber not simply the properties of current fiber.

431

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low Cost Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling Oak Ridge National been identified by carbon fiber manufacturers as a market with substantial growth potential. When manufactured with carbon fiber as opposed to traditional materials such as steel, automotive parts are able

432

International Conference on Carbon Nanotechnology: Potential and Challenges (Carbon 10)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International Conference on Carbon Nanotechnology: Potential and Challenges (Carbon 10) 15 - 17th Since the discovery of the carbon nanotube (CNT) about two decades ago, research related to its of Materials and Process Engineering Kanpur Chapter hosted the `International Conference on Carbon

Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

433

Baseline Carbon Storage, Carbon Sequestration, and Greenhouse-Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Baseline Carbon Storage, Carbon Sequestration, and Greenhouse-Gas Fluxes in Terrestrial Ecosystems, and Benjamin M. Sleeter Chapter 5 of Baseline and Projected Future Carbon Storage and Greenhouse-Gas Fluxes, carbon sequestration, and greenhouse-gas fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems of the Western United States

Fleskes, Joe

434

Reduction of carbon dioxide emissions by mineral carbonation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study investigates the technologies that have the potential to provide feasible reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) from a reference power plant. Particular focus has been given to mineral carbonation (at 1 bar) in which magnesium (Mg) and/or ... Keywords: carbon dioxide, emissions, mineral carbonation

C. J. Sturgeon; M. G. Rasul; Ashfaque Ahmed Chowdhury

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. We are currently estimating the acreage of lands in VA, WV, KY, OH, and PA mined under SMCRA and reclaimed to non-forested post-mining land uses that are not currently under active management, and therefore can be considered as available for carbon sequestration. To determine actual sequestration under different forest management scenarios, a field study was installed as a 3 x 3 factorial in a random complete block design with three replications at each of three locations, Ohio, West Virginia, and Virginia. The treatments included three forest types (white pine, hybrid poplar, mixed hardwood) and three silvicultural regimes (competition control, competition control plus tillage, competition control plus tillage plus fertilization). Each individual treatment plot is 0.5 acres. Each block of nine plots requires 4.5 acres, and the complete installation at each site requires 13.5 acres. The plots at all three locations have been installed and the plot corners marked with PVC stakes. GPS coordinates of each plot have been collected. Soil samples were collected from each plot to characterize the sites prior to treatment. Baseline soil carbon was determined for each of the eighty-one plots. Fertility analysis of soil samples was completed and these data were used to prepare fertilizer prescriptions and the pre-designated plots were fertilized. We also evaluated economic-based policy instruments that are designed to mitigate the reforestation burden borne by the owner of reclaimed mined land. Results suggest that although profitability of reforestation of these previously reclaimed mine lands may be achievable on better sites under lower interest rates, substantial payments would be required to reach ''profitability'' under many conditions.

J. Burger; J. Galbraith; T. Fox; G. Amacher; J. Sullivan; C. Zipper

2004-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

436

Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Second Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Second Generation Advanced Reburning Second Generation Advanced Reburning General Electric - Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE-EER) is carrying out a two Phase research program to develop novel Advanced Reburning (AR) concepts for high efficiency and low cost NOx control from coal-fired utility boilers. AR technologies are based on combination of basic reburning and N-agent/promoter injections. Phase I of the project was successfully completed and EER was selected to continue to develop AR technology during Phase II. Phase I demonstrated that AR technologies are able to provide effective NOx control for coal-fired combustors. Three technologies were originally envisioned for development: AR-Lean, AR-Rich, and Multiple Injection AR (MIAR). Along with these, three additional technologies were identified during the project: reburning plus promoted SNCR; AR-Lean plus promoted SNCR; and AR-Rich plus promoted SNCR. The promoters are sodium salts, in particular sodium carbonate. These AR technologies have different optimum reburn heat input levels and furnace temperature requirements. For full scale application, an optimum technology can be selected on a boiler-specific basis depending on furnace temperature profile and regions of injector access.

437

Functional requirements for gas characterization system computer software  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides the Functional Requirements for the Computer Software operating the Gas Characterization System (GCS), which monitors the combustible gasses in the vapor space of selected tanks. Necessary computer functions are defined to support design, testing, operation, and change control. The GCS requires several individual computers to address the control and data acquisition functions of instruments and sensors. These computers are networked for communication, and must multi-task to accommodate operation in parallel.

