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1

Design basis and requirements for 241-SY modular exhauster mechanical installation  

SciTech Connect

A new ventilation system is being installed to serve as the K-1 primary exhauster. The existing K-1 primary exhauster will then become the backup. This ventilation system services waste tanks 241-SY-101, 102 and 103. The nominal flow rate through the ventilation system is 1,000 cfm. The new ventilation system will contain a moisture eliminator, a heater, a prefilter, two stages of HEPA filtration, an exhaust fan, a stack and stack sampling system. The purpose of this document is to serve as the design and functional requirements for the mechanical installation of the new 241-SY modular exhauster. The mechanical installation will include modifying the existing ductwork (i.e., installing a ``T`` to connect the new exhauster to the existing system), modifying the existing condensate drain lines to accommodate the new lines associated with the new exhauster, a maintenance platform near the stack of the new exhauster, guy wires and guy wire footings to support the stack of the new exhauster, as well as other miscellaneous tasks associated with the mechanical installation design effort.

Kriskovich, J.R.

1994-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

2

Hydrocarbon and Electrical Requirements in the Plasma During Treatment of NOx in Light-Duty Diesel Engine Exhaust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the hydrocarbon (C{sub 1}/NO{sub x} ratio) and electrical energy density (ratio of power to exhaust flow rate) requirements in the plasma during plasma-assisted catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The requirements for treatment of NO{sub x} in heavy-duty and light-duty diesel engines are compared. It is shown that, for light-duty applications, the plasma can significantly enhance the catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} with little fuel penalty incurred in the plasma process.

Penetrante, B.; Brusasco,R.M.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

3

Commercial and institutional kitchen exhaust systems  

SciTech Connect

This article addresses design requirements for commercial and institutional kitchen exhaust systems. The topics of the article include design considerations, toilet exhaust, dishwasher exhaust, grease hood exhaust, codes and standards, design concerns, common problems, and fire suppression. A side bar on ducts, plenums and housings is also included.

McGuire, A.B. (McGuire Engineers, Chicago, IL (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Portable Exhauster Position Paper  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document identifies the tasks that are involved in preparing the ''standby'' portable exhauster (POR05 skid C) to support Interim Stabilization's schedule for saltwell pumping.

KRISKOVICH, J.R.

1999-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

5

Absolute nuclear material assay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

6

Absolute nuclear material assay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Computing Solar Absolute Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computed color indices and spectral shapes for individual stars are routinely compared with observations for essentially all spectral types, but absolute fluxes are rarely tested. We can confront observed irradiances with the predictions from model atmospheres for a few stars with accurate angular diameter measurements, notably the Sun. Previous calculations have been hampered by inconsistencies and the use of outdated atomic data and abundances. I provide here a progress report on our current efforts to compute absolute fluxes for solar model photospheres. Uncertainties in the solar composition constitute a significant source of error in computing solar radiative fluxes.

Prieto, Carlos Allende

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Computing Solar Absolute Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computed color indices and spectral shapes for individual stars are routinely compared with observations for essentially all spectral types, but absolute fluxes are rarely tested. We can confront observed irradiances with the predictions from model atmospheres for a few stars with accurate angular diameter measurements, notably the Sun. Previous calculations have been hampered by inconsistencies and the use of outdated atomic data and abundances. I provide here a progress report on our current efforts to compute absolute fluxes for solar model photospheres. Uncertainties in the solar composition constitute a significant source of error in computing solar radiative fluxes.

Carlos Allende Prieto

2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

9

Exhaust system for v-type engine  

SciTech Connect

An exhaust system is described for an engine having a first exhaust manifold, a second exhaust manifold, a first catalytic converter, a first exhaust pipe portion extending from the first exhaust manifold, and a second exhaust pipe portion extending from the second exhaust manifold. The first and second exhaust pipe portions merge into a common exhaust pipe section leading to the first catalytic converter. A second catalytic converter is positioned in the first exhaust pipe portion, the length of the second exhaust pipe portion from the outlet of the second exhaust manifold to the merger to the common exhaust pipe section being the same as the length of the first exhaust pipe portion to the inlet to the second catalytic converter from the outlet of the first exhaust manifold. The first exhaust pipe portion is substantially longer than the second exhaust pipe portion.

Takii, O.

1987-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Exhaust Speciation Studies for Aftertreatment Technology Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lean NOx reduction shown to be strongly affected by HC reductant composition. Possibility exists to tailor exhaust HC composition by manipulating HC post-injection process. Why is this relevant if lean NOx catalysis ''isn't going to work'' ? Lean NOx (esp. with post-injection of HC) offers unmatched ''passiveness'' NOx adsorber technology will require reductant - potentially introduced the same way

Graves, Ron

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

11

Exhaust gas reactor  

SciTech Connect

A reactor for the oxidation of unburned and partially burned components in the exhaust gas from an internal combustion engine comprising a chamber which is substantially circular in cross sections perpendicular to its axis, one or more inlet pipes which pass a mixture of exhaust gas and air substantially tangentially into the chamber near to one end thereof, and an outlet pipe near to the other end of the chamber and which is so arranged that exhaust gas leaves the chamber substantially tangentially. The tangential inlet and tangential outlet of gases minimizes energy losses in the gas passing through the reactor. The ratio of the cross-sectional areas of the inlet pipe(s) to reactor chamber is preferably from 1:9 to 25:36, and similar ranges of crosssectional area ratios are preferred for the outlet pipe and chamber. The ratio of the length of the reaction chamber to diameter is preferably from 1:1 to 4:1. The chamber may be cylindrical or divergent from inlet end to outlet end and may be thermally insulated.

Camarsa, M.; Cocchiara, F.; Garcea, G.P.

1981-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

12

ABSOLUTE POLARIMETRY AT RHIC.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Precise and absolute beam polarization measurements are critical for the RHIC spin physics program. Because all experimental spin-dependent results are normalized by beam polarization, the normalization uncertainty contributes directly to final physics uncertainties. We aimed to perform the beam polarization measurement to an accuracy Of {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} < 5%. The absolute polarimeter consists of Polarized Atomic Hydrogen Gas Jet Target and left-right pairs of silicon strip detectors and was installed in the RHIC-ring in 2004. This system features proton-proton elastic scattering in the Coulomb nuclear interference (CNI) region. Precise measurements of the analyzing power A{sub N} of this process has allowed us to achieve {Delta}P{sub beam}/P{sub beam} = 4.2% in 2005 for the first long spin-physics run. In this report, we describe the entire set up and performance of the system. The procedure of beam polarization measurement and analysis results from 2004-2005 are described. Physics topics of AN in the CNI region (four-momentum transfer squared 0.001 < -t < 0.032 (GeV/c){sup 2}) are also discussed. We point out the current issues and expected optimum accuracy in 2006 and the future.

OKADA; BRAVAR, A.; BUNCE, G.; GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; MAKDISI, Y.; NASS, A.; WOOD, J.; ZELENSKI, Z.; ET AL.

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

13

The information as Absolute  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article presents and grounds (i.e. presents proof of the existence, the truth, the self-consistence and the completeness of)the informational conception ("the Information as Absolute" conception)in physics and philosophy. the conception defines the information as an ultimately common, real and fundamental concept/phenomenon - "Absolute", which exists as anabsolutely infinite set ("Information" Set) of elements (members) and informational (e.g., logical) linksbetween the elements; where any element itself is some informational structure also. Correspondingly, for example, Matter as the substence, radiation, etc., is some development or realization of informational patterns, constituting a specific - and practically infinitesimal comparing to the Set - subset of the "Information" Set. The conception allows for the resolution, or at least for a consideration on a higher level of comprehension, of the basic ontological and epistemological problems in philosophy and natural sciences; in physics it allows to suggest reasonable model, which makes more clear basic phisical notions,such as space, time, matter, etc.

Sergey V. Shevchenko; Vladimir V. Tokarevsky

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

14

PARABOLIC EXHAUSTIONS AND ANALYTIC COVERINGS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PARABOLIC EXHAUSTIONS AND ANALYTIC COVERINGS Finnur L´arusson January 31, 1993 Abstract. Let be a parabolic exhaustion on a Stein manifold X such that is strictly plurisubharmonic at its zeros. The metric to be parabolic because its logarithm is plurisubharmonic and satisfies the so-called Monge-Amp`ere equation

Lárusson, Finnur

15

Treatment of power utilities exhaust  

SciTech Connect

Provided is a process for treating nitrogen oxide-containing exhaust produced by a stationary combustion source by the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide in the presence of a reductant comprising hydrogen, followed by ammonia selective catalytic reduction to further reduce the nitrogen oxide level in the exhaust.

Koermer, Gerald (Basking Ridge, NJ)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

16

Motorola's Exhaust Optimization Program: Tracer Gas Application for Gas Panel Enclosures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Motorola Exhaust Optimization Program strives toward identifying the optimum exhaust requirements for gas panel enclosures to help conserve energy and provide future exhaust capacity for new tools. Various Motorola studies have shown that at least 20% of total fab electrical usage is attributed to make-up air fans, exhaust fans, and chilled water systems for recirculation and make-up air. This is equivalent to over 35 million kWh per a year for a typical Motorola Semiconductor Products Sector (SPS) fab. These obtained studies have prompted Motorola to focus on a broad range of energy conservation projects. This paper will focus on exhaust optimization through tracer gas testing. Testing has resulted in exhaust and make-up air reductions of as high as 70% of manufacturer's specifications per gas enclosure. This approach leads to energy conservation and infrastructure cost avoidance for new exhaust fans, ductwork, abatement equipment, and make-up air systems.

Myart, H. R.; Camacho, R.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Exhaust after-treatment system with in-cylinder addition of unburnt hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

Certain exhaust after-treatment devices, at least periodically, require the addition of unburnt hydrocarbons in order to create reductant-rich exhaust conditions. The present disclosure adds unburnt hydrocarbons to exhaust from at least one combustion chamber by positioning, at least partially within a combustion chamber, a mixed-mode fuel injector operable to inject fuel into the combustion chamber in a first spray pattern with a small average angle relative to a centerline of the combustion chamber and a second spray pattern with a large average angle relative to the centerline of the combustion chamber. An amount of fuel is injected in the first spray pattern into a non-combustible environment within the at least one combustion chamber during at least one of an expansion stroke and exhaust stroke. The exhaust with the unburnt amount of fuel is moved into an exhaust passage via an exhaust valve.

Coleman, Gerald N. (Corby, GB); Kesse, Mary L. (Peoria, IL)

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

18

Capture of Heat Energy from Diesel Engine Exhaust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel generators produce waste heat as well as electrical power. About one-third of the fuel energy is released from the exhaust manifolds of the diesel engines and normally is not captured for useful applications. This project studied different waste heat applications that may effectively use the heat released from exhaust of Alaskan village diesel generators, selected the most desirable application, designed and fabricated a prototype for performance measurements, and evaluated the feasibility and economic impact of the selected application. Exhaust flow rate, composition, and temperature may affect the heat recovery system design and the amount of heat that is recoverable. In comparison with the other two parameters, the effect of exhaust composition may be less important due to the large air/fuel ratio for diesel engines. This project also compared heat content and qualities (i.e., temperatures) of exhaust for three types of fuel: conventional diesel, a synthetic diesel, and conventional diesel with a small amount of hydrogen. Another task of this project was the development of a computer-aided design tool for the economic analysis of selected exhaust heat recovery applications to any Alaskan village diesel generator set. The exhaust heat recovery application selected from this study was for heating. An exhaust heat recovery system was fabricated, and 350 hours of testing was conducted. Based on testing data, the exhaust heat recovery heating system showed insignificant effects on engine performance and maintenance requirements. From measurements, it was determined that the amount of heat recovered from the system was about 50% of the heat energy contained in the exhaust (heat contained in exhaust was evaluated based on environment temperature). The estimated payback time for 100% use of recovered heat would be less than 3 years at a fuel price of $3.50 per gallon, an interest rate of 10%, and an engine operation of 8 hours per day. Based on experimental data, the synthetic fuel contained slightly less heat energy and fewer emissions. Test results obtained from adding different levels of a small amount of hydrogen into the intake manifold of a diesel-operated engine showed no effect on exhaust heat content. In other words, both synthetic fuel and conventional diesel with a small amount of hydrogen may not have a significant enough effect on the amount of recoverable heat and its feasibility. An economic analysis computer program was developed on Visual Basic for Application in Microsoft Excel. The program was developed to be user friendly, to accept different levels of input data, and to expand for other heat recovery applications (i.e., power, desalination, etc.) by adding into the program the simulation subroutines of the desired applications. The developed program has been validated using experimental data.

Chuen-Sen Lin

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

19

Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the after-treatment of automotive exhaust particulates and marine diesel exhaust NOx  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The trend in environmental legislation is such that primary engine modifications will not be sufficient to meet all future emissions requirements and exhaust aftertreatment technologies will need to be employed. One potential solution that is well placed to meet those requirements is non-thermal plasma technology. This paper will describe our work with some of our partners in the development of a plasma based diesel particulate filter (DPF) and plasma assisted catalytic reduction (PACR) for NOx removal. This paper describes the development of non-thermal plasma technology for the aftertreatment of particulates from a passenger car engine and NOx from a marine diesel exhaust application.

McAdams, R; Beech, P; Gillespie, R; Guy, C; Jones,S; Liddell, T; Morgan, R; Shawcross, J; Weeks, D; Hughes, D; Oesterle, J; Eberspdcher,

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

20

Microwave-Regenerated Diesel Exhaust Particulate Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of a microwave-regenerated particulate filter system has evolved from bench scale work to actual diesel engine experimentation. The filter system was initially evaluated on a stationary mounted 1.2-L diesel engine and was able to remove a significant amount of carbon particles from the exhaust. The ability of the microwave energy to regenerate or clean the filter was also demonstrated on this engine under idle conditions. Based on the 1.2-L experiments, improvements to the filter design and materials were implemented and the system was re-evaluated on a vehicle equipped with a 7.3-L diesel engine. The 7.3-L engine was selected to achieve heavy filter loading in a relatively short period of time. The purpose of these experiments was to evaluate filter-loading capacity, power requirements for regeneration, and filter regeneration efficiency. A more detailed evaluation of the filter was performed on a stationary mounted 1.9-L diesel engine. The effect of exhaust flow rate, loading, transients, and regeneration on filter efficiency was evaluated with this setup. In addition, gaseous exhaust emissions were investigated with and without an oxidation catalyst on the filter cartridge during loading and regeneration. (SAE Paper SAE-2001-01-0903 2001 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

Nixdorf, Richard D. (Industrial Ceramic Solution, LLC); Green, Johney Boyd; Story, John M.; Wagner, Robert M. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

2001-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require absolute exhaustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

Kappatou, A.; Delabie, E. [FOM Institute DIFFER - Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Jaspers, R. J. E.; Jakobs, M. A. [Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Marchuk, O.; Biel, W. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Julich (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Exhaust gas clean up process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ is described. The method involves prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO/sub x/ and SO/sub 2/, and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO/sub x/ is removed as N/sub 2/ gas or nitrogen sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a valuable sulfate salt. 4 figs.

Walker, R.J.

1988-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

23

ARM - Field Campaign - Absolute Solar Transmittance Interferometer...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsAbsolute Solar Transmittance Interferometer (ASTI) Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Absolute...

24

Pseudo-Exhaustive Testing for Software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... for pseudo-exhaustive testing in digital circuits, but ... Conference on Software Engineering (ICSE), St ... Available on-line: http://www.library.adelaide.edu ...

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

25

Exhaust gas bypass valve control for thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of controlling engine exhaust flow through at least one of an exhaust bypass and a thermoelectric device via a bypass valve is provided. The method includes: determining a mass flow of exhaust exiting an engine; determining a desired exhaust pressure based on the mass flow of exhaust; comparing the desired exhaust pressure to a determined exhaust pressure; and determining a bypass valve control value based on the comparing, wherein the bypass valve control value is used to control the bypass valve.

Reynolds, Michael G; Yang, Jihui; Meisner, Greogry P.; Stabler, Francis R.; De Bock, Hendrik Pieter (Peter) Jacobus; Anderson, Todd Alan

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

26

Exhaust aftertreatment using plasma-assisted catalysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the field of catalysis, one application that has been classified as a breakthrough technology is the catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} in oxygen-rich environments using hydrocarbons. This breakthrough will require dramatic improvements in both catalyst and engine technology, but the benefits will be substantial for energy efficiency and a cleaner environment. Engine and automobile companies are placing greater emphasis on the diesel engine because of its potential for saving fuel resources and reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. The modern direct-injection diesel engine offers demonstrated fuel economy advantages unmatched by any other commercially-viable engine. The main drawback of diesel engines is exhaust emissions. A modification of existing oxidation catalyst/engine technology is being used to address the CO, hydrocarbon and particulates. However, no satisfactory solution currently exists for NO{sub x}. Diesel engines operate under net oxidizing conditions, thus rendering conventional three-way catalytic converters ineffective for the controlling the NO{sub x} emission. NO{sub x} reduction catalysts, using ammonia as a reductant, do exist for oxygen-rich exhausts; however, for transportation applications, the use of on-board hydrocarbon fuels is a more feasible, cost-effective, and environmentally-sound approach. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) by hydrocarbons is one of the leading catalytic aftertreatment technologies for the reduction of NO{sub x} in lean-burn engine exhaust (often referred to as lean-NO{sub x}). The objective is to chemically reduce the pollutant molecules of NO{sub x} to benign molecules such as N{sub 2}. Aftertreatment schemes have focused a great deal on the reduction of NO because the NO{sub x} in engine exhaust is composed primarily of NO. Recent studies, however, have shown that the oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} serves an important role in enhancing the efficiency for reduction of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2}. It has become apparent that preconverting NO to NO{sub 2} could improve both the efficiency and durability of lean-NO{sub x} catalysts. A non-thermal plasma is an efficient means for selective partial oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2}. The use of a non-thermal plasma in combination with a lean-NO{sub x} catalyst opens the opportunity for catalysts that are more efficient and more durable compared to conventional catalysts. In the absence of hydrocarbons, the O radicals will oxidize NO to NO{sub 2}, and the OH radicals will further oxidize NO{sub 2} to nitric acid. In plasma-assisted catalysis it is important that the plasma oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} without further producing acids.

Penetrante, B

2000-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

27

Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices; Modeling Exhaust Dispersion for Specifying Acceptable Exhaust/Intake Design (Brochure)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides general information on specifying acceptable exhaust and intake designs. It also provides various quantitative approaches that can be used to determine expected concentration levels resulting from exhaust system emissions. In addition, the guide describes methodologies that can be employed to operate laboratory exhaust systems in a safe and energy efficient manner by using variable air volume (VAV) technology. The guide, one in a series on best practices for laboratories, was produced by Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21), a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Geared toward architects, engineers, and facility managers, the guides contain information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories. Studies show a direct relationship between indoor air quality and the health and productivity of building occupants. Historically, the study and protection of indoor air quality focused on emission sources emanating from within the building. For example, to ensure that the worker is not exposed to toxic chemicals, 'as manufactured' and 'as installed' containment specifications are required for fume hoods. However, emissions from external sources, which may be re-ingested into the building through closed circuiting between the building's exhaust stacks and air intakes, are an often overlooked aspect of indoor air quality.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Software assurance by bounded exhaustive testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The contribution of this paper is an experiment that shows the potential value of a combination of selective reverse engineering to formal specifications and bounded exhaustive testing to improve the assurance levels of complex software. A key problem ... Keywords: TestEra, automated test case generation, bounded exhaustive testing, formal methods, reverse engineering, specification-based testing

Kevin Sullivan; Jinlin Yang; David Coppit; Sarfraz Khurshid; Daniel Jackson

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine  

SciTech Connect

An exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine comprises an exhaust driven turbocharger having a low pressure turbine outlet in fluid communication with an exhaust gas conduit. The turbocharger also includes a low pressure compressor intake and a high pressure compressor outlet in communication with an intake air conduit. An exhaust gas recirculation conduit fluidly communicates with the exhaust gas conduit to divert a portion of exhaust gas to a low pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extending between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and an engine intake system for delivery of exhaust gas thereto. A high pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extends between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and the compressor intake and delivers exhaust gas to the compressor for mixing with a compressed intake charge for delivery to the intake system.

Wu, Ko-Jen

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

30

Cellular Response to Diesel Exhaust Particles Strongly Depends...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cellular Response to Diesel Exhaust Particles Strongly Depends on the Exposure Method Title Cellular Response to Diesel Exhaust Particles Strongly Depends on the Exposure Method...

31

Centrifugal exhauster driven by steam turbine achieves 55% energy savings  

SciTech Connect

A steam turbine/centrifugal exhauster system is being used in a felt dewatering operation in a Michigan pulp and papermill at a hp energy savings of 55%. The system operates at 170 bhp, replacing 375 hp used for conventional liquid ring vacuum pumps. The steam turbine utilizes 450 psig steam into the turbine with a 50 psig back pressure on the discharge side. The mill has also installed an additional felt dewatering box that was never employed before the exhauster system was installed. Since operation first began, the mill reports equal or improved dewatering compared to the previous liquid ring system. The hot air discharge is utilized to heat the machine room wet end area, replacing some space heater requirements.

Bonady, F.M.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Variable Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences Percent of Projections Over- Estimated Gross Domestic Product Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2) 1.0 42.6 Petroleum Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a) 35.2 18.6 Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b) 34.7 19.7 Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4) 6.2 66.5 Crude Oil Production (Table 5) 6.0 59.6 Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6) 13.3 67.0 Natural Gas Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Constant $) (Table 7a) 30.7 26.1 Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Nominal $) (Table 7b) 30.0 27.1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (Table 8) 7.8 70.2 Natural Gas Production (Table 9) 7.1 66.0 Natural Gas Net Imports (Table 10) 29.3 69.7 Coal Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants (Constant $)** (Table 11a)

33

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Brett C. Singer, William W. Delp, Michael G. Apte, Philip N. Price Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California, 94720 November 2011 Direct funding for this research was provided by the California Energy Commission through Contracts 500-05-026 and 500-08-061. Institutional support is provided to LBNL by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science under Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. LBNL-5265E-r1(3) Singer et al., Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices LBNL-5265E-r1(3) Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Brett C. Singer 1

34

Two phase exhaust for internal combustion engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An internal combustion engine having a reciprocating multi cylinder internal combustion engine with multiple valves. At least a pair of exhaust valves are provided and each supply a separate power extraction device. The first exhaust valves connect to a power turbine used to provide additional power to the engine either mechanically or electrically. The flow path from these exhaust valves is smaller in area and volume than a second flow path which is used to deliver products of combustion to a turbocharger turbine. The timing of the exhaust valve events is controlled to produce a higher grade of energy to the power turbine and enhance the ability to extract power from the combustion process.

Vuk, Carl T. (Denver, IA)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

35

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Title Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-5265E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Singer, Brett C., William W. Delp, Michael G. Apte, and Phillip N. Price Journal Indoor Air Volume 22 Issue 3 Pagination 224-234 Date Published 06/2012 Keywords carbon monoxide, natural gas burners, nitrogen dioxide, range hood, task ventilation, unvented combustion, indoor environment group, Range Hood Test Facility Abstract The performance metrics of airflow, sound, and combustion product capture efficiency (CE) were measured for a convenience sample of fifteen cooking exhaust devices, as installed in residences. Results were analyzed to quantify the impact of various device- and installation-dependent parameters on CE. Measured maximum airflows were 70% or lower than values noted on product literature for 10 of the devices. Above-the-cooktop devices with flat bottom surfaces (no capture hood) - including exhaust fan/microwave combination appliances - were found to have much lower CE at similar flow rates, compared to devices with capture hoods. For almost all exhaust devices and especially for rear-mounted downdraft exhaust and microwaves, CE was substantially higher for back compared with front burner use. Flow rate, and the extent to which the exhaust device extends over the burners that are in use, also had a large effect on CE. A flow rate of 95 liters per second (200 cubic feet per minute) was necessary, but not sufficient, to attain capture efficiency in excess of 75% for the front burners. A-weighted sound levels in kitchens exceeded 57 dB when operating at the highest fan setting for all 14 devices evaluated for sound performance.

36

Solid State Electrochemical Sensors for Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Detection in Lean Exhaust Gases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exhaust Aftertreatment System for Diesel Engine", SAE 2002-Exhaust Aftertreatment System for Diesel Engine", SAE 2002-

Rheaume, Jonathan Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Exhaust purification with on-board ammonia production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of ammonia production for a selective catalytic reduction system is provided. The method includes producing an exhaust gas stream within a cylinder group, wherein the first exhaust gas stream includes NOx. The exhaust gas stream may be supplied to an exhaust passage and cooled to a predetermined temperature range, and at least a portion of the NOx within the exhaust gas stream my be converted into ammonia.

Robel, Wade J. (Peoria, IL); Driscoll, James Joshua (Dunlap, IL); Coleman, Gerald N. (Helpston, GB)

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

38

Exhaust purification with on-board ammonia production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system of ammonia production for a selective catalytic reduction system is provided. The system includes producing an exhaust gas stream within a cylinder group, wherein the first exhaust gas stream includes NOx. The exhaust gas stream may be supplied to an exhaust passage and cooled to a predetermined temperature range, and at least a portion of the NOx within the exhaust gas stream may be converted into ammonia.

Robel, Wade J. (Peoria, IL); Driscoll, James Joshua (Dunlap, IL); Coleman, Gerald N. (Peterborough, GB)

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

39

Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance metrics of airflow, sound, and combustion product capture efficiency (CE) were measured for a convenience sample of fifteen cooking exhaust devices, as installed in residences. Results were analyzed to quantify the impact of various device- and installation-dependent parameters on CE. Measured maximum airflows were 70% or lower than values noted on product literature for 10 of the devices. Above-the-cooktop devices with flat bottom surfaces (no capture hood) including exhaust fan/microwave combination appliances were found to have much lower CE at similar flow rates, compared to devices with capture hoods. For almost all exhaust devices and especially for rear-mounted downdraft exhaust and microwaves, CE was substantially higher for back compared with front burner use. Flow rate, and the extent to which the exhaust device extends over the burners that are in use, also had a large effect on CE. A flow rate of 95 liters per second (200 cubic feet per minute) was necessary, but not sufficient, to attain capture efficiency in excess of 75% for the front burners. A-weighted sound levels in kitchens exceeded 57 dB when operating at the highest fan setting for all 14 devices evaluated for sound performance.

Singer, Brett C.; Delp, William W.; Apte, Michael G.; Price, Philip N.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Is the Midlatitude Zonal Flow Absolutely Unstable?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis is performed of the growth and propagation of unstable baroclinic wave packets in relatively realistic midlatitude zonal currents. The absolute growth rates are calculated, incorporating the effects of both Ekman friction and ...

S. J. Lin; R. T. Pierrehumbert

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require absolute exhaustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Achieving Climate Change Absolute Accuracy in Orbit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission will provide a calibration laboratory in orbit for the purpose of accurately measuring and attributing climate change. CLARREO measurements establish new climate change ...

Bruce A. Wielicki; D. F. Young; M. G. Mlynczak; K. J. Thome; S. Leroy; J. Corliss; J. G. Anderson; C.O. Ao; R. Bantges; F. Best; K. Bowman; H. Brindley; J. J. Butler; W. Collins; J. A. Dykema; D. R. Doelling; D. R. Feldman; N. Fox; X. Huang; R. Holz; Y. Huang; Z. Jin; D. Jennings; D. G. Johnson; K. Jucks; S. Kato; D. B. Kirk-Davidoff; R. Knuteson; G. Kopp; D. P. Kratz; X. Liu; C. Lukashin; A. J. Mannucci; N. Phojanamongkolkij; P. Pilewskie; V. Ramaswamy; H. Revercomb; J. Rice; Y. Roberts; C. M. Roithmayr; F. Rose; S. Sandford; E. L. Shirley; W.L. Smith; Sr.; B. Soden; P. W. Speth; W. Sun; P.C. Taylor; D. Tobin; X. Xiong

42

Absolute Energy USA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ansgar, Iowa Zip 50472 Product Absolute Energy has built a 100 million gallon per year ethanol plant on the Iowa-Minnesota border near Lyle, Minnesota. Plant was commissioned in...

43

New-generation absolute angle sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes new schemes for absolute angle sensors designed on the modern element base (megapixel CCD- and CMOS-matrices). In these schemes communication between a measured object and a receiving module is organized through an optical channel ...

Yu. A. Grodetskii; Yu. E. Dukarevich; Yu. M. Ivanov

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

NOX REDUCTION FOR LEAN EXHAUST USING PLASMA ASSISTED CATALYSIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Currently CARB estimates on road diesel vehicles contribute 50% of the NOX and 78% of the particulates being discharged from mobile sources. Diesel emissions obviously must be reduced if future air quality targets are to be met. A critical technological barrier exists because there are no commercial technologies available, which can reduce NOX from diesel (lean), exhaust containing 5-15% O2 concentration. One promising approach to reducing NOX and particulates from diesel exhaust is to use a combination of plasma with catalyst. Plasma can be generated thermally or non-thermally. Thermal plasma is formed by heating the system to an exceedingly high temperature (>2000 C). High temperature requirements for plasma makes thermal plasma inefficient and requires skillful thermal management and hence is considered impractical for mobile applications. Non-thermal plasma directs electrical energy into the creation of free electrons, which in turn react with gaseous species thus creating plasma. A combination of non-thermal plasma with catalysts can be referred to Plasma Assisted Catalysts or PAC. PAC technology has been demonstrated in stationary sources where non-thermal plasma catalysis is carried out in presence of NH3 as a reductant. In stationary applications NO is oxidized to HNO3 and then into ammonium nitrate where it is condensed and removed. This approach is impractical for mobile application because of the ammonia requirement and the ultimate mechanism by which NOX is removed. However, if a suitable catalyst can be found which can use onboard fuel as reductant then the technology holds a considerable promise. NOX REDUCTION FOR LEAN EXHAUST USING PLASMA ASSISTED CATALYSIS Ralph Slone, B. Bhatt and Victor Puchkarev NOXTECH INC. In addition to the development of an effective catalyst, a non-thermal plasma reactor needs be scaled and demonstrated along with a reliable and cost effective plasma power source and onboard HC source needs to be proven. Under the work sponsored by DOE and SCAQMD Noxtech is developing a cost effective and reliable PAC system for mobile applications. The goal of the program is to develop a suitable catalyst with the ability to remove high levels of NOx at reasonable space velocities. This new catalyst will then be used to scale the technology to treat exhaust from 80Hp engine and eventually to demonstrate the technology on 200 and 400 Hp engine applications. Using the 2004 EPA proposed regulation as a standard, it is clear in order for PAC system to be commercially viable it needs to remove NOX by 70% or better. It is further assumed from past experience that 30,000 HR-1 space velocities are necessary to ensure a good compact design.

Bhatt, B.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

45

Lidar Observations of Aircraft Exhaust Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of field campaigns has been made at British airports using a rapid-scanning lidar and other instrumentation in order to measure the dispersion of exhaust plumes from commercial aircraft. The lidar operated at a wavelength of 355 nm and ...

Michael Bennett; Simon Christie; Angus Graham; David Raper

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of Domain Composition...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of Domain Composition and Nanoscale Size Distribution Explains Performance in Solar Cells Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of...

47

The Biodiesel Handbook, 2nd Edition Chapter 7 Exhaust Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Biodiesel Handbook, 2nd Edition Chapter 7 Exhaust Emissions Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Biofuels - Bioproducts eChapters Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 7 Exhaust Emissions from ...

48

Absolut Energy Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Absolut Energy Capital Absolut Energy Capital Jump to: navigation, search Name Absolut Energy Capital Place London, England, United Kingdom Zip W1H - 6HN Sector Renewable Energy Product London-based private equity firm. The firm offers financing for renewable energy ventures. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

49

Steam atmosphere drying concepts using steam exhaust recompression  

SciTech Connect

In the US industrial drying accounts for approximately 1.5 quads of energy use per year. Annual industrial dryer expenditures are estimated to be in the $500 million range. Industrial drying is a significant energy and monetary expense. For the thermal drying processes in which water is removed via evaporation from the feedstock, attempts have been made to reduce the consumption of energy using exhaust waste heat recovery techniques, improved dryer designs, or even the deployment of advanced mechanical dewatering techniques. Despite these efforts, it is obvious that a large amount of thermal energy is often still lost if the latent heat of evaporation from the evaporated water cannot be recovered and/or in some way be utilized as direct heat input into the dryer. Tecogen Inc. is conducting research and development on an industrial drying concept. That utilizes a directly or indirectly superheated steam cycle atmosphere with exhaust steam recompression to recover the latent heat in the exhaust that would otherwise be lost. This approach has the potential to save 55 percent of the energy required by a conventional air dryer. Other advantages to the industrial dryer user include: A 35-percent reduction in the yearly cost per kg{sub evap} to dry wet feedstock, Reduced airborne emissions, Reduced dry dust fire/explosion risks, Hot product not exposed to oxygen thus, the product quality is enhanced, Constant rate drying in steam atmosphere, Reduced dryer size and cost, Reduced dryer heat losses due to lower dryer inlet temperatures. Tecogen has projected that the steam atmosphere drying system is most suitable as a replacement technology for state-of-the-art spray, flash, and fluidized bed drying systems. Such systems are utilized in the food and kindred products; rubber products; chemical and allied products; stone, clay, and glass; textiles; and pulp and paper industrial sectors.

DiBella, F.A. [TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Steam atmosphere drying concepts using steam exhaust recompression  

SciTech Connect

In the US industrial drying accounts for approximately 1.5 quads of energy use per year. Annual industrial dryer expenditures are estimated to be in the $500 million range. Industrial drying is a significant energy and monetary expense. For the thermal drying processes in which water is removed via evaporation from the feedstock, attempts have been made to reduce the consumption of energy using exhaust waste heat recovery techniques, improved dryer designs, or even the deployment of advanced mechanical dewatering techniques. Despite these efforts, it is obvious that a large amount of thermal energy is often still lost if the latent heat of evaporation from the evaporated water cannot be recovered and/or in some way be utilized as direct heat input into the dryer. Tecogen Inc. is conducting research and development on an industrial drying concept. That utilizes a directly or indirectly superheated steam cycle atmosphere with exhaust steam recompression to recover the latent heat in the exhaust that would otherwise be lost. This approach has the potential to save 55 percent of the energy required by a conventional air dryer. Other advantages to the industrial dryer user include: A 35-percent reduction in the yearly cost per kg[sub evap] to dry wet feedstock, Reduced airborne emissions, Reduced dry dust fire/explosion risks, Hot product not exposed to oxygen thus, the product quality is enhanced, Constant rate drying in steam atmosphere, Reduced dryer size and cost, Reduced dryer heat losses due to lower dryer inlet temperatures. Tecogen has projected that the steam atmosphere drying system is most suitable as a replacement technology for state-of-the-art spray, flash, and fluidized bed drying systems. Such systems are utilized in the food and kindred products; rubber products; chemical and allied products; stone, clay, and glass; textiles; and pulp and paper industrial sectors.

DiBella, F.A. (TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Nonthermal aftertreatment of diesel engine exhaust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ultimate objective of this work has been to develop a nonthermal plasma process to reduce NO{sub x} in diesel exhaust gas. A secondary objective has been to study the possibility of particulate matter (soot) reduction by the same technique. The early work revealed a fundamental difficulty with this NO{sub x} reduction approach in the gas environment of the diesel engine exhaust. These observations necessitated a thorough study of the unfavorable chemistry in the hope that knowledge of the chemical mechanism would offer an opportunity to make the approach useful for NO{sub x} reduction. Whereas fundamental understanding of the mechanism has been obtained, the authors have not found any measure that would make the approach meet its original objective.

Wallman, P.H.; Hsiao, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Penetrante, B.M.; Vogtlin, G.E.

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

52

Diesel exhaust filter uses steel wool  

SciTech Connect

Researchers are experimenting with a diesel exhaust filter which can use either steel wool or wire mesh as the filter medium. By using alumina coated metal wool as the filter matrix, submicron-sized particulate emissions may be recovered. The particulate trapping efficiency of this kind of filter depends on the amount of alumina applied to it, and its physical dimensions. Surface area, which is a function of all of these, correlates well with trapping efficiency.

Not Available

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Operational test report, 500 CFM portable exhauster  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 500 cubic foot per minute (CFM) portable exhauster system was fabricated for use on 241-A-101 [a Hydrogen Watch List tank] during saltwell pumping activities. An operational test was performed on this unit during 9/20/96 through 1O/14/96 in the 241-A Tank Farm. This operational test was done in accordance with OTP-060-001 Rev 0 (See Appendix A of this report). The test was performed with exceptions.

Nelson, O.D.

1997-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

An Estimate of Global Absolute Dynamic Topography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We estimate the absolute dynamic topography of the world ocean from the largest scales to a short-wavelength cutoff of about 6700 km for the period July through September 1978. The data base consisted of the time-averaged sea-surface topography ...

Chang-Kou Tai; Carl Wunsch

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Exhaust gas recirculation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operates by injecting liquid fuel directly in a combustion chamber, and mixing the fuel with recirculated exhaust and fresh air through an auto ignition condition of the fuel. The engine includes at least one turbocharger for extracting energy from the engine exhaust and using that energy to boost intake pressure of recirculated exhaust gas and fresh air. Elevated proportions of exhaust gas recirculated to the engine are attained by throttling the fresh air inlet supply. These elevated exhaust gas recirculation rates allow the HCCI engine to be operated at higher speeds and loads rendering the HCCI engine a more viable alternative to a conventional diesel engine.

Duffy, Kevin P. (Metamora, IL); Kieser, Andrew J. (Morton, IL); Rodman, Anthony (Chillicothe, IL); Liechty, Michael P. (Chillicothe, IL); Hergart, Carl-Anders (Peoria, IL); Hardy, William L. (Peoria, IL)

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

56

Absolute Energy Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Absolute Energy Capital Absolute Energy Capital Place London, United Kingdom Zip SW1Y 5NQ Product London-based private equity firm. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

57

Catalysts for lean burn engine exhaust abatement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a process for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxides in an exhaust gas stream containing nitrogen oxides and a reductant material by contacting the gas stream under conditions effective to catalytically reduce the nitrogen oxides with a catalyst comprising a aluminum-silicate type material and a minor amount of a metal, the catalyst characterized as having sufficient catalytic activity so as to reduce the nitrogen oxides by at least 60 percent under temperatures within the range of from about 200.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C.

Ott, Kevin C. (Los Alamos, NM); Clark, Noline C. (Jemez Springs, NM); Paffett, Mark T. (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Catalysts For Lean Burn Engine Exhaust Abatement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a process for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxides in an exhaust gas stream containing nitrogen oxides and a reductant material by contacting the gas stream under conditions effective to catalytically reduce the nitrogen oxides with a catalyst comprising a aluminum-silicate type material and a minor amount of a metal, the catalyst characterized as having sufficient catalytic activity so as to reduce the nitrogen oxides by at least 60 percent under temperatures within the range of from about 200.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C.

Ott, Kevin C. (Los Alamos, NM); Clark, Noline C. (Jemez Springs, NM); Paffett, Mark T. (Los Alamos, NM)

2004-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

59

Process Test Plan Shutdown P16 Exhauster  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Process Test Plan was written to gather temperature data to determine the amount of heat load remaining in tank 241-C-106. This process test plan is being conducted to gather the temperature data necessary to determine how much of the initial heat load is still left in 241-C-106. The heat load will be determined by shutting off the C-106 exhaust system, monitoring the change in tank temperature, and plugging the resulting data into the thermal model for this tank.

PARKMAN, D.B.

2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

60

Exhaust gas purification system for lean burn engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exhaust gas purification system for a lean burn engine includes a thermal mass unit and a NO.sub.x conversion catalyst unit downstream of the thermal mass unit. The NO.sub.x conversion catalyst unit includes at least one catalyst section. Each catalyst section includes a catalytic layer for converting NO.sub.x coupled to a heat exchanger. The heat exchanger portion of the catalyst section acts to maintain the catalytic layer substantially at a desired temperature and cools the exhaust gas flowing from the catalytic layer into the next catalytic section in the series. In a further aspect of the invention, the exhaust gas purification system includes a dual length exhaust pipe upstream of the NO.sub.x conversion catalyst unit. The dual length exhaust pipe includes a second heat exchanger which functions to maintain the temperature of the exhaust gas flowing into the thermal mass downstream near a desired average temperature.

Haines, Leland Milburn (Northville, MI)

2002-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require absolute exhaustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Apparatus for recovery of heat from exhaust gases of dryer  

SciTech Connect

Apparatus and method are disclosed for recovery of heat from exhaust gases of dryers and return of heat to the dryer system. Fresh air is drawn through a plurality of tubes in heat exchange relation to heated exhaust gases and introduced into the drying system without intermingling of contaminated exhaust gases with the heated fresh air. The apparatus and method have particular utility in gas-fired commercial and industrial laundry dryers.

Winstel, F.H.

1977-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

62

Waste Heat Recovery from Industrial Smelting Exhaust Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a cost efficient capture of more valuable heat (higher exergy), heat exchangers should operate on the exhaust gases upstream of the gas treatment plants.

