Sample records for require absolute exhaustion

  1. Functional requirements for portable exhauster system to be used during saltwell pumping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, O.D.

    1998-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines functional requirements for portable exhausters used to ventilate primary tanks during saltwell pumping, and provide back-up to primary and annulus ventilation systems at C-106 and AY-102.

  2. Would you like an absolutely free prescription for reduced risk of numerous diseases and increased energy, happiness and life expectancy that requires no trips to the store or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leistikow, Bruce N.

    Would you like an absolutely free prescription for reduced risk of numerous diseases and increased energy, happiness and life expectancy that requires no trips to the store or special equipment? What

  3. Motorola's Exhaust Optimization Program: Tracer Gas Application for Gas Panel Enclosures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myart, H. R.; Camacho, R.

    The Motorola Exhaust Optimization Program strives toward identifying the optimum exhaust requirements for gas panel enclosures to help conserve energy and provide future exhaust capacity for new tools. Various Motorola studies have shown...

  4. Exhaust gas recirculation apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egnell, R.A.; Hansson, B.L.

    1981-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus is disclosed for recirculating combustion exhaust gases to the burner region of a Stirling cycle hot-gas engine to lower combustion temperature and reduct NO/sub x/ formation includes a first wall separating the exhaust gas stream from the inlet air stream, a second wall separating the exhaust gas stream from the burner region, and low flow resistance ejectors formed in the first and second walls for admitting the inlet air to the burner region and for entraining and mixing with the inlet air portion of the exhaust gas stream. In a preferred embodiment the ejectors are arranged around the periphery of a cylindrical burner region and oriented to admit the air/exhaust gas mixture tangentially to promote mixing. In another preferred embodiment a single annular ejector surrounds and feeds the air/exhaust gas mixture to a cylindrical burner region. The annular ejector includes an annular plate with radially-directed flow passages to provide an even distribution of the air/exhaust gas mixture to the burner region.

  5. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  6. Absolute nuclear material assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  7. Diesel exhaust aftertreatment 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The papers in this volume deal in the main with the two most common forms of aftertreatment technology. The first is the trap oxidizer, which is a system for trapping and filtering the particulate matter from the exhaust gas and periodically removing it by thermal oxidation. This process is commonly known as regeneration. The second is the diesel oxidation catalyst. Similar in many ways to the flow through a converter in passenger cars, it oxidizes the soluble organic fraction of the diesel exhaust as well as gaseous hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. This catalyst is being used in production volumes in heavy duty trucks in the US beginning in 1994. Several papers in this volume deal with the development experience of this converter application. There also is included a series of papers by trap and filter manufacturers dealing with improved materials, making their devices more durable. Papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  8. Preserving Diesel Exhaust Ultrafine (Nano-) Particulate Structure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Preserving Diesel Exhaust Ultrafine (Nano-) Particulate Structure in Genotoxicity Studies to Support Engineering Development of Emission Controls Preserving Diesel Exhaust...

  9. Decoherence at absolute zero

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supurna Sinha

    2005-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analytical study of the loss of quantum coherence at absolute zero. Our model consists of a harmonic oscillator coupled to an environment of harmonic oscillators at absolute zero. We find that for an Ohmic bath, the offdiagonal elements of the density matrix in the position representation decay as a power law in time at late times. This slow loss of coherence in the quantum domain is qualitatively different from the exponential decay observed in studies of high temperature environments.

  10. Absolute Biodiesel Potential Country Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Absolute Biodiesel Potential Country Name Production Cost ($/liter) Potential Biodiesel Volume,234 0% 0% #12;Absolute Biodiesel Potential Country Name Production Cost ($/liter) Potential Biodiesel;Absolute Biodiesel Potential Country Name Production Cost ($/liter) Potential Biodiesel Volume (liters

  11. Exhaust Analyzer | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exhaust Analyzer Technology available for licensing: Aids in development of advanced technologies for reducing particulate emissions, thereby reducing human exposure Diesel engine...

  12. Treatment of power utilities exhaust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koermer, Gerald (Basking Ridge, NJ)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Provided is a process for treating nitrogen oxide-containing exhaust produced by a stationary combustion source by the catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide in the presence of a reductant comprising hydrogen, followed by ammonia selective catalytic reduction to further reduce the nitrogen oxide level in the exhaust.

  13. The investigation of exhaust powered, automotive air cycle air conditioning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holley, James Andrew

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEE INVESTIGATION OF EXHAUST POWERED, AUTOMOTIVE AIR CYCLE AIR CONDITIONING A Thesis James Andrew Holley Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1978 Major SubJect: Mechanical Engineering THE INVESTIGATION OF EXHAUST POWERED, AUTOMOTIVE AIR CYCLE AIR CONDITIONING A Thesis hy James Andrew Holley Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee) (Head of Departm nt) Memb e...

  14. Exhaust after-treatment system with in-cylinder addition of unburnt hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coleman, Gerald N. (Corby, GB); Kesse, Mary L. (Peoria, IL)

    2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Certain exhaust after-treatment devices, at least periodically, require the addition of unburnt hydrocarbons in order to create reductant-rich exhaust conditions. The present disclosure adds unburnt hydrocarbons to exhaust from at least one combustion chamber by positioning, at least partially within a combustion chamber, a mixed-mode fuel injector operable to inject fuel into the combustion chamber in a first spray pattern with a small average angle relative to a centerline of the combustion chamber and a second spray pattern with a large average angle relative to the centerline of the combustion chamber. An amount of fuel is injected in the first spray pattern into a non-combustible environment within the at least one combustion chamber during at least one of an expansion stroke and exhaust stroke. The exhaust with the unburnt amount of fuel is moved into an exhaust passage via an exhaust valve.

  15. Capture of Heat Energy from Diesel Engine Exhaust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuen-Sen Lin

    2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Diesel generators produce waste heat as well as electrical power. About one-third of the fuel energy is released from the exhaust manifolds of the diesel engines and normally is not captured for useful applications. This project studied different waste heat applications that may effectively use the heat released from exhaust of Alaskan village diesel generators, selected the most desirable application, designed and fabricated a prototype for performance measurements, and evaluated the feasibility and economic impact of the selected application. Exhaust flow rate, composition, and temperature may affect the heat recovery system design and the amount of heat that is recoverable. In comparison with the other two parameters, the effect of exhaust composition may be less important due to the large air/fuel ratio for diesel engines. This project also compared heat content and qualities (i.e., temperatures) of exhaust for three types of fuel: conventional diesel, a synthetic diesel, and conventional diesel with a small amount of hydrogen. Another task of this project was the development of a computer-aided design tool for the economic analysis of selected exhaust heat recovery applications to any Alaskan village diesel generator set. The exhaust heat recovery application selected from this study was for heating. An exhaust heat recovery system was fabricated, and 350 hours of testing was conducted. Based on testing data, the exhaust heat recovery heating system showed insignificant effects on engine performance and maintenance requirements. From measurements, it was determined that the amount of heat recovered from the system was about 50% of the heat energy contained in the exhaust (heat contained in exhaust was evaluated based on environment temperature). The estimated payback time for 100% use of recovered heat would be less than 3 years at a fuel price of $3.50 per gallon, an interest rate of 10%, and an engine operation of 8 hours per day. Based on experimental data, the synthetic fuel contained slightly less heat energy and fewer emissions. Test results obtained from adding different levels of a small amount of hydrogen into the intake manifold of a diesel-operated engine showed no effect on exhaust heat content. In other words, both synthetic fuel and conventional diesel with a small amount of hydrogen may not have a significant enough effect on the amount of recoverable heat and its feasibility. An economic analysis computer program was developed on Visual Basic for Application in Microsoft Excel. The program was developed to be user friendly, to accept different levels of input data, and to expand for other heat recovery applications (i.e., power, desalination, etc.) by adding into the program the simulation subroutines of the desired applications. The developed program has been validated using experimental data.

  16. Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the after-treatment of automotive exhaust particulates and marine diesel exhaust NOx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAdams, R; Beech, P; Gillespie, R; Guy, C; Jones,S; Liddell, T; Morgan, R; Shawcross, J; Weeks, D; Hughes, D; Oesterle, J; Eberspdcher,

    2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The trend in environmental legislation is such that primary engine modifications will not be sufficient to meet all future emissions requirements and exhaust aftertreatment technologies will need to be employed. One potential solution that is well placed to meet those requirements is non-thermal plasma technology. This paper will describe our work with some of our partners in the development of a plasma based diesel particulate filter (DPF) and plasma assisted catalytic reduction (PACR) for NOx removal. This paper describes the development of non-thermal plasma technology for the aftertreatment of particulates from a passenger car engine and NOx from a marine diesel exhaust application.

  17. Measurement of the absolute \

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aunion, Jose Luis Alcaraz; /Barcelona, IFAE

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the measurement of the charged current quasi-elastic (CCQE) neutrino-nucleon cross section at neutrino energies around 1 GeV. This measurement has two main physical motivations. On one hand, the neutrino-nucleon interactions at few GeV is a region where existing old data are sparse and with low statistics. The current measurement populates low energy regions with higher statistics and precision than previous experiments. On the other hand, the CCQE interaction is the most useful interaction in neutrino oscillation experiments. The CCQE channel is used to measure the initial and final neutrino fluxes in order to determine the neutrino fraction that disappeared. The neutrino oscillation experiments work at low neutrino energies, so precise measurement of CCQE interactions are essential for flux measurements. The main goal of this thesis is to measure the CCQE absolute neutrino cross section from the SciBooNE data. The SciBar Booster Neutrino Experiment (SciBooNE) is a neutrino and anti-neutrino scattering off experiment. The neutrino energy spectrum works at energies around 1 GeV. SciBooNE was running from June 8th 2007 to August 18th 2008. In that period, the experiment collected a total of 2.65 x 10{sup 20} protons on target (POT). This thesis has used full data collection in neutrino mode 0.99 x 10{sup 20} POT. A CCQE selection cut has been performed, achieving around 70% pure CCQE sample. A fit method has been exclusively developed to determine the absolute CCQE cross section, presenting results in a neutrino energy range from 0.2 to 2 GeV. The results are compatible with the NEUT predictions. The SciBooNE measurement has been compared with both Carbon (MiniBoonE) and deuterium (ANL and BNL) target experiments, showing a good agreement in both cases.

  18. Modular Low Cost High Energy Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Cost High Energy Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator with Closed-Loop Exhaust By-Pass System Modular Low Cost High Energy Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator with...

  19. Characterization of Field-Aged Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooler...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Field-Aged Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooler Deposits Characterization of Field-Aged Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooler Deposits Characterized field-aged exhaust gas recirculation...

  20. Absolute neutrino mass measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Joachim [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), IEKP, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

  1. Microwave-Regenerated Diesel Exhaust Particulate Filter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nixdorf, Richard D. (Industrial Ceramic Solution, LLC); Green, Johney Boyd; Story, John M.; Wagner, Robert M. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

    2001-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of a microwave-regenerated particulate filter system has evolved from bench scale work to actual diesel engine experimentation. The filter system was initially evaluated on a stationary mounted 1.2-L diesel engine and was able to remove a significant amount of carbon particles from the exhaust. The ability of the microwave energy to regenerate or clean the filter was also demonstrated on this engine under idle conditions. Based on the 1.2-L experiments, improvements to the filter design and materials were implemented and the system was re-evaluated on a vehicle equipped with a 7.3-L diesel engine. The 7.3-L engine was selected to achieve heavy filter loading in a relatively short period of time. The purpose of these experiments was to evaluate filter-loading capacity, power requirements for regeneration, and filter regeneration efficiency. A more detailed evaluation of the filter was performed on a stationary mounted 1.9-L diesel engine. The effect of exhaust flow rate, loading, transients, and regeneration on filter efficiency was evaluated with this setup. In addition, gaseous exhaust emissions were investigated with and without an oxidation catalyst on the filter cartridge during loading and regeneration. (SAE Paper SAE-2001-01-0903 © 2001 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

  2. Exhaust emission control and diagnostics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazur, Christopher John; Upadhyay, Devesh

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A diesel engine emission control system uses an upstream oxidation catalyst and a downstream SCR catalyst to reduce NOx in a lean exhaust gas environment. The engine and upstream oxidation catalyst are configured to provide approximately a 1:1 ratio of NO to NO2 entering the downstream catalyst. In this way, the downstream catalyst is insensitive to sulfur contamination, and also has improved overall catalyst NOx conversion efficiency. Degradation of the system is determined when the ratio provided is no longer near the desired 1:1 ratio. This condition is detected using measurements of engine operating conditions such as from a NOx sensor located downstream of the catalysts. Finally, control action to adjust an injected amount of reductant in the exhaust gas based on the actual NO to NO2 ratio upstream of the SCR catalyst and downstream of the oxidation catalyst.

  3. Exhaust gas clean up process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, R.J.

    1988-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO/sub 2/ and NO/sub x/ is described. The method involves prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO/sub x/ and SO/sub 2/, and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO/sub x/ is removed as N/sub 2/ gas or nitrogen sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a valuable sulfate salt. 4 figs.

  4. Exhaust gas clean up process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walker, Richard J. (McMurray, PA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x includes prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2, and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO.sub.x is removed as N.sub.2 or nitrogen-sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a vaulable sulfate salt.

  5. Exhaust gas bypass valve control for thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reynolds, Michael G; Yang, Jihui; Meisner, Greogry P.; Stabler, Francis R.; De Bock, Hendrik Pieter (Peter) Jacobus; Anderson, Todd Alan

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of controlling engine exhaust flow through at least one of an exhaust bypass and a thermoelectric device via a bypass valve is provided. The method includes: determining a mass flow of exhaust exiting an engine; determining a desired exhaust pressure based on the mass flow of exhaust; comparing the desired exhaust pressure to a determined exhaust pressure; and determining a bypass valve control value based on the comparing, wherein the bypass valve control value is used to control the bypass valve.

  6. Absolute Calibration of the Auger Fluorescence Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bauleo; J. Brack; L. Garrard; J. Harton; R. Knapik; R. Meyhandan; A. C. Rovero; A. Tamashiro; D. Warner; for the Auger Collaboration

    2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Absolute calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors uses a light source at the telescope aperture. The technique accounts for the ombined effects of all detector components in a single measurement. The calibrated 2.5 m diameter light source fills the aperture, providing uniform illumination to each pixel. The known flux from the light source and the response of the acquisition system give the required calibration for each pixel. In the lab, light source uniformity is studied using CCD images and the intensity is measured relative to NIST-calibrated photodiodes. Overall uncertainties are presently 12%, and are dominated by systematics.

  7. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices; Modeling Exhaust Dispersion for Specifying Acceptable Exhaust/Intake Design (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide provides general information on specifying acceptable exhaust and intake designs. It also provides various quantitative approaches that can be used to determine expected concentration levels resulting from exhaust system emissions. In addition, the guide describes methodologies that can be employed to operate laboratory exhaust systems in a safe and energy efficient manner by using variable air volume (VAV) technology. The guide, one in a series on best practices for laboratories, was produced by Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21), a joint program of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Geared toward architects, engineers, and facility managers, the guides contain information about technologies and practices to use in designing, constructing, and operating safe, sustainable, high-performance laboratories. Studies show a direct relationship between indoor air quality and the health and productivity of building occupants. Historically, the study and protection of indoor air quality focused on emission sources emanating from within the building. For example, to ensure that the worker is not exposed to toxic chemicals, 'as manufactured' and 'as installed' containment specifications are required for fume hoods. However, emissions from external sources, which may be re-ingested into the building through closed circuiting between the building's exhaust stacks and air intakes, are an often overlooked aspect of indoor air quality.

  8. Exhaust aftertreatment using plasma-assisted catalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penetrante, B

    2000-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In the field of catalysis, one application that has been classified as a breakthrough technology is the catalytic reduction of NO{sub x} in oxygen-rich environments using hydrocarbons. This breakthrough will require dramatic improvements in both catalyst and engine technology, but the benefits will be substantial for energy efficiency and a cleaner environment. Engine and automobile companies are placing greater emphasis on the diesel engine because of its potential for saving fuel resources and reducing CO{sub 2} emissions. The modern direct-injection diesel engine offers demonstrated fuel economy advantages unmatched by any other commercially-viable engine. The main drawback of diesel engines is exhaust emissions. A modification of existing oxidation catalyst/engine technology is being used to address the CO, hydrocarbon and particulates. However, no satisfactory solution currently exists for NO{sub x}. Diesel engines operate under net oxidizing conditions, thus rendering conventional three-way catalytic converters ineffective for the controlling the NO{sub x} emission. NO{sub x} reduction catalysts, using ammonia as a reductant, do exist for oxygen-rich exhausts; however, for transportation applications, the use of on-board hydrocarbon fuels is a more feasible, cost-effective, and environmentally-sound approach. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) by hydrocarbons is one of the leading catalytic aftertreatment technologies for the reduction of NO{sub x} in lean-burn engine exhaust (often referred to as lean-NO{sub x}). The objective is to chemically reduce the pollutant molecules of NO{sub x} to benign molecules such as N{sub 2}. Aftertreatment schemes have focused a great deal on the reduction of NO because the NO{sub x} in engine exhaust is composed primarily of NO. Recent studies, however, have shown that the oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2} serves an important role in enhancing the efficiency for reduction of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2}. It has become apparent that preconverting NO to NO{sub 2} could improve both the efficiency and durability of lean-NO{sub x} catalysts. A non-thermal plasma is an efficient means for selective partial oxidation of NO to NO{sub 2}. The use of a non-thermal plasma in combination with a lean-NO{sub x} catalyst opens the opportunity for catalysts that are more efficient and more durable compared to conventional catalysts. In the absence of hydrocarbons, the O radicals will oxidize NO to NO{sub 2}, and the OH radicals will further oxidize NO{sub 2} to nitric acid. In plasma-assisted catalysis it is important that the plasma oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} without further producing acids.

  9. Exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Ko-Jen

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine comprises an exhaust driven turbocharger having a low pressure turbine outlet in fluid communication with an exhaust gas conduit. The turbocharger also includes a low pressure compressor intake and a high pressure compressor outlet in communication with an intake air conduit. An exhaust gas recirculation conduit fluidly communicates with the exhaust gas conduit to divert a portion of exhaust gas to a low pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extending between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and an engine intake system for delivery of exhaust gas thereto. A high pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extends between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and the compressor intake and delivers exhaust gas to the compressor for mixing with a compressed intake charge for delivery to the intake system.

  10. Correlations of fuel economy, exhaust hydro-carbon concentrations, and vehicle performance efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Philip Douglas

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CORRELATIONS OF FUEL ECONOMY, EXHAUST HYDROCARBON CONCENTRATIONS, AND VEHICLE PERFORMANCE EFFICIENCY A Thesis by PHILIP DOUGLAS BAUMANN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1974 Major Subject: Civil Engineering CORRELATIONS OF FUEL ECONOMY, EXHAUST HYDROCARBON CONCENTRATIONS, AND VEHICLE PERFORMANCE EFFICIENCY A Thesis by PHILIP DOUGLAS BAUMANN Approved as to style and content by...

  11. Combustion Exhaust Gas Heat to Power Using Thermoelectric Engines...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exhaust Gas Heat to Power Using Thermoelectric Engines Combustion Exhaust Gas Heat to Power Using Thermoelectric Engines Discusses a novel TEG which utilizes a proprietary stack...

  12. The Potential of Elelcltric Exhaust Gas Turbocharging for HD...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Elelcltric Exhaust Gas Turbocharging for HD DIesel Engines The Potential of Elelcltric Exhaust Gas Turbocharging for HD DIesel Engines 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)...

  13. Lubricant Formulation and Consumption Effects on Diesel Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Exhaust Particle Size Distributions and Detailed Exhaust Chemical Composition Unraveling DPF Degradation using Chemical Tracers and Opportunities for Extending Filter Life...

  14. Modeling of Diesel Exhaust Systems: A methodology to better simulate...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Diesel Exhaust Systems: A methodology to better simulate soot reactivity Modeling of Diesel Exhaust Systems: A methodology to better simulate soot reactivity Discussed...

  15. Effects of Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF Regeneration Effects of Diesel Exhaust Emissions on Soot Oxidation and DPF Regeneration DPF regeneration experiments verified the...

  16. Diesel Particulate Filter: A Success for Faurecia Exhaust Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DIESEL PARTICULATE FILTER: A SUCCESS FOR FAURECIA EXHAUST SYSTEMS Robert Parmann, Emmanuel Jean, Eric Quemere Faurecia Exhaust Systems DPF with Fuel Borne Catalyst DPF Experience...

  17. Detailed HCCI Exhaust Speciation - ORNL Reference Fuel Blends...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HCCI Exhaust Speciation - ORNL Reference Fuel Blends Accurately measure exhaust profile from an HCCI engine with a variety of fuels and create a better understanding of HCCI...

  18. An Engine Exhaust Particle SizerTM Spectrometer for Transient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An Engine Exhaust Particle SizerTM Spectrometer for Transient Emission Particle Measurements An Engine Exhaust Particle SizerTM Spectrometer for Transient Emission Particle...

  19. A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy Duty Diesel Emission Measurements. A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy Duty Diesel Emission...

  20. Automotive Fuel Efficiency Improvement via Exhaust Gas Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Efficiency Improvement via Exhaust Gas Waste Heat Conversion to Electricity Automotive Fuel Efficiency Improvement via Exhaust Gas Waste Heat Conversion to Electricity Working...

  1. Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable Electricity Thermoelectric Conversion of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat into Usable Electricity Presents successful incorporation of one of the most...

  2. Partitioning of Volatile Organics in Diesel Particulate and Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Diesel Particulate and Exhaust Evaluation of how sampling details affect the measurement of volatile organic compounds in diesel exhaust deer08strzelec.pdf More Documents...

  3. Understanding Automotive Exhaust Catalysts Using a Surface Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Automotive Exhaust Catalysts Using a Surface Science Approach: Model NOx Storage Materials. Understanding Automotive Exhaust Catalysts Using a Surface Science Approach: Model NOx...

  4. Absolute calibration of optical flats

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sommargren, Gary E.

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention uses the phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) to provide a true point-by-point measurement of absolute flatness over the surface of optical flats. Beams exiting the fiber optics in a PSDI have perfect spherical wavefronts. The measurement beam is reflected from the optical flat and passed through an auxiliary optic to then be combined with the reference beam on a CCD. The combined beams include phase errors due to both the optic under test and the auxiliary optic. Standard phase extraction algorithms are used to calculate this combined phase error. The optical flat is then removed from the system and the measurement fiber is moved to recombine the two beams. The newly combined beams include only the phase errors due to the auxiliary optic. When the second phase measurement is subtracted from the first phase measurement, the absolute phase error of the optical flat is obtained.

  5. Absolute Motion and Gravitational Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahill, R T

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new Process Physics provides a new explanation of space as a quantum foam system in which gravity is an inhomogeneous flow of the quantum foam into matter. An analysis of various experiments demonstrates that absolute motion relative to space has been observed experimentally by Michelson and Morley, Miller, Illingworth, Torr and Kolen, and by DeWitte. The Dayton Miller and Roland DeWitte data also reveal the in-flow of space into matter which manifests as gravity. The in-flow also manifests turbulence and the experimental data confirms this as well, which amounts to the observation of a gravitational wave phenomena. The Einstein assumptions leading to the Special and General Theory of Relativity are shown to be falsified by the extensive experimental data. Contrary to the Einstein assumptions absolute motion is consistent with relativistic effects, which are caused by actual dynamical effects of absolute motion through the quantum foam, so that it is Lorentzian relativity that is seen to be essentially co...

  6. Absolute Motion and Gravitational Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T Cahill

    2003-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The new Process Physics provides a new explanation of space as a quantum foam system in which gravity is an inhomogeneous flow of the quantum foam into matter. An analysis of various experiments demonstrates that absolute motion relative to space has been observed experimentally by Michelson and Morley, Miller, Illingworth, Torr and Kolen, and by DeWitte. The Dayton Miller and Roland DeWitte data also reveal the in-flow of space into matter which manifests as gravity. The in-flow also manifests turbulence and the experimental data confirms this as well, which amounts to the observation of a gravitational wave phenomena. The Einstein assumptions leading to the Special and General Theory of Relativity are shown to be falsified by the extensive experimental data. Contrary to the Einstein assumptions absolute motion is consistent with relativistic effects, which are caused by actual dynamical effects of absolute motion through the quantum foam, so that it is Lorentzian relativity that is seen to be essentially correct.

  7. Two phase exhaust for internal combustion engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vuk, Carl T. (Denver, IA)

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An internal combustion engine having a reciprocating multi cylinder internal combustion engine with multiple valves. At least a pair of exhaust valves are provided and each supply a separate power extraction device. The first exhaust valves connect to a power turbine used to provide additional power to the engine either mechanically or electrically. The flow path from these exhaust valves is smaller in area and volume than a second flow path which is used to deliver products of combustion to a turbocharger turbine. The timing of the exhaust valve events is controlled to produce a higher grade of energy to the power turbine and enhance the ability to extract power from the combustion process.

  8. Exhaust Gas Energy Recovery Technology Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exhaust waste heat recovery systems have the potential to significantly improve vehicle fuel economy for conventional and hybrid electric powertrains spanning passenger to heavy truck applications. This chapter discusses thermodynamic considerations and three classes of energy recovery technologies which are under development for vehicle applications. More specifically, this chapter describes the state-of-the-art in exhaust WHR as well as challenges and opportunities for thermodynamic power cycles, thermoelectric devices, and turbo-compounding systems.

  9. On-board ammonia generation and exhaust after treatment system using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Driscoll, Josh (Dunlap, IL); Robel, Wade J. (Peoria, IL); Brown, Cory A. (Pekin, IL); Urven, Jr., Roger L. (Colona, IL)

    2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Often NOx selective catalysts that use ammonia to reduce NOx within exhaust to a harmless gas require on-board storage of ammonia which can be hazardous and inconvenient. In order to generate ammonia in exhaust, the present disclosure increases a NOx concentration in exhaust from at least one combustion chamber, at least in part, by injecting fuel in a predetermined increased NOx generation sequence that includes a first injection during non-auto ignition conditions and a second injection during auto ignition conditions. At least a portion of the NOx is converted to ammonia by passing at least a portion of the exhaust with the increased NOx concentration over an ammonia-producing catalyst.

  10. High speed exhaust gas recirculation valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fensom, Rod (Peterborough, GB); Kidder, David J. (Peterborough, GB)

    2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to minimize pollutants such as Nox, internal combustion engines typically include an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve that can be used to redirect a portion of exhaust gases to an intake conduit, such as an intake manifold, so that the redirected exhaust gases will be recycled. It is desirable to have an EGR valve with fast-acting capabilities, and it is also desirable to have the EGR valve take up as little space as possible. An exhaust gas recirculation valve is provided that includes an exhaust passage tube, a valve element pivotally mounted within the exhaust passage tube, a linear actuator; and a gear train. The gear train includes a rack gear operatively connected to the linear actuator, and at least one rotatable gear meshing with the rack gear and operatively connected to the valve element to cause rotation of the valve element upon actuation of the linear actuator. The apparatus provides a highly compact package having a high-speed valve actuation capability.

  11. Compressor performance, absolutely! M. R. Titchener

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titchener, Mark R.

    Compressor performance, absolutely! M. R. Titchener Dept of CS, U. of Auck., N.Z. (Email: mark the absolute performance of existing string compressors may be measured. Kolmogorov (1958) recognised://tcode.auckland.ac.nz/~corpus has been used to evaluate the `absolute' performance of a series of popular compressors. The results

  12. H-CANYON AIR EXHAUST TUNNEL INSPECTION VEHICLE DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minichan, R.; Fogle, R.; Marzolf, A.

    2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The H-Canyon at Savannah River Site is a large concrete structure designed for chemical separation processes of radioactive material. The facility requires a large ventilation system to maintain negative pressure in process areas for radioactive contamination control and personnel protection. The ventilation exhaust is directed through a concrete tunnel under the facility which is approximately five feet wide and 8 feet tall that leads to a sand filter and stack. Acidic vapors in the exhaust have had a degrading effect on the surface of the concrete tunnels. Some areas have been inspected; however, the condition of other areas is unknown. Experience from historical inspections with remote controlled vehicles will be discussed along with the current challenge of inspecting levels below available access points. The area of interest in the exhaust tunnel must be accessed through a 14 X 14 inch concrete plug in the floor of the hot gang valve corridor. The purpose for the inspection is to determine the condition of the inside of the air tunnel and establish if there are any structural concerns. Various landmarks, pipe hangers and exposed rebar are used as reference points for the structural engineers when evaluating the current integrity of the air tunnel.

  13. Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singer, Brett C.; Delp, William W.; Apte, Michael G.; Price, Philip N.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance metrics of airflow, sound, and combustion product capture efficiency (CE) were measured for a convenience sample of fifteen cooking exhaust devices, as installed in residences. Results were analyzed to quantify the impact of various device- and installation-dependent parameters on CE. Measured maximum airflows were 70% or lower than values noted on product literature for 10 of the devices. Above-the-cooktop devices with flat bottom surfaces (no capture hood) – including exhaust fan/microwave combination appliances – were found to have much lower CE at similar flow rates, compared to devices with capture hoods. For almost all exhaust devices and especially for rear-mounted downdraft exhaust and microwaves, CE was substantially higher for back compared with front burner use. Flow rate, and the extent to which the exhaust device extends over the burners that are in use, also had a large effect on CE. A flow rate of 95 liters per second (200 cubic feet per minute) was necessary, but not sufficient, to attain capture efficiency in excess of 75% for the front burners. A-weighted sound levels in kitchens exceeded 57 dB when operating at the highest fan setting for all 14 devices evaluated for sound performance.

  14. An absolute Johnson noise thermometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Callegaro; Vincenzo D'Elia; Marco Pisani; Alessio Pollarolo

    2009-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We developed an absolute Johnson noise thermometer (JNT), an instrument to measure the thermodynamic temperature of a sensing resistor, with traceability to voltage, resistance and frequency quantities. The temperature is measured in energy units, and can be converted to SI units (kelvin) with the accepted value of the Boltzmann constant kb; or, conversely, it can be employed to perform measurements at the triple point of water, and obtain a determination of kb. The thermometer is composed of a correlation spectrum analyzer an a calibrated noise source, both constructed around commercial mixed-signal boards. The calibrator generates a pseudorandom noise, by digital synthesis and amplitude scaling with inductive voltage dividers; the signal spectrum is a frequency comb covering the measurement bandwidth. JNT measurements at room temperature are compatible with those of a standard platinum resistance thermometer within the combined uncertainty of 60 ppm. A path towards future improvements of JNT accuracy is also sketched.

  15. Two stroke engine exhaust emissions separator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Terry D. (Ammon, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Raterman, Kevin T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A separator for substantially resolving at least one component of a process stream, such as from the exhaust of an internal combustion engine. The separator includes a body defining a chamber therein. A nozzle housing is located proximate the chamber. An exhaust inlet is in communication with the nozzle housing and the chamber. A nozzle assembly is positioned in the nozzle housing and includes a nozzle moveable within and relative to the nozzle housing. The nozzle includes at least one passage formed therethrough such that a process stream entering the exhaust inlet connection passes through the passage formed in the nozzle, which imparts a substantially rotational flow to the process stream as it enters the chamber. A positioning member is configured to position the nozzle relative to the nozzle housing in response to changes in process stream pressure to adjust flowrate of said process stream entering into the chamber.

  16. Two stroke engine exhaust emissions separator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Terry D. (Ammon, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); McKellar, Michael G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Raterman, Kevin T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A separator for substantially resolving at least one component of a process stream, such as from the exhaust of an internal combustion engine. The separator includes a body defining a chamber therein. A nozzle housing is located proximate the chamber. An exhaust inlet is in communication with the nozzle housing and the chamber. A nozzle assembly is positioned in the nozzle housing and includes a nozzle moveable within and relative to the nozzle housing. The nozzle includes at least one passage formed therethrough such that a process stream entering the exhaust inlet connection passes through the passage formed in the nozzle and imparts a substantially rotational flow to the process stream as it enters the chamber. A positioning member is configured to position the nozzle relative to the nozzle housing in response to changes in process stream pressure thereby adjusting flowrate of said process stream entering into the chamber.

  17. Silver doped catalysts for treatment of exhaust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, Paul Worn (Peoria, IL); Hester, Virgil Raymond (Edelstein, IL); Ragle, Christie Susan (Havana, IL); Boyer, Carrie L. (Shiloh, IL)

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making an exhaust treatment element includes washcoating a substrate with a slurry that includes a catalyst support material. At least some of the catalyst support material from the slurry may be transferred to the substrate, and silver metal (Ag) is dispersed within the catalyst support material.

  18. Convective and absolute instabilities in eccentric Taylor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    Convective and absolute instabilities in eccentric Taylor Laboratoire de mécanique des fluides et d and absolute instabilities in Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille flow Benoît PIER Laboratoire de mécanique des fluides flow type often disrupt oil-well drilling By implementing a detailed instability analysis, the dynamics

  19. The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimize Fuel Economy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimize Fuel Economy and Minimize Emissions in Engines Operating on E85 Fuel The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimize Fuel Economy...

  20. New Austenitic Stainless Steels for Exhaust Components (Agreement...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    diesel engines in January, 2007 CF8C-Plus steel SiMo Cast-iron * Exhaust combustor (turbo exhaust + injected fuel) to clean out particulate filters: high temperature and rapid...

  1. Steam atmosphere drying concepts using steam exhaust recompression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiBella, F.A. (TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States))

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the US industrial drying accounts for approximately 1.5 quads of energy use per year. Annual industrial dryer expenditures are estimated to be in the $500 million range. Industrial drying is a significant energy and monetary expense. For the thermal drying processes in which water is removed via evaporation from the feedstock, attempts have been made to reduce the consumption of energy using exhaust waste heat recovery techniques, improved dryer designs, or even the deployment of advanced mechanical dewatering techniques. Despite these efforts, it is obvious that a large amount of thermal energy is often still lost if the latent heat of evaporation from the evaporated water cannot be recovered and/or in some way be utilized as direct heat input into the dryer. Tecogen Inc. is conducting research and development on an industrial drying concept. That utilizes a directly or indirectly superheated steam cycle atmosphere with exhaust steam recompression to recover the latent heat in the exhaust that would otherwise be lost. This approach has the potential to save 55 percent of the energy required by a conventional air dryer. Other advantages to the industrial dryer user include: A 35-percent reduction in the yearly cost per kg[sub evap] to dry wet feedstock, Reduced airborne emissions, Reduced dry dust fire/explosion risks, Hot product not exposed to oxygen thus, the product quality is enhanced, Constant rate drying in steam atmosphere, Reduced dryer size and cost, Reduced dryer heat losses due to lower dryer inlet temperatures. Tecogen has projected that the steam atmosphere drying system is most suitable as a replacement technology for state-of-the-art spray, flash, and fluidized bed drying systems. Such systems are utilized in the food and kindred products; rubber products; chemical and allied products; stone, clay, and glass; textiles; and pulp and paper industrial sectors.

  2. Steam atmosphere drying concepts using steam exhaust recompression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiBella, F.A. [TECOGEN, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the US industrial drying accounts for approximately 1.5 quads of energy use per year. Annual industrial dryer expenditures are estimated to be in the $500 million range. Industrial drying is a significant energy and monetary expense. For the thermal drying processes in which water is removed via evaporation from the feedstock, attempts have been made to reduce the consumption of energy using exhaust waste heat recovery techniques, improved dryer designs, or even the deployment of advanced mechanical dewatering techniques. Despite these efforts, it is obvious that a large amount of thermal energy is often still lost if the latent heat of evaporation from the evaporated water cannot be recovered and/or in some way be utilized as direct heat input into the dryer. Tecogen Inc. is conducting research and development on an industrial drying concept. That utilizes a directly or indirectly superheated steam cycle atmosphere with exhaust steam recompression to recover the latent heat in the exhaust that would otherwise be lost. This approach has the potential to save 55 percent of the energy required by a conventional air dryer. Other advantages to the industrial dryer user include: A 35-percent reduction in the yearly cost per kg{sub evap} to dry wet feedstock, Reduced airborne emissions, Reduced dry dust fire/explosion risks, Hot product not exposed to oxygen thus, the product quality is enhanced, Constant rate drying in steam atmosphere, Reduced dryer size and cost, Reduced dryer heat losses due to lower dryer inlet temperatures. Tecogen has projected that the steam atmosphere drying system is most suitable as a replacement technology for state-of-the-art spray, flash, and fluidized bed drying systems. Such systems are utilized in the food and kindred products; rubber products; chemical and allied products; stone, clay, and glass; textiles; and pulp and paper industrial sectors.

  3. The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimize Fuel Economy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    performance targets - Turbocharger sizing - Exhaust gas recirculation system architecture and components sizing - Charge air cooler - Fuel variation 4 Barriers * Current...

  4. Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices Guide: Modeling Exhaust Dispersion for Specifying Acceptable Exhaust/Intake Design

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guide describes general information on specifying acceptable exhaust and intake designs. It also provides various quantitative approaches that can be used to determine expected concentration levels resulting from exhaust system emissions.

  5. Exhaust Phosphorous Chemistry | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisoryStandardGenerationEducationalChemistry Exhaust Phosphorous Chemistry

  6. Exhaust gas recirculation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duffy, Kevin P. (Metamora, IL); Kieser, Andrew J. (Morton, IL); Rodman, Anthony (Chillicothe, IL); Liechty, Michael P. (Chillicothe, IL); Hergart, Carl-Anders (Peoria, IL); Hardy, William L. (Peoria, IL)

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operates by injecting liquid fuel directly in a combustion chamber, and mixing the fuel with recirculated exhaust and fresh air through an auto ignition condition of the fuel. The engine includes at least one turbocharger for extracting energy from the engine exhaust and using that energy to boost intake pressure of recirculated exhaust gas and fresh air. Elevated proportions of exhaust gas recirculated to the engine are attained by throttling the fresh air inlet supply. These elevated exhaust gas recirculation rates allow the HCCI engine to be operated at higher speeds and loads rendering the HCCI engine a more viable alternative to a conventional diesel engine.

  7. Absolute geopotential height system for Ethiopia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedada, Tullu Besha

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study used airborne gravity data, the 2008 Earth Gravity Model (EGM08) and Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission (SRTM) digital elevation data in a ‘Remove-Compute-Restore’ process to determine absolute vertical reference ...

  8. Absolute vs. intensity-based emission caps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny.

    Cap-and-trade systems limit emissions to some pre-specified absolute quantity. Intensity-based limits, that restrict emissions to some pre-specified rate relative to input or output, are much more widely used in environmental ...

  9. Emission trading with absolute and intensity caps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Jaemin

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kyoto Protocol introduced emission trading to help reduce the cost of compliances for the Annex B countries that have absolute caps. However, we need to expand the emission trading to cover developing countries in order ...

  10. Decommissioning a 60-m-tall exhaust stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louie, R.L.; Speer, D.R. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA))

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The decommissioning of the Strontium Semiworks Complex, located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site, is nearing completion. This facility operated as a pilot plant from 1949 to 1967 to develop fuel reprocessing technology and a method for separating strontium from high-level liquid wastes. Contamination of the facility from these operations was extensive. One of the major activities completed was the decommissioning of the plant exhaust stack. Demolition of the stack was accomplished using explosives. This required decontamination of the stack interior to minimize the release of airborne contamination. Radiation levels in the stack prior to cleaning ranged from 2.5 to 90 mGy/h as measured along the stack centerline. Decontamination was accomplished by sandblasting, using equipment specially designed and fabricated to allow the work to be performed remotely.

  11. Absolute integrated intensities of vapor-phase hydrogen peroxide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Absolute integrated intensities of vapor-phase hydrogen peroxide (H202) in the mid-infrared at atmospheric pressure. Absolute integrated intensities of vapor-phase hydrogen...

  12. Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of Domain Composition...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of Domain Composition and Nanoscale Size Distribution Explains Performance in Solar Cells Organic Solar Cells: Absolute Measurement of...

  13. Catalysts For Lean Burn Engine Exhaust Abatement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ott, Kevin C. (Los Alamos, NM); Clark, Noline C. (Jemez Springs, NM); Paffett, Mark T. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a process for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxides in an exhaust gas stream containing nitrogen oxides and a reductant material by contacting the gas stream under conditions effective to catalytically reduce the nitrogen oxides with a catalyst comprising a aluminum-silicate type material and a minor amount of a metal, the catalyst characterized as having sufficient catalytic activity so as to reduce the nitrogen oxides by at least 60 percent under temperatures within the range of from about 200.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C.

  14. Catalysts for lean burn engine exhaust abatement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ott, Kevin C. (Los Alamos, NM); Clark, Noline C. (Jemez Springs, NM); Paffett, Mark T. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a process for catalytically reducing nitrogen oxides in an exhaust gas stream containing nitrogen oxides and a reductant material by contacting the gas stream under conditions effective to catalytically reduce the nitrogen oxides with a catalyst comprising a aluminum-silicate type material and a minor amount of a metal, the catalyst characterized as having sufficient catalytic activity so as to reduce the nitrogen oxides by at least 60 percent under temperatures within the range of from about 200.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C.

