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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

High potential recovery -- Gas repressurization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to demonstrate that small independent oil producers can use existing gas injection technologies, scaled to their operations, to repressurize petroleum reservoirs and increase their economic oil production. This report gives background information for gas repressurization technologies, the results of workshops held to inform small independent producers about gas repressurization, and the results of four gas repressurization field demonstration projects. Much of the material in this report is based on annual reports (BDM-Oklahoma 1995, BDM-Oklahoma 1996, BDM-Oklahoma 1997), a report describing the results of the workshops (Olsen 1995), and the four final reports for the field demonstration projects which are reproduced in the Appendix. This project was designed to demonstrate that repressurization of reservoirs with gas (natural gas, enriched gas, nitrogen, flue gas, or air) can be used by small independent operators in selected reservoirs to increase production and/or decrease premature abandonment of the resource. The project excluded carbon dioxide because of other DOE-sponsored projects that address carbon dioxide processes directly. Two of the demonstration projects, one using flue gas and the other involving natural gas from a deeper coal zone, were both technical and economic successes. The two major lessons learned from the projects are the importance of (1) adequate infrastructure (piping, wells, compressors, etc.) and (2) adequate planning including testing compatibility between injected gases and fluids, and reservoir gases, fluids, and rocks.

Madden, M.P.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Ohio Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecadeDecade (Million Cubic Feet)DecadeRepressuring

3

Oklahoma Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecadeDecadeFeet) Year JanRepressuring (Million

4

Oklahoma Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecadeDecadeFeet) Year JanRepressuring

5

Tennessee Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic4,630.2 10,037.24. (MillionDecadeRepressuring

6

Arizona Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquidsYear JanYear JanFeet)YearRepressuring

7

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas,095,3628,527 9,029Cubic Feet) YearFuelDecadeRepressuring

8

West Virginia Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions (Billion2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013Repressuring

9

Simulation and optimization of beam losses during continuous transfer extraction at the CERN Proton Synchrotron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The proton beams used for the fixed target physics at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) are extracted from the Proton Synchrotron ( PS) by a multiturn technique called continuous transfer (CT). During the CT extraction, large losses are observed in locations where the machine aperture should be large enough to accommodate the circulating beam. This limits the maximum intensity deliverable due to the induced stray radiation outside the PS tunnel. Scattered particles from the interaction with the electrostatic septum are identified as the possible source of these losses. This article presents a detailed study aiming to understand the origin of losses and propose possible cures. The simulations could reproduce accurately the beam loss pattern measured in real machine operation and determine the beam shaving, intrinsic to the extraction process, as the cause for the unexpected losses. Since these losses are unavoidable, the proposed solution implies a new optics scheme displacing the losses to a region with bett...

Garcia, J B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Physical property changes in hydrate-bearingsediment due to depressurization and subsequent repressurization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Physical property measurements of sediment cores containing natural gas hydrate are typically performed on material exposed at least briefly to non-in situ conditions during recovery. To examine effects of a brief excursion from the gas-hydrate stability field, as can occur when pressure cores are transferred to pressurized storage vessels, we measured physical properties on laboratory-formed sand packs containing methane hydrate and methane pore gas. After depressurizing samples to atmospheric pressure, we repressurized them into the methane-hydrate stability field and remeasured their physical properties. Thermal conductivity, shear strength, acoustic compressional and shear wave amplitudes and speeds are compared between the original and depressurized/repressurized samples. X-ray computed tomography (CT) images track how the gas-hydrate distribution changes in the hydrate-cemented sands due to the depressurization/repressurization process. Because depressurization-induced property changes can be substantial and are not easily predicted, particularly in water-saturated, hydrate-bearing sediment, maintaining pressure and temperature conditions throughout the core recovery and measurement process is critical for using laboratory measurements to estimate in situ properties.

Kneafsey, Timothy; Waite, W.F.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

The extraction of nuclear sea quark distribution and energy loss effect in Drell-Yan experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The next-to-leading order and leading order analysis are performed on the differential cross section ratio from Drell-Yan process. It is found that the effect of next-to-leading order corrections can be negligible on the differential cross section ratios as a function of the quark momentum fraction in the beam proton and the target nuclei for the current Fermilab and future lower beam proton energy. The nuclear Drell-Yan reaction is an ideal tool to study the energy loss of the fast quark moving through cold nuclei. In the leading order analysis, the theoretical results with quark energy loss are in good agreement with the Fermilab E866 experimental data on the Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios as a function of the momentum fraction of the target parton. It is shown that the quark energy loss effect has significant impact on the Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios. The nuclear Drell-Yan experiment at current Fermilab and future lower energy proton beam can not provide us with more information on the nuclear sea quark distribution.

Chun-Gui Duan; Na Liu; Zhan-Yuan Yan

2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

12

Photon backgrounds at the CLIC interaction point due to losses in the post-collision extraction line  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CLIC beam delivery system focuses 1.5~TeV electron and positron beams to a nanometre-sized cross section when colliding them at the interaction point (IP). The intense focusing leads to large beam-beam effects, causing the production of beamstrahlung photons, coherent and incoherent $e^+e^-$ pairs, as well as a significant disruption of the main beam. The transport of the post-collision beams requires a minimal loss extraction line, with high acceptance for energy deviation and divergence. The current design includes vertical bends close to the IP in order to separate the charged particles with a sign opposite to the main beam into a diagnostic-equipped intermediate dump, whilst transporting the photons and the main beam to the final dump. Photon and charged particle losses on magnet masks and dumps result in a complex radiation field and IP background particle fluxes. In this paper, the electromagnetic backgrounds at the IP arising from the losses occurring closest to the collision point are calculated.

Salt, M D; Elsener, K; Ferrari, A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

The influence of quark energy loss on extracting nuclear sea quark distribution from nuclear Drell-Yan experimental data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By means of two typical kinds of quark energy loss parametrization and the nuclear parton distributions determined only with lepton-nuclear deep inelastic scattering experimental data, a leading order analysis are performed on the proton-induced Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios of tungsten versus deuterium as a function of the quark momentum fraction in the beam proton and target nuclei. It is found that the theoretical results with quark energy loss are in good agreement with the experimental data. The quark energy loss effect produce approximately 3% to 11% suppression on the Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios $R_{W/D}$ in the range $0.05\\leq x_2\\leq0.3$. The application of nuclear Drell-Yan data with heavy targets is remarkably subject to difficulty in the constraints of the nuclear sea-quark distribution.