63

Assessment of the 3430 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed a demonstration to determine the acceptable location in which to place an air sampling probe for emissions monitoring for radionuclides in the exhaust air discharge from the new 3430 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack. The method was to adopt the results of a previously performed test series for a system of similar configuration, followed by a partial test on the actual system to verify the applicability of previously performed tests. The qualification criteria included 1) a uniform air velocity, 2) an average flow angle that does not deviate from the axis of the duct by more than 20, 3) a uniform concentration of tracer gases, and 4) a uniform concentration of tracer particles. Section 1 provides background information for the demonstration, and Section 2 describes the test strategy, including the criteria for the applicability of model results and the test matrix. Section 3 describes the flow -angle test and the velocity uniformity test, Section 4 provides the test results, and Section 5 provides the conclusions. Appendix A includes the test data sheets, and Appendix B gives applicable qualification results from the previously tested model stack. The data from the previously tested and similarly designed stack was demonstrated to be applicable to the current design for the 3430 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack. The 3430 stack was tested in both January and May of 2010 to document the results of several changes that were made to the exhaust system after the January tests. The 3430 stack meets the qualification criteria given in the American National Standards Institute/Health Physics Society N13.1 standard. Changes to the system configuration or operations outside of the bounds of this report (e.g., exhaust velocity increases, relocation of sample probe) will require retesting/reevaluation to determine compliancewith the requirements.

Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

64

GASOLINE VEHICLE EXHAUST PARTICLE SAMPLING STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Minnesota collaborated with the Paul Scherrer Institute, the University of Wisconsin (UWI) and Ricardo, Inc to physically and chemically characterize the exhaust plume from recruited gasoline spark ignition (SI) vehicles. The project objectives were: (1) Measure representative particle size distributions from a set of on-road SI vehicles and compare these data to similar data collected on a small subset of light-duty gasoline vehicles tested on a chassis dynamometer with a dilution tunnel using the Unified Drive Cycle, at both room temperature (cold start) and 0 C (cold-cold start). (2) Compare data collected from SI vehicles to similar data collected from Diesel engines during the Coordinating Research Council E-43 project. (3) Characterize on-road aerosol during mixed midweek traffic and Sunday midday periods and determine fleet-specific emission rates. (4) Characterize bulk- and size-segregated chemical composition of the particulate matter (PM) emitted in the exhaust from the gasoline vehicles. Particle number concentrations and size distributions are strongly influenced by dilution and sampling conditions. Laboratory methods were evaluated to dilute SI exhaust in a way that would produce size distributions that were similar to those measured during laboratory experiments. Size fractionated samples were collected for chemical analysis using a nano-microorifice uniform deposit impactor (nano-MOUDI). In addition, bulk samples were collected and analyzed. A mixture of low, mid and high mileage vehicles were recruited for testing during the study. Under steady highway cruise conditions a significant particle signature above background was not measured, but during hard accelerations number size distributions for the test fleet were similar to modern heavy-duty Diesel vehicles. Number emissions were much higher at high speed and during cold-cold starts. Fuel specific number emissions range from 1012 to 3 x 1016 particles/kg fuel. A simple relationship between number and mass emissions was not observed. Data were collected on-road to compare weekday with weekend air quality around the Twin Cities area. This portion of the study resulted in the development of a method to apportion the Diesel and SI contribution to on-road aerosol.

Kittelson, D; Watts, W; Johnson, J; Zarling, D Schauer,J Kasper, K; Baltensperger, U; Burtscher, H

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

65

Standardization of the cumulative absolute velocity  

SciTech Connect

EPRI NP-5930, A Criterion for Determining Exceedance of the Operating Basis Earthquake,'' was published in July 1988. As defined in that report, the Operating Basis Earthquake (OBE) is exceeded when both a response spectrum parameter and a second damage parameter, referred to as the Cumulative Absolute Velocity (CAV), are exceeded. In the review process of the above report, it was noted that the calculation of CAV could be confounded by time history records of long duration containing low (nondamaging) acceleration. Therefore, it is necessary to standardize the method of calculating CAV to account for record length. This standardized methodology allows consistent comparisons between future CAV calculations and the adjusted CAV threshold value based upon applying the standardized methodology to the data set presented in EPRI NP-5930. The recommended method to standardize the CAV calculation is to window its calculation on a second-by-second basis for a given time history. If the absolute acceleration exceeds 0.025g at any time during each one second interval, the earthquake records used in EPRI NP-5930 have been reanalyzed and the adjusted threshold of damage for CAV was found to be 0.16g-set.

O'Hara, T.F.; Jacobson, J.P. (Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Review of Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment Programs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) and its predecessor organizations have maintained aggressive projects in diesel exhaust aftertreatment since 1993. The Energy Policy Act of 1992, Section 2027, specifically authorized DOE to help accelerate the ability of U. S. diesel engine manufacturers to meet emissions regulations while maintaining the compression ignition engines inherently high efficiency. A variety of concepts and devices have been evaluated for NOx and Particulate matter (PM) control. Additionally, supporting technology in diagnostics for catalysis, PM measurement, and catalyst/reductant systems are being developed. This paper provides a summary of technologies that have been investigated and provides recent results from ongoing DOE-sponsored R and D. NOx control has been explored via active NOx catalysis, several plasma-assisted systems, electrochemical cells, and fuel additives. Both catalytic and non-catalytic filter technologies have been investigated for PM control.

Ronald L. Graves

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

67

Harmful Exhaust Emissions Monitoring of Road Vehicle Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Road vehicle improve the quality of people's life, however harmful vehicle exhaust emissions, such as carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), hydrocarbon (HC), and sulphur dioxide (SO2), have become more and more unacceptable ... Keywords: optic absorption spectroscopy based gas sensor, harmful exhaust emission monitoring, engine vibration

Chuliang Wei; Zhemin Zhuang; H. Ewald; A. I. Al-Shamma'a

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The exhaust gas refrigeration and the pollutants variation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work examines the exhaust gas temperature influence in CO2, CO, HC emissions in a fourstroke gasoline engine. The experiments have shown that the reduction of exhaust gas temperature has as a result the reduction of CO2, CO, ... Keywords: CO, CO2, HC, gas emissions, gas temperature

Charalampos Arapatsakos; Anastasios Karkanis; Stella Maria Strofylla

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Acceptance test procedure for SY Tank Farm replacement exhauster unit  

SciTech Connect

The proper functioning of a new 241-SY Tank Farm replacement exhauster will be acceptance tested, to establish operability and to provide an operational baseline for the equipment. During this test, a verification of all of the alarm and control circuits associated with the exhaust, which provide operating controls and/or signals to local and remote alarm/annunciator panels, shall be performed. Test signals for sensors that provide alarms, warnings, and/or interlocks will be applied to verify that alarm, warning, and interlock setpoints are correct. Alarm and warning lights, controls, and local and remote readouts for the exhauster will be verified to be adequate for proper operation of the exhauster. Testing per this procedure shall be conducted in two phases. The first phase of testing, to verify alarm, warning, and interlock setpoints primarily, will be performed in the MO-566 Fab Shop. The second phase of testing, to verify proper operation and acceptable interface with other tank farm systems, will be conducted after the exhauster and all associated support and monitoring equipment have been installed in the SY Tank Farm. The exhauster, which is mounted on a skid and which will eventually be located in the SY tank farm, receives input signals from a variety of sensors mounted on the skid and associated equipment. These sensors provide information such as: exhauster system inlet vacuum pressure; prefilter and HEPA filter differential pressures; exhaust stack sampler status; exhaust fan status; system status (running/shut down); and radiation monitoring systems status. The output of these sensors is transmitted to the exhauster annunciator panel where the signals are displayed and monitored for out-of-specification conditions.

Becken, G.W.

1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

70

Field Study of Exhaust Fans for Mitigating Indoor Air Quality Problems: Final Report to Bonneville Power Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Mechanical Ventilation Exhaust Fans Air-to-Air Heatexpected from exhaust fan A-I Infiltration contribution toIndoor Air Quality -- Exhaust Fan Mitigation" Final Report

Grimsrud, David T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices Guide: Modeling Exhaust Dispersion for Specifying Acceptable Exhaust/Intake Design (Brochure)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

L L a b o r a t o r i e s f o r t h e 2 1 s t C e n t u r y : B e s t P r a c t i c e s Modeling exhaust dispersion for specifying acceptable exhaust/intake designs Introduction This guide provides general information on specify- ing acceptable exhaust and intake designs. It also offers various quantitative approaches (dispersion modeling) that can be used to determine expected concentration (or dilution) levels resulting from exhaust system emissions. In addition, the guide describes methodologies that can be employed to operate laboratory exhaust systems in a safe and energy efficient manner by using variable air volume (VAV) technology. The guide, one in a series on best practices for laboratories, was produced by Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21), a joint pro- gram of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

72

Steam atmosphere drying exhaust steam recompression system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a heated steam atmosphere drying system comprising dryer in combination with an exhaust recompression system which is extremely energy efficient and eliminates dangers known to air dryers. The system uses superheated steam as the drying medium, which recirculates through the system where its heat of evaporation and heat of compression is recovered, thereby providing a constant source of heat to the drying chamber. The dryer has inlets whereby feedstock and superheated steam are fed therein. High heat transfer and drying rates are achieved by intimate contact of the superheated steam with the particles being dried. The dryer comprises a vessel which enables the feedstock and steam to enter and recirculate together. When the feedstock becomes dry it will exit the dryer with the steam and become separated from the steam through the use of a curvilinear louver separator (CLS). The CLS enables removal of fine and ultrafine particles from the dryer. Water vapor separated from the particles in the CLS as superheated steam, may then be recovered and recirculated as steam through the use of a compressor to either directly or indirectly heat the dryer, and a heat exchanger or a heater to directly provide heat to the dryer. This system not only provides a very efficient heat transfer system but results in a minimum carry-over of ultrafine particles thereby eliminating any explosive hazard. 17 figures.

Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.; Doyle, E.F.; DiBella, F.A.

1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

73

Steam atmosphere drying exhaust steam recompression system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a heated steam atmosphere drying system comprising dryer in combination with an exhaust recompression system which is extremely energy efficient and eliminates dangers known to air dryers. The system uses superheated steam as the drying medium, which recirculated through the system where its heat of evaporation and heat of compression is recovered, thereby providing a constant source of heat to the drying chamber. The dryer has inlets whereby feedstock and superheated steam are fed therein. High heat transfer and drying rates are achieved by intimate contact of the superheated steam with the particles being dried The dryer comprises a vessel which enables the feedstock and steam to enter recirculate together. When the feedstock becomes dry it will exit the dryer with the steam and become separated from the steam through the use of a curvilinear louver separator (CLS). The CLS enables removal of fine and ultrafine particles from the dryer. Water vapor separated from the particles in the CLS as superheated steam, may then be recovered and recirculated as steam through the use of a compressor to either directly or indirectly heat the dryer, and a heat exchanger or a heater to directly provide heat to the dryer. This system not only provides a very efficient heat transfer system but results in a minimum carry-over of ultrafine particles thereby eliminating any explosive hazard.

Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA); Doyle, Edward F. (Dedham, MA); DiBella, Francis A. (Roslindale, MA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

A Combined Passive Water Vapor Exchanger and Exhaust Gas Diffusion Barrier for Fuel Cell Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel cells operating on hydrocarbon fuels require water vapor injection into the fuel stream for fuel reforming and the prevention of carbon fouling. Compared to active water recovery systems, a passive approach would eliminate the need for a separate water source, pumps, and actuators, and thus reduce parasitic thermal losses. The passive approach developed in this paper employs a capillary pump that recovers the water vapor from the exhaust, while providing a diffusion barrier that prevents exhaust gases from entering the fuel stream. Benchtop proof tests have proven the feasibility of the passive fuel humidifier concept, and have provided a calibration factor for a computational design tool that can be used for industrial applications

Williford, Rick E. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Hatchell, Brian K. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Singh, Prabhakar (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

2002-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

75

Fate of SO{sub 2} During Plasma Treatment of Diesel Engine Exhaust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several catalytic aftertreatment technologies rely on the conversion of NO to NO{sub 2} to achieve efficient reduction of NO{sub x} and particulates in diesel engine exhaust. These technologies require low sulfur fuel because the catalyst component that is active in converting NO to NO{sub 2} is also active in converting SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. A non-thermal plasma can be used for the selective partial oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} in the gas-phase under diesel engine exhaust conditions. This paper discusses how a non-thermal plasma can efficiently oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} without oxidizing SO{sub 2} to SO{sub 3}. It is shown that the presence of hydrocarbons in the plasma is essential for enhancing the selective partial oxidation of NO and suppressing the oxidation of SO{sub 2}.

Brusasco, R.M.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E.

1999-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

76

Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

77

Absolute Spectrophotometry of Northern Compact Planetary Nebulae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present medium-dispersion spectra and narrowband images of six northern compact planetary nebulae (PNe): BoBn 1, DdDm 1, IC 5117, M 1-5, M 1-71, and NGC 6833. From broad-slit spectra, total absolute fluxes and equivalent widths were measured for all observable emission lines. High signal-to noise emission line fluxes of H-alpha, H-beta, [OIII], [NII], and HeI may serve as emission line flux standards for northern hemisphere observers. From narrow-slit spectra, we derive systemic radial velocities. For four PNe, available emission line fluxes were measured with sufficient signal-to-noise to probe the physical properties of their electron densities, temperatures, and chemical abundances. BoBn 1 and DdDm 1, both type IV PNe, have an H-beta flux over three sigma away from previous measurements. We report the first abundance measurements of M 1-71. NGC 6833 measured radial velocity and galactic coordinates suggest that it is associated with the outer arm or possibly the galactic halo, and its low abundance ([O/H]=1.3x10E-4) may be indicative of low metallicity within that region.

S. A. Wright; R. L. M. Corradi; M. Perinotto

2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

78

Two-Sensor System for Absolute Age and Temperature History  

absolute age and/or temperature history of a device or system starting from the time it is assembled or commissioned. Ideally this information could ...

79

DOE News Release - DOE Reduces Petroleum Use and Exhaust Emissions...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Reduces Petroleum Use and Exhaust Emissions by Promoting Electric Vehicle Use in Federal Fleets The U.S. Department of Energy has provided incremental funding to 37 Federal...

80

Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

curves relating airflow to duct static pressure, sound levels, and exhaust gas for centrifugal fan devices. Pollutant capture efficiency (CE) ranged from 98 gas cooking burners emit air pollutants1-3 at rates that can lead to indoor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require absolute exhaustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Particulate measurement issues in diesel exhausts using laser induced incandescence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of studies in the recent past have identified Laser Induced Incandescence (LII) as a versatile technique for in-flame measurement of soot concentrations. Recently, a number of researchers have focused their attention in adapting this technique to measure particulate in diesel exhausts. However the agreement with established physical sampling techniques, such as the EPA recommended filter paper collection method, was found to be less than ideal. This paper reports the efforts to adapt this technique for diesel exhaust characterization. Many of the factors affecting LII signal were identified through computer modeling. Parameters that could not be determined through such a model were determined experimentally following a parametric study. Subsequently, LII measurements were performed in the exhaust of a modified lab burner, with conditions close to that of diesel engine exhausts. Such measurements show excellent agreement with those performed using the standard filter paper collection technique.

Gupta, S. B.; Poola, R. B.; Sekar, R.

2000-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

82

Measuring of exhaust gas emissions using absorption spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an optical fibre sensor for the detection of NOx (NO2 and NO) and CO2 in the exhaust system of a road vehicle. The measurement is based on a free path interaction zone which is interrogated using ... Keywords: absorption spectroscopy, air pollution, carbon dioxide, emissions measurement, exhaust gas emissions, gas sensors, infrared, nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen oxide, optical fibre sensors, ultraviolet, vehicle emissions

Eamonn Hawe; Gerard Dooly; Colin Fitzpatrick; Paul Chambers; Elfed Lewis; W. Z. Zhao; T. Sun; K. T. V. Grattan; M. Degner; H. Ewald; S. Lochmann; G. Bramman; C. Wei; D. Hitchen; J. Lucas; A. Al-Shamma'a; E. Merlone-Borla; P. Faraldi; M. Pidria

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Method and apparatus for processing exhaust gas with corona discharge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is placing a catalyst coating upon surfaces surrounding a volume containing corona discharge. In addition, the electrodes are coated with a robust dielectric material. Further, the electrodes are arranged so that at least a surface portion of each electrode extends into a flow path of the exhaust gas to be treated and there is only exhaust gas in the volume between each pair of electrodes. 12 figs.

Barlow, S.E.; Orlando, T.M.; Tonkyn, R.G.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

84

Removal of sulfur compounds from combustion product exhaust  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device are disclosed for removing sulfur containing contaminents from a combustion product exhaust. The removal process is carried out in two stages wherein the combustion product exhaust is dissolved in water, the water being then heated to drive off the sulfur containing contaminents. The sulfur containing gases are then resolublized in a cold water trap to form a concentrated solution which can then be used as a commercial product.

Cheng, Dah Y. (Palo Alto, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Low-pressure-ratio regenerative exhaust-heated gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

A design study of coal-burning gas-turbine engines using the exhaust-heated cycle and state-of-the-art components has been completed. In addition, some initial experiments on a type of rotary ceramic-matrix regenerator that would be used to transfer heat from the products of coal combustion in the hot turbine exhaust to the cool compressed air have been conducted. Highly favorable results have been obtained on all aspects on which definite conclusions could be drawn.

Tampe, L.A.; Frenkel, R.G.; Kowalick, D.J.; Nahatis, H.M.; Silverstein, S.M.; Wilson, D.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Testing the quasi-absolute method in photon activation analysis  

SciTech Connect

In photon activation analysis (PAA), relative methods are widely used because of their accuracy and precision. Absolute methods, which are conducted without any assistance from calibration materials, are seldom applied for the difficulty in obtaining photon flux in measurements. This research is an attempt to perform a new absolute approach in PAA - quasi-absolute method - by retrieving photon flux in the sample through Monte Carlo simulation. With simulated photon flux and database of experimental cross sections, it is possible to calculate the concentration of target elements in the sample directly. The QA/QC procedures to solidify the research are discussed in detail. Our results show that the accuracy of the method for certain elements is close to a useful level in practice. Furthermore, the future results from the quasi-absolute method can also serve as a validation technique for experimental data on cross sections. The quasi-absolute method looks promising.

Sun, Z. J. [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Wells, D. [Physics Department, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, 501 E. Saint Joseph St. Rapid City, SD 57701 (United States); Starovoitova, V.; Segebade, C. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Idaho State University, 921 S. 8th Ave. Pocatello, ID 83209 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

87

Opacity meter for monitoring exhaust emissions from non-stationary sources  

SciTech Connect

Method and apparatus for determining the opacity of exhaust plumes from moving emissions sources. In operation, a light source is activated at a time prior to the arrival of a diesel locomotive at a measurement point, by means of a track trigger switch or the Automatic Equipment Identification system, such that the opacity measurement is synchronized with the passage of an exhaust plume past the measurement point. A beam of light from the light source passes through the exhaust plume of the locomotive and is detected by a suitable detector, preferably a high-rate photodiode. The light beam is well-collimated and is preferably monochromatic, permitting the use of a narrowband pass filter to discriminate against background light. In order to span a double railroad track and provide a beam which is substantially stronger than background, the light source, preferably a diode laser, must provide a locally intense beam. A high intensity light source is also desirable in order to increase accuracy at the high sampling rates required. Also included is a computer control system useful for data acquisition, manipulation, storage and transmission of opacity data and the identification of the associated diesel engine to a central data collection center.

Dec, J.E.

2000-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

88

Opacity meter for monitoring exhaust emissions from non-stationary sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for determining the opacity of exhaust plumes from moving emissions sources. In operation, a light source is activated at a time prior to the arrival of a diesel locomotive at a measurement point, by means of a track trigger switch or the Automatic Equipment Identification system, such that the opacity measurement is synchronized with the passage of an exhaust plume past the measurement point. A beam of light from the light source passes through the exhaust plume of the locomotive and is detected by a suitable detector, preferably a high-rate photodiode. The light beam is well-collimated and is preferably monochromatic, permitting the use of a narrowband pass filter to discriminate against background light. In order to span a double railroad track and provide a beam which is substantially stronger than background, the light source, preferably a diode laser, must provide a locally intense beam. A high intensity light source is also desirable in order to increase accuracy at the high sampling rates required. Also included is a computer control system useful for data acquisition, manipulation, storage and transmission of opacity data and the identification of the associated diesel engine to a central data collection center.

Dec, John Edward (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Getting the Word Out: Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) Locator, Mapping Tools, and Outreach Activities (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation covers diesel exhaust fluid resources on the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center.

Brodt-Giles, Debbie

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Pollutant Removal Efficiency of Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capture efficiency (CE) of exhaust from a natural gas cooking range was quantified for three common designs of residential range hoods in laboratory experiments: (A) microwave exhaust combination; (B) short hood with grease-screen-covered air inlet at bottom; and (C) deep, open hood exhausting at top. Devices were evaluated at varying installation heights, at highest and lowest fan settings, and with the hood installed 15 cm away from back wall with intent to improve CE for front burners. Each configuration was evaluated for the oven and for three cooktop burner combinations (two back, two front, one front and one back). At highest fan settings and standard installation against the wall, Hoods A and C captured back cooktop burner exhaust at > 90 percent and Hood B at > 80 percent. In this configuration, CE for front burner exhaust was 73-78 percent for Hoods A and C but only 46-63 percent for Hood B. CEs followed similar patterns but were substantially lower on the lowest fan speed. Installing the hood away from the wall improved CE for oven and front burners on Hood A at low speed, but substantially reduced CE for back burners for all hoods at low and high speed.

Singer, Brett C.; Sherman, Alexander D.; Hotchi, Toshifumi; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECCENTRIC ECLIPSING BINARY STAR FT ORIONIS  

SciTech Connect

Accurate absolute properties are determined for the first time for the 3.15 day period eccentric eclipsing binary star FT Ori based on new absolute photometry, five differential light curves, and a radial velocity curve. The stars appear to be normal for their spectral types, A0 + A2. The orbit is highly eccentric (e = 0.409) and shows apsidal motion with a period of 536 years. The absolute properties and the degree of central mass concentration of the stars are consistent with current theoretical models at an age of 190 Myr.

Sabby, Jeffrey A. [Physics Department, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Edwardsville, IL 62025 (United States); Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg [Physics Department, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Ibanoglu, Cafer [Astronomy and Space Sciences Department, Science Faculty, Ege University, 35100 Boronova, Izmir (Turkey); Claret, Antonio, E-mail: jsabby@siue.edu, E-mail: clacy@uark.edu, E-mail: cafer.ibanoglu@ege.edu.tr, E-mail: claret@iaa.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, CSIC, Apdo. Postal 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

92

Integrated exhaust gas recirculation and charge cooling system  

SciTech Connect

An intake system for an internal combustion engine comprises an exhaust driven turbocharger configured to deliver compressed intake charge, comprising exhaust gas from the exhaust system and ambient air, through an intake charge conduit and to cylinders of the internal combustion engine. An intake charge cooler is in fluid communication with the intake charge conduit. A cooling system, independent of the cooling system for the internal combustion engine, is in fluid communication with the intake charge cooler through a cooling system conduit. A coolant pump delivers a low temperature cooling medium from the cooling system to and through the intake charge cooler for the transfer of heat from the compressed intake charge thereto. A low temperature cooler receives the heated cooling medium through the cooling system conduit for the transfer or heat therefrom.

Wu, Ko-Jen

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

93

Control method for turbocharged diesel engines having exhaust gas recirculation  

SciTech Connect

A method of controlling the airflow into a compression ignition engine having an EGR and a VGT. The control strategy includes the steps of generating desired EGR and VGT turbine mass flow rates as a function of the desired and measured compressor mass airflow values and exhaust manifold pressure values. The desired compressor mass airflow and exhaust manifold pressure values are generated as a function of the operator-requested fueling rate and engine speed. The EGR and VGT turbine mass flow rates are then inverted to corresponding EGR and VGT actuator positions to achieve the desired compressor mass airflow rate and exhaust manifold pressure. The control strategy also includes a method of estimating the intake manifold pressure used in generating the EGR valve and VGT turbine positions.

Kolmanovsky, Ilya V. (Ypsilanti, MI); Jankovic, Mrdjan J (Birmingham, MI); Jankovic, Miroslava (Birmingham, MI)

2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

94

Moist Absolute Instability: The Sixth Static Stability State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is argued that a sixth static stability state, moist absolute instability, can be created and maintained over mesoscale areas of the atmosphere. Examination of over 130 000 soundings and a numerical simulation of an observed event are employed ...

George H. Bryan; Michael J. Fritsch

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

First Observations of Microbaroms with Single Absolute Barometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first observations of microbaroms with single absolute barometers are presented and discussed. Microbaroms are pulses of atmospheric infrasound emitted by ocean surface waves. They can propagate over thousands of kilometers through the ...

Ganesh K. Subramanian; Andreas Muschinski

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Gas flow means for improving efficiency of exhaust hoods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus is described for inhibiting the flow of contaminants in an exhaust enclosure toward an individual located adjacent an opening into the exhaust enclosure by providing a gas flow toward a source of contaminants from a position in front of an individual to urge said contaminants away from the individual toward a gas exit port. The apparatus comprises a gas manifold which may be worn by a person as a vest. The manifold has a series of gas outlets on a front face thereof facing away from the individual and toward the contaminants to thereby provide a flow of gas from the front of the individual toward the contaminants. 15 figures.

Gadgil, A.J.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

97

Low exhaust temperature electrically heated particulate matter filter system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter, a sensor, a heating element, and a control module. The PM filter includes with an upstream end that receives exhaust gas, a downstream end and multiple zones. The sensor detects a temperature of the exhaust gas. The control module controls current to the heating element to convection heat one of the zones and initiate a regeneration process. The control module selectively increases current to the heating element relative to a reference regeneration current level when the temperature is less than a predetermined temperature.

Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Paratore, Jr., Michael J. (Howell, MI); Bhatia, Garima (Bangalore, IN)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

98

Modeling Exhaust Dispersion for Specifying Acceptable Exhaust/Intake Designs; Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect

This publication is one in series of best practice guides for ''Laboratories for the 21st Century,'' a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program. It is intended for those who plan to design and construct public and private-sector laboratory buildings. This guide provides general information on specifying acceptable exhaust and intake designs. It also provides various quantitative approaches that can be used to determine expected concentration levels resulting from exhaust system emissions.

Petersen, R. L.; Carter, J. J.; Cochran, B. C.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Heat pipes and use of heat pipes in furnace exhaust  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An array of a plurality of heat pipe are mounted in spaced relationship to one another with the hot end of the heat pipes in a heated environment, e.g. the exhaust flue of a furnace, and the cold end outside the furnace. Heat conversion equipment is connected to the cold end of the heat pipes.

Polcyn, Adam D. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

100

Exploiting MMS Vulnerabilities to Stealthily Exhaust Mobile Phone's Battery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exploiting MMS Vulnerabilities to Stealthily Exhaust Mobile Phone's Battery Radmilo Racic' battery power up to 22 times faster and therefore could render these devices useless before the end of business hours. This attack targets a unique resource bot- tleneck in mobile devices (the battery power

California at Davis, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require absolute exhaustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Exploiting MMS Vulnerabilities to Stealthily Exhaust Mobile Phone's Battery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exploiting MMS Vulnerabilities to Stealthily Exhaust Mobile Phone's Battery Radmilo Racic' battery power up to 22 times faster and therefore could render these devices useless before the end of business hours. This attack targets a unique resource bot­ tleneck in mobile devices (the battery power

Chen, Hao

102

Exhaust system having a gold-platinum group metal catalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of providing an exhaust treatment device is disclosed. The method includes applying a catalyst including gold and a platinum group metal to a particulate filter. The concentration of the gold and the platinum group metal is sufficient to enable oxidation of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide.

Ragle, Christie Susan (Havana, IL); Silver, Ronald G. (Peoria, IL); Zemskova, Svetlana Mikhailovna (Edelstein, IL); Eckstein, Colleen J. (Metamora, IL)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

103

Test Program for High Efficiency Gas Turbine Exhaust Diffuser  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research relates to improving the efficiency of flow in a turbine exhaust, and thus, that of the turbine and power plant. The Phase I SBIR project demonstrated the technical viability of strutlets to control stalls on a model diffuser strut. Strutlets are a novel flow-improving vane concept intended to improve the efficiency of flow in turbine exhausts. Strutlets can help reduce turbine back pressure, and incrementally improve turbine efficiency, increase power, and reduce greenhouse gas emmission. The long-term goal is a 0.5 percent improvement of each item, averaged over the US gas turbine fleet. The strutlets were tested in a physical scale model of a gas turbine exhaust diffuser. The test flow passage is a straight, annular diffuser with three sets of struts. At the end of Phase 1, the ability of strutlets to keep flow attached to struts was demonstrated, but the strutlet drag was too high for a net efficiency advantage. An independently sponsored followup project did develop a highly-modified low-drag strutlet. In combination with other flow improving vanes, complicance to the stated goals was demonstrated for for simple cycle power plants, and to most of the goals for combined cycle power plants using this particular exhaust geometry. Importantly, low frequency diffuser noise was reduced by 5 dB or more, compared to the baseline. Appolicability to other diffuser geometries is yet to be demonstrated.

Norris, Thomas R.

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

104

Low-Emissions Exhaust Quality Control System to Optimize  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use (Absorption Chiller, Boiler, others) Exhaust control unit (ExECU) integrated with a prime mover (DG) and combined heat and power (CHP) systems or combined cooling heating and power (CCHP) systems this control technology to microturbines with absorption chillers. The project anticipates an improvement

105

Successful Experimental Verification of the Tokamak Exhaust Processing Concept of ITER with the CAPER Facility  

SciTech Connect

One of the design targets for the Tokamak Exhaust Processing (TEP) system of ITER is not to lose more than 10{sup -5}gh{sup -1} into the Normal Vent Detritiation system of the Tritium Plant. The plasma exhaust gas therefore needs to be processed in a way that a tritium removal efficiency of about 10{sup 8} with respect to the flow rate is achieved. Expressed in terms of tritium concentrations this corresponds to a decontamination from about 130 gm{sup -3} down to about 10{sup -4} gm{sup -3} (about 1 Cim{sup -3} = 3.7*10{sup 10} Bqm{sup -3}). The three step reference process for the TEP system of ITER is called CAPER and has been developed and realized at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK). After the successful commissioning of the PERMCAT reactor as the key component of the third step detailed parametric tritium testing of the 3 steps involving the processing of more than 300 g tritium has been carried out and decontamination factors beyond the design requirements have been demonstrated for each process step and for the process as a whole. Not only the decontamination factor of 10{sup 8} as required by ITER, but also the operational mode of TEP as a waste dump for gases from diverse sources has been experimentally validated with the CAPER facility.

Bornschein, B.; Glugla, M.; Guenther, K.; Le, T.L.; Simon, K.H.; Welte, S. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods Title Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-5545E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Delp, William W., and Brett C. Singer Journal Environmental Science & Technology Volume 46 Issue 11 Pagination 6167-6173 Date Published 05/08/2012 Keywords Range Hood Test Facility Abstract This study assessed the performance of seven new residential cooking exhaust hoods representing common U.S. designs. Laboratory tests were conducted to determine fan curves relating airflow to duct static pressure, sound levels, and exhaust gas capture efficiency for front and back cooktop burners and the oven. Airflow rate sensitivity to duct flow resistance was higher for axial fan devices than for centrifugal fan devices. Pollutant capture efficiency (CE) ranged from 98%, varying across hoods and with airflow and burner position for each hood. CE was higher for back burners relative to front burners, presumably because most hoods covered only part of the front burners. Open hoods had higher CE than those with grease screen and metal-covered bottoms. The device with the highest CE-exceeding 80% for oven and front burners-had a large, open hood that covered most of the front burners. The airflow rate for this hood surpassed the industry-recommended level of 118 L·s-1 (250 cfm) and produced sound levels too high for normal conversation. For hoods meeting the sound and fan efficacy criteria for Energy Star, CE was <30% for front and oven burners.

107

Development of Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment System for Tier II Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to their excellent fuel efficiency, reliability, and durability, compression ignition direct injection (CIDI) engines have been used extensively to power almost all highway trucks, urban buses, off-road vehicles, marine carriers, and industrial equipment. CIDI engines burn 35 to 50% less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, and they emit far less greenhouse gases (Carbon Dioxides), which have been implicated in global warming. Although the emissions of CIDI engines have been reduced significantly over the last decade, there remains concern with the Nitrogen Oxides (NOX) and Particulate Matter (PM) emission levels. In 2000, the US EPA proposed very stringent emissions standards to be introduced in 2007 along with low sulfur (< 15ppm) diesel fuel. The California Air Resource Board (CARB) has also established the principle that future diesel fueled vehicles should meet the same emissions standards as gasoline fueled vehicles and the EPA followed suit with its Tier II emissions regulations. Meeting the Tier II standards requires NOX and PM emissions to be reduced dramatically. Achieving such low emissions while minimizing fuel economy penalty cannot be done through engine development and fuel reformulation alone, and requires application of NOX and PM aftertreatment control devices. A joint effort was made between Cummins Inc. and the Department of Energy to develop the generic aftertreatment subsystem technologies applicable for Light-Duty Vehicle (LDV) and Light-Duty Truck (LDT) engines. This paper provides an update on the progress of this joint development program. Three NOX reduction technologies including plasmaassisted catalytic NOX reduction (PACR), active lean NOX catalyst (LNC), and adsorber catalyst (AC) technology using intermittent rich conditions for NOX reduction were investigated in parallel in an attempt to select the best NOX control approach for light-duty aftertreatment subsystem integration and development. Investigations included system design and analysis, critical lab/engine experiments, and ranking then selection of NOX control technologies against reliability, up-front cost, fuel economy, service interval/serviceability, and size/weight. The results of the investigations indicate that the best NOX control approach for LDV and LDT applications is a NOX adsorber system. A greater than 83% NOX reduction efficiency is required to achieve 0.07g/mile NOX Tier II vehicle-out emissions. Both active lean NOX and PACR technology are currently not capable of achieving the high conversion efficiency required for Tier II, Bin 5 emissions standards. In this paper, the NOX technology assessment and selection is first reviewed and discussed. Development of the selected NOX technology (NOX adsorber) and PM control are then discussed in more detail. Discussion includes exhaust sulfur management, further adsorber formulation development, reductant screening, diesel particulate filter development & active regeneration, and preliminary test results on the selected integrated SOX trap, NOX adsorber, and diesel particulate filter system over an FTP-75 emissions cycle, and its impact on fuel economy. Finally, the direction of future work for continued advanced aftertreatment technology development is discussed. (SAE Paper SAE-2002-01-1867 2002 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

Yu, R. C.; Cole, A. S., Stroia, B. J.; Huang, S. C. (Cummins, Inc.); Howden, Kenneth C.; Chalk, Steven (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Light-Duty Vehicle Exhaust Emission Control Cost Estimates Using a Part-Pricing Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9. D. Jones, "Development Cost Estimates for Fuel Economy ofExhaust Emission Control Cost Estimates Using a Part-PricingExhaust Emission Control Cost Estimates Using a Part-Pricing

Wang, Quanlu; Kling, Catherine; Sperling, Daniel

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Characterisation of lightly oxidised organic aerosol formed from the photochemical aging of diesel exhaust particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The oxidative aging of the semivolatile fraction of diesel exhaust aerosol is studied in order to better understand the influence of oxidation reactions on particle chemical composition. Exhaust is sampled from an idling ...

Kroll, Jesse

110

Quantitative troubleshooting of industrial exhaust ventilation systems  

SciTech Connect

This article proposes two troubleshooting tools that may allow precise and accurate assessment of changes to ventilation systems of any type. Both are useful in discovering and quantifying most modifications that affect the distribution of airflows among the branches and static pressures throughout the system. The approaches are derived from energy balance considerations, using power loss coefficients (X) computed for any contiguous section of the system from the duct velocities and static pressures measured at that section`s inlets and outlets. The value of X for a given portion of the system should be nearly constant with changes in airflow and with modifications to other portions of the system. Responsiveness to local modifications and insensitivity to changes elsewhere in the system - including gross changes in fan performance - make X coefficients a valuable troubleshooting tool. Static pressure ratios within a given branch are functionally related to ratios of X coefficients. Therefore, they vary with modifications to the branch and are highly insensitive to changes outside that branch. Unlike X coefficients, determination of static pressure ratios does not require velocity traverses, making them faster and easier to determine than X values. On the other hand, values of X are more universally applicable and have direct physical significance. Use of both static pressure ratios and X coefficients are described in a suggested troubleshooting procedure. Systematic measurement errors have surprisingly little impact on the usefulness of values of X or static pressure ratios. The major impediment to using either tool is the necessity for {open_quotes}baseline{close_quotes} measurements, which are often unavailable. On the other hand, a baseline for future comparisons can be created piecemeal, beginning at any time and extending over any period of time. 11 refs., 8 figs., 8 tabs.

Guffey, S.E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Apparatus and method to inject a reductant into an exhaust gas feedstream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exhaust aftertreatment system for an internal combustion engine is provided including an apparatus and method to inject a reductant into the exhaust gas feedstream. Included is a fuel metering device adapted to inject reductant into the exhaust gas feedstream and a controllable pressure regulating device. A control module is operatively connected to the reductant metering device and the controllable pressure regulating device, and, adapted to effect flow of reductant into the exhaust gas feedstream over a controllable flow range.

Viola, Michael B. (Macomb Township, MI)

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

112

Science Requirements  

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Science Requirements About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network...

113

Introducing an Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer for Improving the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Measurement (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Advancing climate change research requires accurate and traceable measurement of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. Current measurement capabilities are limited to an estimated uncertainty of larger than +/- 4 W/m2 using the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). WISG is traceable to the Systeme international d'unites (SI) through blackbody calibrations. An Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) is being developed to measure absolute outdoor longwave irradiance with traceability to SI using the temperature scale (ITS-90) and the sky as the reference source, instead of a blackbody. The ACP was designed by NREL and optically characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Under clear-sky and stable conditions, the responsivity of the ACP is determined by lowering the temperature of the cavity and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance is then calculated with an uncertainty of +/- 3.96 W/m2 with traceability to SI. The measured irradiance by the ACP was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the WISG. A total of 408 readings was collected over three different clear nights. The calculated irradiance measured by the ACP was 1.5 W/m2 lower than that measured by the two pyrgeometers that are traceable to WISG. Further development and characterization of the ACP might contribute to the effort of improving the uncertainty and traceability of WISG to SI.

Reda, I.; Hansen, L.; Zeng, J.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Absolute Ages of Globular Clusters and the Age of the Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main sequence turnoff luminosity is the best stellar `clock' which can be used to determine the absolute ages of globular clusters. This is due to the fact that it is generally assumed that the luminosity and lifetimes of main sequence globular cluster stars are independent of the properties of stellar convection and atmospheres, two areas of stellar evolution which are poorly understood. Several possible sources of error in this stellar clock are discussed, and isochrones are constructed using a variety of different physical assumptions. The mean age of the oldest globular clusters are determined from these isochrones and it is found that the uncertainties in the input physics can lead to changes in the derived age of $\\pm 15\\%$. Surprisingly the largest source of error is the mixing length theory of convection. It is well known that uncertainties in the distance scale and chemical composition of globular cluster stars lead to changes of order $\\sim 22\\%$ in the determination of absolute ages. Combining the various sources of error, the absolute age of the oldest globular clusters are found to lie in the range 11 --- 21 Gyr. This is meant to be a total theoretical range. For the standard inflationary model ($\\Omega = 1, \\Lambda = 0$), a minimum age of the universe of 11 Gyr requires $H_o \\la 60~\\kmsmpc$.

Brian Chaboyer

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

115

Experimental Evaluation of Installed Cooking Exhaust Fan Performance  

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Experimental Evaluation of Installed Cooking Exhaust Fan Performance Experimental Evaluation of Installed Cooking Exhaust Fan Performance Title Experimental Evaluation of Installed Cooking Exhaust Fan Performance Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4183E Year of Publication 2010 Authors Singer, Brett C., William W. Delp, and Michael G. Apte Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords airflow & pollutant transport group, cooktop, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, gas burners, indoor air quality, indoor environment department, kitchen, nitrogen dioxide, oven, pollutant emissions, range hood, residential, source control, task ventilation, technology, sustainability and impact assessment group Abstract The installed performance of cooking exhaust fans was evaluated through residential field experiments conducted on a sample of 15 devices varying in design and other characteristics. The sample included two rear downdraft systems, two under-cabinet microwave over range (MOR) units, three different installations of an under-cabinet model with grease screens across the bottom and no capture hood, two devices with grease screens covering the bottom of a large capture hood (one under-cabinet, one wall-mount chimney), four under-cabinet open hoods, and two open hoods with chimney mounts over islands. Performance assessment included measurement of airflow and sound levels across fan settings and experiments to quantify the contemporaneous capture efficiency for the exhaust generated by natural gas cooking burners. Capture efficiency is defined as the fraction of generated pollutants that are removed through the exhaust and thus not available for inhalation of household occupants. Capture efficiency (CE) was assessed for various configurations of burner use (e.g. single front, single back, combination of one front and one back, oven) and fan speed setting. Measured airflow rates were substantially lower than the levels noted in product literature for many of the units. This shortfall was observed for several units costing in excess of $1000. Capture efficiency varied widely (from <5% to roughly 100%) across devices and across conditions for some devices. As expected, higher capture efficiencies were achieved with higher fan settings and the associated higher air flow rates. In most cases, capture efficiencies were substantially higher for rear burners than for front burners. The best and most consistent performance was observed for open hoods that covered all cooktop burners and operated at higher airflow rates. The lowest capture efficiencies were measured when a front burner was used with a rear backdraft system or with lowest fan setting for above the range systems that do not cover the front burners.

116

Design Analysis Report for 244-AR Interim Stabilization Exhaust Ventilation Ducting  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the design analysis performed for the exhaust ducting associated with the 244-AR Interim Stabilization Project. The exhaust ducting connects portable exhausters PORO5 and PORO6 to the existing east dog house of the 291-AR filter vault and the vessel ventilation system. This analysis examines loads on the ductwork and ductwork supports.