  15. Exhaust gas purification system for lean burn engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haines, Leland Milburn (Northville, MI)

    2002-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An exhaust gas purification system for a lean burn engine includes a thermal mass unit and a NO.sub.x conversion catalyst unit downstream of the thermal mass unit. The NO.sub.x conversion catalyst unit includes at least one catalyst section. Each catalyst section includes a catalytic layer for converting NO.sub.x coupled to a heat exchanger. The heat exchanger portion of the catalyst section acts to maintain the catalytic layer substantially at a desired temperature and cools the exhaust gas flowing from the catalytic layer into the next catalytic section in the series. In a further aspect of the invention, the exhaust gas purification system includes a dual length exhaust pipe upstream of the NO.sub.x conversion catalyst unit. The dual length exhaust pipe includes a second heat exchanger which functions to maintain the temperature of the exhaust gas flowing into the thermal mass downstream near a desired average temperature.

  16. Exhaust purification with on-board ammonia production

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robel, Wade J. (Peoria, IL); Driscoll, James J. (Dunlap, IL); Coleman, Gerald N. (Peterborough, GB); Knox, Kevin J. (Peoria, IL)

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A power source is provided for use with selective catalytic reduction systems for exhaust-gas purification. The power source includes a first cylinder group with a first air-intake passage and a first exhaust passage, and a second cylinder group with a second air-intake passage and a second exhaust passage. The second air-intake passage is fluidly isolated from the first air-intake passage. A fuel-supply device may be configured to supply fuel into the first exhaust passage, and a catalyst may be disposed downstream of the fuel-supply device to convert at least a portion of the exhaust stream in the first exhaust passage into ammonia.

  17. Mechanisms of Oxidation-Enhanced Wear in Diesel Exhaust Valves...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Diesel Exhaust Valves (Friction and Wear Reduction) Peter J. Blau, Principal Investigator Materials Science and Technology Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory May 21, 2009...

  18. The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimize Fuel Economy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimize Fuel Economy and Minimize Emissions in Engines Operating on E85 Fuel Quarterly Biomass ProgramClean Cities State Web Conference:...

  19. automotive exhaust gas: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    additive to diesel-biodiesel blends. The combined effect of EGR and DTBP on Brake Thermal Efficiency(BTE), Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC), cylinder pressure and exhaust...

  20. Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control Technology and Regulations...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control Technology and Regulations Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control Technology and Regulations 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation:...

  1. New Austenitic Stainless Steels for Exhaust Components (Agreement...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Documents & Publications CF8C PLus: A New Cast Stainless Steel for High-Temperature Diesel Exhaust Components Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Materials for...

  2. Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, and Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies on the AFDC Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel...

  3. Catalytic reduction system for oxygen-rich exhaust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogtlin, G.E.; Merritt, B.T.; Hsiao, M.C.; Wallman, P.H.; Penetrante, B.M.

    1999-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-thermal plasma gas treatment is combined with selective catalytic reduction to enhance NO{sub x} reduction in oxygen-rich vehicle engine exhausts. 8 figs.

  4. Performance Assessment of U.S. Residential Cooking Exhaust Hoods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    gas cooking burners emit air pollutants1-3 at rates that can lead to indoor curves relating airflow to duct static pressure, sound levels, and exhaust gas

  5. An Information Dependant Computer Program for Engine Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    engineers at rural Alaskan village power plants to quickly evaluate how to use exhaust waste heat from individual diesel power plants. deer09avadhanula.pdf More Documents &...

  6. Combustion Exhaust Gas Heat to Power usingThermoelectric Engines...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Solutions Combustion Exhaust Gas Heat to Power using Thermoelectric Engines John LaGrandeur October 5, 2011 Advanced Thermoelectric Solutions - 1 - Market motivation based on CO 2...

  7. Update on Diesel Exhaust Emission Control Technology and Regulations

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    diesel out of the PM inventory * Technology is the state of optimization and cost reduction - Regeneration * LDD and MDD: engine management * HDD: auxiliary exhaust injection -...

  8. A Model of Absolute Autonomy and Power: Toward Group Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hexmoor, Henry

    575 2420 fax:479 575 5339 Abstract. We present a model of absolute autonomy and power in agent systems present a model that approximates absolute autonomy and power in agent systems. This absolute sense1 A Model of Absolute Autonomy and Power: Toward Group Effects HENRY HEXMOOR Computer Science

  9. Review of Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Graves

    1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) and its predecessor organizations have maintained aggressive projects in diesel exhaust aftertreatment since 1993. The Energy Policy Act of 1992, Section 2027, specifically authorized DOE to help accelerate the ability of U. S. diesel engine manufacturers to meet emissions regulations while maintaining the compression ignition engines inherently high efficiency. A variety of concepts and devices have been evaluated for NOx and Particulate matter (PM) control. Additionally, supporting technology in diagnostics for catalysis, PM measurement, and catalyst/reductant systems are being developed. This paper provides a summary of technologies that have been investigated and provides recent results from ongoing DOE-sponsored R and D. NOx control has been explored via active NOx catalysis, several plasma-assisted systems, electrochemical cells, and fuel additives. Both catalytic and non-catalytic filter technologies have been investigated for PM control.

  10. Multiverse Set Theory and Absolutely Undecidable Propositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Väänänen, Jouko

    Multiverse Set Theory and Absolutely Undecidable Propositions Jouko V¨a¨an¨anen University of Helsinki and University of Amsterdam Contents 1 Introduction 2 2 Background 4 3 The multiverse of sets 6 3.1 The one universe case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 3.2 The multiverse

  11. Extraction costs in the theory of exhaustible resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Frederic Yui-Ming

    Extraction costs in the theory of exhaustible resources Robert M. Solow Professor of Economics. First, it reformulates the theory of optimal use of an exhaustible resource with more attention in the supply of exhausti- ble resources. Our most striking result is, in fact, the suggestion that relatively

  12. Catalytic Methane Reduction in the Exhaust Gas of Combustion Engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Catalytic Methane Reduction in the Exhaust Gas of Combustion Engines Peter Mauermann1,* , Michael Dornseiffer6 , Frank Amkreutz6 1 Institute for Combustion Engines , RWTH Aachen University, Schinkelstr. 8, D of the hydrocarbon exhaust of internal combustion engines. In contrast to other gaseous hydrocarbons, significant

  13. Measurement of Dynamic Parameters of Automotive Exhaust Mohan D. Rao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Mohan

    1 01NVC-121 Measurement of Dynamic Parameters of Automotive Exhaust Hangers Mohan D. Rao ME Copyright © 2001 Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc. ABSTRACT Different methodologies to test and analyze the dynamic stiffness (K) and damping (C) properties of several silicone and EPDM rubber automotive exhaust

  14. Absolute-magnitude distributions of supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, Dean; Wright, John [Department of Physics, Xavier University of Louisiana, New Orleans, LA 70125 (United States); Jenkins III, Robert L. [Applied Physics Department, Richard Stockton College, Galloway, NJ 08205 (United States); Maddox, Larry, E-mail: drichar7@xula.edu [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, LA 70402 (United States)

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The absolute-magnitude distributions of seven supernova (SN) types are presented. The data used here were primarily taken from the Asiago Supernova Catalogue, but were supplemented with additional data. We accounted for both foreground and host-galaxy extinction. A bootstrap method is used to correct the samples for Malmquist bias. Separately, we generate volume-limited samples, restricted to events within 100 Mpc. We find that the superluminous events (M{sub B} < –21) make up only about 0.1% of all SNe in the bias-corrected sample. The subluminous events (M{sub B} > –15) make up about 3%. The normal Ia distribution was the brightest with a mean absolute blue magnitude of –19.25. The IIP distribution was the dimmest at –16.75.

  15. Absolute absorption spectroscopy based on molecule interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Nimmrichter; Klaus Hornberger; Hendrik Ulbricht; Markus Arndt

    2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new method to measure the absolute photon absorption cross section of neutral molecules in a molecular beam. It is independent of our knowledge of the particle beam density, nor does it rely on photo-induced fragmentation or ionization. The method is based on resolving the recoil resulting from photon absorption by means of near-field matter-wave interference, and it thus applies even to very dilute beams with low optical densities. Our discussion includes the possibility of internal state conversion as well as fluorescence. We assess the influence of various experimental uncertainties and show that the measurement of absolute absorption cross sections is conceivable with high precision and using existing technologies.

  16. On-Board Engine Exhaust Particulate Matter Sensor for HCCI and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    On-Board Engine Exhaust Particulate Matter Sensor for HCCI and Conventional Diesel Engines On-Board Engine Exhaust Particulate Matter Sensor for HCCI and Conventional Diesel...

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - aircraft exhaust sulfur Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gases FAA, 2005. Water in the aircraft exhaust at altitude may have a greenhouse effect... . Aircraft exhaust emissions are calculated for the ... Source: Ecole...

  18. Diesel exhaust particulate increases the size and complexity of lesions in atherosclerotic mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    McDonald JD: Inhaled diesel emissions alter atheroscleroticinduced by inhalation of diesel exhaust. AtherosclerosisA, Sandstrom T, Newby DE: Diesel exhaust inhalation causes

  19. Steam atmosphere drying exhaust steam recompression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, F.E.; Smolensky, L.A.; Doyle, E.F.; DiBella, F.A.

    1994-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a heated steam atmosphere drying system comprising dryer in combination with an exhaust recompression system which is extremely energy efficient and eliminates dangers known to air dryers. The system uses superheated steam as the drying medium, which recirculates through the system where its heat of evaporation and heat of compression is recovered, thereby providing a constant source of heat to the drying chamber. The dryer has inlets whereby feedstock and superheated steam are fed therein. High heat transfer and drying rates are achieved by intimate contact of the superheated steam with the particles being dried. The dryer comprises a vessel which enables the feedstock and steam to enter and recirculate together. When the feedstock becomes dry it will exit the dryer with the steam and become separated from the steam through the use of a curvilinear louver separator (CLS). The CLS enables removal of fine and ultrafine particles from the dryer. Water vapor separated from the particles in the CLS as superheated steam, may then be recovered and recirculated as steam through the use of a compressor to either directly or indirectly heat the dryer, and a heat exchanger or a heater to directly provide heat to the dryer. This system not only provides a very efficient heat transfer system but results in a minimum carry-over of ultrafine particles thereby eliminating any explosive hazard. 17 figures.

  20. Steam atmosphere drying exhaust steam recompression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becker, Frederick E. (Reading, MA); Smolensky, Leo A. (Concord, MA); Doyle, Edward F. (Dedham, MA); DiBella, Francis A. (Roslindale, MA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a heated steam atmosphere drying system comprising dryer in combination with an exhaust recompression system which is extremely energy efficient and eliminates dangers known to air dryers. The system uses superheated steam as the drying medium, which recirculated through the system where its heat of evaporation and heat of compression is recovered, thereby providing a constant source of heat to the drying chamber. The dryer has inlets whereby feedstock and superheated steam are fed therein. High heat transfer and drying rates are achieved by intimate contact of the superheated steam with the particles being dried The dryer comprises a vessel which enables the feedstock and steam to enter recirculate together. When the feedstock becomes dry it will exit the dryer with the steam and become separated from the steam through the use of a curvilinear louver separator (CLS). The CLS enables removal of fine and ultrafine particles from the dryer. Water vapor separated from the particles in the CLS as superheated steam, may then be recovered and recirculated as steam through the use of a compressor to either directly or indirectly heat the dryer, and a heat exchanger or a heater to directly provide heat to the dryer. This system not only provides a very efficient heat transfer system but results in a minimum carry-over of ultrafine particles thereby eliminating any explosive hazard.

  1. Elevated exhaust temperature, zoned, electrically-heated particulate matter filter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Bhatia, Garima [Bangalore, IN

    2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A system includes an electrical heater and a particulate matter (PM) filter that is arranged one of adjacent to and in contact with the electrical heater. A control module selectively increases an exhaust gas temperature of an engine to a first temperature and that initiates regeneration of the PM filter using the electrical heater while the exhaust gas temperature is above the first temperature. The first temperature is greater than a maximum exhaust gas temperature at the PM filter during non-regeneration operation and is less than an oxidation temperature of the PM.

  2. Absolute instruments and perfect imaging in geometrical optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyc, Tomas

    Absolute instruments and perfect imaging in geometrical optics Tom´as Tyc, Lenka Herz symmetric absolute instruments that provide perfect imaging in the sense of geometrical optics. We derive to propose several new absolute instruments, in particular a lens providing a stigmatic image of an optically

  3. Method of removing nitrogen oxides from exhaust gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batha, H.D.; Mason, J.H.; Thompson, S.R.

    1980-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of removing nitrogen oxides (NOX) from exhaust gas mixtures is described. The removal of NOX from exhaust gas mixtures is accomplished by exposing the exhaust gas mixture, in a manner that does not substantially impede the gas flow, to a ceramic material containing from about 75% to about 95% by weight silicon carbide and from about 0.3% to about 10.0% silica. A reduction of at least 85% of NOX from the mixture is to be expected and reductions up to 95 to 100% are attainable. Ceramic mixtures containing silicon nitride in amounts between about 10% and about 30% are found to reduce the amount of NOX in exhaust gases at temperatures as low as 200* C.

  4. Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Passenger Car and Medium-Duty Engine in Conjunction with...

  5. automobile exhaust gases: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Welcome, jc Sign Up for Newsletters Go Feature Find More Low Fares Experience Orbitz Past 30 Days 12;Jobs at NYTDigital Online Media Kit Our Crimaldi, John P. 9 EXHAUST GAS...

  6. The Carnot efficiencybetween these temperatures is: This provides an absolute upper limit to the Rankine cycle effi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Y. A.

    to the Rankine cycle effi- ciency. Heat Absorbed from Stream 3 Power Produced by Steam Turbine Required Power a steam cycle alongsidethe gas turbine cycle. LITERATURE CITED Christodoulou,K., Diploma Thesis, N Output of Gas Turbine For the Gas Turbine Cycle Calculated for Case 2, Upper Exhaust Temperature T6

  7. Centerline velocity profile for plain round exhaust hoods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Kirksey E

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , System 2, . . . 52 Appendix D ? Statistical Analysis Tables . . . . , . . . , . 63 ITA ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o o ~ ~ i ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ V ~ ~ ~ Q I ~ ~ 0 Q ~ ~ ~ 66 LIST OF FIBURES Fi gure 1 Air Flow into Simple Hood Page 2 Compound Hood 3 Duct Air Moni tor.... ' ' ' However, if 2,6, 7,8 Sil verman's model were correct, contaminant control would be maintained with significantly reduced exhaust volumes. Local exhaust system de- sign, based on this reduced volume, cpu]d result in substantial savings in equipment...

  8. Low-pressure-ratio regenerative exhaust-heated gas turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tampe, L.A.; Frenkel, R.G.; Kowalick, D.J.; Nahatis, H.M.; Silverstein, S.M.; Wilson, D.G.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A design study of coal-burning gas-turbine engines using the exhaust-heated cycle and state-of-the-art components has been completed. In addition, some initial experiments on a type of rotary ceramic-matrix regenerator that would be used to transfer heat from the products of coal combustion in the hot turbine exhaust to the cool compressed air have been conducted. Highly favorable results have been obtained on all aspects on which definite conclusions could be drawn.

  9. Method and apparatus for processing exhaust gas with corona discharge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barlow, S.E.; Orlando, T.M.; Tonkyn, R.G.

    1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is placing a catalyst coating upon surfaces surrounding a volume containing corona discharge. In addition, the electrodes are coated with a robust dielectric material. Further, the electrodes are arranged so that at least a surface portion of each electrode extends into a flow path of the exhaust gas to be treated and there is only exhaust gas in the volume between each pair of electrodes. 12 figs.

  10. Method and apparatus for processing exhaust gas with corona discharge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barlow, Stephan E. (Richland, WA); Orlando, Thomas M. (Kennewick, WA); Tonkyn, Russell G. (Kennewick, WA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is placing a catalyst coating upon surfaces surrounding a volume containing corona discharge. In addition, the electrodes are coated with a robust dielectric material. Further, the electrodes are arranged so that at least a surface portion of each electrode extends into a flow path of the exhaust gas to be treated and there is only exhaust gas in the volume between each pair of electrodes.

  11. Absolute Measurement Of Laminar Shear Rate Using Photon Correlation Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elliot Jenner; Brian D'Urso

    2015-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An absolute measurement of the components of the shear rate tensor $\\mathcal{S}$ in a fluid can be found by measuring the photon correlation function of light scattered from particles in the fluid. Previous methods of measuring $\\mathcal{S}$ involve reading the velocity at various points and extrapolating the shear, which can be time consuming and is limited in its ability to examine small spatial scale or short time events. Previous work in Photon Correlation Spectroscopy has involved only approximate solutions, requiring free parameters to be scaled by a known case, or different cases, such as 2-D flows, but here we present a treatment that provides quantitative results directly and without calibration for full 3-D flow. We demonstrate this treatment experimentally with a cone and plate rheometer.

  12. Opacity meter for monitoring exhaust emissions from non-stationary sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dec, John Edward (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for determining the opacity of exhaust plumes from moving emissions sources. In operation, a light source is activated at a time prior to the arrival of a diesel locomotive at a measurement point, by means of a track trigger switch or the Automatic Equipment Identification system, such that the opacity measurement is synchronized with the passage of an exhaust plume past the measurement point. A beam of light from the light source passes through the exhaust plume of the locomotive and is detected by a suitable detector, preferably a high-rate photodiode. The light beam is well-collimated and is preferably monochromatic, permitting the use of a narrowband pass filter to discriminate against background light. In order to span a double railroad track and provide a beam which is substantially stronger than background, the light source, preferably a diode laser, must provide a locally intense beam. A high intensity light source is also desirable in order to increase accuracy at the high sampling rates required. Also included is a computer control system useful for data acquisition, manipulation, storage and transmission of opacity data and the identification of the associated diesel engine to a central data collection center.

  13. Getting the Word Out: Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) Locator, Mapping Tools, and Outreach Activities (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodt-Giles, Debbie

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation covers diesel exhaust fluid resources on the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center.

  14. Experiments for the absolute neutrino mass measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Markus Steidl

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results and perspectives of different methods to measure the absolute mass scale of neutrinos are briefly reviewed. The mass sensitivities from cosmological observations, double beta decay searches and single beta decay spectroscopy differ in sensitivity and model dependance. Next generation experiments in the three fields reach the sensitivity for the lightest mass eigenstate of $m_1<0.2eV$, which will finally answer the question if neutrino mass eigenstates are degenerate. This sensitivity is also reached by the only model-independent approach of single beta decay (KATRIN experiment). For higher sensitivities on cost of model-dependance the neutrinoless double beta decay search and cosmological observation have to be applied. Here, in the next decade sensitivities are approached with the potential to test inverted hierarchy models.

  15. Absolute Maximal Entanglement and Quantum Secret Sharing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helwig, Wolfram; Riera, Arnau; Latorre, José I; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the existence of absolutely maximally entangled (AME) states in quantum mechanics and its applications to quantum information. AME states are characterized by being maximally entangled for all bipartitions of the system and exhibit genuine multipartite entanglement. With such states, we present a novel parallel teleportation protocol which teleports multiple quantum states between groups of senders and receivers. The notable features of this protocol are that (i) the partition into senders and receivers can be chosen after the state has been distributed, and (ii) one group has to perform joint quantum operations while the parties of the other group only have to act locally on their system. We also prove the equivalence between pure state quantum secret sharing schemes and AME states with an even number of parties. This equivalence implies the existence of AME states for an arbitrary number of parties based on known results about the existence of quantum secret sharing schemes.

  16. Commentary Biodiesel Exhaust: The Need for Health Effects Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimberly J. Swanson; Michael C. Madden; Andrew J. Ghio

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BACKGROUND: Biodiesel is a diesel fuel alternative that has shown potential of becoming a commercially accepted part of the United States ’ energy infrastructure. In November 2004, the signing of the Jobs Creation Bill HR 4520 marked an important turning point for the future production of biodiesel in the United States because it offers a federal excise tax credit. By the end of 2005, industry production was 75 million gallons, a 300 % increase in 1 year. Current industry capacity, however, stands at just over 300 million gallons/year, and current expansion and new plant construction could double the industry’s capacity within a few years. Biodiesel exhaust emission has been extensively characterized under field and laboratory conditions, but there have been limited cytotoxicity and mutagenicity studies on the effects of biodiesel exhaust in biologic systems. OBJECTIVES: We reviewed pertinent medical literature and addressed recommendations on testing specific research needs in the field of biodiesel toxicity. DISCUSSION: Employment of biodiesel fuel is favorably viewed, and there are suggestions that its exhaust emissions are less likely to present any risk to human health relative to petroleum diesel emissions. CONCLUSION: The speculative nature of a reduction in health effects based on chemical composition of biodiesel exhaust needs to be followed up with investigations in biologic systems. KEY WORDS: air pollution, biodiesel, diesel exhaust, diesel fuels, lung diseases, vehicle emissions. Environ Health Perspect 115:496–499 (2007). doi:10.1289/ehp.9631 available via

  17. Integrated exhaust and electrically heated particulate filter regeneration systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V.; Paratore, Jr., Michael J.

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter that includes multiple zones. An electrical heater includes heater segments that are associated with respective ones of the zones. The electrical heater is arranged upstream from and proximate with the PM filter. A post-fuel injection system injects fuel into at least one of a cylinder of an engine and an exhaust system. A control module is configured to operate in a first mode that includes activating the electrical heater to heat exhaust of the engine. The control module is also configured to operate in a second mode that includes activating the post-injection system to heat the exhaust. The control module selectively operates in at least one of the first mode and the second mode.

  18. Modular exhaust gas steam generator with common boiler casing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kidaloski, R.G.; Olinger, H.S.; Bryk, S.A.

    1987-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A modular exhaust gas steam generator is described wherein each module comprises: (a) an open box frame through which hot exhaust gases travel, a portion of the frame being in contact with the gases; (b) casing means fixedly secured to selected perimeter surfaces of the box frame thereby forming an integral part of the box frame for sealably closing the surface of the box frame and for retaining the gases within the box frame; (c) tubing means extending within and nearly the height of the box frame, the tubing means being in contact with the hot gases for generating steam in the steam generator; (d) header means within the box frame and connected to the tubing means for distributing fluid thereto, and; (e) connecting means secured to an upper region of the box frame for top supporting the header and the tubing means; whereby adjacent modules are sealably secured together forming a unitary gas tight enclosure through which exhaust gases travel.

  19. Integrated exhaust gas recirculation and charge cooling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wu, Ko-Jen

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An intake system for an internal combustion engine comprises an exhaust driven turbocharger configured to deliver compressed intake charge, comprising exhaust gas from the exhaust system and ambient air, through an intake charge conduit and to cylinders of the internal combustion engine. An intake charge cooler is in fluid communication with the intake charge conduit. A cooling system, independent of the cooling system for the internal combustion engine, is in fluid communication with the intake charge cooler through a cooling system conduit. A coolant pump delivers a low temperature cooling medium from the cooling system to and through the intake charge cooler for the transfer of heat from the compressed intake charge thereto. A low temperature cooler receives the heated cooling medium through the cooling system conduit for the transfer or heat therefrom.

  20. Control method for turbocharged diesel engines having exhaust gas recirculation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kolmanovsky, Ilya V. (Ypsilanti, MI); Jankovic, Mrdjan J (Birmingham, MI); Jankovic, Miroslava (Birmingham, MI)

    2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of controlling the airflow into a compression ignition engine having an EGR and a VGT. The control strategy includes the steps of generating desired EGR and VGT turbine mass flow rates as a function of the desired and measured compressor mass airflow values and exhaust manifold pressure values. The desired compressor mass airflow and exhaust manifold pressure values are generated as a function of the operator-requested fueling rate and engine speed. The EGR and VGT turbine mass flow rates are then inverted to corresponding EGR and VGT actuator positions to achieve the desired compressor mass airflow rate and exhaust manifold pressure. The control strategy also includes a method of estimating the intake manifold pressure used in generating the EGR valve and VGT turbine positions.

  1. Absolute nuclear material assay using count distribution (LAMBDA) space

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prasad, Manoj K. (Pleasanton, CA); Snyderman, Neal J. (Berkeley, CA); Rowland, Mark S. (Alamo, CA)

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of absolute nuclear material assay of an unknown source comprising counting neutrons from the unknown source and providing an absolute nuclear material assay utilizing a model to optimally compare to the measured count distributions. In one embodiment, the step of providing an absolute nuclear material assay comprises utilizing a random sampling of analytically computed fission chain distributions to generate a continuous time-evolving sequence of event-counts by spreading the fission chain distribution in time.

  2. absolutely calibrated effective: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    identical to the Sun, to set the absolute zero point of the effective temperature scale to within few degrees. Our newly calibrated, accurate and precise temperature...

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: high-precision absolute yaw encoder

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    high-precision absolute yaw encoder Increasing the Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility's Power Production On April 7, 2014, in Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events,...

  4. absolute neutrino mass: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    obtained in tritium beta decay experiments, cosmological observations and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Carlo Giunti 2005-11-10 3 Absolute neutrino mass from...

  5. absolute neutrino masses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    obtained in tritium beta decay experiments, cosmological observations and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Carlo Giunti 2005-11-10 3 Absolute neutrino mass from...

  6. Low exhaust temperature electrically heated particulate matter filter system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Paratore, Jr., Michael J. (Howell, MI); Bhatia, Garima (Bangalore, IN)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter, a sensor, a heating element, and a control module. The PM filter includes with an upstream end that receives exhaust gas, a downstream end and multiple zones. The sensor detects a temperature of the exhaust gas. The control module controls current to the heating element to convection heat one of the zones and initiate a regeneration process. The control module selectively increases current to the heating element relative to a reference regeneration current level when the temperature is less than a predetermined temperature.

  7. Exhaust system with emissions storage device and plasma reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoard, John W. (Livonia, MI)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An exhaust system for a combustion system, comprising a storage device for collecting NO.sub.x, hydrocarbon, or particulate emissions, or mixture of these emissions, and a plasma reactor for destroying the collected emissions is described. After the emission is collected in by the storage device for a period of time, the emission is then destroyed in a non-thermal plasma generated by the plasma reactor. With respect to the direction of flow of the exhaust stream, the storage device must be located before the terminus of the plasma reactor, and it may be located wholly before, overlap with, or be contained within the plasma reactor.

  8. Exhaust system having a gold-platinum group metal catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ragle, Christie Susan (Havana, IL); Silver, Ronald G. (Peoria, IL); Zemskova, Svetlana Mikhailovna (Edelstein, IL); Eckstein, Colleen J. (Metamora, IL)

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of providing an exhaust treatment device is disclosed. The method includes applying a catalyst including gold and a platinum group metal to a particulate filter. The concentration of the gold and the platinum group metal is sufficient to enable oxidation of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide.

  9. Exhausting Battery Statistics Understanding the energy demands on mobile handsets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    energy models and resources managers designed for laptops [20] and data cen- ters [4] inapplicableExhausting Battery Statistics Understanding the energy demands on mobile handsets Narseo Vallina.surname@telekom.de ABSTRACT Despite the advances in battery technologies, mobile phones still suffer from severe energy

  10. ON CONDITION MONITORING OF EXHAUST VALVES IN MARINE DIESEL ENGINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosegaard, Klaus

    ON CONDITION MONITORING OF EXHAUST VALVES IN MARINE DIESEL ENGINES T. L. Fog x L. K. Hansen z , J : Research & Development, MAN B&W Diesel A/S Teglholmsgade 41, DK­2450, Copenhagen SV, Denmark. E­mail: tof­invasive characterisation of ex­ haust valve conditions in large marine diesel engines, were exper­ imentally investigated

  11. Heat pipes and use of heat pipes in furnace exhaust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Polcyn, Adam D. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An array of a plurality of heat pipe are mounted in spaced relationship to one another with the hot end of the heat pipes in a heated environment, e.g. the exhaust flue of a furnace, and the cold end outside the furnace. Heat conversion equipment is connected to the cold end of the heat pipes.

  12. absolute gamma ray: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absolute gamma ray First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Absolute Branching Ratio of...

  13. Bonus exhaustion rule after Commissioner v. Engle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, M.J.; Price, J.R.

    1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Supreme Court held in Commissioner v. Engle that the percentage depletion allowances for oil and gas does not require current production. This makes it available against advance royalty and/or bonus income received in consideration for assigning or leasing oil and gas interests even if there was no production. The authors discuss the circumstances of that position and the implication in the decision for the computation of the depletion deduction. The example demonstrates that an allocated portion of the taxes paid as a bonus with respect to mineral property must be included in determining the gross income in order to compute the limitation on the percentage depletion allowance of 50% of taxable income computed without the allowance for depletion.

  14. Generic effluent monitoring system certification for salt well portable exhauster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Maughan, A.D.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests were conducted to verify that the Generic Effluent Monitoring System (GEMS), as it is applied to the Salt Well Portable Exhauster, meets all applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the air sampling probe location and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering air sampling probe location ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in the report. The tests demonstrated that the GEMS/Salt Well Exhauster system meets all applicable performance criteria. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted the testing using a mockup of the Salt Well Portable Exhauster stack at the Numatec Hanford Company`s 305 Building. The stack/sampling system configuration tested was designed to provide airborne effluent control for the Salt Well pumping operation at some U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, Washington. The portable design of the exhauster allows it to be used in other applications and over a range of exhaust air flowrates (approximately 200 - 1100 cubic feet per minute). The unit includes a stack section containing the sampling probe and another stack section containing the airflow, temperature and humidity sensors. The GEMS design features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and sample collection system. The collection system includes a filter holder to collect the sample of record and an in-line detector head and filter for monitoring beta radiation-emitting particles.

  15. Development of Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment System for Tier II Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, R. C.; Cole, A. S., Stroia, B. J.; Huang, S. C. (Cummins, Inc.); Howden, Kenneth C.; Chalk, Steven (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to their excellent fuel efficiency, reliability, and durability, compression ignition direct injection (CIDI) engines have been used extensively to power almost all highway trucks, urban buses, off-road vehicles, marine carriers, and industrial equipment. CIDI engines burn 35 to 50% less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, and they emit far less greenhouse gases (Carbon Dioxides), which have been implicated in global warming. Although the emissions of CIDI engines have been reduced significantly over the last decade, there remains concern with the Nitrogen Oxides (NOX) and Particulate Matter (PM) emission levels. In 2000, the US EPA proposed very stringent emissions standards to be introduced in 2007 along with low sulfur (< 15ppm) diesel fuel. The California Air Resource Board (CARB) has also established the principle that future diesel fueled vehicles should meet the same emissions standards as gasoline fueled vehicles and the EPA followed suit with its Tier II emissions regulations. Meeting the Tier II standards requires NOX and PM emissions to be reduced dramatically. Achieving such low emissions while minimizing fuel economy penalty cannot be done through engine development and fuel reformulation alone, and requires application of NOX and PM aftertreatment control devices. A joint effort was made between Cummins Inc. and the Department of Energy to develop the generic aftertreatment subsystem technologies applicable for Light-Duty Vehicle (LDV) and Light-Duty Truck (LDT) engines. This paper provides an update on the progress of this joint development program. Three NOX reduction technologies including plasmaassisted catalytic NOX reduction (PACR), active lean NOX catalyst (LNC), and adsorber catalyst (AC) technology using intermittent rich conditions for NOX reduction were investigated in parallel in an attempt to select the best NOX control approach for light-duty aftertreatment subsystem integration and development. Investigations included system design and analysis, critical lab/engine experiments, and ranking then selection of NOX control technologies against reliability, up-front cost, fuel economy, service interval/serviceability, and size/weight. The results of the investigations indicate that the best NOX control approach for LDV and LDT applications is a NOX adsorber system. A greater than 83% NOX reduction efficiency is required to achieve 0.07g/mile NOX Tier II vehicle-out emissions. Both active lean NOX and PACR technology are currently not capable of achieving the high conversion efficiency required for Tier II, Bin 5 emissions standards. In this paper, the NOX technology assessment and selection is first reviewed and discussed. Development of the selected NOX technology (NOX adsorber) and PM control are then discussed in more detail. Discussion includes exhaust sulfur management, further adsorber formulation development, reductant screening, diesel particulate filter development & active regeneration, and preliminary test results on the selected integrated SOX trap, NOX adsorber, and diesel particulate filter system over an FTP-75 emissions cycle, and its impact on fuel economy. Finally, the direction of future work for continued advanced aftertreatment technology development is discussed. (SAE Paper SAE-2002-01-1867 © 2002 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

  16. System Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Methodology for Diesel Exhaust After-treatment Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    System Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Methodology for Diesel Exhaust After;System Modeling, Analysis, and Optimization Methodology for Diesel Exhaust After-treatment Technologies Developing new aftertreatment technologies to meet emission regulations for diesel engines is a growing

  17. Estimation of Fuel Savings by Recuperation of Furnace Exhausts to Preheat Combustion Air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebello, W. J.; Kohnken, K. H.; Phipps, H. R., Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery of waste energy in furnace exhaust gases is gaining in importance as fuel costs continue to escalate. Installation of a recuperator in the furnace exhaust stream to preheat the combustion air can result in considerable savings in fuel...

  18. Estimation of Fuel Savings by Recuperation of Furnace Exhausts to Preheat Combustion Air 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebello, W. J.; Kohnken, K. H.; Phipps, H. R., Jr.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery of waste energy in furnace exhaust gases is gaining in importance as fuel costs continue to escalate. Installation of a recuperator in the furnace exhaust stream to preheat the combustion air can result in considerable savings in fuel...

  19. Optimization of Combustion Efficiency for Supplementally Fired Gas Turbine Cogenerator Exhaust Heat Receptors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterland, A. F.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad range of unique cogeneration schemes are being installed or considered for application in the process industries involving gas turbines with heat recovery from the exhaust gas. Depending on the turbine design, exhaust gases will range from...

  20. Characterisation of lightly oxidised organic aerosol formed from the photochemical aging of diesel exhaust particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroll, Jesse

    The oxidative aging of the semivolatile fraction of diesel exhaust aerosol is studied in order to better understand the influence of oxidation reactions on particle chemical composition. Exhaust is sampled from an idling ...

  1. Optimization of Combustion Efficiency for Supplementally Fired Gas Turbine Cogenerator Exhaust Heat Receptors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterland, A. F.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad range of unique cogeneration schemes are being installed or considered for application in the process industries involving gas turbines with heat recovery from the exhaust gas. Depending on the turbine design, exhaust gases will range from...

  2. Evaluation of SCR and DOC/CPF Tech in Diesel Exhaust Emission...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SCR and DOCCPF Tech in Diesel Exhaust Emission Control to Meet U.S. Tier 2 Bin 5 Evaluation of SCR and DOCCPF Tech in Diesel Exhaust Emission Control to Meet U.S. Tier 2 Bin 5...

  3. Research and development of industrial drying concepts using a superheated steam atmosphere with exhaust recompression

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dibella, F.A.; Doyle, E.F.; Becker, F.E.; Lang, R.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the thermal drying processes where water is to be removed via evaporation from the feedstock, attempts have been made to reduce the consumption of energy using exhaust waste heat recovery techniques, improved dryer designs, or even the deployment of advanced mechanical dewatering techniques. Despite these efforts, it is obvious that a large amount of thermal energy is often still lost if the latent heat of evaporation from the evaporated water cannot be recovered and/or in some way be utilized as direct heat input into the dryer. Tecogen Inc. is conducting research and development on an industrial drying concept. The concept utilizes a superheated steam drying atmosphere with exhaust steam recompression to recover the latent heat in the exhaust that would otherwise be lost. This approach has the potential to 55% of the energy required by a conventional air dryer. Work on Phase I: Feasibility Investigation, has been completed and the results of this work are given in this Phase I Final Report. Two designs are described for steam drying systems, one directly heated and one indirectly heated. The work on Phase I of the program also concentrated on identifying the most significant industrial applications for this superheated steam drying concept. The work consisted of evaluating information gathered from a literature search, a survey of industrial dryer manufacturers product brochures, and material provided by a major industrial dryer manufacturer. Results from the six tasks in Phase I are given. The tasks were: industrial applicability study; exploration of system configurations; designing system elements; laboratory testing; energy savings analysis; and program management and reporting. Reports on the first 5 tasks have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  4. Apparatus and method to inject a reductant into an exhaust gas feedstream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viola, Michael B. (Macomb Township, MI)

    2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An exhaust aftertreatment system for an internal combustion engine is provided including an apparatus and method to inject a reductant into the exhaust gas feedstream. Included is a fuel metering device adapted to inject reductant into the exhaust gas feedstream and a controllable pressure regulating device. A control module is operatively connected to the reductant metering device and the controllable pressure regulating device, and, adapted to effect flow of reductant into the exhaust gas feedstream over a controllable flow range.

  5. Electrochemical cell and membrane for continuous NOx removal from natural gas-combustion exhaust gases. Final report, October 1, 1990-September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, J.H.; Burt, J.; Cook, R.L.; Sammells, A.F.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program investigated the utility of electrochemically promoted NOx decomposition under conditions appropriate to those found in natural gas prime mover exhaust. In addition, the utility of mixed ionic and electronic conducting membranes for the spontaneous decomposition of NOx were investigated using catalytic sites identified during the electrochemical study. The program was conducted by initially evaluating perovskite related cathode electrocatalysts using high NOx concentrations. This was followed by investigations at NOx concentrations consistent with those encountered in natural gas prime mover exhausts. Preferred electrocatalysts were then incorporated into mixed conducting membranes for promoting NOx decomposition. Work showed that cobalt based electrocatalysts were active towards promoting NOx decomposition at high concentrations. At lower NOx concentrations initial activation, by passage of a large cathodic current, was required which probably resulted in producing a distinct population of surface oxygen vacancies before the subject decomposition reaction could proceed. This study showed that electrochemically promoted decomposition is feasible under conditions appropriate to those found in prime mover exhausts.

  6. Current sheets and pressure anisotropy in the reconnection exhaust

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le, A.; Karimabadi, H.; Roytershteyn, V. [SciberQuest, Inc., Del Mar, California 92014 (United States)] [SciberQuest, Inc., Del Mar, California 92014 (United States); Egedal, J. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Ng, J. [PPPL, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)] [PPPL, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Scudder, J. [University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)] [University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States); Daughton, W.; Liu, Y.-H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A particle-in-cell simulation shows that the exhaust during anti-parallel reconnection in the collisionless regime contains a current sheet extending 100 inertial lengths from the X line. The current sheet is supported by electron pressure anisotropy near the X line and ion anisotropy farther downstream. Field-aligned electron currents flowing outside the magnetic separatrices feed the exhaust current sheet and generate the out-of-plane, or Hall, magnetic field. Existing models based on different mechanisms for each particle species provide good estimates for the levels of pressure anisotropy. The ion anisotropy, which is strong enough to reach the firehose instability threshold, is also important for overall force balance. It reduces the outflow speed of the plasma.

  7. Parasitic load control system for exhaust temperature control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strauser, Aaron D. (Washington, IL); Coleman, Gerald N. (Peterborough, GB); Coldren, Dana R. (Fairbury, IL)

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A parasitic load control system is provided. The system may include an exhaust producing engine and a fuel pumping mechanism configured to pressurize fuel in a pressure chamber. The system may also include an injection valve configured to cause fuel pressure to build within the pressure chamber when in a first position and allow injection of fuel from the pressure chamber into one or more combustion chambers of the engine when in a second position. The system may further include a controller configured to independently regulate the pressure in the pressure chamber and the injection of fuel into the one or more combustion chambers, to increase a load on the fuel pumping mechanism, increasing parasitic load on the engine, thereby increasing a temperature of the exhaust produced by the engine.

  8. New concept on lower exhaust emission of diesel engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujimoto, Hajime; Senda, Jiro; Shibata, Ichiro; Matsui, Koji

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the countermeasures for exhaust emissions from a diesel engine, especially, DI diesel engine, is the use of a super high pressure injection system with a small hole diameter. However, the system needs greater driving force than that with normal injection pressure,and its demerit is an increase in NO{sub x}, although soot decreases. The authors propose a new concept, the simultaneous reduction of NO{sub x} and soot. The concept is that the utilization of flash boiling phenomenon in a diesel engine. The phenomenon can be realized by use of the injection of fuel oil with CO{sub 2} gas dissolved. Flash boiling facilities the distinguished atomization of fuel oil and CO{sub 2} gas contributes to the internal EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) during combustion. Fundamental information on the characteristics of a flash boiling spray of n-tridecane with CO{sub 2} gas dissolved is described in this paper, as a first step.

  9. Diesel emission reduction using internal exhaust gas recirculation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    He, Xin (Denver, CO); Durrett, Russell P. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for controlling combustion in a direct-injection diesel engine includes monitoring a crankshaft rotational position of a cylinder of the engine, monitoring an engine load, determining an intake stroke within the cylinder based upon the crankshaft rotational position, and when the engine load is less than a threshold engine load, opening an exhaust valve for the cylinder during a portion of the intake stroke.