Duan Chun-Gui; Liu Na

2008-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

14

Natural Gas Used for Repressuring  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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15

Natural Gas Used for Repressuring  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year Jan Feb Marthrough Monthly2. Average

16

Evaluating Transformer Losses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and replacing them with low loss units. Today few industrials evaluate losses on either power or distribution transformers. TRANSFORMER LOSSES Transformer losses are divided 'nto load losses and no-load losses. Load losses are due to the winding resista... therefore are a function of the load squared. No-load losses occur from energizing the transformer steel and fore are continuous regardless of the transformer load. TRANSFORMER DESIGN Both types of losses are a fun ce here ion of design. If losses...

Grun, R. L. Jr.

17

Wyoming Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions (Billion2008Sep-14 Oct-14Year

18

Wyoming Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions (Billion2008Sep-14 Oct-14YearYear Jan Feb Mar Apr

19

Nevada Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) in KansasYear Jan Feb MarYearYear (Million2009Decade

20

Nevada Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) in KansasYear Jan Feb MarYearYear

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Ohio Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecadeDecade (Million Cubic Feet)Decade

22

Oregon Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 (Million CubicSep-14

23

Oregon Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 (Million CubicSep-14Year Jan

24

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0SalesElements)5.88 4.56

25

Tennessee Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic4,630.2 10,037.24. (MillionDecade

26

Texas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic4,630.2perSep-14 (MillionSep-14 Oct-14

27

Texas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic4,630.2perSep-14 (MillionSep-14 Oct-14Year Jan

28

Kansas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0ExtensionsYearSep-14 Oct-14

29

Kansas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0ExtensionsYearSep-14 Oct-14Year Jan

30

Kentucky Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15Industrial Consumers2009 2010 2011Decade

31

Kentucky Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15Industrial Consumers2009 2010

32

Louisiana Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289 0 0FuelFuel2,208,9202009Decade

33

Louisiana Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343 342 3289 0

34

Maryland Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343Decade Year-0Thousand CubicDecade Year-0

35

Maryland Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14343Decade Year-0Thousand CubicDecade

36

Michigan Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15 15 15 3Year Jan Feb2008 2009Decade

37

Michigan Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15 15 15 3Year Jan Feb2008 2009DecadeYear

38

Mississippi Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15Year Jan Feb (Million2008 2009Decade

39

Mississippi Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15Year Jan Feb (Million2008 2009DecadeYear

40

Missouri Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15YearThousand Cubic Feet)Decade

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Missouri Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19 15YearThousand Cubic Feet)DecadeYear

42

Montana Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19343 369 384Fuel

43

Montana Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 04 19343 369 384FuelYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

44

Alabama Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquidsYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayProcessed

45

Alabama Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquidsYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayProcessedYear Jan Feb

46

Alaska Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquidsYear Jan FebProvedGrossYearDecade Year-0

47

Alaska Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquidsYear Jan FebProvedGrossYearDecade Year-0Year

48

Arizona Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquidsYear JanYear JanFeet)Year

49

Arkansas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquidsYear JanYearVentedYear Jan(Million CubicDecade

50

Arkansas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteam Coal Import CostsLiquidsYear JanYearVentedYear Jan(Million

51

Natural Gas Used for Repressuring (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing ReservoirsYear-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3Processing:Used

52

Colorado Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 46 (Million Cubic2009 2010 2011Decade

53

Colorado Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 622 56623 46 (Million Cubic2009 2010

54

Florida Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0 0 0 1979-2013Fuel2009 2010 2011Decade

55

Florida Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0 0 0 1979-2013Fuel2009 2010 2011DecadeYear

56

Illinois Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 1 0DecadeWithdrawals

57

Indiana Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0 0

58

Indiana Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 6330 0 14 15 0 0 0Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul

59

California Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998 10,643 10,998 10,998 10,643 10,998Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3

60

California Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998 10,643 10,998 10,998 10,643 10,998Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Utah Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28 198Separation 321 (Million Cubic2008Decade

62

Utah Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28 198Separation 321 (Million Cubic2008DecadeYear

63

Virginia Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28Decreases (Billion CubicYear7.14 6.59 5.12

64

Virginia Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand28Decreases (Billion CubicYear7.14 6.59 5.12Year Jan

65

Natural Gas Used for Repressuring (Summary)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year Jan Feb Marthrough Monthly2. Average8 2009 2010 2011 2012

66

Nebraska Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year Jan Feb Marthrough Monthly2.FuelFuelProcessed (Million

67

Nebraska Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year Jan Feb Marthrough Monthly2.FuelFuelProcessed

68

Possible effects of reinjection at Wairakei goethermal field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although the two-phase zone of Wairakei Field is in mass flow equilibrium, there is a net heat flow loss (approx. 700 MW) at present. Apart from the heat drawoff from the production borefield (approx. = 1600 MW), the major contributing factor appears to be natural steam flow through thermal areas (approx. = 600 MW). Reinjection of all waste water from the borefield would cause an additional heat flow loss of 400 to 500 MW. In the short-term, reinjection will improve the output of the borefield due to repressuring of the two-phase zone. However, in the long-term (> 5 years), substantial repressuring will reduce the hot, liquid inflow from depth. This inflow has provided most of the heat extracted from the field to date.

Allis, R.G.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Modified Extraction Scheme for the CERN PS Multi-Turn Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-activation of the extraction magnetic septum of the CERN PS machine was observed due to the losses of the continuous beam extracted via the Multi-Turn Extraction (MTE) method. A possible mitigation measure consists of using an existing electrostatic septum, located upstream of the extraction magnetic septum, to deflect the beam. This would highly decrease the beam losses, and hence the induced activation, during the rise time of the MTE kickers due to the reduced thickness of the electrostatic septum with respect to the magnetic one. The layout of this new extraction will be described in detail and the results of beam measurements presented.