RUTHERFORD, J.

2002-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

117

Chemiion evolution in motor vehicle exhaust: Further evidence of its role in nanoparticle formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemiion evolution in motor vehicle exhaust: Further evidence of its role in nanoparticle formation of the nanoparticles in motor vehicle exhaust. INDEX TERMS: 0305 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Aerosols [2001] found that total number of NPs formed in motor vehicle exhaust is very sensitive to CI

Yu, Fangqun

118

A COMPACT CORONA DISCHARGE DEVICE (CDD{trademark}) FOR NON-THERMAL PLASMA GENERATION IN GASOLINE OR DIESEL ENGINE EXHAUST  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Higher fuel economy targets and hybrid vehicles are increasing the marketability of diesel engines. But in order to implement the growth of diesels to achieve the fuel economy benefits, all emission regulation issues must be met. To do this traps and catalysts are being utilized. One of the main problems is finding a technology that enables the exhaust emission system to not only meet the emission requirements when new, but also to meet them at the regulated intermediate and full life requirements. Work is being done that enables catalysts to remain highly efficient throughout their full life. It is done by using a corona discharge device (CDD{trademark}) that introduces non-thermal plasma into the exhaust ahead of the converter. This low power device creates radicals that alter the chemistry of the exhaust so as to limit the poisoning of the catalyst. This can be done without so called ''purge'' cycles that lower fuel economy and degrade catalyst long-term durability. This device has been developed, not as a laboratory tool, but as a production ready product and is the first of its kind that is commercially available for testing. It is this product, the Corona Discharge Device, CDD{trademark}, which will be described.

Nowak,Victor J.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

119

Diesel emission reduction using internal exhaust gas recirculation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for controlling combustion in a direct-injection diesel engine includes monitoring a crankshaft rotational position of a cylinder of the engine, monitoring an engine load, determining an intake stroke within the cylinder based upon the crankshaft rotational position, and when the engine load is less than a threshold engine load, opening an exhaust valve for the cylinder during a portion of the intake stroke.

He, Xin (Denver, CO); Durrett, Russell P. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

120

Enhancement of automotive exhaust heat recovery by thermoelectric devices  

SciTech Connect

In an effort to improve automobile fuel economy, an experimental study is undertaken to explore practical aspects of implementing thermoelectric devices for exhaust gas energy recovery. A highly instrumented apparatus consisting of a hot (exhaust gas) and a cold (coolant liquid) side rectangular ducts enclosing the thermoelectric elements has been built. Measurements of thermoelectric voltage output and flow and surface temperatures were acquired and analyzed to investigate the power generation and heat transfer properties of the apparatus. Effects of inserting aluminum wool packing material inside the hot side duct on augmentation of heat transfer from the gas stream to duct walls were studied. Data were collected for both the unpacked and packed cases to allow for detection of packing influence on flow and surface temperatures. Effects of gas and coolant inlet temperatures as well as gas flow rate on the thermoelectric power output were examined. The results indicate that thermoelectric power production is increased at higher gas inlet temperature or flow rate. However, thermoelectric power generation decreases with a higher coolant temperature as a consequence of the reduced hot-cold side temperature differential. For the hot-side duct, a large temperature gradient exists between the gas and solid surface temperature due to poor heat transfer through the gaseous medium. Adding the packing material inside the exhaust duct enhanced heat transfer and hence raised hot-side duct surface temperatures and thermoelectric power compared to the unpacked duct, particularly where the gas-to-surface temperature differential is highest. Therefore it is recommended that packing of exhaust duct becomes common practice in thermoelectric waste energy harvesting applications.

Ibrahim, Essam [Alabama A& M University, Normal; Szybist, James P [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Alternative catalyst and exhaust gas sensor work at Argonne National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research programs at Argonne National Laboratory in the areas of automobile emissions monitoring and control are described. The mandate to improve automobile efficiency while reducing Pollution requires the development of new catalysts for exhaust emissions control that are capable of functioning efficiently under lean-burn engine operating conditions. It is also desirable that the use of expensive noble metal catalysts be avoided. NO{sub x} emissions will not be efficiently controlled by the current three-way, supported noble metal catalysts under lean-burn conditions. New catalysts are being sought that could effect the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} by exhaust hydrocarbons in the presence of oxygen. Molecular sieve zeolites of the ZSM-5 and ferrierite types, ion-exchanged with copper ions, are the best of the catalysts known to effect this chemistry, but the mechanism of the SCR is still not understood. In this project the authors will first undertake the investigation of the SCR of NO using model reactions to test postulated mechanistic pathways. Initial experiments have been devised to investigate the possible participation of metal alkyl complexes, metal oxime complexes, N-alkyl-N-nitroso-alkylaminato-metal complexes, and metal nitrile complexes in the zeolites. ANL will also develop microsensors, based on surface acoustic wave (SAW) chemical sensing techniques, and a micro mass-spectrometer (MS) for tailpipe or engine-out emission monitoring. The sensor configurations and sensing techniques of the proposed SAW and micro-MS are described.

Iton, L.E.; Maroni, V.A.; Dieckman, S.L.; Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

AN ENGINE EXHAUST PARTICLE SIZERTM SPECTROMETER FOR TRANSIENT EMISSION PARTICLE MEASUREMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There has been increased interest in obtaining size distribution data during transient engine operation where both particle size and total number concentrations can change dramatically. Traditionally, the measurement of particle emissions from vehicles has been a compromise based on choosing between the conflicting needs of high time resolution or high particle size resolution for a particular measurement. Currently the most common technique for measuring submicrometer particle sizes is the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPSTM) system. The SMPS system gives high size resolution but requires an aerosol to be stable over a long time period to make a particle size distribution measurement. A Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) is commonly used for fast time response measurements but is limited to measuring total concentration only. This paper describes a new instrument, the Engine Exhaust Particle SizerTM (EEPSTM) spectrometer, which has high time resolution and a reasonable size resolution. The EEPS was designed specifically for measuring engine exhaust and, like the SMPS system, uses a measurement based on electrical mobility. Particles entering the instrument are charged to a predictable level, then passed through an annular space where they are repelled outward by the voltage from a central column. When the particles reach electrodes on the outer cylindrical (a column of rings), they create a current that is measured by an electrometer on one or more of the rings. The electrometer currents are measured multiple times per second to give high time resolution. A sophisticated realtime inversion algorithm converts the currents to particle size and concentration for immediate display.

Johnson, T; Caldow, R; Pucher, A; Mirme, A; Kittelson, D

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

123

AN ENGINE EXHAUST PARTICLE SIZER{trademark} SPECTROMETER FOR TRANSIENT EMISSION PARTICLE MEASUREMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There has been increased interest in obtaining size distribution data during transient engine operation where both particle size and total number concentrations can change dramatically. Traditionally, the measurement of particle emissions from vehicles has been a compromise based on choosing between the conflicting needs of high time resolution or high particle size resolution for a particular measurement. Currently the most common technique for measuring submicrometer particle sizes is the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPSTM) system. The SMPS system gives high size resolution but requires an aerosol to be stable over a long time period to make a particle size distribution measurement. A Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) is commonly used for fast time response measurements but is limited to measuring total concentration only. This paper describes a new instrument, the Engine Exhaust Particle SizerTM (EEPSTM) spectrometer, which has high time resolution and a reasonable size resolution. The EEPS was designed specifically for measuring engine exhaust and, like the SMPS system, uses a measurement based on electrical mobility. Particles entering the instrument are charged to a predictable level, then passed through an annular space where they are repelled outward by the voltage from a central column. When the particles reach electrodes on the outer cylindrical (a column of rings), they create a current that is measured by an electrometer on one or more of the rings. The electrometer currents are measured multiple times per second to give high time resolution. A sophisticated realtime inversion algorithm converts the currents to particle size and concentration for immediate display.

Johnson, T: Caldow, R; Pucher, A Mirme, A Kittelson, D

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

124

Methanol fuel vehicle demonstration: Exhaust emission testing. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ford Motor Company converted four stock 1986 Ford Crown Victoria sedans to methanol flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs). During 143,108 operational miles from 1987 to 1990, the FFVs underwent more than 300 dynamometer driving tests to measure exhaust emissions, catalytic activity, fuel economy, acceleration, and driveability with gasoline and methanol blend fuels. Dynamometer driving tests included the Federal Test Procedure (FTP), the Highway Fuel Economy Test, and the New York City Cycle. Exhaust emission measurements included carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), non- oxygenated hydrocarbons, organic material hydrocarbon equivalent (OMHCE), formaldehyde, and methanol. Catalytic activity was based on exhaust emissions data from active and inactive catalysts. OMHCE, CO, and NO{sub x} were usually lower with M85 (85% methanol, 15% gasoline) than with gasoline for both active and inactive catalysts when initial engine and catalyst temperatures were at or near normal operating temperatures. CO was higher with M85 than with gasoline when initial engine and catalyst temperatures were at or near ambient temperature. Formaldehyde and methanol were higher with M85. Active catalyst FTP OMHCE, CO, and NO{sub x} increased as vehicle mileage increased, but increased less with M85 than with gasoline. Energy based fuel economy remained almost constant with changes in fuel composition and vehicle mileage.

Hyde, J.D. [New York State Dept. of Environmental Conservation, Albany, NY (US). Automotive Emissions Lab.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Method and apparatus for powering engine with exhaust generated steam  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for installation in an automobile to generate steam with heat from the exhaust of an engine is provided. The steam is generated at a sufficient pressure for entry into the combustion chambers of the engine to increase the power output of the engine. The apparatus includes a water storage unit and a steam generator for generating steam with the water from the unit through transfer of heat from combusted gases in the exhaust system. The steam travels through steam inlet manifolds for entry into the combustion chambers. The entry is controlled by a cylinder injection timing valve assembly timed to the operation of the engine to enter the steam during the power stroke. A steam throttling control valve assembly is provided to throttle the steam input to the combustion chambers. A throttle proportioning control unit proportions the carburetor throttle and steam throttle assembly to the operator throttle input to provide the greatest efficiency in engine operation. The throttle proportioning control unit operates in response to the steam temperature and pressure within the steam generator. The apparatus may be adapted for use on an engine design for solely air fuel combustion with the cylinder adapter. A throttle linkage interchange unit may be provided to initiate operation of steam input only upon reaching a minimum engine temperature. An intake manifold vacuum control valve may be provided for selectively entering exhaust gases into the intake manifold of the engine to compensate for the vacuum variation due to the steam input to the combustion chamber.

Gill, P.A.

1983-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

126

Vehicle exhaust gas chemical sensors using acoustic wave resonators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under Sandia`s Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program, novel acoustic wave-based sensors were explored for detecting gaseous chemical species in vehicle exhaust streams. The need exists for on-line, real-time monitors to continuously analyze the toxic exhaust gases -- nitrogen oxides (NOx), carbon monoxide (CO), and hydrocarbons (HC) -- for determining catalytic converter efficiency, documenting compliance to emission regulations, and optimizing engine performance through feedback control. In this project, the authors adapted existing acoustic wave chemical sensor technology to the high temperature environment and investigated new robust sensor materials for improving gas detection sensitivity and selectivity. This report describes one new sensor that has potential use as an exhaust stream residual hydrocarbon monitor. The sensor consists of a thickness shear mode (TSM) quartz resonator coated with a thin mesoporous silica layer ion-exchanged with palladium ions. When operated at temperatures above 300 C, the high surface area film catalyzes the combustion of the hydrocarbon vapors in the presence of oxygen. The sensor acts as a calorimeter as the exothermic reaction slightly increases the temperature, stressing the sensor surface, and producing a measurable deviation in the resonator frequency. Sensitivities as high as 0.44 (ppm-{Delta}f) and (ppm-gas) have been measured for propylene gas, with minimum detectable signals of < 50 ppm of propylene at 500 C.

Cernosek, R.W.; Small, J.H.; Sawyer, P.S.; Bigbie, J.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, M.T. [3M Industrial and Consumer Sector Research Lab., St. Paul, MN (United States)

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Absolute Calibration of Analog Detectors by using Parametric Down Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we report our systematic study of a promising absolute calibration technique of analog photo-detectors, based on the properties of parametric down conversion. Our formal results and a preliminary uncertainty analysis show that the proposed method can be effectively developed with interesting applications to metrology.

Giorgio Brida; Maria Chekhova; Marco Genovese; Alexander Penin; Maria Luisa Rastello; Ivano Ruo-Berchera

2007-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

128

Analysis of standard reference materials by absolute INAA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three standard reference materials, flyash, soil, and ASI 4340 steel, were analyzed by a method of absolute instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Two different light water pool-type reactors were used to produce equivalent analytical results even though the epithermal to thermal flux ratio in one reactor was higher than that in the other by a factor of two.

Heft, R.E.; Koszykowski, R.F.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Absolute Calibration of a Large-diameter Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method of absolute calibration for large aperture optical systems is presented, using the example of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors. A 2.5 m diameter light source illuminated by an ultra--violet light emitting diode is calibrated with an overall uncertainty of 2.1 % at a wavelength of 365 nm.

Brack, J T; Dorofeev, A; Gookin, B; Harton, J L; Petrov, Y; Rovero, A C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Absolute Bunch Length Measurements at the ALS by Incoherent Synchrotron Radiation Fluctuation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Absolute Bunch Length Measurements at the ALS by Incoherent Synchrotron Radiation Fluctuation Analysis

Filippetto, D; Zolotorev, Max Samuil; Stupakov, G V

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Energy Efficient Single Stack Exhaust Fan Systems (E3S3F)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper first investigates the fan energy performance of a constant air volume exhaust system. Two single stack energy efficient exhaust fan systems (E3S3F) are presented. The E3S3F-I has the static pressure sensor located at the inlet of the exhaust fan. It has been found to consume up to 15% less fan power than conventional constant air volume exhaust systems. The E3S3F-II uses a variable speed device to maintain the static pressure at the entrance of the stack. It consumes up to 60% less fan power than conventional constant volume exhaust systems.

Wang, G.; Liu, M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Diesel Exhaust Emissions Control for Light-Duty Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to present the results of diesel exhaust aftertreatment testing and analysis done under the FreedomCAR program. Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) adsorber technology was selected based on a previous investigation of various NOx aftertreatment technologies including non-thermal plasma, NOx adsorber and active lean NOx. Particulate Matter (PM) emissions were addressed by developing a catalyzed particulate filter. After various iterations of the catalyst formulation, the aftertreatment components were integrated and optimized for a light duty vehicle application. This compact exhaust aftertreatment system is dual leg and consists of a sulfur trap, NOx adsorbers, and catalyzed particulate filters (CPF). During regeneration, supplementary ARCO ECD low-sulfur diesel fuel is injected upstream of the adsorber and CPF in the exhaust. Steady state and transient emission test results with and without the exhaust aftertreatment system (EAS) are presented. Results of soot filter regeneration by injecting low-sulfur diesel fuel and slip of unregulated emissions, such as NH3, are discussed. Effects of adsorber size and bypass strategy on NOx conversion efficiency and fuel economy penalty are also presented in this paper. The results indicate that if the supplementary fuel injection is optimized, NH3 slip is negligible. During the FTP cycle, injection of low sulfur diesel fuel can create temperature exotherms high enough to regenerate a loaded CPF. With the optimized NOx adsorber regeneration strategies the fuel injection penalty can be reduced by 40 to 50%. Results for various other issues like low temperature light off, reductant optimization, exhaust sulfur management, system integration and design trade-off, are also presented and discussed in this paper. (SAE Paper SAE-2003-01-0041 2003 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

Mital, R.; Li, J.; Huang, S. C.; Stroia, B. J.; Yu, R. C. (Cummins, Inc.); Anderson, J.A. (Argonne National Laboratory); Howden, Kenneth C. (U.S. Department of Energy)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Impact of Oil Consumption Mechanisms on Diesel Exhaust Particle Size Distributions and Detailed Exhaust Chemical Composition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detailed exhaust emission data have been taken from a Cummins N-14 single cylinder research engine in which the oil consumption was varied by different engine modifications. Low sulfur fuel was used, and oil consumption was varied by modifying the intake valve stem seals, the exhaust valve stem seals, the oil control ring and combinations of these modifications. Detailed measurements of exhaust gas particle size distributions and chemical composition were made for the various oil consumption configurations for a range of engine loads and speeds. The particulate mass was measured with TEOM and traditional gravimetric filter methods. Filter data for EC/OC, sulfates and trace metals have been taken and analyzed. The trace metals in the particulate mass serve as the basis for assessing oil consumption at the different operating conditions. The data indicate that the oil consumption for the steady state testing done here was approximately an order of magnitude below oil consumption values cited in the literature. We did measure changes in the details of the chemical composition of the particulate for the different engine operating conditions, but it did not correlate with changes in the oil consumption. Furthermore, the data indicate that the particle size distribution is not strongly impacted by low level oil consumption variations observed in this work.

Stetter, J; Forster, N; Ghandhi, J; Foster, D

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

134

Light-Duty Drive Cycle Simulations of Diesel Engine-Out Exhaust Properties for an RCCI-Enabled Vehicle  

SciTech Connect

In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel fuels to achieve low-temperature reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) can reduce NOx and PM emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency compared to conventional diesel combustion (CDC). Moreover, the dual-fueling RCCI is able to achieve these benefits by tailoring combustion reactivity over a wider range of engine operation than is possible with a single fuel. However, the currently demonstrated range of stable RCCI combustion just covers a portion of the engine speed-load range required in several light-duty drive cycles. This means that engines must switch from RCCI to CDC when speed and load fall outside of the stable RCCI range. In this study we investigated the impact of RCCI as it has recently been demonstrated on practical engine-out exhaust temperature and emissions by simulating a multi-mode RCCI-enabled vehicle operating over two urban and two highway driving cycles. To implement our simulations, we employed experimental engine maps for a multi-mode RCCI/CDC engine combined with a standard mid-size, automatic transmission, passenger vehicle in the Autonomie vehicle simulation platform. Our results include both detailed transient and cycle-averaged engine exhaust temperature and emissions for each case, and we note the potential implications of the modified exhaust properties on catalytic emissions control and utilization of waste heat recovery on future RCCI-enabled vehicles.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Case study: Visual analysis of complex, time-dependent simulation results of a diesel exhaust system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In previous work we have presented visualization techniques that provide engineers with a high degree of interactivity and flexibility for analyzing large, time-dependent, and high-dimensional data sets resulting from CFD (computational fluid dynamics) simulations. In this case study we apply our techniques in the fields of the automotive engineering industry and demonstrate how users benefit from using them during their routine analysis, as well as for exploring new phenomena. For coping with some of the special requirements in this application, we adapted and extended parts of the system. A comparison of two related cases of a diesel exhaust system is presented, and some important questions about these cases are addressed. 1.

Helmut Doleisch; Michael Mayer; Martin Gasser; Helwig Hauser

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Absolute calibration of Analog Detectors using Stimulated Parametric Down Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spontaneous parametric down conversion has been largely exploited as a tool for absolute calibration of photon counting detectors, photomultiplier tubes or avalanche photodiodes working in Geiger regime. In this work we investigate the extension of this technique from very low photon flux of photon counting regime to the absolute calibration of analog photodetectors at higher photon flux. Moving toward higher photon rate, i.e. at high gain regime, with the spontaneous parametric down conversion shows intrinsic limitations of the method, while the stimulated parametric down conversion process, where a seed beam properly injected into the crystal in order to increase the photon generation rate in the conjugate arm, allows us to work around this problem. A preliminary uncertainty budget is discussed.

G. Brida; M. Chekhova; M. Genovese; M. L. Rastello; I. Ruo-Berchera

2008-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

137

Assessment of the Building 3430 Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed a demonstration to determine the acceptable location in which to place an air sampling probe for emissions monitoring for radionuclides in the exhaust air discharge from the new 3430 Building Filtered Pathway Stack . The method was to adopt the results of a previously performed test series for a system of similar configuration, followed by a partial test on the actual system to verify the applicability of previously performed tests. The qualification criteria included 1) a uniform air velocity, 2) an average flow angle that does not deviate from the axis of the duct by more than 20, 3) a uniform concentration of tracer gases, and 4) a uniform concentration of tracer particles. Section 1 provides background information for the demonstration, and Section 2 describes the test strategy, including the criteria for the applicability of model results and the test matrix. Section 3 describes the flow angle test and the velocity uniformity test, Section 4 provides the test results, and Section 5 provides the conclusions. Appendix A includes the test data sheets, and Appendix B gives applicable qualification results from the previously tested model stack. The data from the previously tested and similarly designed stack was demonstrated to be applicable to the current design for the 3430 Building Filtered Pathway stack. Therefore, this new system also meets the qualification criteria given in the ANSI/HPS N13.1 standard. Changes to the system configuration or operations outside of the bounds of this report (e.g., exhaust velocity increases, relocation of sample probe) will require retesting/reevaluation to determine compliance to the requirements.

Glissmeyer, John A.

2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

138

Radioactive air emissions program notice of construction, rotary mode core-sampling truck and exhauster  

SciTech Connect

Efforts have been ongoing to obtain core samples from the contents of each of the Hanford Site`s 149 single-shell tanks (SSTs). The SSTs contain various amounts and combinations of liquid, sludge, and saltcake. Existing sampling equipment is unable to retrieve samples of hardened waste within established tank safety restrictions (particularly limits on temperature). A new rotary mode core-sampling system has been designed to sample tanks containing hardened wastes. The prominent feature of this new system is the use of a nitrogen gas purge. The nitrogen gas purge will cool the drill bit and prevent cross contamination of different waste layers in the tank. The nitrogen gas purge will also allow more complete sample recovery, by clearing cuttings that might otherwise obstruct the sampler or drill bit. Nitrogen was chosen over other compressed gases for its inherent safety. Many of the tanks to be sampled with the rotary mode core-sampling system are not actively ventilated, these tanks are operated at atmospheric pressure with passive (breather) high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. Unless a ventilation system of the proper capacity is used, addition of the nitrogen purge gas to SSTs will cause the tanks to pressurize. Additionally, the use of the rotary mode core-sampling system will generate aerosols and dusts potentially containing radioactive particles in the tank vapor space. Consequently, an exhauster will be required during operation of the rotary mode core-sampling system on SSTs to prevent tank pressurization and to control emissions. This exhauster will be required to be moved from tank farm to tank farm with the rotary mode core-sampling system.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Absolute Bunch Length Measurements by Incoherent Radiation Fluctuation Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By analyzing the pulse to pulse intensity fluctuations of the radiation emitted by a charge particle in the incoherent part of the spectrum, it is possible to extract information about the spatial distribution of the beam. At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we have developed and successfully tested a simple scheme based on this principle that allows for the absolute measurement of the rms bunch length. A description of the method and the experimental results are presented.

Sannibale, F.; /LBL, Berkeley; Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC; Zolotorev, M.S.; /LBL, Berkeley; Filippetto, D.; /INFN, Rome; Jagerhofer, L.; /Vienna, Tech. U.

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

140

Experimental Evaluation of Installed Cooking Exhaust Fan Performance  

SciTech Connect

The installed performance of cooking exhaust fans was evaluated through residential field experiments conducted on a sample of 15 devices varying in design and other characteristics. The sample included two rear downdraft systems, two under-cabinet microwave over range (MOR) units, three different installations of an under-cabinet model with grease screens across the bottom and no capture hood, two devices with grease screens covering the bottom of a large capture hood (one under-cabinet, one wall-mount chimney), four under-cabinet open hoods, and two open hoods with chimney mounts over islands. Performance assessment included measurement of airflow and sound levels across fan settings and experiments to quantify the contemporaneous capture efficiency for the exhaust generated by natural gas cooking burners.Capture efficiency is defined as the fraction of generated pollutants that are removed through the exhaust and thus not available for inhalation of household occupants. Capture efficiency (CE) was assessed for various configurations of burner use (e.g., single front, single back, combination of one front and one back, oven) and fan speed setting. Measured airflow rates were substantially lower than the levels noted in product literature for many of the units. This shortfall was observed for several units costing in excess of $1000. Capture efficiency varied widely (from<5percent to roughly 100percent) across devices and across conditions for some devices. As expected, higher capture efficiencies were achieved with higher fan settings and the associated higher air flow rates. In most cases, capture efficiencies were substantially higher for rear burners than for front burners. The best and most consistent performance was observed for open hoods that covered all cooktop burners and operated at higher airflow rates. The lowest capture efficiencies were measured when a front burner was used with a rear backdraft system or with lowest fan setting for above the range systems that do not cover the front burners.

Singer, Brett C.; Delp, William W.; Apte, Michael G.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require absolute exhaustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Non-Thermal Plasma System Development for CIDI Exhaust Aftertreatment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is a need for an efficient, durable technology to reduce NOx emissions from oxidative exhaust streams such as those produced by compression-ignition, direct injection (CIDI) diesel or lean-burn gasoline engines. A partnership formed between the DOE Office of Advanced Automotive Technology, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the USCAR Low Emission Technologies Research and Development Partnership is evaluating the effectiveness of a non-thermal plasma in conjunction with catalytic materials to mediate NOx and particulate emissions from diesel fueled light duty (CIDI) engines. Preliminary studies showed that plasma-catalyst systems could reduce up to 70% of NOx emissions at an equivalent cost of 3.5% of the input fuel in simulated diesel exhaust. These studies also showed that the type and concentration of hydrocarbon play a key role in both the plasma gas phase chemistry and the catalyst surface chemistry. More recently, plasma/catalyst systems have been evaluated for NOx reduction and particulate removal on a CIDI engine. Performance results for select plasma-catalyst systems for both simulated and actual CIDI exhaust will be presented. The effect of NOx and hydrocarbon concentration on plasma-catalyst performance will also be shown. SAE Paper SAE-2000-01-1601 {copyright} 2000 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.

Balmer, M. Lou (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)); Tonkyn, Russell (Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BPNL)); Maupin, Gary; Yoon, Steven; Kolwaite, Ana (PNNL); Barlow, Stephen (BPNL); Domingo, Norberto; Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Hoard, John Wm. (Ford Research Laboratory); Howden, Ken (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Experimental Evaluation of Installed Cooking Exhaust Fan Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The installed performance of cooking exhaust fans was evaluated through residential field experiments conducted on a sample of 15 devices varying in design and other characteristics. The sample included two rear downdraft systems, two under-cabinet microwave over range (MOR) units, three different installations of an under-cabinet model with grease screens across the bottom and no capture hood, two devices with grease screens covering the bottom of a large capture hood (one under-cabinet, one wall-mount chimney), four under-cabinet open hoods, and two open hoods with chimney mounts over islands. Performance assessment included measurement of airflow and sound levels across fan settings and experiments to quantify the contemporaneous capture efficiency for the exhaust generated by natural gas cooking burners.Capture efficiency is defined as the fraction of generated pollutants that are removed through the exhaust and thus not available for inhalation of household occupants. Capture efficiency (CE) was assessed for various configurations of burner use (e.g., single front, single back, combination of one front and one back, oven) and fan speed setting. Measured airflow rates were substantially lower than the levels noted in product literature for many of the units. This shortfall was observed for several units costing in excess of $1000. Capture efficiency varied widely (fromfan settings and the associated higher air flow rates. In most cases, capture efficiencies were substantially higher for rear burners than for front burners. The best and most consistent performance was observed for open hoods that covered all cooktop burners and operated at higher airflow rates. The lowest capture efficiencies were measured when a front burner was used with a rear backdraft system or with lowest fan setting for above the range systems that do not cover the front burners.

Singer, Brett C.; Delp, William W.; Apte, Michael G.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of Domain Composition and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of Domain Composition and Nanoscale Size Distribution Explains Performance in Solar Cells Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of Domain Composition and Nanoscale Size Distribution Explains Performance in Solar Cells Print Tuesday, 22 January 2013 00:00 This front cover represents the morphology and resulting device dynamics in organic solar cell blend films of PTB7 and PC71BM, as revealed by combined resonant x-ray scattering and microscopy done at the Advanced Light Source. Harald Ade and co-workers find that the fullerene molecules (red) are miscible in the polymer (blue) up to 30 wt.%, above which they begin to agglomerate (bottom). This agglomeration is important for the optoelectronic processes within the device, but the agglomerates must be kept to small sizes by the solvent processing additive diiodooctane (DIO). Correlation of this morphology with the spectrally resolved quantum efficiency shows that the yellow excitons created upon photoabsorption must arrive at the agglomerate interface for charge separation to occur. The blue electrons and green holes can then percolate through appropriate molecules in the mixed matrix to the electrodes for harvesting of electrical energy. Article Link (PDF)

144

Absolute photoionization cross-section of the propargyl radical  

SciTech Connect

Using synchrotron-generated vacuum-ultraviolet radiation and multiplexed time-resolved photoionization mass spectrometry we have measured the absolute photoionization cross-section for the propargyl (C{sub 3}H{sub 3}) radical, {sigma}{sub propargyl}{sup ion}(E), relative to the known absolute cross-section of the methyl (CH{sub 3}) radical. We generated a stoichiometric 1:1 ratio of C{sub 3}H{sub 3} : CH{sub 3} from 193 nm photolysis of two different C{sub 4}H{sub 6} isomers (1-butyne and 1,3-butadiene). Photolysis of 1-butyne yielded values of {sigma}{sub propargyl}{sup ion}(10.213 eV)=(26.1{+-}4.2) Mb and {sigma}{sub propargyl}{sup ion}(10.413 eV)=(23.4{+-}3.2) Mb, whereas photolysis of 1,3-butadiene yielded values of {sigma}{sub propargyl}{sup ion}(10.213 eV)=(23.6{+-}3.6) Mb and {sigma}{sub propargyl}{sup ion}(10.413 eV)=(25.1{+-}3.5) Mb. These measurements place our relative photoionization cross-section spectrum for propargyl on an absolute scale between 8.6 and 10.5 eV. The cross-section derived from our results is approximately a factor of three larger than previous determinations.

Savee, John D.; Welz, Oliver; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Combustion Research Facility, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Soorkia, Satchin [Institut des Sciences Moleculaires d'Orsay, Universite Paris-Sud 11, Orsay (France); Selby, Talitha M. [Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin, Washington County Campus, West Bend, Wisconsin 53095 (United States)

2012-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

145

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 6.1 (July 2011) Chapter 6.1 (July 2011) 1 Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 6.3. Documentation justifying the use of any of these exceptions is required. The exception, with supporting documentation, must be certified and approved at certain levels that vary according to the dollar value of the

146

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

----------------------------------------------- ---------------------------------------- Chapter 6.1 (February 2011) 1 Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 6.3. Documentation justifying the use of any of these exceptions is required. The exception, with supporting documentation, must

147

Use of noble metals in automobile exhaust catalysts  

SciTech Connect

This is a review of recent literature involving laboratory work on catalytic reactions of interest in automobile exhaust purification. The review is concerned with the noble metals Pt, Pd, and Rh, the oxidation of CO and hydrocarbons, the reduction of NO, and the water-gas-shift and steam-re-forming reactions. Current thoughts are given about the mechanisms of these reactions, the dependence of the reaction rates on particle size, when known, and the role of the impurity SO/sub 2/. The current opinion that alloy formation between the noble metals is detrimental and segregation beneficial is supported by literature references.

Kummer, J.T.

1986-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

148

Particulate Measurements and Emissions Characterization of Alternative Fuel Vehicle Exhaust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to measure and characterize particulate emissions from light-duty alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) and equivalent gasoline-fueled vehicles. The project included emission testing of a fleet of 129 gasoline-fueled vehicles and 19 diesel vehicles. Particulate measurements were obtained over Federal Test Procedure and US06 cycles. Chemical characterization of the exhaust particulate was also performed. Overall, the particulate emissions from modern technology compressed natural gas and methanol vehicles were low, but were still comparable to those of similar technology gasoline vehicles.

Durbin, T. D.; Truex, T. J.; Norbeck, J. M. (Center for Environmental Research and Technology College of Engineering, University of California - Riverside, California)

1998-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

149

Nano-science Safety Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nano-science Safety Requirements Effective Date 12/6/2011 Nano-science Safety Requirements Effective Date 12/6/2011 The only official copy of this file is the one on-line. Before using a printed copy, verify that it is the most current version by checking the effective date. Page 1 of 3 Prepared By: L. Stiegler Low Risk - Embedded or Fixed Nanostructures (nanomaterials, incapable as a practical matter, of becoming airborne) Ensure that fixed nanomaterials are not subjected to actions that may generate Unbound NanoParticles (UNP). * For work outside of a HEPA filtered exhaust hood: o No Mechanical stresses e.g., (grinding, scraping, or pressing). o No thermal stresses o Cover samples when practical e.g., (slide cover, Kapton tape, Mylar tape, or cellophane tape). Samples/container must be labeled if not used immediately.

150

Method of controlling temperature of a thermoelectric generator in an exhaust system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of controlling the temperature of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) in an exhaust system of an engine is provided. The method includes determining the temperature of the heated side of the TEG, determining exhaust gas flow rate through the TEG, and determining the exhaust gas temperature through the TEG. A rate of change in temperature of the heated side of the TEG is predicted based on the determined temperature, the determined exhaust gas flow rate, and the determined exhaust gas temperature through the TEG. Using the predicted rate of change of temperature of the heated side, exhaust gas flow rate through the TEG is calculated that will result in a maximum temperature of the heated side of the TEG less than a predetermined critical temperature given the predicted rate of change in temperature of the heated side of the TEG. A corresponding apparatus is provided.

Prior, Gregory P; Reynolds, Michael G; Cowgill, Joshua D

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

151

Treating exhaust gas from a pressurized fluidized bed reaction system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hot gases from a pressurized fluidized bed reactor system are purified. Under super atmospheric pressure conditions hot exhaust gases are passed through a particle separator, forming a filtrate cake on the surface of the separator, and a reducing agent--such as an NO{sub x} reducing agent (like ammonia)--is introduced into the exhaust gases just prior to or just after particle separation. The retention time of the introduced reducing agent is enhanced by providing a low gas velocity (e.g. about 1--20 cm/s) during passage of the gas through the filtrate cake while at super atmospheric pressure. Separation takes place within a distinct pressure vessel, the interior of which is at a pressure of about 2--100 bar, and introduction of reducing agent can take place at multiple locations (one associated with each filter element in the pressure vessel), or at one or more locations just prior to passage of clean gas out of the pressure vessel (typically passed to a turbine). 8 figs.

Isaksson, J.; Koskinen, J.

1995-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

152

Effects of rocket exhaust products in the thermosphere and ionsphere  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews the current state of understanding of the problem of ionospheric F-layer depletions produced by chemical effects of the exhaust gases from large rockets, with particular emphasis on the Heavy Lift Launch Vehicles (HLLV) proposed for use in the construction of solar power satellites. The currently planned HLLV flight profile calls for main second-stage propulsion confined to altitudes below 124 km, and a brief orbit circularization maneuver at apogee. The second stage engines deposit 9 x 10/sup 31/ H/sub 2/O and H/sub 2/ molecules between 74 and 124 km. Model computations show that they diffuse gradually into the ionospheric F region, where they lead to weak but widespread and persistent depletions of ionization and continuous production of H atoms. The orbit circularization burn deposits 9 x 10/sup 29/ exhaust molecules at about 480-km altitude. These react rapidly with the F2 region 0/sup +/ ions, leading to a substantial (factor-of-three) reduction in plasma density, which extends over a 1000- by 2000-km region and persists for four to five hours. For purposes of computer model verification, a computation is included representing the Skylab I launch, for which observational data exist. The computations and data are compared, and the computer model is described.

Zinn, J.; Sutherland, C.D.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 6.1 (April 2010) Chapter 6.1 (April 2010) 1 Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) Subpart 6.3. Documentation justifying the use of any of these exceptions is required. The exception, with supporting documentation, must be certified and approved at certain levels that vary according to the dollar value of the acquisition. The information that must be included in each justification is identified in FAR

154

Required Documents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Required Documents Required Documents Required Documents All foreign nationals, including students and postdocs, must select the foreign nationals employment category to complete the new-hire process. Contact (505) 665-7158 Email Complete following forms before New-Hire Orientation Be sure to bring the forms with you for the orientation event, but do not sign and date: Form I-9, Employment Eligibility Verification (pdf) - original, unexpired documents for verification of employment eligibility. Please refer to the I-9 verification form titled, "Lists of Acceptable Documents", which was included with your offer letter. (Laminated documents or hospital/temporary birth certificates are not accepted.) Note: Failure to provide required documents will result in delay and/or

155

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chapter 6.1 (April 2009) Chapter 6.1 (April 2009) Competition Requirements [Reference: FAR 6 and DEAR 906] Overview This section discusses competition requirements and provides a model Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC). Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in FAR Part 6. Documentation justifying the use of any of these exceptions is required. The exception, with supporting documentation, must be certified and approved at certain levels that vary according to the dollar value of the acquisition. The information that must be included in each justification is

156

School requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a smooth surface and no "lip". Some presentations require AV equipment such as LCD or overhead projectors. A wireless microphone and sound system may be helpful to ensure that...

157

A proposed new energy source: The mixing energy of engine exhaust gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One potential source of useful energy that seems to be unrecognized and overlooked is the entropy of mixing of engine exhaust gases with the atmosphere. In particular

Martin Gellender

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Combining Inverted Echo Sounder and Horizontal Electric Field Recorder Measurements to Obtain Absolute Velocity Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Profiles of absolute velocity are difficult to obtain in the ocean, especially over long periods of time at the same location. This paper presents a method of estimating full water column absolute horizontal velocity profiles as a function of ...

Christopher S. Meinen; Douglas S. Luther; D. Randolph Watts; Karen L. Tracey; Alan D. Chave; James Richman

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Absolute magnetic helicity and the cylindrical magnetic field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The different magnetic helicities conserved under conditions of perfect electrical conductivity are expressions of the fundamental property that every evolving fluid surface conserves its net magnetic flux. This basic hydromagnetic point unifies the well known Eulerian helicities with the Lagrangian helicity defined by the conserved fluxes frozen into a prescribed set of disjoint toroidal tubes of fluid flowing as a permanent partition of the entire fluid [B. C. Low, Astrophys. J. 649, 1064 (2006)]. This unifying theory is constructed from first principles, beginning with an analysis of the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of fluids, separating the ideas of fluid and magnetic-flux tubes and removing the complication of the magnetic vector potential's free gauge from the concept of helicity. The analysis prepares for the construction of a conserved Eulerian helicity, without that gauge complication, to describe a 3D anchored flux in an upright cylindrical domain, this helicity called absolute to distinguish it from the well known relative helicity. In a version of the Chandrasekhar-Kendall representation, the evolving field at any instant is a unique superposition of a writhed, untwisted axial flux with a circulating flux of field lines all closed and unlinked within the cylindrical domain. The absolute helicity is then a flux-weighted sum of the writhe of that axial flux and its mutual linkage with the circulating flux. The absolute helicity is also conserved if the frozen-in field and its domain are continuously deformed by changing the separation between the rigid cylinder-ends with no change of cylinder radius. This hitherto intractable cylindrical construction closes a crucial conceptual gap for the fundamentals to be complete at last. The concluding discussion shows the impact of this development on our understanding of helicity, covering (i) the helicities of wholly contained and anchored fields; (ii) the Eulerian and Lagrangian descriptions of field evolution; (iii) twist as a topological property of solenoidal fields versus the linkage properties of open and closed discrete curves treated by Gauss, Caligarneau, Berger, and Prior; and (iv) the change of absolute helicity by resistive diffusion. These are important hydromagnetic properties of twisted magnetic fields in the million-degree hot, highly conducting corona of the Sun.

Low, B. C. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado 80307 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require absolute exhaustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

162

Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

163

Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

165

Precision Absolute Beam Current Measurement of Low Power Electron Beam  

SciTech Connect

Precise measurements of low power CW electron beam current for the Jefferson Lab Nuclear Physics program have been performed using a Tungsten calorimeter. This paper describes the rationale for the choice of the calorimeter technique, as well as the design and calibration of the device. The calorimeter is in use presently to provide a 1% absolute current measurement of CW electron beam with 50 to 500 nA of average beam current and 1-3 GeV beam energy. Results from these recent measurements will also be presented.

Ali, M. M.; Bevins, M. E.; Degtiarenko, P.; Freyberger, A.; Krafft, G. A.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

--------------------------- Chapter 6.5 (January 2011) 1 Competition Advocate Responsibilities [Reference: FAR 6.5, FAR 7 and DEAR 906.501] Overview This section discusses the competition advocate requirements and provides a Federal Procurement Data System-New Generation (FPDS-NG) coding assistance sheet and screen shots for the FPDS-NG Competition Report. Background FAR Part 6.5, -Competition Advocates,‖ implements section 20 of the Office of Federal Procurement Policy Act, which requires the head of each executive agency to designate an Agency Competition Advocate and Procuring Activity Advocates (hereafter referred to as Activity Competition Advocates). In accordance with DEAR 906.501, the Secretary of

167

235U Holdup Measurements in the 321-M Exhaust Elbows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Analytical Development Section of Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) was requested by the Facilities Disposition Division (FDD) to determine the holdup of enriched uranium in the 321-M facility as part of an overall deactivation project of the facility. The 321-M facility was used to fabricate enriched uranium fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the production reactors. The facility also includes the 324-M storage building and the passageway connecting it to 321-M. The results of the holdup assays are essential for determining compliance with the Waste Acceptance Criteria, Material Control and Accountability, and to meet criticality safety controls. This report covers holdup measurements of uranium residue in the exhaust piping elbows removed from the roof the 321-M facility.

Salaymeh, S.R.