  10. Exhaust gas treatment in testing nuclear rocket engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zweig, H.R.; Fischler, S.; Wagner, W.R. (Rocketdyne Division, Rockwell International Corporation, 6633 Canoga Avenue, P.O. Box 7922, Canoga Park, California 91309-7922 (United States))

    1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    With the exception of the last test series of the Rover program, Nuclear Furnace 1, test-reactor and rocket engine hydrogen gas exhaust generated during the Rover/NERVA program was released directly to the atmosphere, without removal of the associated fission products and other radioactive debris. Current rules for nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480.6) are far more protective of the general environment; even with the remoteness of the Nevada Test Site, introduction of potentially hazardous quantities of radioactive waste into the atmosphere must be scrupulously avoided. The Rocketdyne treatment concept features a diffuser to provide altitude simulation and pressure recovery, a series of heat exchangers to gradually cool the exhaust gas stream to 100 K, and an activated charcoal bed for adsorption of inert gases. A hydrogen-gas fed ejector provides auxiliary pumping for startup and shutdown of the engine. Supplemental filtration to remove particulates and condensed phases may be added at appropriate locations in the system. The clean hydrogen may be exhausted to the atmosphere and flared, or the gas may be condensed and stored for reuse in testing. The latter approach totally isolates the working gas from the environment.

  11. Measuring absolute infrared spectral radiance with correlated photons: new arrangements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migdall, Alan

    metrologia Measuring absolute infrared spectral radiance with correlated photons: new arrangements must be created in pairs, the VIS channel is also stimulated. In this Metrologia, 1998, 35, 295-300 295

  12. absolute efficiency calibration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    good. This is used in a technique developed for the absolute calibration of ultra high energy cosmic ray fluorescence telescopes, and it can also be applied to imaging atmospheric...

  13. absolute radiometric calibration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are good. This is used in a technique developed for the absolute calibration of ultra high energy cosmic ray fluorescence telescopes, and it can also be applied to imaging...

  14. absolute calibration site: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    good. This is used in a technique developed for the absolute calibration of ultra high energy cosmic ray fluorescence telescopes, and it can also be applied to imaging atmospheric...

  15. absolute intensity calibration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    good. This is used in a technique developed for the absolute calibration of ultra high energy cosmic ray fluorescence telescopes, and it can also be applied to imaging atmospheric...

  16. absolute solar transmission: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    data were collected from Chang, Grace C. 7 January 1996 NREUfP-463-20619 Calibration of a Solar Absolute Renewable Energy Websites Summary: of Scientific and Technical Information...

  17. Comparative vs. Absolute Performance Assessment with Environmental Sustainability Metrics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High, Karen

    Comparative vs. Absolute Performance Assessment with Environmental Sustainability Metrics Xun Jin Different goals and potential audiences determine that two types of environmental performance assessments metrics can be partitioned into two camps. One suite of metrics aim to assess the environmental

  18. Absolutely minimal Lipschitz extension of tree-valued mappings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naor, Assaf

    We prove that every Lipschitz function from a subset of a locally compact length space to a metric tree has a unique absolutely minimal Lipschitz extension (AMLE). We relate these extensions to a stochastic game called ...

  19. absolute transition probabilities: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Absolute entropy and free energy of fluids using the hypothetical scanning method. I. Calculation of transition...

  20. General Relativity and Spatial Flows: I. Absolute Relativistic Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Martin

    2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Two complementary and equally important approaches to relativistic physics are explained. One is the standard approach, and the other is based on a study of the flows of an underlying physical substratum. Previous results concerning the substratum flow approach are reviewed, expanded, and more closely related to the formalism of General Relativity. An absolute relativistic dynamics is derived in which energy and momentum take on absolute significance with respect to the substratum. Possible new effects on satellites are described.

  1. Diesel Exhaust Emissions Control for Light-Duty Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mital, R.; Li, J.; Huang, S. C.; Stroia, B. J.; Yu, R. C. (Cummins, Inc.); Anderson, J.A. (Argonne National Laboratory); Howden, Kenneth C. (U.S. Department of Energy)

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this paper is to present the results of diesel exhaust aftertreatment testing and analysis done under the FreedomCAR program. Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) adsorber technology was selected based on a previous investigation of various NOx aftertreatment technologies including non-thermal plasma, NOx adsorber and active lean NOx. Particulate Matter (PM) emissions were addressed by developing a catalyzed particulate filter. After various iterations of the catalyst formulation, the aftertreatment components were integrated and optimized for a light duty vehicle application. This compact exhaust aftertreatment system is dual leg and consists of a sulfur trap, NOx adsorbers, and catalyzed particulate filters (CPF). During regeneration, supplementary ARCO ECD low-sulfur diesel fuel is injected upstream of the adsorber and CPF in the exhaust. Steady state and transient emission test results with and without the exhaust aftertreatment system (EAS) are presented. Results of soot filter regeneration by injecting low-sulfur diesel fuel and slip of unregulated emissions, such as NH3, are discussed. Effects of adsorber size and bypass strategy on NOx conversion efficiency and fuel economy penalty are also presented in this paper. The results indicate that if the supplementary fuel injection is optimized, NH3 slip is negligible. During the FTP cycle, injection of low sulfur diesel fuel can create temperature exotherms high enough to regenerate a loaded CPF. With the optimized NOx adsorber regeneration strategies the fuel injection penalty can be reduced by 40 to 50%. Results for various other issues like low temperature light off, reductant optimization, exhaust sulfur management, system integration and design trade-off, are also presented and discussed in this paper. (SAE Paper SAE-2003-01-0041 © 2003 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

  2. The Impact of Oil Consumption Mechanisms on Diesel Exhaust Particle Size Distributions and Detailed Exhaust Chemical Composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stetter, J; Forster, N; Ghandhi, J; Foster, D

    2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed exhaust emission data have been taken from a Cummins N-14 single cylinder research engine in which the oil consumption was varied by different engine modifications. Low sulfur fuel was used, and oil consumption was varied by modifying the intake valve stem seals, the exhaust valve stem seals, the oil control ring and combinations of these modifications. Detailed measurements of exhaust gas particle size distributions and chemical composition were made for the various oil consumption configurations for a range of engine loads and speeds. The particulate mass was measured with TEOM and traditional gravimetric filter methods. Filter data for EC/OC, sulfates and trace metals have been taken and analyzed. The trace metals in the particulate mass serve as the basis for assessing oil consumption at the different operating conditions. The data indicate that the oil consumption for the steady state testing done here was approximately an order of magnitude below oil consumption values cited in the literature. We did measure changes in the details of the chemical composition of the particulate for the different engine operating conditions, but it did not correlate with changes in the oil consumption. Furthermore, the data indicate that the particle size distribution is not strongly impacted by low level oil consumption variations observed in this work.

  3. Light-Duty Drive Cycle Simulations of Diesel Engine-Out Exhaust Properties for an RCCI-Enabled Vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-cylinder blending of gasoline and diesel fuels to achieve low-temperature reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) can reduce NOx and PM emissions while maintaining or improving brake thermal efficiency compared to conventional diesel combustion (CDC). Moreover, the dual-fueling RCCI is able to achieve these benefits by tailoring combustion reactivity over a wider range of engine operation than is possible with a single fuel. However, the currently demonstrated range of stable RCCI combustion just covers a portion of the engine speed-load range required in several light-duty drive cycles. This means that engines must switch from RCCI to CDC when speed and load fall outside of the stable RCCI range. In this study we investigated the impact of RCCI as it has recently been demonstrated on practical engine-out exhaust temperature and emissions by simulating a multi-mode RCCI-enabled vehicle operating over two urban and two highway driving cycles. To implement our simulations, we employed experimental engine maps for a multi-mode RCCI/CDC engine combined with a standard mid-size, automatic transmission, passenger vehicle in the Autonomie vehicle simulation platform. Our results include both detailed transient and cycle-averaged engine exhaust temperature and emissions for each case, and we note the potential implications of the modified exhaust properties on catalytic emissions control and utilization of waste heat recovery on future RCCI-enabled vehicles.

  4. The biological effects of subacute inhalation of diesel exhaust following addition of cerium oxide nanoparticles in atherosclerosis-prone mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassee, Flemming R., E-mail: flemming.cassee@rivm.nl [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, PO box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Campbell, Arezoo, E-mail: acampbell@westernu.edu [Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA (United States)] [Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA (United States); Boere, A. John F., E-mail: john.boere@rivm.nl [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, PO box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands)] [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, PO box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); McLean, Steven G., E-mail: smclean1@staffmail.ed.ac.uk [BHF/University Centre for Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Duffin, Rodger, E-mail: Rodger.Duffin@ed.ac.uk [MRC Centre for Inflammation Research, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)] [MRC Centre for Inflammation Research, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Krystek, Petra, E-mail: petra.krystek@philips.com [Philips Innovation Services, Eindhoven (Netherlands)] [Philips Innovation Services, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Gosens, Ilse, E-mail: Ilse.gosens@rivm.nl [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, PO box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands)] [National Institute for Public Health and the Environment, PO box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Miller, Mark R., E-mail: Mark.Miller@ed.ac.uk [BHF/University Centre for Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles improve the burning efficiency of fuel, however, little is known about health impacts of altered emissions from the vehicles. Methods: Atherosclerosis-prone apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE{sup -/-}) mice were exposed by inhalation to diluted exhaust (1.7 mg/m{sup 3}, 20, 60 or 180 min, 5 day/week, for 4 weeks), from an engine using standard diesel fuel (DE) or the same diesel fuel containing 9 ppm cerium oxide nanoparticles (DCeE). Changes in hematological indices, clinical chemistry, atherosclerotic burden, tissue levels of inflammatory cytokines and pathology of the major organs were assessed. Results: Addition of CeO{sub 2} to fuel resulted in a reduction of the number (30%) and surface area (10%) of the particles in the exhaust, whereas the gaseous co-pollutants were increased (6-8%). There was, however, a trend towards an increased size and complexity of the atherosclerotic plaques following DE exposure, which was not evident in the DCeE group. There were no clear signs of altered hematological or pathological changes induced by either treatment. However, levels of proinflammatory cytokines were modulated in a brain region and liver following DCeE exposure. Conclusions: These results imply that addition of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles to fuel decreases the number of particles in exhaust and may reduce atherosclerotic burden associated with exposure to standard diesel fuel. From the extensive assessment of biological parameters performed, the only concerning effect of cerium addition was a slightly raised level of cytokines in a region of the central nervous system. Overall, the use of cerium as a fuel additive may be a potentially useful way to limit the health effects of vehicle exhaust. However, further testing is required to ensure that such an approach is not associated with a chronic inflammatory response which may eventually cause long-term health effects.

  5. Multivariate analysis of exhaust emissions from heavy-duty diesel fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sjoegren, M.; Ulf, R.; Li, H.; Westerholm, R. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particulate and gaseous exhaust emission phases from running 10 diesel fuels on two makes of heavy-duty diesel engines were analyzed with respect to 63 chemical descriptors. Measurements for one of the fuels were also made in the presence of an exhaust aftertreatment device. The variables included 28 polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC), regulated pollutants (CO, HC, NO{sub x}, particles), and 19 other organic and inorganic exhaust emission components. Principal components analysis (PCA) was applied for the statistical exploration of the obtained data. In addition, relationships between chemical (12 variables) and physical (12 variables) parameters of the fuels to the exhaust emissions were derived using partial least squares (PLS) regression. Both PCA and PLS models were derived for the engine makes separately. The PCA showed that the most descriptive exhaust emission factors from these diesel fuels included fluoranthene as a representative of PAC, the regulated pollutants, sulfates, methylated pyrenes, and monoaromatics. Exhaust emissions were significantly decreased in the presence of an exhaust aftertreatment device. Both engine makes exhibited similar patterns of exhaust emissions. Discrepancies were observed for the exhaust emissions of CO{sub 2} and oil-derived soluble organic fractions, owing to differences in engine design. The PLS analysis showed a good correlation of exhaust emission of the regulated pollutants and PAC with the contents of PAC in the fuels and the fuel aromaticity. 41 refs., 6 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Non-Thermal Plasma System Development for CIDI Exhaust Aftertreatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balmer, M. Lou (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)); Tonkyn, Russell (Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BPNL)); Maupin, Gary; Yoon, Steven; Kolwaite, Ana (PNNL); Barlow, Stephen (BPNL); Domingo, Norberto; Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Hoard, John Wm. (Ford Research Laboratory); Howden, Ken (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a need for an efficient, durable technology to reduce NOx emissions from oxidative exhaust streams such as those produced by compression-ignition, direct injection (CIDI) diesel or lean-burn gasoline engines. A partnership formed between the DOE Office of Advanced Automotive Technology, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the USCAR Low Emission Technologies Research and Development Partnership is evaluating the effectiveness of a non-thermal plasma in conjunction with catalytic materials to mediate NOx and particulate emissions from diesel fueled light duty (CIDI) engines. Preliminary studies showed that plasma-catalyst systems could reduce up to 70% of NOx emissions at an equivalent cost of 3.5% of the input fuel in simulated diesel exhaust. These studies also showed that the type and concentration of hydrocarbon play a key role in both the plasma gas phase chemistry and the catalyst surface chemistry. More recently, plasma/catalyst systems have been evaluated for NOx reduction and particulate removal on a CIDI engine. Performance results for select plasma-catalyst systems for both simulated and actual CIDI exhaust will be presented. The effect of NOx and hydrocarbon concentration on plasma-catalyst performance will also be shown. SAE Paper SAE-2000-01-1601 {copyright} 2000 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.

  7. Experimental Evaluation of Installed Cooking Exhaust Fan Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singer, Brett C.; Delp, William W.; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The installed performance of cooking exhaust fans was evaluated through residential field experiments conducted on a sample of 15 devices varying in design and other characteristics. The sample included two rear downdraft systems, two under-cabinet microwave over range (MOR) units, three different installations of an under-cabinet model with grease screens across the bottom and no capture hood, two devices with grease screens covering the bottom of a large capture hood (one under-cabinet, one wall-mount chimney), four under-cabinet open hoods, and two open hoods with chimney mounts over islands. Performance assessment included measurement of airflow and sound levels across fan settings and experiments to quantify the contemporaneous capture efficiency for the exhaust generated by natural gas cooking burners.Capture efficiency is defined as the fraction of generated pollutants that are removed through the exhaust and thus not available for inhalation of household occupants. Capture efficiency (CE) was assessed for various configurations of burner use (e.g., single front, single back, combination of one front and one back, oven) and fan speed setting. Measured airflow rates were substantially lower than the levels noted in product literature for many of the units. This shortfall was observed for several units costing in excess of $1000. Capture efficiency varied widely (from<5percent to roughly 100percent) across devices and across conditions for some devices. As expected, higher capture efficiencies were achieved with higher fan settings and the associated higher air flow rates. In most cases, capture efficiencies were substantially higher for rear burners than for front burners. The best and most consistent performance was observed for open hoods that covered all cooktop burners and operated at higher airflow rates. The lowest capture efficiencies were measured when a front burner was used with a rear backdraft system or with lowest fan setting for above the range systems that do not cover the front burners.

  8. Exhaustive search system and method using space-filling curves

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spires, Shannon V.

    2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A search system and method for one agent or for multiple agents using a space-filling curve provides a way to control one or more agents to cover an area of any space of any dimensionality using an exhaustive search pattern. An example of the space-filling curve is a Hilbert curve. The search area can be a physical geography, a cyberspace search area, or an area searchable by computing resources. The search agent can be one or more physical agents, such as a robot, and can be software agents for searching cyberspace.

  9. Modular Low Cost High Energy Exhaust Heat Thermoelectric Generator with

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311,OfficialProducts | Departmentof EnergyClosed-Loop Exhaust

  10. Method of controlling temperature of a thermoelectric generator in an exhaust system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prior, Gregory P; Reynolds, Michael G; Cowgill, Joshua D

    2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of controlling the temperature of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) in an exhaust system of an engine is provided. The method includes determining the temperature of the heated side of the TEG, determining exhaust gas flow rate through the TEG, and determining the exhaust gas temperature through the TEG. A rate of change in temperature of the heated side of the TEG is predicted based on the determined temperature, the determined exhaust gas flow rate, and the determined exhaust gas temperature through the TEG. Using the predicted rate of change of temperature of the heated side, exhaust gas flow rate through the TEG is calculated that will result in a maximum temperature of the heated side of the TEG less than a predetermined critical temperature given the predicted rate of change in temperature of the heated side of the TEG. A corresponding apparatus is provided.

  11. Absolute Lineshifts - A new diagnostic for stellar hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dainis Dravins

    2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    For hydrodynamic model atmospheres, absolute lineshifts are becoming an observable diagnostic tool beyond the classical ones of line-strength, -width, -shape, and -asymmetry. This is the wavelength displacement of different types of spectral lines away from the positions naively expected from the Doppler shift caused by stellar radial motion. Caused mainly by correlated velocity and brightness patterns in granular convection, such absolute lineshifts could in the past be studied only for the Sun (since the relative Sun-Earth motion, and the ensuing Doppler shift is known). For other stars, this is now becoming possible thanks to three separate developments: (a) Astrometric determination of stellar radial motion; (b) High-resolution spectrometers with accurate wavelength calibration, and (c) Accurate laboratory wavelengths for several atomic species. Absolute lineshifts offer a tool to segregate various 2- and 3-dimensional models, and to identify non-LTE effects in line formation.

  12. Absolute Lineshifts - A new diagnostic for stellar hydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dravins, D

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For hydrodynamic model atmospheres, absolute lineshifts are becoming an observable diagnostic tool beyond the classical ones of line-strength, -width, -shape, and -asymmetry. This is the wavelength displacement of different types of spectral lines away from the positions naively expected from the Doppler shift caused by stellar radial motion. Caused mainly by correlated velocity and brightness patterns in granular convection, such absolute lineshifts could in the past be studied only for the Sun (since the relative Sun-Earth motion, and the ensuing Doppler shift is known). For other stars, this is now becoming possible thanks to three separate developments: (a) Astrometric determination of stellar radial motion; (b) High-resolution spectrometers with accurate wavelength calibration, and (c) Accurate laboratory wavelengths for several atomic species. Absolute lineshifts offer a tool to segregate various 2- and 3-dimensional models, and to identify non-LTE effects in line formation.

  13. Absolute polarization standards at medium and high energies. [200 to 900 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNaughton, M.W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although measurement of a polarization asymmetry is rather easy, the normalization of the measurement to obtain the analyzing power requires an absolute knowledge of the beam polarization or comparison with a known standard analyzing power. Such calibration standards can be hard to find. This paper concentrates on medium and higher energies, and divides the techniques into four categories: double scattering, polarized target methods, polarized source methods, and theoretical methods. Secondary standards are also discussed, and earlier data are assessed. 52 references, 6 figures. (RWR)

  14. The concepts of leak before break and absolute reliability of NPP equipment and piping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Getman, A.F.; Komarov, O.V.; Sokov, L.M. [and others

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the absolute reliability (AR) concept for ensuring safe operation of nuclear plant equipment and piping. The AR of a pipeline or component is defined as the level of reliability when the probability of an instantaneous double-ended break is near zero. AR analysis has been applied to Russian RBMK and VVER type reactors. It is proposed that analyses required for application of the leak before break concept should be included in AR implementation. The basic principles, methods, and approaches that provide the basis for implementing the AR concept are described.

  15. Treating exhaust gas from a pressurized fluidized bed reaction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Isaksson, J.; Koskinen, J.

    1995-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot gases from a pressurized fluidized bed reactor system are purified. Under super atmospheric pressure conditions hot exhaust gases are passed through a particle separator, forming a filtrate cake on the surface of the separator, and a reducing agent--such as an NO{sub x} reducing agent (like ammonia)--is introduced into the exhaust gases just prior to or just after particle separation. The retention time of the introduced reducing agent is enhanced by providing a low gas velocity (e.g. about 1--20 cm/s) during passage of the gas through the filtrate cake while at super atmospheric pressure. Separation takes place within a distinct pressure vessel, the interior of which is at a pressure of about 2--100 bar, and introduction of reducing agent can take place at multiple locations (one associated with each filter element in the pressure vessel), or at one or more locations just prior to passage of clean gas out of the pressure vessel (typically passed to a turbine). 8 figs.

  16. Stability comparison of two absolute gravimeters: optical versus atomic interferometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillot, Pierre; Landragin, Arnaud; Santos, Franck Pereira Dos; Merlet, Sébastien

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the direct comparison between the stabilities of two mobile absolute gravimeters of different technology: the LNE-SYRTE Cold Atom Gravimeter and FG5X\\#216 of the Universit\\'e du Luxembourg. These instruments rely on two different principles of operation: atomic and optical interferometry. The comparison took place in the Walferdange Underground Laboratory for Geodynamics in Luxembourg, at the beginning of the last International Comparison of Absolute Gravimeters, ICAG-2013. We analyse a 2h10 duration common measurement, and find that the CAG shows better immunity with respect to changes in the level of vibration noise, as well as a slightly better short term stability.

  17. Electron Cyclotron Emission Measurements on JET: Michelson Interferometer, New Absolute Calibration and Determination of Electron Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electron Cyclotron Emission Measurements on JET: Michelson Interferometer, New Absolute Calibration and Determination of Electron Temperature

  18. Comparative Study on Exhaust Emissions from Diesel- and CNG-Powered...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Outlines of the presentation 18 Green House Gas Emissions Production Compression Refinery CH4 GWP25 CO2 Exhaust 19 ADEME Program Program Evaluations on Diesel & CNG Buses...

  19. Reduction of NOx in Synthetic Diesel Exhaust via Two-Step Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Citation: Tonkyn RG, SE Barlow, and J Hoard.2003."Reduction of NOx in Synthetic Diesel Exhaust via Two-Step Plasma-Catalysis Treatment."Applied Catalysis. B,...

  20. The Effects of an Exhaust Thermoelectric Generator of a GM Sierra...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Truck The Effects of an Exhaust Thermoelectric Generator of a GM Sierra Pickup Truck 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Hi-Z Technology Inc. and...

  1. Design and Integrate Improved Systems for Nuclear Facility Ventilation and Exhaust Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Murray E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective: The objective of this R&D project would complete the development of three new systems and integrate them into a single experimental effort. However, each of the three systems has stand-alone applicability across the DOE complex. At US DOE nuclear facilities, indoor air is filtered and ventilated for human occupancy, and exhaust air to the outdoor environment must be regulated and monitored. At least three technical standards address these functions, and the Los Alamos National Laboratory would complete an experimental facility to answer at least three questions: (1) Can the drag coefficient of a new Los Alamos air mixer be reduced for better operation in nuclear facility exhaust stacks? (2) Is it possible to verify the accuracy of a new dilution method for HEPA filter test facilities? (3) Is there a performance-based air flow metric (volumetric flow or mass flow) for operating HEPA filters? In summary, the three new systems are: a mixer, a diluter and a performance-based metric, respectively. The results of this project would be applicable to at least four technical standards: ANSI N13.1 Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities; ASTM F1471 Standard Test Method for Air Cleaning Performance of a High-Efficiency Particulate Air Filter System, ASME N511: In-Service Testing of Nuclear Air Treatment, Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systems, and ASME AG-1: Code On Nuclear Air And Gas Treatment. All of the three proposed new systems must be combined into a single experimental device (i.e. to develop a new function of the Los Alamos aerosol wind tunnel). Technical Approach: The Radiation Protection RP-SVS group at Los Alamos has an aerosol wind tunnel that was originally (2006) designed to evaluate small air samplers (cf. US EPA 40 CFR 53.42). In 2009, the tunnel was modified for exhaust stack verifications per the ANSI N13.1 standard. In 2010, modifications were started on the wind tunnel for testing HEPA filters (cf. ASTM F1471 and ASME N511). This project involves three systems that were developed for testing the 24*24*11 (inch) HEPA filters (i.e. the already mentioned mixer, diluter and metric). Prototypes of the mixer and the diluter have been built and individually tested on a preliminary basis. However, the third system (the HEPA metric method) has not been tested, since that requires complete operability of the aerosol wind tunnel device. (The experimental wind tunnel has test aerosol injection, control and measurement capabilities, and can be heated for temperature dependent measurements.) Benefits: US DOE facilities that use HEPA filters and/or require exhaust stacks from their nuclear facility buildings will benefit from access to the new hardware (mixer and diluter) and performance-based metric (for HEPA filter air flow).

  2. Assessment of the Revised 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack Sampling Probe Location

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Glissmeyer, John A.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to support the air emissions permit for the 3410 Building, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory performed a series of tests in the exhaust air discharge from the reconfigured 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack. The objective was to determine whether the location of the air sampling probe for emissions monitoring meets the applicable regulatory criteria governing such effluent monitoring systems. In particular, the capability of the air sampling probe location to meet the acceptance criteria of ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011 , Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stack and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities was determined. The qualification criteria for these types of stacks address 1) uniformity of air velocity, 2) sufficiently small flow angle with respect to the axis of the duct, 3) uniformity of tracer gas concentration, and 4) uniformity of tracer particle concentration. Testing was performed to conform to the quality requirements of NQA-1-2000. Fan configurations tested included all fan combinations of any two fans at a time. Most of the tests were conducted at the normal flow rate, while a small subset of tests was performed at a slightly higher flow rate achieved with the laboratory hood sashes fully open. The qualification criteria for an air monitoring probe location are taken from ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011 and are paraphrased as follows with key results summarized: 1. Angular Flow—The average air velocity angle must not deviate from the axis of the stack or duct by more than 20°. Our test results show that the mean angular flow angles at the center two-thirds of the ducts are smaller than 4.5? for all testing conditions. 2. Uniform Air Velocity—The acceptance criterion is that the COV of the air velocity must be ? 20% across the center two thirds of the area of the stack. Our results show that the COVs of the air velocity across the center two-thirds of the stack are smaller than 2.9% for all testing conditions. 3. Uniform Concentration of Tracer Gases—The uniformity of the concentration of potential contaminants is first tested using a tracer gas to represent gaseous effluents. The tracer is injected downstream of the fan outlets and at the junction downstream fan discharges meet. The acceptance criteria are that 1) the COV of the measured tracer gas concentration is ?20% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane and 2) at no point in the sampling plane does the concentration vary from the mean by >30%. Our test results show that 1) the COV of the measured tracer gas concentration is < 2.9% for all test conditions and 2) at no point in the sampling plane does the concentration vary from the mean by >6.5%. 4. Uniform Concentration of Tracer Particles—Tracer particles of 10-?m aerodynamic diameter are used for the second demonstration of concentration uniformity. The acceptance criterion is that the COV of particle concentration is ? 20% across the center two thirds of the sampling plane. Our test results indicate that the COV of particle concentration is <9.9% across the center two-thirds of the sampling plane among all testing conditions. Thus, the reconfigured 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack was determined to meet the qualification criteria given in the ANSI/HPS N13.1-2011 standard. Changes to the system configuration or operations outside the bounds described in this report (e.g., exhaust stack velocity changes, relocation of sampling probe, and addition of fans) may require re-testing or re-evaluation to determine compliance.

  3. Power plant including an exhaust gas recirculation system for injecting recirculated exhaust gases in the fuel and compressed air of a gas turbine engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy; Shaffer, Jason Brian; York, William David

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A power plant is provided and includes a gas turbine engine having a combustor in which compressed gas and fuel are mixed and combusted, first and second supply lines respectively coupled to the combustor and respectively configured to supply the compressed gas and the fuel to the combustor and an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system to re-circulate exhaust gas produced by the gas turbine engine toward the combustor. The EGR system is coupled to the first and second supply lines and configured to combine first and second portions of the re-circulated exhaust gas with the compressed gas and the fuel at the first and second supply lines, respectively.

  4. Absolute Calibration of a Large-diameter Light Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brack, J T; Dorofeev, A; Gookin, B; Harton, J L; Petrov, Y; Rovero, A C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of absolute calibration for large aperture optical systems is presented, using the example of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors. A 2.5 m diameter light source illuminated by an ultra--violet light emitting diode is calibrated with an overall uncertainty of 2.1 % at a wavelength of 365 nm.

  5. Double Beta Decay and the Absolute Neutrino Mass Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlo Giunti

    2003-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    After a short review of the current status of three-neutrino mixing, the implications for the values of neutrino masses are discussed. The bounds on the absolute scale of neutrino masses from Tritium beta-decay and cosmological data are reviewed. Finally, we discuss the implications of three-neutrino mixing for neutrinoless double-beta decay.

  6. absolute standard hydrogen: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absolute standard hydrogen First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Hydrogen Storage CODES &...

  7. Regeneration analysis under different exhaust gas thermal conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bella, G.; Rocco, Y. (Dept. di Ingegneria Meccanica, II Univ. di Roma Tor Vergata, Rome (IT))

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A refinement of the honeycomb trap model developed by the authors of this paper for analyzing the temperature history of the trap channels during the regeneration period is presented. The first results obtained, shown in previous papers, encouraged the authors to improve the model in order to account for the heat transfer not only along the channel length, but also in the radial direction. In order to achieve this objective, a control volume approach was used to simulate the soot regeneration in all contiguous channels along the axial and radial directions of the monolith, and to determine the wall temperature and soot oxidation as a function of time. Different thermodynamic conditions of the exhaust gas at the trap inlet were considered in order to examine the effects of cold regeneration. For the same soot amount accumulated in the trap, the soot burnup time and temperature history depend on the inlet temperature.

  8. Exhaustive Database Searching for Amino Acid Mutations in Proteomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyatt, Philip Douglas [ORNL; Pan, Chongle [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amino acid mutations in proteins can be found by searching tandem mass spectra acquired in shotgun proteomics experiments against protein sequences predicted from genomes. Traditionally, unconstrained searches for amino acid mutations have been accomplished by using a sequence tagging approach that combines de novo sequencing with database searching. However, this approach is limited by the performance of de novo sequencing. The Sipros algorithm v2.0 was developed to perform unconstrained database searching using high-resolution tandem mass spectra by exhaustively enumerating all single non-isobaric mutations for every residue in a protein database. The performance of Sipros for amino acid mutation identification exceeded that of an established sequence tagging algorithm, Inspect, based on benchmarking results from a Rhodopseudomonas palustris proteomics dataset. To demonstrate the viability of the algorithm for meta-proteomics, Sipros was used to identify amino acid mutations in a natural microbial community in acid mine drainage.

  9. Adaptive Air Charge Estimation for Turbocharged Diesel Engines without Exhaust Gas Recirculation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Adaptive Air Charge Estimation for Turbocharged Diesel Engines without Exhaust Gas Recirculation an adaptive observer for in-cylinder air charge estimation for turbocharged diesel engines without exhaust gas (734) 764-4256 1 #12;Storset et al.- Adaptive Air Charge Est. for TC Diesel Engines 2 1 Introduction

  10. Side branch absorber for exhaust manifold of two-stroke internal combustion engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Ralph E. (San Antonio, TX); Broerman, III, Eugene L. (San Antonio, TX); Bourn, Gary D. (Laramie, WY)

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of improving scavenging operation of a two-stroke internal combustion engine. The exhaust pressure of the engine is analyzed to determine if there is a pulsation frequency. Acoustic modeling is used to design an absorber. An appropriately designed side branch absorber may be attached to the exhaust manifold.

  11. Fume Hoods Standards and Practices Laboratory exhaust ventilation systems designed, constructed, maintained, and used at Cal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Fume Hoods Standards and Practices General Laboratory exhaust ventilation systems designed. New or renovated fume hood systems will be tested using the procedures below. Fume hoods that do to an exhaust system. It can only capture contaminants that are very close to the inlet of the hose, typically

  12. Interaction between soot particles and NOx during dielectric barrier discharge plasma remediation of simulated diesel exhaust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kushner, Mark

    of simulated diesel exhaust Rajesh Doraia) University of Illinois, Department of Chemical Engineering, 1406 from combustion effluent and from diesel exhausts in particular. Soot particles are inevitably present, a computational investigation of the effect of soot on the plasma chemistry of NOx removal in a simulated diesel

  13. A comparison between the performance of different silencer designs for gas turbine exhaust systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A comparison between the performance of different silencer designs for gas turbine exhaust systems in more specialist applications, such as the exhaust systems of gas turbines, different silencer experiments are carried out with the aim of investigating performance of silencers used on gas turbines

  14. Chemiion evolution in motor vehicle exhaust: Further evidence of its role in nanoparticle formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Fangqun

    Chemiion evolution in motor vehicle exhaust: Further evidence of its role in nanoparticle formation of the nanoparticles in motor vehicle exhaust. INDEX TERMS: 0305 Atmospheric Composition and Structure: Aerosols fuel combustion play an important role in the formation of these NPs. The predicted NP properties based

  15. Correction due to finite speed of light in absolute gravimeters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagornyi, V D; Zanimonskiy, Y Y

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correction due to finite speed of light is among the most inconsistent ones in absolute gravimetry. Formulas reported by different authors yield corrections scattered up to 8 $\\mu$Gal with no obvious reasons. The problem, though noted before, has never been studied, and nowadays the correction is rather postulated than rigorously proven. In this paper we investigate the problem from several prospectives, find the corrections for different types of absolute gravimeters, and establish relationships between different ways of implement them. The obtained results enabled us to analyze and understand the discrepancies in the results of other authors. We found that the correction derived from the Doppler effect is accountable only for $\\tfrac{2}{3}$ of the total correction due to finite speed of light, if no signal delays are considered. Another major source of inconsistency was found in the tacit use of simplified trajectory models.

  16. In Self-contradiction, Machian Geocentrism Entails Absolute Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartman, Herbert I

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Luka Popov has attempted to advance Machian physics by maintaining that the heliocentric system must be replaced by Tycho Brahe's geocentric system. We show that while geocentrism relies on Mach's contention that accelerations are relative, this contention is untenable because, inter alia, the consequences of an acceleration of an object with respect to the fixed stars cannot be duplicated by acceleration of the stars with respect to this object and, if the universe and a co-rotating observer have the same angular velocity, this motion is detectable because they have different linear velocities. Also, geocentrism precludes the relativity of accelerations and leads to an absolute space while Mach argued against absolute space, Popov's result that the force exerted by the Earth on the Sun depends on the square of the Sun's mass but is independent of the Earth's mass is paradoxical, and the annual asymmetry of the Cosmic Microwave Background falsifies all geocentric or 'Tychonic/Brahean) systems.

  17. Absolute Source Activity Measurement with a Single Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bikit, I.; Nemes, T.; Mrdja, D.; Forkapic, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovica 4, 21 000 Novi Sad (Serbia)

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper the activity of {sup 60}Co source was measured using the full absorption, sum and random coincidences (pile up) peaks and the total spectrum area in the gamma spectra. By the exact treatment of the chance coincidence and pile-up events, surprisingly good results were obtained. With the source on the detector end-cap (when the angular correlation effects are negligible), this simple method yields absolute activity values deviating from the reference activity for about 1 percent.

  18. Field Study of Exhaust Fans for Mitigating Indoor Air Quality Problems: Final Report to Bonneville Power Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grimsrud, David T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement Protocol Ventilation System Operation. . . . .Balanced mechanical ventilation systems, employing heatcompared to balanced ventilation systems. (a) exhaust fan

  19. Bulk Tungsten in the JET Divertor: Potential Influence of the Exhaustion of Ductility and Grain Growth on the Lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bulk Tungsten in the JET Divertor: Potential Influence of the Exhaustion of Ductility and Grain Growth on the Lifetime

  20. Supervision and control prototyping for an engine exhaust gas heat recovery system based on a steam Rankine cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Supervision and control prototyping for an engine exhaust gas heat recovery system based on a steam of a practical supervi- sion and control system for a pilot Rankine steam process for exhaust gas heat recovery Rankine steam process for exhaust gas heat recovery from a spark-ignition (SI) engine, from a prototyping

  1. Diode laser measurement of H?O, CO?, and temperature in gas turbine exhaust through the application of wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leon, Marco E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sensor for measurements of gas turbine exhaust temperature."O, CO 2 , and Temperature in Gas Turbine Exhaust through theview of UCSD power plant gas turbine systems 31

  2. Diode laser measurement of H?O, CO?, and temperature in gas turbine exhaust through the application of wavelength modulation spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leon, Marco E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sensor for measurements of gas turbine exhaust temperature."from the TDLAS, FTIR, and gas turbine systems. The finaltrends between the TDL and gas turbine exhaust temperatures

  3. Respiratory effects of diesel exhaust in salt miners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamble, J.F.; Jones, W.G.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The respiratory health of 259 white males working at 5 salt (NaCl) mines was assessed by questionnaire, chest radiographs, and air and He-O/sup 2/ spirometry. Response variables were symptoms, pneumoconiosis, and spirometry. Predictor variables included age, height, smoking, mine, and tenure in diesel-exposed jobs. The purpose was to assess the association of response measures of respiratory health with exposure to diesel exhaust. There were only 2 cases of Grade 1 pneumoconiosis, so no further analysis was done. Comparisons within the study population showed a statistically significant dose-related association of phlegm and diesel exposure. There was a nonsignificant trend for cough and dyspnea, and no association with spirometry. Age- and smoking-adjusted rates of cough, phlegm, and dyspnea were 145, 159, and 93% of an external comparison population. Percent predicted flow rates showed statistically significant reductions, but the reductions were small and there were no dose-response relations. Percent predicted FEV1 and FVC were about 96% of predicted.

  4. Method for controlling exhaust gas heat recovery systems in vehicles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spohn, Brian L.; Claypole, George M.; Starr, Richard D

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of operating a vehicle including an engine, a transmission, an exhaust gas heat recovery (EGHR) heat exchanger, and an oil-to-water heat exchanger providing selective heat-exchange communication between the engine and transmission. The method includes controlling a two-way valve, which is configured to be set to one of an engine position and a transmission position. The engine position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the engine, but does not allow heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the oil-to-water heat exchanger. The transmission position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger, the oil-to-water heat exchanger, and the engine. The method also includes monitoring an ambient air temperature and comparing the monitored ambient air temperature to a predetermined cold ambient temperature. If the monitored ambient air temperature is greater than the predetermined cold ambient temperature, the two-way valve is set to the transmission position.

  5. Grout disposal facility vault exhauster: Technical background document on demonstration of best available control technology for toxics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Glantz, C.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Rittman, P.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Grout Disposal Facility (GDF) is currently operated on the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Site. The GDF is located near the east end of the Hanford Site`s 200 East operations area, and is used for the treatment and disposal of low-level radioactive liquid wastes. In the grout treatment process, selected radioactive wastes from double-shell tanks are mixed with grout-forming solids; the resulting grout slurry is pumped to near-surface concrete vaults for solidification and permanent disposal. As part of this treatment process, small amounts of toxic particles and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) may be released to the atmosphere through the GDF`s exhaust system. This analysis constitutes a Best Available Control Technology for Toxics (T-BACT) study, as required in the Washington Administrative Code (WAC 173-460) to support a Notice of Construction for the operation of the GDF exhaust system at a modified flow rate that exceeds the previously permitted value. This report accomplishes the following: assesses the potential emissions from the GDF; estimates air quality impacts to the public from toxic air pollutants; identifies control technologies that could reduce GDF emissions; evaluates impacts of the control technologies; and recommends appropriate emissions controls.

  6. Influence of EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) on Engine Components Durability & Lubricating Oil Condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mrs Rita; S. Pimpalkar

    Abstract––Diesel engines are extensively used in automotive systems due to their low fuel consumption and very low CO emissions. Despite of these advantages, diesel engines suffer from environmental and health drawbacks such as high levels of NOx and particulate matter. Exhaust Gas Recirculation ( EGR) is an effective technique which is being used widely to control the NOx emissions from diesel engines. However, the use of EGR leads to rise in soot emission and it causes the problems inside the engine like degradation of lubricating oil, enhanced engine component wear etc. Therefore, it requires a study of influence of EGR on engine components and lubricating oil. This can be achieved only with different experimental investigation. In the present work, Engine test and Tribology test with lubricants ( Without EGR and With EGR) have been carried out to evaluate the effect of EGR on tribo- characteristics of engine components and lubricating oil condition. Influencing parameters like load, speed, temperature were selected as per the engine components operating condition. Friction and wear characteristics were measured and compared with the actual engine wear results to validate the test parameters. I.