Gilardoni, S; Hernalsteens, C; Lachaize, A; Métral, G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Fluid extraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Coal extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Coal is extracted using a mixed solvent which includes a substantially aromatic component and a substantially naphthenic component, at a temperature of 400/sup 0/ to 500/sup 0/C. Although neither component is an especially good solvent for coal by itself, the use of mixed solvent gives greater flexibility to the process and offers efficiency gains.

Clarke, J.W.; Kimber, G.M.; Rantell, T.D.; Snape, C.E.

1985-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

72

Unknown: Multifocal scalp hair loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unknown: Multifocal scalp hair loss Sadllah Shamsadini 1 ,four patches of scalp hair loss. What is your diagnosis?

Shamsadini, Sadollah; Esfandiarpoor, Iraj; Zeinali, Hamid; Kalantari, Behjat; Ebrahimi, Hoseiali

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

74

Catalogue of a Loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Catalogue of a Loss is a collection of sixty-two prose poems written within the past year and half. The work is printed on 4x6 cards. Each poem may be read individually from a single card or the poems can be read in ...

Berger, Larisa (Larisa A.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

West Virginia Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30NaturalThousandExtensions (Billion2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013

76

New Mexico Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) in KansasYearDecade

77

New Mexico Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) in KansasYearDecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug

78

New York Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) in KansasYearDecadeYearDecadeand (MillionSep-14

79

New York Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) in KansasYearDecadeYearDecadeand (MillionSep-14Year Jan

80

North Dakota Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecadeDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

North Dakota Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996) inDecadeDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4Year

82

Other States Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2007 10,998 9,933 10,998 10,643 10,998through 1996)Decade Year-0 Year-1Cubic Feet)Feet)

83

South Dakota Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1Year Jan Feb

84

South Dakota Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1Year Jan FebYear

85

U.S. Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinter 2013-14DeliveriesProvedBarrels)SalesAll

86

U.S. Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S. NaturalA. Michael SchaalNovember 26,8,Coal Stocks

87

CAB International 2007. Biodiversity Loss and Conservation in Fragmented Forest Landscapes: 370 The Forests of Montane Mexico and Temperate South America (ed. A.C. Newton)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, mining, development of infrastructure (roads, pipelines, dams), logging/fuelwood extraction, habitat fragmentation, climate change and loss of keystone species and ecological structures. The relative importance

Rey Benayas, José María

88

Information extraction system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An information extraction system and methods of operating the system are provided. In particular, an information extraction system for performing meta-extraction of named entities of people, organizations, and locations as well as relationships and events from text documents are described herein.

Lemmond, Tracy D; Hanley, William G; Guensche, Joseph Wendell; Perry, Nathan C; Nitao, John J; Kidwell, Paul Brandon; Boakye, Kofi Agyeman; Glaser, Ron E; Prenger, Ryan James

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

89

Tax aspects of casualty losses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sudden, unex- 1 pected or unusual nature. The word also signifies an accident, a mishap, or some sudden invasion by a hostile agency. It excludes the progressive deterioration of property through a steadily operating cause, and the loss of an article.... F. T, R. 432, rulings and Court decisions indicate that there may be a tendency to dis- regard suddenness as a requirement for a casualty loss deduction. The casualty loss deduction is allowed only for the loss of pro- 3 perty and the property...

Lehmann, August Herman

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Fission Product Extraction Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new INL technology can simultaneously extract cesium and strontium for reuse. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

None

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Coal extraction process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sub-divided coal is extracted under non-thermally destructive conditions with a solvent liquid containing a compound having the general formula:

Hammack, R. W.; Sears, J. T.; Stiller, A. H.

1981-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

92

Fission Product Extraction Process  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A new INL technology can simultaneously extract cesium and strontium for reuse. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

93

GRIEF AND LOSS COUNSELLING AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LEARN TO UNDERSTAND GRIEF AND LOSS COUNSELLING AND PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES (CAPS) #12;The death be tired with no energy or feel sick in the stomach and have headaches. People experiencing grief after

Viglas, Anastasios

94

Turbine tip clearance loss mechanisms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three-dimensional numerical simulations (RANS and URANS) were used to assess the impact of two specific design features, and of aspects of the actual turbine environment, on turbine blade tip loss. The calculations were ...

Mazur, Steven (Steven Andrew)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Extraction Utility Design Specification  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Extraction Utility Design Specification January 11, 2011 Document Version 1.9 1 Revision History Date Version Section and Titles Author Summary of Change January 15, 2010 1.0 All...

96

Liquid chromatographic extraction medium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Liquid chromatographic extraction medium  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

98

Cancer Vulnerabilities Unveiled by Genomic Loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to genome instability, most cancers exhibit loss of regions containing tumor suppressor genes and collateral loss of other genes. To identify cancer-specific vulnerabilities that are the result of copy number losses, ...

Nijhawan, Deepak

99

Efficiency loss in resource allocation games  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The overarching goals of this thesis are to quantify the efficiency loss due to market participant strategic behavior, and to design proper pricing mechanisms that reduce the efficiency loss. The concept of efficiency loss ...

Xu, Yunjian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Solvent extraction studies of holmium with acidic extractants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid-liquid extraction studies of holmium with 2-ethylhexyl phosphoric acid mono-2-ethylhexyl ester, naphthenic, and Versatic 10 acids have been carried out. The nature of the extracted species and the extraction equilibrium constants of these systems have been determined from aqueous nitrate solution. The extraction mechanism and complexation models have been proposed. 11 refs., 8 figs.

Gaikwad, A.G.; Damodaran, A.D. (CSIR, Trivandrum (India))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Supercritical fluid extraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated or lipophilic crown ether or fluorinated dithiocarbamate. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth (Pullman, WA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Optimization of quantum interferometric metrological sensors in the presence of photon loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We optimize two-mode, entangled, number states of light in the presence of loss in order to maximize the extraction of the available phase information in an interferometer. Our approach optimizes over the entire available input Hilbert space with no constraints, other than fixed total initial photon number. We optimize to maximize the Fisher information, which is equivalent to minimizing the phase uncertainty. We find that in the limit of zero loss the optimal state is the so-called N00N state, for small loss, the optimal state gradually deviates from the N00N state, and in the limit of large loss the optimal state converges to a generalized two-mode coherent state, with a finite total number of photons. The results provide a general protocol for optimizing the performance of a quantum optical interferometer in the presence of photon loss, with applications to quantum imaging, metrology, sensing, and information processing.