2002-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

168

Exhaust remediation using non-thermal (plasma) aftertreatments: A review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are four post combustion (nonthermal) plasma treatments on the table for reducing NOx in exhaust streams. This paper compares these techniques and suggests what appears to be a novel (8 inventions) and optimum path for development of auseful ehaust treatment system. We propose to use 5 GHz microwaves which will have a risetime of 20 ps, 100 times shorter than present state of the art and result in the best chemistry path by reduction ofplasma shielding, greater availability of atomic nitrogen, elimination of surface charging of dielectrics, avoidance of low threshold fields, and higher breakdown limit. We also propose combining a surface intrinsically into the plasma discharge. Novel embodiments are proposed for the pebbel bed discharge allowing an order of amgnitude increase of eidl-volume over the closest packing configuration.

Whealton, J.H.; Graves, R.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Exhaust-gas measurements from NASAs HYMETS arc jet.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arc-jet wind tunnels produce conditions simulating high-altitude hypersonic flight such as occurs upon entry of space craft into planetary atmospheres. They have traditionally been used to study flight in Earth's atmosphere, which consists mostly of nitrogen and oxygen. NASA is presently using arc jets to study entry into Mars' atmosphere, which consists of carbon dioxide and nitrogen. In both cases, a wide variety of chemical reactions take place among the gas constituents and with test articles placed in the flow. In support of those studies, we made measurements using a residual gas analyzer (RGA) that sampled the exhaust stream of a NASA arc jet. The experiments were conducted at the HYMETS arc jet (Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System) located at the NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA. This report describes our RGA measurements, which are intended to be used for model validation in combination with similar measurements on other systems.

Miller, Paul Albert

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Exhaust gas provides alternative gas source for cyclic EOR  

SciTech Connect

Injected exhaust gas from a natural gas or propane engine enhanced oil recovery from several Nebraska and Kansas wells. The gas, containing nitrogen and carbon dioxide, is processed through a catalytic converted and neutralized as necessary before being injected in a cyclic (huff and puff) operation. The process equipment is skid or trailer mounted. The engine in these units drives the gas-injection compressor. The gas after passing through the converter and neutralizers is approximately 13% CO[sub 2] and 87% N[sub 2]. The pH is above 6.0 and dew point is near 0 F at atmospheric pressure. Water content is 0.0078 gal/Mscf. This composition is less corrosive than pure CO[sub 2] and reduces oil viscosity by 30% at 1,500 psi. The nitrogen supplies reservoir energy and occupies pore space. The paper describes gas permeability, applications, and field examples.

Stoeppelwerth, G.P.

1993-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

171

Absolute motion Galilean relativity (hence Einsteins) not correct  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concept of relativity of motion was first introduced by Galileo. In his principle of invariance he stated that the laws of motion are the same in all inertial frames. He used the Galileos ship thought experiment in his argument, among other arguments. This principle of invariance was then modified by Einstein (special relativity), which included the speed of light to be invariant in all inertial frames. Therefore, the relativity theory we know today is based on Galileos principle of invariance. There is no sound argument yet in support of relativity of motion. Simply because an observer hasnt been able to identify between illusion of motion and real motion cannot be taken as a sound argument to support relativity of motion. However, in the usual arguments of relativity of motion, to detect absolute motion is difficult. In this paper, a sound argument against Galileos principle of invariance will be presented, which will prove the notion of absolute motion to be correct and disprove relativity of motion, both Galileos and Einsteins. Discussion Imagine two hypothetical identical solar systems in space, initially at rest relative to each other, separated by some distance, with an observer in each solar system. For simplicity, assume that each solar system has one sun and one planet only, the two solar systems do not affect each other, and that the planetary orbits are both circular.

Henok Tadesse; Electrical Engineer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Effects of temperature on the absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effect of temperature on absolute permeability has been a point of disagreement in the petroleum literature for many years. Recent work at Stanford University has shown no dependence on temperature of the absolute permeability to water of unconsolidated sand cores. The objective of this report is to extend the investigation to consolidated sandstone by following similar experimental procedures and observing whether any temperature effects exist. Fontainebleau sandstone was chosen as the core sample because of its low porosity and relatively clay-free composition. These characteristics allow the nature of consolidated sandstone permeability to be studied, while minimizing the effects of extraneous factors. Such factors, often present in Berea and Boise sandstones, include interstitital clay swelling in the presence of distilled water. Properties of sandstone differ from those of unconsolidated sand. Consequently, the effects of throughput water volume and flow rate, in addition to temperature, are studied. Mechanical difficulties with parts of the experimental apparatus have prevented the development of a satisfactory conclusion based on results obtained thus far. Recommendations are provided for necessary modifications before further experiments are performed. When these changes are implemented, a final run can be made to complete the analysis. 19 references, 10 figures.

McKay, W.I.; Brigham, W.E.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

The Absolute Magnitude of RRc Variables From Statistical Parallax  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first definitive measurement of the absolute magnitude of RR Lyrae c-type variable stars (RRc) determined purely from statistical parallax. We use a sample of 247 RRc selected from the All Sky Automated Survey (ASAS) for which high-quality light curves, photometry and proper motions are available. We obtain high-resolution echelle spectra for these objects to determine radial velocities and abundances as part of the Carnegie RR Lyrae Survey (CARRS). We find that M_(V,RRc) = 0.52 +/- 0.11 at a mean metallicity of [Fe/H] = -1.59. This is to be compared with previous estimates for RRab stars (M_(V,RRab) = 0.75 +/- 0.13 and the only direct measurement of an RRc absolute magnitude (RZ Cephei, M_(V, RRc) = 0.27 +/- 0.17). We find the bulk velocity of the halo to be (W_pi, W_theta, W_z) = (10.9,34.9,7.2) km/s in the radial, rotational and vertical directions with dispersions (sigma_(W_pi), sigma_(W_theta), sigma_(W_z)) = (154.7, 103.6, 93.8) km/s. For the disk, we find (W_pi, W_theta, W_z) = (8.5, 213...

Kollmeier, Juna A; Burns, Christopher R; Gould, Andrew; Thompson, Ian B; Preston, George W; Sneden, Christopher; Crane, Jeffrey D; Dong, Subo; Madore, Barry F; Morrell, Nidia; Prieto, Jose L; Shectman, Stephen; Simon, Joshua D; Villanueva, Edward

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

THERMOELECTRICAL ENERGY RECOVERY FROM THE EXHAUST OF A LIGHT TRUCK  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A team formed by Clarkson University is engaged in a project to design, build, model, test, and develop a plan to commercialize a thermoelectric generator (TEG) system for recovering energy from the exhaust of light trucks and passenger cars. Clarkson University is responsible for project management, vehicle interface design, system modeling, and commercialization plan. Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (sub-contractor to Clarkson) is responsible for TEG design and construction. Delphi Corporation is responsible for testing services and engineering consultation and General Motors Corporation is responsible for providing the test vehicle and information about its systems. Funds were supplied by a grant from the Transportation Research Program of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), through Joseph R. Wagner. Members of the team and John Fairbanks (Project Manager, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technology). Currently, the design of TEG has been completed and initial construction of the TEG has been initiated by Hi-Z. The TEG system consists of heat exchangers, thermoelectric modules and a power conditioning unit. The heat source for the TEG is the exhaust gas from the engine and the heat sink is the engine coolant. A model has been developed to simulate the performance of the TEG under varying operating conditions. Preliminary results from the model predict that up to 330 watts can be generated by the TEG which would increase fuel economy by 5 percent. This number could possibly increase to 20 percent with quantum-well technology. To assess the performance of the TEG and improve the accuracy of the modeling, experimental testing will be performed at Delphi Corporation. A preliminary experimental test plan is given. To determine the economic and commercial viability, a business study has been conducted and results from the study showing potential areas for TEG commercialization are discussed.

Karri, M; Thacher, E; Helenbrook, B; Compeau, M; Kushch, A; Elsner, N; Bhatti, M; O' Brien, J; Stabler, F

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

175

Task Plan for the selection and evaluation of flow monitoring instrumentation to be used on the primary exhaust ventilation in Double Shell Hydrogen Watch List Tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Task Plan outlines the activities required to select and evaluate flow measuring devices to be used in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts for Double Shell Tanks (DST) on the hydrogen watch list that don`t already have this capability. This currently includes tanks 101-AW, 103-AN, 104-AN, and 105-AN. The continuous measurement and recording of this flow is necessary to quantify the amount of hydrogen being off-gased by these tanks for further mitigation studies.

Hertelendy, N.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

A comparison between the performance of different silencer designs for gas turbine exhaust systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comparison between the performance of different silencer designs for gas turbine exhaust systems in more specialist applications, such as the exhaust systems of gas turbines, different silencer experiments are carried out with the aim of investigating performance of silencers used on gas turbines

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

177

Aeroengine turbine exhaust gas temperature prediction using process support vector machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The turbine exhaust gas temperature (EGT) is an important parameter of the aeroengine and it represents the thermal health condition of the aeroengine. By predicting the EGT, the performance deterioration of the aeroengine can be deduced in advance and ... Keywords: aeroengine, condition monitoring, process support vector machines, time series prediction, turbine exhaust gas temperature

Xu-yun Fu, Shi-sheng Zhong

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Does India need to harmonize the law of patent exhaustion and parallel imports?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amendment of patent law of India in 2005 to fulfill her international obligation under the TRIPS Agreement (World Trade Organization Agreement on Trade Related Intellectual Property Rights) was an outcome of an attempt to balance the competing interests ... Keywords: TRIPS Agreement, exclusive rights exhaustion, national, parallel imports, regional and international exhaustion

Rajnish Kumar Rai

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF  

SciTech Connect

The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

ABSOLUTE MEASUREMENT OF THE POLARIZATION OF HIGH ENERGY PROTON BEAMS AT RHIC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The spin physics program at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) requires knowledge of the beam polarization to better than 5%. Such a goal is made the more difficult by the lack of knowledge of the analyzing power of high energy nuclear physics processes. To overcome this, a polarized hydrogen jet target was constructed and installed at one intersection region in RHIC where it intersects both beams and utilizes the precise knowledge of the jet atomic hydrogen beam polarization to measure the analyzing power in proton-proton elastic scattering in the Nuclear Coulomb Interference (CNI) region at the prescribed RHIC proton beam energy. The reverse reaction is used to assess the absolute beam polarization. Simultaneous measurements taken with fast high statistics polarimeters that measure the p-Carbon elastic scattering process also in the CNI region use the jet results to calibrate the latter.

MAKDISI,Y.; BRAVAR, A. BUNCE, G. GILL, R.; HUANG, H.; ET AL.

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require absolute exhaustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Absolute Current Calibrations of 1muA CW Electron Beam  

SciTech Connect

The future experimental program at Jefferson Lab requires an absolute current calibration of a 1{mu}A CW electron beam to better than 1% accuracy. This paper presents the mechanical and electrical design of a Tungsten calorimeter that is being constructed to provide an accurate measurement of the deposited energy. The energy is determined by measuring the change in temperature after beam exposure. Knowledge of the beam energy then yields number of electrons stopped by the calorimeter during the exposure. Simulations show that the energy losses due to electromagnetic and hadronic losses are the dominant uncertainty. Details of the precision thermometry and calibration, mechanical design, thermal simulations and GEANT simulations will be presented.

A. Freyberger, M.E. Bevins, A.R. Day, P. Degtiarenko, A. Saha, S. Slachtouski, R. Gilman

2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

182

Competition Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Chapter 5.2 (April 2008) - Chapter 5.2 (April 2008) Synopsizing Proposed Non-Competitive Contract Actions Citing the Authority of FAR 6.302-1 [Reference: FAR 5 and DEAR 905] Overview This section discusses publicizing sole source actions as part of the approval of a Justification for Other than Full and Open Competition (JOFOC) using the authority of FAR 6.302-1. Background The Competition in Contracting Act (CICA) of 1984 requires that all acquisitions be made using full and open competition. Seven exceptions to using full and open competition are specifically identified in FAR Part 6. One exception permits contracting without full and open competition when the required supplies or services are available from only one responsible source (FAR 6.302-1). This exception is

183

TNKVNT: A model of the Tank 48 purge/ventilation exhaust system. Revision 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The waste tank purge ventilation system for Tank 48 is designed to prevent dangerous concentrations of hydrogen or benzene from accumulating in the gas space of the tank. Fans pull the gas/water vapor mixture from the tank gas space and pass it sequentially through a demister, a condenser, a reheater, and HEPA filters before discharging to the environment. Proper operation of the HEPA filters requires that the gas mixture passing through them has a low relative humidity. The ventilation system has been modified by increasing the capacity of the fans and changing the condenser from a two-pass heat exchanger to a single-pass heat exchanger. It is important to understand the impact of these modifications on the operation of the system. A hydraulic model of the ventilation exhaust system has been developed. This model predicts the properties of the air throughout the system and the flowrate through the system, as functions of the tank gas space and environmental conditions. This document serves as a Software Design Report, a Software Coding report, and a User`s Manual. All of the information required for understanding and using this code is herein contained: the governing equations are fully developed, the numerical algorithms are described in detail, and an extensively commented code listing is included. This updated version of the code models the entire purge ventilation system, and is therefore more general in its potential applications.

Shadday, M.A. Jr.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Method and apparatus for making absolute range measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for making absolute distance or ranging measurements using Fresnel diffraction. The invention employs a source of electromagnetic radiation having a known wavelength or wavelength distribution, which sends a beam of electromagnetic radiation through a screen at least partially opaque at the wavelength. The screen has an aperture sized so as to produce a Fresnel diffraction pattern. A portion of the beam travels through the aperture to a detector spaced some distance from the screen. The detector detects the central intensity of the beam as well as a set of intensities displaced from a center of the aperture. The distance from the source to the target can then be calculated based upon the known wavelength, aperture radius, and beam intensity.

Earl, Dennis D [Knoxville, TN; Allison, Stephen W [Knoxville, TN; Cates, Michael R [Oak Ridge, TN; Sanders, Alvin J [Knoxville, TN

2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

185

Full field imaging based instantaneous hyperspectral absolute refractive index measurement  

SciTech Connect

Multispectral refractometers typically measure refractive index (RI) at discrete monochromatic wavelengths via a serial process. We report on the demonstration of a white light full field imaging based refractometer capable of instantaneous multispectral measurement of absolute RI of clear liquid/gel samples across the entire visible light spectrum. The broad optical bandwidth refractometer is capable of hyperspectral measurement of RI in the range 1.30 1.70 between 400nm 700nm with a maximum error of 0.0036 units (0.24% of actual) at 414nm for a = 1.50 sample. We present system design and calibration method details as well as results from a system validation sample.

Baba, Justin S [ORNL; Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE TRIPLE STAR CF TAURI  

SciTech Connect

CF Tau is now known to be an eclipsing triple star with relatively deep total and annular eclipses. New light and radial velocity curves as well as new times of minima were obtained and used for further modeling of the system. Very accurate (better than 0.9%) masses and radii of the eclipsing pair are determined from analysis of the two new light curves, the radial velocity curve, and the times of minimum light. The mass and luminosity of the distant third component is accurately determined as well. Theoretical models of the detached, evolved eclipsing pair match the observed absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 4.3 Gyr and [Fe/H] = -0.14.

Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg [Physics Department, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Torres, Guillermo [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Claret, Antonio, E-mail: clacy@uark.edu, E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: claret@iaa.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, CSIC, Apdo. Postal 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

ABSOLUTE PROPERTIES OF THE ECLIPSING BINARY STAR V335 SERPENTIS  

SciTech Connect

V335 Ser is now known to be an eccentric double-lined A1+A3 binary star with fairly deep (0.5 mag) partial eclipses. Previous studies of the system are improved with 7456 differential photometric observations from the URSA WebScope and 5666 from the NFO WebScope, and 67 high-resolution spectroscopic observations from the Tennessee State University 2 m automatic spectroscopic telescope. From dates of minima, the apsidal period is about 880 years. Accurate (better than 2%) masses and radii are determined from analysis of the two new light curves and the radial velocity curve. Theoretical models match the absolute properties of the stars at an age of about 380 Myr, though the age agreement for the two components is poor. Tidal theory correctly confirms that the orbit should still be eccentric, but we find that standard tidal theory is unable to match the observed asynchronous rotation rates of the components' surface layers.

Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg [Physics Department, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Fekel, Francis C. [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States); Claret, Antonio, E-mail: clacy@uark.edu, E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu, E-mail: claret@iaa.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, CSIC, Apdo. Postal 3004, E-18080 Granada (Spain)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

Engine Performance and Exhaust Emissions of a Diesel Engine From Various Biodiesel Feedstock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing fuel prices, stricter government policies, and technological developments made it possible to seek for renewable alternatives, called biofuels, to petroleum fuel. Biodiesel, a biofuel that is produced from chemically mixing animal fat, vegetable oils, or recycled restaurant grease with alcohol and catalyst, is gaining popularity in recent years as a substitute for petroleum diesel. Ninety percent (90%) of U.S. biodiesel industry makes use of soybean oil as its feedstock. However, soybean oil alone cannot meet such a huge demand on biofuel production. Hence, it is important to identify and get more information about other feedstocks, specifically on its effects on the performance and exhaust emissions of diesel engines. The purpose of this study is to investigate the performance and emissions of two diesel engines operating on different biodiesel fuels (i.e. canola oil, sunflower oil, safflower oil, peanut oil, and chicken fat) and compare them to the performance and emissions when the engine is operated on soybean oil-based biodiesel and petroleum-based diesel. Results indicated that an engine operating on biodiesel generates a little less power and torque at any given speed than one running on diesel. Such power and torque loss were attributed to the biodiesel's lower energy content. The lower heating value (energy content) of biodiesel can be reflected in the specific fuel consumption, i.e., to generate the same power, more biodiesel is needed. The reduction in torque and power of less than 10% indicates that in some cases biodiesel has better combustion than diesel. Unfortunately, the high efficiency of combustion may give rise to increased combustion temperature which may lead to higher exhaust emissions. The gradual decrease in the total hydrocarbon and CO2 emissions, as blends were increased from B20 to B100, was also found to be an indication of better combustion using biodiesel fuels than petroleum diesel. However, NOx emissions were higher, predominantly at low speeds for most biodiesel and blends and therefore may require some additives or engine modifications/or adjustments to equalize the NOx emissions of diesel. Other emissions particularly SO2 were lower than standards require.

Santos, Bjorn Sanchez

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Field Study of Exhaust Fans for Mitigating Indoor Air Quality Problems: Final Report to Bonneville Power Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operation at low fan speeds (LBL design) and operation --continuously design in the heat exchangers exhaust fans onDesign The basic objective of this project, to study the effects of exhaust fan

Grimsrud, David T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer to Measure the Absolute Outdoor Longwave Irradiance with Traceability to International System of Units, SI  

SciTech Connect

This article describes a method of measuring the absolute outdoor longwave irradiance using an absolute cavity pyrgeometer (ACP), U.S. Patent application no. 13/049, 275. The ACP consists of domeless thermopile pyrgeometer, gold-plated concentrator, temperature controller, and data acquisition. The dome was removed from the pyrgeometer to remove errors associated with dome transmittance and the dome correction factor. To avoid thermal convection and wind effect errors resulting from using a domeless thermopile, the gold-plated concentrator was placed above the thermopile. The concentrator is a dual compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) with 180{sup o} view angle to measure the outdoor incoming longwave irradiance from the atmosphere. The incoming irradiance is reflected from the specular gold surface of the CPC and concentrated on the 11 mm diameter of the pyrgeometer's blackened thermopile. The CPC's interior surface design and the resulting cavitation result in a throughput value that was characterized by the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The ACP was installed horizontally outdoor on an aluminum plate connected to the temperature controller to control the pyrgeometer's case temperature. The responsivity of the pyrgeometer's thermopile detector was determined by lowering the case temperature and calculating the rate of change of the thermopile output voltage versus the changing net irradiance. The responsivity is then used to calculate the absolute atmospheric longwave irradiance with an uncertainty estimate (U{sub 95}) of {+-}3.96 W m{sup 02} with traceability to the International System of Units, SI. The measured irradiance was compared with the irradiance measured by two pyrgeometers calibrated by the World Radiation Center with traceability to the Interim World Infrared Standard Group, WISG. A total of 408 readings were collected over three different nights. The calculated irradiance measured by the ACP was 1.5 W/m{sup 2} lower than that measured by the two pyrgeometers that are traceable to WISG, with a standard deviation of {+-}0.7 W m{sup -2}. These results suggest that the ACP design might be used for addressing the need to improve the international reference for broadband outdoor longwave irradiance measurements.

Reda, I.; Zeng, J.; Scheuch, J.; Hanssen, L.; Wilthan, B.; Myers, D.; Stoffel, T.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Method for controlling exhaust gas heat recovery systems in vehicles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of operating a vehicle including an engine, a transmission, an exhaust gas heat recovery (EGHR) heat exchanger, and an oil-to-water heat exchanger providing selective heat-exchange communication between the engine and transmission. The method includes controlling a two-way valve, which is configured to be set to one of an engine position and a transmission position. The engine position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the engine, but does not allow heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the oil-to-water heat exchanger. The transmission position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger, the oil-to-water heat exchanger, and the engine. The method also includes monitoring an ambient air temperature and comparing the monitored ambient air temperature to a predetermined cold ambient temperature. If the monitored ambient air temperature is greater than the predetermined cold ambient temperature, the two-way valve is set to the transmission position.

Spohn, Brian L.; Claypole, George M.; Starr, Richard D

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

192

Diode laser measurement of H?O, CO?, and temperature in gas turbine exhaust through the application of wavelength modulation spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sensor for measurements of gas turbine exhaust temperature."O, CO 2 , and Temperature in Gas Turbine Exhaust through theview of UCSD power plant gas turbine systems 31

Leon, Marco E.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Exhaust emission testing of two ethanol variable fueled 1992 Chevrolet Luminas. Test results - 1993. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

The report describes the exhaust emission testing results for two 1992 low-mileage Chevrolet Lumina ethanol variable fuel vehicles. The vehicles were tested on both Indolene and E85 fuel using the Federal Test Procedure (FTP) for exhaust emissions. In the future, the EPA will retest the Luminas at future mileage accumulations of 20,000, 50,000 and possibly 100,000. At these future mileage accumulations, the vehicles will also be tested using intermediate fuel blends for both exhaust and evaporative emissions.

Samulski, M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime, high frequency, high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a plasma discharge and passing a gas to be treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases and enhanced catalyst reactivity through application of the pulsed microwave fields directly to the catalyst material sufficient to cause a polarizability catastrophe and enhanced heating of the metal crystallite particles of the catalyst, and in the presence or absence of the plasma. The invention also includes a reactor for aftertreatment of exhaust gases.

Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Raridon, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Armfield, Jeffrey S. (Ypsilanti, MI); Bigelow, Timothy S. (Knoxville, TN); Graves, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Grout disposal facility vault exhauster: Technical background document on demonstration of best available control technology for toxics  

SciTech Connect

The Grout Disposal Facility (GDF) is currently operated on the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. The GDF is located near the east end of the Hanford Site`s 200 East operations area, and is used for the treatment and disposal of low-level radioactive liquid wastes. In the grout treatment process, selected radioactive wastes from double-shell tanks are mixed with grout-forming solids; the resulting grout slurry is pumped to near-surface concrete vaults for solidification and permanent disposal. As part of this treatment process, small amounts of toxic particles and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) may be released to the atmosphere through the GDF`s exhaust system. This analysis constitutes a Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (T-BACT) study, as required in the Washington Administrative Code (WAC 173-460) to support a Notice of Construction for the operation of the GDF exhaust system at a modified flow rate that exceeds the previously permitted value. This report accomplishes the following: assesses the potential emissions from the GDF; estimates air quality impacts to the public from toxic air pollutants; identifies control technologies that could reduce GDF emissions; evaluates impacts of the control technologies; and recommends appropriate emissions controls.

Glissmeyer, J.A.; Glantz, C.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rittman, P.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Research on the Integration Characteristics of Cooling Energy Recovery from Room Exhausting Cool Air in Summer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Currently, the design and construction of buildings and building energy systems are far from reasonable. The requirement and consumption of primary energy resources is aggravated, the use of building energy is free and wasteful, and pollution of the earth's atmosphere from building energy consumption is also aggravated. Therefore, the research and applications of energy efficiency and environmentally benign building energy systems are very important and urgent. Until now, much work on building energy conservation methods, measures and evaluations have been done by people in many countries. Some theoretical achievements have been already put into practice, but most of them put undue emphasis on some parts of the whole system. The complete idea of building energy conservation by integrating the building energy systems has not been put forward, and unequivocal guidance and a complete evaluation index and theoretical system for building energy consumption and its impact on the environment have not been formed. In this paper, we make further suggestions for improvement, and present some new concepts such as building energy flow, building mass flow, couple recovering of building discharge energy, integrated system of building energy , factor of building energy integration I, and effect factor on atmospheric environment of building energy F. The positive effects of these new concepts and methods on traditional approaches are also predicted. Theoretical research on an energy recovery unit that recovers cooling energy from indoor exhausting cool air in summer has been done in this paper, and demonstrates great advantages of its integration characteristics of building thermal systems.

Zhang, W.; Wu, J.; Wei, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Method and apparatus for making absolute range measurements  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for making absolute distance or ranging measurements using Fresnel diffraction. The invention employs a source of electromagnetic radiation having a known wavelength or wavelength distribution, which sends a beam of electromagnetic radiation through an object which causes it to be split (hereinafter referred to as a "beamsplitter"), and then to a target. The beam is reflected from the target onto a screen containing an aperture spaced a known distance from the beamsplitter. The aperture is sized so as to produce a Fresnel diffraction pattern. A portion of the beam travels through the aperture to a detector, spaced a known distance from the screen. The detector detects the central intensity of the beam. The distance from the object which causes the beam to be split to the target can then be calculated based upon the known wavelength, aperture radius, beam intensity, and distance from the detector to the screen. Several apparatus embodiments are disclosed for practicing the method embodiments of the present invention.

Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Key, William S. (Knoxville, TN); Sanders, Alvin J. (Knoxville, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Particulate control for coal-fueled diesel engine exhaust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Core Separator is a cylindrical vessel having one tangential inlet and two outlets at the opposite end of the vessel. It contains an outlet for the clean flow and a second outlet for the recirculating flow. The solids-laden flue gas is introduced through a fan to the inlet of the Core Separator. Due to the swirling motion of the flow, solids move to the periphery as the central jet leaving the system through the central outlet is cleaned of particulates. The peripheral flow with most of the particles is exhausted to the cyclone and then recirculates back to the Core Separator by means of the fan. The processes of separation and solids collection are accomplished separately and in different components. The Core Separator cleans the flow discharged from the system and detains solids within the system If the Core Separator efficiency is high enough, particles cannot leave the system. They recirculate again and again until the cyclone finally collects them for removal. An analytical formula can be derived that defines the system performance. E = E{sub c}E{sub s}/1{minus}E{sub s}(1{minus}E{sub c}), where E, E{sub c}, and E{sub s} are the system, collector, and Core Separator partial separation efficiencies respectively. Examination of this equation shows that the system efficiency remains high even with poor performance in the collector, as long as the efficiency of the Core Separator is high. For example, if E{sub s} is 99% and E{sub c} is 30%, the system efficiency is 96.7%.

Smolensky, L.A.; Easom, B.H.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Pulmonary effects of inhaled diesel exhaust in aged mice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pulmonary morbidity and mortality resulting from exposure to fine particulate matter (PM) increases with age. The present studies analyzed potential mechanisms underlying increased susceptibility of the elderly to PM using diesel exhaust (DE) as a model. Mice (2 m and 18 m) were exposed to DE (0, 300, and 1000 mug/m{sup 3}) for 3 h once (single) or 3 h/day for 3 days (repeated). Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL), serum and lung tissue were collected 0 and 24 h later. Exposure to DE resulted in structural alterations in the lungs of older but not younger mice, including patchy thickening of the alveolar septa and inflammatory cell localization in alveolar spaces. These effects were most pronounced 24 h after a single exposure to the higher dose of DE. Significant increases in BAL nitrogen oxides were also noted in older mice, as well as expression of lipocalin 24p3, an oxidative stress marker in the lung with no effects in younger mice. Following DE inhalation, expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha (TNFalpha) was upregulated in lungs of both younger and older mice; however, this was attenuated in older animals. Whereas exposure to DE resulted in increases in lung Interleukin-6 (IL-6) expression in both older and younger mice, IL-8 increased only in older animals. In younger mice, constitutive expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) decreased after DE exposure, while in older mice, constitutive MnSOD was not detectable and DE had no effect on expression of this antioxidant. Taken together, these results suggest that altered generation of inflammatory mediators and MnSOD may contribute to increased susceptibility of older mice to inhaled DE.

Sunil, Vasanthi R., E-mail: sunilvr@eohsi.rutgers.ed [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, 160 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Patel, Kinal J. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, 160 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Mainelis, Gediminas; Turpin, Barbara J. [Department of Environmental Science, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Ridgely, Sherritta [Laboratory Animal Services, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laumbach, Robert J.; Kipen, Howard M. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Nazarenko, Yevgen [Department of Environmental Science, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Veleeparambil, Manoj; Gow, Andrew J. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, 160 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Rutgers University, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, 160 Frelinghuysen Road, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

A WEAR MODEL FOR DIESEL ENGINE EXHAUST VALVES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The work summarized here comprises the concluding effort of a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies. It supports the development of a better understanding of advanced diesel engine designs in which enhanced power density, energy efficiency, and emissions control place increasing demands upon the durability of engine materials. Many kinds of metallic alloys are used in engines depending on the operating stresses, temperatures, and chemical environments. Exhaust valves, for example, are subjected to high temperatures and repetitive surface contacts that place demands on durability and frictional characteristics of the materials. Valves must continue to seal the combustion chamber properly for thousands of hours of cyclic engine operation and under varying operating conditions. It was the focus of this effort to understand the wear processes in the valve-seat area and to develop a model for the surface deformation and wear of that important interface. An annotated bibliography is provided to illustrate efforts to understand valve wear and to investigate the factors of engine operation that affect its severity and physical manifestation. The project for which this modeling effort was the final task, involved construction of a high-temperature repetitive impact test system as well as basic tribology studies of the combined processes of mechanical wear plus oxidation at elevated temperatures. Several publications resulted from this work, and are cited in this report. The materials selected for the experimental work were high-performance alloys based on nickel and cobalt. In some cases, engine-tested exhaust valves were made available for wear analysis and to ensure that the modes of surface damage produced in experiments were simulative of service. New, production-grade exhaust valves were also used to prepare test specimens for experimental work along with the other alloy samples. Wear analysis of valves and seats run for hundreds of hours in heavy-duty diesels provided insights into the kinds of complexity that the contact conditions in engines can produce, and suggested the physical basis for the current approach to modeling. The model presented here involves four terms, two representing the valve response and two for its mating seat material. The model's structure assumes that wear that takes place under a complex combination of plastic deformation, tangential shear, and oxidation. Tribolayers form, are removed, and may reform. Layer formation affects the friction forces in the interface, and in turn, the energy available to do work on the materials to cause wear. To provide friction data for the model at various temperatures, sliding contact experiments were conducted from 22 to 850 C in a pin-on-disk apparatus at ORNL. In order to account for the behavior of different materials and engine designs, parameters in all four terms of the model can be adjusted to account for wear-in and incubation periods before the dominant wear processes evolve to their steady-state rates. For example, the deformation rate is assumed to be maximum during the early stages of operation, and then, due to material work-hardening and the increase in nominal contact area (which reduces the load per unit area), decreases to a lower rate at long times. Conversely, the rate of abrasion increases with time or number of cycles due to the build-up of oxides and tribo-layers between contact surfaces. The competition between deformation and abrasion results in complex, non-linear behavior of material loss per cycle of operation. Furthermore, these factors are affected by valve design features, such as the angle of incline of the valve seat. Several modeling scenarios are presented to demonstrate how the wear profile versus number of cycles changes in response to: (a) different relative abrasion rates of the seat and valve materials, (b) the friction coefficient as a function of temperature, (c) the relative deformation contribution of valve and seat materials, and (d) an interruption in the dominant we

Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require absolute exhaustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Effects of Micro- and Macroscale Turbulent Mixing on the Chemical Processes in Engine Exhaust Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turbulent mixing and chemical reactions in the near field of an engine exhaust jet plume have been investigated using a mixing model that explicitly incorporates both large- and small-scale turbulent mixing and the molecular diffusion effects. A ...

S. Menon; J. Wu

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Taxation and the Extraction of Exhaustible Resources: Evidence From California Oil Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid increases in oil prices in 2008 led some to call for special taxes on the oil industry. Because oil is an exhaustible resource, however, the effects of excise taxes on production or on reported producer profits may ...

Rao, Nirupama S.

203

Airship Measurements of Ships Exhaust Plumes and Their Effect on Marine Boundary Layer Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution aerosol, trace gas, and cloud microphysical measurements were made from an airship during transects across ships exhaust plumes advecting downwind of ships in the marine boundary layer (MBL). This study was part of the Office of ...

G. M. Frick; W. A. Hoppel

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas after treatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent application describes a method and apparatus of exhaust gas remediation that enhance the reactivity of the material catalysts found within catalytic converters of cars, trucks, and power stations.

Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Assessment of Low Pressure Turbine Exhaust System Improvements at Mayo Generating Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes extensive analyses and tests conducted on Carolina Power and Light's (CP&L's) Mayo Generating Station low pressure turbines to investigate the possibility of achieving heat rate reductions through modification to the turbine exhaust hood. Field results showed slightly less exhaust loss than anticipated from the manufacturer's thermal kit data, suggesting less potential for gains derived from hood improvements. Analytical work with computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models supported t...

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

206

Low-pressure-ratio regenerative exhaust-heated gas turbine. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A design study of coal-burning gas-turbine engines using the exhaust-heated cycle and state-of-the-art components has been completed. In addition, some initial experiments on a type of rotary ceramic-matrix regenerator that would be used to transfer heat from the products of coal combustion in the hot turbine exhaust to the cool compressed air have been conducted. Highly favorable results have been obtained on all aspects on which definite conclusions could be drawn.

Tampe, L.A.; Frenkel, R.G.; Kowalick, D.J.; Nahatis, H.M.; Silverstein, S.M.; Wilson, D.G.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Particle exhaust from plasma discharges with an expanded-boundary divertor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of the divertor-region plasma characteristics and argon exhaust efficiencies of the expanded-boundary divertor are reported. High plasma and neutral-hydrogen densities (approx.10/sup 14//cm/sup -3/) are observed in the divertor region, and the exhaust efficiency for injected argon exceeds 95%. A simple model based on electron heat conduction parallel to the diverted field lines and frictional force due to proton-argon collisions in the divertor region accurately describes the experimental observations.

Mahdavi, M.A.; DeBoo, J.C.; Hsieh, C.L.; Ohyabu, N.; Stambaugh, R.D.; Wesley, J.C.

1981-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

208

Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime (about 40 ps), high frequency (about 5G hz), high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a dielectric barrier discharge and passing a gas to treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases. The invention also includes a reactor for generating the non-thermal plasma.

Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Raridon, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Armfield, Jeffrey S. (Upsilanti, MI); Bigelow, Timothy S. (Knoxville, TN); Graves, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Absolute Timing of the Crab Pulsar with RXTE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have monitored the phase of the main X-ray pulse of the Crab pulsar with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) for almost eight years, since the start of the mission in January 1996. The absolute time of RXTE's clock is sufficiently accurate to allow this phase to be compared directly with the radio profile. Our monitoring observations of the pulsar took place bi-weekly (during the periods when it was at least 30 degrees from the Sun) and we correlated the data with radio timing ephemerides derived from observations made at Jodrell Bank. We have determined the phase of the X-ray main pulse for each observation with a typical error in the individual data points of 50 us. The total ensemble is consistent with a phase that is constant over the monitoring period, with the X-ray pulse leading the radio pulse by 0.0102+/-0.0012 period in phase, or 344+/-40 us in time. The error estimate is dominated by a systematic error of 40 us in the radio data, arising from uncertainties in the variable amount of pulse delay due to interstellar scattering and instrumental calibration. The statistical error is 0.00015 period, or 5 us. The separation of the main pulse and interpulse appears to be unchanging at time scales of a year or less, with an average value of 0.4001+/-0.0002 period. There is no apparent variation in these values with energy over the 2-30 keV range. The lag between the radio and X-ray pulses may be constant in phase (rotational) or constant in time (linear pathlength). We are not (yet) able to distinguish between these two interpretations.

Arnold H. Rots; Keith Jahoda; Andrew G. Lyne

2004-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

210

The Effect of Temperature on the Absolute Permeability to Distilled Water of Unconsolidated Sand Cores  

SciTech Connect

The work presented herein is a study of the effect of temperature on the absolute permeability to distilled water of unconsolidated sandstones at one confining pressure. The absolute permeability to distilled water of Ottawa silica sand was not dependent on the temperature level.

Sageev, A.; Gobran, B.D.; Brigham, W.E.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

211

Free volume hypothetical scanning molecular dynamics method for the absolute free energy of liquids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free volume hypothetical scanning molecular dynamics method for the absolute free energy of liquids for calculating the absolute entropy, S, and free energy, F, by analyzing Boltzmann samples obtained by Monte. In this paper we remove the excluded volume EV restriction, replacing it by a "free volume" FV approach

Meirovitch, Hagai

212

Engine performance and exhaust emissions from a diesel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-road diesel engines are significant contributors to air pollution in the United States. Recent regulations put forth by EPA and other environmental agencies have laid out stringent guidelines for engine manufacturers and fuel producers. Recent increases in oil prices and foreign energy dependency has led to a push to produce renewable fuels, which will supplement current reserves. Biodiesel is a clean-burning renewable fuel, that can be blended with petroleum diesel. It is important to understand the effect on engine performance and exhaust emissions when using biodiesel from different feedstocks. The objective of this research was to determine the relationship between engine performance and emissions and cottonseed oil biodiesel used in a diesel engine rated for 14.2 kW. When using cottonseed oil biodiesel blends, CO, hydrocarbon, NOx, and SO2 emissions decreased as compared to petroleum diesel. Carbon dioxide emissions had no definitive trend in relation to cottonseed oil biodiesel blends. Carbon monoxide emissions increased by an average 15% using B5 and by an average of 19% using B100. Hydrocarbon emissions decreased by 14% using B5 and by 26% using B100. Nitrogen oxide emissions decreased by four percent with B5, five percent with B20, and 14% with B100. Sulfur dioxide emissions decreased by an average of 86% using B100, and by 94% using B50 blended with ultra-low sulfur diesel. The difference between peak output power when using biodiesel and diesel was insignificant in blends less that B40. Peak measured power using B100 was about five percent lower than for diesel fuel. Pure cottonseed oil biodiesel achieved and maintained a peak corrected measured power of 13.1 kW at speeds of 2990, 2875, and 2800 rpm at loads of 41.3, 42.7, and 43.8 N-m. Using B5 produced a peak power of 13.6 kW at 2990 rpm and 43.9 N-m and at 2800 rpm and 46.7 N-m, while using B20 produced a peak power of 13.4 kW at 2990 rpm and 43.7 N-m. Brake-specific fuel consumption at peak measured load and torque using B100 was 1238 g/kW-h. Brake-specific fuel consumption at peak measured power and loads using B5 and B20 were 1276 and 1155 g/kW-h.

Powell, Jacob Joseph

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Final Report LDRD 04-ERD-019 Development of absolute spectroscopic diagnostics for non-LTE plasmas  

SciTech Connect

This project sought to further our understanding of non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) processes by providing benchmark data to validate computational models. This has been a difficult regime to study in the laboratory, where experimental scales produce strong gradients while interpretation requires well-characterized uniform plasmas. It has also been a difficult regime to simulate, as evidenced by the large discrepancies in predictions of NLTE spectra for fixed plasma properties. Not surprisingly, discrepancies between data and calculations of recombining laser-produced plasmas have been in evidence since the 1980's. The goal here was to obtain data of sufficient accuracy to help resolve these discrepancies and enable better modeling of the NLTE processes that are integral to high-energy density experiments. Advances in target fabrication, diagnostic development and simulation capabilities provided the foundations for this project. Uniform plasmas were to be achieved by using aerogel foams of low enough density ({approx}mg/cm{sup 3}) and thickness ({approx}mm) to be volumetrically heated by a laser. The foams were doped with Ti to provide K- and L-shell emission and recombination spectra during the experiments. A new absolutely calibrated transmission grating spectrometer provided absolute temporal measurements at 18 frequencies, in addition to a CCD image of the time-integrated spectrum. Finally, atomic models of varying degrees of sophistication and detail, combined with NLTE radiation transport and hydrodynamics, were used to simulate the experiments and understand the observed spectra. The first set of experiments was performed on the NIKE laser at NRL in March, 2004, with the goals of evaluating the performance of the diagnostics and the achieved plasma uniformity. By varying the laser parameters, we determined the required parameters for creating L-shell emission and were able to obtain K-shell (He-like) Ti. Pinhole x-ray images of the K-shell emission showed transverse plasma uniformity depended upon the target quality. Not all targets had acceptable quality, as it proved difficult to fabricate targets of the desired thickness (1/2 mm). Using thicker targets also adversely affected the production of uniform conditions through the plasma, as the plasma was expected to have a moderate optical thickness ({approx}few) to the laser radiation at early times during the laser pulse. Large differences in predictions of target performance by different codes were traced to the differences in the calculation of laser absorption, and this is discussed at length in the reports from UCSD. The first absolutely calibrated, time resolved L-shell emission spectra (from 4 to 26 {angstrom}) were also obtained in this series of experiments. The spectral resolution was not sufficient to match any individual spectral features. However, combined with the time resolution, it was sufficient to demonstrate that the emission shifted to lower photon energies later in time, consistent with the plasma recombining as it cooled. Simulations of these targets produced time-integrated emission in 3 different wavelength bands that matched the experimental measurements within a factor of three and provided a constraint on the average plasma temperature. The simulations also found rise times for the spectral bands similar to those actually observed. However, the highly non-uniform plasma conditions along with the poor spectral resolution did not place any detailed constraints on the NLTE modeling. The first set of experiments succeeded in mapping out the achievable plasma parameters and in identifying the major constraints and deficiencies due to target fabrication and experimental design. The second set of experiments was designed to provide increased spectral resolution, through modifications to the spectrometer, and increased plasma uniformity. Simulations predicted that illuminating the targets from two sides would provide good uniformity and still achieve the desired plasma temperatures with the decreased laser intensity achievable with th

Scott, H A

2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

214

Role of Modeling When Designing for Absolute Energy Use Intensity Requirements in a Design-Build Framework: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The Research Support Facility was designed to use half the energy of an equivalent minimally code-compliant building, and to produce as much renewable energy as it consumes on an annual basis. These energy goals and their substantiation through simulation were explicitly included in the project's fixed firm price design-build contract. The energy model had to be continuously updated during the design process and to match the final building as-built to the greatest degree possible. Computer modeling played a key role throughout the design process and in verifying that the contractual energy goals would be met within the specified budget. The main tool was a whole building energy simulation program. Other models were used to provide more detail or to complement the whole building simulation tool. Results from these specialized models were fed back into the main whole building simulation tool to provide the most accurate possible inputs for annual simulations. This paper will detail the models used in the design process and how they informed important program and design decisions on the path from preliminary design to the completed building.