Tate, D.D.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Requirements Engineering for Digital Upgrades: Specification, Analysis, and Tracking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As nuclear power plants upgrade their instrumentation and control (I&C) systems with digital equipment to continue meeting safety and reliability requirements while controlling operating costs, the transition to the new technology has brought new challenges in properly specifying and confirming the correct performance of digital systems and devices. This guideline describes an approach that utilities can use to refine and improve their processes for developing and verifying requirements for digital upgra...

1997-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

439

Carbon nanotubes : synthesis, characterization, and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of graphitized carbon fibers. Carbon, 1976. 14 (2): p. 133-chemical vapor deposited carbon fiber. Carbon, 2001. 39 : p.G.G. , Lengths of Carbon Fibers Grown from Iron Catalyst

Deck, Christian Peter

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Home: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

content. | Skip to navigation content. | Skip to navigation Site Map Contact Us Current Documents Archived Documents Entire Site only in current section Advanced Search... U.S. Department of Energy Office of Management Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Sections Home Directives Current Directives Draft Directives Archives Delegations Current Delegations Current Designations Rescinded Organizations' Assignment of Responsibility Development & Review RevCom Writers' Tools DPC Corner References News and Updates Help Personal tools You are here: Office of Management » Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Info Home Directives are the Department of Energy's primary means of establishing policies, requirements, responsibilities, and procedures for Departmental elements and contractors. Directive

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require carbon control" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Cyber Security Issues and Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program (SGIG) Cyber Security Issues and Requirements Jeff Dagle November 19, 2009 Communication and Information Technology will be Central to Smart Grid Deployment Final Interim Smart Grid Roadmap, prepared by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) for the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Cyber Security Requirements Associated with ARRA Projects Proposals were required to include:  Discussion of how cyber security risks will be mitigated  What criteria will be used for vendor and technology selection  Relevant cyber security standards that will be followed (or industry best practices)  How emerging smart grid cyber security standards that are currently being developed will be adopted Cyber Security Objectives for Smart

442

Option values of low carbon technology policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of spillovers across periods in the production process: plants that are developed initially reduce the cost of following projects. The effect of first period LCT plants on the aggregated expected cost (eq. 3) with 0=? is... are: carbon capture and storage (CCS), the new nuclear, solar thermal plants, and offshore windpower farms. These technologies require high upfront capital investments and long construction lead?times. Such new large...

Finon, Dominique; Meunier, Guy

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

443

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the first performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first Partnership meeting the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Complementary to the efforts on evaluation of sources and sinks is the development of the Big Sky Partnership Carbon Cyberinfrastructure (BSP-CC) and a GIS Road Map for the Partnership. These efforts will put in place a map-based integrated information management system for our Partnership, with transferability to the national carbon sequestration effort. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but other policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. A series of meetings held in November and December, 2003, have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These include the impact of existing local, state, and federal permitting issues for terrestrial based carbon sequestration projects, consistency of final protocols and planning standards with national requirements, and alignments of carbon sequestration projects with existing federal and state cost-share programs. Finally, the education and outreach efforts during this performance period have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The primary goal of this plan is to increase awareness, understanding, and public acceptance of sequestration efforts and build support for a constituent based network which includes the initial Big Sky Partnership and other local and regional businesses and entities.