  7. Absolute Efficiency Calibration of a Beta-Gamma Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, Matthew W.; Ely, James H.; Haas, Derek A.; Hayes, James C.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Lidey, Lance S.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract- Identification and quantification of nuclear events such as the Fukushima reactor failure and nuclear explosions rely heavily on the accurate measurement of radioxenon releases. One radioxenon detection method depends on detecting beta-gamma coincident events paired with a stable xenon measurement to determine the concentration of a plume. Like all measurements, the beta-gamma method relies on knowing the detection efficiency for each isotope measured. Several methods are commonly used to characterize the detection efficiency for a beta-gamma detector. The most common method is using a NIST certified sealed source to determine the efficiency. A second method determines the detection efficiencies relative to an already characterized detector. Finally, a potentially more accurate method is to use the expected sample to perform an absolute efficiency calibration; in the case of a beta-gamma detector, this relies on radioxenon gas samples. The complication of the first method is it focuses only on the gamma detectors and does not offer a solution for determining the beta efficiency. The second method listed is not similarly constrained, however it relies on another detector to have a well-known efficiency calibration. The final method using actual radioxenon samples to make an absolute efficiency determination is the most desirable, but until recently it was not possible to produce all four isotopically pure radioxenon. The production, by University of Texas (UT), of isotopically pure radioxenon has allowed the beta-gamma detectors to be calibrated using the absolute efficiency method. The first four radioxenon isotope calibration will be discussed is this paper.

  8. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  9. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

    2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  10. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

    2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  11. Quantum bath refrigeration towards absolute zero: unattainability principle challenged

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michal Kolá?; David Gelbwaser-Klimovsky; Robert Alicki; Gershon Kurizki

    2012-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A minimal model of a quantum refrigerator (QR), i.e. a periodically phase-flipped two-level system permanently coupled to a finite-capacity bath (cold bath) and an infinite heat dump (hot bath), is introduced and used to investigate the cooling of the cold bath towards the absolute zero (T=0). Remarkably, the temperature scaling of the cold-bath cooling rate reveals that it does not vanish as T->0 for certain realistic quantized baths, e.g. phonons in strongly disordered media (fractons) or quantized spin-waves in ferromagnets (magnons). This result challenges Nernst's third-law formulation known as the unattainability principle.

  12. Precision Absolute Beam Current Measurement of Low Power Electron Beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, M. M.; Bevins, M. E.; Degtiarenko, P.; Freyberger, A.; Krafft, G. A.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precise measurements of low power CW electron beam current for the Jefferson Lab Nuclear Physics program have been performed using a Tungsten calorimeter. This paper describes the rationale for the choice of the calorimeter technique, as well as the design and calibration of the device. The calorimeter is in use presently to provide a 1% absolute current measurement of CW electron beam with 50 to 500 nA of average beam current and 1-3 GeV beam energy. Results from these recent measurements will also be presented.

  13. Optimized replica gas estimation of absolute integrals and partition functions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minh, D. (Biosciences Division)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In contrast with most Monte Carlo integration algorithms, which are used to estimate ratios, the replica gas identities recently introduced by Adib enable the estimation of absolute integrals and partition functions using multiple copies of a system and normalized transition functions. Here, an optimized form is presented. After generalizing a replica gas identity with an arbitrary weighting function, we obtain a functional form that has the minimal asymptotic variance for samples from two replicas and is provably good for a larger number. This equation is demonstrated to improve the convergence of partition function estimates in a two-dimensional Ising model.

  14. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  15. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William (Overland Park, KS)

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  16. Knock mitigation on boosted Controlled Auto-Ignition engines with fuel stratification and Exhaust Gas Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang, Wen, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research is carried out to understand the mechanism of using fuel stratification and Exhaust Gas Recycling (EGR) for knock mitigation on boosted Controlled Auto-Ignition (CAl) engines. Experiments were first conducted ...

  17. Taxation and the Extraction of Exhaustible Resources: Evidence From California Oil Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Nirupama S.

    Rapid increases in oil prices in 2008 led some to call for special taxes on the oil industry. Because oil is an exhaustible resource, however, the effects of excise taxes on production or on reported producer profits may ...

  18. Selective Catalytic Oxidation (SCO) of NH3 to N2 for Hot Exhaust...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Oxidation (SCO) of NH3 to N2 for Hot Exhaust Treatment Investigation of a series of transition metal oxides and precious metal based catalysts for ammonia selective oxidation at...

  19. Performance characteristics of a low pressure cyclone for axial-flow fan exhausts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simpson, Shay Lynn

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on axial-flow fan exhausts to significantly reduce particulate emissions. Average emission concentrations, cut-point diameters, PMIO emission concentrations, and fractional efficiencies from this cyclone operating at different cyclone inlet velocities...

  20. Control of Charge Dilution in Turbocharged Diesel Engines via Exhaust Valve Timing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines high level of EGR can be used to indirectly control combustion initiation and HCCI engines [7, 10]. Conventional external EGR (eEGR), relies on a pressure drop from exhaust manifold

  1. Turbine exhaust diffuser with region of reduced flow area and outer boundary gas flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orosa, John

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An exhaust diffuser system and method for a turbine engine. The outer boundary may include a region in which the outer boundary extends radially inwardly toward the hub structure and may direct at least a portion of an exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the hub structure. At least one gas jet is provided including a jet exit located on the outer boundary. The jet exit may discharge a flow of gas downstream substantially parallel to an inner surface of the outer boundary to direct a portion of the exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the outer boundary to effect a radially outward flow of at least a portion of the exhaust gas flow toward the outer boundary to balance an aerodynamic load between the outer and inner boundaries.

  2. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Casey, D. T. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Frenje, J. A. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Gatu Johnson, M. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Seguin, F. H. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Li, C. K. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Petrasso, R. D. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Glebov, V. Yu. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Katz, J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Magoon, J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Sangster, T. C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Shoup, M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Ulreich, J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Ashabranner, R. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bionta, R. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carpenter, A. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Felker, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Khater, H. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacKinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McKernan, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moran, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yeoman, M. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zacharias, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leeper, R. J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fletcher, K. [State Univ. of New York at Geneseo, NY (United States); Farrell, M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Jasion, D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Kilkenny, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Paguio, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, iontemperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  3. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; et al

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, iontemperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describesmore »ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.« less

  4. A WEAR MODEL FOR DIESEL ENGINE EXHAUST VALVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work summarized here comprises the concluding effort of a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies. It supports the development of a better understanding of advanced diesel engine designs in which enhanced power density, energy efficiency, and emissions control place increasing demands upon the durability of engine materials. Many kinds of metallic alloys are used in engines depending on the operating stresses, temperatures, and chemical environments. Exhaust valves, for example, are subjected to high temperatures and repetitive surface contacts that place demands on durability and frictional characteristics of the materials. Valves must continue to seal the combustion chamber properly for thousands of hours of cyclic engine operation and under varying operating conditions. It was the focus of this effort to understand the wear processes in the valve-seat area and to develop a model for the surface deformation and wear of that important interface. An annotated bibliography is provided to illustrate efforts to understand valve wear and to investigate the factors of engine operation that affect its severity and physical manifestation. The project for which this modeling effort was the final task, involved construction of a high-temperature repetitive impact test system as well as basic tribology studies of the combined processes of mechanical wear plus oxidation at elevated temperatures. Several publications resulted from this work, and are cited in this report. The materials selected for the experimental work were high-performance alloys based on nickel and cobalt. In some cases, engine-tested exhaust valves were made available for wear analysis and to ensure that the modes of surface damage produced in experiments were simulative of service. New, production-grade exhaust valves were also used to prepare test specimens for experimental work along with the other alloy samples. Wear analysis of valves and seats run for hundreds of hours in heavy-duty diesels provided insights into the kinds of complexity that the contact conditions in engines can produce, and suggested the physical basis for the current approach to modeling. The model presented here involves four terms, two representing the valve response and two for its mating seat material. The model's structure assumes that wear that takes place under a complex combination of plastic deformation, tangential shear, and oxidation. Tribolayers form, are removed, and may reform. Layer formation affects the friction forces in the interface, and in turn, the energy available to do work on the materials to cause wear. To provide friction data for the model at various temperatures, sliding contact experiments were conducted from 22 to 850 C in a pin-on-disk apparatus at ORNL. In order to account for the behavior of different materials and engine designs, parameters in all four terms of the model can be adjusted to account for wear-in and incubation periods before the dominant wear processes evolve to their steady-state rates. For example, the deformation rate is assumed to be maximum during the early stages of operation, and then, due to material work-hardening and the increase in nominal contact area (which reduces the load per unit area), decreases to a lower rate at long times. Conversely, the rate of abrasion increases with time or number of cycles due to the build-up of oxides and tribo-layers between contact surfaces. The competition between deformation and abrasion results in complex, non-linear behavior of material loss per cycle of operation. Furthermore, these factors are affected by valve design features, such as the angle of incline of the valve seat. Several modeling scenarios are presented to demonstrate how the wear profile versus number of cycles changes in response to: (a) different relative abrasion rates of the seat and valve materials, (b) the friction coefficient as a function of temperature, (c) the relative deformation contribution of valve and seat materials, and (d) an interruption in the dominant we

  5. Low-pressure-ratio regenerative exhaust-heated gas turbine. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tampe, L.A.; Frenkel, R.G.; Kowalick, D.J.; Nahatis, H.M.; Silverstein, S.M.; Wilson, D.G.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A design study of coal-burning gas-turbine engines using the exhaust-heated cycle and state-of-the-art components has been completed. In addition, some initial experiments on a type of rotary ceramic-matrix regenerator that would be used to transfer heat from the products of coal combustion in the hot turbine exhaust to the cool compressed air have been conducted. Highly favorable results have been obtained on all aspects on which definite conclusions could be drawn.

  6. automotive exhaust emission: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hybrid electric powertrains and automotive fuel cells. In each case, fundamental models are discussed requirements and mandates on greenhouse gas emissions such as CO2,...

  7. Absolute Values of Neutrino Masses: Status and Prospects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Bilenky; C. Giunti; J. A. Grifols; E. Masso

    2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Compelling evidences in favor of neutrino masses and mixing obtained in the last years in Super-Kamiokande, SNO, KamLAND and other neutrino experiments made the physics of massive and mixed neutrinos a frontier field of research in particle physics and astrophysics. There are many open problems in this new field. In this review we consider the problem of the absolute values of neutrino masses, which apparently is the most difficult one from the experimental point of view. We discuss the present limits and the future prospects of beta-decay neutrino mass measurements and neutrinoless double-beta decay. We consider the important problem of the calculation of nuclear matrix elements of neutrinoless double-beta decay and discuss the possibility to check the results of different model calculations of the nuclear matrix elements through their comparison with the experimental data. We discuss the upper bound of the total mass of neutrinos that was obtained recently from the data of the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey and other cosmological data and we discuss future prospects of the cosmological measurements of the total mass of neutrinos. We discuss also the possibility to obtain information on neutrino masses from the observation of the ultra high-energy cosmic rays (beyond the GZK cutoff). Finally, we review the main aspects of the physics of core-collapse supernovae, the limits on the absolute values of neutrino masses from the observation of SN1987A neutrinos and the future prospects of supernova neutrino detection.

  8. Thermoelectric generators incorporating phase-change materials for waste heat recovery from engine exhaust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meisner, Gregory P; Yang, Jihui

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermoelectric devices, intended for placement in the exhaust of a hydrocarbon fuelled combustion device and particularly suited for use in the exhaust gas stream of an internal combustion engine propelling a vehicle, are described. Exhaust gas passing through the device is in thermal communication with one side of a thermoelectric module while the other side of the thermoelectric module is in thermal communication with a lower temperature environment. The heat extracted from the exhaust gasses is converted to electrical energy by the thermoelectric module. The performance of the generator is enhanced by thermally coupling the hot and cold junctions of the thermoelectric modules to phase-change materials which transform at a temperature compatible with the preferred operating temperatures of the thermoelectric modules. In a second embodiment, a plurality of thermoelectric modules, each with a preferred operating temperature and each with a uniquely-matched phase-change material may be used to compensate for the progressive lowering of the exhaust gas temperature as it traverses the length of the exhaust pipe.

  9. Exhaust-gas recirculation for retrofit NOx control on natural gas engines. Topical report, January-April 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urban, C.M.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data on exhaust-gas recirculation obtained from Tenneco Gas Transportation Company were reviewed and analyzed, and a basic EGR system design and cost estimate were developed. EGR can provide practical NOx reductions of up to 50% in 2-cycle natural gas engines. The amount of NO reduction achievable is dependent on the initial baseline NOx emissions of the engine. On the basis of NOx reduction per unit of costs, EGR was found to be more cost effective than selective catalytic reduction. EGR is considered to provide a practical retrofit NOx control method in applications where the level of NOx control achievable with EGR meet regulatory requirements. One specific application is emissions offset to enable installation of additional engine horsepower. Also, EGR could become the primary NOx control method for any regulation in which costs are a major consideration.

  10. Model Checking Software, 10th International SPIN Workshop, Portland, OR, USA, May 2003, Proceedings A Requirements Patterns-Driven Approach to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Betty H.C.

    Diesel Corporation. Please contact this author for all correspondences. #12;requirements and high filter system to reduce the amount of soot emitted from diesel truck exhaust. Given the safety

  11. The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimize Fuel Economy and Minimize Emission in Engines Operating on E85 Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Ko-Jen

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes activities conducted for the project “The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimized Fuel Economy and Minimize Emissions in Engines Operating on E85 Fuel” under COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC26-07NT43271, which are as outlined in the STATEMENT OF PROJECT OBJECTIVES (SOPO) dated March 2007 and in the supplemental SOPO dated October 2010. The project objective was to develop and demonstrate an internal combustion engine that is optimized for E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline) fuel operation to achieve substantially improved fuel economy while operating with E85 fuel and that is also production viable in the near- to medium-term. The key engine technology selected for research and development was turbocharging, which is known to improve fuel economy thru downsizing and is in particular capable of exploiting ethanol fuel’s characteristics of high octane number and high latent heat of vaporization. The engine further integrated synergistic efficiency improving technologies of cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), direct fuel injection and dual continuously variable intake and exhaust cam phasers. On the vehicle level, fuel economy was furthered thru powertrain system optimization by mating a state-of-the-art six-speed automatic transmission to the engine. In order to achieve the project’s objective of near- to medium-term production viability, it was essential to develop the engine to be flex-fuel capable of operating with fuels ranging from E0 (0% ethanol and 100% gasoline) to E85 and to use three-way type of catalyst technology for exhaust aftertreatment. Within these scopes, various technologies were developed through systems approach to focus on ways to help accelerate catalyst light-off. Significant amount of development took place during the course of the project within General Motors, LLC. Many prototype flex-fuel engines were designed, built and developed with various hardware configurations selected to achieve the project goals. Several flex-fuel demonstration vehicles were designed and built for carrying out calibration development and final testing to quantify the technology merits. Based on the extensive test results collected from dynamometer and vehicle testing, the fuel economy benefits of cooled EGR from the intended level of turbocharger technology were quantified. When combined with turbo downsizing, the FE benefits are considered large enough for E0 fuel as well as for E85 fuel to warrant further development of the technology beyond the current proof-of-concept level to a level that can meet production driveability quality and durability requirements in order to meet customers’ expectations. Cold-start cart test results from the emissions segment of the project were positive, confirming the assumption of faster thermal response of turbo exhaust system for emissions reductions for both E0 and E85 fuels. Vehicle emissions test results directionally correlated to the cold-start cart findings. The limited number of test runs did demonstrate the potentials of meeting stringent emission standards, however, they did not comprehend the factors such as hardware variability and long-term durability, 3 which are essential for mass production to satisfy customers’ expectations. It is therefore recommended, moving forward, durability concerns over turbocharger, EGR system and aftertreatment system, which would likely impact production viability, should be addressed. The data moreover suggested that further FE increase is likely with turbocharger technology advancement.

  12. Hanford Site radionuclide national emission standards for hazardous ari pollutants registered and and unregistered stack (powered exhaust) source assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, W.E.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On February 3, 1993, US DOE Richland Operations Office received a Compliance Order and Information Request from the Director of the Air and Toxics Div. of US EPA, Region X. The compliance order requires the Richland Operations Office to evaluate all radionuclide emission points at the Hanford site to determine which are subject to the continuous emission measurement requirements in Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 61, Subpart H, and to continuously measure radionuclide emissions in accordance with 40 CFR 61.93. The Information Request required The provision of a written compliance plan to meet the requirements of the compliance order. A compliance plan was submitted to EPA, Region X, on April 30, 1993. It set as one of the milestones, the complete assessment of the Hanford Site 84 stacks registered with the Washington State Department of Health, by December 17, 1993. This milestone was accomplished. The compliance plan also called for reaching a Federal Facility Compliance Agreement; this was reached on February 7, 1994, between DOE Richland Operations and EPA, Region X. The milestone to assess the unregistered stacks (powered exhaust) by August 31, 1994, was met. This update presents assessments for 72 registered and 22 unregistered stacks with potential emissions > 0.1 mrem/yr.

  13. Method and apparatus for making absolute range measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sanders, Alvin J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for making absolute distance or ranging measurements using Fresnel diffraction. The invention employs a source of electromagnetic radiation having a known wavelength or wavelength distribution, which sends a beam of electromagnetic radiation through a screen at least partially opaque at the wavelength. The screen has an aperture sized so as to produce a Fresnel diffraction pattern. A portion of the beam travels through the aperture to a detector spaced some distance from the screen. The detector detects the central intensity of the beam as well as a set of intensities displaced from a center of the aperture. The distance from the source to the target can then be calculated based upon the known wavelength, aperture radius, and beam intensity.

  14. Absolute Values of Neutrino Masses implied by the Seesaw Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsujimoto, H

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is found that the seesaw mechanism not only explain the smallness of neutrino masses but also account for the large mixing angles simultaneously, once the unification of the neutrino Dirac mass matrix with that of up-quark sector is realized. We show that provided the Majorana masses have hierarchical structure as is seen in the up-quark sector, we can reduce the information about the absolute values of neutrino masses through the data set of neutrino experiments. The results for the light neutrino masses are $m_1:m_2:m_3\\approx 1:3:17$ $(m_1\\simeq m_2:m_3\\approx 1.2:1)$ in the case of normal mass spectrum (inverted mass spectrum), and the heaviest Majorana mass turns out to be $m_3^R=1\\times 10^{15}$ GeV which just corresponds to the GUT scale.

  15. THE ABSOLUTE CALIBRATION OF THE EUV IMAGING SPECTROMETER ON HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Landi, Enrico [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the absolute calibration of the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode by comparing EIS full-disk mosaics with irradiance observations from the EUV Variability Experiment on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We also use extended observations of the quiet corona above the limb combined with a simple differential emission measure model to establish new effective area curves that incorporate information from the most recent atomic physics calculations. We find that changes to the EIS instrument sensitivity are a complex function of both time and wavelength. We find that the sensitivity is decaying exponentially with time and that the decay constants vary with wavelength. The EIS short wavelength channel shows significantly longer decay times than the long wavelength channel.

  16. The chromospherically active binary star EI Eridani I. Absolute dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Washuettl; K. G. Strassmeier; T. Granzer; M. Weber; K. Oláh

    2008-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed determination of the astrophysical parameters of the chromospherically active binary star EI Eridani. Our new radial velocities allow to improve the set of orbital elements and reveal long-term variations of the barycentric velocity. A possible third-body orbit with a period of approximately 19 years is presented. Absolute parameters are determined in combination with the Hipparcos parallax. EI Eri's inclination angle of the rotational axis is confined to 56.0 plus/minus 4.5 degrees, its luminosity class IV is confirmed by its radius of 2.37 plus/minus 0.12 R_Sun. A comparison to theoretical stellar evolutionary tracks suggests a mass of 1.09 plus/minus 0.05 M_Sun and an age of approximately 6.15 Gyr. The present investigation is the basis of our long-term Doppler imaging study of its stellar surface.

  17. Conductance and absolutely continuous spectrum of 1D samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent Bruneau; Vojkan Jakši?; Yoram Last; Claude-Alain Pillet

    2015-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We characterize the absolutely continuous spectrum of the one-dimensional Schr\\"odinger operators $h=-\\Delta+v$ acting on $\\ell^2(\\mathbb{Z}_+)$ in terms of the limiting behavior of the Landauer-B\\"uttiker and Thouless conductances of the associated finite samples. The finite sample is defined by restricting $h$ to a finite interval $[1,L]\\cap\\mathbb{Z}_+$ and the conductance refers to the charge current across the sample in the open quantum system obtained by attaching independent electronic reservoirs to the sample ends. Our main result is that the conductances associated to an energy interval $I$ are non-vanishing in the limit $L\\to\\infty$ iff ${\\rm sp}_{\\rm ac}(h)\\cap I=\\emptyset$. We also discuss the relationship between this result and the Schr\\"odinger Conjecture.

  18. Upgrade of absolute extreme ultraviolet diagnostic on J-TEXT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, X. L.; Cheng, Z. F., E-mail: chengfe@hust.edu.cn; Hou, S. Y.; Zhuang, G.; Luo, J. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The absolute extreme ultraviolet (AXUV) diagnostic system is used for radiation observation on J-TEXT tokamak [J. Zhang, G. Zhuang, Z. J. Wang, Y. H. Ding, X. Q. Zhang, and Y. J. Tang, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 073509 (2010)]. The upgrade of the AXUV system is aimed to improve the spatial resolution and provide a three-dimensional image on J-TEXT. The new system consists of 12 AXUV arrays (4 AXUV16ELG arrays, 8 AXUV20ELG arrays). The spatial resolution in the cross-section is 21 mm for the AXUV16ELG arrays and 17 mm for the AXUV20ELG arrays. The pre-amplifier is also upgraded for a higher signal to noise ratio. By upgrading the AXUV imaging system, a more accurate observation on the radiation information is obtained.

  19. Absolute properties of the eclipsing binary star IM Persei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lacy, Claud H. Sandberg [Physics Department, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Torres, Guillermo [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Fekel, Francis C.; Muterspaugh, Matthew W. [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States); Southworth, John, E-mail: clacy@uark.edu, E-mail: gtorres@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: fekel@evans.tsuniv.edu, E-mail: matthew1@coe.tsuniv.edu, E-mail: astro.js@keele.ac.uk [Astrophysics Group, Keele University, Staffordshire, ST5 5BG (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IM Per is a detached A7 eccentric eclipsing binary star. We have obtained extensive measurements of the light curve (28,225 differential magnitude observations) and radial velocity curve (81 spectroscopic observations) which allow us to fit orbits and determine the absolute properties of the components very accurately: masses of 1.7831 ± 0.0094 and 1.7741 ± 0.0097 solar masses, and radii of 2.409 ± 0.018 and 2.366 ± 0.017 solar radii. The orbital period is 2.25422694(15) days and the eccentricity is 0.0473(26). A faint third component was detected in the analysis of the light curves, and also directly observed in the spectra. The observed rate of apsidal motion is consistent with theory (U = 151.4 ± 8.4 year). We determine a distance to the system of 566 ± 46 pc.

  20. Method of and apparatus for removing sulfur oxides from exhaust gases formed by combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voeste, T.

    1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is described for removing sulfur oxides from exhaust gas formed by combustion particularly exhaust gas from an electricity generating power plant. The exhaust gas flows through a reaction zone which operates like a spray dryer. A purifying liquor consisting of an aqueous solution of sodium carbonate and/or sodium bicarbonate is sprayed into the reaction zone, in which the heat content of the exhaust gases causes virtually all of the water content of the purifying liquor to be evaporated. The exhaust gas is subsequently passed through a filter. Anhydrous solids are withdrawn from the reaction zone and the filter and contain at least 75% of sodium sulfite, sodium sulfate and sodium chloride and are processed to form sodium carbonate. To that end the solids are dissolved and sulfite is oxidized to form sulfate so that a solution that contains sodium sulfate and sodium chloride is formed. The sulfate is separated from that solution and the remaining solution is used in the recovery of sodium carbonate by the solvay process.

  1. Interpretation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Diesel Exhaust Photooxidation in an Environmental Chamber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakao, Shunsuke; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Nguyen, Anh; Jung, Hee-Jung; Cocker, David R.

    2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from diesel exhaust in a smog chamber was investigated. Particle volume measurement based on mobility diameter is shown to underestimate SOA formation from diesel exhaust due to the external void space of agglomerate particles, in which case mass-based measurement technique is necessary. Rapid determination of particle effective density as a function of particle mass was performed by an Aerosol Particle Mass analyzer – Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (APM-SMPS) to obtain particle mass concentration and fractal dimension. Continuous aging of aerosol was observed in terms of atomic ratio (O/C), from 0.05 to 0.25 in 12 hours, underscoring the importance of multi-generational oxidation of low-volatile organic vapors emitted from diesel engine as the significant source of oxygenated SOA. Experimental conditions possibly have strong impacts on physical evolution of diesel particulates in a smog chamber. Higher particle effective densities were observed when raw exhaust was injected into a full bag as opposed to filling a bag with diluted exhaust using an ejector diluter. When longer transfer line was used for injecting diesel exhaust into the smog chamber, rapid particle coagulation was observed, leading to increasing particle volume concentration in dark while its mass concentration is decreasing.

  2. Gas separation process using membranes with permeate sweep to remove CO.sub.2 from gaseous fuel combustion exhaust

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijmans Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C. (Menlo Park, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas separation process for treating exhaust gases from the combustion of gaseous fuels, and gaseous fuel combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the exhaust stream to a carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the exhaust gas stream across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas back to the combustor.

  3. Absolute measurement of the viscosity of classical and quantum fluids by rotating-cylinder viscometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, R.J.; LaMar, M.M.

    1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the use of rotating-cylinder viscometers to determine absolute shear viscosities of classical fluids and of helium II in the context of past and current knowledge of the stability and flow of these fluids between concentric cylinders. We identify a problem in measuring the absolute viscosity when the inner cylinder is rotating and the outer cylinder is at rest. We conclude by discussing the design of viscometers for absolute viscosity measurements in helium I and helium II.

  4. High-Octane Fuel from Refinery Exhaust Gas: Upgrading Refinery Off-Gas to High-Octane Alkylate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Exelus is developing a method to convert olefins from oil refinery exhaust gas into alkylate, a clean-burning, high-octane component of gasoline. Traditionally, olefins must be separated from exhaust before they can be converted into another source of useful fuel. Exelus’ process uses catalysts that convert the olefin to alkylate without first separating it from the exhaust. The ability to turn up to 50% of exhaust directly into gasoline blends could result in an additional 46 million gallons of gasoline in the U.S. each year.

  5. Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, and Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies on the AFDC (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodt-Giles, D.

    2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation covers new content available on the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicle Data Center regarding diesel vehicles, diesel exhaust fluid, and selective catalytic reduction technologies.

  6. Further Developments of a Robust Absolute Calibration Method Utilizing Beta/Gamma Coincidence Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, Justin I.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Ely, James H.; Haas, Derek A.; Schrom, Brian T.; Warren, Glen A.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a conference proceedings from the MARC conference. It discusses the research conducted into an alternative method of detector calibration and absolute activity measurement.

  7. absolute single-molecule entropies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Last Page Topic Index 1 A simulation method for calculating the absolute entropy and free energy of fluids: Application to Chemistry Websites Summary: A simulation method for...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute zero temperature Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Quantum Gases Group Collection: Physics 47 Radiometric Modeling of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction of their Absolute Temperature from Summary: of...

  9. Turbine exhaust diffuser flow path with region of reduced total flow area

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orosa, John A.

    2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An exhaust diffuser system and method for a turbine engine includes an inner boundary and an outer boundary with a flow path defined therebetween. The inner boundary is defined at least in part by a hub that has an upstream end and a downstream end. The outer boundary has a region in which the outer boundary extends radially inward toward the hub. The region can begin at a point that is substantially aligned with the downstream end of the hub or, alternatively, at a point that is proximately upstream of the downstream end of the hub. The region directs at least a portion of an exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the hub. As a result, the exhaust diffuser system and method can achieve the performance of a long hub system while enjoying the costs of a short hub system.

  10. Turbine exhaust diffuser with a gas jet producing a coanda effect flow control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orosa, John; Montgomery, Matthew

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An exhaust diffuser system and method for a turbine engine includes an inner boundary and an outer boundary with a flow path defined therebetween. The inner boundary is defined at least in part by a hub structure that has an upstream end and a downstream end. The outer boundary may include a region in which the outer boundary extends radially inward toward the hub structure and may direct at least a portion of an exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the hub structure. The hub structure includes at least one jet exit located on the hub structure adjacent to the upstream end of the tail cone. The jet exit discharges a flow of gas substantially tangential to an outer surface of the tail cone to produce a Coanda effect and direct a portion of the exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the inner boundary.

  11. Catalysts, systems and methods to reduce NOX in an exhaust gas stream

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Castellano, Christopher R. (Ringoes, NJ); Moini, Ahmad (Princeton, NJ); Koermer, Gerald S. (Basking Ridge, NJ); Furbeck, Howard (Hamilton, NJ)

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalysts, systems and methods are described to reduce NO.sub.x emissions of an internal combustion engine. In one embodiment, an emissions treatment system for an exhaust stream is provided having an SCR catalyst comprising silver tungstate on an alumina support. The emissions treatment system may be used for the treatment of exhaust streams from diesel engines and lean burn gasoline engines. An emissions treatment system may further comprise an injection device operative to dispense a hydrocarbon reducing agent upstream of the catalyst.

  12. Method and apparatus to selectively reduce NO.sub.x in an exhaust gas feedstream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmieg, Steven J. (Troy, MI); Blint, Richard J. (Shelby Township, MI); Den, Ling (Sterling Heights, MI); Viola, Michael B. (Macomb Township, MI); Lee, Jong-Hwan (Rochester Hills, MI)

    2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are described to selectively reduce NO.sub.x emissions of an internal combustion engine. An exhaust aftertreatment system includes an injection device operative to dispense a hydrocarbon reductant upstream of a silver-alumina catalytic reactor device. A control system determines a NO.sub.x concentration and hydrocarbon/NOx ratio based upon selected parameters of the exhaust gas feedstream and dispenses hydrocarbon reductant during lean engine operation. Included is a method to control elements of the feedstream during lean operation. The hydrocarbon reductant may include engine fuel.

  13. Absolute Values of Neutrino Masses implied by the Seesaw Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Tsujimoto

    2005-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    It is found that the seesaw mechanism not only explain the smallness of neutrino masses but also account for the large mixing angles simultaneously, even if the unification of the neutrino Dirac mass matrix with that of up-type quark sector is realized. We show that provided the Majorana masses have hierarchical structure as is seen in the up-type quark sector and all mass matrices are real, we can reduce the information about the absolute values of neutrino masses through the data set of neutrino experiments. Especially for $\\theta_{13}=0$, we found that the neutrino masses are decided as $m_1:m_2:m_3\\approx 1:3:17$ or $1:50:250$ ($m_1\\simeq m_2:m_3\\approx 3:1$ or $12:1$) in the case of normal mass spectrum (inverted mass spectrum), and the greatest Majorana mass turns out to be $m_3^R=1\\times 10^{15}$ GeV which just corresponds to the GUT scale. Including the decoupling effects caused by three singlet neutrinos, we also perform a renormalization group analysis to fix the neutrino Yukawa coupling matrix at low energy.

  14. INTERPRETATION OF THE ARCADE 2 ABSOLUTE SKY BRIGHTNESS MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seiffert, M.; Levin, S. M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Fixsen, D. J.; Kogut, A.; Wollack, E. [University of Maryland, Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Limon, M. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550W 120th St., Mail Code 5247, New York, NY 10027-6902 (United States); Lubin, P. M. [Physics Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Mirel, P. [Wyle Informations Systems, Code 665, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Singal, J. [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Villela, T.; Wuensche, C. A., E-mail: Michael.D.Seiffert@jpl.nasa.gov [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, Divisao de Astrofisica, Caixa Postal 515, 12245-970-Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We use absolutely calibrated data between 3 and 90 GHz from the 2006 balloon flight of the ARCADE 2 instrument, along with previous measurements at other frequencies, to constrain models of extragalactic emission. Such emission is a combination of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) monopole, Galactic foreground emission, the integrated contribution of radio emission from external galaxies, any spectral distortions present in the CMB, and any other extragalactic source. After removal of estimates of foreground emission from our own Galaxy, and an estimated contribution of external galaxies, we present fits to a combination of the flat-spectrum CMB and potential spectral distortions in the CMB. We find 2{sigma} upper limits to CMB spectral distortions of {mu} < 6 x 10{sup -4} and |Y{sub ff}| < 1 x 10{sup -4}. We also find a significant detection of a residual signal beyond that, which can be explained by the CMB plus the integrated radio emission from galaxies estimated from existing surveys. This residual signal may be due to an underestimated galactic foreground contribution, an unaccounted for contribution of a background of radio sources, or some combination of both. The residual signal is consistent with emission in the form of a power law with amplitude 18.4 {+-} 2.1 K at 0.31 GHz and a spectral index of -2.57 {+-} 0.05.

  15. Method and apparatus for making absolute range measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Key, W.S.; Sanders, A.J.; Earl, D.D.

    1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for making absolute distance or ranging measurements using Fresnel diffraction. The invention employs a source of electromagnetic radiation having a known wavelength or wavelength distribution, which sends a beam of electromagnetic radiation through an object which causes it to be split (hereinafter referred to as a beam splitter''), and then to a target. The beam is reflected from the target onto a screen containing an aperture spaced a known distance from the beam splitter. The aperture is sized so as to produce a Fresnel diffraction pattern. A portion of the beam travels through the aperture to a detector, spaced a known distance from the screen. The detector detects the central intensity of the beam. The distance from the object which causes the beam to be split to the target can then be calculated based upon the known wavelength, aperture radius, beam intensity, and distance from the detector to the screen. Several apparatus embodiments are disclosed for practicing the method embodiments of the present invention. 9 figs.

  16. Method and apparatus for making absolute range measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, Stephen W. (Knoxville, TN); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Key, William S. (Knoxville, TN); Sanders, Alvin J. (Knoxville, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for making absolute distance or ranging measurements using Fresnel diffraction. The invention employs a source of electromagnetic radiation having a known wavelength or wavelength distribution, which sends a beam of electromagnetic radiation through an object which causes it to be split (hereinafter referred to as a "beamsplitter"), and then to a target. The beam is reflected from the target onto a screen containing an aperture spaced a known distance from the beamsplitter. The aperture is sized so as to produce a Fresnel diffraction pattern. A portion of the beam travels through the aperture to a detector, spaced a known distance from the screen. The detector detects the central intensity of the beam. The distance from the object which causes the beam to be split to the target can then be calculated based upon the known wavelength, aperture radius, beam intensity, and distance from the detector to the screen. Several apparatus embodiments are disclosed for practicing the method embodiments of the present invention.

  17. Precision absolute-value amplifier for a precision voltmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hearn, W.E.; Rondeau, D.J.

    1982-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Bipolar inputs are afforded by the plus inputs of first and second differential input amplifiers. A first gain determining resistor is connected between the minus inputs of the differential amplifiers. First and second diodes are connected between the respective minus inputs and the respective outputs of the differential amplifiers. First and second FETs have their gates connected to the outputs of the amplifiers, while their respective source and drain circuits are connected between the respective minus inputs and an output lead extending to a load resistor. The output current through the load resistor is proportional to the absolute value of the input voltage difference between the bipolar input terminals. A third differential amplifier has its plus input terminal connected to the load resistor. A second gain determining resistor is connected between the minus input of the third differential amplifier and a voltage source. A third FET has its gate connected to the output of the third amplifier. The source and drain circuit of the third transistor is connected between the minus input of the third amplifier and a voltage-frequency converter, constituting an output device. A polarity detector is also provided, comprising a pair of transistors having their inputs connected to the outputs of the first and second differential amplifiers. The outputs of the polarity detector are connected to gates which switch the output of the voltage-frequency converter between up and down counting outputs.

  18. Precision absolute value amplifier for a precision voltmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hearn, William E. (Berkeley, CA); Rondeau, Donald J. (El Sobrante, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bipolar inputs are afforded by the plus inputs of first and second differential input amplifiers. A first gain determining resister is connected between the minus inputs of the differential amplifiers. First and second diodes are connected between the respective minus inputs and the respective outputs of the differential amplifiers. First and second FETs have their gates connected to the outputs of the amplifiers, while their respective source and drain circuits are connected between the respective minus inputs and an output lead extending to a load resister. The output current through the load resister is proportional to the absolute value of the input voltage difference between the bipolar input terminals. A third differential amplifier has its plus input terminal connected to the load resister. A second gain determining resister is connected between the minus input of the third differential amplifier and a voltage source. A third FET has its gate connected to the output of the third amplifier. The source and drain circuit of the third transistor is connected between the minus input of the third amplifier and a voltage-frequency converter, constituting an output device. A polarity detector is also provided, comprising a pair of transistors having their inputs connected to the outputs of the first and second differential amplifiers. The outputs of the polarity detector are connected to gates which switch the output of the voltage-frequency converter between up and down counting outputs.

  19. The investigation of exhaust powered, automotive air cycle air conditioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holley, James Andrew

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    domestic automobiles and trucks because of its proven success. This system requires approximately 4 hp (2. 983 kW)[3] for operation snd employs a pressurized fluorinated hydrocarbon (R-12), hereafter fluorocarbon, as a refrigerant. Most of the research... extraction and avoid the use of a fluorocarbon refrigerant. The maJority of work involved with the new units has associated itself in the area of utilizing an absorption cycle or air cycle. The absorption air conditioning unit differs significantly from...

  20. A simulation method for calculating the absolute entropy and free energy of fluids: Application to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meirovitch, Hagai

    A simulation method for calculating the absolute entropy and free energy of fluids: Application is a general approach for calculating the absolute entropy and free energy by analyzing Boltzmann samples and the TIP3P model of water, and very good results for the free energy are obtained, as compared with results

  1. Free volume hypothetical scanning molecular dynamics method for the absolute free energy of liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meirovitch, Hagai

    Free volume hypothetical scanning molecular dynamics method for the absolute free energy of liquids for calculating the absolute entropy, S, and free energy, F, by analyzing Boltzmann samples obtained by Monte energy evaluation is a central issue in atomistic modeling.1­5 When the free energy is known, equilibrium

  2. Bayesian modelling of an absolute chronology for Egypt's 18th Dynasty by astrophysical and radiocarbon methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Bayesian modelling of an absolute chronology for Egypt's 18th Dynasty by astrophysical Egyptology, the establishment of an absolute chronology for Ancient Egypt has been an ambition which has contained lists of the kings who reigned in Egypt. The Palermo Stone, the Abydos reliefs and the Turin Canon

  3. Variability in Bioreactivity Linked to Changes in Size and Zeta Potential of Diesel Exhaust Particles in Human

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garfunkel, Eric

    Variability in Bioreactivity Linked to Changes in Size and Zeta Potential of Diesel Exhaust) nanoparticles have been used in Europe as diesel fuel additives (EnviroxTM ). We attempted to examine the effects of particles emitted from a diesel engine burning either diesel (diesel exhaust particles, DEP

  4. Exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by non-thermal arc discharge for NOx trap regeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by non- thermal arc discharge for NOx trap regeneration to the reforming of Diesel fuel with Diesel engine exhaust gas using a non-thermal plasma torch for NOx trap Diesel fuel reforming with hal-00617141,version1-17May2013 Author manuscript, published in "Energy

  5. Understanding the catalytic conversion of automobile exhaust emissions using model catalysts: CO+NO reaction on Pd(111)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    Understanding the catalytic conversion of automobile exhaust emissions using model catalysts: CO and the quantity of the exhaust gases originating from mobile sources such as automobile emissions by the automobile industry for emission control purposes due to its technical and economical advantages [2

  6. Noble gas impurity balance and exhaust model for DIII-D and JET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillis, D.L.; Hogan, J.; Wade, M.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hellermann, M. von; Ehrenberg, J.; Horton, L.; Koenig, R.; Morgan, P.; Saibene, G. [JET Joint Undertaking, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments to study the exhaust of noble gases (helium, neon) with cryopumping in DIII-D Advanced Divertor Program (ADP) configuration and in JET (Mk1 configuration) found significant differences in the global exhaust rate of helium, while efficient neon exhaust was observed in both machines. An attempt to better understand the basic processes governing the exhaust of noble gases in ELMy H-mode with cryopumping has been undertaken. Since divertor geometries investigated in the DIII-D and in the JET cases have significant differences, a comparative modeling study has been undertaken using the MIST core impurity transport code and the b2.5 time-independent divertor transport code. Photodiode measurements are used to determine ELM frequency, and charge-exchange recombination (CER) measurements are compared with the MIST ELM model to evaluate transport coefficients in the core plasma. A significant reduction in the anomalous diffusivities is found for the non-ELM component of radial transport without the need for a pinch velocity, and the model provides a more coherent description than the conventional ELM-averaged approach. Sensitivity to boundary conditions has been studied through establishment of a database of divertor enrichment cases using b2.5.

  7. Proceedings IEEE International Test Conference, Washington, DC, 1990 Generating Pseudo-Exhaustive Vectors for External Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellebrand, Sybille

    Proceedings IEEE International Test Conference, Washington, DC, 1990 Generating Pseudo-Exhaustive Vectors for External Testing S. Hellebrand, H.-J. Wunderlich, O. F. Haberl Institute of Computer Design. Germany Abstract In the past years special chips for external test have been suc- cessfully used

  8. Use of exhaust gas as sweep flow to enhance air separation membrane performance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutart, Charles H. (Washington, IL); Choi, Cathy Y. (Morton, IL)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An intake air separation system for an internal combustion engine is provided with purge gas or sweep flow on the permeate side of separation membranes in the air separation device. Exhaust gas from the engine is used as a purge gas flow, to increase oxygen flux in the separation device without increasing the nitrogen flux.