Hirsch, A.; Pless, S.; Guglielmetti, R.; Torcellini, P. A.; Okada, D.; Antia, P.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

The Role of Modeling When Designing for Absolute Energy Use Intensity Requirements in a Design-Build Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC

Adam Hirsch; Shanti Pless; Rob Guglielmetti; Paul A. Torcellini; David Okada; Porus Antia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Role of Modeling When Designing for Absolute Energy Use Intensity Requirements in a Design-Build Framework: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

The Research Support Facility was designed to use half the energy of an equivalent minimally code-compliant building, and to produce as much renewable energy as it consumes on an annual basis. These energy goals and their substantiation through simulation were explicitly included in the project's fixed firm price design-build contract. The energy model had to be continuously updated during the design process and to match the final building as-built to the greatest degree possible. Computer modeling played a key role throughout the design process and in verifying that the contractual energy goals would be met within the specified budget. The main tool was a whole building energy simulation program. Other models were used to provide more detail or to complement the whole building simulation tool. Results from these specialized models were fed back into the main whole building simulation tool to provide the most accurate possible inputs for annual simulations. This paper will detail the models used in the design process and how they informed important program and design decisions on the path from preliminary design to the completed building.

Hirsch, A.; Pless, S.; Guglielmetti, R.; Torcellini, P. A.; Okada, D.; Antia, P.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Hanford Site radionuclide national emission standards for hazardous ari pollutants registered and and unregistered stack (powered exhaust) source assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On February 3, 1993, US DOE Richland Operations Office received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Div. of US EPA, Region X. The compliance order requires the Richland Operations Office to evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford site to determine which are subject to the continuous emission measurement requirements in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, and to continuously measure radionuclide emissions in accordance with 40 CFR 61.93. The Information Request required The provision of a written compliance plan to meet the requirements of the compliance order. A compliance plan was submitted to EPA, Region X, on April 30, 1993. It set as one of the milestones, the complete assessment of the Hanford Site 84 stacks registered with the Washington State Department of Health, by December 17, 1993. This milestone was accomplished. The compliance plan also called for reaching a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement; this was reached on February 7, 1994, between DOE Richland Operations and EPA, Region X. The milestone to assess the unregistered stacks (powered exhaust) by August 31, 1994, was met. This update presents assessments for 72 registered and 22 unregistered stacks with potential emissions > 0.1 mrem/yr.

Davis, W.E.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Interpretation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Diesel Exhaust Photooxidation in an Environmental Chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from diesel exhaust in a smog chamber was investigated. Particle volume measurement based on mobility diameter is shown to underestimate SOA formation from diesel exhaust due to the external void space of agglomerate particles, in which case mass-based measurement technique is necessary. Rapid determination of particle effective density as a function of particle mass was performed by an Aerosol Particle Mass analyzer Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (APM-SMPS) to obtain particle mass concentration and fractal dimension. Continuous aging of aerosol was observed in terms of atomic ratio (O/C), from 0.05 to 0.25 in 12 hours, underscoring the importance of multi-generational oxidation of low-volatile organic vapors emitted from diesel engine as the significant source of oxygenated SOA. Experimental conditions possibly have strong impacts on physical evolution of diesel particulates in a smog chamber. Higher particle effective densities were observed when raw exhaust was injected into a full bag as opposed to filling a bag with diluted exhaust using an ejector diluter. When longer transfer line was used for injecting diesel exhaust into the smog chamber, rapid particle coagulation was observed, leading to increasing particle volume concentration in dark while its mass concentration is decreasing.

Nakao, Shunsuke; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Nguyen, Anh; Jung, Hee-Jung; Cocker, David R.

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

219

Federal Greenhouse Gas Requirements | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Requirements Requirements Federal Greenhouse Gas Requirements October 7, 2013 - 10:02am Addthis Executive Order (E.O.) 13514 expands the energy reduction and environmental requirements of Executive Order 13423 by making greenhouse gas (GHG) management a priority for the Federal government. Under Section 2 of E.O. 13514, each Federal agency must: Within 90 days of the order, establish and report to the CEQ Chair and OMB Director a percentage reduction target for agency-wide reductions of Scope 1 and Scope 2 GHG emissions in absolute terms by fiscal year 2020 relative to a fiscal year 2008 baseline of the agency's Scope 1 greenhouse gas emissions. In establishing the target, agencies shall consider reductions associated with: Reducing agency building energy intensity Increasing agency renewable energy use and implementing on-site renewable

220

Gas separation process using membranes with permeate sweep to remove CO.sub.2 from gaseous fuel combustion exhaust  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas separation process for treating exhaust gases from the combustion of gaseous fuels, and gaseous fuel combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the exhaust stream to a carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the exhaust gas stream across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas back to the combustor.

Wijmans Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C. (Menlo Park, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require absolute exhaustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Flammable gas tank exhauster interlock (FGTEI) computer software design description  

SciTech Connect

Modicon Compact Programmable Logic Controller (PLC). The device configuration integrates the isolation and current-carrying capacities of mechanical relays with the logic and programming sophistication of the PLC. This document provides descriptions of components and tasks involved in the PLC system for controlling and monitoring the FGTEI. All control functions required by the PLC, and how they are implemented, are described in detail.

Smith, S.0.

1996-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

222

Flammable gas tank exhauster interlock (FGTEI) computer software design description  

SciTech Connect

Modicon Compact Programmable Logic Controller (PLC). The device configuration integrates the isolation and current- carrying capacities of mechanical relays with the logic and programming sophistication of the PLC. This revised document provides descriptions of components and tasks involved in the PLC system for controlling and monitoring the FGTEI. All control functions required by the PLC, and how they are implemented, are described in detail.

Smith, S.O., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

223

Flammable gas tank exhauster interlock (LFGTEI) computer software design description  

SciTech Connect

Modicon Compact Programmable Logic Controller (PLC). The device configuration integrates the isolation and current- carrying capacities of mechanical relays with the logic and programming sophistication of the PLC. This revised document provides descriptions of components and tasks involved in the PLC system for controlling and monitoring the FGTEI. All control functions required by the PLC, and how they are implemented, are described in detail.

Smith, S.O.; Irvitt, R.W., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

224

High-Octane Fuel from Refinery Exhaust Gas: Upgrading Refinery Off-Gas to High-Octane Alkylate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Exelus is developing a method to convert olefins from oil refinery exhaust gas into alkylate, a clean-burning, high-octane component of gasoline. Traditionally, olefins must be separated from exhaust before they can be converted into another source of useful fuel. Exelus process uses catalysts that convert the olefin to alkylate without first separating it from the exhaust. The ability to turn up to 50% of exhaust directly into gasoline blends could result in an additional 46 million gallons of gasoline in the U.S. each year.

None

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Field Study of Exhaust Fans for Mitigating Indoor Air Quality Problems: Final Report to Bonneville Power Administration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fans Air-to-Air Heat Exchangers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .expected from heat exchangers Ventilation expected fromventilation supplied by heat exchanger and exhaust flow. .

Grimsrud, David T.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, and Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies on the AFDC (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation covers new content available on the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicle Data Center regarding diesel vehicles, diesel exhaust fluid, and selective catalytic reduction technologies.

Brodt-Giles, D.

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

227

Open loop pneumatic control of a Lysholm engine or turbine exhaust pressure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Lysholm engine, or helical screw expander, is currently being evaluated at the University of California, Berkeley for staging with a conventional turbine in geothermal energy conversion. A pneumatic closed loop, proportional-integral control system was implemented to control the Lysholm engine's exhaust pressure for performance testing of the engine at constant inlet/outlet pressure ratios. The control system will also be used to control the exhaust pressure of the conventional turbine during future testing of the staged Lysholm-turbine system. Analytical modeling of the control system was performed and successful tuning was achieved by applying Ziegler-Nichol's tuning method. Stable control and quick response, of approximately 1 minute, was demonstrated for load and set point changes in desired exhaust pressures.

Plonski, B.A.

1981-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

228

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction: Use of a portable exhauster on 241-A-101 tank during salt well pumping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC) for the use of a portable exhauster on 241-A-101 single-shell tank (SST) during salt well pumping and other routine activities at the tank. Approval for salt well pumping is not being requested as this is a routine activity performed to manage the waste within the SST Tank System. The primary objective of providing active ventilation to the 241-A-101 tank is to satisfy the requirements of a Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL) Safety Analysis Report (SAR) that requires postulated accidents to remain within risk guidelines. It is anticipated that salt well pumping will release gases entrapped within the waste as the liquid level is lowered, because of less hydrostatic force keeping the gases in place. Other routine activities also have the potential to release trapped gases by interrupting gas pockets within the waste. Hanford Site waste tanks must comply with the National Fire Protection Association guidelines, which mandate that flammable gas concentration be less than 25 percent of the lower flammability limits. The LANL SAR indicates that the lower flammability limit may be exceeded during certain postulated accident scenarios. Also, the potentials for electrical (pump motor, heat tracing) and mechanical (equipment installation) spark sources exist. Therefore, because of the presence of ignition sources and the increase in released flammable gases, active ventilation will be required to reduce the ``time at risk`` while performing routine operations at the tank.

Hays, C.B.

1996-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

229

Absolute Spectral Irradiance Measurements of Lightning from 375 to 880 nm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectrometer-detector optical multichannel analyzer system capable of absolute spectral irradiance measurements has been used to record the time-integrated emissions (150 or 300 ms) from cloud-to-ground lightning. Two detectors, one operating ...

Richard E. Orville; Ronald W. Henderson

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

An Improved Gaussian Jet Model for Deriving Absolute Geostrophic Velocity from Satellite Altimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Key aspects of a Gaussian jet model for deriving absolute geostrophic velocity from TOPEX/Poseidon altimeter data are improved. Velocities are obtained by synthesizing Gaussian fits to cross-stream velocity anomaly profiles of the Kuroshio and ...

Seung-Bum Kim; M. A. Saunders

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

White-light scanning interferometer for absolute nano-scale gap thickness measurement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A special configuration of white-light scanning interferometer is described for measuring the absolute air gap thickness between two planar plates brought into close proximity. The measured gap is not located in any ...

Xu, Zhiguang

232

Application of pulsed plasma NO{sub x} reduction to diesel engine exhaust  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the effect of pulsed plasma discharges on gas mixtures simulating diesel engine exhaust by modeling and by experiment. Our modeling results have shown that the pulsed plasma can convert NO{sub x} to N{sub 2} using the nitrogen itself as a reductant. However, this process is energetically unfavorable for the plasma regime of our measurements. In our experiments we found that addition of hydrocarbons improves substantially the energy efficiency of pulsed plasma NO{sub x} reduction. Real exhaust gas contains some gaseous hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide that may prove sufficient for improving the energy efficiency of the ``right`` pulsed plasma reduction process.

Wallman, P.H.; Penetrante, B.M.; Vogtlin, G.E.; Hsiao, M.C.

1993-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

233

Catalysts, systems and methods to reduce NOX in an exhaust gas stream  

SciTech Connect

Catalysts, systems and methods are described to reduce NO.sub.x emissions of an internal combustion engine. In one embodiment, an emissions treatment system for an exhaust stream is provided having an SCR catalyst comprising silver tungstate on an alumina support. The emissions treatment system may be used for the treatment of exhaust streams from diesel engines and lean burn gasoline engines. An emissions treatment system may further comprise an injection device operative to dispense a hydrocarbon reducing agent upstream of the catalyst.

Castellano, Christopher R. (Ringoes, NJ); Moini, Ahmad (Princeton, NJ); Koermer, Gerald S. (Basking Ridge, NJ); Furbeck, Howard (Hamilton, NJ)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

234

Optimization of Combustion Efficiency for Supplementally Fired Gas Turbine Cogenerator Exhaust Heat Receptors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A broad range of unique cogeneration schemes are being installed or considered for application in the process industries involving gas turbines with heat recovery from the exhaust gas. Depending on the turbine design, exhaust gases will range from 800 to 1000 F with roughly 15 to 18 percent remaining oxygen. The overall heat utilization efficiency and the net effective heat rate of the cogenerating facility varies widely with the degree of supplemental firing of the heat receptor. This effect is explained and its economic significance defined. Other effects are also explored, such as adiabatic and equilibrium combustion temperatures; and variations in radiant versus convection heat transfer in the heat receptor furnace or boiler.

Waterland, A. F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Assessment of the 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed several tests in the exhaust air discharge from the new 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack to determine whether the air sampling probe for emissions monitoring for radionuclides is acceptable. The method followed involved adopting the results of a previously performed test series from a system with a similar configuration, followed by several tests on the actual system to verify the applicability of the previously performed tests. The qualification criteria for these types of stacks include metrics concerning 1) uniformity of air velocity, 2) sufficiently small flow angle with respect to the axis of the duct, 3) uniformity of tracer gas concentration, and 4) uniformity tracer particle concentration.

Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

236

Assessment of the 3420 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed several tests in the exhaust air discharge from the new 3420 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack to determine whether the air sampling probe for emissions monitoring for radionuclides is acceptable. The method followed involved adopting the results of a previously performed test series from a system with a similar configuration, followed by several tests on the actual system to verify the applicability of the previously performed tests. The qualification criteria for these types of stacks include metrics concerning 1) uniformity of air velocity, 2) sufficiently small flow angle with respect to the axis of the duct, 3) uniformity of tracer gas concentration, and 4) uniformity tracer particle concentration.

Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

2010-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

237

Method and apparatus to selectively reduce NO.sub.x in an exhaust gas feedstream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are described to selectively reduce NO.sub.x emissions of an internal combustion engine. An exhaust aftertreatment system includes an injection device operative to dispense a hydrocarbon reductant upstream of a silver-alumina catalytic reactor device. A control system determines a NO.sub.x concentration and hydrocarbon/NOx ratio based upon selected parameters of the exhaust gas feedstream and dispenses hydrocarbon reductant during lean engine operation. Included is a method to control elements of the feedstream during lean operation. The hydrocarbon reductant may include engine fuel.

Schmieg, Steven J. (Troy, MI); Blint, Richard J. (Shelby Township, MI); Den, Ling (Sterling Heights, MI); Viola, Michael B. (Macomb Township, MI); Lee, Jong-Hwan (Rochester Hills, MI)

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the NIF D. T. Casey, J. A. Frenje, M. Gatu Johnson, F. H. Séguin, C. K. Li et al. Citation: Rev. Sci for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF D. T. Casey,1,a) J. A. Frenje,1 M. Gatu used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute

239

Sensing Requirements for Real-Time Monitoring and Control in Energy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of coal (syngas), requires physical and chemical sensors for exhaust gas monitoring as well as real-time control of the combustion process. Following a description of syngas production from coal, we outline species at 630 °C. Our SiC sensor can monitor the hydrogen concentration in a 350 °C simulated syngas

Ghosh, Ruby N.

240

HEPA Filter Differential Pressure Fan Interlock System Functional Requirements and Technical Design Criteria  

SciTech Connect

Double-shell tanks (DSTs) and Double Contained Receiver Tanks (DCRTs) are actively ventilated, along with certain single-shell tanks (SSTs) and other RPP facilities. The exhaust air stream on a typical primary ventilation system is drawn through two stages of high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtration to ensure confinement of airborne radioactive materials. Active ventilation exhaust stacks require a stack CAM interlock to detect releases from postulated accidents, and to shut down the exhaust fan when high radiation levels are detected in the stack airstream. The stack CAM interlock is credited as a mitigating control to stop continued unfiltered radiological and toxicological discharges from the stack, which may result from an accident involving failure of a HEPA filter. This document defines the initial technical design baseline for a HEPA filter AP fan interlock system.

TUCK, J.A.

2000-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require absolute exhaustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Peribronchiolar fibrosis in lungs of cats chronically exposed to diesel exhaust  

SciTech Connect

This study reports the quantitative changes in the pulmonary proximal acinar region following chronic exposure to diesel exhaust and following an additional 6 months in clean air. Cats (13 months of age) from a minimum disease colony were exposed to clean air (eight cats for 27 months and nine cats for 33 months), diesel exhaust for 8 hours/day, 7 days/week (nine cats for 27 months), or diesel exhaust for 27 months followed by 6 months in clean air (10 cats). Morphologic and morphometric evaluation using light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed two major exposure-related lesions in proximal acinar regions of lungs of cats: peribronchiolar fibrosis associated with significant increases in lymphocytes, fibroblasts, and interstitial macrophages containing diesel particulate-like inclusions and bronchiolar epithelial metaplasia associated with the presence of ciliated and basal cells and alveolar macrophages containing diesel particulate-like inclusions. Peribronchiolar fibrosis was greater at the end of the 6 months in clean air following exposure, whereas the bronchiolar epithelial metaplasia was most severe at the end of exposure. Following an additional 6 months in clean air the epithelium more closely resembled the control epithelial cell population. The labeling index of terminal bronchiolar epithelium was significantly increased at the end of exposure but was not significantly different from controls or exposed cats following an additional 6 months in clean air. The ultrastructural appearance of epithelial cells remained relatively unchanged following diesel exhaust exposure with the exception of diesel particulate-like inclusions.

Hyde, D.M.; Plopper, C.G.; Weir, A.J.; Murnane, R.D.; Warren, D.L.; Last, J.A.; Pepelko, W.E.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Active NOX Control of Cogen Gas Turbine Exhaust using a Nonlinear Feed Forward with Cascade Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active NOX Control of Cogen Gas Turbine Exhaust using a Nonlinear Feed Forward with Cascade control, cogeneration, gas turbine, model based control, feed forward, cascade ABSTRACT Presented is a model based strategy for controlling the NOX concentration of natural gas turbine emissions

Cooper, Doug

243

On-Road Remote Sensing of Vehicle Exhaust Emissions in Auckland, New Zealand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On-Road Remote Sensing of Vehicle Exhaust Emissions in Auckland, New Zealand S. Xie, J. G. Bluett Zealand's vehicle fleet. The remote sensing campaign was implemented to establish the emissions profile of this remote sensing campaign was to redress this knowledge gap, improve understanding of the emissions

Denver, University of

244

Environmental Evaluation on Atmosphere Radioactive Pollution of Uranium Mine Shaft Ventilation Exhausts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study on calculation and evaluation on atmosphere radioactive pollution of uranium mine well ventilation exhaust gas is presented in this paper. Neutral atmosphere conditions were taken into consideration. Nuclear industry standards on safety protection ... Keywords: atmosphere pollution, radiation protection, environmental evaluation, control methods

Dong Xie; Zehua Liu; Jun Xiong; Jianxiang Liu

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

In-Flight Winds from the Drift of a Rocket Exhaust Trail  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study presents an analysis of free drift of the exhaust trail obtained from television photos of India's satellite launch vehicle, ASLV-D2, in flight. Triangulation is not possible, necessitating the use of in-flight trajectory data and a ...

Prakash M. Dolas

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

System acceptance and operability test report for the RMCS exhauster C on flammable gas tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test report documents the completion of acceptance and operability testing of the rotary mode core sampling (RMCS) exhauster C, as modified for use as a major stack (as defined by the Washington State Department of Health) on flammable gas tanks.

Waldo, E.J.

1998-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

247

Setting the global thermostat with an exhaustible tradeable permit system  

SciTech Connect

The global warming policy debate has centered largely on near-term objectives such as freezing 1990 CO{sub 2} emissions without regard to long-run implications. A policy of freezing CO{sub 2} emissions is shown to slow but not halt global warming, while requiring expensive near-term adjustments. If the long-run temperature change outcome of the freeze policy is set as the goal of a more graduated control policy, one which allows the market to determine annual emissions, a more cost-effective solution is obtained that reduces the negative adjustment effects on the energy and other affected industries. The most cost-effective emissions time path of a graduated control policy could be achieved by an evaporative marketable CO{sub 2} emissions permit system. This paper provides a preliminary examination of an evaporative permit system used to achieve long-run stabilization of greenhouse-induced temperature change.

Kosobud, R.G.; Quinn, K.G. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Economics; South, D.W.; Daly, T.A. [Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States). Dept. of Economics

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Effect of Heat Exchanger Material and Fouling on Thermoelectric Exhaust Heat Recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is conducted in an effort to better understand and improve the performance of thermoelectric heat recovery systems for automotive use. For this purpose an experimental investigation of thermoelectrics in contact with clean and fouled heat exchangers of different materials is performed. The thermoelectric devices are tested on a bench-scale thermoelectric heat recovery apparatus that simulates automotive exhaust. The thermoelectric apparatus consists of a series of thermoelectric generators contacting a hot-side and a cold-side heat exchanger. The thermoelectric devices are tested with two different hot-side heat exchanger materials, stainless steel and aluminum, and at a range of simulated exhaust gas flowrates (40 to 150 slpm), exhaust gas temperatures (240 C and 280 C), and coolant-side temperatures (40 C and 80 C). It is observed that for higher exhaust gas flowrates, thermoelectric power output increases while overall system efficiency decreases. Degradation of the effectiveness of the EGR-type heat exchangers over a period of driving is also simulated by exposing the heat exchangers to diesel engine exhaust under thermophoretic conditions to form a deposit layer. For the fouled EGR-type heat exchangers, power output and system efficiency is observed to be significantly lower for all conditions tested. The study found, however, that heat exchanger material is the dominant factor in the ability of the system to convert heat to electricity with thermoelectric generators. This finding is thought to be unique to the heat exchangers used for this study, and not a universal trend for all system configurations.

Love, Norman [University of Texas, El Paso; Szybist, James P [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Quantifying requirements volatility effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an organization operating in the bancassurance sector we identified a low-risk IT subportfolio of 84 IT projects comprising together 16,500 function points, each project varying in size and duration, for which we were able to quantify its requirements ... Keywords: ?-ratio, ?-ratio, Compound monthly growth rate, IT dashboard, IT portfolio management, Quantitative IT portfolio management, Requirements churn, Requirements creep, Requirements metric, Requirements scrap, Requirements volatility, Requirements volatility dashboard, Scope creep, Volatility benchmark, Volatility tolerance factor

G. P. Kulk; C. Verhoef

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Absolute rate measurements of two-photon process of gases, liquids, and solids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Due to rapid improvements in high-power laser performance, two-photon absorption processes have become a very useful tool for studying the molecular structures of various gases, liquids and solids. However, measurements of absolute two-photon absorption cross sections were more or less ignored previously because of their small size. In this work, we obtained not only the two-photon absorption spectra, but also measurements of their absolute cross sections for various gases, liquids, and solids. 8 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

Chen, C.H.; McCann, M.P.; Payne, M.G.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

COMPARISON OF VENTED AND ABSOLUTE PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS FOR WATER-LEVEL MONITORING IN HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU WELLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated water-level data collected using vented pressure transducers deployed in Hanford Site Central Plateau wells commonly display more variability than manual tape measurements in response to barometric pressure fluctuations. To explain this difference, it was hypothesized that vented pressure transducers installed in some wells are subject to barometric pressure effects that reduce water-level measurement accuracy. Vented pressure transducers use a vent tube, which is open to the atmosphere at land surface, to supply air pressure to the transducer housing for barometric compensation so the transducer measurements will represent only the water pressure. When using vented transducers, the assumption is made that the air pressure between land surface and the well bore is in equilibrium. By comparison, absolute pressure transducers directly measure the air pressure within the wellbore. Barometric compensation is achieved by subtracting the well bore air pressure measurement from the total pressure measured by a second transducer submerged in the water. Thus, no assumption of air pressure equilibrium is needed. In this study, water-level measurements were collected from the same Central Plateau wells using both vented and absolute pressure transducers to evaluate the different methods of barometric compensation. Manual tape measurements were also collected to evaluate the transducers. Measurements collected during this study demonstrated that the vented pressure transducers over-responded to barometric pressure fluctuations due to a pressure disequilibrium between the air within the wellbores and the atmosphere at land surface. The disequilibrium is thought to be caused by the relatively long time required for barometric pressure changes to equilibrate between land surface and the deep vadose zone and may be exacerbated by the restriction of air flow between the well bore and the atmosphere due to the presence of sample pump landing plates and well caps. The disequilibrium is likely limited to wells screened across the water table (i.e., open to the deep vadose zone) where the depth to water is large or a low-permeability layer occurs in the vadose zone. Such wells are a pathway for air movement between the deep vadose zone and land surface and this sustains the pressure disequilibrium between the well bore and the atmosphere for longer time periods. Barometric over-response was not observed with the absolute pressure transducers because barometric compensation was achieved by directly measuring the air pressure within the well. Users of vented pressure transducers should be aware of the over-response issue in certain Hanford Site wells and ascertain if it will affect the use of the data. Pressure disequilibrium between the well and the atmosphere can be identified by substantial air movement through the wellbore. In wells exhibiting pressure disequilibrium, it is recommended that absolute pressure transducers be used rather than vented transducers for applications that require precise automated determinations of well water-level changes in response to barometric pressure fluctuations.

MCDONALD JP

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

252

Material and system for catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide in an exhaust stream of a combustion process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic material of activated hydrous metal oxide doped with platinum, palladium, or a combination of these, and optionally containing an alkali or alkaline earth metal, that is effective for NO.sub.X reduction in an oxidizing exhaust stream from a combustion process is disclosed. A device for reduction of nitrogen oxides in an exhaust stream, particularly an automotive exhaust stream, the device having a substrate coated with the activated noble-metal doped hydrous metal oxide of the invention is also provided.

Gardner, Timothy J. (Albuquerque, NM); Lott, Stephen E. (Edgewood, NM); Lockwood, Steven J. (Albuquerque, NM); McLaughlin, Linda I. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Simulation of catalytic oxidation and selective catalytic NOx reduction in lean-exhaust hybrid vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We utilize physically-based models for diesel exhaust catalytic oxidation and urea-based selective catalytic NOx reduction to study their impact on drive cycle performance of hypothetical light-duty diesel powered hybrid vehicles. The models have been implemented as highly flexible SIMULINK block modules that can be used to study multiple engine-aftertreatment system configurations. The parameters of the NOx reduction model have been adjusted to reflect the characteristics of Cu-zeolite catalysts, which are of widespread current interest. We demonstrate application of these models using the Powertrain System Analysis Toolkit (PSAT) software for vehicle simulations, along with a previously published methodology that accounts for emissions and temperature transients in the engine exhaust. Our results illustrate the potential impact of DOC and SCR interactions for lean hybrid electric and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Chakravarthy, Veerathu K [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Towards an intrusion detection system for battery exhaustion attacks on mobile computing devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mobile computers are subject to a unique form of denial of service attack known as a battery exhaustion attack, in which an attacker attempts to rapidly drain the battery of the device. In this paper we present our first steps in the design of an intrusion detection system for these attacks, a system that takes into account the performance, energy, and memory constraints of mobile computing devices. This intrusion detection system uses several parameters, such as CPU load and disk accesses, to estimate the power consumption using a linear regression model, allowing us to find the energy used on a per process basis, and thus identifying processes that are potentially battery exhaustion attacks. 1.

Daniel C. Nash; Thomas L. Martin; Dong S. Ha; Michael S. Hsiao

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Test report of evaluation of primary exhaust ventilation flowmeters for double shell hydrogen watch list tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document reports the results of testing four different flowmeters for use in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts of Double Shell Tanks on the hydrogen watch list that do not already have this capability. This currently includes tanks 241-AW-101,241-AN- 103, 241-AN-104, 241-AN-105 and 241-SY-103. The anticipated airflow velocity in these tanks range from 0.25 m/s(50 ft/min) to 1/78 m/s (350 ft/min). Past experiences at Hanford have forced the evaluation and selection of instruments to be used at the low flow and relatively high humidity conditions found in these tanks. Based on the results of this test, a flow meter has been chosen for installation in the primary exhaust ventilation ducts of the above mentioned waste tanks.

Willingham, W.E., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

256

Program on Technology Innovation: Combustion Exhaust Gas Monitoring with Laser Absorption Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In current plant practice, the operator of a coal-fired boiler must typically rely on a limited number of point measurements of exhaust-gas oxygen and nitric oxides (NOX) to support combustion and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) control efforts with the goal of meeting emissions reduction mandates. As a possible alternative, tunable diode laser technology offers the potential for enabling a much richer set of measurements to be obtained using in situ, species-specific laser absorption sensors. This t...

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

257

Analysis of drying wood waste fuels with boiler exhaust gases: simulation, performance, and economics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study evaluates the feasibility of retrofitting a rotary dryer to a hog fuel boiler, using the boiler exhaust gases as the drying medium. Two simulation models were developed. Each model accurately predicts system performance given site-specific parameters such as boiler steam demand, fue moisture content, boiler exhaust temperature and combustion excess air. Three rotary dryers/hog fuel boilers currently in operation in the forest products industry were analyzed. The data obtained were used to validate te accuracy of the simulation models and to establish the performance of boiler/dryer systems under field conditions. The boiler exhaust temperatures observed ranged from 340 to 500/sup 0/F and indicated that significant drying could be realized at moderate stack temperatures, as substantitated by experimental moisture content data. The simulation models were used to evaluate a general boiler/dryer system's sensitivity to variation in operating conditions. The sensitivity analyses indicated that under moderate conditions (400/sup 0/F boiler exhaust, etc.) the installation of a rotary dryer results in a 15% increase in boiler efficiency and a 13% decrease in fuel consumption. Both the field data and sensitivity analyses indicated that a greater increase in boiler efficiency could be realized at higher stack temperatures, approximately a 30% increase in boiler efficiency for a stack temperature of 600/sup 0/F. The cash flow basis payback periods based on hog fuel savings due to dryer installation ranged from 2.7 years for a used dryer to 3.9 years for a new dryer. The payback periods for equivalent BTU savings of gas and oil ranged from 1.2 to 2.0 for gas and from 1.3 to 2.1 years for oil. This study concludes that retrofitting a rotary dryer to an existing hog fuel boiler is an economically feasible option to the forest products industry. 31 references, 24 figures, 18 tables.

Kirk, R.W.; Wilson, J.B.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Characterization and control of exhaust gas from diesel engine firing coal-water mixture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exhaust from the GE-TS single cylinder diesel engine, fitted with hardened metal, and diamond-tipped metal fuel injection nozzles, and firing coal-water mixture (CWM) has been characterized with respect to gas composition, particulate size distribution, and particulate filtration characteristics. The measured flue gas compositions are roughly in keeping with results from combustion calculations. The time variations of the hydrocarbon, CO, and NO[sub x] concentrations are also understood in terms of known reaction mechanisms.

Samuel, E.A.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Characterization and control of exhaust gas from diesel engine firing coal-water mixture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exhaust from the GE-TS single cylinder diesel engine, fitted with hardened metal, and diamond-tipped metal fuel injection nozzles, and firing coal-water mixture (CWM) has been characterized with respect to gas composition, particulate size distribution, and particulate filtration characteristics. The measured flue gas compositions are roughly in keeping with results from combustion calculations. The time variations of the hydrocarbon, CO, and NO{sub x} concentrations are also understood in terms of known reaction mechanisms.

Samuel, E.A.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Catalysts to reduce NO.sub.x in an exhaust gas stream and methods of preparation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Catalysts, systems and methods are described to reduce NO.sub.x emissions of an internal combustion engine. In one embodiment, an emissions treatment system for an exhaust stream is provided having a catalyst comprising silver on a particulate alumina support, the silver having a diameter of less than about 20 nm. Methods of manufacturing catalysts are described in which ionic silver is impregnated on particulate hydroxylated alumina particles.

Koermer, Gerald S. (Basking Ridge, NJ); Moini, Ahmad (Princeton, NJ); Furbeck, Howard (Hamilton, NJ); Castellano, Christopher R. (Ringoes, NJ)

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require absolute exhaustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Estimation of Fuel Savings by Recuperation of Furnace Exhausts to Preheat Combustion Air  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recovery of waste energy in furnace exhaust gases is gaining in importance as fuel costs continue to escalate. Installation of a recuperator in the furnace exhaust stream to preheat the combustion air can result in considerable savings in fuel usage. These savings are primarily the result of the sensible heat increase of the combustion air and, to some extent, improved combustion efficiency. The amount of fuel saved will depend on the exhaust gas temperature, amount of excess air used, the type of burner and the furnace control system. These fuel savings may be accurately measured by metering the energy consumption per unit of production before and after installation of the recuperator. In the design of a waste heat recuperation system, it is necessary to be able to estimate the fuel saved by use of such a system. Standard industrial practice refers to the method described in the North American Combustion Handbook with its curves and tables that directly predict the percentage fuel savings. This paper analyzes the standard estimation technique and suggests a more realistic approach to calculation of percent fuel savings. Mass and enthalpy balances are provided for both methods and a typical furnace recuperation example is detailed to illustrate the differences in the two methods of calculating the percent energy saved.

Rebello, W. J.; Kohnken, K. H.; Phipps, H. R., Jr.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooler Fouling in Diesel Applications: Fundamental Studies Deposit Properties and Microstructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the results of experimental efforts aimed at improving the understanding of the mechanisms and conditions at play in the fouling of EGR coolers. An experimental apparatus was constructed to utilize simplified surrogate heat exchanger tubes in lieu of full-size heat exchangers. The use of these surrogate tubes allowed removal of the tubes after exposure to engine exhaust for study of the deposit layer and its properties. The exhaust used for fouling the surrogate tubes was produced using a modern medium-duty diesel engine fueled with both ultra-low sulfur diesel and biodiesel blends. At long exposure times, no significant difference in the fouling rate was observed between fuel types and HC levels. Surface coatings for the tubes were also evaluated to determine their impact on deposit growth. No surface treatment or coating produced a reduction in the fouling rate or any evidence of deposit removal. In addition, microstructural analysis of the fouling layers was performed using optical and electron microscopy in order to better understand the deposition mechanism. The experimental results are consistent with thermophoretic deposition for deposit formation, and van der Waals attraction between the deposit surface and exhaust-borne particulate.

Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL; Styles, Dan [Ford Motor Company; Simko, Steve [Ford Motor Company

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

BER Requirements Review 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network Requirements...

264

ASCR Requirements Review 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About ESnet Overview ESnet Staff Governance Our Network Case Studies ESnet Strategic Plan ESnet Organizational Chart ESnet History Science Requirements Network Requirements...

265

TVDG Training Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Training Requirements TVDG Training Requirements information is now located at: http:www.bnl.govuserscenterTrainingtandem.asp. You will automatically be taken to the new...

266

Radiometric Modeling of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction of their Absolute Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiometric Modeling of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction CENTER FOR IMAGING SCIENCE Title of Dissertation: Radiometric Modeling of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction of their Absolute Temperature from Remote Thermal

Salvaggio, Carl

267

Relative and absolute components of leapfrogging in mobile phones by developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper suggests a novel way of measuring the important concept of leapfrogging in mobile phones. It argues that an adequate measure of leapfrogging needs to include absolute as well as relative components. The new measure is used to measure the performance ... Keywords: Diffusion, ICT, New technology, Penetration, Technology

Jeffrey James

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A California Statewide Three-Dimensional Seismic Velocity Model from Both Absolute and Differential Times  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A California Statewide Three-Dimensional Seismic Velocity Model from Both Absolute and Differential of the California crust and uppermost mantle using a regional-scale double-difference tomography algorithm. We begin using S picks from both the Southern California Seismic Network and USArray, assuming a starting model

Shearer, Peter

270

The Impact of Different Absolute Solar Irradiance Values on Current Climate Model Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of the pre-industrial and doubled CO2 climates are made with the GISS GCMAM using two different estimates of the absolute solar irradiance value, a higher value measured by solar radiometers in the 1990s and the lower value measured ...

David H. Rind; Judith L. Lean; Jeffrey Jonas

271

On the vanishing of Tor of the absolute integral Hans Schoutens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

submitted to Elsevier Science 03.06.2003 #12;by Kunz's Theorem, that R is regular (here R1/p denotes NYC College of Technology City University of New York NY, NY 11201 (USA) Abstract Let R be an excellent local domain of positive characteristic with residue field k and let R+ be its absolute integral

Schoutens, Hans

272

Absolute Geostrophic Velocity Determination from Historical Hydrographic Data in the Western North Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beta-spiral calculations are presented using averaged western North Atlantic hydrographic data from the period 191473. Profiles of long-term mean geostrophic flow relative to ISM db along 70W from 26 to 32N are shown. Absolute reference ...

Eric J. Lindstrom; David W. Behringer; Bruce A. Taft; Curtis C. Ebbesmeyer

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Absolutely continuous spectrum implies ballistic transport for quantum particles in a random potential on tree graphs  

SciTech Connect

We discuss the dynamical implications of the recent proof that for a quantum particle in a random potential on a regular tree graph absolutely continuous (ac) spectrum occurs non-perturbatively through rare fluctuation-enabled resonances. The main result is spelled in the title.

Aizenman, Michael [Departments of Physics and Mathematics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Warzel, Simone [Zentrum Mathematik, TU Munich, Boltzmannstr. 3, 85747 Garching (Germany)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Far Future Colliders and Required R&D Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Particle colliders for high energy physics have been in the forefront of scientific discoveries for more than half a century. The accelerator technology of the collider has progressed immensely, while the beam energy, luminosity, facility size and the cost have grown by several orders of magnitude. The method of colliding beams has not fully exhausted its potential but its pace of progress has greatly slowed down. In this paper we very briefly review the R&D toward near future colliders and make an attempt to look beyond the current horizon and outline the changes in the paradigm required for the next breakthroughs.