Tae-Woo Lee; Sean D. Huver; Hwang Lee; Lev Kaplan; Steven B. McCracken; Changjun Min; Dmitry B. Uskov; Christoph F. Wildfeuer; Georgios Veronis; Jonathan P. Dowling

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

103

Effects of Magnet Errors in the ILC 14 mrad Extraction Line  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ILC baseline extraction line is designed for 14 mrad horizontal crossing angle between e{sup +} and e{sup -} colliding beams at Interaction Point (IP). The extraction optics in the Interaction Region (IR) includes a detector integrated dipole field (anti-DID) to reduce orbit perturbation caused by the detector solenoid and minimize detector background. This paper presents a study of random field and alignment errors in the extraction magnets, compensation of the induced orbit perturbation, and effects of errors on extraction beam power loss. The results are obtained for the baseline ILC energy of 500 GeV center-of-mass and three options of beam parameters.

Toprek, Dragan; /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

104

Painted Ponies: Essays on Memory and Loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This collection explores the spiral nature of memory as it examines the way loss and one's reactions to loss repeat themselves in new guises and new contexts. Interspersing poetry with essays of memoir, Klayder examines ...

Klayder, Mary

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

Loss mechanisms in turbine tip clearance flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Numerical simulations of tip clearance ow have been carried out to dene the loss generation mechanisms associated with tip leakage in unshrouded axial turbines. Mix- ing loss between the leakage, which takes the form of a ...

Huang, Arthur (Arthur C.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Loss of coordination in competitive supply chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The loss of coordination in supply chains quantifies the inefficiency (i.e. the loss of total profit) due to the presence of competition in the supply chain. In this thesis, we discuss four models: one model with multiple ...

Teo, Koon Soon

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Fission product solvent extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two main objectives concerning removal of fission products from high-level tank wastes will be accomplished in this project. The first objective entails the development of an acid-side Cs solvent-extraction (SX) process applicable to remediation of the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and dissolved calcine waste (DCW) at INEEL. The second objective is to develop alkaline-side SX processes for the combined removal of Tc, Cs, and possibly Sr and for individual separation of Tc (alone or together with Sr) and Cs. These alkaline-side processes apply to tank wastes stored at Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge. This work exploits the useful properties of crown ethers and calixarenes and has shown that such compounds may be economically adapted to practical processing conditions. Potential benefits for both acid- and alkaline-side processing include order-of-magnitude concentration factors, high rejection of bulk sodium and potassium salts, and stripping with dilute (typically 10 mM) nitric acid. These benefits minimize the subsequent burden on the very expensive vitrification and storage of the high-activity waste. In the case of the SRTALK process for Tc extraction as pertechnetate anion from alkaline waste, such benefits have now been proven at the scale of a 12-stage flowsheet tested in 2-cm centrifugal contactors with a Hanford supernatant waste simulant. SRTALK employs a crown ether in a TBP-modified aliphatic kerosene diluent, is economically competitive with other applicable separation processes being considered, and has been successfully tested in batch extraction of actual Hanford double-shell slurry feed (DSSF).

Moyer, B.A.; Bonnesen, P.V.; Sachleben, R.A. [and others

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Extracting the Eliashberg Function  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolution Enhanced Oil RecoveryExtracellularExtracting the

109

Extracting the Eliashberg Function  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolution Enhanced Oil RecoveryExtracellularExtracting

110

Extracting the Eliashberg Function  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolution Enhanced OilExtracting the Eliashberg Function

111

Extracting the Eliashberg Function  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolution Enhanced OilExtracting the Eliashberg

112

Extraction Utility Design Specification  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit|Department of Energy56Executive212-2012 June 2012Extraction Utility

113

Induction machine stray loss from inter-bar currents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stray load loss refers generally to the sources of induction machine loss not accounted for by typical calculations of primary or secondary copper loss, no load core loss, or friction and windage loss. Harmonic rotor bar ...

Englebretson, Steven Carl

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Extraction of fossil fuel with guanadine extracting agent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subdivided coal, oil shale or tar sands is extracted under non-thermally destructive conditions with a solvent liquid containing a compound having the general formula: (R1-)2 N-C(=N-R)-N(-R2)2 Where R, R/sub 1/, and R/sub 2/ are each hydrogen atoms, lower alkyl (C/sub 1/-C/sub 4/) groups, or phenyl groups; provided that the compound has a decomposition temperature higher than the temperature of the extraction, and the extraction temperature is below the softening or decomposition temperature of the material being extracted.

Case, G.D.; Bekowies, P.J.; Panson, A.G.; Stiller, A.H.

1984-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

115

Reducing Data Loss and Saving Money by Acquiring Data Loss Prevention Software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reducing Data Loss and Saving Money by Acquiring Data Loss Prevention Software Master of Art data loss and saving money by acquiring DLP software Patarika Tipwong Acknowledgements This thesisPaul University. #12;Reducing data loss and saving money by acquiring DLP software Patarika Tipwong Table

Schaefer, Marcus

116

Actinide extraction methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of separating actinides from lanthanides are disclosed. A regio-specific/stereo-specific dithiophosphinic acid having organic moieties is provided in an organic solvent that is then contacted with an acidic medium containing an actinide and a lanthanide. The method can extend to separating actinides from one another. Actinides are extracted as a complex with the dithiophosphinic acid. Separation compositions include an aqueous phase, an organic phase, dithiophosphinic acid, and at least one actinide. The compositions may include additional actinides and/or lanthanides. A method of producing a dithiophosphinic acid comprising at least two organic moieties selected from aromatics and alkyls, each moiety having at least one functional group is also disclosed. A source of sulfur is reacted with a halophosphine. An ammonium salt of the dithiophosphinic acid product is precipitated out of the reaction mixture. The precipitated salt is dissolved in ether. The ether is removed to yield the dithiophosphinic acid.

Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Harrup, Mason K. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Tillotson, Richard D. (Moore, ID) [Moore, ID; Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID) [Pocatello, ID

2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

117

Extraction chromatography: Progress and opportunities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extraction chromatography provides a simple and effective method for the analytical and preparative-scale separation of a variety of metal ions. Recent advances in extractant design, particularly the development of extractants capable of metal ion recognition or of strong complex formation in highly acidic media, have significantly improved the utility of the technique. Advances in support design, most notably the introduction of functionalized supports to enhance metal ion retention, promise to yield further improvements. Column instability remains a significant obstacle, however, to the process-scale application of extraction chromatography. 79 refs.

Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bond, A.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Passive vapor extraction feasibility study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Demonstration of a passive vapor extraction remediation system is planned for sites in the 200 West Area used in the past for the disposal of waste liquids containing carbon tetrachloride. The passive vapor extraction units will consist of a 4-in.-diameter pipe, a check valve, a canister filled with granular activated carbon, and a wind turbine. The check valve will prevent inflow of air that otherwise would dilute the soil gas and make its subsequent extraction less efficient. The granular activated carbon is used to adsorb the carbon tetrachloride from the air. The wind turbine enhances extraction rates on windy days. Passive vapor extraction units will be designed and operated to meet all applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. Based on a cost analysis, passive vapor extraction was found to be a cost-effective method for remediation of soils containing lower concentrations of volatile contaminants. Passive vapor extraction used on wells that average 10-stdft{sup 3}/min air flow rates was found to be more cost effective than active vapor extraction for concentrations below 500 parts per million by volume (ppm) of carbon tetrachloride. For wells that average 5-stdft{sup 3}/min air flow rates, passive vapor extraction is more cost effective below 100 ppm.

Rohay, V.J.

1994-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

119

Characteristic losses in metals: Al, Be, and Ni  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information about the {ital occupied} portion of the surface density of states of materials can be derived from electron-excited Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), which is a standard experimental technique in most surface science laboratories. Surface sensitive experimental techniques that provide information regarding the {ital unoccupied} portion of the surface density of states are often not standard and are not so readily available. Here we explore the possibility of utilizing the same experimental equipment as in AES to derive information about the unoccupied portion of the surface density of states from a characteristic loss spectroscopy, in particular, from core-level inelastic electron-scattering spectroscopy (CLIESS). An important application of this technique is in comparative studies. CLIESS spectra from clean surfaces of aluminum, beryllium and nickel are presented. These data were taken in the first-derivative mode using the reflection of monoenergetic primary beams of 450 eV energy for Be, and 300 eV for Al and Ni. The Al and Be spectra had to be extracted from overlapping plasmon signals using synthesized plasmon spectra based on the behavior of these spectra between the elastic peak energy and the respective core level threshold energies. After applying loss-deconvolution techniques to remove secondary loss spectral distortions, integral spectra were obtained which compared well to corresponding experimental soft x-ray absorption and transmission electron-energy loss data as well as to theoretical calculations of the unoccupied density-of-states for these materials. Comparison similarities as well as some differences are discussed. Finally, in order to illustrate the potential these signals have in serving as {open_quotes}fingerprints{close_quotes} of surface chemistry, derivative metal-CLIESS curves for the three oxide surfaces of the metals are also presented. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

Madden, H.H.; Landers, R.; Kleiman, G.G. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Caixa Postal 6165, 13081-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brasil] [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Caixa Postal 6165, 13081-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brasil; Zehner, D.M. [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6057 (United States)] [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6057 (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Analysis of TPV Network Losses (a Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This talk focuses on the theoretical analysis of electrical losses associated with electrically networking large numbers of TPV cells to produce high power TPV power generators.

DM DePoy; MW Dashiell; DD Rahner; LR Danielson; JE Oppenlander; JL Vell; RJ Wehrer

2004-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A New Loss Control Management System; Assimilating Loss Control Methodology in Reducing the Overall Quality Losses in XYZ Chemical Corporation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that has occurred in recent past. While the quality management system that is in place at XYZ monitors and improves the overall quality of the products, it does not capture the quality losses as it should. Quality losses occur due to human error...

Shaikh, Sameer

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

122

Handling Food and Supplies during Power Loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ER-017 6-06 Loss of electricity or gas commonly occurs during storms or other natural disasters. However, power loss may continue for weeks after the storm has passed, especially if an area has been damaged by floods or high winds. If you...

Anding, Jenna

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

MANAGING JOB LOSS and FINANCIAL STRESS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-hunting strategy. Put time and energy into planning actions that will lead to your next job such as preparingMANAGING JOB LOSS and FINANCIAL STRESS a Personal and Family Guide CENTER ON THE FAMILY #12;2 Managing Job Loss and Financial Stress The issues associated with losing one's job or having hours cut

124

Support vector machines with the ramp loss and the hard margin loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 4, 2008 ... Support vector machines with the ramp loss and the hard margin loss. J.P. Brooks (jpbrooks ***at*** vcu.edu). Abstract: In the interest of ...

J.P. Brooks

2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

125

Heat loss from an open cavity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cavity type receivers are used extensively in concentrating solar thermal energy collecting systems. The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP) in Shenandoah, Georgia is a large scale field test for the collection of solar thermal energy. The STEP experiment consists of a large field array of solar collectors used to supplement the process steam, cooling and other electrical power requirements of an adjacent knitwear manufacturing facility. The purpose of the tests, conducted for this study, was to isolate and quantify the radiative, conductive, and convective components of total heat loss, and to determine the effects of operating temperature, receiver angle, and aperture size on cavity heat loss. An analytical model for radiative heat loss was developed and compared with two other methods used to determine radiative heat loss. A proposed convective heat loss correlation, including effects of aperture size, receiver operating temperature, and receiver angle is presented. The resulting data is a source to evaluate the STEP measurements.

McDonald, C.G. [California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomona, CA (United States). Coll. of Engineering

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

CLASSICAL CEPHEIDS REQUIRE ENHANCED MASS LOSS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of rates of period change of Classical Cepheids probe stellar physics and evolution. Additionally, better understanding of Cepheid structure and evolution provides greater insight into their use as standard candles and tools for measuring the Hubble constant. Our recent study of the period change of the nearest Cepheid, Polaris, suggested that it is undergoing enhanced mass loss when compared to canonical stellar evolution model predictions. In this work, we expand the analysis to rates of period change measured for about 200 Galactic Cepheids and compare them to population synthesis models of Cepheids including convective core overshooting and enhanced mass loss. Rates of period change predicted from stellar evolution models without mass loss do not agree with observed rates, whereas including enhanced mass loss yields predicted rates in better agreement with observations. This is the first evidence that enhanced mass loss as suggested previously for Polaris and {delta} Cephei must be a ubiquitous property of Classical Cepheids.