  9. Anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells operating in exhaust gases of thermal engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Anode supported single chamber solid oxide fuel cells operating in exhaust gases of thermal engine. Conventional solid oxide fuel cells are separated into two compartments containing each electrode split hydrocarbons, pollutant emissions reduction hal-01056363,version1-21Aug2014 #12;1. Introduction Solid oxide

  10. Experiments on the reduction of nitric oxide from exhaust gases by selective non-catalytic reactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narney, John Kenneth

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The simulated exhaust gas contained varying amounts of N2, 02, H20, CO, and NO and the reactor conditions were varied with regard to temperature, residence time, and mixing. The results of these experiments show that the effect of oxygen concentration and NH3...

  11. Zero discounting and optimal paths of depletion of an exhaustible resource with an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ...le of the optimal paths. We show that, in the Cobb-Douglas case, the ratio of the values of the resource and capitalZero discounting and optimal paths of depletion of an exhaustible resource with an amenity value Dasgupta­Heal­Solow model when the stock of natural capital is a direct argument of well-being, besides

  12. The Effect of Metal Salts on Quantification of Elemental and Organic Carbon in Diesel Exhaust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    The Effect of Metal Salts on Quantification of Elemental and Organic Carbon in Diesel Exhaust-loaded diesel samples. Estimated TC was calculated from the BC concentration measured by optical transmissometer and linear relationship between TC and BC, TC (µg)= 1.78 ×BC(µg) - 21.97, derived from diesel reference

  13. EFFECTS OF WATER SPRAYS AND SCRUBBER EXHAUST ON FACE METHANE CONCENTRATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saylor, John R.

    Chapter 65 EFFECTS OF WATER SPRAYS AND SCRUBBER EXHAUST ON FACE METHANE CONCENTRATIONS Ch.D. Taylor-mounted scrubber and water sprays can reduced methane levels at the face. The current research was conducted to determine how the sprays and scrubber interact to reduce methane levels, and what spray configurations

  14. Improving engine efficiency by extracting laser energy from hot exhaust gas RID A-1272-2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rostovtsev, Y. V.; Matsko, A. B.; Nayak, N.; Zubairy, M. Suhail; Scully, Marlan O.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1050-2947/2003/67~5!/053811~8!/$20.00 67 0538 g laser energy from hot exhaust gas ,1 M. S. Zubairy,1,2 and M. O. Scully 1,3,4 , Texas A&M University, Texas 77843-4242, USA m University, Islamabad, Pakistan s A&M University, Texas 77843, USA , D...

  15. With Exhaustible Resources, Can A Developing Country Escape From The Poverty Trap?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    With Exhaustible Resources, Can A Developing Country Escape From The Poverty Trap? Cuong Le Van is convex-concave, so that the economy may be locked into a poverty trap. We show that the extent to which the country will escape from the poverty trap depends, besides the interactions between its technology and its

  16. Diesel exhaust induced pulmonary and cardiovascular impairment: The role of hypertension intervention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kodavanti, Urmila P., E-mail: kodavanti.urmila@epa.gov [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL), Office of Research and Development (ORD), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Thomas, Ronald F.; Ledbetter, Allen D.; Schladweiler, Mette C.; Bass, Virginia; Krantz, Q. Todd; King, Charly [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL), Office of Research and Development (ORD), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Nyska, Abraham [Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Richards, Judy E. [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL), Office of Research and Development (ORD), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Andrews, Debora [Research Core Unit, NHEERL, ORD, U.S. EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States); Gilmour, M. Ian [Environmental Public Health Division, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL), Office of Research and Development (ORD), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency - EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711 (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) and associated gases is linked to cardiovascular impairments; however, the susceptibility of hypertensive individuals is poorly understood. The objectives of this study were (1) to determine cardiopulmonary effects of gas-phase versus whole-DE and (2) to examine the contribution of systemic hypertension in pulmonary and cardiovascular effects. Male Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats were treated with hydralazine to reduce blood pressure (BP) or L-NAME to increase BP. Spontaneously hypertensive (SH) rats were treated with hydralazine to reduce BP. Control and drug-pretreated rats were exposed to air, particle-filtered exhaust (gas), or whole DE (1500 ?g/m{sup 3}), 4 h/day for 2 days or 5 days/week for 4 weeks. Acute and 4-week gas and DE exposures increased neutrophils and ?-glutamyl transferase (?-GT) activity in lavage fluid of WKY and SH rats. DE (4 weeks) caused pulmonary albumin leakage and inflammation in SH rats. Two-day DE increased serum fatty acid binding protein-3 (FABP-3) in WKY. Marked increases occurred in aortic mRNA after 4-week DE in SH (eNOS, TF, tPA, TNF-?, MMP-2, RAGE, and HMGB-1). Hydralazine decreased BP in SH while L-NAME tended to increase BP in WKY; however, neither changed inflammation nor BALF ?-GT. DE-induced and baseline BALF albumin leakage was reduced by hydralazine in SH rats and increased by L-NAME in WKY rats. Hydralazine pretreatment reversed DE-induced TF, tPA, TNF-?, and MMP-2 expression but not eNOS, RAGE, and HMGB-1. ET-1 was decreased by HYD. In conclusion, antihypertensive drug treatment reduces gas and DE-induced pulmonary protein leakage and expression of vascular atherogenic markers. - Highlights: ? Acute diesel exhaust exposure induces pulmonary inflammation in healthy rats. ? In hypertensive rats diesel exhaust effects are seen only after long term exposure. ? Normalizing blood pressure reverses lung protein leakage caused by diesel exhaust. ? Normalizing blood pressure reverses atherogenic effects of diesel exhaust. ? Diesel exhaust and hydralazine cause similar aorta effect on vascular tone markers.

  17. Effect of Heat Exchanger Material and Fouling on Thermoelectric Exhaust Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Love, Norman [University of Texas, El Paso; Szybist, James P [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study is conducted in an effort to better understand and improve the performance of thermoelectric heat recovery systems for automotive use. For this purpose an experimental investigation of thermoelectrics in contact with clean and fouled heat exchangers of different materials is performed. The thermoelectric devices are tested on a bench-scale thermoelectric heat recovery apparatus that simulates automotive exhaust. The thermoelectric apparatus consists of a series of thermoelectric generators contacting a hot-side and a cold-side heat exchanger. The thermoelectric devices are tested with two different hot-side heat exchanger materials, stainless steel and aluminum, and at a range of simulated exhaust gas flowrates (40 to 150 slpm), exhaust gas temperatures (240 C and 280 C), and coolant-side temperatures (40 C and 80 C). It is observed that for higher exhaust gas flowrates, thermoelectric power output increases while overall system efficiency decreases. Degradation of the effectiveness of the EGR-type heat exchangers over a period of driving is also simulated by exposing the heat exchangers to diesel engine exhaust under thermophoretic conditions to form a deposit layer. For the fouled EGR-type heat exchangers, power output and system efficiency is observed to be significantly lower for all conditions tested. The study found, however, that heat exchanger material is the dominant factor in the ability of the system to convert heat to electricity with thermoelectric generators. This finding is thought to be unique to the heat exchangers used for this study, and not a universal trend for all system configurations.

  18. Literature review supporting assessment of potential radionuclides in the 291-Z exhaust ventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahoney, L.A.; Ballinger, M.Y.; Jette, S.J.; Thomas, L.M. Glissmeyer, J.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Davis, W.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This literature review was prepared to support a study conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory to assess the potential deposition and resuspension of radionuclides in the 291-Z ventilation exhaust building located in the 200 West Area of the US Department of Energy`s Hanford Project near Richland, Washington. The filtered ventilation air from three of the facilities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) complex are combined together in the 291-Z building before discharge through a common stack. These three facilities contributing filtered exhaust air to the discharge stream are (1) the PFP, also known as the Z-Plant or 234-5Z, (2) the Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF or 236-Z), and (3), the Waste Incinerator Building (WIB or 232-Z). The 291-Z building houses the exhaust fans that pull air from the 291-Z central collection plenum and exhausts the air to the stack. Section 2.0 of this report is a description of the physical characteristic of the ventilation system from the High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters to the exhaust stack. A description of the processes performed in the facilities that are vented through 291-Z is given in Section 3.0. The description focuses on the chemical and physical forms of potential aerosols given off from the unit operations. A timeline of the operations and events that may have affected the deposition of material in the ventilation system is shown. Aerosol and radiation measurements taken in previous studies are also discussed. Section 4.0 discusses the factors that influence particle deposition and adhesion. Mechanisms of attachment and resuspension are covered with specific attention to the PFP ducts. Conclusions and recommendations are given in Section 5.0.

  19. Sensing Requirements for Real-Time Monitoring and Control in Energy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Ruby N.

    of coal (syngas), requires physical and chemical sensors for exhaust gas monitoring as well as real-time control of the combustion process. Following a description of syngas production from coal, we outline species at 630 °C. Our SiC sensor can monitor the hydrogen concentration in a 350 °C simulated syngas

  20. Absolute frequency measurement of an SF6 two-photon line using a femtosecond optical comb and sum-frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Absolute frequency measurement of an SF6 two-photon line using a femtosecond optical comb and sum laser. The absolute frequency of a CO2 laser stabilized onto an SF6 two-photon line has been measured

  1. Effect of Gas Turbine Exhaust Temperature, Stack Temperature and Ambient Temperature on Overall Efficiency of Combine Cycle Power Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Abstract—The gas turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature play a very important role during the predication of the performance of combine cycle power plant. This paper covers parametric analysis of effects of gas turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature on the overall efficiency of combine cycle power plant keeping the gas turbine efficiency as well as steam turbine efficiency constant. The results shows that out of three variables i.e. turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature, the most dominating factor of increasing the overall efficiency of the combine cycle power plant is the stack temperature.

  2. Material and system for catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxide in an exhaust stream of a combustion process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gardner, Timothy J. (Albuquerque, NM); Lott, Stephen E. (Edgewood, NM); Lockwood, Steven J. (Albuquerque, NM); McLaughlin, Linda I. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A catalytic material of activated hydrous metal oxide doped with platinum, palladium, or a combination of these, and optionally containing an alkali or alkaline earth metal, that is effective for NO.sub.X reduction in an oxidizing exhaust stream from a combustion process is disclosed. A device for reduction of nitrogen oxides in an exhaust stream, particularly an automotive exhaust stream, the device having a substrate coated with the activated noble-metal doped hydrous metal oxide of the invention is also provided.

  3. Absolute vs. Intensity Limits for CO2 Emission Control: Performance Under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sue Wing, Ian.

    We elucidate the differences between absolute and intensity-based limits of CO2 emission when there is uncertainty about the future. We demonstrate that the two limits are identical under certainty, and rigorously establish ...

  4. Absolute Percent Error Based Fitness Functions for Evolving Forecast Models AndyNovobilski,Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Absolute Percent Error Based Fitness Functions for Evolving Forecast Models Andy computfi~gas a methodof data mining,is its intrinsic ability to drive modelselection accordingto a mixedset of criteria. Basedon natural selection, evolutionary computing utilizes evaluationof candidatesolutions

  5. E-Print Network 3.0 - absolute gamma ray Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: absolute gamma ray Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Characterizing the Memory Behavior of CompilerParallelized...

  6. Primary crossflow vortices, secondary absolute instabilities and their control in the rotating-disk boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Primary crossflow vortices, secondary absolute instabilities and their control in the rotating patterns of crossflow vortices are derived by employing asymptotic techniques. This approach accounts three-dimensional velocity profiles, are subject to inviscid crossflow in- stabilities and rapidly

  7. Effect of Gasoline Properties on Exhaust Emissions from Tier 2 Light-Duty Vehicles -- Final Report: Phase 3; July 28, 2008 - July 27, 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitney, K.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers work the Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) Office of Automotive Engineering has conducted for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and the Coordinating Research Council (CRC) in support of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct). Section 1506 of EPAct requires EPA to produce an updated fuel effects model representing the 2007 light - duty gasoline fleet, including determination of the emissions impacts of increased renewable fuel use. This report covers the exhaust emissions testing of 15 light-duty vehicles with 27 E0 through E20 test fuels, and 4 light-duty flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) on an E85 fuel, as part of the EPAct Gasoline Light-Duty Exhaust Fuel Effects Test Program. This program will also be referred to as the EPAct/V2/E-89 Program based on the designations used for it by the EPA, NREL, and CRC, respectively. It is expected that this report will be an attachment or a chapter in the overall EPAct/V2/E-89 Program report prepared by EPA and NREL.

  8. Role of Modeling When Designing for Absolute Energy Use Intensity Requirements in a Design-Build Framework: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, A.; Pless, S.; Guglielmetti, R.; Torcellini, P. A.; Okada, D.; Antia, P.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Research Support Facility was designed to use half the energy of an equivalent minimally code-compliant building, and to produce as much renewable energy as it consumes on an annual basis. These energy goals and their substantiation through simulation were explicitly included in the project's fixed firm price design-build contract. The energy model had to be continuously updated during the design process and to match the final building as-built to the greatest degree possible. Computer modeling played a key role throughout the design process and in verifying that the contractual energy goals would be met within the specified budget. The main tool was a whole building energy simulation program. Other models were used to provide more detail or to complement the whole building simulation tool. Results from these specialized models were fed back into the main whole building simulation tool to provide the most accurate possible inputs for annual simulations. This paper will detail the models used in the design process and how they informed important program and design decisions on the path from preliminary design to the completed building.

  9. Advanced engine management of individual cylinders for control of exhaust species

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graves, Ronald L [Knoxville, TN; West, Brian H [Knoxville, TN; Huff, Shean P [Knoxville, TN; Parks, II, James E

    2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system controls engine-out exhaust species of a combustion engine having a plurality of cylinders. The method typically includes various combinations of steps such as controlling combustion parameters in individual cylinders, grouping the individual cylinders into a lean set and a rich set of one or more cylinders, combusting the lean set in a lean combustion parameter condition having a lean air:fuel equivalence ratio, combusting the rich set in a rich combustion parameter condition having a rich air:fuel equivalence ratio, and adjusting the lean set and the rich set of one or more cylinders to generate net-lean combustion. The exhaust species may have elevated concentrations of hydrogen and oxygen.

  10. NO.sub.x catalyst and method of suppressing sulfate formation in an exhaust purification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balmer-Millar, Mari Lou (Chillicothe, IL); Park, Paul W. (Peoria, IL); Panov, Alexander G. (Peoria, IL)

    2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The activity and durability of a zeolite lean-burn NOx catalyst can be increased by loading metal cations on the outer surface of the zeolite. However, the metal loadings can also oxidize sulfur dioxide to cause sulfate formation in the exhaust. The present invention is a method of suppressing sulfate formation in an exhaust purification system including a NO.sub.x catalyst. The NO.sub.x catalyst includes a zeolite loaded with at least one metal. The metal is selected from among an alkali metal, an alkaline earth metal, a lanthanide metal, a noble metal, and a transition metal. In order to suppress sulfate formation, at least a portion of the loaded metal is complexed with at least one of sulfate, phosphate, and carbonate.

  11. Second Law Comparisons of Volumetric and Flame Combustion in an Ideal Engine with Exhaust Heat Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakravarthy, Veerathu K [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Graves, Ronald L [ORNL

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the results of a theoretical second law (exergy) analysis of an idealized internal combustion engine operating in flame versus volumetric (e.g., HCCI-like) combustion modes. We also consider the impact of exhaust heat recovery. Our primary objective is to better understand the fundamental differences (if any) in thermodynamic irreversibility among these different combustion modes and the resulting impact on engine work output. By combustion irreversibility, we mean that portion of the fuel energy that becomes unavailable for producing useful work due to entropy generation in the combustion process, exclusive of all other heat and friction losses. A key question is whether or not volumetric combustion offers any significant irreversibility advantage over conventional flame combustion. Another key issue is how exhaust heat recovery would be expected to change the net work output of an ideal piston engine. Based on these results, we recommend specific research directions for improving the fuel efficiency of advanced engines.

  12. Absolute Measure of Local Chirality and the Chiral Polarization Scale of the QCD Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Alexandru; Terrence Draper; Ivan Horváth; Thomas Streuer

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of the absolute measure of local chirality is championed since it has a uniform distribution for randomly reshuffled chiral components so that any deviations from uniformity in the associated "X-distribution" are directly attributable to QCD-induced dynamics. We observe a transition in the qualitative behavior of this absolute X-distribution of low-lying eigenmodes which, we propose, defines a chiral polarization scale of the QCD vacuum.

  13. Catalysts to reduce NO.sub.x in an exhaust gas stream and methods of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koermer, Gerald S. (Basking Ridge, NJ); Moini, Ahmad (Princeton, NJ); Furbeck, Howard (Hamilton, NJ); Castellano, Christopher R. (Ringoes, NJ)

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalysts, systems and methods are described to reduce NO.sub.x emissions of an internal combustion engine. In one embodiment, an emissions treatment system for an exhaust stream is provided having a catalyst comprising silver on a particulate alumina support, the silver having a diameter of less than about 20 nm. Methods of manufacturing catalysts are described in which ionic silver is impregnated on particulate hydroxylated alumina particles.

  14. Catalysts to reduce NO.sub.x in an exhaust gas stream and methods of preparation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Castellano, Christopher R. (Ringoes, NJ); Moini, Ahmad (Princeton, NJ); Koermer, Gerald S. (Basking Ridge, NJ); Furbeck, Howard (Hamilton, NJ); Schmieg, Steven J. (Troy, MI); Blint, Richard J. (Shelby Township, MI)

    2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalysts, systems and methods are described to reduce NO.sub.x emissions of an internal combustion engine. In one embodiment, an emissions treatment system for an exhaust stream is provided having a catalyst comprising silver and a platinum group metal on a particulate alumina support, the atomic fraction of the platinum group metal being less than or equal to about 0.25. Methods of manufacturing catalysts are described in which silver is impregnated on alumina particles.

  15. Decontamination and size reduction of plutonium contaminated process exhaust ductwork and glove boxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFrate, P.; Elliott, J.; Valasquez, M.

    1996-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Decommissioning Program has decontaminated and demolished two filter plenum buildings at Technical Area 21 (TA-21). During the project a former hot cell was retrofitted to perform decontamination and size reduction of highly Pu contaminated process exhaust (1,100 ft) and gloveboxes. Pu-238/239 concentrations were as high a 1 Ci per linear foot and averaged approximately 1 mCi/ft. The Project decontamination objective was to reduce the plutonium contamination on surfaces below transuranic levels. If possible, metal surfaces were decontaminated further to meet Science and Ecology Group (SEG) waste classification guidelines to enable the metal to be recycled at their facility in oak Ridge, Tennessee. Project surface contamination acceptance criteria for low-level radioactive waste (LLRW), transuranic waste, and SEG waste acceptance criteria will be presented. Ninety percent of all radioactive waste for the project was characterized as LLRW. Twenty percent of this material was shipped to SEG. Process exhaust and glove boxes were brought to the project decontamination area, an old hot cell in Building 4 North. This paper focuses on process exhaust and glovebox decontamination methodology, size reduction techniques, waste characterization, airborne contamination monitoring, engineering controls, worker protection, lessons learned, and waste minimization. Decontamination objectives are discussed in detail.

  16. Helium transport and exhaust studies of H-mode discharges in the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hillis, D.L.; Wade, M.R.; Hogan, J.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A collaborative program has been initiated to measure helium (He) transport and exhaust on DIII-D in L-mode, ELM-free H-mode, and ELMing H-mode. These diverted plasmas operating in enhanced confinement regimes should provide valuable information for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). To simulate the presence of He ash in DIII-D, a 50 ms He puff is injected into a DIII-D plasma, resulting in a He concentration of {approximately} 15%. The time dependence of the He density profiles in the plasma core is measured with charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy and the He spatial distribution on the diverter floor is studied with an impurity monitor array. The dependence of core transport diffusivities as a function of ELM frequency have been studied and the first demonstration made of He exhaust from an H-mode plasma in a diverted tokamak. The exhaust rate of He from these ELMing H-mode plasmas appears to be within the acceptable range for a fusion reactor, like ITER, based on a measured value of {tau}*{sub He}/{tau}E {approx}14.

  17. Exhaust Gas Recirculation Cooler Fouling in Diesel Applications: Fundamental Studies Deposit Properties and Microstructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Lance, Michael J [ORNL; Styles, Dan [Ford Motor Company; Simko, Steve [Ford Motor Company

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the results of experimental efforts aimed at improving the understanding of the mechanisms and conditions at play in the fouling of EGR coolers. An experimental apparatus was constructed to utilize simplified surrogate heat exchanger tubes in lieu of full-size heat exchangers. The use of these surrogate tubes allowed removal of the tubes after exposure to engine exhaust for study of the deposit layer and its properties. The exhaust used for fouling the surrogate tubes was produced using a modern medium-duty diesel engine fueled with both ultra-low sulfur diesel and biodiesel blends. At long exposure times, no significant difference in the fouling rate was observed between fuel types and HC levels. Surface coatings for the tubes were also evaluated to determine their impact on deposit growth. No surface treatment or coating produced a reduction in the fouling rate or any evidence of deposit removal. In addition, microstructural analysis of the fouling layers was performed using optical and electron microscopy in order to better understand the deposition mechanism. The experimental results are consistent with thermophoretic deposition for deposit formation, and van der Waals attraction between the deposit surface and exhaust-borne particulate.

  18. Analysis Of Exhaust Emission Of Internal Combustion Engine Using Biodiesel Blend

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suvendu Mohanty; Dr. Om Prakash; Reasearch Scholar

    Abstract-The main purpose of this research is to study the effect of various blends of an environmental friendly alternative fuel such as biodiesel on the performance of diesel engine. In the Present investigation experimental work has been carried out to analyze the performance and exhaust emission characteristics of a single cylinder internal combustion engine fuelled with biodiesel blend at the different load. In this experiment the biodiesel which is use as a waste cooking oil (WCO) biodiesel.To investigation of the emission characteristics of the engine loads, which is supplied from the alternator. The experiment was carried out different load i.e. (NO LOAD, 100W 200W, 500W, 1000W, 1500W, 2000W, 2500W & 3000Watt) at engine speed 1500 rpm/min. A test was applied in which an engine was fuel with diesel and seven different blends of diesel. Biodiesel (B5, B10, B20, B40, B60, B80, B100) made from waste cooking oil and the results were analyzed.The emission of were measured carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon carbon(HC), Oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and oxygen ().The experimental results will be compared with biodiesel blends and diesel. The biodiesel results of (WCO) in lower emission of hydro carbon (HC) and (CO) and increase emission of (NO2). This study showed that the results of exhaust emission of biodiesel blends were lower than the diesel fuel. Keyword- Biodiesel (WCO), diesel engine, gas analyzer, Exhaust emission. I.

  19. Exhaust Aftertreatment and Low Pressure Loop EGR Applied to an Off-Highway Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumgard, Kirby; Triana, Antonio; Johnson, John; Yang, Song; Premchand, Kiran

    2006-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the project was to demonstrate that low pressure loop EGR incorporating a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) and a diesel particulate filter (DPF) can be applied to an off-highway engine to meet Tier 3 (Task I) and Interim Tier 4 (Task II) off-road emissions standards. Task I data was collected using a John Deere 8.1 liter engine modified with a low pressure loop EGR system. The engine and EGR system was optimized and final data over the ISO 8178 eight mode test indicated the NOx emissions were less than 4 g/kWh and the PM was less than 0.02 g/kWh which means the engine met the Tier 3 off-road standard. Considerable experimental data was collected and used by Michigan Tech University to develop and calibrate the MTU-Filter 1D DPF model. The MTU-Filter 1D DPF code predicts the particulate mass evolution (deposition and oxidation) in the diesel particulate filter (DPF) during simultaneous loading and during thermal and NO{sub 2}-assisted regeneration conditions. It also predicts the pressure drop across the DPF, the flow and temperature fields, the solid filtration efficiency and the particle number distribution downstream of the DPF. A DOC model was also used to predict the NO{sub 2} upstream of the DPF. The DPF model was calibrated to the experimental data at temperatures from 230 C to 550 C, and volumetric flow rates from 9 to 39 actual m{sup 3}/min. Model predictions of the solid particulate mass deposited in the DPF after each loading and regeneration case were in agreement within +/-10g (or +/-10%) of experimental measurements at the majority of the engine operating conditions. The activation temperatures obtained from the model calibration are in good agreement with values reported in the literature and gave good results in the model calibration by using constant pre-exponential factors throughout the entire range of conditions evaluated. The average clean filter permeability was 2.372 x 10{sup -13} m{sup 2}. Estimates of the solid particulate mass packing density inside the porous wall were 1 to 5 kg/m{sup 3}; and percolation factors were 0.81 to 0.97. Average particulate layer permeability was 1.95 x 10{sup -14} m{sup 2}. Solid particulate layer packing density values were between 11 and 128 kg/m{sup 3}. These values were in good agreement with the Peclet number correlation theory reported in the literature. NO{sub 2}-assisted oxidation of PM in the DPF showed experimentally that a significant reduction of the pressure drop can be achieved (<8 kPa) when sufficient NO{sub 2} (>120 ppm) is available and high exhaust gas temperatures ({approx}360-460 C) can be maintained, even at high PM loadings (low NO{sub 2}/solid PM ratios). The CRT{trademark} (DOC-DPF system) showed limited advantages when used with high PM rates (low NOx/PM ratios) in combination with a low pressure loop EGR strategy for a continuous operation of an engine-exhaust aftertreatment system. The 8.1-liter engine was not designed for low-pressure loop EGR and when the EGR was added the NOx emissions were reduced but the PM emissions increased. This corresponds to the well known NOx to PM relationship in which if the NOx is reduced the PM emissions increase. In order for this technology to be successful on this engine family, the engine out PM emissions must be reduced. These results led to Task II. Task II objective was to meet the interim Tier 4 standards using the CCRT{trademark} technology applied to an advanced 6.8 liter John Deere engine. The advanced engine incorporated a 4 valve head, required additional EGR, an advanced high pressure common rail fuel system and a better matched turbocharger. The EGR system was optimized and the goal of less than 2 g/kWh NOx and less than 0.02 g/kWh PM were achieved over the 8 mode test. Again, experimental data was provided to Michigan Tech to study the passive regeneration of the CCRT{trademark} technology. Two computer models, i.e., the MTU 1-D DOC model and the MTU 1-D 2-layer CPF model were developed as part of this research and calibrated using the data obtained from experiments. The 1-D D

  20. Lubricant oil consumption effects on diesel exhaust ash emissions using a sulfur dioxide trace technique and thermogravimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plumley, Michael J

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed experimental study was conducted targeting lubricant consumption effects on ,diesel exhaust ash levels using a model year 2002 5.9L diesel engine, high and low Sulfur commercial lubricants, and clean diesel ...

  1. Double layer electric fields aiding the production of energetic flat-top distributions and superthermal electrons within the exhausts from magnetic reconnection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egedal, Jan; Le, Ari; Borg, Anette L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a kinetic simulation of magnetic reconnection it was recently shown that magnetic-field-aligned electric fields (E||) can be present over large spatial scales in reconnection exhausts. The largest values of E|| are observed within double layers. The existence of double layers in the Earth's magnetosphere is well documented. In our simulation their formation is triggered by large parallel streaming of electrons into the reconnection region. These parallel electron fluxes are required for maintaining quasi-neutrality of the reconnection region and increase with decreasing values of the normalized electron pressure upstream of the reconnection region. A threshold normalized pressure is derived for strong double layers to develop. We also document how the electron confinement, provided in part by the structure in E||, allows sustained energization by perpendicular electric fields. The energization is a consequence of the confined electrons' chaotic orbital motion that includes drifts aligned with the reconn...

  2. An ISO 8178 correlation study between raw and dilute exhaust emission sampling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stotler, R.; Human, D.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Beginning in 1996 the exhaust emissions of off-highway heavy-duty diesel engines between 175--750 hp will be regulated by the EPA. Along with the emission regulations comes the difficulty of establishing a set of standard test procedures which allow engine manufacturers and regulatory agencies to compare emissions data based on similar test methods. In order to remedy this problem, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has come up with an exhaust measurement procedure, ISO 8178, that can be applied worldwide to off-highway heavy-duty diesel engines. The ISO 8178 test procedure allows the exhaust emissions to be sampled with either a full flow dilute or raw sampling system. However, the preferred sampling systems are the raw gaseous and mini dilution tunnel (MDT) particulate measurement methods. The main concern of these sampling systems is the demonstration of equivalency to the full flow dilution system that is currently used for the certification of on-highway heavy-duty diesel engines. Using an in-house full flow dilution system and a recently built raw gaseous emissions bench along with a pre-existing MDT, this research was conducted to find the correlation between the two sampling systems. For the gaseous emissions of HC, NO{sub x}, and CO the correlation between the raw and full dilution sampling systems was within 7.0%, 3.0%, and 1.0% respectively. The correlation between the MDT and full dilution particulate sampling systems was within 2.5%. Additional investigation was performed in the area of MDT transfer tube length and its effect on particulate measurement. An experiment was performed to quantify the effect of a wide range of water vapor concentrations on the measurement of NO{sub x}.

  3. Field study of exhaust fans for mitigating indoor air quality problems: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimsrud, D.T.; Szydlowski, R.F.; Turk, B.H.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Residential ventilation in the United States housing stock is provided primarily by infiltration, the natural leakage of outdoor air into a building through cracks and holes in the building shell. Since ventilation is the dominant mechanism for control of indoor pollutant concentrations, low infiltration rates caused fluctuation in weather conditions may lead to high indoor pollutant concentrations. Supplemental mechanical ventilation can be used to eliminate these periods of low infiltration. This study examined effects of small continuously-operating exhaust fan on pollutant concentrations and energy use in residences.

  4. Strength and fatigue of NT551 silicon nitride and NT551 diesel exhaust valves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrews, M.J.; Werezczak, A.A.; Kirkland, T.P.; Breder, K.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The content of this report is excerpted from Mark Andrew's Ph.D. Thesis (Andrews, 1999), which was funded by a DOE/OTT High Temperature Materials Laboratory Graduate Fellowship. It involves the characterization of NT551 and valves fabricated with it. The motivations behind using silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) as an exhaust valve for a diesel engine are presented in this section. There are several economic factors that have encouraged the design and implementation of ceramic components for internal combustion (IC) engines. The reasons for selecting the diesel engine valve for this are also presented.

  5. Non-thermal plasma exhaust aftertreatment: Are all plasmas the same?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whealton, J.H.; Hanson, G.R.; Storey, J.M.; Raridon, R.J.; Armfield, J.S.; Bigelow, T.S.; Graves, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors describe initial experiments employing 5.5 GHz pulsed microwave power, which should result in enhanced chemistry compared to present state-of-the-art plasma aftertreatments by; reducing plasma electric field shielding, increasing availability of atomic nitrogen, exploiting surface charging of dielectrics, avoiding (low field) threshold initiated discharges, and achieving a higher high energy tail on the electron distribution function. As an example, the authors decided to test for NO reduction in N{sub 2}. While this reaction is not a complete description of the exhaust issues by any means, they thought it would demonstrate the technology proposed.

  6. Optimization of Multi-Stack Exhaust Systems - New System Design Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, G.; Cui, Y.; Yuill, D.; Liu, M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). For a three-stack system, the total number of stack combinations is 7 and the calculation is classified into one of two situations. Controller VFD P DM DM DM Exhaust Fan Backflow damper P FS Fumehood Back flow ductMake-up damper For 521.... It is assumed that these static pressure set points are constant. A reset schedule could be integrated if necessary. The pressure loss in the duct is a function of the airflow through each duct section. The dynamic head difference is relatively small...

  7. Graduation Requirements and Procedures Graduation Requirements and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Degree Audit (DARS) or contact the department offering the major. Graduation Average Requirement The minimum

  8. Differential transcriptional regulation of IL-8 expression by human airway epithelial cells exposed to diesel exhaust particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tal, Tamara L. [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Simmons, Steven O. [Integrated Systems Toxicology, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Silbajoris, Robert; Dailey, Lisa [Environmental and Public Health, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Cho, Seung-Hyun [Air Pollution Prevention Control Division, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Research Participation Program, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge (United States); Ramabhadran, Ram [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Integrated Systems Toxicology, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Linak, William [Air Pollution Prevention Control Division, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States); Reed, William; Bromberg, Philip A. [Center for Environmental Medicine, Asthma, and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Samet, James M., E-mail: samet.james@epa.go [Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Environmental and Public Health, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, U.S. EPA (United States)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) induces inflammatory signaling characterized by MAP kinase-mediated activation of NFkB and AP-1 in vitro and in bronchial biopsies obtained from human subjects exposed to DEP. NFkB and AP-1 activation results in the upregulation of genes involved in promoting inflammation in airway epithelial cells, a principal target of inhaled DEP. IL-8 is a proinflammatory chemokine expressed by the airway epithelium in response to environmental pollutants. The mechanism by which DEP exposure induces IL-8 expression is not well understood. In the current study, we sought to determine whether DEP with varying organic content induces IL-8 expression in lung epithelial cells, as well as, to develop a method to rapidly evaluate the upstream mechanism(s) by which DEP induces IL-8 expression. Exposure to DEP with varying organic content differentially induced IL-8 expression and IL-8 promoter activity human airway epithelial cells. Mutational analysis of the IL-8 promoter was also performed using recombinant human cell lines expressing reporters linked to the mutated promoters. Treatment with a low organic-containing DEP stimulated IL-8 expression by a mechanism that is predominantly NFkB-dependent. In contrast, exposure to high organic-containing DEP induced IL-8 expression independently of NFkB through a mechanism that requires AP-1 activity. Our study reveals that exposure to DEP of varying organic content induces proinflammatory gene expression through multiple specific mechanisms in human airway epithelial cells. The approaches used in the present study demonstrate the utility of a promoter-reporter assay ensemble for identifying transcriptional pathways activated by pollutant exposure.

  9. Ionospheric effects of rocket exhaust products (HEAO-C, Skylab and SPS-HLLV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinn, J; Sutherland, D; Stone, S N; Duncan, L M; Behnke, R

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews the current state of our understanding of the problem of ionospheric F-layer depletions produced by chemical effects of the exhaust gases from large rockets, with particular emphasis on the Heavy Lift Launch Vehicles (HLLV) proposed for use in the construction of solar power satellites. The currently planned HLLV flight profile calls for main second-stage propulsion confined to altitudes below 124 km, and a brief orbit-circularization maneuver at apogee. The second-stage engines deposit 9 x 10/sup 31/ H/sub 2/O and H/sub 2/ molecules between 56 and 124 km. Model computations show that they diffuse gradually into the ionospheric F region, where they lead to weak but widespread and persistent depletions of ionization and continuous production of H atoms. The orbit-circularization burn deposits 9 x 10/sup 29/ exhaust molecules at about 480-km altitude. These react rapidly with the F2 region 0/sup +/ ions, leading to a substantial (factor-of-three) reduction in plasma density, which extends over a 1000- by 2000-km region and persists for four to five hours. Also described are experimental airglow and incoherent-scatter radar measurements performed in conjunction with the 1979 launch of satellite HEAO-C, together with prelaunch and post-launch computations of the ionospheric effects. Several improvements in the model have been driven by the experimental observations. The computer model is described in some detail.

  10. Process for the removal of acid forming gases from exhaust gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, David K. (San Pablo, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exhaust gases are treated to remove NO or NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2 by contacting the gases with an aqueous emulsion or suspension of yellow phosphorus preferably in a wet scrubber. The pressure is not critical, and ambient pressures are used. Hot water temperatures are best, but economics suggest about 50.degree. C. are attractive. The amount of yellow phosphorus used will vary with the composition of the exhaust gas, less than 3% for small concentrations of NO, and 10% or higher for concentrations above say 1000 ppm. Similarly, the pH will vary with the composition being treated, and it is adjusted with a suitable alkali. For mixtures of NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2, alkalis that are used for flue gas desulfurization are preferred. With this process, 100% of the by-products created are usable, and close to 100% of the NO or NO and SO.sub.2 can be removed in an economic fashion.

  11. Process for the removal of acid forming gases from exhaust gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, S.G.; Liu, D.K.

    1992-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Exhaust gases are treated to remove NO or NO[sub x] and SO[sub 2] by contacting the gases with an aqueous emulsion or suspension of yellow phosphorus preferably in a wet scrubber. The pressure is not critical, and ambient pressures are used. Hot water temperatures are best, but economics suggest about 50 C is attractive. The amount of yellow phosphorus used will vary with the composition of the exhaust gas, less than 3% for small concentrations of NO, and 10% or higher for concentrations above say 1000 ppm. Similarly, the pH will vary with the composition being treated, and it is adjusted with a suitable alkali. For mixtures of NO[sub x] and SO[sub 2], alkalis that are used for flue gas desulfurization are preferred. With this process, 100% of the by-products created are usable, and close to 100% of the NO or NO[sub x] and SO[sub 2] can be removed in an economic fashion. 9 figs.

  12. Novel Collection and Toxicological Analysis Techniques for IC Engine Exhaust Particulate Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Keane; Xiao-Chun Shi; Tong-man Ong

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The project staff partnered with Costas Sioutas from the University of Southern California to apply the VACES (Versatile Aerosol Concentration Enhancement System) to a diesel engine test facility at West Virginia University Department of Mechanical Engineering and later the NIOSH Lake Lynn Mine facility. The VACES system was able to allow diesel exhaust particulate matter (DPM) to grow to sufficient particle size to be efficiently collected with the SKC Biosampler impinger device, directly into a suspension of simulated pulmonary surfactant. At the WVU-MAE facility, the concentration of the aerosol was too high to allow efficient use of the VACES concentration enhancement, although aerosol collection was successful. Collection at the LLL was excellent with the diluted exhaust stream. In excess of 50 samples were collected at the LLL facility, along with matching filter samples, at multiple engine speed and load conditions. Replicate samples were combined and concentration increased using a centrifugal concentrator. Bioassays were negative for all tested samples, but this is believed to be due to insufficient concentration in the final assay suspensions.

  13. The Natural Gas Vehicle Challenge `92: Exhaust emissions testing and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rimkus, W.A.; Larsen, R.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Zammit, M.G. [Johnson Matthey, Wayne, PA (United States); Davies, J.G.; Salmon, G.S. [General Motors of Canada Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada); Bruetsch, R.I. [US Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) Challenge `92, was organized by Argonne National Laboratory. The main sponsors were the US Department of Energy the Energy, Mines, and Resources -- Canada, and the Society of Automotive Engineers. It resulted in 20 varied approaches to the conversion of a gasoline-fueled, spark-ignited, internal combustion engine to dedicated natural gas use. Starting with a GMC Sierra 2500 pickup truck donated by General Motors, teams of college and university student engineers worked to optimize Chevrolet V-8 engines operating on natural gas for improved emissions, fuel economy, performance, and advanced design features. This paper focuses on the results of the emission event, and compares engine mechanical configurations, engine management systems, catalyst configurations and locations, and approaches to fuel control and the relationship of these parameters to engine. out and tailpipe emissions of regulated exhaust constituents. Nine of the student modified trucks passed the current levels of exhaust emission standards, and some exceeded the strictest future emissions standards envisioned by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Factors contributing to good emissions control using natural gas are summarized, and observations concerning necessary components of a successful emissions control strategy are presented.

  14. Capture Efficiency of Cooking-Related Fine and Ultrafine Particles by Residential Exhaust Hoods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunden, Melissa M.; Delp, William W.

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective exhaust hoods can mitigate the indoor air quality impacts of pollutant emissions from residential cooking. This study reports capture efficiencies (CE) measured for cooking generated particles for scripted cooking procedures in a 121-m3 chamber with kitchenette. CEs also were measured for burner produced CO2 during cooking and separately for pots and pans containing water. The study used four exhaust hoods previously tested by Delp and Singer (Environ. Sci. Technol., 2012, 46, 6167-6173). For pan-frying a hamburger over medium heat on the back burner, CEs for particles were similar to those for burner produced CO2 and mostly above 80percent. For stir-frying green beans in a wok (high heat, front burner), CEs for burner CO2 during cooking varied by hood and airflow: CEs were 34-38percent for low (51?68 L s-1) and 54?72percent for high (109?138 L s-1) settings. CEs for 0.3?2.0 ?m particles during front burner stir-frying were 3?11percent on low and 16?70percent on high settings. Results indicate that CEs measured for burner CO2 are not predictive of CEs of cooking-generated particles under all conditions, but they may be suitable to identify devices with CEs above 80percent both for burner combustion products and for cooking-related particles.