Shiltsev, V.; /Fermilab

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Exhaust Aftertreatment and Low Pressure Loop EGR Applied to an Off-Highway Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of the project was to demonstrate that low pressure loop EGR incorporating a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a diesel particulate filter (DPF) can be applied to an off-highway engine to meet Tier 3 (Task I) and Interim Tier 4 (Task II) off-road emissions standards. Task I data was collected using a John Deere 8.1 liter engine modified with a low pressure loop EGR system. The engine and EGR system was optimized and final data over the ISO 8178 eight mode test indicated the NOx emissions were less than 4 g/kWh and the PM was less than 0.02 g/kWh which means the engine met the Tier 3 off-road standard. Considerable experimental data was collected and used by Michigan Tech University to develop and calibrate the MTU-Filter 1D DPF model. The MTU-Filter 1D DPF code predicts the particulate mass evolution (deposition and oxidation) in the diesel particulate filter (DPF) during simultaneous loading and during thermal and NO{sub 2}-assisted regeneration conditions. It also predicts the pressure drop across the DPF, the flow and temperature fields, the solid filtration efficiency and the particle number distribution downstream of the DPF. A DOC model was also used to predict the NO{sub 2} upstream of the DPF. The DPF model was calibrated to the experimental data at temperatures from 230 C to 550 C, and volumetric flow rates from 9 to 39 actual m{sup 3}/min. Model predictions of the solid particulate mass deposited in the DPF after each loading and regeneration case were in agreement within +/-10g (or +/-10%) of experimental measurements at the majority of the engine operating conditions. The activation temperatures obtained from the model calibration are in good agreement with values reported in the literature and gave good results in the model calibration by using constant pre-exponential factors throughout the entire range of conditions evaluated. The average clean filter permeability was 2.372 x 10{sup -13} m{sup 2}. Estimates of the solid particulate mass packing density inside the porous wall were 1 to 5 kg/m{sup 3}; and percolation factors were 0.81 to 0.97. Average particulate layer permeability was 1.95 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}. Solid particulate layer packing density values were between 11 and 128 kg/m{sup 3}. These values were in good agreement with the Peclet number correlation theory reported in the literature. NO{sub 2}-assisted oxidation of PM in the DPF showed experimentally that a significant reduction of the pressure drop can be achieved (120 ppm) is available and high exhaust gas temperatures ({approx}360-460 C) can be maintained, even at high PM loadings (low NO{sub 2}/solid PM ratios). The CRT{trademark} (DOC-DPF system) showed limited advantages when used with high PM rates (low NOx/PM ratios) in combination with a low pressure loop EGR strategy for a continuous operation of an engine-exhaust aftertreatment system. The 8.1-liter engine was not designed for low-pressure loop EGR and when the EGR was added the NOx emissions were reduced but the PM emissions increased. This corresponds to the well known NOx to PM relationship in which if the NOx is reduced the PM emissions increase. In order for this technology to be successful on this engine family, the engine out PM emissions must be reduced. These results led to Task II. Task II objective was to meet the interim Tier 4 standards using the CCRT{trademark} technology applied to an advanced 6.8 liter John Deere engine. The advanced engine incorporated a 4 valve head, required additional EGR, an advanced high pressure common rail fuel system and a better matched turbocharger. The EGR system was optimized and the goal of less than 2 g/kWh NOx and less than 0.02 g/kWh PM were achieved over the 8 mode test. Again, experimental data was provided to Michigan Tech to study the passive regeneration of the CCRT{trademark} technology. Two computer models, i.e., the MTU 1-D DOC model and the MTU 1-D 2-layer CPF model were developed as part of this research and calibrated using the data obtained from experiments. The 1-D D

Baumgard, Kirby; Triana, Antonio; Johnson, John; Yang, Song; Premchand, Kiran

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

276

Exhaust Aftertreatment and Low Pressure Loop EGR Applied to an Off-Highway Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the project was to demonstrate that low pressure loop EGR incorporating a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a diesel particulate filter (DPF) can be applied to an off-highway engine to meet Tier 3 (Task I) and Interim Tier 4 (Task II) off-road emissions standards. Task I data was collected using a John Deere 8.1 liter engine modified with a low pressure loop EGR system. The engine and EGR system was optimized and final data over the ISO 8178 eight mode test indicated the NOx emissions were less than 4 g/kWh and the PM was less than 0.02 g/kWh which means the engine met the Tier 3 off-road standard. Considerable experimental data was collected and used by Michigan Tech University to develop and calibrate the MTU-Filter 1D DPF model. The MTU-Filter 1D DPF code predicts the particulate mass evolution (deposition and oxidation) in the diesel particulate filter (DPF) during simultaneous loading and during thermal and NO{sub 2}-assisted regeneration conditions. It also predicts the pressure drop across the DPF, the flow and temperature fields, the solid filtration efficiency and the particle number distribution downstream of the DPF. A DOC model was also used to predict the NO{sub 2} upstream of the DPF. The DPF model was calibrated to the experimental data at temperatures from 230 C to 550 C, and volumetric flow rates from 9 to 39 actual m{sup 3}/min. Model predictions of the solid particulate mass deposited in the DPF after each loading and regeneration case were in agreement within +/-10g (or +/-10%) of experimental measurements at the majority of the engine operating conditions. The activation temperatures obtained from the model calibration are in good agreement with values reported in the literature and gave good results in the model calibration by using constant pre-exponential factors throughout the entire range of conditions evaluated. The average clean filter permeability was 2.372 x 10{sup -13} m{sup 2}. Estimates of the solid particulate mass packing density inside the porous wall were 1 to 5 kg/m{sup 3}; and percolation factors were 0.81 to 0.97. Average particulate layer permeability was 1.95 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}. Solid particulate layer packing density values were between 11 and 128 kg/m{sup 3}. These values were in good agreement with the Peclet number correlation theory reported in the literature. NO{sub 2}-assisted oxidation of PM in the DPF showed experimentally that a significant reduction of the pressure drop can be achieved (<8 kPa) when sufficient NO{sub 2} (>120 ppm) is available and high exhaust gas temperatures ({approx}360-460 C) can be maintained, even at high PM loadings (low NO{sub 2}/solid PM ratios). The CRT{trademark} (DOC-DPF system) showed limited advantages when used with high PM rates (low NOx/PM ratios) in combination with a low pressure loop EGR strategy for a continuous operation of an engine-exhaust aftertreatment system. The 8.1-liter engine was not designed for low-pressure loop EGR and when the EGR was added the NOx emissions were reduced but the PM emissions increased. This corresponds to the well known NOx to PM relationship in which if the NOx is reduced the PM emissions increase. In order for this technology to be successful on this engine family, the engine out PM emissions must be reduced. These results led to Task II. Task II objective was to meet the interim Tier 4 standards using the CCRT{trademark} technology applied to an advanced 6.8 liter John Deere engine. The advanced engine incorporated a 4 valve head, required additional EGR, an advanced high pressure common rail fuel system and a better matched turbocharger. The EGR system was optimized and the goal of less than 2 g/kWh NOx and less than 0.02 g/kWh PM were achieved over the 8 mode test. Again, experimental data was provided to Michigan Tech to study the passive regeneration of the CCRT{trademark} technology. Two computer models, i.e., the MTU 1-D DOC model and the MTU 1-D 2-layer CPF model were developed as part of this research and calibrated using the data obtained from experiments. The 1-D D

Baumgard, Kirby; Triana, Antonio; Johnson, John; Yang, Song; Premchand, Kiran

2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

277

Lubricant oil consumption effects on diesel exhaust ash emissions using a sulfur dioxide trace technique and thermogravimetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed experimental study was conducted targeting lubricant consumption effects on ,diesel exhaust ash levels using a model year 2002 5.9L diesel engine, high and low Sulfur commercial lubricants, and clean diesel ...

Plumley, Michael J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

HAN System Security Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, "Home Area Network (HAN) Security Requirements," identifies and discusses the key cyber security requirements for different interfaces of HAN-based systems. These cyber security requirements for HAN interfaces are derived from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) "Catalog of Control Systems Security," which provides an excellent checklist of general security requirements.

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

279

Absolute entropy and free energy of fluids using the hypothetical scanning method. I. Calculation of transition probabilities from local grand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Absolute entropy and free energy of fluids using the hypothetical scanning method. I. Calculation the absolute entropy and free energy from a Boltzmann sample generated by Monte Carlo, molecular dynamics for the free energy. We demonstrate that very good results for the entropy and the free energy can be obtained

Meirovitch, Hagai

280

A Liquid-Helium-Cooled Absolute Reference Cold Load forLong-Wavelength Radiometric Calibration  

SciTech Connect

We describe a large (78-cm) diameter liquid-helium-cooled black-body absolute reference cold load for the calibration of microwave radiometers. The load provides an absolute calibration near the liquid helium (LHe) boiling point, accurate to better than 30 mK for wavelengths from 2.5 to 25 cm (12-1.2 GHz). The emission (from non-LHe temperature parts of the cold load) and reflection are small and well determined. Total corrections to the LHe boiling point temperature are {le} 50 mK over the operating range. This cold load has been used at several wavelengths at the South Pole and at the White Mountain Research Station. In operation, the average LHe loss rate was {le} 4.4 l/hr. Design considerations, radiometric and thermal performance and operational aspects are discussed. A comparison with other LHe-cooled reference loads including the predecessor of this cold load is given.

Bensadoun, M.; Witebsky, C.; Smoot, George F.; De Amici,Giovanni; Kogut, A.; Levin, S.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require absolute exhaustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF  

SciTech Connect

A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

Mackinnon, A; Casey, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M G; Seguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Katz, J; Knauer, J; Meyerhofer, D; Sangster, T; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Hachett, S P; Hartouni, E; Lepape, S; Mckernan, M; Moran, M; Yeamans, C

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

282

Absolute response of Fuji imaging plate detectors to picosecond-electron bunches  

SciTech Connect

The characterization of the absolute number of electrons generated by laser wakefield acceleration often relies on absolutely calibrated FUJI imaging plates (IP), although their validity in the regime of extreme peak currents is untested. Here, we present an extensive study on the dependence of the sensitivity of BAS-SR and BAS-MS IP to picosecond electron bunches of varying charge of up to 60 pC, performed at the electron accelerator ELBE, making use of about three orders of magnitude of higher peak intensity than in prior studies. We demonstrate that the response of the IPs shows no saturation effect and that the BAS-SR IP sensitivity of 0.0081 photostimulated luminescence per electron number confirms surprisingly well data from previous works. However, the use of the identical readout system and handling procedures turned out to be crucial and, if unnoticed, may be an important error source.

Zeil, K.; Kraft, S. D.; Jochmann, A.; Kroll, F.; Jahr, W.; Schramm, U. [Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (FZD), Dresden 01314 (Germany); Karsch, L.; Pawelke, J. [TU Dresden, OncoRay-Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden 01307 (Germany); Hidding, B.; Pretzler, G. [Heinrich-Heine Universitaet Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf 40225 (Germany)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

283

Admission Requirements Admission Requirements for Graduate Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

required reports. Such a candidate may, for a nominal fee and with the approval of his/her graduate advisor://www.utdallas.edu/admissions/graduate/degrees/ There is a $50.00 nonrefundable application fee. Applicants are advised to carefully review the program a bachelor's degree. Test Scores (GMAT, GRE) Standardized test scores must be official and reported directly

O'Toole, Alice J.

284

Requirement-Reviews.pptx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Published 3 h%p:www.nersc.govsciencerequirements---reviews final---reports * Compurequirements f or 20132014 * Execurequirements * Case s...

285

Centriacinar alterations in lungs of cats chronically exposed to diesel exhaust  

SciTech Connect

This study describes the morphologic changes in the centriacinar regions of lungs following long-term exposure of cats to diesel exhaust. Nine male cats (13 months of age) from a minimal disease colony were exposed to diesel exhaust for 8 hours/day, 7 days/week for 27 months. Eight cats were exposed to filtered air. Following exposure, the animals were killed by exsanguination and the lungs and trachea removed from the chest by thoracotomy, weighed, and fixed via tracheal cannula with glutaraldehyde/paraformaldehyde (550 mOsmoles, pH 7.4) at 30 cm of pressure. Centriacinar regions were selected from fixed tissue, the airways bisected, and complementary tissue halves processed by a large block method for high resolution light microscopy and for scanning electron microscopy. Compared with controls, diesel-exposed cats had lower fresh lung and kidney weights and lower fixed volumes of the right cranial lobe. The volume fractions of pulmonary parenchyma and nonparenchyma were unchanged. Epithelium of terminal and respiratory bronchioles in exposed cats consisted of three types of cells (ciliated, basal, and Clara cells), compared with only one type (Clara cells) in controls. Carbon-laden macrophages were found filling alveolar and interstitial spaces in exposed animals. Type 2 pneumocyte hyperplasia was present in proximal interalveolar septa. More distal alveolar ducts and the majority of the rest of the parenchyma were unchanged from controls. We concluded that exposure to diesel exhaust produces changes in both epithelial and interstitial tissue compartments and that the focus of these lesions in peripheral lung is the centriacinar region where alveolar ducts join terminal conducting airways.

Plopper, C.G.; Hyde, D.M.; Weir, A.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Progress in Understanding the Toxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Exhaust Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To help guide heavy vehicle engine, fuel, and exhaust after-treatment technology development, the U.S. Department of Energy and the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute are conducting research not addressed elsewhere on aspects of the toxicity of particulate engine emissions. Advances in these technologies that reduce diesel particulate mass emissions may result in changes in particle composition, and there is concern that the number of ultrafine (<0.1 micron) particles may increase. All present epidemiological and laboratory data on the toxicity of diesel emissions were derived from emissions of older-technology engines. New, short-term toxicity data are needed to make health-based choices among diesel technologies and to compare the toxicity of diesel emissions to those of other engine technologies. This research program has two facets: (1) development and use of short-term in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays for comparing the toxicities of gasoline and diesel exhaust emissions; and (2) determination of the disposition of inhaled ultrafine particles deposited in the lung. Responses of cultured cells, cultured lung slices, and rodent lungs to various types of particles were compared to develop an improved short-term toxicity screening capability. To date, chemical toxicity indicators of cultured human A549 cells and early inflammatory and cytotoxic indicators of rat lungs have given the best distinguishing capability. A study is now underway to determine the relative toxicities of exhaust samples from in-use diesel and gasoline engines. The samples are being collected under the direction of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory with support from DOE's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. The ability to generate solid ultrafine particles and to trace their movement in the body as particles and soluble material was developed. Data from rodents suggest that ultrafine particles can move from the lung to the liver in particulate form. The quantitative disposition of inhaled ultrafine particles will be determined in rodents and nonhuman primates.

Kristen J. Nikula; Gregory L. Finch; Richard A. Westhouse; JeanClare Seagrave; Joe L. Mauderly; Doughlas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

287

Allocating Reserve Requirements (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides an overview of present and possible future ways to allocate and assign benefits for reserve requirements.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Collaborative Requirements Engineering Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... dependencies, safety, and environmental requirements) is essential to the ... Construction, and Operation of Constructed Facilities, March 2012. ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

289

Precise Measurement of the Absolute Yield of Fluorescence Photons in Atmospheric Gases  

SciTech Connect

We have performed a measurement of the absolute yield of fluorescence photons at the Fermilab Test Beam. A systematic uncertainty at 5% level was achieved by the use of Cherenkov radiation as a reference calibration light source. A cross-check was performed by an independent calibration using a laser light source. A significant improvement on the energy scale uncertainty of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays is expected.

Ave, M.; /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.; Bohacova, M.; /Chicago U., EFI; Daumiller, K.; /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.; Di Carlo, P.; /INFN, Aquila; Di Giulio, C.; /INFN, Rome; Luis, P.Facal San; /Chicago U., EFI; Gonzales, D.; /Karlsruhe U., EKP; Hojvat, C.; /Fermilab; Horandel, J.R.; /Nijmegen U., IMAPP; Hrabovsky, M.; /Palacky U.; Iarlori, M.; /INFN, Aquila /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Absolute Bunch Length Measurements at the ALS by Incoherent Synchrotron Radiation Fluctuation Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By analyzing the pulse to pulse intensity fluctuations of the radiation emitted by a charge particle in the incoherent part of the spectrum, it is possible to extract information about the spatial distribution of the beam. At the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, we have developed and tested a simple scheme based on this principle that allows for the absolute measurement of the bunch length. A description of the method and the experimental results are presented.

Filippetto, D.; /Frascati; Sannibale, F.; Zolotorev, Max Samuil; /LBL, Berkeley; Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC

2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

291

Strength and fatigue of NT551 silicon nitride and NT551 diesel exhaust valves  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The content of this report is excerpted from Mark Andrew's Ph.D. Thesis (Andrews, 1999), which was funded by a DOE/OTT High Temperature Materials Laboratory Graduate Fellowship. It involves the characterization of NT551 and valves fabricated with it. The motivations behind using silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) as an exhaust valve for a diesel engine are presented in this section. There are several economic factors that have encouraged the design and implementation of ceramic components for internal combustion (IC) engines. The reasons for selecting the diesel engine valve for this are also presented.

Andrews, M.J.; Werezczak, A.A.; Kirkland, T.P.; Breder, K.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Emergency Medical Treatment Required  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emergency Medical Treatment Required Non-Emergency Medical Treatment Required If possible, get help present if possible OptaComp will complete the "First Report of Injury or Illness" and authorize medical Investigation Report" to Environmental Health & Safety within 48 hours Emergency Medical Treatment Required

Weston, Ken

293

FES Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FES Science Network Requirements Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted March 13 and 14, 2008 #12;FES Science Network Requirements Workshop Fusion Energy Sciences Program Office, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network Gaithersburg, MD ­ March 13 and 14, 2008 ESnet

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

294

PIT Coating Requirements Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This study identifies the applicable requirements for procurement and installation of a coating intended for tank farm valve and pump pit interior surfaces. These requirements are intended to be incorporated into project specification documents and design media. This study also evaluates previously recommended coatings and identifies requirement-compliant coating products.

MINTEER, D.J.

2000-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

295

Transportation System Requirements Document  

SciTech Connect

This Transportation System Requirements Document (Trans-SRD) describes the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of this document is to define the system-level requirements for Transportation consistent with the CRWMS Requirement Document (CRD). These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presents an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. The interface identification and description are published in the CRWMS Interface Specification.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Differential transcriptional regulation of IL-8 expression by human airway epithelial cells exposed to diesel exhaust particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induces inflammatory signaling characterized by MAP kinase-mediated activation of NFkB and AP-1 in vitro and in bronchial biopsies obtained from human subjects exposed to DEP. NFkB and AP-1 activation results in the upregulation of genes involved in promoting inflammation in airway epithelial cells, a principal target of inhaled DEP. IL-8 is a proinflammatory chemokine expressed by the airway epithelium in response to environmental pollutants. The mechanism by which DEP exposure induces IL-8 expression is not well understood. In the current study, we sought to determine whether DEP with varying organic content induces IL-8 expression in lung epithelial cells, as well as, to develop a method to rapidly evaluate the upstream mechanism(s) by which DEP induces IL-8 expression. Exposure to DEP with varying organic content differentially induced IL-8 expression and IL-8 promoter activity human airway epithelial cells. Mutational analysis of the IL-8 promoter was also performed using recombinant human cell lines expressing reporters linked to the mutated promoters. Treatment with a low organic-containing DEP stimulated IL-8 expression by a mechanism that is predominantly NFkB-dependent. In contrast, exposure to high organic-containing DEP induced IL-8 expression independently of NFkB through a mechanism that requires AP-1 activity. Our study reveals that exposure to DEP of varying organic content induces proinflammatory gene expression through multiple specific mechanisms in human airway epithelial cells. The approaches used in the present study demonstrate the utility of a promoter-reporter assay ensemble for identifying transcriptional pathways activated by pollutant exposure.

Tal, Tamara L. [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Simmons, Steven O. [Integrated Systems Toxicology, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Silbajoris, Robert; Dailey, Lisa [Environmental and Public Health, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Cho, Seung-Hyun [Air Pollution Prevention Control Division, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Research Participation Program, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge (United States); Ramabhadran, Ram [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Integrated Systems Toxicology, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Linak, William [Air Pollution Prevention Control Division, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Reed, William; Bromberg, Philip A. [Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Samet, James M., E-mail: samet.james@epa.go [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Environmental and Public Health, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

The Natural Gas Vehicle Challenge `92: Exhaust emissions testing and results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge `92, was organized by Argonne National Laboratory. The main sponsors were the US Department of Energy the Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada, and the Society of Automotive Engineers. It resulted in 20 varied approaches to the conversion of a gasoline-fueled, spark-ignited, internal combustion engine to dedicated natural gas use. Starting with a GMC Sierra 2500 pickup truck donated by General Motors, teams of college and university student engineers worked to optimize Chevrolet V-8 engines operating on natural gas for improved emissions, fuel economy, performance, and advanced design features. This paper focuses on the results of the emission event, and compares engine mechanical configurations, engine management systems, catalyst configurations and locations, and approaches to fuel control and the relationship of these parameters to engine. out and tailpipe emissions of regulated exhaust constituents. Nine of the student modified trucks passed the current levels of exhaust emission standards, and some exceeded the strictest future emissions standards envisioned by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Factors contributing to good emissions control using natural gas are summarized, and observations concerning necessary components of a successful emissions control strategy are presented.

Rimkus, W.A.; Larsen, R.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Zammit, M.G. [Johnson Matthey, Wayne, PA (United States); Davies, J.G.; Salmon, G.S. [General Motors of Canada Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada); Bruetsch, R.I. [US Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The Natural Gas Vehicle Challenge '92: Exhaust emissions testing and results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge '92, was organized by Argonne National Laboratory. The main sponsors were the US Department of Energy the Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada, and the Society of Automotive Engineers. It resulted in 20 varied approaches to the conversion of a gasoline-fueled, spark-ignited, internal combustion engine to dedicated natural gas use. Starting with a GMC Sierra 2500 pickup truck donated by General Motors, teams of college and university student engineers worked to optimize Chevrolet V-8 engines operating on natural gas for improved emissions, fuel economy, performance, and advanced design features. This paper focuses on the results of the emission event, and compares engine mechanical configurations, engine management systems, catalyst configurations and locations, and approaches to fuel control and the relationship of these parameters to engine. out and tailpipe emissions of regulated exhaust constituents. Nine of the student modified trucks passed the current levels of exhaust emission standards, and some exceeded the strictest future emissions standards envisioned by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Factors contributing to good emissions control using natural gas are summarized, and observations concerning necessary components of a successful emissions control strategy are presented.

Rimkus, W.A.; Larsen, R.P. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Zammit, M.G. (Johnson Matthey, Wayne, PA (United States)); Davies, J.G.; Salmon, G.S. (General Motors of Canada Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada)); Bruetsch, R.I. (US Environmental Protection Agency (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Process for the removal of acid forming gases from exhaust gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Exhaust gases are treated to remove NO or NO[sub x] and SO[sub 2] by contacting the gases with an aqueous emulsion or suspension of yellow phosphorus preferably in a wet scrubber. The pressure is not critical, and ambient pressures are used. Hot water temperatures are best, but economics suggest about 50 C is attractive. The amount of yellow phosphorus used will vary with the composition of the exhaust gas, less than 3% for small concentrations of NO, and 10% or higher for concentrations above say 1000 ppm. Similarly, the pH will vary with the composition being treated, and it is adjusted with a suitable alkali. For mixtures of NO[sub x] and SO[sub 2], alkalis that are used for flue gas desulfurization are preferred. With this process, 100% of the by-products created are usable, and close to 100% of the NO or NO[sub x] and SO[sub 2] can be removed in an economic fashion. 9 figs.

Chang, S.G.; Liu, D.K.

1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

300

Novel Collection and Toxicological Analysis Techniques for IC Engine Exhaust Particulate Matter  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project staff partnered with Costas Sioutas from the University of Southern California to apply the VACES (Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enhancement System) to a diesel engine test facility at West Virginia University Department of Mechanical Engineering and later the NIOSH Lake Lynn Mine facility. The VACES system was able to allow diesel exhaust particulate matter (DPM) to grow to sufficient particle size to be efficiently collected with the SKC Biosampler impinger device, directly into a suspension of simulated pulmonary surfactant. At the WVU-MAE facility, the concentration of the aerosol was too high to allow efficient use of the VACES concentration enhancement, although aerosol collection was successful. Collection at the LLL was excellent with the diluted exhaust stream. In excess of 50 samples were collected at the LLL facility, along with matching filter samples, at multiple engine speed and load conditions. Replicate samples were combined and concentration increased using a centrifugal concentrator. Bioassays were negative for all tested samples, but this is believed to be due to insufficient concentration in the final assay suspensions.

Michael Keane; Xiao-Chun Shi; Tong-man Ong

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require absolute exhaustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Mandatory Supervisory Training Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mandatory Supervisory Training Requirements Mandatory Supervisory Training Requirements All DOE supervisors, managers, and executives will comply with mandatory supervisory training requirements (5 CFR 412; 5 CFR 315.801; 5 CFR 315.901; DOE O 360.1; and DOE O 320.1): * New supervisors: 80 hours of supervisory training, with 40 hours required to be completed during the supervisory probationary period. * Experienced supervisors: minimum of 8 hours of supervisory training each year. The Office of Learning and Workforce Development has developed an inventory of training and developmental activities that will meet the supervisory training requirements. The DOE courses Supervisory Essentials (32 hours) and Navigating the Federal Hiring Process (8 hours) are required to fulfill the first year 40-hour training

302

Management requirements for accreditation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... handbook, shall be defined in the quality manual. ... It is a fundamental requirement that the results ... NIST Handbook 150 (and ISO/IEC 17025) details ...

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

303

Public Safety Network Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... need excellent situational awareness in order to do their jobs effectively. ... performance requirements as shown in Figure 2. This analysis was used ...

2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

304

CCI: Program Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Your Arrival Your First Day Weekly Activities Program Requirements Checkout FAQ The DOE WDTS site has comprehensive information on Participant Obligations. Consult that site for...

305

Public Safety Network Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Usage scenario. ... imposed by public safety applications and usage scenarios is key in ... requirements as shown in Figure 2. This analysis was used as ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

306

ASCR Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ASCR Science Network Requirements Office of AdvancedScientific Computing Research, DOE Office of ScienceEnergy Sciences Network Gaithersburg, MD April 15 and 16,

Dart, Eli

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

New Employee Training Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

All New Employees New Supervisors New Employee Training Requirements Welcome to Berkeley Lab We value you and the talents that you bring to our workplace. The training listed...

308

Integrated Management Requirements mapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains five appendices documenting how Sandia implemented the DOE Conduct of Operations (5480.19) and DOE Quality Assurance (5700.6C) orders. It provides a mapping of the Sandia integrated requirements to the specific requirements of each Order and a mapping to Sandia's approved program for implementing the Conduct of Operations Order.

Holmes, J.T.; Andrews, N.S.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Absolute permeability as a function of confining pressure, pore pressure, and temperature  

SciTech Connect

This is an investigation of the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand and consolidated sandstone cores to distilled water as a function of the temperature of the system, confining pressure on the core, and the pore pressure of the flowing fluid. The effects of flow rate and throughput are also discussed. In contrast to some previous investigations, no effect of temperature on permeability was found beyond experimental errors and effects caused by volumetric throughput. The probable causes of differing results in previous studies are also presented.

Gobran, B.D.; Brigham, W.E.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Absolute permeability as a function of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature  

SciTech Connect

This work is an investigation of the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand and consolidated sandstone cores to distilled water as a function of the temperature of the system, confining pressure on the core and the pore pressure of the flowing liquid. The results of this study indicate that temperatures is not an important variable that needs to be reproduced in the laboratory. Confining pressure and pore pressure affect permeability in a predictable manner. This allows measurements at a lower pressure level to be extrapolated to higher pressure conditions. 21 refs.

Gobran, B.D.; Brigham, W.E.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Absolute free energies estimated by combining pre-calculated molecular fragment libraries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The absolute free energy -- or partition function, equivalently -- of a molecule can be estimated computationally using a suitable reference system. Here, we demonstrate a practical method for staging such calculations by growing a molecule based on a series of fragments. Significant computer time is saved by pre-calculating fragment configurations and interactions for re-use in a variety of molecules. We employ such fragment libraries and interaction tables for amino acids and capping groups to estimate free energies for small peptides. Equilibrium ensembles for the molecules are generated at no additional computational cost, and are used to check our results by comparison to standard dynamics simulation.

Zhang, Xin; Zuckerman, Daniel M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Atmospheric Temperature and Absolute Humidity Profiles over the Beaufort Sea and Amundsen Gulf from a Microwave Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Radiometrics MP-3000A microwave radiometric profiler (MWRP) provided high temporal resolution atmospheric profiles for temperature and absolute humidity up to 10 km, while 113 radiosondes were launched (and 68 were used in the analysis) over sea ...

Lauren M. Candlish; Richard L. Raddatz; Matthew G. Asplin; David G. Barber

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Full SPP Partnership Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Partnership Requirements: Partnership Requirements: ENERGY STAR Partnership for Commercial & Industrial Service and Product Providers (SPP) Eligible Organizations Companies providing energy efficiency services and products to commercial buildings and industrial manufacturing facilities/plants are eligible for the Service and Product Provider (SPP) partnership, but must meet certain requirements as specified below. Types of eligible companies include: architecture, distributor, energy consultant/energy management services, energy improvement contractor, energy information services, energy services company (ESCO), engineering, equipment manufacturer, financial services, on-site energy production services, unregulated energy retailer and marketer, or other supplier of standard energy-efficient products and/or services for commercial buildings and/or

314

Exhaust-gas measurements from NASAs HYMETS arc jet.  

SciTech Connect

Arc-jet wind tunnels produce conditions simulating high-altitude hypersonic flight such as occurs upon entry of space craft into planetary atmospheres. They have traditionally been used to study flight in Earth's atmosphere, which consists mostly of nitrogen and oxygen. NASA is presently using arc jets to study entry into Mars' atmosphere, which consists of carbon dioxide and nitrogen. In both cases, a wide variety of chemical reactions take place among the gas constituents and with test articles placed in the flow. In support of those studies, we made measurements using a residual gas analyzer (RGA) that sampled the exhaust stream of a NASA arc jet. The experiments were conducted at the HYMETS arc jet (Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System) located at the NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA. This report describes our RGA measurements, which are intended to be used for model validation in combination with similar measurements on other systems.

Miller, Paul Albert

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Device for use in a furnace exhaust stream for thermoelectric generation  

SciTech Connect

A device for generating voltage or electrical current includes an inner elongated member mounted in an outer elongated member, and a plurality of thermoelectric modules mounted in the space between the inner and the outer members. The outer and/or inner elongated members each include a plurality of passages to move a temperature altering medium through the members so that the device can be used in high temperature environments, e.g. the exhaust system of an oxygen fired glass melting furnace. The modules are designed to include a biasing member and/or other arrangements to compensate for differences in thermal expansion between the first and the second members. In this manner, the modules remain in contact with the first and second members. The voltage generated by the modules can be used to power electrical loads.

Polcyn, Adam D.

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

316

Pulmonary function and pathology in cats exposed 28 days to diesel exhaust  

SciTech Connect

Young adult male cats were exposed 28 days, 20 hrs per day, to a 1:14 dilution of diesel exhaust emissions. Following termination of exposure, the following pulmonary function measurements were carried out: lung volumes, maximum expiratory flow rates (MEF), MEF at 50%, 25% and 10% of vital capacity (VC): forced expiratory volume (FEV) after 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 sec, dynamic compliance, resistance and helium washout at 25, 50, 75, and 100 breaths per min. The only significant functional change was a decrease in MEF at 10% of VC (P x .02). The lungs of the exposed cats appeared charcoal grey with frequent focal black spots visible on the pleural surface. Pathologic changes in the exposed cats included a predominantly peribronchiolar localization of black-pigmented macrophages within the alveoli producing a focal pneumonitis or alveolitis. In general, evidence of serious lung damage was not observed following the 28-day exposure period.

Pepelko, W.E.; Mattox, J.K.; Yang, Y.Y.; Moore, W. Jr.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Variable-geometry turbocharger with asymmetric divided volute for engine exhaust gas pulse optimization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A turbine assembly for a variable-geometry turbocharger includes a turbine housing defining a divided volute having first and second scrolls, wherein the first scroll has a substantially smaller volume than the second scroll. The first scroll feeds exhaust gas to a first portion of a turbine wheel upstream of the throat of the wheel, while the second scroll feeds gas to a second portion of the wheel at least part of which is downstream of the throat. Flow from the second scroll is regulated by a sliding piston. The first scroll can be optimized for low-flow conditions such that the turbocharger can operate effectively like a small fixed-geometry turbocharger when the piston is closed. The turbine housing defines an inlet that is divided by a dividing wall into two portions respectively feeding gas to the two scrolls, a leading edge of the dividing wall being downstream of the inlet mouth.

Serres, Nicolas (Epinal, FR)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

318

Multi-stage selection catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} in lean burn engine exhaust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent studies suggest that the conversion of NO to NO{sub 2} is an important intermediate step in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2}. These studies have prompted the development of schemes that use an oxidation catalyst to convert NO to NO{sub 2}, followed by a reduction catalyst to convert NO{sub 2} to N{sub 2}. Multi-stage SCR offers high NO{sub x} reduction efficiency from catalysts that, separately, are not very active for reduction of NO, and alleviates the problem of selectivity between NO reduction and hydrocarbon oxidation. A plasma can also be used to oxidize NO to NO{sub 2}. This paper compares the multi-stage catalytic scheme with the plasma-assisted catalytic scheme for reduction of NO{sub x} in lean-bum engine exhausts. The advantages of plasma oxidation over catalytic oxidation are presented.

Penetrante, B.M.; Hsiao, M.O.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogling, E.

1998-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

319

Impact of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on the oxidative reactivity of diesel engine soot  

SciTech Connect

This paper expands the consideration of the factors affecting the nanostructure and oxidative reactivity of diesel soot to include the impact of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Past work showed that soot derived from oxygenated fuels such as biodiesel carries some surface oxygen functionality and thereby possesses higher reactivity than soot from conventional diesel fuel. In this work, results show that EGR exerts a strong influence on the physical properties of the soot which leads to enhanced oxidation rate. HRTEM images showed a dramatic difference between the burning modes of the soot generated under 0 and 20% EGR. The soot produced under 0% EGR strictly followed an external burning mode with no evidence of internal burning. In contrast, soot generated under 20% EGR exhibited dual burning modes: slow external burning and rapid internal burning. The results demonstrate clearly that highly reactive soot can be achieved by manipulating the physical properties of the soot via EGR. (author)

Al-Qurashi, Khalid; Boehman, Andre L. [The EMS Energy Institute, The Pennsylvania State University, 405 Academic Activities Bldg., University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

235U Holdup Measurements in Three 321-M Exhaust HEPA Banks  

SciTech Connect

The Analytical Development Section of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested by the Facilities Disposition Division to determine the holdup of enriched uranium in the 321-M facility as part of an overall deactivation project of the facility. The 321-M facility was used to fabricate enriched uranium fuel assemblies, lithium-aluminum target tubes, neptunium assemblies, and miscellaneous components for the production reactors. The results of the holdup assays are essential for determining compliance with the Waste Acceptance Criteria, Material Control & Accountability, and to meet criticality safety controls. This report covers holdup measurements of uranium residue in three HEPA filter exhaust banks of the 321-M facility. Each of the exhaust banks has dimensions near 7' x 14' x 4' and represents a complex holdup problem. A portable HPGe detector and EG&G Dart system that contains the high voltage power supply and signal processing electronics were used to determine highly enriched uranium (HEU) holdup. A personal computer with Gamma-Vision software was used to control the Dart MCA and to provide space to store and manipulate multiple 4096-channel {gamma}-ray spectra. Some acquisitions were performed with the portable detector configured to a Canberra Inspector using NDA2000 acquisition and analysis software. Our results for each component uses a mixture of redundant point source and area source acquisitions that yielded HEU contents in the range of 2-10 grams. This report discusses the methodology, non-destructive assay (NDA) measurements, assumptions, and results of the uranium holdup in these items. This report includes use of transmission-corrected assay as well as correction for contributions from secondary area sources.

Dewberry, R

2005-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require absolute exhaustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

COMPARATIVE STUDY ON EXHAUST EMISSIONS FROM DIESEL- AND CNG-POWERED URBAN BUSES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Couple years ago, ADEME engaged programs dedicated to the urban buses exhaust emissions studies. The measures associated with the reduction of atmospheric and noise pollution has particular importance in the sector of urban buses. In many cases, they illustrate the city's environmental image and contribute to reinforcing the attractiveness of public transport. France's fleet in service, presently put at about 14,000 units, consumes about 2 per cent of the total energy of city transport. It causes about 2 per cent of the HC emissions and from 4 to 6 per cent of the NOx emissions and particles. These vehicles typically have a long life span (about 15 years) and are relatively expensive to buy, about 150.000 euros per unit. Several technical solutions were evaluated to quantify, on a real condition cycle for buses, on one hand pollutants emissions, fuel consumption and on the other hand reliability, cost in real existing fleet. This paper presents main preliminary results on urban buses exhaust emission on two different cases: - existing Diesel buses, with fuel modifications (Diesel with low sulphur content), Diesel with water emulsion and bio-Diesel (30% oil ester in standard Diesel fuel); renovating CNG powered Euro II buses fleet, over representative driving cycles, set up by ADEME and partners. On these cycles, pollutants (regulated and unregulated) were measured as well as fuel consumption, at the beginning of a program and one year after to quantify reliability and increase/decrease of pollutants emissions. At the same time, some after-treatment technologies were tested under real conditions and several vehicles. Information such as fuel consumption, lubricant analysis, problem on the technology were following during a one year program. On the overall level, it is the combination of various action, pollution-reduction and renewal that will make it possible to meet the technological challenge of reducing emissions and fuel consumption by urban bus networks.

COROLLER, P; PLASSAT, G

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

322

Process for the removal of acid forming gases from exhaust gases and production of phosphoric acid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Exhaust gases are treated to remove NO or NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2 by contacting the gases with an aqueous emulsion or suspension of yellow phosphorous preferably in a wet scrubber. The addition of yellow phosphorous in the system induces the production of O.sub.3 which subsequently oxidizes NO to NO.sub.2. The resulting NO.sub.2 dissolves readily and can be reduced to form ammonium ions by dissolved SO.sub.2 under appropriate conditions. In a 20 acfm system, yellow phosphorous is oxidized to yield P.sub.2 O.sub.5 which picks up water to form H.sub.3 PO.sub.4 mists and can be collected as a valuable product. The pressure is not critical, and ambient pressures are used. Hot water temperatures are best, but economics suggest about 50.degree. C. The amount of yellow phosphorus used will vary with the composition of the exhaust gas, less than 3% for small concentrations of NO, and 10% or higher for concentrations above say 1000 ppm. Similarly, the pH will vary with the composition being treated, and it is adjusted with a suitable alkali. For mixtures of NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2, alkalis that are used for flue gas desulfurization are preferred. With this process, better than 90% of SO.sub.2 and NO in simulated flue gas can be removed. Stoichiometric ratios (P/NO) ranging between 0.6 and 1.5 were obtained.

Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, David K. (San Pablo, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Technical Safety Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety Requirements Safety Requirements FUNCTIONAL AREA GOAL: Contractor has developed, maintained, and received DOE Field Office Approval for the necessary operating conditions of a facility. The facility has also maintained an inventory of safety class and safety significant systems and components. REQUIREMENTS:  10 CFR 830.205, Nuclear Safety Rule.  DOE-STD-3009-2002, Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses.  DOE-STD-1186-2004, Specific Administrative Controls. Guidance:  DOE G 423.1-1, Implementation Guide for Use in Developing Technical Safety Requirements.  NSTP 2003-1, Use of Administrative Controls for Specific Safety Functions. Performance Objective 1: Contractor Program Documentation

324

BES Science Network Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedOffice of Basic Energy Sciences. This is LBNL report LBNL-BES Science Network Requirements Report of the Basic Energy

Dart, Eli

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

NSLS II: Authentication Required  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Pages Login Access to this area of the NSLS-II website requires a valid username and password. Username: Password: Next > Last Modified: April 2, 2013 Please forward all...

326

Test Set Reordering Using the Gate Exhaustive Test Metric Kyoung Youn Cho and Edward J. McCluskey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Set Reordering Using the Gate Exhaustive Test Metric Kyoung Youn Cho and Edward J. Mc kycho@crc.stanford.edu Abstract When a test set size is larger than desired, some patterns must be dropped. This paper presents a systematic method to reduce test set size; the method reorders a test set

Stanford University

327

Prediction of performance and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine fueled with biodiesel produced from waste frying palm oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biodiesel is receiving increasing attention each passing day because of its fuel properties and compatibility with the petroleum-based diesel fuel (PBDF). Therefore, in this study, the prediction of the engine performance and exhaust emissions is carried ... Keywords: ANN, Biodiesel, Diesel engine, Emissions, Engine performance

Mustafa Canakci; Ahmet Necati Ozsezen; Erol Arcaklioglu; Ahmet Erdil

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Exhaust Emissions and Combustion Performances of Rapeseed Oil Monoester of Ethylene Glycol Monomethyl Ether as a Novel Biodiesel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a novel biodiesel named rapeseed oil monoester of ethylene glycol monomethyl ether has been developed, which has one more ester group than traditional biodiesel. It was synthesized and structurally identified through FT-IR, 1H NMR analyses. ... Keywords: component, rapeseed oil monoester, synthesis, exhaust emissions, combustion performances

Jiang Dayong; Wang Xuanjun; Wang Wenguo; Han Qilong

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Applications of an Improved Wavelet Network in the Low Pressure Cylinder of Turbine Steam Exhaust Enthalpies Calculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

this paper applies the principle of the immune system adjustment to optimize the structure parameters of wavelet network, so as to establish a new type of wavelet neural network model which will be applied to turbine exhaust steam enthalpies. The calculation ... Keywords: steam turbine, wavelet network Vector distance Eexhaust, steam enthalpy

Zhang Liping; Sun Quanhong; Xu Qi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A Fast Algorithm for the Exhaustive Analysis of 12-Nucleotide-Long DNA Sequences. Applications to Human Genomics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a new algorithm that allows the exhaustive determination of words of up to 12 nucleotides in DNA sequences. It is fast enough as to be used at a genomic scale running on a standard personal computer. As an example, we apply the algorithm ...