Neilson, Hilding R.; Langer, Norbert; Izzard, Robert [Argelander Institute for Astronomy, University of Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Engle, Scott G.; Guinan, Ed, E-mail: neilsonh@etsu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 Lancaster Ave. Villanova, PA 19085 (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

127

Liquid-Liquid Extraction Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liquid-liquid extraction is the separation of one or more components of a liquid solution by contact with a second immiscible liquid called the solvent. If the components in the original liquid solution distribute themselves differently between...

Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Hot water bitumen extraction process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a method of extracting bitumen oils from tar-sands ore. It includes an initial conditioning step comprising crushing tar-sands ore to yield solid particles of a maximum size required by a log washer conditioner in a second conditioning step; a bitumen extraction step; a bitumen separation step; a solvent recovery step; a sand washing and water clarification step; and a sand solvent recovery step.

Rendall, J.S.

1989-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

129

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

130

Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

131

Heat Loss Measurement Using Infrared Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in various applications. Examples of two applications are presented. The first describes the development of heat balance data for a solvent refined coal processing unit. The second describes the measurement of heat loss and thermal resistance in a double...

Seeber, S. A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Telling Absence: War Widows, Loss and Memory   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis concerns feminist sociological analysis of war loss and its consequences as experienced and told by Finnish Karelian war widows of World War 2. They lost their partners and had to leave their homes by force, ...

Loipponen, Jaana

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Reduction of Hydrocarbon Losses to Flare Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

merit consideration because the losses and associated economic penalties are assumed to be small. Flare gas flow is not easily measured and as a result, most plants are unaware of how much product they are actually losing during normal operation...

Page, J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Corona losses in HVdc bipolar lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem related to the prediction of corona losses in HVdc bipolar lines has been solved, in the past, by means of semi-empirical monomial formulae. However, the proposed formulae that are simpler to use do not always give adequate calculation precision, while the formulae that provide the closest results require implicit functions of different complexity, which are difficult to apply; moreover, it is not possible to understand clearly what influence the variations of the different line parameters have on the losses themselves. The new monomial semi-empirical relationship, proposed to predict the corona losses in HVdc bipolar lines, is very simple to use; it highlights the dependence of power losses due to the corona effect by the different line parameters. The formula has been developed by elaborating a considerable amount of available experimental data.

Corbellini, U.; Pelacchi, P. [Univ. of Pisa (Italy). Dept. of Electric Systems and Automation] [Univ. of Pisa (Italy). Dept. of Electric Systems and Automation

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Report on fuel pool water loss tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To resolve potential concerns on the integrity of the fuel storage pool at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), a highly accurate testing technique was developed to quantify water losses from the pool. The fuel pool is an unlined, single wall, reinforced concrete structure containing approximately 818,000 gallons of water. Since an initial test indicated that water losses could possibly be attributed solely to evaporation, a cover was suspended and sealed over the pool to block evaporation losses. High accuracy water level and temperature instrumentation was procured and installed. The conclusions of this report indicate that unaccounted-for water losses from the pool are insignificant and there is no detectable leakage within the range of test accuracy.

Zalenski, R.F. [West Valley Nuclear Services Co., West Valley, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

Cesium and strontium extraction using a mixed extractant solvent including crown ether and calixarene extractants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mixed extractant solvent including calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from an acidic solution. The DtBu18C6 may be present from approximately 0.01 M to approximately 0.4M, such as from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may form an organic phase in an extraction system that also includes an aqueous phase. Methods of extracting cesium and strontium as well as strontium alone are also disclosed.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

137

Factors affect offshore production loss control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many aspects of petroleum measurement on an offshore production platform are the same as at an onshore facility, but there are some unique differences. Before going into them it should be noted that even in today's climate of low or declining oil prices that stock loss control is still important. Improving measurement of the quantity of oil transfers can help reduce the amount of stock that is ''unaccounted for'' or lost. As stock loss is reduced, the salable quantity increases, the gross revenue increases, and the net revenue increases. Even in cases where transfers are between two departments of the same company, accurate measurement and proper accountability are required because they often are the basis for determining costs and can thus affect the price that is charged on a later custody transfer. Inefficiencies in intracompany transfers can often hide real losses which may occur during intercompany transfers.

Ash, C.S.

1986-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

138

2 Extracting and trapping biogenic 3 volatile organic compounds stored  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Subcritical water extraction; UAE, Ultrasound-assisted extraction 36 1. Introduction Plants release

Goldstein, Allen

139

Uranium Ore Uranium is extracted  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Milling of Uranium Ore Uranium is extracted from ore with strong acids or bases. The uranium is concentrated in a solid substance called"yellowcake." Chemical Conversion Plants convert the uranium in yellowcake to uranium hexafluoride (UF6 ), a compound that can be made into nuclear fuel. Enrichment

140

Parallel algorithms for inductance extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 3. Pin Connect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 C. The Inductance Extraction Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 ix CHAPTER Page V COMPARISON WITH EXISTING WORK . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 A. Ground Plane... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 1. Shared Memory Parallelization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 2. Mixed Mode Parallelization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 3. Distributed Memory Parallelization . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 VII CONCLUSIONS...