  15. Helium Exhaust Experiments on JET with Type I ELMs in H-Mode and with Type III ELMs in ITB Discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helium Exhaust Experiments on JET with Type I ELMs in H-Mode and with Type III ELMs in ITB Discharges

  16. Characterizing absolute piezoelectric microelectromechanical system displacement using an atomic force microscope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, J., E-mail: radiant@ferrodevices.com; Chapman, S., E-mail: radiant@ferrodevices.com [Radiant Technologies, Inc., 2835C Pan American Fwy NE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87107 (United States)

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Piezoresponse Force Microscopy (PFM) is a popular tool for the study of ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials at the nanometer level. Progress in the development of piezoelectric MEMS fabrication is highlighting the need to characterize absolute displacement at the nanometer and Ångstrom scales, something Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) might do but PFM cannot. Absolute displacement is measured by executing a polarization measurement of the ferroelectric or piezoelectric capacitor in question while monitoring the absolute vertical position of the sample surface with a stationary AFM cantilever. Two issues dominate the execution and precision of such a measurement: (1) the small amplitude of the electrical signal from the AFM at the Ångstrom level and (2) calibration of the AFM. The authors have developed a calibration routine and test technique for mitigating the two issues, making it possible to use an atomic force microscope to measure both the movement of a capacitor surface as well as the motion of a micro-machine structure actuated by that capacitor. The theory, procedures, pitfalls, and results of using an AFM for absolute piezoelectric measurement are provided.

  17. HC-1 Ideal Gas and Absolute Zero Name_______________________ Lab Worksheet Group member names__________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    that you always start with the same volume and pressure. 3) Compress the gas in the syringe as slowly as possible clicking at 5cm3 intervals and recording the volume. You can continue to slowly compress the gas reasoning. b) What do we call this process? #12;HC-1 Ideal Gas and Absolute Zero Name

  18. Increasing absolute mortality disparities by education in Finland, Norway and Sweden, 1971e2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Increasing absolute mortality disparities by education in Finland, Norway and Sweden, 1971e2000 differences by education in Finland, Norway and Sweden over the period 1971 to 2000. Methods The age and the AIDs have increased since the 1970s in Norway and Sweden, and since the 1980s in Finland

  19. Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

  20. Radiometric Modeling of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction of their Absolute Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction of their Absolute Temperature from Remote Thermal Abstract Determination of the internal temperature of a mechanical draft cooling tower (MDCT) from remotelyRadiometric Modeling of Mechanical Draft Cooling Towers to Assist in the Extraction

  1. Absolute cross section for Si2 P... electron-impact excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savin, Daniel Wolf

    the excited ions was detected using an absolutely calibrated optical system. The fractional population such as qua- sars and active galactic nuclei. Modern space observatories such as the Hubble Space Telescope 3-ray line intensities with detectors calibrated to a high degree of accuracy 7,8,6 , placing more demand

  2. A rapid multiple-sample approach to the determination of absolute paleointensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    an alternative approach to absolute paleointensity determination, one which involves exactly five heatings involves the simultaneous thermal treatment of several subspecimens sampled from different regions throughout the igneous rock unit under investigation. For inclusion of data in a given determination, self

  3. Subjective evaluation of HDTV stereoscopic videos in IPTV scenarios using absolute category rating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Subjective evaluation of HDTV stereoscopic videos in IPTV scenarios using absolute category rating.Sjöströmc a Dept. of NetLab: IPTV, Video and Display Quality, Acreo AB, Sweden b Dept. of Image and Video at the same time it inevitably brings quality degradations to the processed video. This paper investigated

  4. Absolutely continuous spectrum implies ballistic transport for quantum particles in a random potential on tree graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aizenman, Michael [Departments of Physics and Mathematics, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Warzel, Simone [Zentrum Mathematik, TU Munich, Boltzmannstr. 3, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the dynamical implications of the recent proof that for a quantum particle in a random potential on a regular tree graph absolutely continuous (ac) spectrum occurs non-perturbatively through rare fluctuation-enabled resonances. The main result is spelled in the title.

  5. The absolute and relative de Rham-Witt complexes Lars Hesselholt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -schemes to * *Z(p)-schemes. From this comparison, we derive a Gauss-Manin connection on the crystalline. There is a canonical surjective map Wn .X! Wn .X=S from the absolute de Rham of the canonical map f-1Wn* * 1S! Wn 1X. The graded pieces for the I-adic filtration are differential graded

  6. DIGITALVISION ltra-wideband (UWB) radios have relative bandwidths larger than 20% or absolute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannakis, Georgios

    .S. Federal Communications Commission (FCC) allowed the use of unlicensed UWB communications [8]. The first bandwidths of more than 500 MHz. Such wide bandwidths offer a wealth of advan- tages for both communications ranging accuracy. For communications, both large relative and large absolute band- width alleviate small

  7. Biological activity of exhaust emissions from two after-treatment device-equipped light-duty diesel engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carraro, E.; Locatelli, A.L.; Ferrero, C.; Fea, E.; Gilli, G. [Univ. of Turin (Italy)

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Whole diesel exhaust has recently been classified as a portable carcinogen, and particulate exhaust known to contain mutagenic and carcinogenic chemicals, has clearly shown to be mutagenic in several genotoxicity studies. The goal of this study was to determine whether, and to what extent, the installation of some exhaust aftertreatment devices on two light-duty diesel engines (1930 cc and 2500 cc) EGR-valve equipped may reduce mutagenic activity associated to particles collected during both USA and European driving cycles. The preliminary results point out the usefulness of mutagenicity tests in the research of even new more efficient automotive emission aftertreatment devices. The aim of this investigation is to determine whether, and to what range, the use of some new aftertreatment devices on light-duty diesel engines could reduce the particle-associated genotoxic potential of diesel emissions. 24 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Absolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy range using a diffraction-based iterative method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Thomas S.

    Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York 11794, USA 2 DepartmentAbsolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy range using a diffraction-based iterative;REVIEW OF SCIENTIFIC INSTRUMENTS 83, 063901 (2012) Absolute x-ray energy calibration over a wide energy

  9. Absolute entropy and free energy of fluids using the hypothetical scanning method. I. Calculation of transition probabilities from local grand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meirovitch, Hagai

    Absolute entropy and free energy of fluids using the hypothetical scanning method. I. Calculation the absolute entropy and free energy from a Boltzmann sample generated by Monte Carlo, molecular dynamics for the free energy. We demonstrate that very good results for the entropy and the free energy can be obtained

  10. Exhaust-gas measurements from NASAs HYMETS arc jet.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Paul Albert

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arc-jet wind tunnels produce conditions simulating high-altitude hypersonic flight such as occurs upon entry of space craft into planetary atmospheres. They have traditionally been used to study flight in Earth's atmosphere, which consists mostly of nitrogen and oxygen. NASA is presently using arc jets to study entry into Mars' atmosphere, which consists of carbon dioxide and nitrogen. In both cases, a wide variety of chemical reactions take place among the gas constituents and with test articles placed in the flow. In support of those studies, we made measurements using a residual gas analyzer (RGA) that sampled the exhaust stream of a NASA arc jet. The experiments were conducted at the HYMETS arc jet (Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System) located at the NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA. This report describes our RGA measurements, which are intended to be used for model validation in combination with similar measurements on other systems.

  11. Device for use in a furnace exhaust stream for thermoelectric generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Polcyn, Adam D.

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for generating voltage or electrical current includes an inner elongated member mounted in an outer elongated member, and a plurality of thermoelectric modules mounted in the space between the inner and the outer members. The outer and/or inner elongated members each include a plurality of passages to move a temperature altering medium through the members so that the device can be used in high temperature environments, e.g. the exhaust system of an oxygen fired glass melting furnace. The modules are designed to include a biasing member and/or other arrangements to compensate for differences in thermal expansion between the first and the second members. In this manner, the modules remain in contact with the first and second members. The voltage generated by the modules can be used to power electrical loads.

  12. Variable-geometry turbocharger with asymmetric divided volute for engine exhaust gas pulse optimization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Serres, Nicolas (Epinal, FR)

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine assembly for a variable-geometry turbocharger includes a turbine housing defining a divided volute having first and second scrolls, wherein the first scroll has a substantially smaller volume than the second scroll. The first scroll feeds exhaust gas to a first portion of a turbine wheel upstream of the throat of the wheel, while the second scroll feeds gas to a second portion of the wheel at least part of which is downstream of the throat. Flow from the second scroll is regulated by a sliding piston. The first scroll can be optimized for low-flow conditions such that the turbocharger can operate effectively like a small fixed-geometry turbocharger when the piston is closed. The turbine housing defines an inlet that is divided by a dividing wall into two portions respectively feeding gas to the two scrolls, a leading edge of the dividing wall being downstream of the inlet mouth.

  13. Investigation of Nitro-Organic Compounds in Diesel Engine Exhaust: Final Report, February 2007 - April 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dane, J.; Voorhees, K. J.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory upgraded its ReFUEL engine and vehicle testing facility to speciate unregulated gas-phase emissions. To complement this capability, the laboratory contracted with the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) to study the effects of soy biodiesel fuel and a diesel particle filter (DPF) on emissions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (NPAH). CSM developed procedures to sample diesel particulate matter (PM) emissions from raw and diluted exhaust, with and without a DPF. They also developed improved procedures for extracting PAH and NPAH from the PM and quantifying them with a gas chromatograph-electron monochromator mass spectrometer. The study found the DPF generally reduced PAH emissions by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude. PAH conversion was lowest for B100, suggesting that PAHs were forming in the DPF. Orders of magnitude reductions were also found for NPAH emissions exiting the DPF.

  14. Process for the removal of acid forming gases from exhaust gases and production of phosphoric acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Shih-Ger (El Cerrito, CA); Liu, David K. (San Pablo, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exhaust gases are treated to remove NO or NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2 by contacting the gases with an aqueous emulsion or suspension of yellow phosphorous preferably in a wet scrubber. The addition of yellow phosphorous in the system induces the production of O.sub.3 which subsequently oxidizes NO to NO.sub.2. The resulting NO.sub.2 dissolves readily and can be reduced to form ammonium ions by dissolved SO.sub.2 under appropriate conditions. In a 20 acfm system, yellow phosphorous is oxidized to yield P.sub.2 O.sub.5 which picks up water to form H.sub.3 PO.sub.4 mists and can be collected as a valuable product. The pressure is not critical, and ambient pressures are used. Hot water temperatures are best, but economics suggest about 50.degree. C. The amount of yellow phosphorus used will vary with the composition of the exhaust gas, less than 3% for small concentrations of NO, and 10% or higher for concentrations above say 1000 ppm. Similarly, the pH will vary with the composition being treated, and it is adjusted with a suitable alkali. For mixtures of NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2, alkalis that are used for flue gas desulfurization are preferred. With this process, better than 90% of SO.sub.2 and NO in simulated flue gas can be removed. Stoichiometric ratios (P/NO) ranging between 0.6 and 1.5 were obtained.

  15. San Diego 01.05.2001 Power and Particle Exhaust in ITER Slide 1 by G. Janeschitz, et.al. _______________________________________________________________________ ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Diego 01.05.2001 Power and Particle Exhaust in ITER Slide 1 by G. Janeschitz, et.al. ITER. Pacher, G. Pacher, R. Tivey, M. Sugihara, JCT and HTs #12;San Diego; 01.05.2001 Power and Particle to pump #12;San Diego; 01.05.2001 Power and Particle Exhaust in ITER Slide 3 by G. Janeschitz. ITER

  16. KONG, JIAN. Infrared-Based Temperature Measurement in Ceramics Grinding and Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment Filters. (Under the direction of Albert J. Shih)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shih, Albert J.

    of the temperature distribution on the cavity wall surface in diesel exhaust aftertreatment filters usingABSTRACT KONG, JIAN. Infrared-Based Temperature Measurement in Ceramics Grinding and Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment Filters. (Under the direction of Albert J. Shih) Non-contact remote-sensing radiation thermometry

  17. Examples of past vehicle-related projects at the University of Alabama: Diesel Exhaust Treatment Using Catalyst/Zeolite-II-collaborative UAB/UA project funded by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carver, Jeffrey C.

    Examples of past vehicle-related projects at the University of Alabama: Diesel Exhaust Treatment of Alabama to study the effectiveness of low-cost zeolite catalytic materials for treating diesel exhaust of an electrostatic diesel injector. Micro-Pilot Ignition Studies for Alternative Fueled Engines- five-year project

  18. Like all other vertebrates, fish need time to recover after exhaustive activity. Furthermore, a rapid rate of recovery may

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    Like all other vertebrates, fish need time to recover after exhaustive activity. Furthermore. For example, a rapid rate of recovery is needed to keep migratory passage timely when adult salmon use of anaerobic swimming because the entire upstream migration is completed using stored energy reserves

  19. Abundance of mass 47 CO2 in urban air, car exhaust, and human breath Hagit P. Affek *, John M. Eiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . For example, d13 C values of respired CO2 and CO2 generated by combustion of oil, gasoline or biomass. In particular, the mass 47 anomaly (D47) can distinguish between CO2 produced by high temperature combustion a car exhaust pipe was enriched in a combustion source having a composition, as determined by a ÔKeeling

  20. ESTIMATION OF ETHANOL CONTENT IN FLEX-FUEL VEHICLES USING AN EXHAUST GAS OXYGEN SENSOR: MODEL, TUNING AND SENSITIVITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    ESTIMATION OF ETHANOL CONTENT IN FLEX-FUEL VEHICLES USING AN EXHAUST GAS OXYGEN SENSOR: MODEL periods of intense interest in using ethanol as an alternative fuel to petroleum-based gasoline and diesel derivatives. Currently available flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) can operate on a blend of gasoline and ethanol

  1. Test Set Reordering Using the Gate Exhaustive Test Metric Kyoung Youn Cho and Edward J. McCluskey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Test Set Reordering Using the Gate Exhaustive Test Metric Kyoung Youn Cho and Edward J. Mc kycho@crc.stanford.edu Abstract When a test set size is larger than desired, some patterns must be dropped. This paper presents a systematic method to reduce test set size; the method reorders a test set

  2. Checklist for fixing problems with your Mathematica Lab (these are just some ideas, not an exhaustive list)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foote, Richard M.

    , not an exhaustive list) 1. Did you execute each command line separately (with shift-enter on each separate line "enter" to put them on separate lines in the file) ­ after each command sentence do a "shift-enter" to have Mathematica execute it. Look for the "In[n]:=" to the left of your command line to see

  3. Absolute dipole gamma-ray strength functions for /sup 176/Lu

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardner, D.G.; Gardner, M.A.; Hoff, R.W.

    1984-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We have derived absolute dipole strength-function information for /sup 176/Lu from an average resonance capture study of /sup 175/Lu with 2-keV neutrons, and from neutron capture cross-section measurements with neutrons from 30 keV to about 1 MeV. We found that we needed to increase our previous estimate of the relative M1/E1 strengths near 5 MeV by a factor of 3, and to revise downward the absolute magnitude of our E1 strength function. We accomplished the latter, while still maintaining continuity with the photonuclear data, by adjusting the one free parameter in our line shape. The present E1 and M1 strengths now seem correct both near the neutron separation energy and also around 1 MeV.

  4. Absolute total and partial dissociative cross sections of pyrimidine at electron and proton intermediate impact velocities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolff, Wania, E-mail: wania@if.ufrj.br; Luna, Hugo; Sigaud, Lucas; Montenegro, Eduardo C. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, PO 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)] [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, PO 68528, 21941-972 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Tavares, Andre C. [Departamento de Física, Pontificia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, PO 38071, Rua Marquês de São Vicente 225, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)] [Departamento de Física, Pontificia Universidade Católica do Rio de Janeiro, PO 38071, Rua Marquês de São Vicente 225, 22453-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Absolute total non-dissociative and partial dissociative cross sections of pyrimidine were measured for electron impact energies ranging from 70 to 400 eV and for proton impact energies from 125 up to 2500 keV. MOs ionization induced by coulomb interaction were studied by measuring both ionization and partial dissociative cross sections through time of flight mass spectrometry and by obtaining the branching ratios for fragment formation via a model calculation based on the Born approximation. The partial yields and the absolute cross sections measured as a function of the energy combined with the model calculation proved to be a useful tool to determine the vacancy population of the valence MOs from which several sets of fragment ions are produced. It was also a key point to distinguish the dissociation regimes induced by both particles. A comparison with previous experimental results is also presented.

  5. Absolute Magnitude Distribution And Light Curves Of Gamma-Ray Burst Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean Richardson

    2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Photometry data were collected from the literature and analyzed for supernovae that are thought to have a gamma-ray burst association. There are several gamma-ray burst afterglow light curves that appear to have a supernova component. For these light curves, the supernova component was extracted and analyzed. A supernova light curve model was used to help determine the peak absolute magnitudes as well as estimates for the kinetic energy, ejected mass and nickel mass in the explosion. The peak absolute magnitudes are, on average, brighter than those of similar supernovae (stripped-envelope supernovae) that do not have a gamma-ray burst association, but this can easily be due to a selection effect. However, the kinetic energies and ejected masses were found to be considerably higher, on average, than those of similar supernovae without a gamma-ray burst association.

  6. The Roland De Witte 1991 Detection of Absolute Motion and Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahill, R T

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991 Roland De Witte carried out an experiment in Brussels in which variations in the one-way speed of RF waves through a coaxial cable were recorded over 178 days. The data from this experiment shows that De Witte had detected absolute motion of the earth through space, as had six earlier experiments, beginning with the Michelson-Morley experiment of 1887. His results are in excellent agreement with the extensive data from the Miller 1925/26 detection of absolute motion using a gas-mode Michelson interferometer atop Mt.Wilson, California. The De Witte data reveals turbulence in the flow which amounted to the detection of gravitational waves. Similar effects were also seen by Miller, and by Torr and Kolen in their coaxial cable experiment. Here we bring together what is known about the De Witte experiment.

  7. The Roland De Witte 1991 Detection of Absolute Motion and Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T Cahill

    2006-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1991 Roland De Witte carried out an experiment in Brussels in which variations in the one-way speed of RF waves through a coaxial cable were recorded over 178 days. The data from this experiment shows that De Witte had detected absolute motion of the earth through space, as had six earlier experiments, beginning with the Michelson-Morley experiment of 1887. His results are in excellent agreement with the extensive data from the Miller 1925/26 detection of absolute motion using a gas-mode Michelson interferometer atop Mt.Wilson, California. The De Witte data reveals turbulence in the flow which amounted to the detection of gravitational waves. Similar effects were also seen by Miller, and by Torr and Kolen in their coaxial cable experiment. Here we bring together what is known about the De Witte experiment.

  8. Absolute calibration of a charge-coupled device camera with twin beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meda, A.; Ruo-Berchera, I., E-mail: i.ruoberchera@inrim.it; Degiovanni, I. P.; Brida, G.; Rastello, M. L.; Genovese, M. [Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica, Strada delle Cacce 91, 10135 Torino (Italy)

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the absolute calibration of a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) camera by exploiting quantum correlation. This method exploits a certain number of spatial pairwise quantum correlated modes produced by spontaneous parametric-down-conversion. We develop a measurement model accounting for all the uncertainty contributions, and we reach the relative uncertainty of 0.3% in low photon flux regime. This represents a significant step forward for the characterization of (scientific) CCDs used in mesoscopic light regime.

  9. Absolute intensity calibration of the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, X.; Zhao, H. L.; Liu, Y., E-mail: liuyong@ipp.ac.cn; Li, E. Z.; Han, X.; Ti, A.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhang, X. D. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of the in situ absolute intensity calibration for the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. The hot/cold load method is adopted, and the coherent averaging technique is employed to improve the signal to noise ratio. Measured spectra and electron temperature profiles are compared with those from an independent calibrated Michelson interferometer, and there is a relatively good agreement between the results from the two different systems.

  10. Absolute calibration of photon-number-resolving detectors with an analog output using twin beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pe?ina, Jan, E-mail: jan.perina.jr@upol.cz [RCPTM, Joint Laboratory of Optics of Palacký University and Institute of Physics AS CR, 17. listopadu 12, 77146 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Haderka, Ond?ej [Joint Laboratory of Optics of Palacký University and Institute of Physics AS CR, 17. listopadu 12, 771 46 Olomouc (Czech Republic); Allevi, Alessia [Dipartimento di Scienza e Alta Tecnologia, Università degli Studi dell'Insubria, I-22100 Como (Italy); Bondani, Maria [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie, CNR-IFN, I-22100 Como (Italy)

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for absolute calibration of a photon-number resolving detector producing analog signals as the output is developed using a twin beam. The method gives both analog-to-digital conversion parameters and quantum detection efficiency for the photon fields. Characteristics of the used twin beam are also obtained. A simplified variant of the method applicable to fields with high signal to noise ratios and suitable for more intense twin beams is suggested.

  11. Comment on 'Simultaneous gravity and gradient measurements from a recoil-compensated absolute gravimeter'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagornyi, V D

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The article (Niebauer et al. 2011 Metrologia 48 154-163) reports on the important innovations enhancing the ability of absolute gravimeter to measure vertical gravity gradient along with the gravity acceleration. This comment suggests experiments to further assess the improvements and the results obtained with the modified instrument, considers some limitations of non-linear models in metrology and ways to overcome them, and discusses possible applications of the described instrument.

  12. Comment on "Measurement of the speed-of-light perturbation of free-fall absolute gravimeters"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagornyi, V D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper (Rothleitner et al. 2014 Metrologia 51, L9) reports on the measurement of the speed-of-light perturbation in absolute gravimeters. The conclusion that the perturbation reaches only 2/3 of the commonly accepted value violates the fundamental limitation on the maximum speed of information transfer. The conclusion was deluded by unaccounted parasitic perturbations, some of which are obvious from the report.

  13. Precise Measurement of the Absolute Yield of Fluorescence Photons in Atmospheric Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ave, M.; /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.; Bohacova, M.; /Chicago U., EFI; Daumiller, K.; /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.; Di Carlo, P.; /INFN, Aquila; Di Giulio, C.; /INFN, Rome; Luis, P.Facal San; /Chicago U., EFI; Gonzales, D.; /Karlsruhe U., EKP; Hojvat, C.; /Fermilab; Horandel, J.R.; /Nijmegen U., IMAPP; Hrabovsky, M.; /Palacky U.; Iarlori, M.; /INFN, Aquila /Karlsruhe, Inst. Technol.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed a measurement of the absolute yield of fluorescence photons at the Fermilab Test Beam. A systematic uncertainty at 5% level was achieved by the use of Cherenkov radiation as a reference calibration light source. A cross-check was performed by an independent calibration using a laser light source. A significant improvement on the energy scale uncertainty of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays is expected.

  14. Absolute pulse energy measurements of soft x-rays at the Linac Coherent Light Source

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tiedtke, K.; Sorokin, A. A.; Jastrow, U.; Jurani?, P.; Kreis, S.; Gerken, N.; Richter, M.; Arp, U.; Feng, Y.; Nordlund, D.; et al

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports novel measurements of x-ray optical radiation on an absolute scale from the intense and ultra-short radiation generated in the soft x-ray regime of a free electron laser. We give a brief description of the detection principle for radiation measurements which was specifically adapted for this photon energy range. We present data characterizing the soft x-ray instrument at the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) with respect to the radiant power output and transmission by using an absolute detector temporarily placed at the downstream end of the instrument. This provides an estimation of the reflectivity of all x-ray opticalmore »elements in the beamline and provides the absolute photon number per bandwidth per pulse. This parameter is important for many experiments that need to understand the trade-offs between high energy resolution and high flux, such as experiments focused on studying materials via resonant processes. Furthermore, the results are compared with the LCLS diagnostic gas detectors to test the limits of linearity, and observations are reported on radiation contamination from spontaneous undulator radiation and higher harmonic content.« less

  15. The requirements discovery process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahill, A.T. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Systems and Industrial Engineering; Dean, F.F. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirement process. This paper provides a high-level overview of the requirements discovery process.

  16. BER Requirements Review 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Attendees 2015 ASCR Requirements Review 2015 Previous Reviews Requirements Review Reports Case Studies News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet...

  17. ASCR Requirements Review 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Requirements Review 2015 ASCR Attendees 2015 Previous Reviews Requirements Review Reports Case Studies News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet...

  18. Real-time absolute frequency measurement of continuous-wave terahertz wave based on dual terahertz combs of photocarriers with different frequency spacings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yasui, Takeshi; Ichikawa, Ryuji; Cahyadi, Harsono; Hsieh, Yi-Da; Mizutani, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu; Iwata, Tetsuo; Inaba, Hajime; Minoshima, Kaoru

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Real-time measurement of the absolute frequency of continuous-wave terahertz (CW-THz) waves is required for characterization and frequency calibration of practical CW-THz sources. We proposed a method for real-time monitoring of the absolute frequency of CW-THz waves involving temporally parallel, i.e., simultaneous, measurement of two pairs of beat frequencies and laser repetition frequencies based on dual THz combs of photocarriers (PC-THz combs) with different frequency spacings. To demonstrate the method, THz-comb-referenced spectrum analyzers were constructed with a dual configuration based on dual femtosecond lasers. Regardless of the presence or absence of frequency control in the PC-THz combs, a frequency precision of 10-11 was achieved at a measurement rate of 100 Hz. Furthermore, large fluctuation of the CW-THz frequencies, crossing several modes of the PC-THz combs, was correctly monitored in real time. The proposed method will be a powerful tool for the research and development of practical CW-THz...

  19. 3. MATERIAL CERTIFICATIONS REQUIRED NO RADIOGRAPHY REQUIRED.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    SHALL BE DYE PENETRANT INSPECTED. ASME SECTION IX. NO CODE STAMP REQUIRED. 1. WELDING TO BE PERFORMED is property of 1. ALL DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES 2. INTERPRET DIMENSIONS AND TOLERANCES PER ASME Y14.5M 3

  20. System and method for selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides in combustion exhaust gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A

    2014-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-stage selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit (32) provides efficient reduction of NOx and other pollutants from about 50-550.degree. C. in a power plant (19). Hydrogen (24) and ammonia (29) are variably supplied to the SCR unit depending on temperature. An upstream portion (34) of the SCR unit catalyzes NOx+NH.sub.3 reactions above about 200.degree. C. A downstream portion (36) catalyzes NOx+H.sub.2 reactions below about 260.degree. C., and catalyzes oxidation of NH.sub.3, CO, and VOCs with oxygen in the exhaust above about 200.degree. C., efficiently removing NOx and other pollutants over a range of conditions with low slippage of NH.sub.3. An ammonia synthesis unit (28) may be connected to the SCR unit to provide NH.sub.3 as needed, avoiding transport and storage of ammonia or urea at the site. A carbonaceous gasification plant (18) on site may supply hydrogen and nitrogen to the ammonia synthesis unit, and hydrogen to the SCR unit.

  1. A Partial Oxidation Technique for Fuel-Cell Anode Exhaust-Gas Synthesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edward H. Robey, Jr.; Randall S. Gemmen

    1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the performance of a gas generator used to synthesize the exhaust gas from the anode of a molten-carbonate fuel cell. The composition of this gas is estimated to be that of equilibrium at 1,250 ° F and 1 atm: 48% CO2 , 39% H2O, 5% CO, and 8% H2, with an energy content of approximately 39 Btu/scf (higher heating value). To synthesize a range of gas compositions around this point, the gas generator partially oxidizes a mixture of CH4 , O2 , and CO2 to generate energy densities between 20 and 60 Btu/scf at temperatures between 1,198 and 1,350 ° F. Results show that the technique provides a relatively high ratio of CO to H2 concentrations compared with the target composition (CO:H2 of 2, versus 0.71). A detailed chemical model shows that the likely cause is quenching of the CO and H2 chemistry below 2,000 ° F.

  2. Dynamic instabilities in spark-ignited combustion engines with high exhaust gas recirculation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a cycle-resolved dynamic model for combustion instabilities in spark-ignition engines operating with high levels of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). High EGR is important for increasing fuel efficiency and implementing advanced low-emission combustion modes such as homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI). We account for the complex combustion response to cycle-to-cycle feedback by utilizing a global probability distribution that describes the pre-spark state of in-cylinder fuel mixing. The proposed model does a good job of simulating combustion instabilities observed in both lean-fueling engine experiments and in experiments where nitrogen dilution is used to simulate some of the combustion inhibition of EGR. When used to simulate high internal EGR operation, the model exhibits a range of global bifurcations and chaos that appear to be very robust. We use the model to show that it should be possible to reduce high EGR combustion instabilities by switching from internal to external EGR. We also explain why it might be helpful to deliberately stratify the fuel in the pre-spark gas mixture. It might be possible to extend the simple approach used in this model to other chemical reaction systems with spatial inhomogeneity.

  3. Fuel-Specific Effect of Exhaust Gas Residuals on HCCI Combustion: A Modeling Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szybist, James P [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A modeling study was performed to investigate fuel-specific effects of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) components on homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion at conditions relevant to the negative valve overlap (NVO) strategy using CHEMKIN-PRO. Four single-component fuels with well-established kinetic models were chosen: n-heptane, iso-octane, ethanol, and toluene. These fuels were chosen because they span a wide range of fuel chemistries, and produce a wide compositions range of complete stoichiometric products (CSP). The simulated engine conditions combined a typical spark ignition engine compression ratio (11.34) and high intake charge temperatures (500-550 K) that are relevant to NVO HCCI. It was found that over the conditions investigated, all the fuels had overlapping start of combustion (SOC) phasing, despite the wide range in octane number (RON = 0 to 120). The effect of the EGR components CO2 and H2O was to suppress the compression temperature because of their higher heat capacities, which retarded SOC. For a concentration of O2 higher than the stoichiometric amount, or excess O2, there was an effect of advancing SOC for n-heptane, iso-octane, and toluene, but SOC for ethanol was not advanced. Low temperature heat release (LTHR) for n-heptane was also found to be highly dependent on excess O2, and mild endothermic reaction was observed for cases when excess O2 was not present.

  4. Method for compressing and heating a heating medium to be externally supplied to an engine while using the energy available in the hot exhaust gases of the engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlquist, S. G.

    1985-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In a method for compressing and heating a heating medium to be externally supplied to an engine, while using the energy available in the hot exhaust gases of the engine, the exhaust gases are caused to expand in at least two expansion stages to emit energy for compressing the heating medium in at least two compression stages, heat is transmitted from the exhaust gases after the first expansion stage to the heating medium after the last compression stage, and the heating medium is thereafter supplied with additional heat in a heat-producing unit before it is led to the engine.

  5. An absolute quantum energy inequality for the Dirac field in curved spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvin J. Smith

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Weak Energy Inequalities (QWEIs) are results which limit the extent to which the smeared renormalised energy density of a quantum field can be negative. On globally hyperbolic spacetimes the massive quantum Dirac field is known to obey a QWEI in terms of a reference state chosen arbitrarily from the class of Hadamard states; however, there exist spacetimes of interest on which state-dependent bounds cannot be evaluated. In this paper we prove the first QWEI for the massive quantum Dirac field on four dimensional globally hyperbolic spacetime in which the bound depends only on the local geometry; such a QWEI is known as an absolute QWEI.

  6. UNDERSTANDING THE EFFECT OF DYNAMIC FEED CONDITIONS ON WATER RECOVERY FROM IC ENGINE EXHAUST BY CAPILLARY CONDENSATION WITH INORGANIC MEMBRANES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeBusk, Melanie Moses [ORNL] [ORNL; Bischoff, Brian L [ORNL] [ORNL; Hunter, James A [ORNL] [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL] [ORNL; Nafziger, Eric J [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An inorganic membrane water recovery concept is evaluated as a method to recovering water from the exhaust of an internal combustion engine. Integrating the system on-board a vehicle would create a self-sustaining water supply that would make engine water injection technologies consumer transparent . In laboratory experiments, water recovery from humidified air was measured to evaluate how different operating parameters affect the membrane system s efficiency. The observed impact of transmembrane pressure and gas flow rate suggest that gas residence time is more important than water flux through the membrane. Heat transfer modeling suggests that increasing membrane length can be used to improve efficiency and allow greater flow per membrane, an important parameter for practical applications where space is limited. The membrane water recovery concept was also experimentally validated by extracting water from diesel exhaust coming from a stationary generator. The insight afforded by these studies provides a basis for developing improved membrane designs that balance both efficiency and cost.

  7. FES Requirements Review 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Review 2014 FES Attendees 2014 BES Requirements Review 2014 Requirements Review Reports Case Studies Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638...

  8. BES Requirements Review 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Review 2014 BES Requirements Review 2014 BES Attendees 2014 Requirements Review Reports Case Studies Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638...

  9. Allocating Reserve Requirements (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of present and possible future ways to allocate and assign benefits for reserve requirements.

  10. BER Science Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management and analysis of geospatial data involvingmanipulation, analysis, and display of geospatial data,Analysis and interpretation require mapping geospatial

  11. FES Science Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    FES Science Network Requirements Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted March 13 and 14, 2008 #12;FES Science Network Requirements Workshop Fusion Energy Sciences Program Office, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network Gaithersburg, MD ­ March 13 and 14, 2008 ESnet

  12. The Absolute Magnitude of RR Lyrae Stars Derived from the Hipparcos Catalogue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takuji Tsujimoto; Masanori Miyamoto; Yuzuru Yoshii

    1997-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The present determination of the absolute magnitude $M_V(RR)$ of RR Lyrae stars is twofold, relying upon Hipparcos proper motions and trigonometric parallaxes separately. First, applying the statistical parallax method to the proper motions, we find $=0.69\\pm0.10$ for 99 halo RR Lyraes with $$ =--1.58. Second, applying the Lutz-Kelker correction to the RR Lyrae HIP95497 with the most accurately measured parallax, we obtain $M_V(RR)$=(0.58--0.68)$^{+0.28}_{-0.31}$ at [Fe/H]=--1.6. Furthermore, allowing full use of low accuracy and negative parallaxes as well for 125 RR Lyraes with -- 2.49$\\leq$[Fe/H]$\\leq$0.07, the maximum likelihood estimation yields the relation, $M_V(RR)$=(0.59$\\pm$0.37)+(0.20$\\pm$0.63)([Fe/H]+1.60), which formally agrees with the recent preferred relation. The same estimation yields again $$ = $0.65\\pm0.33$ for the 99 halo RR Lyraes. Although the formal errors in the latter three parallax estimates are rather large, all of the four results suggest the fainter absolute magnitude, $M_V(RR)$$\\approx$0.6--0.7 at [Fe/H]=--1.6. The present results still provide the lower limit on the age of the universe which is inconsistent with a flat, matter-dominated universe and current estimates of the Hubble constant.

  13. Absolute Calibration of the Radio Astronomy Flux Density Scale at 22 to 43 GHz Using Planck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partridge, B; Perley, R A; Stevens, J; Butler, B J; Rocha, G; Walter, B; Zacchei, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Planck mission detected thousands of extragalactic radio sources at frequencies from 28 to 857 GHz. Planck's calibration is absolute (in the sense that it is based on the satellite's annual motion around the Sun and the temperature of the cosmic microwave background), and its beams are well characterized at sub-percent levels. Thus Planck's flux density measurements of compact sources are absolute in the same sense. We have made coordinated VLA and ATCA observations of 65 strong, unresolved Planck sources in order to transfer Planck's calibration to ground-based instruments at 22, 28, and 43 GHz. The results are compared to microwave flux density scales currently based on planetary observations. Despite the scatter introduced by the variability of many of the sources, the flux density scales are determined to 1-2% accuracy. At 28 GHz, the flux density scale used by the VLA runs 3.6% +- 1.0% below Planck values; at 43 GHz, the discrepancy increases to 6.2% +- 1.4% for both ATCA and the VLA.

  14. Variable Selection for Modeling the Absolute Magnitude at Maximum of Type Ia Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uemura, Makoto; Kawabata, S; Ikeda, Shiro; Maeda, Keiichi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss what is an appropriate set of explanatory variables in order to predict the absolute magnitude at the maximum of Type Ia supernovae. In order to have a good prediction, the error for future data, which is called the "generalization error," should be small. We use cross-validation in order to control the generalization error and LASSO-type estimator in order to choose the set of variables. This approach can be used even in the case that the number of samples is smaller than the number of candidate variables. We studied the Berkeley supernova database with our approach. Candidates of the explanatory variables include normalized spectral data, variables about lines, and previously proposed flux-ratios, as well as the color and light-curve widths. As a result, we confirmed the past understanding about Type Ia supernova: i) The absolute magnitude at maximum depends on the color and light-curve width. ii) The light-curve width depends on the strength of Si II. Recent studies have suggested to add more va...

  15. Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tomlinson, Leroy Omar (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

  16. In situ measurements of nitric oxide in coal-combustion exhaust using a sensor based on a widely tunable external-cavity GaN diode laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, T.N.; Lucht, R.P.; Priyadarsan, S.; Annamalai, K.; Caton, J.A. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Mechanical Engineers

    2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A diode-laser-based sensor has been developed to measure nitric oxide mole fractions using absorption spectroscopy. The sensor is based on sum-frequency mixing of a 395 nm external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) and a 532 run laser in a beta-barium-borate crystal. Using a new tuning scheme, the GaN ECDL wavelength was modulated over 90 GHz without mode hops. The sensor was applied for measurements of the NO mole fraction in the exhaust of a laboratory-scale, 30 kW, coal-fired boiler burner. Absorption measurements were successfully performed despite severe attenuation by scattering from ash particles in the exhaust stream and on the exhaust-section windows. A detection limit (1 sigma) of 4.5 ppm m/root Hz at 700 K was demonstrated in coal-combustion exhaust at a maximum detection rate of 5 Hz.

  17. The effect of fuel and engine design on diesel exhaust particle size distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baumgard, K.J.; Johnson, J.H. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research was to obtain diesel particle size distributions from a 1988 and a 1991 diesel engine using three different fuels and two exhaust control technologies (a ceramic particle trap and an oxidation catalytic converter). The particle size distributions from both engines were used to develop models to estimate the composition of the individual size particles. Nucleation theory of the H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} vapor is used to predict when nuclei-mode particles will form in the dilution tunnel. Combining the theory with the experimental data, the conditions necessary in the dilution tunnel for particle formation are predicted. The paper also contains a discussion on the differences between the 1988 and 1991 engine`s particle size distributions. The results indicated that nuclei mode particles (0.0075--0.046 {micro}m) are formed in the dilution tunnel and consist of more than 80% H{sub 2}O-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} particles when using the 1988 engine and 0.29 wt% sulfur fuel. Nucleation theory indicated that H{sub 2}O-H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} particles may form during dilution at 0.03 wt% fuel sulfur levels and above. The 1991 engine was designed for lower particulate emissions than the 1988 engine and the 1991 engine`s accumulation mode particles (0.046-1.0 {micro}m) were reduced more than 80% by volume compared to the 1988 engine using the same low sulfur fuel. The particle size composition model indicated that using low sulfur fuel and the 1991 engine, the nuclei mode contained more than 45% of the total solid particles and over 85% of the soluble organic fraction.

  18. Absolute x-ray dosimetry on a synchrotron medical beam line with a graphite calorimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harty, P. D., E-mail: Peter.Harty@arpansa.gov.au; Ramanathan, G.; Butler, D. J.; Johnston, P. N. [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia)] [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia); Lye, J. E. [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085, Australia and Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia)] [Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency, Yallambie, Victoria 3085, Australia and Australian Clinical Dosimetry Service, Yallambie, Victoria 3085 (Australia); Hall, C. J. [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)] [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Stevenson, A. W. [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia and CSIRO, Materials Science and Engineering, Clayton Sth Victoria 3169 (Australia)] [Imaging and Medical Beamline, Australian Synchrotron, Clayton, Victoria 3168, Australia and CSIRO, Materials Science and Engineering, Clayton Sth Victoria 3169 (Australia)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The absolute dose rate of the Imaging and Medical Beamline (IMBL) on the Australian Synchrotron was measured with a graphite calorimeter. The calorimetry results were compared to measurements from the existing free-air chamber, to provide a robust determination of the absolute dose in the synchrotron beam and provide confidence in the first implementation of a graphite calorimeter on a synchrotron medical beam line. Methods: The graphite calorimeter has a core which rises in temperature when irradiated by the beam. A collimated x-ray beam from the synchrotron with well-defined edges was used to partially irradiate the core. Two filtration sets were used, one corresponding to an average beam energy of about 80 keV, with dose rate about 50?Gy/s, and the second filtration set corresponding to average beam energy of 90 keV, with dose rate about 20 Gy/s. The temperature rise from this beam was measured by a calibrated thermistor embedded in the core which was then converted to absorbed dose to graphite by multiplying the rise in temperature by the specific heat capacity for graphite and the ratio of cross-sectional areas of the core and beam. Conversion of the measured absorbed dose to graphite to absorbed dose to water was achieved using Monte Carlo calculations with the EGSnrc code. The air kerma measurements from the free-air chamber were converted to absorbed dose to water using the AAPM TG-61 protocol. Results: Absolute measurements of the IMBL dose rate were made using the graphite calorimeter and compared to measurements with the free-air chamber. The measurements were at three different depths in graphite and two different filtrations. The calorimetry measurements at depths in graphite show agreement within 1% with free-air chamber measurements, when converted to absorbed dose to water. The calorimetry at the surface and free-air chamber results show agreement of order 3% when converted to absorbed dose to water. The combined standard uncertainty is 3.9%. Conclusions: The good agreement of the graphite calorimeter and free-air chamber results indicates that both devices are performing as expected. Further investigations at higher dose rates than 50?Gy/s are planned. At higher dose rates, recombination effects for the free-air chamber are much higher and expected to lead to much larger uncertainties. Since the graphite calorimeter does not have problems associated with dose rate, it is an appropriate primary standard detector for the synchrotron IMBL x rays and is the more accurate dosimeter for the higher dose rates expected in radiotherapy applications.