Vicente Arnau; Ignacio Marn

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Federal Energy Management Program: Federal Greenhouse Gas Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements Requirements Executive Order (E.O.) 13514 expands the energy reduction and environmental requirements of Executive Order 13423 by making greenhouse gas (GHG) management a priority for the Federal government. Under Section 2 of E.O. 13514, each Federal agency must: Within 90 days of the order, establish and report to the CEQ Chair and OMB Director a percentage reduction target for agency-wide reductions of Scope 1 and Scope 2 GHG emissions in absolute terms by fiscal year 2020 relative to a fiscal year 2008 baseline of the agency's Scope 1 greenhouse gas emissions. In establishing the target, agencies shall consider reductions associated with: Reducing agency building energy intensity Increasing agency renewable energy use and implementing on-site renewable energy generation projects

332

Regulators, Requirements, Statutes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regulators, Requirements, Statutes Regulators, Requirements, Statutes Regulators, Requirements, Statutes The Laboratory must comply with environmental laws and regulations that apply to Laboratory operations. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Environmental laws and regulations LANL complies with more than 30 state and federal regulations and policies designed to protect human health and the environment. Regulators Regulators Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) EPA Homepage EPA - Region VI U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) DOE Homepage DOE Environmental Policy DOE Citizen's Advisory Board U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) Southwest Region 2 New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) NMED Homepage NMED DOE Oversight Office

333

VFP: Program Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Requirements Program Requirements Home Welcome Researcher! Preparing for Your Visit Your Arrival Your First Day Weekly Activities Program Requirements Checkout FAQ The DOE WDTS site has comprehensive information on Participant Obligations. Consult that site for more information on all deliverables except the Fermilab Summer Interns website. Attendance: Complete the full ten-week program and attend all scheduled events including lectures, tours and group activities. Entrance Survey: Complete the entrance survey within your first week at Fermilab. One-page Peer Review Provide a one-page written peer review of another SULI intern' talk or poster. Abstract for General Audience Complete and submit an abstract summarizing your research experience. Oral or Poster Presentation: Deliver an oral or poster presentation to mentors and peers the final week

334

BER Science Network Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Network Network Requirements Report of the Biological and Environmental Research Network Requirements Workshop Conducted July 26 and 27, 2007 BER Science Network Requirements Workshop Biological and Environmental Research Program Office, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network Bethesda, MD - July 26 and 27, 2007 ESnet is funded by the US Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program. Dan Hitchcock is the ESnet Program Manager. ESnet is operated by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, which is operated by the University of California for the US Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. This work was supported by the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research, Facilities Division, and the Office of Biological &

335

SULI: Program Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Requirements Program Requirements Home Welcome Intern! Preparing for Your Internship Your Arrival Your First Day Weekly Activities Program Requirements Checkout FAQ The DOE WDTS site has comprehensive information on Participant Obligations. Consult that site for more information on all deliverables except the Fermilab Summer Interns website. Attendance: Complete the full ten-week program and attend all scheduled events including lectures, tours and group activities. Entrance Survey: First create an account by following the link, educationLink New Account Setup. After creating the account, you can login to the educationLink site. Complete the entrance survey posted on your EduLink site within your first week at Fermilab. One-page Peer Review Provide a one-page written peer review of another SULI intern' talk or

336

Federal Metering Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Metering Requirements Metering Requirements FUPWG - May 23, 2013 Brad Gustafson Federal Energy Management Program 2 42 USC 8253 - ENERGY MANAGEMENT REQUIREMENT (e) Metering By October 1, 2012, in accordance with guidelines established by the Secretary under paragraph (2), all Federal buildings shall, for the purposes of efficient use of energy and reduction in the cost of electricity used in such buildings, be metered. Each agency shall use, to the maximum extent practicable, advanced meters or advanced metering devices that provide data at least daily and that measure at least hourly consumption of electricity in the Federal buildings of the agency. Not later than October 1, 2016, each agency shall provide for equivalent metering of natural gas and steam, in accordance with guidelines established by the Secretary

337

Quantitative Resolution to some "Absolute Discrepancies" in Cancer Theories: a View from Phage lambda Genetic Switch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Is it possible to understand cancer? Or more specifically, is it possible to understand cancer from genetic side? There already many answers in literature. The most optimistic one has claimed that it is mission-possible. Duesberg and his colleagues reviewed the impressive amount of research results on cancer accumulated over 100 years. It confirms the a general opinion that considering all available experimental results and clinical observations there is no cancer theory without major difficulties, including the prevailing gene-based cancer theories. They have then listed 9 "absolute discrepancies" for such cancer theory. In this letter the quantitative evidence against one of their major reasons for dismissing mutation cancer theory, by both in vivo experiment and a first principle computation, is explicitly pointed out.

P. Ao

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

338

Possible Observation of Nuclear Reactor Neutrinos Near the Oscillation Absolute Minimum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After a summary of the basic three neutrino oscillation formalism we review briefly our present empirical knowledge of the oscillation parameters and conclude that the 2-neutrinos model is adequate to describe the survival probability of the electronic neutrino P(nue->nue). Then we proceed to the evaluation of P(nue->nue) relative to the antineutrinos emitted by the nuclear power stations presently in operation along the the Rhone valley. We assume that a detector has been installed in a existing cavity located under the Mont Ventoux at a depth equivalent to 1500 m of water. We show that such an experiment would provide the opportunity to observe neutrinos near the oscillation absolute minimum. We end by a rough estimate of the counting rate.

C. Bouchiat

2003-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

339

Absolute angle-differential vibrational excitation cross sections for electron collisions with diacetylene  

SciTech Connect

Absolute vibrational excitation cross sections were measured for diacetylene (1,3-butadiyne). The selectivity of vibrational excitation reveals detailed information about the shape resonances. Excitation of the C{identical_to}C stretch and of double quanta of the C-H bend vibrations reveals a {sup 2}{Pi}{sub u} resonance at 1 eV (autodetachment width {approx}30 meV) and a {sup 2}{Pi}{sub g} resonance at 6.2 eV (autodetachment width 1-2 eV). There is a strong preference for excitation of even quanta of the bending vibration. Excitation of the C-H stretch vibration reveals {sigma}* resonances at 4.3, 6.8, and 9.8 eV, with autodetachment widths of {approx}2 eV. Detailed information about resonances permits conclusions about the mechanism of the dissociative electron attachment.

Allan, M.; May, O.; Fedor, J.; Ibanescu, B. C.; Andric, L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musee 9, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); UPMC, Universite Paris 06, LCPMR, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France) and CNRS, LCPMR (UMR 7614), 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Requirements engineering with ORM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The number of IT project overspends and failures suggest that many IT projects do not conform to requirements. Despite decades of development the IT industry still seems to lack an effective method of ensuring that a project will be right first time. ...

Ken Evans

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require absolute exhaustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Requirements for Xenon International  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

342

Training requirements. - 19...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z www.OSHA.gov Regulations (Standards - 29 CFR) Training requirements. - 1926.454 Regulations (Standards - 29 CFR) - Table of Contents * Part...

343

Using Absolute Humidity and Radiochemical Analyses of Water Vapor Samples to Correct Underestimated Atmospheric Tritium Concentrations  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) emits a wide variety of radioactive air contaminants. An extensive ambient air monitoring network, known as AIRNET, is operated on-site and in surrounding communities to estimate radioactive doses to the public. As part of this monitoring network, water vapor is sampled continuously at more than 50 sites. These water vapor samples are collected every two weeks by absorbing the water vapor in the sampled air with silica gel and then radiochemically analyzing the water for tritium. The data have consistently indicated that LANL emissions cause a small, but measurable impact on local concentrations of tritium. In early 1998, while trying to independently verify the presumed 100% water vapor collection efficiency, the author found that this efficiency was normally lower and reached a minimum of 10 to 20% in the middle of summer. This inefficient collection was discovered by comparing absolute humidity (g/m{sup 3}) calculated from relative humidity and temperature to the amount of water vapor collected by the silica gel per cubic meter of air sampled. Subsequent experiments confirmed that the elevated temperature inside the louvered housing was high enough to reduce the capacity of the silica gel by more than half. In addition, their experiments also demonstrated that, even under optimal conditions, there is not enough silica gel present in the sampling canister to absorb all of the moisture during the higher humidity periods. However, there is a solution to this problem. Ambient tritium concentrations have been recalculated by using the absolute humidity values and the tritium analyses. These recalculated tritium concentrations were two to three times higher than previously reported. Future tritium concentrations will also be determined in the same manner. Finally, the water vapor collection process will be changed by relocating the sampling canister outside the housing to increase collection efficiency and, therefore, comparability to the true ambient concentrations of tritium.

Eberhart, C.F.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

NERSC Requirements Workshop November  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements Requirements Workshop November 2009 Lattice gauge theory and some other HE theory Doug Toussaint (University of Arizona) Help from: Paul Mackenzie (Fermilab) Crude comparison of lattice hadron spec- trum to the real world. Lattice Gauge Theory First-principles computations in QCD Also, computations in other strongly coupled field theories * Find hadronic factors to get fundamental physics from experi- ments * Understand structure and interactions of hadrons, maybe even nuclei * Understand QCD: confinement and chiral symmetry breaking * Other strongly interacting theories (what if we don't find the Higgs?) * Quark-gluon matter at high temeratures (RHIC, LHC, early uni- verse) or high densities (neutron stars) HEP theory projects at NERSC now: * Production and analysis of QCD configurations with dynamical quarks, (Doug Toussaint) (MILC collaboration) * Heavy quarks, using

345

Support Requirements for Synfuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Producing synfuels from coal is technically feasible. Projects have a high probability of success but risks do exist (technical, marketing, environmental delays, regulatory and political changes, etc.). The various segments of the developing synfuels industry are identified. For each segment its characteristics, uncertainties and risks are discussed, as well as the type of support of guarantee required to develop this portion of the synfuels industry.

Hyland, M. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

BER Science Network Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2010 ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research, of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the science programs funded by BER. The requirements identified at the workshop are summarized and described in more detail in the case studies and the Findings section. A number of common themes emerged from the case studies and workshop discussions. One is that BER science, like many other disciplines, is becoming more and more distributed and collaborative in nature. Another common theme is that data set sizes are exploding. Climate Science in particular is on the verge of needing to manage exabytes of data, and Genomics is on the verge of a huge paradigm shift in the number of sites with sequencers and the amount of sequencer data being generated.

Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

A Partial Oxidation Technique for Fuel-Cell Anode Exhaust-Gas Synthesis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the performance of a gas generator used to synthesize the exhaust gas from the anode of a molten-carbonate fuel cell. The composition of this gas is estimated to be that of equilibrium at 1,250 F and 1 atm: 48% CO2 , 39% H2O, 5% CO, and 8% H2, with an energy content of approximately 39 Btu/scf (higher heating value). To synthesize a range of gas compositions around this point, the gas generator partially oxidizes a mixture of CH4 , O2 , and CO2 to generate energy densities between 20 and 60 Btu/scf at temperatures between 1,198 and 1,350 F. Results show that the technique provides a relatively high ratio of CO to H2 concentrations compared with the target composition (CO:H2 of 2, versus 0.71). A detailed chemical model shows that the likely cause is quenching of the CO and H2 chemistry below 2,000 F.

Edward H. Robey, Jr.; Randall S. Gemmen

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

348

System interfaces control document for the Tokamak exhaust processing system PBS 3.2.1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP) removes tritium from highly tritiated gas streams and returns it back to the fuel system. The largest feed streams originate from the torus, but others arrive from systems throughout the tritium plant. Tritium in the form of free hydrogen (i.e., DT, HT) is separated by Pd-Ag permeators or by cryoadsorption and directed to the Isotope Separation System (ISS). Tritium present in impurities (such as CD{sub 2}T{sub 2} and DTO) is chemically converted to free hydrogen, separated by Pd-Ag membranes, and then sent to ISS. All waste streams are processed by the Detritiation System (DS) prior to venting to the atmosphere. The stream received from Helium Glow Discharge Cleaning (GDC) is returned to GDC after processing. TEP is also designed to accommodate a Tritium Plant (TP) standby mode of operation whereby gases received from fuelling are processed by TEP and returned to SDS. This S-ICD describes all process interfaces for TEP and contains tables to control their progressive definition.

Willms, R Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carlson, Bryan J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Coons, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kubic, William L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Dynamic instabilities in spark-ignited combustion engines with high exhaust gas recirculation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We propose a cycle-resolved dynamic model for combustion instabilities in spark-ignition engines operating with high levels of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). High EGR is important for increasing fuel efficiency and implementing advanced low-emission combustion modes such as homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI). We account for the complex combustion response to cycle-to-cycle feedback by utilizing a global probability distribution that describes the pre-spark state of in-cylinder fuel mixing. The proposed model does a good job of simulating combustion instabilities observed in both lean-fueling engine experiments and in experiments where nitrogen dilution is used to simulate some of the combustion inhibition of EGR. When used to simulate high internal EGR operation, the model exhibits a range of global bifurcations and chaos that appear to be very robust. We use the model to show that it should be possible to reduce high EGR combustion instabilities by switching from internal to external EGR. We also explain why it might be helpful to deliberately stratify the fuel in the pre-spark gas mixture. It might be possible to extend the simple approach used in this model to other chemical reaction systems with spatial inhomogeneity.

Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

BES Science Network Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivityfor the US Department of Energy Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office ofScience programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years.

Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian; Dart, Eli; Biocca, A.; Carlson, R.; Chen, J.; Cotter, S.; Dattoria, V.; Davenport, J.; Gaenko, A.; Kent, P.; Lamm, M.; Miller, S.; Mundy, C.; Ndousse, T.; Pederson, M.; Perazzo, A.; Popescu, R.; Rouson, D.; Sekine, Y.; Sumpter, B.; Wang, C.-Z.; Whitelam, S.; Zurawski, J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Repository seals requirements study  

SciTech Connect

The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. This report presents the results of a repository sealing requirements study. Sealing is defined as the permanent closure of the shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes. Sealing includes those components that would reduce potential inflows above the repository, or that would divert flow near the repository horizon to allow vertical infiltration to below the repository. Sealing of such features as emplacement drifts was not done in this study because the current capability to calculate fracture flow into the drifts is not sufficiently mature. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

NONE

1997-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

352

Application of a diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption sensor for in situ measurements of atomic mercury in coal-combustion exhaust  

SciTech Connect

A diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption sensor was successfully demonstrated for both in situ and extractive sampling atomic mercury measurements in a laboratory-scale 29.3 kWt (100 000 BTU/h) coal combustor and in situ measurements in a flow reactor at Texas A&M University. Laser sensor measurements were compared to measurements from a commercial mercury analyzer (CMA). A 375 nm single-mode laser and a 784 nm distributed feedback (DFB) laser are sum-frequency-mixed in a nonlinear {beta}-barium borate crystal to generate a 254 nm beam. By tuning the frequency of the DFB laser, the ultraviolet beam frequency was tuned across the transition frequency of mercury at 253.7 nm. The tuning range was large enough that an off-resonant baseline was clearly visible on both sides of the Hg transition. No pretreatment is required for elemental mercury measurements, and the effects of broadband absorption can be effectively eliminated during data analysis. Extractive sampling was demonstrated to improve the detection limit of the sensor and demonstrate the feasibility of total mercury concentration measurements in the future through extractive sampling. Significant variation in the atomic mercury concentration of coal-combustion exhaust was observed over short time periods during our in situ measurements. The sensor detection limits for in situ and extractive sampling are 0.3 and 0.1 parts per billion over a 1 m path length, respectively. 34 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

Jesse K. Magnuson; Thomas N. Anderson; Robert P. Lucht; Udayasarathy A. Vijayasarathy; Hyukjin Oh; Kalyan Annamalai; Jerald A. Caton [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Mechanical Engineering

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

An Absolute Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Temperature at 10.7 GHz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A balloon-borne experiment has measured the absolute temperature of the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) at 10.7 GHz to be Tcmbr = 2.730 +- .014 K. The error is the quadratic sum of several systematic errors, with statistical error of less than 0.1 mK. The instrument comprises a cooled corrugated horn antenna coupled to a total-power radiometer. A cryogenic mechanical waveguide switch alternately connects the radiometer to the horn and to an internal reference load. The small measured temperature difference (load in conjunction with the use of a cold front end keeps systematic instrumental corrections small. Atmospheric and window emission are minimized by flying the instrument at 24 km altitude. A large outer ground screen and smaller inner screen shield the instrument from stray radiation from the ground and the balloon. In-flight tests constrain the magnitude of ground radiation contamination, and low level interference is monitored through observations in several narrow frequency bands.

S. T. Staggs; N. C. Jarosik; S. S. Meyer; D. T. Wilkinson

1996-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

354

In-Flight Measurement of the Absolute Energy Scale of the Fermi Large Area Telescope  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a pair-conversion telescope designed to survey the gamma-ray sky from 20 MeV to several hundreds of GeV. In this energy band there are no astronomical sources with sufficiently well known and sharp spectral features to allow an absolute calibration of the LAT energy scale. However, the geomagnetic cutoff in the cosmic ray electron-plus-positron (CRE) spectrum in low Earth orbit does provide such a spectral feature. The energy and spectral shape of this cutoff can be calculated with the aid of a numerical code tracing charged particles in the Earth's magnetic field. By comparing the cutoff value with that measured by the LAT in different geomagnetic positions, we have obtained several calibration points between {approx}6 and {approx}13 GeV with an estimated uncertainty of {approx}2%. An energy calibration with such high accuracy reduces the systematic uncertainty in LAT measurements of, for example, the spectral cutoff in the emission from gamma ray pulsars.

Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Allafort, A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bouvier, A.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Buehler, R.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Buson, S.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /CSIC, Catalunya /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Unlisted, US /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /ASDC, Frascati /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Montpellier U. /ASDC, Frascati /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Montpellier U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Ecole Polytechnique /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /NASA, Goddard /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; /more authors..

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

355

Absolute energy calibration for relativistic electron beams with pointing instability from a laser-plasma accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pointing instability of energetic electron beams generated from a laser-driven accelerator can cause a serious error in measuring the electron spectrum with a magnetic spectrometer. In order to determine a correct electron spectrum, the pointing angle of an electron beam incident on the spectrometer should be exactly defined. Here, we present a method for absolutely calibrating the electron spectrum by monitoring the pointing angle using a scintillating screen installed in front of a permanent dipole magnet. The ambiguous electron energy due to the pointing instability is corrected by the numerical and analytical calculations based on the relativistic equation of electron motion. It is also possible to estimate the energy spread of the electron beam and determine the energy resolution of the spectrometer using the beam divergence angle that is simultaneously measured on the screen. The calibration method with direct measurement of the spatial profile of an incident electron beam has a simple experimental layout and presents the full range of spatial and spectral information of the electron beams with energies of multi-hundred MeV level, despite the limited energy resolution of the simple electron spectrometer.

Cha, H. J.; Choi, I. W.; Kim, H. T.; Kim, I J.; Nam, K. H.; Jeong, T. M.; Lee, J. [Advanced Photonics Research Institute, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

Absolute reactivity calibration of accelerator-driven systems after RACE-T experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The RACE-T experiments that were held in november 2005 in the ENEA-Casaccia research center near Rome allowed us to improve our knowledge of the experimental techniques for absolute reactivity calibration at either startup or shutdown phases of accelerator-driven systems. Various experimental techniques for assessing a subcritical level were inter-compared through three different subcritical configurations SC0, SC2 and SC3, about -0.5, -3 and -6 dollars, respectively. The area-ratio method based of the use of a pulsed neutron source appears as the most performing. When the reactivity estimate is expressed in dollar unit, the uncertainties obtained with the area-ratio method were less than 1% for any subcritical configuration. The sensitivity to measurement location was about slightly more than 1% and always less than 4%. Finally, it is noteworthy that the source jerk technique using a transient caused by the pulsed neutron source shutdown provides results in good agreement with those obtained from the area-ratio technique. (authors)

Jammes, C. C. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique CEA, Centre de Cadarache, DEN/CAD/DER/SPEx/LPE, 13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Imel, G. R. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Geslot, B. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique CEA, Centre de Cadarache, DEN/CAD/DER/SPEx/LPE, 13108 Saint Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Rosa, R. [Ente per le Nuove Tecnologie, L'Energia e l'Ambiente, Centro della Casaccia, Via Anguillarese, 301, 00060 Roma I (Italy)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Setting Whole-Building Absolute Energy Use Targets for the K-12 School, Retail, and Healthcare Sectors: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper helps owners' efficiency representatives to inform executive management, contract development, and project management staff as to how specifying and applying whole-building absolute energy use targets for new construction or renovation projects can improve the operational energy performance of commercial buildings.

Leach, M.; Bonnema, E.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Absolute light yield measurements on SrF$_{2}$ and BaF$_{2}$ doped with rare earth ions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Results of absolute light output measurements on strontium and barium fluoride doped with PrF$_3$ and CeF$_3$ are presented and compared with scintillators having well-known light output (NaI-Tl, CsI-Tl, BGO). For pure SrF$_2$ crystal we obtain a value of about 28600 photons/MeV.

Shendrik, Roman

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Setting Whole-Building Absolute Energy Use Targets for the K-12 School, Retail, and Healthcare Sectors: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper helps owners' efficiency representatives to inform executive management, contract development, and project management staff as to how specifying and applying whole-building absolute energy use targets for new construction or renovation projects can improve the operational energy performance of commercial buildings.

Leach, M.; Bonnema, E.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Repository seals requirement study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project, managed by the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) Management and Operating Contractor (M and O) is conducting investigations to support the Viability Assessment and the License Application for a high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The sealing subsystem is part of the Yucca Mountain Waste Isolation System. The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is currently evaluating the role of the sealing subsystem (shaft, ramp and exploratory borehole seals) in achieving the overall performance objectives for the Waste Isolation System. This report documents the results of those evaluations. The objective of the study is to provide water or air flow performance based requirements for shafts, ramps, and exploratory boreholes located near the repository. Recommendations, as appropriate, are provided for developing plans, seals component testing, and other studies relating to sealing.

NONE

1997-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require absolute exhaustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Equipment Operational Requirements  

SciTech Connect

The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

362

Effects of diesel exhaust on the microbiota within a tuffaceous tunnel system  

SciTech Connect

The abundance and distribution of microbiota that may be impacted by diesel and diesel exhaust were investigated from three depths into the walls and invert (floor) of U12n tunnel at Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, a potential geological analog of Yucca Mountain. Enumerations included total cell counts, and numbers of aerobic heterotrophic, sulfate-reducing, nitrate-reducing, and diesel-degrading bacteria. Additionally, the disappearance of total petroleum hydrocarbons was determined in microcosms containing subsurface materials that were amended with diesel fuel. Results revealed that microbes capable of utilizing diesel and diesel combustion products were present in the subsurface in both the walls and the invert of the tunnel. The abundance of specific bacterial types in the tunnel invert, a perturbed environment, was greater than that observed in the tunnel wall. Few trends of microbial distribution either into the tunnel wall or the invert were noted with the exception of aerobic heterotrophic abundance which increased with depth into the wall and decreased with depth into the invert. No correlation between microbiota and a specific introduced chemical species have yet been determined. The potential for microbial contamination of the tunnel wall during sampling was determined to be negligible by the use of fluorescently labeled latex spheres (1{mu}m in dia.) as tracers. Results indicate that additional investigations might be needed to examine the microbiota and their possible impacts on the geology and geochemistry of the subsurface, both indigenous microbiota and those microorganisms that will likely be introduced by anthropogenic activity associated with the construction of a high-level waste repository.

Haldeman, D.L.; Lagadinos, T.; Amy, P.S. [Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Hersman, L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Meike, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

Tomlinson, Leroy Omar (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

ASCR Science Network Requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2009 ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by ASCR. The ASCR facilities anticipate significant increases in wide area bandwidth utilization, driven largely by the increased capabilities of computational resources and the wide scope of collaboration that is a hallmark of modern science. Many scientists move data sets between facilities for analysis, and in some cases (for example the Earth System Grid and the Open Science Grid), data distribution is an essential component of the use of ASCR facilities by scientists. Due to the projected growth in wide area data transfer needs, the ASCR supercomputer centers all expect to deploy and use 100 Gigabit per second networking technology for wide area connectivity as soon as that deployment is financially feasible. In addition to the network connectivity that ESnet provides, the ESnet Collaboration Services (ECS) are critical to several science communities. ESnet identity and trust services, such as the DOEGrids certificate authority, are widely used both by the supercomputer centers and by collaborations such as Open Science Grid (OSG) and the Earth System Grid (ESG). Ease of use is a key determinant of the scientific utility of network-based services. Therefore, a key enabling aspect for scientists beneficial use of high performance networks is a consistent, widely deployed, well-maintained toolset that is optimized for wide area, high-speed data transfer (e.g. GridFTP) that allows scientists to easily utilize the services and capabilities that the network provides. Network test and measurement is an important part of ensuring that these tools and network services are functioning correctly. One example of a tool in this area is the recently developed perfSONAR, which has already shown its usefulness in fault diagnosis during the recent deployment of high-performance data movers at NERSC and ORNL. On the other hand, it is clear that there is significant work to be done in the area of authentication and access control - there are currently compatibility problems and differing requirements between the authentication systems in use at different facilities, and the policies and mechanisms in use at different facilities are sometimes in conflict. Finally, long-term software maintenance was of concern for many attendees. Scientists rely heavily on a large deployed base of software that does not have secure programmatic funding. Software packages for which this is true include data transfer tools such as GridFTP as well as identity management and other software infrastructure that forms a critical part of the Open Science Grid and the Earth System Grid.

Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

365

The Absolute Magnitude and Kinematics of RR Lyrae Stars via Statistical Parallax  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new statistical parallax solutions for the absolute magnitude and kinematics of RR Lyrae stars. New proper motion, radial velocity, and abundance data are used; the new data set is 50% larger, and of higher quality, than previously available data sets. Based on an a priori kinematic study, we separate the stars into halo and thick disk sub-populations. Statistical parallax solutions on these sub-samples yield M_V(RR) = +0.71 +/- 0.12 at = -1.61 for the halo (162 stars), and M_V(RR) = +0.79 +/- 0.30 at = -0.76 for the thick disk (51 stars). The solutions yield kinematic parameters (solar motion and velocity ellipsoid) in good agreement with estimates of the halo and thick disk kinematics derived from both RR Lyrae stars and other stellar tracers. Monte Carlo simulations indicate that the solutions are accurate, and that the errors may be smaller than the estimates above. The simulations reveal a small bias in the disk solutions, and appropriate corrections are derived. The large uncertainty in the disk M_V(RR) prevents ascertaining the slope of the M_V(RR)-[Fe/H] relation. We find that (1) the distance to the Galactic Center is 7.6 +/- 0.4 kpc; (2) the mean age of the 17 oldest Galactic globular clusters is 16.5 _{-1.9}^{+2.1} Gyr; and (3) the distance modulus of the LMC is 18.28 +/- 0.13 mag. Estimates of H_0 which are based on an LMC distance modulus of 18.50 (e.g., Cepheid studies) increase by 10% if they are recalibrated to match our LMC distance modulus.

A. C. Layden; R. B. Hanson; S. L. Hawley; A. R. Klemola; C. J. Hanley

1996-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

366

A New Light-Speed Anisotropy Experiment: Absolute Motion and Gravitational Waves Detected  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data from a new experiment measuring the anisotropy of the one-way speed of EM waves in a coaxial cable, gives the speed of light as 300,000+/-400+/-20km/s in a measured direction RA=5.5+/-2hrs, Dec=70+/-10deg S, is shown to be in excellent agreement with the results from seven previous anisotropy experiments, particularly those of Miller (1925/26), and even those of Michelson and Morley (1887). The Miller gas-mode interferometer results, and those from the RF coaxial cable experiments of Torr and Kolen (1983), De Witte (1991) and the new experiment all reveal the presence of gravitational waves, as indicated by the last +/- variations above, but of a kind different from those supposedly predicted by General Relativity. The understanding of the operation of the Michelson interferometer in gas-mode was only achieved in 2002 and involved a calibration for the interferometer that necessarily involved Special Relativity effects and the refractive index of the gas in the light paths. The results demonstrate the reality of the Fitzgerald-Lorentz contraction as an observer independent relativistic effect. A common misunderstanding is that the anisotropy of the speed of light is necessarily in conflict with Special Relativity and Lorentz symmetry - this is explained. All eight experiments and theory show that we have both anisotropy of the speed of light and relativistic effects, and that a dynamical 3-space exists - that absolute motion through that space has been repeatedly observed since 1887. These developments completely change fundamental physics and our understanding of reality.

Reginald T Cahill

2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

367

Absolute frequency measurement for the emission transitions of molecular iodine in the 982 - 985 nm range  

SciTech Connect

We report high-precision frequency measurements of the separate hyperfine structure (HFS) components of the emission B - X system transitions of {sup 127}I{sub 2} molecules in the 982 - 985 nm range. To resolve the HFS of the emission lines, advantage was taken of the method of three-level laser spectroscopy. The function of exciting radiation was fulfilled by the second harmonic of a cw Nd : YAG laser, and the probe radiation in the 968 - 998 nm range was generated by an external-cavity diode laser. The output Nd : YAG laser frequency was locked to an HFS component of the absorption transition and the probing laser radiation to the emission transition component. When both frequencies were locked to HFS components with a common upper level, the output diode laser frequency was precisely equal to the emission transition frequency. The output frequency of the thus stabilised diode laser was measured with the help of a femtosecond optical frequency synthesiser based on a Ti : sapphire laser. We present the results of the absolute frequency measurements of 20 HFS components belonging to six vibrational - rotational transitions of the B - X system of iodine [R56(32 - 48)a1, P58(32 - 48)a1, P85(33 - 48)a1, R87(33 - 48a1, R88(33 - 48)a10] and all 15 components of the R86(33 - 48) line. The relative measurement uncertainty is equal to 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} and is determined by the frequency instability of the diode laser radiation.

Matyugin, Yu A; Ignatovich, S M; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Nesterenko, M I; Okhapkin, M V; Pivtsov, V S; Skvortsov, Mikhail N; Bagaev, Sergei N [Institute of Laser Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

Match Pumps to System Requirements  

SciTech Connect

BestPractices Program tip sheet discussing pumping system efficiency matching pumps to system requirements

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

New Method for Calculating the Absolute Free Energy of Binding: The Effect of a Mobile Loop on the Avidin/Biotin Complex  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Method for Calculating the Absolute Free Energy of Binding: The Effect of a Mobile Loop Hypothetical scanning molecular dynamics (HSMD) is a relatively new method for calculating the absolute free as a byproduct of the simulation. The binding mechanism of biotin to avidin involves a mobile loop

Meirovitch, Hagai

370

Lower and upper bounds for the absolute free energy by the hypothetical scanning Monte Carlo method: Application to liquid argon and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lower and upper bounds for the absolute free energy by the hypothetical scanning Monte Carlo method The hypothetical scanning HS method is a general approach for calculating the absolute entropy S and free energy F to provide the free energy through the analysis of a single configuration. © 2004 American Institute

Meirovitch, Hagai

371

Utilization of coal mine ventilation exhaust as combustion air in gas-fired turbines for electric and/or mechanical power generation. Semi-annual topical report, June 1995--August 1995  

SciTech Connect

Methane emitted during underground coal mining operations is a hazard that is dealt with by diluting the methane with fresh air and exhausting the contaminated air to the atmosphere. Unfortunately this waste stream may contain more than 60% of the methane resource from the coal, and in the atmosphere the methane acts as a greenhouse gas with an effect about 24.5 times greater than CO{sub 2}. Though the waste stream is too dilute for normal recovery processes, it can be used as combustion air for a turbine-generator, thereby reducing the turbine fuel requirements while reducing emissions. Preliminary analysis indicates that such a system, built using standard equipment, is economically and environmentally attractive, and has potential for worldwide application.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF  

SciTech Connect

A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, UR, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Bionta, R. M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Doeppner, T.; Glenzer, S.; Hartouni, E.; Hatchett, S. P.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; MacKinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

The earth's absolute gravitation potential function in the prospect 'gravitational potential metering' of geological objects and earthquake centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The direct problem of the detection of the Earth's absolute gravitation potential maximum value (MGP) was solved. The inverse problem finding of the Earth maximum gravitation (where there is a maximum of gravitation field intensity and a potential function has a 'bending point') with the help of MGP was solved as well. The obtained results show that the revealed Earth maximum gravitation coincides quite strictly with the cseismic D" layer on the border of the inner and outer (liquid) core. The validity of the method of an absolute gravitation potential detection by the equal- potential velocity was proved as 'gravitation potential measurement' or 'Vs-gravity method'. The prospects of this method for detecting of low-power or distant geological objects with abnormal density and the possible earthquakes with low density was shown.

Aleksandr Fridrikson; Marina Kasatochkina

2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

374

Absolute calibration of image plates for electrons at energy between 100 keV and 4 MeV  

SciTech Connect

We measured the absolute response of image plate (Fuji BAS SR2040) for electrons at energies between 100 keV and 4 MeV using an electron spectrometer. The electron source was produced from a short pulse laser irradiated on solid density targets. This paper presents the calibration results of image plate photon stimulated luminescence per electron at this energy range. The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX results are also presented for three representative incident angles onto the image plates and corresponding electron energy depositions at these angles. These provide a complete set of tools that allows extraction of our absolute calibration to other spectrometer setting at this electron energy range.

Chen Hui; Back, Norman L.; Eder, David C.; MacPhee, Andrew G.; Ping Yuan; Song, Peter M.; Throop, Alan [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550-9234 (United States); Bartal, Teresa; Beg, F. N. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Link, Anthony J.; Van Woerkom, Linn [Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Absolute Calibration of Image Plate for electrons at energy between 100 keV and 4 MeV  

SciTech Connect

The authors measured the absolute response of image plate (Fuji BAS SR2040) for electrons at energies between 100 keV to 4 MeV using an electron spectrometer. The electron source was produced from a short pulse laser irradiated on the solid density targets. This paper presents the calibration results of image plate Photon Stimulated Luminescence PSL per electrons at this energy range. The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX results are also presented for three representative incident angles onto the image plates and corresponding electron energies depositions at these angles. These provide a complete set of tools that allows extraction of the absolute calibration to other spectrometer setting at this electron energy range.

Chen, H; Back, N L; Eder, D C; Ping, Y; Song, P M; Throop, A

2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

376

Telescope Spectrophotometric and Absolute Flux Calibration, and National Security Applications, Using a Tunable Laser on a Satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a tunable laser-based satellite-mounted spectrophotometric and absolute flux calibration system, to be utilized by ground- and space-based telescopes. As spectrophotometric calibration may play a significant role in the accuracy of photometric redshift measurement, and photometric redshift accuracy is important for measuring dark energy using SNIa, weak gravitational lensing, and baryon oscillations, a method for reducing such uncertainties is needed. We propose to improve spectrophotometric calibration, currently obtained using standard stars, by placing a tunable laser and a wide-angle light source on a satellite by early next decade (perhaps included in the upgrade to the GPS satellite network) to improve absolute flux calibration and relative spectrophotometric calibration across the visible and near-infrared spectrum. As well as fundamental astrophysical applications, the system proposed here potentially has broad utility for defense and national security applications such as ground target illumination and space communication.

Justin Albert; William Burgett; Jason Rhodes

2006-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

377

General Motors Corporation and Pacific Northwest Laboratory Staff Exchange: Instrumentation for rapid measurement of automotive exhaust emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information in this report on the staff exchange of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff with the AIGER Consortium (General Motors, Ford, Chrysler, Navistar, the environmental protection Agency, and the California Air Resources Board) includes the purpose and objectives, a summary of activities, significant accomplishments, significant problems, industry benefits realized, recommended follow-on work and potential benefits from that work, and two appendices. Appendix A is a brief description of the fast gas chromatography and infrared spectroscopy chemometric technologies and their application to the rapid characterization of automobile exhaust emissions. Appendix B is a list of key contacts and the schedule of activities pertaining to the staff exchange.

Griffin, J.W.; Sharpe, S.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Sloane, T.M. [General Motors Corp., Warren, MI (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Supplementary absolute differential cross sections for the excitation of atomic hydrogen's n=3 and 4 levels by electron impact  

SciTech Connect

We have conducted measurements of absolute differential cross sections for the excitation of hydrogen atoms to their n=3(3S+3P+3D) and 4(4S+4P+4D+4F) levels. A modulated, crossed-beam method was employed, and the impact energies were 40 and 60 eV. Comparison of our results with those of others is quite favorable.

Sweeney, Christopher J.; Shyn, Tong W. [Center for Space Physics, Department of Astronomy, Boston University, Boston, Massachussetts 02215-1401 (United States); Grafe, Alan [Department of Computer Science, Engineering Science, and Physics, University of Michigan-Flint, Flint, Michigan 48502-1950 (United States)

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Requirements dependencies: the emergence of a requirements network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We believe that the requirements at the leaf-node level of the requirements tree structure cannot be viewed in isolation and that dependencies between them exist. We pursued this notion in order to find a coherent set of requirement dependencies that ...

Vishwajeet Kulshreshtha; John Boardman; Dinesh Verma

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Calculation of absolute free energy of binding for theophylline and its analogs to RNA aptamer using nonequilibrium work values  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The massively parallel computation of absolute binding free energy with a well-equilibrated system (MP-CAFEE) has been developed [H. Fujitani, Y. Tanida, M. Ito, G. Jayachandran, C. D. Snow, M. R. Shirts, E. J. Sorin, and V. S. Pande, J. Chem. Phys. ${\\bf 123}$, 084108 (2005)]. As an application, we perform the binding affinity calculations of six theophylline-related ligands with RNA aptamer. Basically, our method is applicable when using many compute nodes to accelerate simulations, thus a parallel computing system is also developed. To further reduce the computational cost, the adequate non-uniform intervals of coupling constant $\\lambda$, connecting two equilibrium states, namely bound and unbound, are determined. The absolute binding energies $\\Delta G$ thus obtained have effective linear relation between the computed and experimental values. If the results of two other different methods are compared, thermodynamic integration (TI) and molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) by the paper of Gouda $et al$ [H. Gouda, I. D. Kuntz, D. A. Case, and P. A. Kollman, Biopolymers ${\\bf 68}$, 16 (2003)], the predictive accuracy of the relative values $\\Delta\\Delta G$ is almost comparable to that of TI: the correlation coefficients (R) obtained are 0.99 (this work), 0.97 (TI), and 0.78 (MM-PBSA). On absolute binding energies meanwhile, a constant energy shift of $\\sim$ -7 kcal/mol against the experimental values is evident. To solve this problem, several presumable reasons are investigated.

Yoshiaki Tanida; Masakatsu Ito; Hideaki Fujitani

2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

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381

4.5 Audit Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Audit Requirements Audit Requirements Audit requirements are now contained in 2 separate sub-sections. Subsection 4.5.1 contains the audit requirements for States, Local Governments and Non-Profit Organizations while subsection 4.5.2 contains the audit requirements for For-Profit Organizations. 4.5.1 Audit Requirements for States, Local Governments and Non-Profit Organizations (a) General. All States, Local Governments and Non-Profit Organizations that expend over $500,000 in Federal funds in any year are required to have a single audit conducted in accordance with OMB Circular A-133. This requirement flows down to subrecipients that meet the dollar threshold. An independent auditor shall perform the audit in accordance with the Government Auditing Standards and must: 1) audit and provide opinions on the fair presentation of the

382

SG Network System Requirements Specification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SG Network System Requirements Specification SG Network System Requirements Specification Interim Release 3 5/17/2010 - 2 - Table of Contents Document History ....................................................................................................................................... - 3 - Revision History .......................................................................................................................................... - 3 - Preface........................................................................................................................................................ - 4 - Authors........................................................................................................................................................ - 6 -

383

Building security requirements with CLASP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, security requirements have been derived in an ad hoc manner. Recently, commercial software development organizations have been looking for ways to produce effective security requirements.In this paper, we show how to build security ... Keywords: application security, security process, security requirements

John Viega

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Development of a Simple Field Test for Vehicle Exhaust to Detect Illicit Use of Dyed Diesel Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of tax-free dyed fuel on public highways in the United States provides a convenient way of evading taxes. Current enforcement involves visual inspection for the red azo dye added to the fuel to designate its tax-free status. This approach has shortcomings such as the invasive nature of the tests and/or various deceptive tactics applied by tax evaders. A test designed to detect dyed fuel use by analyzing the exhaust would circumvent these shortcomings. This paper describes the development of a simple color spot test designed to detect the use of tax-free (dyed) diesel fuel by analyzing the engine exhaust. Development first investigated the combustion products of C.I. Solvent Red 164 (the azo dye formulation used in the United States to tag tax-free fuel). A variety of aryl amines were identified as characteristic molecular remnants that appear to survive combustion. A number of microanalytical color tests specific for aryl amines were then investigated. One test based on the use of 4-(dimethylamino)benzaldehyde seemed particularly applicable and was used in a proof-of-principle experiment. The 4-(dimethylamino)benzaldehyde color spot test was able to clearly distinguish between engines burning regular and dyed diesel fuel. Further development will refine this color spot test to provide an easy-to-use field test for Internal Revenue Service Field Compliance specialists.

Harvey, Scott D.; Wright, Bob W.

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

Data Requirements from NERSC Requirements Reviews Richard Gerber...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Scientists represented by the NERSC user community have growing requirements for data storage, IO bandwidth, networking bandwidth, and data software and services. Over the...

386

Managing System of Systems Requirements with a Requirements Screening Group  

SciTech Connect

Figuring out an effective and efficient way to manage not only your Requirements Baseline, but also the development of all your individual requirements during a Programs/Projects Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages can be both daunting and difficult. This is especially so when you are dealing with a complex and large System of Systems (SoS) Program with potentially thousands and thousands of Top Level Requirements as well as an equal number of lower level System, Subsystem and Configuration Item requirements that need to be managed. This task is made even more overwhelming when you have to add in integration with multiple requirements development teams (e.g., Integrated Product Development Teams (IPTs)) and/or numerous System/Subsystem Design Teams. One solution for tackling this difficult activity on a recent large System of Systems Program was to develop and make use of a Requirements Screening Group (RSG). This group is essentially a Team made up of co-chairs from the various Stakeholders with an interest in the Program of record that are enabled and accountable for Requirements Development on the Program/Project. The RSG co-chairs, often with the help of individual support team, work together as a Program Board to monitor, make decisions on, and provide guidance on all Requirements Development activities during the Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages of a Program/Project. In addition, the RSG can establish and maintain the Requirements Baseline, monitor and enforce requirements traceability across the entire Program, and work with other elements of the Program/Project to ensure integration and coordination.

Ronald R. Barden

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Project X functional requirements specification  

SciTech Connect

Project X is a multi-megawatt proton facility being developed to support intensity frontier research in elementary particle physics, with possible applications to nuclear physics and nuclear energy research, at Fermilab. A Functional Requirements Specification has been developed in order to establish performance criteria for the Project X complex in support of these multiple missions. This paper will describe the Functional Requirements for the Project X facility and the rationale for these requirements.