Mahawar, Hemant

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Reducing the losses of optical metamaterials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The field of metamaterials is driven by fascinating and far-reaching theoretical visions, such as perfect lenses, invisibility cloaking, and enhanced optical nonlinearities. However, losses have become the major obstacle towards real world applications in the optical regime. Reducing the losses of optical metamaterials becomes necessary and extremely important. In this thesis, two approaches are taken to reduce the losses. One is to construct an indefinite medium. Indefinite media are materials where not all the principal components of the permittivity and permeability tensors have the same sign. They do not need the resonances to achieve negative permittivity, {var_epsilon}. So, the losses can be comparatively small. To obtain indefinite media, three-dimensional (3D) optical metallic nanowire media with different structures are designed. They are numerically demonstrated that they are homogeneous effective indefinite anisotropic media by showing that their dispersion relations are hyperbolic. Negative group refraction and pseudo focusing are observed. Another approach is to incorporate gain into metamaterial nanostructures. The nonlinearity of gain is included by a generic four-level atomic model. A computational scheme is presented, which allows for a self-consistent treatment of a dispersive metallic photonic metamaterial coupled to a gain material incorporated into the nanostructure using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The loss compensations with gain are done for various structures, from 2D simplified models to 3D realistic structures. Results show the losses of optical metamaterials can be effectively compensated by gain. The effective gain coefficient of the combined system can be much larger than the bulk gain counterpart, due to the strong local-field enhancement.

Fang, Anan

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

142

Parton Energy Loss with Detailed Balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stimulated gluon emission and thermal absorption in addition to induced radiation are considered for an energetic parton propagating inside a quark- gluon plasma. In the presence of thermal gluons, stimulated emission reduces while absorption increases the parton's energy. The net effect is a reduction of the parton energy loss. Though decreasing asymptotically as $T/E$ with the parton energy, the relative reduction is found to be important for intermediate energies. The modified energy dependence of the energy loss will affect the shape of suppression of moderately high $p_T$ hadrons due to jet quenching in high-energy heavy-ion collisions.

Enke Wang; Xin-Nian Wang

2001-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

143

Energy Use Loss and Opportunities Analysis: U.S. Manufacturing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Use Loss and Opportunities Analysis: U.S. Manufacturing & Mining Energy Use Loss and Opportunities Analysis: U.S. Manufacturing & Mining energyuselossopportunitiesanalys...

144

Understanding Collection-Related Losses in Organic Solar Cells...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Understanding Collection-Related Losses in Organic Solar Cells Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Understanding Collection-Related Losses in Organic Solar Cells...

145

Draft "Michigan Saves" Loan Loss Reserve Fund Agreement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A sample loan loss reserve agreement between a state or local government and a financial institution setting the terms and conditions of the loan loss reserve fund.

146

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines About U.S.30Natural Gas Glossary529 633 6221,2372003ofDec. 31 705 740(Million

147

Kalman Filtering in Correlated Losses Sachin Adlakha  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for such networks is the tracking and navigation of autonomous vehicles using sensor nodes. Such applications in presence of correlated losses using a Kalman Filter . This scenario arises in performing vehicle tracking Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) have fueled interest in research and development of a new class

Adlakha, Sachin

148

Standby and Off-Mode Energy Losses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Standby and Off-Mode Energy Losses In New Appliances Measured in Shops #12;ISBN: 978 with the University of Coimbra. Its research interests include energyefficient technologies, renewable energies, and energy planning. Recent work includes the coordination of several European projects on market

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

149

Loss and thermal noise in plasmonic waveguides  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rytov's theory of thermally generated radiation is used to find the noise in two-dimensional passive guides based on an arbitrary distribution of lossy isotropic dielectric. To simplify calculations, the Maxwell curl equations are approximated using difference equations that also permit a transmission-line analogy, and material losses are assumed to be low enough for modal losses to be estimated using perturbation theory. It is shown that an effective medium representation of each mode is valid for both loss and noise and, hence, that a one-dimensional model can be used to estimate the best achievable noise factor when a given mode is used in a communications link. This model only requires knowledge of the real and imaginary parts of the modal dielectric constant. The former can be found by solving the lossless eigenvalue problem, while the latter can be estimated using perturbation theory. Because of their high loss, the theory is most relevant to plasmonic waveguides, and its application is demonstrated using single interface, slab, and slot guide examples. The best noise performance is offered by the long-range plasmon supported by the slab guide.

Syms, R. R. A., E-mail: r.syms@imperial.ac.uk; Solymar, L. [Optical and Semiconductor Devices Group, EEE Department, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

150

Energy loss of fast quarks in nuclei  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report an analysis of the nuclear dependence of the yield of Drell-Yan (DY) dimuons from the 800 GeV/c proton bombardment of {sup 2}H, C, Ca, Fe, and W targets. A light-cone formulation of the DY process is employed in the rest frame of the nucleus. In this frame, for x{sub 2} <loss and shadowing, in a consistent formulation. Shadowing, involving no free parameters, is calculated within the light-cone dipole formalism. Initial-state energy loss, the only unknown in the problem, is determined from afit to the nuclear-dependence ratio versus x{sub 1}. With the assumption of constant energy loss per unit path length, we find -dE/dz = 2.32 {+-} 0.52 {+-} 0.5 GeV/fm. This is the first observation of a nonzero energy loss of partons traveling in nuclear environment.

Garvey, G. T. (Gerald T.); Johnson, Mikkel B.; Leitch, M. J.; McGaughey, P. L. (Patrick L.); Peng, J. C. (Jen-Chieh); Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Moss, J. M. (Joel Marshall)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Titanium metal: extraction to application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

Gambogi, Joseph (USGS, Reston, VA); Gerdemann, Stephen J.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Gauge Invariant Spectral Cauchy Characteristic Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present gauge invariant spectral Cauchy characteristic extraction. We compare gravitational waveforms extracted from a head-on black hole merger simulated in two different gauges by two different codes. We show rapid convergence, demonstrating both gauge invariance of the extraction algorithm and consistency between the legacy Pitt null code and the much faster Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC).

Casey J. Handmer; Béla Szilágyi; Jeffrey Winicour

2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

153

Tuneable dielectric films having low electrical losses  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a method for forming dielectric thin films having substantially reduced electrical losses at microwave and millimeter wave frequencies relative to conventional dielectric thin films. The reduction in losses is realized by dramatically increasing the grain sizes of the dielectric films, thereby minimizing intergranular scattering of the microwave signal due to grain boundaries and point defects. The increase in grain size is realized by heating the film to a temperature at which the grains experience regrowth. The grain size of the films can be further increased by first depositing the films with an excess of one of the compoents, such that a highly mobile grain boundary phase is formed.