  19. Nutritional requirements of sesame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eller, Joe C

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L)&RARYi ~st t~6~ 0F TEXACO NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS OF SESAME A Thesis By JOE C. ELLER Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in. partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of M... AS TER 0 F SCIENC E January 1958 Major Subject: Agronomy NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS OF SESAME A Thesis JOE C. ELLER Approved. as to style and content by. ' Chairman of Committee Head qg Department January 1958 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The author wishes...

  20. RPAM & Energy Order Requirements

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    430.1C, Real Property Asset Management and DOE O 430.2B, Departmental Energy, Renewable Energy and Transportation Management Requirements, Overlap & Differences Office of...

  1. Required Annual Notices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Required Annual Notices The Women's Health and Cancer Rights Act of 1998 (WHCRA) The medical programs sponsored by LANS will not restrict benefits if you or your dependent...

  2. Transuranic Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

  3. Utilization of coal mine ventilation exhaust as combustion air in gas-fired turbines for electric and/or mechanical power generation. Semi-annual topical report, June 1995--August 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane emitted during underground coal mining operations is a hazard that is dealt with by diluting the methane with fresh air and exhausting the contaminated air to the atmosphere. Unfortunately this waste stream may contain more than 60% of the methane resource from the coal, and in the atmosphere the methane acts as a greenhouse gas with an effect about 24.5 times greater than CO{sub 2}. Though the waste stream is too dilute for normal recovery processes, it can be used as combustion air for a turbine-generator, thereby reducing the turbine fuel requirements while reducing emissions. Preliminary analysis indicates that such a system, built using standard equipment, is economically and environmentally attractive, and has potential for worldwide application.

  4. Can corner-cube absolute gravimeters sense the effects of Special Relativity?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagornyi, V D; Zanimonskiy, Y Y

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic treatment of the finite speed of light correction in absolute gravimeters, as evolved by Rothleitner and Francis in Metrologia 2011, 48 442-445, following the initial publication in Metrologia 2011, 48 187-195, leads to spurious conclusions. The double Doppler shift implemented in the gravimeters obliterates the difference between its relativistic and non-relativistic formulation. Optical heterodyning used in Michelson-type interferometers makes the quadratic Lorenz-like term of the double Doppler shift discernable against the linear term, while in relativistic experiments the quadratic term has to be detected against the unit. The disturbance of the registered trajectory caused by the finite speed of light includes tracking signal delay as intrinsic part not reducible to the Doppler shifts.

  5. Possible Observation of Nuclear Reactor Neutrinos Near the Oscillation Absolute Minimum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Bouchiat

    2003-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    After a summary of the basic three neutrino oscillation formalism we review briefly our present empirical knowledge of the oscillation parameters and conclude that the 2-neutrinos model is adequate to describe the survival probability of the electronic neutrino P(nue->nue). Then we proceed to the evaluation of P(nue->nue) relative to the antineutrinos emitted by the nuclear power stations presently in operation along the the Rhone valley. We assume that a detector has been installed in a existing cavity located under the Mont Ventoux at a depth equivalent to 1500 m of water. We show that such an experiment would provide the opportunity to observe neutrinos near the oscillation absolute minimum. We end by a rough estimate of the counting rate.

  6. The effective beta sensitivity to the incident neutron energy dependence of the absolute delayed neutron yields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Angelo, A. (ENEA, Casaccia (Italy)); Filip, A. (Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance (France). Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The uncertainty of the [sup 235]U, [sup 239]Pu, and [sup 238]U absolute delayed neutron yields v[sub d] is one of the principal sources of uncertainty in predicting the fission reactor reactivity scale [beta][sub eff]. The current uncertainties in the dependence of v[sub d] on incident neutron energy is investigated for significance in the evaluation of [beta][sub eff]. The uncertainty effects on the GODIVA, JEZEBEL, Zero Power Reactor, SNEAK, and Masurca benchmark facility calculations are analyzed using ENDF/B and JEF basic data. Different assumptions about the energy dependence result in variations of up to 5% in the reactor spectrum averaged values of v[sub d], and these would result in variations of up to [approximately] 2% in the value of [beta][sub eff] for a typical liquid-metal fast breeder reactor.

  7. The modified dynamics (MOND) predicts an absolute maximum to the acceleration produced by `dark halos'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafael Brada; Mordehai Milgrom

    1998-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We have recently discovered that the modified dynamics (MOND) implies some universal upper bound on the acceleration that can be contributed by a `dark halo'--assumed in a Newtonian analysis to account for the effects of MOND. Not surprisingly, the limit is of the order of the acceleration constant of the theory. This can be contrasted directly with the results of structure-formation simulations. The new limit is substantial and different from earlier MOND acceleration limits (discussed in connection with the MOND explanation of the Freeman law for galaxy disks, and the Fish law for ellipticals): It pertains to the `halo', and not to the observed galaxy; it is absolute, and independent of further physical assumptions on the nature of the galactic system; and it applies at all radii, whereas the other limits apply only to the mean acceleration in the system.

  8. Measurement of the Absolute Branching Fraction of D0 to K- pi+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Boutigny, D.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Abrams, G.S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Button-Shafer, J.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors measure the absolute branching fraction for D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +} using partial reconstruction of {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}X{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decays, in which only the charged lepton and the pion from the decay D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} are used. Based on a data sample of 230 million B{bar B} pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC, they obtain {Beta}(D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = (4.007 {+-} 0.037 {+-} 0.070)%, where the first error is statistical and the second error is systematic.

  9. Modeling the Air Flow in the 3410 Building Filtered Exhaust Stack System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Barnett, J. M.; Suffield, Sarah R.

    2013-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Additional ventilation capacity has been designed for the 3410 Building filtered exhaust stack system. The updated system will increase the number of fans from two to three and will include ductwork to incorporate the new fan into the existing stack. Stack operations will involve running various two-fan combinations at any given time. The air monitoring system of the existing two-fan stack was previously found to be in compliance with the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard, however it is not known if the modified (three-fan) system will comply. Subsequently, a full-scale three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the modified stack system has been created to examine the sampling location for compliance with the standard. The CFD modeling results show good agreement with testing data collected from the existing 3410 Building stack and suggest that velocity uniformity and flow angles will remain well within acceptance criteria when the third fan and associated ductwork is installed. This includes two-fan flow rates up to 31,840 cfm for any of the two-fan combinations. For simulation cases in which tracer gas and particles are introduced in the main duct, the model predicts that both particle and tracer gas coefficients of variance (COVs) may be larger than the acceptable 20 percent criterion of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard for each of the two-fan, 31,840 cfm combinations. Simulations in which the tracers are introduced near the fans result in improved, though marginally acceptable, COV values for the tracers. Due to the remaining uncertainty that the stack will qualify with the addition of the third fan and high flow rates, a stationary air blender from Blender Products, Inc. is considered for inclusion in the stack system. A model of the air blender has been developed and incorporated into the CFD model. Simulation results from the CFD model that includes the air blender show striking improvements in tracer gas mixing and tracer particle dispersion. The results of these simulations suggest the air blender should be included in the stack system to ensure qualification of the stack.

  10. General Responsibilities and Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The material presented in this guide provides suggestions and acceptable ways of implementing DOE M 435.1-1 and should not be viewed as additional or mandatory requirements. The objective of the guide is to ensure that responsible individuals understand what is necessary and acceptable for implementing the requirements of DOE M 435.1-1.

  11. Research on the Integration Characteristics of Cooling Energy Recovery from Room Exhausting Cool Air in Summer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, W.; Wu, J.; Wei, Y.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, the design and construction of buildings and building energy systems are far from reasonable. The requirement and consumption of primary energy resources is aggravated, the use of building energy is free and wasteful, and pollution...

  12. Fuel-optimal Earth-Mars trajectories using low-thrust exhaust-modulated plasma propulsion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nah, Ren Sang

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this thesis is the determination of fuel-optimal interplanetary trajectories of a spacecraft using a variable specific impulse thruster. The spacecraft departs from an Earth parking orbit and is required to establish a specified...

  13. Test plan for N2 HEPA filters assembly shop stock used on PFP E4 exhaust system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DICK, J.D.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Plutonium Reclamation Facility (PRF) Self-contained HEPA filters, encased in wooden frames and boxes, are installed in the E4 Exhaust Ventilation System to provide confinement of radioactive releases to the environment and confinement of radioactive contamination within designated zones inside the facility. Recently during the routine testing in-leakage was discovered downstream of the Self-contained HEPA filters boxes. This Test Plan describes the approach to conduct investigation of the root causes for the in-leakage of HEPA filters.

  14. Promulgating Nuclear Safety Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Applies to all Nuclear Safety Requirements Adopted by the Department to Govern the Conduct of its Nuclear Activities. Cancels DOE P 410.1. Canceled by DOE N 251.85.

  15. BES Science Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedOffice of Basic Energy Sciences. This is LBNL report LBNL-BES Science Network Requirements Report of the Basic Energy

  16. Timeline for Net Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x By July 31 of each Forecast Year, BPA publishes all Load Following customers' Net Requirements data for the two years of the upcoming Rate Period. 17.6.1 7312010 Yes...

  17. Conditions Required by Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed I.

    No No Sto H 2 NoIs it required by law "Violence on children"?164.512 (c) (1) H CE may disclose to government to LEO HCE may not disclose to LEO H No Yes No Required by law: "reporting certain type of injuries"? H disclose to LEO H 164.512 (f) (1) (ii) (C)(2) It provides that the request is specific and limited in scope

  18. Requirements | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS September 9,Award RecipientsActMission to ChinaRequirements Requirements

  19. Decontamination and demolition of a former plutonium processing facility`s process exhaust system, firescreen, and filter plenum buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFrate, P.J. Jr.; Stout, D.S.; Elliott, J.W.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Decommissioning Project has decontaminated, demolished, and decommissioned a process exhaust system, two filter plenum buildings, and a firescreen plenum structure at Technical Area 21 (TA-2 1). The project began in August 1995 and was completed in January 1996. These high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums and associated ventilation ductwork provided process exhaust to fume hoods and glove boxes in TA-21 Buildings 2 through 5 when these buildings were active plutonium and uranium processing and research facilities. This paper summarizes the history of TA-21 plutonium and uranium processing and research activities and provides a detailed discussion of integrated work process controls, characterize-as-you-go methodology, unique engineering controls, decontamination techniques, demolition methodology, waste minimization, and volume reduction. Also presented in detail are the challenges facing the LANL Decommissioning Project to safely and economically decontaminate and demolish surplus facilities and the unique solutions to tough problems. This paper also shows the effectiveness of the integrated work package concept to control work through all phases.

  20. Decontamination and demolition of a former plutonium processing facility`s process exhaust system, firescreen, and filter plenum buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaFrate, P.J. Jr.; Stout, D.S.; Elliott, J.W.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Decommissioning Project has decontaminated, demolished, and decommissioned a process exhaust system, two filter plenum buildings, and a firescreen plenum structure at Technical Area 21 (TA-21). The project began in August 1995 and was completed in January 1996. These high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter plenums and associated ventilation ductwork provided process exhaust to fume hoods and glove boxes in TA-21 Buildings 2 through 5 when these buildings were active plutonium and uranium processing and research facilities. This paper summarizes the history of TA-21 plutonium and uranium processing and research activities and provides a detailed discussion of integrated work process controls, characterize-as-you-go methodology, unique engineering controls, decontamination techniques, demolition methodology, waste minimization, and volume reduction. Also presented in detail are the challenges facing the LANL Decommissioning Project to safely and economically decontaminate and demolish surplus facilities and the unique solutions to tough problems. This paper also shows the effectiveness of the integrated work package concept to control work through all phases.

  1. Development of a Simple Field Test for Vehicle Exhaust to Detect Illicit Use of Dyed Diesel Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, Scott D.; Wright, Bob W.

    2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of tax-free dyed fuel on public highways in the United States provides a convenient way of evading taxes. Current enforcement involves visual inspection for the red azo dye added to the fuel to designate its tax-free status. This approach has shortcomings such as the invasive nature of the tests and/or various deceptive tactics applied by tax evaders. A test designed to detect dyed fuel use by analyzing the exhaust would circumvent these shortcomings. This paper describes the development of a simple color spot test designed to detect the use of tax-free (dyed) diesel fuel by analyzing the engine exhaust. Development first investigated the combustion products of C.I. Solvent Red 164 (the azo dye formulation used in the United States to tag tax-free fuel). A variety of aryl amines were identified as characteristic molecular remnants that appear to survive combustion. A number of microanalytical color tests specific for aryl amines were then investigated. One test based on the use of 4-(dimethylamino)benzaldehyde seemed particularly applicable and was used in a proof-of-principle experiment. The 4-(dimethylamino)benzaldehyde color spot test was able to clearly distinguish between engines burning regular and dyed diesel fuel. Further development will refine this color spot test to provide an easy-to-use field test for Internal Revenue Service Field Compliance specialists.

  2. Design and Synthesis of Visible Isotope-Coded Affinity Tags for the Absolute Quantification of Specific Proteins in Complex Mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelb, Michael

    for selective enrichment of tag peptides. Another cysteine peptide enrichment and isotope tagging scheme hasDesign and Synthesis of Visible Isotope-Coded Affinity Tags for the Absolute Quantification spectrometry is most useful when quantitative data is also obtained. We recently introduced isotope

  3. Absolute orientation-dependent anisotropic TiN,,111... island step energies and stiffnesses from shape fluctuation analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khare, Sanjay V.

    by alternating 110 steps, which form 100 and 110 nanofacets with the terrace. Relative step energiesAbsolute orientation-dependent anisotropic TiN,,111... island step energies and stiffnesses from of the island per unit TiN area. We find that for alternating S1 and S2 110 steps, the ratio 1 / 2 0.72 0

  4. A versatile thermoelectric temperature controller with 10 mK reproducibility and 100 mK absolute accuracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Libbrecht, Kenneth G.

    A versatile thermoelectric temperature controller with 10 mK reproducibility and 100 mK absolute December 2009 We describe a general-purpose thermoelectric temperature controller with 1 mK stability, 10 m elements and thermoelectric modules to heat or cool in the 40 to 40 °C range. A schematic of our controller

  5. Absolute Free Energy and Entropy of a Mobile Loop of the Enzyme Acetylcholinesterase Mihail Mihailescu and Hagai Meirovitch*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meirovitch, Hagai

    Absolute Free Energy and Entropy of a Mobile Loop of the Enzyme Acetylcholinesterase Mihail dissociation measurements suggest that the free-energy (F) penalty for the loop displacement is F ) Ffree contribution of water to the total free energy. Namely, for water densities close to the experimental value

  6. Setting Whole-Building Absolute Energy Use Targets for the K-12 School, Retail, and Healthcare Sectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leach, M.; Bonnema, E.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper helps owners' efficiency representatives to inform executive management, contract development, and project management staff as to how specifying and applying whole-building absolute energy use targets for new construction or renovation projects can improve the operational energy performance of commercial buildings.

  7. Direct and absolute temperature mapping and heat transfer measurements in diode-end-pumped Yb:YAG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Direct and absolute temperature mapping and heat transfer measurements in diode-end-pumped Yb and heat sink grease respectively). The dynamics of thermal effects is also presented. PACS 42.55.Xi (Diode-pumped in a diode-end-pumped Yb:YAG crystal, using a calibrated infrared camera, with a 60-µm spatial resolution

  8. Estimation of Absolute Free Energies of Hydration using Continuum Methods: Accuracy of Partial Charge Models and Optimization of Nonpolar Contributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rizzo, Robert C.

    Estimation of Absolute Free Energies of Hydration using Continuum Methods: Accuracy of Partial, and Irwin D. Kuntz Supporting Information Table S1. Experimental Free Energies of Hydration (Ghyd) in kcal,2-dimethylcyclohexane 1.58 36 trans-1,4-dimethylcyclohexane 2.11 37 ethene 1.28 38 propene 1.32 39 but-1-ene 1.38 40

  9. Phase diagram of a model protein derived by exhaustive enumeration of the conformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinner, Aaron

    available to a polypeptide chain is important for a description of the protein folding process. We use a 16 results agree well with analytical heteropolymer theory. A full understanding of protein folding requires with tightly packed sidechains is the first-order ("all-or-none") transition observed in the protein folding

  10. Population effects on the red giant clump absolute magnitude The K-band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salaris, M; Salaris, Maurizio

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed analysis of the behaviour of the Red Clump K-band absolute magnitude (M(K,RC)) in simple and composite stellar populations, in light of its use as standard candle for distance determinations. The advantage of using M(K,RC), following recent empirical calibrations of its value for the solar neighbourhood, arises from its very low sensitivity to the extinction by interstellar dust. We provide data and equations which allow the determination of the K-band population correction Delta(M(K,RC)) (difference between the Red Clump brightness in the solar neighbourhood and in the population under scrutiny) for any generic stellar population. These data complement the results presented in Girardi & Salaris(2001) for the V- and I-band. We show how data from galactic open clusters consistently support our predicted Delta(M(V,RC)), Delta(M(I,RC)) and Delta(M(K,RC)) values. Multiband VIK population corrections for various galaxy systems are provided. They can be used in conjunction with the method ...

  11. In-Flight Measurement of the Absolute Energy Scale of the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Ajello, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Allafort, A.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Atwood, W.B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Axelsson, M.; /Stockholm U. /Stockholm U., OKC /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Barbiellini, G.; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bellazzini, R.; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, B.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bloom, E.D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bonamente, E.; /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; Borgland, A.W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bouvier, A.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Buehler, R.; /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Buson, S.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /CSIC, Catalunya /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Unlisted, US /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /ASDC, Frascati /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Montpellier U. /ASDC, Frascati /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Montpellier U. /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /Ecole Polytechnique /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Ecole Polytechnique /Hiroshima U. /Stanford U., HEPL /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Bari Polytechnic /INFN, Bari /INFN, Bari /NASA, Goddard /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U.; /more authors..

    2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Area Telescope (LAT) on-board the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope is a pair-conversion telescope designed to survey the gamma-ray sky from 20 MeV to several hundreds of GeV. In this energy band there are no astronomical sources with sufficiently well known and sharp spectral features to allow an absolute calibration of the LAT energy scale. However, the geomagnetic cutoff in the cosmic ray electron-plus-positron (CRE) spectrum in low Earth orbit does provide such a spectral feature. The energy and spectral shape of this cutoff can be calculated with the aid of a numerical code tracing charged particles in the Earth's magnetic field. By comparing the cutoff value with that measured by the LAT in different geomagnetic positions, we have obtained several calibration points between {approx}6 and {approx}13 GeV with an estimated uncertainty of {approx}2%. An energy calibration with such high accuracy reduces the systematic uncertainty in LAT measurements of, for example, the spectral cutoff in the emission from gamma ray pulsars.

  12. Absolute frequency measurement of the In$^{+}$ clock transition with a mode-locked laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. von Zanthier; Th. Becker; M. Eichenseer; A. Yu. Nevsky; Ch. Schwedes; E. Peik; H. Walther; R. Holzwarth; J. Reichert; Th. Udem; T. W. Hänsch; P. V. Pokasov; M. N. Skvortsov; S. N. Bagayev

    2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The absolute frequency of the In$^{+}$ $5s^{2 1}S_{0}$ - $5s5p^{3}P_{0}$ clock transition at 237 nm was measured with an accuracy of 1.8 parts in $10^{13}$. Using a phase-coherent frequency chain, we compared the $^{1}S_{0}$ - $^{3}P_{0}$ transition with a methane-stabilized He-Ne laser at 3.39 $\\mu$m which was calibrated against an atomic cesium fountain clock. A frequency gap of 37 THz at the fourth harmonic of the He-Ne standard was bridged by a frequency comb generated by a mode-locked femtosecond laser. The frequency of the In$^{+}$ clock transition was found to be $1 267 402 452 899.92 (0.23)$ kHz, the accuracy being limited by the uncertainty of the He-Ne laser reference. This represents an improvement in accuracy of more than 2 orders of magnitude on previous measurements of the line and now stands as the most accurate measurement of an optical transition in a single ion.

  13. Requirements Definition Stage

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter addresses development of a Software Configuration Management Plan to track and control work products, analysis of the system owner/users' business processes and needs, translation of those processes and needs into formal requirements, and planning the testing activities to validate the performance of the software product.

  14. Requirements for Xenon International

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  15. New Method for Calculating the Absolute Free Energy of Binding: The Effect of a Mobile Loop on the Avidin/Biotin Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meirovitch, Hagai

    New Method for Calculating the Absolute Free Energy of Binding: The Effect of a Mobile Loop energy and entropy. HSMD is extended here for the first time for calculating the absolute free energy change to the total free energy of binding is calculated here for the first time. Our result, A0 ) -24

  16. Lower and upper bounds for the absolute free energy by the hypothetical scanning Monte Carlo method: Application to liquid argon and water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meirovitch, Hagai

    Lower and upper bounds for the absolute free energy by the hypothetical scanning Monte Carlo method The hypothetical scanning HS method is a general approach for calculating the absolute entropy S and free energy F to provide the free energy through the analysis of a single configuration. © 2004 American Institute

  17. Observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: A reappraisal after WMAP-3y and first MINOS results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; A. Marrone; A. Melchiorri; A. Palazzo; P. Serra; J. Silk; A. Slosar

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In the light of recent neutrino oscillation and non-oscillation data, we revisit the phenomenological constraints applicable to three observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: The effective neutrino mass in single beta decay (m_beta); the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta decay (m_2beta); and the sum of neutrino masses in cosmology (Sigma). In particular, we include the constraints coming from the first Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) data and from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) three-year (3y) data, as well as other relevant cosmological data and priors. We find that the largest neutrino squared mass difference is determined with a 15% accuracy (at 2-sigma) after adding MINOS to world data. We also find upper bounds on the sum of neutrino masses Sigma ranging from ~2 eV (WMAP-3y data only) to ~0.2 eV (all cosmological data) at 2-sigma, in agreement with previous studies. In addition, we discuss the connection of such bounds with those placed on the matter power spectrum normalization parameter sigma_8. We show how the partial degeneracy between Sigma and sigma_8 in WMAP-3y data is broken by adding further cosmological data, and how the overall preference of such data for relatively high values of sigma_8 pushes the upper bound of Sigma in the sub-eV range. Finally, for various combination of data sets, we revisit the (in)compatibility between current Sigma and m_2beta constraints (and claims), and derive quantitative predictions for future single and double beta decay experiments.

  18. Observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: Constraints and correlations from world neutrino data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; A. Marrone; A. Melchiorri; A. Palazzo; P. Serra; J. Silk

    2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of three-flavor neutrino mixing, we present a thorough study of the phenomenological constraints applicable to three observables sensitive to absolute neutrino masses: The effective neutrino mass in Tritium beta decay (m_beta); the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta decay (m_2beta); and the sum of neutrino masses in cosmology (Sigma). We discuss the correlations among these variables which arise from the combination of all the available neutrino oscillation data, in both normal and inverse neutrino mass hierarchy. We set upper limits on m_beta by combining updated results from the Mainz and Troitsk experiments. We also consider the latest results on m_2beta from the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment, both with and without the lower bound claimed by such experiment. We derive upper limits on Sigma from an updated combination of data from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite and the 2 degrees Fields (2dF) Galaxy Redshifts Survey, with and without Lyman-alpha forest data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), in models with a non-zero running of the spectral index of primordial inflationary perturbations. The results are discussed in terms of two-dimensional projections of the globally allowed region in the (m_beta,m_2beta,Sigma) parameter space, which neatly show the relative impact of each data set. In particular, the (in)compatibility between Sigma and m_2beta constraints is highlighted for various combinations of data. We also briefly discuss how future neutrino data (both oscillatory and non-oscillatory) can further probe the currently allowed regions.

  19. Absolute kinematics of radio source components in the complete S5 polar cap sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. Perez-Torres; J. M. Marcaide; J. C. Guirado; E. Ros

    2004-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed the thirteen extragalactic radio sources of the complete S5 polar cap sample at 15.4 GHz with the Very Long Baseline Array, on 27 July 1999 (1999.57) and 15 June 2000 (2000.46). We present the maps from those two epochs, along with maps obtained from observations of the 2 cm VLBA survey for some of the sources of the sample, making a total of 40 maps. We discuss the apparent morphological changes displayed by the radio sources between the observing epochs. Our VLBA observations correspond to the first two epochs at 15.4 GHz of a program to study the absolute kinematics of the radio source components of the members of the sample, by means of phase delay astrometry at 8.4 GHz, 15.4 GHz, and 43 GHz. Our 15.4 GHz VLBA imaging allowed us to disentangle the inner milliarcsecond structure of some of the sources, thus resolving components that appeared blended at 8.4 GHz. For most of the sources, we identified the brightest feature in each radio source with the core. These identifications are supported by the spectral index estimates for those brightest features, which are in general flat, or even inverted. Most of the sources display core-dominance in the overall emission. We find that three of the sources have their most inverted spectrum component shifted with respect to the origin in the map, which approximately coincides with the peak-of-brightness at both 15.4 GHz and 8.4 GHz.

  20. A New Light-Speed Anisotropy Experiment: Absolute Motion and Gravitational Waves Detected

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T Cahill

    2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from a new experiment measuring the anisotropy of the one-way speed of EM waves in a coaxial cable, gives the speed of light as 300,000+/-400+/-20km/s in a measured direction RA=5.5+/-2hrs, Dec=70+/-10deg S, is shown to be in excellent agreement with the results from seven previous anisotropy experiments, particularly those of Miller (1925/26), and even those of Michelson and Morley (1887). The Miller gas-mode interferometer results, and those from the RF coaxial cable experiments of Torr and Kolen (1983), De Witte (1991) and the new experiment all reveal the presence of gravitational waves, as indicated by the last +/- variations above, but of a kind different from those supposedly predicted by General Relativity. The understanding of the operation of the Michelson interferometer in gas-mode was only achieved in 2002 and involved a calibration for the interferometer that necessarily involved Special Relativity effects and the refractive index of the gas in the light paths. The results demonstrate the reality of the Fitzgerald-Lorentz contraction as an observer independent relativistic effect. A common misunderstanding is that the anisotropy of the speed of light is necessarily in conflict with Special Relativity and Lorentz symmetry - this is explained. All eight experiments and theory show that we have both anisotropy of the speed of light and relativistic effects, and that a dynamical 3-space exists - that absolute motion through that space has been repeatedly observed since 1887. These developments completely change fundamental physics and our understanding of reality.

  1. Technical Bulletin A Guide to Absolute Counting Using the BD Accuri C6 Flow Cytometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Contents 1 Introduction 2 Preventive maintenance 2 Performance validation 3 Sample preparation 5 Counting Preventive maintenance As with any laboratory instrument, optimal performance requires proper system maintenance. The following table shows the suggested preventive maintenance routine. For detailed procedures

  2. Mineral Requirements of Sheep.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1918-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    constituents in feed, residues, and excrements were estimated. In connection with other digestion experiments, estimates were made of certain ash constituents in feeds, excrements and urine. The results of this work throw light upon the mineral requirements...,11 grams phosphoric acid. The ratio of lime to phosphoric acid in tri- calcium phosphate is 1 :0.80. Table 7.-Average magnesia eaten and digested. BALANCE EXPEBIMENTS In twenty tests with ten rations, the urine was analyzed in addition to the feeds...

  3. LEGACY MANAGEMENT REQUIRES INFORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CONNELL, C.W.; HILDEBRAND, R.D.

    2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ''Legacy Management Requires Information'' describes the goal(s) of the US Department of Energy's Office of Legacy Management (LM) relative to maintaining critical records and the way those goals are being addressed at Hanford. The paper discusses the current practices for document control, as well as the use of modern databases for both storing and accessing the data to support cleanup decisions. In addition to the information goals of LM, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the ''Tri-Party Agreement'' (TPA) is one of the main drivers in documentation and data management. The TPA, which specifies discrete milestones for cleaning up the Hanford Site, is a legally binding agreement among the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The TPA requires that DOE provide the lead regulatory agency with the results of analytical laboratory and non-laboratory tests/readings to help guide them in making decisions. The Agreement also calls for each signatory to preserve--for at least ten years after the Agreement has ended--all of the records in its or its contractors, possession related to sampling, analysis, investigations, and monitoring conducted. The tools used at Hanford to meet TPA requirements are also the tools that can satisfy the needs of LM.

  4. BER Science Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2010 ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research, of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the science programs funded by BER. The requirements identified at the workshop are summarized and described in more detail in the case studies and the Findings section. A number of common themes emerged from the case studies and workshop discussions. One is that BER science, like many other disciplines, is becoming more and more distributed and collaborative in nature. Another common theme is that data set sizes are exploding. Climate Science in particular is on the verge of needing to manage exabytes of data, and Genomics is on the verge of a huge paradigm shift in the number of sites with sequencers and the amount of sequencer data being generated.

  5. Absolute calibration of image plates for electrons at energy between 100 keV and 4 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Hui; Back, Norman L.; Eder, David C.; MacPhee, Andrew G.; Ping Yuan; Song, Peter M.; Throop, Alan [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550-9234 (United States); Bartal, Teresa; Beg, F. N. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States); Link, Anthony J.; Van Woerkom, Linn [Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We measured the absolute response of image plate (Fuji BAS SR2040) for electrons at energies between 100 keV and 4 MeV using an electron spectrometer. The electron source was produced from a short pulse laser irradiated on solid density targets. This paper presents the calibration results of image plate photon stimulated luminescence per electron at this energy range. The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNPX results are also presented for three representative incident angles onto the image plates and corresponding electron energy depositions at these angles. These provide a complete set of tools that allows extraction of our absolute calibration to other spectrometer setting at this electron energy range.

  6. The earth's absolute gravitation potential function in the prospect 'gravitational potential metering' of geological objects and earthquake centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksandr Fridrikson; Marina Kasatochkina

    2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct problem of the detection of the Earth's absolute gravitation potential maximum value (MGP) was solved. The inverse problem finding of the Earth maximum gravitation (where there is a maximum of gravitation field intensity and a potential function has a 'bending point') with the help of MGP was solved as well. The obtained results show that the revealed Earth maximum gravitation coincides quite strictly with the cseismic D" layer on the border of the inner and outer (liquid) core. The validity of the method of an absolute gravitation potential detection by the equal- potential velocity was proved as 'gravitation potential measurement' or 'Vs-gravity method'. The prospects of this method for detecting of low-power or distant geological objects with abnormal density and the possible earthquakes with low density was shown.

  7. Telescope Spectrophotometric and Absolute Flux Calibration, and National Security Applications, Using a Tunable Laser on a Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin Albert; William Burgett; Jason Rhodes

    2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a tunable laser-based satellite-mounted spectrophotometric and absolute flux calibration system, to be utilized by ground- and space-based telescopes. As spectrophotometric calibration may play a significant role in the accuracy of photometric redshift measurement, and photometric redshift accuracy is important for measuring dark energy using SNIa, weak gravitational lensing, and baryon oscillations, a method for reducing such uncertainties is needed. We propose to improve spectrophotometric calibration, currently obtained using standard stars, by placing a tunable laser and a wide-angle light source on a satellite by early next decade (perhaps included in the upgrade to the GPS satellite network) to improve absolute flux calibration and relative spectrophotometric calibration across the visible and near-infrared spectrum. As well as fundamental astrophysical applications, the system proposed here potentially has broad utility for defense and national security applications such as ground target illumination and space communication.

  8. Absolute infrared vibrational band intensities of molecular ions determined by direct laser absorption spectroscopy in fast ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keim, E.R.; Polak, M.L.; Owrutsky, J.C.; Coe, J.V.; Saykally, R.J. (Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, CA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technique of direct laser absorption spectroscopy in fast ion beams has been employed for the determination of absolute integrated band intensities ({ital S}{sup 0}{sub {ital v}}) for the {nu}{sub 3} fundamental bands of H{sub 3}O{sup +} and NH{sup +}{sub 4}. In addition, the absolute band intensities for the {nu}{sub 1} fundamental bands of HN{sup +}{sub 2} and HCO{sup +} have been remeasured. The values obtained in units of cm{sup {minus}2} atm{sup {minus}1} at STP are 1880(290) and 580(90) for the {nu}{sub 1} fundamentals of HN{sup +}{sub 2} and HCO{sup +}, respectively; and 4000(800) and 1220(190) for the {nu}{sub 3} fundamentals of H{sub 3}O{sup +} and NH{sup +}{sub 4}, respectively. Comparisons with {ital ab} {ital initio} results are presented.

  9. Absolute frequency measurements of 85Rb nF7/2 Rydberg states using purely optical detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. A. M. Johnson; H. O. Majeed; B. Sanguinetti; Th. Becker; B. T. H. Varcoe

    2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-step laser excitation scheme is used to make absolute frequency measurements of highly excited nF7/2 Rydberg states in 85Rb for principal quantum numbers n=33-100. This work demonstrates the first absolute frequency measurements of rubidium Rydberg levels using a purely optical detection scheme. The Rydberg states are excited in a heated Rb vapour cell and Doppler free signals are detected via purely optical means. All of the frequency measurements are made using a wavemeter which is calibrated against a GPS disciplined self-referenced optical frequency comb. We find that the measured levels have a very high frequency stability, and are especially robust to electric fields. The apparatus has allowed measurements of the states to an accuracy of 8.0MHz. The new measurements are analysed by extracting the modified Rydberg-Ritz series parameters.

  10. Absolute spin calibration of an electron spin polarimeter by spin-resolved photoemission from the Au(111) surface states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cacho, Cephise M. [Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14, km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Photon Science Department, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Vlaic, Sergio [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trieste, via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy); Malvestuto, Marco; Ressel, Barbara [Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14, km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Seddon, Elaine A. [Photon Science Department, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Daresbury WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Parmigiani, Fulvio [Sincrotrone Trieste, Strada Statale 14, km 163,5 in AREA Science Park, 34012 Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trieste, via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we report the absolute characterization of a spin polarimeter by measuring the Sherman function with high precision. These results have been obtained from the analysis of the spin and angle-resolved photoemission spectra of Au(111) surface states. The measurements have been performed with a 250 kHz repetition rate Ti:sapphire amplified laser system combined with a high energy-, angle-, and spin-resolving time-of-flight electron spectrometer.

  11. Constraining the absolute neutrino mass scale and Majorana CP violating phases by future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Nunokawa; W. J. C. Teves; R. Zukanovich Funchal

    2002-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Assuming that neutrinos are Majorana particles, in a three generation framework, current and future neutrino oscillation experiments can determine six out of the nine parameters which fully describe the structure of the neutrino mass matrix. We try to clarify the interplay among the remaining parameters, the absolute neutrino mass scale and two CP violating Majorana phases, and how they can be accessed by future neutrinoless double beta ($0\

  12. Theoretical full power correction factors as related to changes in ambient temperature, pressure and absolute humidity for aircraft turbine engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphael, Michel Antoun

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IN AMBIENT TEMPERATURE, PRESSURF. AND ABSOLUTE HUMIDITY FOR AIRCRAFT TURBINE ENGINES (August 1969) Michael Antoun Raphael B. S. (Mechanical Engineering) Texas A&M University Directed by: Professor Stanley H, Lowy ABSTRACT Power losses in aircraft gas... rated at standard atmospheric conditions (i. e, ambient temperature 69 F 3'Fend atmospheric pressure 29. 92 in. Hg. dry) . Obviously this same turbine will not be exposed to such standard conditions; therefore we have a change in power directly...

  13. Detection of multimode spatial correlation in PDC and application to the absolute calibration of a CCD camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brida, Giorgio; Genovese, Marco; Rastello, Maria Luisa; Ruo-Berchera, Ivano

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and demonstrate experimentally a new method based on the spatial entanglement for the absolute calibration of analog detector. The idea consists on measuring the sub-shot-noise intensity correlation between two branches of parametric down conversion, containing many pairwise correlated spatial modes. We calibrate a scientific CCD camera and a preliminary evaluation of the statistical uncertainty indicates the metrological interest of the method.

  14. Detection of multimode spatial correlation in PDC and application to the absolute calibration of a CCD camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giorgio Brida; Ivo Pietro Degiovanni; Marco Genovese; Maria Luisa Rastello; Ivano Ruo-Berchera

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and demonstrate experimentally a new method based on the spatial entanglement for the absolute calibration of analog detector. The idea consists on measuring the sub-shot-noise intensity correlation between two branches of parametric down conversion, containing many pairwise correlated spatial modes. We calibrate a scientific CCD camera and a preliminary evaluation of the statistical uncertainty indicates the metrological interest of the method.

  15. Method and system for the combination of non-thermal plasma and metal/metal oxide doped .gamma.-alumina catalysts for diesel engine exhaust aftertreatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aardahl, Christopher L. (Richland, WA); Balmer-Miller, Mari Lou (West Richland, WA); Chanda, Ashok (Peoria, IL); Habeger, Craig F. (West Richland, WA); Koshkarian, Kent A. (Peoria, IL); Park, Paul W. (Peoria, IL)

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure pertains to a system and method for treatment of oxygen rich exhaust and more specifically to a method and system that combines non-thermal plasma with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina catalyst. Current catalyst systems for the treatment of oxygen rich exhaust are capable of achieving only approximately 7 to 12% NO.sub.x reduction as a passive system and only 25 40% reduction when a supplemental hydrocarbon reductant is injected into the exhaust stream. It has been found that treatment of an oxygen rich exhaust initially with a non-thermal plasma and followed by subsequent treatment with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina prepared by the sol gel method is capable of increasing the NO.sub.x reduction to a level of approximately 90% in the absence of SO.sub.2 and 80% in the presence of 20 ppm of SO.sub.2. Especially useful metals have been found to be indium, gallium, and tin.

  16. Extending Exhaust Gas Recirculation Limits in Diesel Engines Robert M. Wagner, Johney B. Green, Jr., John M. Storey, and C. Stuart Daw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tennessee, University of

    1 Extending Exhaust Gas Recirculation Limits in Diesel Engines Robert M. Wagner, Johney B. Green) for reduced nitro- gen oxide emissions from diesel engines. The research objective is to develop fundamental in- formation about the relationship between EGR parameters and diesel combustion instability

  17. Finding new reserves of oil and gas As the world's reserves of oil and gas become exhausted, we urgently need to find new

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Jim

    Finding new reserves of oil and gas As the world's reserves of oil and gas become exhausted, we urgently need to find new fields to answer our energy needs. Oil companies are keen to use novel techniques) techniques represent arguably the most significant technological advance in the field of oil exploration

  18. BES Science Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian; Dart, Eli; Biocca, A.; Carlson, R.; Chen, J.; Cotter, S.; Dattoria, V.; Davenport, J.; Gaenko, A.; Kent, P.; Lamm, M.; Miller, S.; Mundy, C.; Ndousse, T.; Pederson, M.; Perazzo, A.; Popescu, R.; Rouson, D.; Sekine, Y.; Sumpter, B.; Wang, C.-Z.; Whitelam, S.; Zurawski, J.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivityfor the US Department of Energy Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office ofScience programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years.