Holmes, S.D.; Henderson, S.D.; Kephart, R.; Kerby, J.; Mishra, S.; Nagaitsev, S.; Tschirhart, R.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

The Araucaria Project: Dependence of mean K, J, and I absolute magnitudes of red clump stars on metallicity and age  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Abridged) We present results of deep near-infrared JK imaging of LMC, SMC, and the Carina and Fornax dwarf galaxies. A comparison of the extinction-corrected K-band red clump star magnitudes with the tip of the red giant branch magnitude, the mean RR Lyrae star V-band magnitude, and the mean K-band magnitude of Cepheid variables at a period of 10 days (for the LMC and SMC) strongly suggest that the red clump star absolute K-band magnitude has a very low (if any) dependence on metallicity over the broad range of metallicities covered by our target galaxies. This finding is in contrast to the mean I-band and J-band red clump star magnitudes, which do have a clear metallicity dependence which we calibrate from our data. Excellent agreement with the former calibration of the red clump I-band magnitude dependence on metallicity of Udalski is found from our new data. We use the Galactic cluster K-band red clump star data of Grocholski and Sarajedini to demonstrate that the K-band red clump star absolute magnitude also has very little (if any) dependence on age. The present study therefore provides clear evidence that the mean K-band magnitude of red clump stars is an excellent distance indicator, with very small (if any) population corrections to be applied over a large range in metallicity and age. Comparing derived distances to those coming from the observed mean I-band magnitudes of the red clump stars, we find evidence that there is likely to be a problem in the photometric calibration of the local, solar neighborhood red clump star K-band or I-band magnitudes which amounts to some 0.2 mag. A re-determination of the absolute photometric calibration of the Hipparcos-observed nearby red clump stars seems necessary to resolve this problem.

G. Pietrzy{?}ski; W. Gieren; A. Udalski

2003-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

389

Requirements Specifications For Hybrid Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this paper is to present a formal framework for representing and reasoning about the requirements of hybrid systems. As background, the paper briefly reviews an abstract model for specifying system and software requirements, called the Four Variable Model [12], and a related requirements method, called SCR (Software Cost Reduction) [10, 1]. The paper then introduces a special discrete version of the Four Variable Model, the SCR requirements model [8] and proposes an extension of the SCR model for specifying and reasoning about hybrid systems. 2 Background

Constance Heitmeyer

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Data preparation requirements for modeling wind turbines with ADAMS{reg_sign}  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This contains guidelines for the kind of information that designers need to model a complete wind turbine with ADAMS. The information here is not at all exhaustive. It does, however, represent the collective knowledge of two years of experience gained by National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) engineers while using ADAMS to model wind turbines. If designers save the following information as they design a new turbine, they will have an excellent start on an ADAMS model. The more accurate the input data, the better the results will be. Designers will have to make the tradeoff between the required effort to improve their input data and the benefits of a more accurate simulation. The authors break the turbine into each of its major subsystems and describe them in detail. They attach a table of parameters to the end of the document to make it easier for one to keep track of data requirements.

Buhl, M.L. Jr.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

A wearable system that learns a kinematic model and finds structure in everyday manipulation by using absolute orientation sensors and a camera  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents Duo, the first wearable system to autonomously learn a kinematic model of the wearer via body-mounted absolute orientation sensors and a head-mounted camera. With Duo, we demonstrate the significant ...

Kemp, Charles C. (Charles Clark), 1972-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Statistical comparison of the effect of relative and absolute humidity on fixed-bed carbon adsorption capacity. Report for January 1987-July 1988  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes statistical methods used to evaluate data for toluene (at several typical operating temperatures and humidity levels) and to determine which measure of humidity (relative or absolute) is more important in determining carbon adsorption efficiency. The water content of a solvent-laden stream is critical for its control via carbon adsorption, especially at relative humidities about 50-70%. (Relative humidity is the percent of saturation: absolute humidity is the total water content.)

Dunn, J.E.; Nunez, C.; Kosusko, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures for the Chemistry Graduate Program PLEASE NOTE: This version of the Handbook must be used by students who start during or after the Spring 2012 semester is a central activity. 1.2 Purpose and Content of the Handbook. A detailed account of the academic requirements

Kounaves, Samuel P.

394

Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures for the Chemistry Graduate Program PLEASE NOTE: This version of the Handbook can be used by students who started during or before the Fall 2011 semester activity. 1.2 Purpose and Content of the Handbook. A detailed account of the academic requirements

Kounaves, Samuel P.

395

Humidity requirements in WSCF Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this paper is to develop and document a position on Relative Humidity (RH) requirements in the WSCF Laboratories. A current survey of equipment vendors for Organic, Inorganic and Radiochemical laboratories indicate that 25% - 80% relative humidity may meet the environmental requirements for safe operation and protection of all the laboratory equipment.

Evans, R.A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 2006 MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL INFORMATION AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS: FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD (FIPS) 200 APPROVED BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE Shirley Radack, EditorShirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division

397

Method for simultaneously removing SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.X pollutants from exhaust of a combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for removing pollutants from the exhaust of combustion systems burning fuels containing substantial amounts of sulfur and nitrogen. An exemplary method of the invention involves the formation and reaction of a sorbent comprising calcium magnesium acetate (CMA). The CMA is either dry-sprayed (in the form of a fine powder) or wet-sprayed in an aqueous solution in a high temperature environment such as a combustion chamber. The latter technique is feasible since CMA is a uniquely water-soluble form of calcium and magnesium. When the dispersed particles of CMA are heated to a high temperature, fine calcium and magnesium oxide particles, which are hollow with thin and highly porous walls are formed, affording optimum external and internal accessibility for reacting with toxic gaseous emissions such as SO.sub.2. Further, the combustion of the organic acetate portion of the sorbent results in the conversion of NO.sub.x to N.sub.2.

Levendis, Yiannis A. (Boston, MA); Wise, Donald L. (Belmont, MA)

1994-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

398

Home: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

content. | Skip to navigation content. | Skip to navigation Site Map Contact Us Current Documents Archived Documents Entire Site only in current section Advanced Search... U.S. Department of Energy Office of Management Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Sections Home Directives Current Directives Draft Directives Archives Delegations Current Delegations Current Designations Rescinded Organizations' Assignment of Responsibility Development & Review RevCom Writers' Tools DPC Corner References News and Updates Help Personal tools You are here: Office of Management » Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Info Home Directives are the Department of Energy's primary means of establishing policies, requirements, responsibilities, and procedures for Departmental elements and contractors. Directive

399

Cyber Security Issues and Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program Program (SGIG) Cyber Security Issues and Requirements Jeff Dagle November 19, 2009 Communication and Information Technology will be Central to Smart Grid Deployment Final Interim Smart Grid Roadmap, prepared by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) for the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Cyber Security Requirements Associated with ARRA Projects Proposals were required to include:  Discussion of how cyber security risks will be mitigated  What criteria will be used for vendor and technology selection  Relevant cyber security standards that will be followed (or industry best practices)  How emerging smart grid cyber security standards that are currently being developed will be adopted Cyber Security Objectives for Smart

400

Review of Literature Related to Residential Ventilation Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

typical existing house. Designed passive ventilation systemsPassive Ventilation by Constant Area Vents to Maintain Indoor Air Quality in Houses."House Ventilation Rates Local Exhaust Rates Air Distribution and Duct Leakage Infiltration Windows and Passive

McWilliams, Jennifer; Sherman, Max

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require absolute exhaustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Finding new reserves of oil and gas As the world's reserves of oil and gas become exhausted, we urgently need to find new  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finding new reserves of oil and gas As the world's reserves of oil and gas become exhausted, we urgently need to find new fields to answer our energy needs. Oil companies are keen to use novel techniques) techniques represent arguably the most significant technological advance in the field of oil exploration

Anderson, Jim

402

Method and system for the combination of non-thermal plasma and metal/metal oxide doped .gamma.-alumina catalysts for diesel engine exhaust aftertreatment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure pertains to a system and method for treatment of oxygen rich exhaust and more specifically to a method and system that combines non-thermal plasma with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina catalyst. Current catalyst systems for the treatment of oxygen rich exhaust are capable of achieving only approximately 7 to 12% NO.sub.x reduction as a passive system and only 25 40% reduction when a supplemental hydrocarbon reductant is injected into the exhaust stream. It has been found that treatment of an oxygen rich exhaust initially with a non-thermal plasma and followed by subsequent treatment with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina prepared by the sol gel method is capable of increasing the NO.sub.x reduction to a level of approximately 90% in the absence of SO.sub.2 and 80% in the presence of 20 ppm of SO.sub.2. Especially useful metals have been found to be indium, gallium, and tin.

Aardahl, Christopher L. (Richland, WA); Balmer-Miller, Mari Lou (West Richland, WA); Chanda, Ashok (Peoria, IL); Habeger, Craig F. (West Richland, WA); Koshkarian, Kent A. (Peoria, IL); Park, Paul W. (Peoria, IL)

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

403

The Practice of Parking Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cost of the required parking is thus $20 per square foot$40 per square foot of floor area, or twice the cost in aper 1,000 square feet in a TOD, and the developer's cost of

Shoup, Donald C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

land requirements | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

requirements requirements Dataset Summary Description This dataset is part of a larger internal dataset at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) that explores various characteristics of large solar electric (both PV and CSP) facilities around the United States. This dataset focuses on the land use characteristics for solar facilities that are either under construction or currently in operation. Source Land-Use Requirements for Solar Power Plants in the United States Date Released June 25th, 2013 (5 months ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords acres area average concentrating solar power csp Density electric hectares km2 land land requirements land use land-use mean photovoltaic photovoltaics PV solar statistics Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Master Solar Land Use Spreadsheet (xlsx, 1.5 MiB)

405

Manifest requirements. RCRA Information Brief  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Specific pretransport regulatory requirements must be met by DOE prior to shipment of hazardous waste, low-level wastes (LLW), and radioactive mixed wastes (RMW). The pretransport requirements are intended to help reduce the risk of loss or leakage of, or exposure to, hazardous wastes, LLW, and RMW during shipment; and to communicate information on potential hazards to shippers, carriers, or receivers of waste shipments, and emergency response personnel in the event of an accident, spill, or leak. These goals are accomplished through tracking of shipments, correct packaging and labeling, and communication of potential hazards. Specific requirements include manifesting, packaging, marking and labeling of waste packages, placarding of vehicles, and selecting appropriate waste transporters and shipment destinations. This Information Brief focuses on the manifesting requirements associated with domestic transport of hazardous wastes, LLW, and RMW.

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Physics and detector simulation requirements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the computing environment needed to meet the requirements for high energy physics Monte Carlo Calculations for the simulation of Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory physics and detectors. (AIP)

Computer Acquisition Working Group

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

SofTV Viewer Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

may be required to view all features in a presentations where build steps and animations are published. (This feature can be turned off) Netscape 7.1+ Presentations created...

408

OpenEI - land requirements  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4180 en Land use requirements for ground-mounted solar power facilities. http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode454

This dataset is part of...

409

Fusion technology status and requirements  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the status of fusion technology and discusses the requirements to be met in order to build a demonstration fusion plant. Strategies and programmatic considerations in pursuing engineering feasibility are also outlined.

Thomassen, K.I.

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

410

Renewable Energy Requirement Status: 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential impacts of renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and other requirements are significant for electricity generation, transmission, and distribution companies, especially for those that depend on coal and other fossil fuels to supply the power delivered to their customers. this Technical Update is to update the information presented in the previous EPRI report, Renewable Energy Requirement Status and Compliance Strategies: 2004 (1008374, December 2004). Although the assessment focuses on state ...

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

411

Functional Requirements for Customer Communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Customer communications infrastructures could support a wide variety of useful utility operations and industry-wide applications. However, these systems will require a substantial investment, which necessitates viewing customer communications with multiple stakeholders and applications in mind. This report describes the development of requirements for customer interface applications such as revenue metering, communications gateways, and remote equipment operations that can provide the basis for powerful ...

2002-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

412

A Method to Derive the Absolute Composition of the Sun, the Solar System and the Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The knowledge of isotopic and elemental abundances of the pristine solar system material provides a fundamental test of galactic chemical evolution models, while the composition of the solar photosphere is a reference pattern to understand stellar abundances. However, spectroscopic or meteoritic abundance determinations are only possible for an incomplete sample of the 83 elements detected in the solar system. Therefore, only relative abundances are experimentally determined, with respect to H or to Si for spectroscopic or meteoritic measurements, respectively. For this reason, the available compilations of solar abundances are obtained by combining spectroscopic and meteoritic determinations, a procedure requiring the knowledge of the chemical modification occurred in the solar photosphere. We provide a method to derive the mass fractions of all the 83 elements (and their most abundant isotopes) in the early solar system material and in the present-day solar surface. Calculations are repeated by adopting the most widely adopted compilations of solar abundances. Since for a given [Fe/H], the total metallicity depends on solar (Z/X), a 30% reduction of Z is found when passing from the classical Anders&Grevesse to the most recent Lodders compilation. Some implications are discussed, as, in particular, an increase of about 700 Myr of the estimated age of Globular Clusters. Within the experimental errors, the complete set of relative solar abundances, as obtained by combining meteoritic and photospheric measurements, are consistent with the variations implied by the quoted physical processes. Few deviations can be easily attributed to the decay of long-lived radioactive isotopes. The huge lithium depletion is only partially explained by introducing a rotational-induced mixing in the tachocline.

L. Piersanti; O. Straniero; S. Cristallo

2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

413

Near-threshold absolute angle-differential cross sections for electron-impact excitation of argon and xenon  

SciTech Connect

Absolute angle-differential cross sections for electron-impact excitation of argon and xenon atoms to the lowest four np{sup 5}(n+1)s levels, and the 5p{sup 5}5d[7/2]{sub 3} level in xenon, have been measured and calculated as a function of electron energy up to a few eV above threshold at a fixed scattering angle of 135 degree sign . For argon, very good agreement is observed between the experimental data and predictions from a Breit-Pauli B-spline R-matrix (BSR) method, in which nonorthogonal orbital sets are used to optimize the target description. The agreement is still satisfactory for the more complex xenon target, suggesting that predictions from the BSR model should already be sufficiently accurate for many modeling applications. Nevertheless, the remaining discrepancies indicate the need for further refinement of the theoretical model.

Allan, M.; Zatsarinny, O.; Bartschat, K. [Department of Chemistry, University of Fribourg, Fribourg (Switzerland); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa 50311 (United States)

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Initial characterization of unequal-length, low-background proportional counters for absolute gas-counting applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization of two sets of custom unequal length proportional counters is underway at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). These detectors will be used in measurements to determine the absolute activity concentration of gaseous radionuclides (e.g. 37 Ar ). A set of three detectors has been fabricated based on previous PNNL ultra-low-background proportional counter designs and now operate in PNNL's shallow underground counting laboratory. A second set of four counters has also been fabricated using clean assembly of Oxygen-Free High-Conductivity copper components for use in a shielded above-ground counting laboratory. Characterization of both sets of detectors is underway with measurements of background rates

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

The recent absolute total np and pp cross section determinations: quality of data description and prediction of experimental observables  

SciTech Connect

The absolute total cross sections for np and pp scattering below 1000 MeV are determined based on partial-wave analyses (PWAs) of nucleon-nucleon scattering data. These cross sections are compared with the most recent ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-3.3 data files, and the Nijmegen PWA. Systematic deviations from the ENDF/B-VII.0 and JENDL-3.3 evaluations are found to exist in the low-energy region. Comparison of the np evaluation with the result of most recent np total and differential cross section measurements will be discussed. Results of those measurements were not used in the evaluation database. A comparison was done to check a quality of evaluation and its capabilities to predict experimental observables. Excellent agreement was found between the new experimental data and our PWA predictions.

Laptev, Alexander B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haight, Robert C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Arndt, Richard A [GWU; Briscoe, William J [GWU; Paris, Mark W [GWU; Strakovsky, Igor I [GWU; Workman, Ron L [GWU

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Solid-state track recorder dosimetry device to measure absolute reaction rates and neutron fluence as a function of time  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid state track recording type dosimeter is disclosed to measure the time dependence of the absolute fission rates of nuclides or neutron fluence over a period of time. In a primary species an inner recording drum is rotatably contained within an exterior housing drum that defines a series of collimating slit apertures overlying windows defined in the stationary drum through which radiation can enter. Film type solid state track recorders are positioned circumferentially about the surface of the internal recording drum to record such radiation or its secondary products during relative rotation of the two elements. In another species both the recording element and the aperture element assume the configuration of adjacent disks. Based on slit size of apertures and relative rotational velocity of the inner drum, radiation parameters within a test area may be measured as a function of time and spectra deduced therefrom.

Gold, Raymond (1393 George Washington Way, Suite No. 7, P.O. Box 944, Richland, WA 99352); Roberts, James H. (1393 George Washington Way, Suite No. 7, P.O. Box 944, Richland, WA 99352)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

OMB Requirements | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

OMB Requirements OMB Requirements OMB Requirements Acquisitions OMB Circular A-109, Acquisition of Major Systems (04-05-76) (Available in hard copy only) OMB M-04-08, Maximizing Use of SmartBuy and Avoiding Duplication of Agency Activities with with the President's 24 E-Gov Initiatives (02-25-2004) (pdf) OMB M-04-16, Software Acquisition (07-01-2004) Budget/Capital Planning OMB Circular A-11 OMB M-05-23, Improving Informational Technology (IT) Project Planning and Execution (8-04-2005) (pdf) Cyber Security & Privacy OMB M-00-07, Incorporating and Funding Security in Information Systems Investments (02-28-2000) OMB M-02-01, Guidance for Preparing and Submitting Security Plans of Action and Milestones(10-19-2001) OMB M-02-09, Reporting Instructions for the Government Information

418

Exposure to diesel exhaust up-regulates iNOS expression in ApoE knockout mice  

SciTech Connect

Traffic related particulate matter air pollution is a risk factor for cardiovascular events; however, the biological mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesize that diesel exhaust (DE) inhalation induces up-regulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), which is known to contribute to vascular dysfunction, progression of atherosclerosis and ultimately cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Methods: ApoE knockout mice (30-week) were exposed to DE (at 200 {mu}g/m{sup 3} of particulate matter) or filtered-air (control) for 7 weeks (6 h/day, 5 days/week). iNOS expression in the blood vessels and heart was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and western blotting analysis. To examine iNOS activity, thoracic aortae were mounted in a wire myograph, and vasoconstriction stimulated by phenylephrine (PE) was measured with and without the presence of the specific inhibitor for iNOS (1400 W). NF-{kappa}B (p65) activity was examined by ELISA. The mRNA expression of iNOS and NF-{kappa}B (p65) was determined by real-time PCR. Results: DE exposure significantly enhanced iNOS expression in the thoracic aorta (4-fold) and heart (1.5 fold). DE exposure significantly attenuated PE-stimulated vasoconstriction by {approx} 20%, which was partly reversed by 1400 W. The mRNA expression of iNOS and NF-{kappa}B was significantly augmented after DE exposure. NF-{kappa}B activity was enhanced 2-fold after DE inhalation, and the augmented NF-{kappa}B activity was positively correlated with iNOS expression (R{sup 2} = 0.5998). Conclusions: We show that exposure to DE increases iNOS expression and activity possibly via NF-{kappa}B-mediated pathway. We suspect that DE exposure-caused up-regulation of iNOS contributes to vascular dysfunction and atherogenesis, which could ultimately lead to urban air pollution-associated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. - Highlights: > Exposed ApoE knockout mice (30-week) to diesel exhaust (DE) for 7 weeks. > Examine iNOS expression and activity in the blood vessels and heart. > DE exposure enhanced iNOS protein and mRNA expression in the aorta and heart. > iNOS activity was also increased after DE exposure. > This up-regulation of iNOS may contribute to vascular dysfunction and atherogenesis.

Bai Ni [Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); James Hogg Research Centre, Providence Heart and Lung Institute, St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Kido, Takashi [James Hogg Research Centre, Providence Heart and Lung Institute, St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Kavanagh, Terrance J.; Kaufman, Joel D.; Rosenfeld, Michael E. [Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Breemen, Cornelis van [Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Eeden, Stephan F. van, E-mail: Stephan.vanEeden@hli.ubc.ca [James Hogg Research Centre, Providence Heart and Lung Institute, St. Paul's Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Homogeneous production and removal of NO/sub x/ from combustion exhaust flows. First quarterly technical summary report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The production and removal of No/sub x/ and other combustion products during fossil fuel combustion is a serious environmental problem for both stationary and mobile energy systems. Since stationary systems are faced with increased utilization of coal, oil shale, or synthetic fuel oils, all of which have significant levels of fuel-bound nitrogen, NO/sub x/ formation may become acute. Recent studies of the production of NO/sub x/ due to oxidation of fuel nitrogen indicate that a critical role is played by the interaction of NH/sub i/ (i = 1,2,3) species with NO, O/sub 2/, OH, and H. In fact, these reactions play a vital role in the homogeneous removal of NO/sub x/ from combustion exhaust streams upon addition of NH/sub 3/ or NH/sub 3/-like compounds. Over the past two years, there has been an increased understanding of the chemistry of the NH/sub i//NO/sub x/ system at combustor exhaust temperatures. For an ammonia addition system to be effective in reducing NO/sub x/ emissions, it must work successfully in the presence of a variety of sulfur-bearing compounds present in the products of combusted coal and oil shale. The work in progress has three major objectives. The first objective is to determine whether the reactions of SO/sub 2/ (the predominant sulfur-bearing compound present) + NH/sub i/ (i = 1,2,3) directly produce NO/sub x/ in the temperature range of 300 to 1500 K. Depending on the products and value of these rate constants, the effectiveness of NO removal by NH/sub 3/ could be dramatically affected. The second objective is to screen and evaluate various sulfur-containing scavenger precursors such as SO, SO/sub 2/, HS, and H/sub 2/S to assess their impact on the NH/sub i//NO/sub x/ chemical system.

Silver, J.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

RPAM & Energy Order Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

430.1C, Real Property Asset Management 430.1C, Real Property Asset Management and DOE O 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management Requirements, Overlap & Differences Office of Engineering and Construction Management September 2009 2 10/27/2009 Energy Order & RPAM Order Requirements DOE O 430.1C - RPAM DOE O 430.2B ENERGY ORDER Energy Efficiency Water Consumption Utility Metering ESPCs & USPCs Personnel - Energy Training Environmental Management System (EMS) Real Property Performance Indicators Sustainable Buildings Facilities Information Management System (FIMS) Personnel - Certified Realty Specialists Ten Year Site Plans Sustainable & Integrated Design TEAM Executable Plans High Performance Building Plan OVERLAP Real Property

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "require absolute exhaustion" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Stellar Astrophysics Requirements NERSC Forecast  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements for Requirements for m461:Stellar Explosions in Three Dimensions Tomek Plewa (Florida State University) + 3 graduate students, Artur Gawryszczak (Warsaw), Konstantinos Kifonidis (Munich), Andrzej Odrzywolek (Cracow), Ju Zhang (FIT), Andrey Zhiglo (Kharkov) 1. m461: Stellar Explosions in Three Dimensions * Summarize your projects and expected scientific objectives through 2014 * Modeling and simulations of transient phenomena in stellar astrophysics driven by either radiation or thermonuclear processes * Numerical solution of a coupled system of PDEs and ODEs * Tame nonlinearity! * Our goal is to ... * Explain observed properties of exploding stellar objects * Present focus is ... * Neutrino-driven core-collapse supernova explosions * In the next 3 years we expect to ...

422

New Solutions Require New Thinking  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solutions Require Solutions Require New Thinking America's demand for power threatens to overburden an already congested electric system. The U.S. Department of Energy is addressing these energy challenges with innovative solutions to energy generation. Its Renewable and Distributed Systems Integration (RDSI) Program is helping to alleviate congestion, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and improve reliability by investigating answers such as * Microgrid technologies * Distributed generation * Two-way communication systems * Demand response programs Reducing Peak Demand The RDSI program aims to reduce peak load on distribution feeders 20% by 2015. To help achieve this goal, RDSI is sponsoring demonstration projects nationwide. From California to New York, these projects are

423

Meeting Federal Energy Security Requirements  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Markel Markel SRA International Lawrence_Markel@sra.com Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Fall 2012 - October 16-17 Mobile, AL Sponsored by Alabama Power Theme Meeting energy security requirements in federal facilities provides opportunities for additional types of cooperation between utilities and the federal agencies. However, there are significant barriers to pursuing these opportunities - constraints on utilities and on federal agencies, as well as sometimes-competing objectives. Energy security encompasses sufficiency, surety, and sustainability.  Above all, energy security means having adequate power to conduct critical operations for the duration required (sufficiency).  Secondarily, and leading to sufficiency, is ensuring resilient energy supplies that are accessible when

424

Science-Driven Network Requirements for ESnet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron Source Network Requirements Six DOE laboratories arehas networking requirements which differ from many other DOEhas networking requirements which differ from many other DOE

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

ALLOCATION OF REACTIVE SUPPORT REQUIREMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the voltage setting point s kV of each bus Qk and the voltage profile for the buses c j Q . Recall that Q for these transactions so that all bus voltages meet the specified voltage profile requirements. Consequently load is locally met at the bus. In other words, we assume that at each load bus the power factor is 1

Gross, George

426

Enhanced oil recovery water requirements  

SciTech Connect

Water requirements for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) are evaluated using publicly available information, data from actual field applications, and information provided by knowledgeable EOR technologists in 14 major oil companies. Water quantity and quality requirements are estimated for individual EOR processes (steam drive; in situ combustion; and CO/sub 2/, micellar-polymer, polymer, and caustic flooding) in those states and specific geographic locations where these processes will play major roles in future petroleum production by the year 2000. The estimated quantity requirements represent the total water needed from all sources. A reduction in these quantities can be achieved by reinjecting all of the produced water potentially available for recycle in the oil recovery method. For injection water quality requirements, it is noted that not all of the water used for EOR needs to be fresh. The use of treated produced water can reduce significantly the quantities of fresh water that would be sought from other sources. Although no major EOR project to date has been abandoned because of water supply problems, competing regional uses for water, drought situations, and scarcity of high quality surface water and ground water could be impediments to certain projects in the near future.

Royce, B.; Kaplan, E.; Garrell, M.; Geffen, T.M.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Vehicle cabin cooling system for capturing and exhausting heated boundary layer air from inner surfaces of solar heated windows  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The cabin cooling system includes a cooling duct positioned proximate and above upper edges of one or more windows of a vehicle to exhaust hot air as the air is heated by inner surfaces of the windows and forms thin boundary layers of heated air adjacent the heated windows. The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a flow rate that captures the hot air in the boundary layer without capturing a significant portion of the cooler cabin interior air and to discharge the hot air at a point outside the vehicle cabin, such as the vehicle trunk. In a preferred embodiment, the cooling duct has a cross-sectional area that gradually increases from a distal point to a proximal point to the fan inlet to develop a substantially uniform pressure drop along the length of the cooling duct. Correspondingly, this cross-sectional configuration develops a uniform suction pressure and uniform flow rate at the upper edge of the window to capture the hot air in the boundary layer adjacent each window.

Farrington, Robert B. (Golden, CO); Anderson, Ren (Broomfield, CO)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Evaluation of materials exposed to scale-control/nozzle-exhaust experiments at the Salton Sea geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The erosion, corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of Ti-, Co-, Ni-, and Fe-base alloys specimens that were used in scale-control tests performed at the Salton Sea geothermal field were evaluated. Specimens were exposed to high-velocity, two-phase, 104{sup 0}C nozzle exhaust that was produced by expanding acidified hypersaline, highly mineralized brine to atmospheric pressure through converging-diverging nozzles. The exposed specimens were evaluated using surface profilometer traces, light microscopy, scanning-electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy ananlysis. The observed degradation was attributed largely to synergistic effects of erosion, corrosion, and stress. A principal mode of degradation appeared to be the formation and growth of corrosion-assisted erosion cavities; it was proposed that surface repassivation kinetics play a key role in the development of these cavities. It was also suggested that scale deposits on the metal surface may either alter the mode of attack or act as protective barriers. It was concluded that, of the potential turbine-blade materials tested, the Ti-base alloys exhibited the best combination of resistance to erosion, corrosion, and SCC.

Goldberg, A.; Kershaw, R.P.

1979-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

429

Quality Assurance Requirements and Description  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

QjCivilianRadioactive QjCivilianRadioactive Was'fe Management QA: QA QVALITY ASSURANCE REQUIREMENTS AND DESCRIPTION DOEIRW-0333P Revisiol1 20 Effective Date: 10-01-2008 LarrY Newman, DlrectQr Office of Quality As,surance ~~--~-_._._- Edward F. Spr at III, Di or Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Date I/Jf/4t' , . - - - Date OCRWM Title: Quality Assurance Requirements and Description DOEIRW-0333P, Revision 20 Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Quality Assurance Policy Page: 2 of 160 Successful implementation of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) Quality Assurance (QA) program is essential for the OCRWM to carry out its mission. Our mission is to manage and dispose ofbigh-Ievel radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel in a manner that protects health, safety, and the environment; enhances national and energy security; and merits

430

Requirements for signaling channel authentication  

SciTech Connect

This contribution addresses requirements for ATM signaling channel authentication. Signaling channel authentication is an ATM security service that binds an ATM signaling message to its source. By creating this binding, the message recipient, and even a third party, can confidently verify that the message originated from its claimed source. This provides a useful mechanism to mitigate a number of threats. For example, a denial of service attack which attempts to tear-down an active connection by surreptitiously injecting RELEASE or DROP PARTY messages could be easily thwarted when authenticity assurances are in place for the signaling channel. Signaling channel authentication could also be used to provide the required auditing information for accurate billing which is impervious to repudiation. Finally, depending on the signaling channel authentication mechanism, end-to-end integrity of the message (or at least part of it) can be provided. None of these capabilities exist in the current specifications.

Tarman, T.D.

1995-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

431

Functional Requirements and Use Cases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iously also beneficial in information systems development, staging core functionality for early releases and adding features over the course of several subsequent releases. In many industries, companies produce product lines with different cost/feature variations per product in the line, and product families that include a number of product lines targeted at somewhat different markets or usage situations. What makes these product lines part of a family, are some common elements of functionality and identity. A platform-based development approach leverages this commonality, utilizing a set of reusable assets across the family. These strategies have important implications for software architecture. In particular, it is not just the functional requirements of the first product or release that must be supported by the architecture. The functional requirements of early (nearly concurrent) releases need to be explicitly taken into account. Later releases are accommodated through architectu

System Has Properties; Ruth Malan; Dana Bredemeyer

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Evaluate deaerator steam requirements quickly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam plant engineers frequently have to perform energy balance calculations around the deaerator to estimate the steam required to preheat and deaerate the make-up water and condensate returns. This calculation involves solving two sets of equations, one for mass and the other for energy balance. Reference to steam tables is also necessary. However, with the help of this program written in BASIC, one can arrive at the make-up water and steam requirements quickly, without referring to steam tables. This paper shows the mass and energy balance equations for the deaerator. This paper gives the program listing. An number of condensate returns can be handled. An example illustrates the use of the program.

Ganapathy, V. (ABCO Industries, Inc., Abilene, TX (US))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Present and Future Computing Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for Computational Cosmology for Computational Cosmology DES LSST Presenter: Salman Habib Argonne National Laboratory Jim Ahrens (LANL) Scott Dodelson (FNAL) Katrin Heitmann (ANL) Peter Nugent (LBNL) Anze Slosar (BNL) Risa Wechsler (SLAC) 1 Cosmic Frontier Computing Collaboration Computational Cosmology SciDAC-3 Project Ann Almgren (LBNL) Nick Gnedin (FNAL) Dave Higdon (LANL) Rob Ross (ANL) Martin White (UC Berkeley/ LBNL) Large Scale Production Computing and Storage Requirements for High Energy Physics Research A DOE Technical Program Review November 27-28, 2012

434

CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Utility Generation Plant Exhausts and Sequestration by a Biomimetic Route Based on Enzymatic Catalysts-Current Status  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from Coal-Fired Utility Generation Plant Exhausts, and from Coal-Fired Utility Generation Plant Exhausts, and Sequestration by a Biomimetic Route Based on Enzymatic Catalysis - Current Status Gillian M. Bond (gbond@nmt.edu; 505-835-5653) Margaret-Gail Medina (magail@nmt.edu; 505-835-5229) New Mexico Tech 801 Leroy Socorro, NM 87801 John Stringer (jstringe@epri.com; 650-855-2472) Electric Power Research Institute 3412 Hillview Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94304 F. Arzum Simsek-Ege (fatma.a.simsek-egel@intel.com; 505-893-8694) Intel Corporation Albuquerque, New Mexico Introduction A range of carbon management strategies will have to be implemented if meaningful reductions in CO 2 emissions are to be achieved in response to concerns about global climate change. It is becoming increasingly clear that some form or forms of carbon

435

Characterization of rocket propellant combustion products. Chemical characterization and computer modeling of the exhaust products from four propellant formulations: Final report, September 23, 1987--April 1, 1990  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the work described in this report is four-fold: to (a) develop a standardized and experimentally validated approach to the sampling and chemical and physical characterization of the exhaust products of scaled-down rocket launch motors fired under experimentally controlled conditions at the Army`s Signature Characterization Facility (ASCF) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama; (b) determine the composition of the exhaust produces; (c) assess the accuracy of a selected existing computer model for predicting the composition of major and minor chemical species; (d) recommended alternations to both the sampling and analysis strategy and the computer model in order to achieve greater congruence between chemical measurements and computer prediction. 34 refs., 2 figs., 35 tabs.

Jenkins, R.A.; Nestor, C.W.; Thompson, C.V.; Gayle, T.M.; Ma, C.Y.; Tomkins, B.A.; Moody, R.L.

1991-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

436

Tank exhaust comparison with 40 CFR 61.93, Subpart H, and other referenced guidelines for Tank Farms National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) designated stacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated National Emission Standards other than Radon from US Department of Energy (DOE) Facilities (40 CFR 61, Subpart H) on December 15, 1989. The regulations specify procedures, equipment, and test methods that.are to be used to measure radionuclide emissions from exhaust stacks that are designated as National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutant (NESHAP) stacks. Designated NESHAP stacks are those that have the potential to cause any member of the public to receive an effective dose equivalent (EDE) greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/year, assuming all emission controls were removed. Tank Farms currently has 33 exhaust stacks, 15 of which are designated NESHAP stacks. This document assesses the compliance status of the monitoring and sampling systems for the designated NESHAP stacks.

Bachand, D.D.; Crummel, G.M.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Seismic Performance Requirements for WETF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report develops recommendations for requirements on the Weapons Engineering Tritium Facility (WETF) performance during seismic events. These recommendations are based on fragility estimates of WETF structures, systems, and components that were developed by LANL experts during facility walkdowns. They follow DOE guidance as set forth in standards DOE-STD-1021-93, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Performance Categorization Guidelines for Structures, Systems, and Components'' and DOE-STD-1020-94, ''Natural Phenomena Hazards Design and Evaluation Criteria for Department of Energy Facilities''. Major recommendations are that WETF institute a stringent combustible loading control program and that additional seismic bracing and anchoring be provided for gloveboxes and heavy equipment.

Hans Jordan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Absolute Value Programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ber 2005, was supported by National Science Foundation Grants CCR-0138308 and IIS-0511905, the Microsoft Corporation and ExxonMobil. References. 1.

439

Quantitative Vapor-phase IR Intensities and DFT Computations to Predict Absolute IR Spectra based on Molecular Structure: I. Alkanes  

SciTech Connect

Recently recorded quantitative IR spectra of a variety of gas-phase alkanes are shown to have integrated intensities in both the C-H stretching and C-H bending regions that depend linearly on the molecular size, i.e. the number of C-H bonds. This result is well predicted from CH4 to C15H32 by DFT computations of IR spectra at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level of DFT theory. A simple model predicting the absolute IR band intensities of alkanes based only on structural formula is proposed: For the C-H stretching band near 2930 cm-1 this is given by (in km/mol): CH_str = (343)*CH (4160) where CH is number of C-H bonds in the alkane. The linearity is explained in terms of coordinated motion of methylene groups rather than the summed intensities of autonomous -CH2- units. The effect of alkyl chain length on the intensity of a C-H bending mode is explored and interpreted in terms of conformer distribution. The relative intensity contribution of a methyl mode compared to the total C-H stretch intensity is shown to be linear in the number of terminal methyl groups in the alkane, and can be used to predict quantitative spectra a priori based on structure alone.

Williams, Stephen D.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Yavelak, Veronica; Oats, R. P.; Brauer, Carolyn S.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

440

Absolute high-resolution Se{sup +} photoionization cross-section measurements with Rydberg-series analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Absolute single photoionization cross-section measurements for Se{sup +} ions were performed at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory using the photo-ion merged-beams technique. Measurements were made at a photon energy resolution of 5.5 meV from 17.75 to 21.85 eV spanning the 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 3} {sup 4}S{sub 3/2}{sup o} ground-state ionization threshold and the {sup 2}P{sub 3/2}{sup o},{sup 2}P{sub 1/2}{sup o},{sup 2}D{sub 5/2}{sup o}, and{sup 2}D{sub 3/2}{sup o} metastable state thresholds. Extensive analysis of the complex resonant structure in this region identified numerous Rydberg series of resonances and obtained the Se{sup 2+} 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 23}P{sub 2} and 4s{sup 2}4p{sup 21}S{sub 0} state energies. In addition, particular attention was given to removing significant effects in the measurements due to a small percentage of higher-order undulator radiation.

Esteves, D. A. [University of Nevada, Reno, Department of Physics, MS 0220, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Bilodeau, R. C. [Western Michigan University, MS 5252, 1903 W. Michigan Ave, Kalamazoo, Michigan 49008 (United States); Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Sterling, N. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, 3248, Biomedical Physical Sciences, East Lansing, Michigan 48824-2320 (United States); Phaneuf, R. A. [University of Nevada, Reno, Department of Physics, MS 0220, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Red, E. C.; Aguilar, A. [Advanced Light Source, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Iran cannot have claimed to be building a thermonuclear reactor -To build a thermonuclear reactor by its own efforts is a task absolutely beyond Iran's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iran cannot have claimed to be building a thermonuclear reactor - expert To build a thermonuclear reactor by its own efforts is a task absolutely beyond Iran's strength, and reports that Iran has made such claims must be a misunderstanding, a nuclear specialist said._Georgy Yeliseyev, chief specialist

442

Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance Uncertainty: Pyrgeometers Compared to an Absolute Sky-Scanning Radiometer, Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer, and Radiative Transfer Model Calculations  

SciTech Connect

Because atmospheric longwave radiation is one of the most fundamental elements of an expected climate change, there has been a strong interest in improving measurements and model calculations in recent years. Important questions are how reliable and consistent are atmospheric longwave radiation measurements and calculations and what are the uncertainties? The First International Pyrgeometer and Absolute Sky-scanning Radiometer Comparison, which was held at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program's Souther Great Plains site in Oklahoma, answers these questions at least for midlatitude summer conditions and reflects the state of the art for atmospheric longwave radiation measurements and calculations. The 15 participating pyrgeometers were all calibration-traced standard instruments chosen from a broad international community. Two new chopped pyrgeometers also took part in the comparison. And absolute sky-scanning radiometer (ASR), which includes a pyroelectric detector and a reference blackbody source, was used for the first time as a reference standard instrument to field calibrate pyrgeometers during clear-sky nighttime measurements. Owner-provided and uniformly determined blackbody calibration factors were compared. Remarkable improvements and higher pyrgeometer precision were achieved with field calibration factors. Results of nighttime and daytime pyrgeometer precision and absolute uncertainty are presented for eight consecutive days of measurements, during which period downward longwave irradiance varied between 260 and 420 W m-2. Comparisons between pyrgeometers and the absolute ASR, the atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer, and radiative transfer models LBLRTM and MODTRAN show a surprisingly good agreement of <2 W m-2 for nighttime atmospheric longwave irradiance measurements and calculations.

Philipona, J. R.; Dutton, Ellsworth G.; Stoffel, T.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Reda, I.; Stifter, Armin; Wendling, Peter; Wood, Norm; Clough, Shepard A.; Mlawer, Eli J.; Anderson, Gail; Revercomb, Henry E.; Shippert, Timothy R.

2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

443

Outlook and Related Information Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This procedure provides the steps required for market participants to submit the information required for the 18-Month Outlook, and specifies the information to be contained in the Outlook. Public Disclaimer The posting of documents on this Web site is done for the convenience of market participants and other interested visitors to the IESO Web site. Please be advised that, while the IESO attempts to have all posted documents conform to the original, changes can result from the original, including changes resulting from the programs used to format the documents for posting on the Web site as well as from the programs used by the viewer to download and read the documents. The IESO makes no representation or warranty, express or implied, that the documents on this Web site are exact reproductions of the original documents listed. In addition, the documents and information posted on this Web site are subject to change. The IESO may revise, withdraw or make final these materials at any time at its sole discretion without further notice. It is solely your responsibility to ensure that you are using up-to-date documents and information.

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Passenger Car and Medium-duty Engine in Conjunction with Ultra Low Sulfur Fuel (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discusses the full useful life exhaust emission performance of a NOx (nitrogen oxides) adsorber and diesel particle filter equipped light-duty and medium-duty engine using ultra low sulfur diesel fuel.

Thornton, M.; Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Weber, P.; Webb, C.

2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

445

Debris exhaust system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A debris removal system removes debris from a work site by flowing fluid away from the work site toward the periphery of a structure. The fluid flow can be kept constant around the periphery so that debris is removed evenly. The structure can have a reduced cross section between the fluid inlet and the work site so that the resulting increased fluid velocity works to prevent debris from escaping. 9 figs.

McBride, D.D.; Bua, D.; Domankevitz, Y.; Nishioka, N.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

446

Debris exhaust system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A debris removal system removes debris from a work site by flowing fluid away from the work site toward the periphery of a structure. The fluid flow can be kept constant around the periphery so that debris is removed evenly. The structure can have a reduced cross section between the fluid inlet and the work site so that the resulting increased fluid velocity works to prevent debris from escaping.

McBride, Donald D. (Albuquerque, NM); Bua, Dominic (Lynnfield, MA); Domankevitz, Yacov (Brookline, MA); Nishioka, Norman (Wayland, MA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Microsoft Word - Requirements 0819.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Studying the ) DOE-HQ-2009-0003-0819 Studying the ) DOE-HQ-2009-0003-08