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

444

SEQUESTERING CARBON DIOXIDE IN COALBEDS  

SciTech Connect

The authors' long term goal is to develop accurate prediction methods for describing the adsorption behavior of gas mixtures on solid adsorbents over complete ranges of temperature, pressure and adsorbent types. The major objectives of the project are to: (1) measure the adsorption behavior of pure CO{sub 2}, methane, nitrogen and their binary and ternary mixtures on several selected coals having different properties at temperatures and pressures applicable to the particular coal being studied, (2) generalize the adsorption results in terms of appropriate properties of the coals, to facilitate estimation of adsorption behavior for coals other than those studied experimentally, (3) delineate the sensitivity of the competitive adsorption of CO{sub 2}, methane and nitrogen to the specific characteristics of the coal on which they are adsorbed; establish the major differences (if any) in the nature of this competitive adsorption on different coals, and (4) test and/or develop theoretically-based mathematical models to represent accurately the adsorption behavior of mixtures of the type for which measurements are made. The specific accomplishments of this project during this reporting period are summarized below in three broad categories outlining experimentation, model development, and coal characterization. (1) Experimental Work: Our adsorption apparatus was reassembled, and all instruments were tested and calibrated. Having confirmed the viability of the experimental apparatus and procedures used, adsorption isotherms for pure methane, carbon dioxide and nitrogen on wet Fruitland coal were measured at 319.3 K (115 F) and pressures to 12.4 MPa (1800 psia). These measurements showed good agreement with our previous data and yielded an expected uncertainty of about 2%. Preparations are underway to measure adsorption isotherms for pure methane, carbon dioxide and nitrogen on two other coals. (2) Model Development: The experimental data were used to evaluate the predictive capabilities of various adsorption models, including the Langmuir/loading ratio correlation, two-dimensional cubic equations of state, and the local density model. In general, all models performed well for Type I adsorption exhibited by methane, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide up to 8.3 MPa (average deviations within 2%). However, for pressures higher than 8.3 MPa (1200 psia), carbon dioxide produced multilayer adsorption behavior similar to Type IV adsorption. Our results to date indicate that the SLD model may be a suitable choice for modeling multilayer coalbed gas adsorption. However, model improvements are required to (a) account for coal heterogeneity and structure complexity, and (b) provide for more accurate density predictions. (3) Coal Characterization: We have identified several well-characterized coals for use in our adsorption studies. The criteria for coal selection has been guided by the need for coals that (a) span the spectrum of properties encountered in coalbed methane production (such as variation in rank), and (b) originate from coalbed methane recovery sites (e.g., San Juan Basin, Black Warrior Basin, etc.). At Pennsylvania State University, we have completed calibrating our instruments using a well-characterized activated carbon. In addition, we have conducted CO{sub 2} and methane uptakes on four samples, including (a) a widely used commercial activated carbon, BPL from Calgon Carbon Corp.; (b) an Illinois No.6 bituminous coal from the Argonne Premium Coal sample bank; (c) a Fruitland Intermediate coal sample; (d) a dry Fruitland sample. The results are as expected, except for a greater sensitivity to the outgassing temperature. ''Standard'' outgassing conditions (e.g., 383.2 K, overnight), which are often used, may not be appropriate for gas storage in coalbeds. Conditions that are more representative of in-situ coal (approximately 313.2 K) may be much more appropriate. In addition, our results highlight the importance of assessing the degree of approach to adsorption equilibrium.

K.A.M. Gasem; R.L. Robinson, Jr.; L.R. Radovic

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

February 28, 2006, Department letter reporting completion of NNSA portion of Commitment 23 in the 2004-1 implementation plan, Oversight of Complex, High-Hazard Nuclear Operations, which requires the development of site office action plans to improve the consistency and reliability of work planning and work control at the activity level, including the incorporation of Integrated Safety Management core functions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Washington, DC 20585 Washington, DC 20585 February 28, 2006 OFFICE O F THE ADMINISTRATOR The Honorable A. J. Eggenberger Ch a i rm an Defensc Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 625 Indiana Avenue, NW., Suite 700 Washington, D.C. 20004-2901 Dear Mr. Chairman: On Julie 10, 2005, Secretary Bodnian submitted the Department's Iiizplenzentution Plun to Itizpt-ove Oversight qf'Nucleur Operutions in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 2004- I , Oversight qf Complex, High-Hrrzurd Nucleur Openrtiotzs. Section 5.3 of the Implementation Plan (IP) addresses Revitalizing Integruted SU/i-'ty Munagernent Implementution, and Subsection 5.3.2 addresses Work Plunning mil Work Control ut the Activity Level. Commitment 23 of the 1P requires development of site office action plans to improve the consistency and reliability of work

446

CYCLIC CARBON DIOXIDE STIMULATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CARBON DIOXIDE STIMULATION ("Huff-and-Puff') (A well-stimulation method) Cyclic CO 2 stimulation is a single-well operation that is developing as a method of rapidly producing oil....