  19. NERSC Requirements Workshop November

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Saleshttp://www.fnal.gov/directorate/nalcal/nalcal02_07_05_files/nalcal.gif Directorate - Events -ExascalemadeArchivalRequirements

  20. Requirements Review Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Scienceand Requirements Recently ApprovedReliability TechnologyRenewalReportReportsJ.TO9Complex

  1. Documentation Requirements for Sensory Impairments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Documentation Requirements for Sensory Impairments Vision and Hearing Students, faculty, staff documentation requirements: 1. Requirements of the PRACTITIONER: A) Ophthalmologists and optometrists of interest. C) Documentation must be typed, dated and signed by the evaluator and submitted to ODR

  2. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES Plan Requirements Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES Plan Requirements Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group Career: GPH RQ = Requirement Program: 01848 LN = Line Plan: 3200MPH RG 5298 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES REQUIREMENTS, 643, 653, 675, 677 or 695 LN 0030 - Environmental Health Sciences: EHS 501, 506, 507 or 508 LN 0040

  3. A Wireless Batch Sealed Absolute Capacitive Pressure Sensor Orhan Akar1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akin, Tayfun

    -etch stop technique. Fabricated devices measure 2.6x1.6 mm 2 in size and houses 24 turns of gold, however, these devices are often big and require a power source in the form of an implanted battery pressure sensors. The structure utilizes a parallel inductor-capacitor resonant circuit. The capacitor

  4. Equipment Operational Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

    2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

  5. ENGINEERING PHYSICS BSE Plan Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    ENGINEERING PHYSICS BSE Plan Requirements 1 Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group Career: UENG RQ = Requirement Program: LN = Line Plan: 2990BSE RG 6394 ENGINEERING PHYSICS MAJOR REQUIREMENTS Effective FA12/1910 (09/04/2012) RQ 4925 Physics Technical Subjects (C or higher) Effective FA12/1910 (09/04/2012) LN 0010

  6. ASCR Science Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

    2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2009 ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by ASCR. The ASCR facilities anticipate significant increases in wide area bandwidth utilization, driven largely by the increased capabilities of computational resources and the wide scope of collaboration that is a hallmark of modern science. Many scientists move data sets between facilities for analysis, and in some cases (for example the Earth System Grid and the Open Science Grid), data distribution is an essential component of the use of ASCR facilities by scientists. Due to the projected growth in wide area data transfer needs, the ASCR supercomputer centers all expect to deploy and use 100 Gigabit per second networking technology for wide area connectivity as soon as that deployment is financially feasible. In addition to the network connectivity that ESnet provides, the ESnet Collaboration Services (ECS) are critical to several science communities. ESnet identity and trust services, such as the DOEGrids certificate authority, are widely used both by the supercomputer centers and by collaborations such as Open Science Grid (OSG) and the Earth System Grid (ESG). Ease of use is a key determinant of the scientific utility of network-based services. Therefore, a key enabling aspect for scientists beneficial use of high performance networks is a consistent, widely deployed, well-maintained toolset that is optimized for wide area, high-speed data transfer (e.g. GridFTP) that allows scientists to easily utilize the services and capabilities that the network provides. Network test and measurement is an important part of ensuring that these tools and network services are functioning correctly. One example of a tool in this area is the recently developed perfSONAR, which has already shown its usefulness in fault diagnosis during the recent deployment of high-performance data movers at NERSC and ORNL. On the other hand, it is clear that there is significant work to be done in the area of authentication and access control - there are currently compatibility problems and differing requirements between the authentication systems in use at different facilities, and the policies and mechanisms in use at different facilities are sometimes in conflict. Finally, long-term software maintenance was of concern for many attendees. Scientists rely heavily on a large deployed base of software that does not have secure programmatic funding. Software packages for which this is true include data transfer tools such as GridFTP as well as identity management and other software infrastructure that forms a critical part of the Open Science Grid and the Earth System Grid.

  7. A wearable system that learns a kinematic model and finds structure in everyday manipulation by using absolute orientation sensors and a camera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemp, Charles C. (Charles Clark), 1972-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents Duo, the first wearable system to autonomously learn a kinematic model of the wearer via body-mounted absolute orientation sensors and a head-mounted camera. With Duo, we demonstrate the significant ...

  8. Measurements of absolute delayed neutron yield and group constants in the fast fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 237}Np

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loaiza, D.J.; Brunson, G.; Sanchez, R.; Butterfield, K. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The delayed neutron activity resulting from the fast induced fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 237}Np has been studied. The six-group decay constants, relative abundances, and absolute yield of delayed neutrons from fast fission of {sup 235}U and {sup 237}Np were measured using the Godiva IV fast assembly at the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility. The absolute yield measured for {sup 235}U was 0.0163 {+-} 0.0008 neutron/fission. This value compares very well with the well-established Keepin absolute yield of 0.0165 {+-} 0.0005. The absolute yield value measured for {sup 237}Np was 0.0126 {+-} 0.0007. The measured delayed neutron parameters for {sup 235}U are corroborated with period (e-folding time) versus reactivity calculations.

  9. Endothelial-constitutive nitric oxide synthase exists in airways and diesel exhaust particles inhibit the effect of nitric oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muto, Emiko; Hayashi, Toshio; Yamada, Kazuyoshi [Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan)] [and others] [Nagoya Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) are an important cause of air pollution and are thought to be responsible for some respiratory ailments, but the exact mechanism is not known. We evaluated whether DEP inhibit nitric oxide (NO) synthesis in bronchi as No is present in the exhaled air and has a physiological role in the respiratory tract. Aortic rings were also examined for comparison. We observed that acetylcholine (ACh) induced contraction of the bronchi was partially attenuated by the simultaneous release of NO. When bronchial rings were incubated either with N{sup G}-methyl-L-arginine (L-NMA): an inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS) or with DEP, the contraction to ACh was abolished. The source of the NOS was the bronchial epithelium and this endothelial-constitutive NOS was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. DEP like L-NMA inhibited the ACh induced endothelium dependent relaxation in the aortic rings. The inhibition of NO release by DEP and L-NMA from bronchial and aortic rings was also confirmed by a selective NO electrode. We conclude that inhibition of NO availability by DEP may in part be responsible for the adverse respiratory effects seen by inhalation of these particles in polluted air. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Epidemiological-environmental study of diesel bus garage workers: chronic effects of diesel exhaust on the respiratory system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamble, J.; Jones, W.; Minshall, S.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two hundred and eighty-three (283) male diesel bus garage workers from four garages in two cities were examined to determine if there was excess chronic respiratory morbidity related to diesel exposure. The dependent variables were respiratory symptoms, radiographic interpretation for pneumoconiosis, and pulmonary function (FVC, FEV1, and flow rates). Independent variables included race, age, smoking, drinking, height, and tenure (as surrogate measure of exposure). Exposure-effect relationships within the study population showed no detectable associations of symptoms with tenure. There was an apparent association of pulmonary function and tenure. Seven workers (2.5%) had category 1 pneumoconiosis (three rounded opacities, two irregular opacities, and one with both rounded and irregular). The study population was also compared to a nonexposed blue-collar population. After indirect adjustment for age, race, and smoking, the study population had elevated prevalences of cough, phlegm, and wheezing, but there was no association with tenure. Dyspnea showed a dose-response trend but no apparent increase in prevalence. Mean percent predicted pulmonary function of the study population was greater than 100%, i.e., elevated above the comparison population. These data show there is an apparent effect of diesel exhaust on pulmonary function but not chest radiographs. Respiratory symptoms are high compared to blue-collar workers, but there is no relationship with tenure.

  11. Vehicle cabin cooling system for capturing and exhausting heated boundary layer air from inner surfaces of solar heated windows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrington, Robert B. (Golden, CO); Anderson, Ren (Broomfield, CO)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cabin cooling system includes a cooling duct positioned proximate and above upper edges of one or more windows of a vehicle to exhaust hot air as the air is heated by inner surfaces of the windows and forms thin boundary layers of heated air adjacent the heated windows. The cabin cooling system includes at least one fan to draw the hot air into the cooling duct at a flow rate that captures the hot air in the boundary layer without capturing a significant portion of the cooler cabin interior air and to discharge the hot air at a point outside the vehicle cabin, such as the vehicle trunk. In a preferred embodiment, the cooling duct has a cross-sectional area that gradually increases from a distal point to a proximal point to the fan inlet to develop a substantially uniform pressure drop along the length of the cooling duct. Correspondingly, this cross-sectional configuration develops a uniform suction pressure and uniform flow rate at the upper edge of the window to capture the hot air in the boundary layer adjacent each window.

  12. Application of Reinforcement Learning to Requirements Engineering: Requirements Tracing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Jane E.

    of the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC) can be appreciated by the customers who request and expect delivery the phases of the SDLC, a number of steps can be taken. Requirements tracing ensures that requirements

  13. Development of All-Solid-State Sensors for Measurement of Nitric Oxide and Ammonia Concentrations by Optical Absorption in Particle-Laden Combusion Exhaust Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerald A. Caton; Kalyan Annamalai

    2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An all-solid-state continuous-wave (cw) laser system for ultraviolet absorption measurements of the nitric oxide (NO) molecule has been developed and demonstrated. For the NO sensor, 250 nW of tunable cw ultraviolet radiation is produced by sum-frequency-mixing of 532-nm radiation from a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and tunable 395-nm radiation from an external cavity diode laser (ECDL). The sum-frequency-mixing process occurs in a beta-barium borate crystal. The nitric oxide absorption measurements are performed by tuning the ECDL and scanning the sum-frequency-mixed radiation over strong nitric oxide absorption lines near 226 nm. The nitric oxide sensor has been used for measurements in the exhaust of a coal-fired laboratory combustion facility. The Texas A&M University boiler burner facility is a 30 kW (100,000 Btu/hr) downward-fired furnace with a steel shell encasing ceramic insulation. Measurements of nitric oxide concentration in the exhaust stream were performed after modification of the facility for laser based NOx diagnostics. The diode-laser-based sensor measurements showed good agreement with the results from physical probe sampling of the combustion exhaust. The diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption measurements were successful even when the beam was severely attenuated by particulate in the exhaust stream and window fouling. Single-laser-sweep measurements were demonstrated with an effective time resolution of 100 msec, limited at this time by the scan rate of our mechanically tuned ECDL system. Future planned modifications will lead to even faster response times at sensitivity levels at or below 1 ppm.

  14. Precision laser surveying instrument using atmospheric turbulence compensation by determining the absolute displacement between two laser beam components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric effects on sighting measurements are compensated for by adjusting any sighting measurements using a correction factor that does not depend on atmospheric state conditions such as temperature, pressure, density or turbulence. The correction factor is accurately determined using a precisely measured physical separation between two color components of a light beam (or beams) that has been generated using either a two-color laser or two lasers that project different colored beams. The physical separation is precisely measured by fixing the position of a short beam pulse and measuring the physical separation between the two fixed-in-position components of the beam. This precisely measured physical separation is then used in a relationship that includes the indexes of refraction for each of the two colors of the laser beam in the atmosphere through which the beam is projected, thereby to determine the absolute displacement of one wavelength component of the laser beam from a straight line of sight for that projected component of the beam. This absolute displacement is useful to correct optical measurements, such as those developed in surveying measurements that are made in a test area that includes the same dispersion effects of the atmosphere on the optical measurements. The means and method of the invention are suitable for use with either single-ended systems or a double-ended systems.

  15. A ROBUST ABSOLUTE DETECTION EFFICIENCY CALIBRATION METHOD UTILIZING BETA/GAMMA COINCIDENCE SIGNATURES AND ISOTOPICALLY PURIFIED NEUTRON ACTIVATED RADIOXENON ISOTOPES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, Justin I.; Cooper, Matthew W.; Ely, James H.; Haas, Derek A.; Schrom, Brian T.

    2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts to calibrate the absolute efficiency of gas cell radiations detectors have utilized a number of methodologies which allow adequate calibration but are time consuming and prone to a host of difficult-to-determine uncertainties. A method that extrapolates the total source strength from the measured beta and gamma gated beta coincidence signal was developed in the 1960’s and 1970’s. It has become clear that it is possible to achieve more consistent results across a range of isotopes and a range of activities using this method. Even more compelling is the ease with which this process can be used on routine samples to determine the total activity present in the detector. Additionally, recent advances in the generation of isotopically pure radioxenon samples of Xe-131m, Xe-133, and Xe-135 have allowed these measurement techniques to achieve much better results than would have been possible before when using mixed isotopic radioxenon source. This paper will discuss the beta/gamma absolute detection efficiency technique that utilizes several of the beta-gamma decay signatures to more precisely determine the beta and gamma efficiencies. It will than compare these results with other methods using pure sources of Xe-133, Xe-131m, and Xe-135 and a Xe-133/Xe-133m mix.

  16. Dynamical masses, absolute radii and 3D orbits of the triply eclipsing star HD 181068 from Kepler photometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borkovits, Tamás; Kiss, László L; Király, Amanda; Forgács-Dajka, Emese; Bíró, Imre Barna; Bedding, Timothy R; Bryson, Stephen T; Huber, Daniel; Szabó, Róbert

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HD 181068 is the brighter of the two known triply eclipsing hierarchical triple stars in the Kepler field. It has been continuously observed for more than 2 years with the Kepler space telescope. Of the nine quarters of the data, three have been obtained in short-cadence mode, that is one point per 58.9 s. Here we analyse this unique dataset to determine absolute physical parameters (most importantly the masses and radii) and full orbital configuration using a sophisticated novel approach. We measure eclipse timing variations (ETVs), which are then combined with the single-lined radial velocity measurements to yield masses in a manner equivalent to double-lined spectroscopic binaries. We have also developed a new light curve synthesis code that is used to model the triple, mutual eclipses and the effects of the changing tidal field on the stellar surface and the relativistic Doppler-beaming. By combining the stellar masses from the ETV study with the simultaneous light curve analysis we determine the absolute...

  17. Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements, originally presented on June 25, 2013.

  18. Full Useful Life (120,000 miles) Exhaust Emission Performance of a NOx Adsorber and Diesel Particle Filter Equipped Passenger Car and Medium-duty Engine in Conjunction with Ultra Low Sulfur Fuel (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, M.; Tatur, M.; Tomazic, D.; Weber, P.; Webb, C.

    2005-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Discusses the full useful life exhaust emission performance of a NOx (nitrogen oxides) adsorber and diesel particle filter equipped light-duty and medium-duty engine using ultra low sulfur diesel fuel.

  19. Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee : Guidelines for Requirements...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee : Guidelines for Requirements Management Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee : Guidelines for Requirements Management Requirements...

  20. Managing System of Systems Requirements with a Requirements Screening Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald R. Barden

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figuring out an effective and efficient way to manage not only your Requirement’s Baseline, but also the development of all your individual requirements during a Program’s/Project’s Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages can be both daunting and difficult. This is especially so when you are dealing with a complex and large System of Systems (SoS) Program with potentially thousands and thousands of Top Level Requirements as well as an equal number of lower level System, Subsystem and Configuration Item requirements that need to be managed. This task is made even more overwhelming when you have to add in integration with multiple requirements’ development teams (e.g., Integrated Product Development Teams (IPTs)) and/or numerous System/Subsystem Design Teams. One solution for tackling this difficult activity on a recent large System of Systems Program was to develop and make use of a Requirements Screening Group (RSG). This group is essentially a Team made up of co-chairs from the various Stakeholders with an interest in the Program of record that are enabled and accountable for Requirements Development on the Program/Project. The RSG co-chairs, often with the help of individual support team, work together as a Program Board to monitor, make decisions on, and provide guidance on all Requirements Development activities during the Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages of a Program/Project. In addition, the RSG can establish and maintain the Requirements Baseline, monitor and enforce requirements traceability across the entire Program, and work with other elements of the Program/Project to ensure integration and coordination.

  1. Controlling exhaust gas recirculation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zurlo, James Richard (Madison, WI); Konkle, Kevin Paul (West Bend, WI); May, Andrew (Milwaukee, WI)

    2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In controlling an engine, an amount of an intake charge provided, during operation of the engine, to a combustion chamber of the engine is determined. The intake charge includes an air component, a fuel component and a diluent component. An amount of the air component of the intake charge is determined. An amount of the diluent component of the intake charge is determined utilizing the amount of the intake charge, the amount of the air component and, in some instances, the amount of the fuel component. An amount of a diluent supplied to the intake charge is adjusted based at least in part on the determined amount of diluent component of the intake charge.

  2. Measurement of the Absolute Branching Fractions of$B^\\pm \\to K^\\pm X_{c\\bar c}$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

    2005-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the two-body decays of B{sup {+-}} mesons to K{sup {+-}} and a charmonium state, X{sub c{bar c}}, in a sample of 210.5 fb{sup -1} of data from the BABAR experiment. We perform measurements of absolute branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} K{sup {+-}} X{sub c{bar c}}) using a missing mass technique, and report several new or improved results. In particular, the upper limit {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} K{sup {+-}}(3872)) < 3.2 x 10{sup -4} at 90% CL and the inferred lower limit {Beta}(X(3872) {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) > 4.2% will help in understanding the nature of the recently discovered X(3872).

  3. Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Division, and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences. This isFusion Energy Sciences NetworkRequirements Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Energy

  4. Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection Technical s o Freiberge s 3 % A PB 2 7 7 2 x>16Forms of1, 2

  5. Thesis and Dissertation Required Elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    /dissertation documents have a uniform appearance and are suitable for archiving. The requirements follow the guidelines to the following guidelines are acceptable. · All margins must be at least 1.25" and may not be more than 1/dissertation should be double-spaced. #12;Thesis and Dissertation Required Elements 2012 version Paragraph Indentation

  6. Calibration Requirements and Procedures for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuceryan, Mihran

    Calibration Requirements and Procedures for Augmented Reality Mihran Tuceryan Douglas S. Greer Ross Graphics, Sept 1995) Calibration Requirements and Procedures for Augmented Reality Mihran Tuceryan Douglas of calibration procedures are necessary so that the location and parameters of each of the system components

  7. MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    March 2006 MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS FOR FEDERAL INFORMATION AND INFORMATION SYSTEMS: FEDERAL INFORMATION PROCESSING STANDARD (FIPS) 200 APPROVED BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE MINIMUM SECURITY REQUIREMENTS BY THE SECRETARY OF COMMERCE Shirley Radack, EditorShirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division

  8. Humidity requirements in WSCF Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, R.A.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to develop and document a position on Relative Humidity (RH) requirements in the WSCF Laboratories. A current survey of equipment vendors for Organic, Inorganic and Radiochemical laboratories indicate that 25% - 80% relative humidity may meet the environmental requirements for safe operation and protection of all the laboratory equipment.

  9. 3. MATERIAL CERTIFICATIONS REQUIRED. 100% DYE PENETRANT INSPECTION REQUIRED.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    WELDS SHOULD BE MINIMIZED. NO CODE STAMP REQUIRED. IN ACCORDANCE WITH ASME SECTION IX. 1. WELDING and applicable 1. ALL DIMENSIONS ARE IN INCHES 2. INTERPRET DIMENSIONS AND TOLERANCES PER ASME Y14.5M 3. MACHINED

  10. An analysis of salt and moisture deposition on the air sampling probes in the exhaust shaft of the waste isolation pilot plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Gregg Shelton

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    at the top of the exhaust shaft. The salt encrustations could potentially interfere with the operation of the air sampling probes. The formation of the salt was not uniform with time or location on the probe surface. Previous studies (Westinghouse Electric... becomes entrained once the gas velocities increase above about 15 m/s. Westinghouse Electric Corporation (1994) detailed a study of the probes conducted from April, 1993 to May, 1994. The probes suspended from Stations A-l, A-2, and A-3 were removed...

  11. Meeting Federal Energy Security Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the opportunity to increase the scope of federal-utility partnerships for meeting energy security requirements.

  12. Fusion technology status and requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the status of fusion technology and discusses the requirements to be met in order to build a demonstration fusion plant. Strategies and programmatic considerations in pursuing engineering feasibility are also outlined.

  13. POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES Procedures and Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagannatham, Aditya K.

    Engineering, Materials Science, Mechanical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering and Technology and Photonics Statistics), Mechanical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering and Technology, Photonics Science and Engineering(1) POSTGRADUATE PROGRAMMES Procedures and Requirements INDIAN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY KANPUR

  14. SU-E-J-85: Leave-One-Out Perturbation (LOOP) Fitting Algorithm for Absolute Dose Film Calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, A; Ahmad, M; Chen, Z; Nath, R [Yale New Haven Hospital/School of Medicine Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Feng, W [New York Presbyterian Hospital, Tenafly, NJ (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To introduce an outliers-recognition fitting routine for film dosimetry. It cannot only be flexible with any linear and non-linear regression but also can provide information for the minimal number of sampling points, critical sampling distributions and evaluating analytical functions for absolute film-dose calibration. Methods: The technique, leave-one-out (LOO) cross validation, is often used for statistical analyses on model performance. We used LOO analyses with perturbed bootstrap fitting called leave-one-out perturbation (LOOP) for film-dose calibration . Given a threshold, the LOO process detects unfit points (“outliers”) compared to other cohorts, and a bootstrap fitting process follows to seek any possibilities of using perturbations for further improvement. After that outliers were reconfirmed by a traditional t-test statistics and eliminated, then another LOOP feedback resulted in the final. An over-sampled film-dose- calibration dataset was collected as a reference (dose range: 0-800cGy), and various simulated conditions for outliers and sampling distributions were derived from the reference. Comparisons over the various conditions were made, and the performance of fitting functions, polynomial and rational functions, were evaluated. Results: (1) LOOP can prove its sensitive outlier-recognition by its statistical correlation to an exceptional better goodness-of-fit as outliers being left-out. (2) With sufficient statistical information, the LOOP can correct outliers under some low-sampling conditions that other “robust fits”, e.g. Least Absolute Residuals, cannot. (3) Complete cross-validated analyses of LOOP indicate that the function of rational type demonstrates a much superior performance compared to the polynomial. Even with 5 data points including one outlier, using LOOP with rational function can restore more than a 95% value back to its reference values, while the polynomial fitting completely failed under the same conditions. Conclusion: LOOP can cooperate with any fitting routine functioning as a “robust fit”. In addition, it can be set as a benchmark for film-dose calibration fitting performance.

  15. HTS wire requirements for SMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoenung, S.; Schafer, W.J.

    1994-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation/paper gives an overview of the Sandia National Lab`s sponsorship of W.J. Schafer Associates, Inc. to examine the following topics: the refrigeration savings possible by using high temperature superconductors (HTS) in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES), the impact of duty cycle on refrigeration requirements, and outline the required HTS wire performance. Included are specifications for SMES applications, advantages, cost components, assumed conductor performance parameters, and the effects of duty cycle and conductor twist pitch.

  16. Requirements for GNEP Transmutation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. C. Crawford; M. K. Meyer; S. L. Hayes

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to provide a baseline set of requirements to guide fuel fabrication development and irradiation testing performed as part of the AFCRD Transmutation Fuel Development Program. This document can be considered a supplement to the GNEP TRU Fuel Development and Qualification Plan, and will be revised as necessary to maintain a documented set of fuel testing objectives and requirements consistent with programmatic decisions and advances in technical knowledge.

  17. Results of the Sixth International Comparison of Absolute Gravimeters, ICAG-2001 This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article. 2002 Metrologia 39 IOPscience #12;metrologia Results of the Sixth International Comparison of Absolute Gravimeters, ICAG-2001 L di Metrologia "G. Colonnetti" (IMGC), Turin, Italy. M. Diament: Institut de Physique du Globe de

  18. The effect of task structure, practice schedule, and model type on the learning of relative and absolute timing by physical and observational practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Charles Beyer

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three experiments compared learning of relative and absolute timing of a sequential key-pressing task by physical and observational practice. Experiment 1 compared a task with a complex internal structure (goal proportions of 22.2, 44.4, 33...

  19. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and R are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield for extending by 103 the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions. Sci. Instrum. 85, 063502 (2014); 10.1063/1.4880203 D 3 He -proton emission imaging for inertial

  20. A detailed analysis of next generation sequencing reads of microRNA expression in Barrett’s Esophagus: absolute versus relative quantification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, In-Hee; Hong, Xiaoman; Mathur, Sharad C.; Sharma, Mukut; Rastogi, Amit; Sharma, Prateek; Christenson, Lane K.; Bansal, Ajay

    2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    compared (>1000 vs. 500 vs. 100 vs. <100). The accuracy, precision and recall of NGS to label a miRNA as differentially expressed were 0.71, 0.88 and 0.74 respectively. Conclusion Absolute NGS reads correlated modestly with q...

  1. The Model 5000-16C 1000 WATT FEL Lamp Standard pro-vides absolute calibration of spectral irradiance from 250 nm to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Model 5000-16C 1000 WATT FEL Lamp Standard pro- vides absolute calibration of spectral irradiance from 250 nm to 2.5 microns.This Tungsten-Halogen Lamp Standard bears the ANSI designation of FEL might be discernible at the crossover point of the two referenced NIST Scales. 5000 FEL 1000Watt Lamp

  2. Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements (Text Version) | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Requirements (Text Version) Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements (Text Version) Below is the text version of the webinar titled "Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements,"...

  3. Gas turbine cycles with solid oxide fuel cells. Part 1: Improved gas turbine power plant efficiency by use of recycled exhaust gases and fuel cell technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, S.P.; Richter, H.J. (Dartmouth Coll., Hanover, NH (United States). Thayer School of Engineering)

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy conversion efficiency of the combustion process can be improved if immediate contact of fuel and oxygen is prevent4ed and an oxygen carrier is used. In a previous paper (Harvey et al., 1992), a gas turbine cycle was investigated in which part of the exhaust gases are recycled and used as oxygen-carrying components. For the optimized process, a theoretical thermal efficiency of 66.3% was achieved, based on the lower heating value (LHV) of the methane fuel. One means to further improve the exergetic efficiency of a power cycle is to utilize fuel cell technology. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) have many features that make them attractive for utility and industrial applications. In this paper, the authors will therefore consider SOFC technology. In view of their high operating temperatures and the incomplete nature of the fuel oxidation process, fuel cells must be combined with conventional power generation technology to develop power plant configurations that are both functional and efficient. In this paper, the authors will show how monolithic SOFC (MSOFC) technology may be integrated into the previously described gas turbine cycle using recycled exhaust gases as oxygen carriers. An optimized cycle configuration will be presented based upon a detailed cycle analysis performance using Aspen Plus[trademark] process simulation software and a MSOFC fuel cell simulator developed by Argonne National Labs. The optimized cycle achieves a theoretical thermal efficiency of 77.7%, based on the LHV of the fuel.

  4. Results of Second Outdoor Comparison Between Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and Infrared Integrating Sphere (IRIS) Radiometer at PMOD (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Grobner, J.; Wacker, S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Absolute Cavity Pyrgeometer (ACP) and InfraRed Integrating Sphere radiometer (IRIS) are developed to establish a world reference for calibrating pyrgeometers with traceability to SI units. The two radiometers are un-windowed with negligible spectral dependence, and traceable to SI units through the temperature scale (ITS-90). The second outdoor comparison between the two designs was held from September 30 to October 11, 2013 at the Physikalisch-Metorologisches Observatorium Davos (PMOD). The difference between the irradiance measured by ACP and that of the IRIS was within 1 W/m2 (3 IRISs: PMOD + Australia + Germany). From the first and second comparisons, a difference of 4-6 W/m2 was observed between the irradiance measured by ACP&IRIS and that of the interim World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). This presentation includes results from the first and second comparison in an effort to establish the world reference for pyrgeometer calibrations, a key deliverable for the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and the DOE-ASR.

  5. Absolute Time-Resolved Emission of Non-LTE L-Shell Spectra from Ti-Doped Aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back,C.; Feldman, U.; Weaver, J.; Seely, J.; Constantin, C.; Holland, G.; Lee, R.; Chung, H.; Scott, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Outstanding discrepancies between data and calculations of laser-produced plasmas in recombination have been observed since the 1980s. Although improvements in hydrodynamic modeling may reduce the discrepancies, there are indications that non-LTE atomic kinetics may be the dominant cause. Experiments to investigate non-LTE effects were recently performed at the NIKE KrF laser on low-density Ti-doped aerogels. The laser irradiated a 2 mm diameter, cylindrical sample of various lengths with a 4-ns square pulse to create a volumetrically heated plasma. Ti L-shell spectra spanning a range of 0.47-3 keV were obtained with a transmission grating coupled to Si photodiodes. The diagnostic can be configured to provide 1-dimensional spatial resolution at a single photon energy, or 18 discrete energies with a resolving power, {gamma}/{delta}{gamma} of 3-20. The data are examined and compared to calculations to develop absolute emission measurements that can provide new tests of the non-LTE physics.

  6. Development of All-Solid-State Sensors for Measurement of Nitric Oxide and Ammonia Concentrations by Optical Absorption in Particle-Laden Combustion Exhaust Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerald A. Caton; Kalyan Annamalai; Robert P. Lucht

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An all-solid-state continuous-wave (cw) laser system for ultraviolet absorption measurements of the nitric oxide (NO) molecule has been developed and demonstrated. For the NO sensor, 250 nW of tunable cw ultraviolet radiation is produced by sum-frequency-mixing of 532-nm radiation from a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and tunable 395-nm radiation from an external cavity diode laser (ECDL). The sum-frequency-mixing process occurs in a beta-barium borate crystal. The nitric oxide absorption measurements are performed by tuning the ECDL and scanning the sum-frequency-mixed radiation over strong nitric oxide absorption lines near 226 nm. In Year 1 of the research, the nitric oxide sensor was used for measurements in the exhaust of a coal-fired laboratory combustion facility. The Texas A&M University boiler burner facility is a 30 kW (100,000 Btu/hr) downward-fired furnace with a steel shell encasing ceramic insulation. Measurements of nitric oxide concentration in the exhaust stream were performed after modification of the facility for laser based NOx diagnostics. The diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption measurements were successful even when the beam was severely attenuated by particulate in the exhaust stream and window fouling. Single-laser-sweep measurements were demonstrated with an effective time resolution of 100 msec, limited at this time by the scan rate of our mechanically tuned ECDL system. In Year 2, the Toptica ECDL in the original system was replaced with a Sacher Lasers ECDL. The mode-hop-free tuning range and tuning rate of the Toptica ECDL were 25 GHz and a few Hz, respectively. The mode-hop-free tuning range and tuning rate of the Sacher Lasers ECDL were 90 GHz and a few hundred Hz, respectively. The Sacher Lasers ECDL thus allows us to scan over the entire NO absorption line and to determine the absorption baseline with increased accuracy and precision. The increased tuning rate is an advantage in that data can be acquired much more rapidly and the absorption measurements are less susceptible to the effects of transient fluctuations in the properties of the coal combustor exhaust stream. Gas cell measurements were performed using the NO sensor with the new ECDL, and a few spectra were acquired from the coal exhaust stream. However, the laser diode in the new ECDL failed during the coal combustor tests. In Year 3, however, we obtained a new GaN laser diode for our ECDL system, installed it, and completed an extensive series of measurements in the Texas A&M coal-fired laboratory combustion facility. The combustor was operated with coal and coal/biomass as fuels, with and without reburn, and with and without ammonia injection. Several different fuel equivalence ratios were investigated for each operating condition.

  7. Development of All-Solid-State Sensors for Measurement of Nitric Oxide and Ammonia Concentrations by Optical Absorption in Particle-Laden Combustion Exhaust Streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerald A. Caton; Kalyan Annamalai; Robert P. Lucht

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An all-solid-state continuous-wave (cw) laser system for ultraviolet absorption measurements of the nitric oxide (NO) molecule has been developed and demonstrated. For the NO sensor, 250 nW of tunable cw ultraviolet radiation is produced by sum-frequency-mixing of 532-nm radiation from a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and tunable 395-nm radiation from an external cavity diode laser (ECDL). The sum-frequency-mixing process occurs in a beta-barium borate crystal. The nitric oxide absorption measurements are performed by tuning the ECDL and scanning the sum-frequency-mixed radiation over strong nitric oxide absorption lines near 226 nm. In Year 1 of the research, the nitric oxide sensor was used for measurements in the exhaust of a coal-fired laboratory combustion facility. The Texas A&M University boiler burner facility is a 30 kW (100,000 Btu/hr) downward-fired furnace with a steel shell encasing ceramic insulation. Measurements of nitric oxide concentration in the exhaust stream were performed after modification of the facility for laser based NOx diagnostics. The diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption measurements were successful even when the beam was severely attenuated by particulate in the exhaust stream and window fouling. Single-laser-sweep measurements were demonstrated with an effective time resolution of 100 msec, limited at this time by the scan rate of our mechanically tuned ECDL system. In Year 2, the Toptica ECDL in the original system was replaced with a Sacher Lasers ECDL. The mode-hop-free tuning range and tuning rate of the Toptica ECDL were 25 GHz and a few Hz, respectively. The mode-hop-free tuning range and tuning rate of the Sacher Lasers ECDL were 90 GHz and a few hundred Hz, respectively. The Sacher Lasers ECDL thus allows us to scan over the entire NO absorption line and to determine the absorption baseline with increased accuracy and precision. The increased tuning rate is an advantage in that data can be acquired much more rapidly and the absorption measurements are less susceptible to the effects of transient fluctuations in the properties of the coal combustor exhaust stream. Gas cell measurements were performed using the NO sensor with the new ECDL, and a few spectra were acquired from the coal exhaust stream. However, the laser diode in the new ECDL failed during the coal combustor tests. In Year 3, however, we obtained a new GaN laser diode for our ECDL system, installed it, and completed an extensive series of measurements in the Texas A&M coal-fired laboratory combustion facility. The combustor was operated with coal and coal/biomass as fuels, with and without reburn, and with and without ammonia injection. Several different fuel equivalence ratios were investigated for each operating condition. A series of spectral simulations was performed using the HITRAN code to investigate the potential sensitivity of absorption measurements of ammonia in different spectral regions. It was concluded that ammonia absorption features in the 3000-nm spectral region would be hard to measure due to water vapor interferences. We will concentrate on the spectral region near 1530 nm, where other researchers have had some success in measuring ammonia.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF ALL-SOLID-STATE SENSORS FOR MEASUREMENT OF NITRIC OXIDE AND AMMONIA CONCENTRATIONS BY OPTICAL ABSORPTION IN PARTICLE-LADEN COMBUSTION EXHAUST STREAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerald A. Caton; Kalyan Annamalai; Robert P. Lucht

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An all-solid-state continuous-wave (cw) laser system for ultraviolet absorption measurements of the nitric oxide (NO) molecule has been developed and demonstrated. For the NO sensor, 250 nW of tunable cw ultraviolet radiation is produced by sum-frequency-mixing of 532-nm radiation from a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser and tunable 395-nm radiation from an external cavity diode laser (ECDL). The sum-frequency-mixing process occurs in a beta-barium borate crystal. The nitric oxide absorption measurements are performed by tuning the ECDL and scanning the sum-frequency-mixed radiation over strong nitric oxide absorption lines near 226 nm. In Year 1 of the research, the nitric oxide sensor was used for measurements in the exhaust of a coal-fired laboratory combustion facility. The Texas A&M University boiler burner facility is a 30 kW (100,000 Btu/hr) downward-fired furnace with a steel shell encasing ceramic insulation. Measurements of nitric oxide concentration in the exhaust stream were performed after modification of the facility for laser based NOx diagnostics. The diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption measurements were successful even when the beam was severely attenuated by particulate in the exhaust stream and window fouling. Single-laser-sweep measurements were demonstrated with an effective time resolution of 100 msec, limited at this time by the scan rate of our mechanically tuned ECDL system. In Year 2 described in this progress report, the Toptica ECDL in the original system was replaced with a Sacher Lasers ECDL. The mode-hop-free tuning range and tuning rate of the Toptica ECDL were 25 GHz and a few Hz, respectively. The mode-hop-free tuning range and tuning rate of the Sacher Lasers ECDL were 90 GHz and a few hundred Hz, respectively. The Sacher Lasers ECDL thus allows us to scan over the entire NO absorption line and to determine the absorption baseline with increased accuracy and precision. The increased tuning rate is an advantage in that data can be acquired much more rapidly and the absorption measurements are less susceptible to the effects of transient fluctuations in the properties of the coal combustor exhaust stream. Gas cell measurements were performed using the NO sensor with the new ECDL, and a few spectra were acquired from the coal exhaust stream. However, the laser diode in the new ECDL failed during the coal combustor tests. A series of spectral simulations was performed using the HITRAN code to investigate the potential sensitivity of absorption measurements of ammonia in different spectral regions. It was concluded that ammonia absorption features in the 3000-nm spectral region would be hard to measure due to water vapor interferences.

  9. The Proton Transfer Reaction-Mass Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chemistry Tracers of Diesel Exhaust Emissions and Measurements of Trace gas and Aerosol properties.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    , for it was dependent upon their polarity and the required heat supply for sufficient signals. The pipeline required

  10. Absolute cavity pyrgeometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reda, Ibrahim

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Implementations of the present disclosure involve an apparatus and method to measure the long-wave irradiance of the atmosphere or long-wave source. The apparatus may involve a thermopile, a concentrator and temperature controller. The incoming long-wave irradiance may be reflected from the concentrator to a thermopile receiver located at the bottom of the concentrator to receive the reflected long-wave irradiance. In addition, the thermopile may be thermally connected to a temperature controller to control the device temperature. Through use of the apparatus, the long-wave irradiance of the atmosphere may be calculated from several measurements provided by the apparatus. In addition, the apparatus may provide an international standard of pyrgeometers' calibration that is traceable back to the International System of Units (SI) rather than to a blackbody atmospheric simulator.

  11. Disposal requirements for PCB waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are a class of organic chemicals that had become widely used in industrial applications due to their practical physical and chemical properties. Historical uses of PCBs include dielectric fluids (used in utility transformers, capacitors, etc.), hydraulic fluids, and other applications requiring stable, fire-retardant materials. Due to findings that PCBs may cause adverse health effects and due to their persistence and accumulation in the environment, the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), enacted on october 11, 1976, banned the manufacture of PCBs after 1978 [Section 6(e)]. The first PCB regulations, promulgated at 40 CFR Part 761, were finalized on February 17, 1978. These PCB regulations include requirements specifying disposal methods and marking (labeling) procedures, and controlling PCB use. To assist the Department of Energy (DOE) in its efforts to comply with the TSCA statute and implementing regulations, the Office of Environmental Guidance has prepared the document ``Guidance on the Management of Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs).`` That document explains the requirements specified in the statute and regulations for managing PCBs including PCB use, storage, transport, and disposal. PCB materials that are no longer in use and have been declared a waste must be disposed of according to the requirements found at 40 CFR 761.60. These requirements establish disposal options for a multitude of PCB materials including soil and debris, liquid PCBs, sludges and slurries, containers, transformers, capacitors, hydraulic machines, and other electrical equipment. This Information Brief supplements the PCB guidance document by responding to common questions concerning disposal requirements for PCBs. It is one of a series of Information Briefs pertinent to PCB management issues.

  12. Johnson Noise Thermometry System Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britton Jr, Charles L [ORNL; Roberts, Michael [ORNL; Ezell, N Dianne Bull [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is intended to capture the requirements for the architecture of the developmental electronics for the ORNL-lead drift-free Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) project conducted under the Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) research pathway of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Research and Development (R&D) program. The requirements include not only the performance of the system but also the allowable measurement environment of the probe and the allowable physical environment of the associated electronics. A more extensive project background including the project rationale is available in the initial project report [1].

  13. Project X functional requirements specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, S.D.; Henderson, S.D.; Kephart, R.; Kerby, J.; Kourbanis, I.; Lebedev, V.; Mishra, S.; Nagaitsev, S.; Solyak, N.; Tschirhart, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project X is a multi-megawatt proton facility being developed to support a world-leading program in Intensity Frontier physics at Fermilab. The facility is designed to support programs in elementary particle and nuclear physics, with possible applications to nuclear energy research. A Functional Requirements Specification has been developed in order to establish performance criteria for the Project X complex in support of these multiple missions, and to assure that the facility is designed with sufficient upgrade capability to provide U.S. leadership for many decades to come. This paper will briefly review the previously described Functional Requirements, and then discuss their recent evolution.

  14. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Requirements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requirements Management Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Requirements Management Checklist The following checklist is intended to provide system owners,...

  15. Formby et al.: Integration Without Absolute Energy Cues 1285Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research Vol. 45 12851296 December 2002 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association 1092-4388/02/4506-1285

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinz, Michael G.

    Formby et al.: Integration Without Absolute Energy Cues 1285Journal of Speech, Language Baltimore Temporal Integration of Sinusoidal Increments in the Absence of Absolute Energy Cues Classical temporal integration (TI) is often viewed as a frequency-dependent, energy-based detection process

  16. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    DEGREE REQUIREMENTS BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY The curriculum in the technology programs must satisfy the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS for the technology programs are listed by subject matter in three major categories: (A) Basic Subjects, (B) Advanced

  17. APPLICATION REQUIREMENTS: Admission Applica on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rainforth, Emma C.

    basis. An interview may be required. MS Educa onal Technology Program: A state issued teaching cer: State issued teaching cer ficate. Three years of professional experience as a teacher:_____________ ­ __________ ­ ________________ Sex: Male Female Street Address Town or City County State Zip Code Home Telephone

  18. SRS control system upgrade requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, L.F.

    1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines requirements for an upgrade of the Sodium Removal System (SRS) control system. The upgrade is being performed to solve a number of maintainability and operability issues. The upgraded system will provide the same functions, controls and interlocks as the present system, and in addition provide enhanced functionality in areas discussed in this document.

  19. Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadok, Erez

    Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist ­ Fall 2008 Computer Science Courses Course Gr. Sem. Comments CSE 114 Computer Science I [prerequisite: CSE 110] CSE 214 Computer Science II CSE 215 Foundations of Computer Science CSE 219 Computer Science III CSE 220 Computer Organization CSE 300 Writing

  20. Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadok, Erez

    Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist ­ Fall 2009 Computer Science Courses Course Gr. Sem. Comments CSE 114 Computer Science I [prerequisite: CSE 110] CSE 214 Computer Science II CSE 215 Foundations of Computer Science CSE 219 Computer Science III CSE 220 Computer Organization CSE 300 Writing