447

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Review Meeting October 12-14, 2005 Table of Contents Agenda PDF-1438KB Phase I Program Review Meeting Phase II Kick-Off Meeting Phase...

448

SRD 134 Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

> Return to SRD 134, Index of Semiconductor Process Gases. CARBON DIOXIDE. MW [1]. 44.010. NBP [1]. 194.75 K. TP [1]. 216.59 K. CO 2. Pc [1]. ...

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

449

Carbon Storage Review 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage R&D Project Review Meeting Developing the Technologies and Building the Infrastructure for CO 2 Storage August 21-23,...

450

Carbon Capture Pilots (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Support for the Carbon Management Research Group (CMRG), a public/private partnership consisting of most of the Commonwealths utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Center for...

451

Carbon nanotube zoom lenses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that convergent or divergent zoom lenses with focal length variations up to approximately 100% can be implemented by growing arrays of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on curved templates. Unique lenses, which can change their character from divergent ...

D. Dragoman; M. Dragoman

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Carbon Dioxide Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies » Carbon Dioxide Heat Pump Water Heater Emerging Technologies » Carbon Dioxide Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project Carbon Dioxide Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into carbon dioxide (CO2) heat pump water heaters. This project will employ innovative techniques to adapt water heating technology to meet U.S. market requirements, including specifications, cost, and performance targets. Carbon dioxide is a refrigerant with a global warming potential (GWP) of 1. The CO2 heat pump water heater research seeks to develop an improved life cycle climate performance compared to conventional refrigerants. For example, R134a, another type of refrigerant, has a GWP of 1,300. Project Description This project seeks to develop a CO2-based heat pump water heater (HPWH)

453

Closeout of Advanced Boron and Metal Loaded High Porosity Carbons.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Penn State effort explored the development of new high-surface-area materials for hydrogen storage, materials that could offer enhancement in the hydrogen binding energy through a direct chemical modification of the framework in high specific-surface-area platforms. The team chemically substituted boron into the hexagonal sp2 carbon framework, dispersed metal atoms bound to the boro-carbon structure, and generated the theory of novel nanoscale geometries that can enhance storage through chemical frustration, sheet curvature, electron deficiency, large local fields and mixed hybridization states. New boro-carbon materials were synthesized by high temperature plasma, pyrolysis of boron-carbon precursor molecules, and post-synthesis modification of carbons. Hydrogen uptake has been assessed, and several promising leads have been identified, with the requirement to simultaneously optimize total surface area while maintaining the enhanced hydrogen binding energies already demonstrated.

Peter C. Eklund (deceased); T. C. Mike Chung; Henry C. Foley; Vincent H. Crespi

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Carbon Sequestration Initiative CSI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sequestration Initiative CSI Sequestration Initiative CSI Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Sequestration Initiative (CSI) Place Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip MA 02139-4307 Sector Carbon Product Massachusetts based consortium which was formed in 2000 to investigate carbon capture and storage technologies. Coordinates 43.003745°, -89.017499° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.003745,"lon":-89.017499,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

455

Low Carbon Research Institute | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Carbon Research Institute Low Carbon Research Institute Name Low Carbon Research Institute Address King Edward VII Avenue CF10 3NB Place Cardiff, United Kingdom Phone number 029 20870003 Website http://www.lcri.org.uk/ Coordinates 51.4865872°, -3.1817252° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.4865872,"lon":-3.1817252,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

456

First Carbon Solutions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Solutions Carbon Solutions Jump to: navigation, search Name First Carbon Solutions Place Bethesda, Maryland Product To be completed... Coordinates 40.020185°, -81.073819° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.020185,"lon":-81.073819,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

457

Sindicatum Carbon Capital SCC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sindicatum Carbon Capital SCC Sindicatum Carbon Capital SCC Jump to: navigation, search Name Sindicatum Carbon Capital (SCC) Place London, United Kingdom Zip W1S 1HX Product SCC is a specialist end-to-end developer of climate change related projects, from conception to operation. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

458

Carbon Opportunity Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Opportunity Group Opportunity Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Opportunity Group Place Chicago, Illinois Zip 60606 Sector Carbon, Services Product Chicago-based firm that provides expertise in private equity investments, carbon asset development, financial risk management as well as advisory services. Coordinates 41.88415°, -87.632409° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"im