Dimos, Duane Brian (Albuquerque, NM); Schwartz, Robert William (Albuquerque, NM); Raymond, Mark Victor (Albuquerque, NM); Al-Shareef, Husam Niman (Boise, ID); Mueller, Carl (Lakewood, CO); Galt, David (Denver, CO)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Scannerless laser range imaging using loss modulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A scannerless 3-D imaging apparatus is disclosed which utilizes an amplitude modulated cw light source to illuminate a field of view containing a target of interest. Backscattered light from the target is passed through one or more loss modulators which are modulated at the same frequency as the light source, but with a phase delay .delta. which can be fixed or variable. The backscattered light is demodulated by the loss modulator and detected with a CCD, CMOS or focal plane array (FPA) detector to construct a 3-D image of the target. The scannerless 3-D imaging apparatus, which can operate in the eye-safe wavelength region 1.4-1.7 .mu.m and which can be constructed as a flash LADAR, has applications for vehicle collision avoidance, autonomous rendezvous and docking, robotic vision, industrial inspection and measurement, 3-D cameras, and facial recognition.

Sandusky, John V. (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

155

Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging methods and apparatus are disclosed for producing three dimensional (3D) images of a target within a scene. Apparatus and methods according to the present invention comprise a light source providing at least three wavelengths (passbands) of illumination that are each loss modulated, phase delayed and simultaneously directed to illuminate the target. Phase delayed light backscattered from the target is spectrally filtered, demodulated and imaged by a planar detector array. Images of the intensity distributions for the selected wavelengths are obtained under modulated and unmodulated (dc) illumination of the target, and the information contained in the images combined to produce a 3D image of the target.

Sandusky, John V. (Albuquerque, NM); Pitts, Todd Alan (Rio Rancho, NM)

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

156

Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging methods and apparatus are disclosed for producing three dimensional (3D) images of a target within a scene. Apparatus and methods according to the present invention comprise a light source providing at least three wavelengths (passbands) of illumination that are each loss modulated, phase delayed and simultaneously directed to illuminate the target. Phase delayed light backscattered from the target is spectrally filtered, demodulated and imaged by a planar detector array. Images of the intensity distributions for the selected wavelengths are obtained under modulated and unmodulated (dc) illumination of the target, and the information contained in the images combined to produce a 3D image of the target.

Sandusky, John V. (Albuquerque, NM); Pitts, Todd Alan (Rio Rancho, NM)

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

157

Energy loss rate in disordered quantum well  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the effect of dynamically screened deformation potential on the electron energy loss rate in disordered semiconductor quantum well. Interaction of confined electrons with bulk acoustic phonons has been considered in the deformation coupling. The study concludes that the dynamically screened deformation potential coupling plays a significant role as it substantially affects the power dependency of electron relaxation on temperature and mean free path.

Tripathi, P.; Ashraf, S. S. Z. [Centre of Excellence in Nanomaterials, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002 (India); Hasan, S. T. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, The M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara-390002 (India); Sharma, A. C. [Physics Department, Sibli National College, Azamgarh-276128 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

158

Assessing Phosphorous Loss to Protect Surface Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phosphorus LossStory by Raul L. Garcia The Texas State Soil and Water ConservationBoard (TSSWCB) in collaboration with the Department of Soil and Crop Sciences at Texas A&M University, Texas Cooperative Extension (TCE), Texas Water Resources... Institute (TWRI), and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS), have developed a field validation of the Texas Phosphorus Index. This project, located near Bosque and Leon Rivers, began June 1, 2002, and ended...

Garcia, Raul

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Recent Stirling engine loss - understanding results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For several years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and other US Government agencies have been funding experimental and analytical efforts to improve the understanding of Stirling thermodynamic losses. NASA`s objective is to improve Stirling engine design capability to support the development of new engines for space power. An overview of these efforts was last given at the 1988 IECEC. Recent results of this research are reviewed.

Tew, R.C.; Thieme, L.G.; Dudenhoefer, J.E.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Understanding Loss Mechanisms and Efficiency Improvement Options for HCCI Engines Using Detailed Exergy Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exergy Loss from Cylinder Gases Combustion Heat Loss Exhaustheptane and Natural Gas blends Combustion in HCCI Engines,”from Cylinder Gases (%) Loss Mechanisms Combustion Heat Loss

Saxena, Samveg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Preliminary analysis of NAPL behavior in soil-heated vapor extraction for in-situ environmental restoration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simulations of soil-heated vapor extraction have been performed to evaluate the NAPL removal performance as a function of borehole vacuum. The possibility of loss of NAPL containment, or NAPL migration into the unheated soil, is also evaluated in the simulations. A practical warning sign indicating migration of NAPL into the unheated zone is discussed.

Webb, S.W.; Phelan, J.M.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Solvent extraction of inorganic acids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the solution by a sim?. le process that is economically =ttrsctlve is of con- sider. ble interest~ Dilute "olution; of hydrochloric, nitric and sul- furic acid d; occur in many processes either alone or toga- th: r . 'he use of li. , uid-li~uid extraction...~~ram for hexyl c~rbitol- water-nitric acid 17 ~ Distribution die, r m for hoxl'' ca:-bitol- watcr-sulfur'c acid Table 1. . 'xperimental d ta of amyl alcohol-water-!!Cl Pa, e 33 2. Experimental data of isoamyl alcohol-water- HC1 34 3 ~ Cxperimental data...

Ysrael, Miguel Curie

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

System Losses and Assessment Trade Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) study has developed new analysis methods to examine old and new technology options toward the goal of improving fuel cycle systems. We have integrated participants and information from AFCI Systems Analysis, Transmutation Fuels, Separations, and Waste Form Campaigns in the Systems Losses and Assessment Trade Study. The initial objectives of this study were to 1) increase understanding of system interdependencies and thereby identify system trade-offs that may yield important insights, 2) define impacts of separations product purity on fuel manufacture and transmutation reactivity, 3) define impacts from transuranic (TRU) losses to waste, 4) identify the interrelationships involved in fuels and separations technology performance, and 5) identify system configuration adjustments with the greatest potential for influencing system losses. While bounding and analyzing this initial problem, we also identified significantly higher-level programmatic drivers with broad implications to the current fuel cycle research charter and the general issue of a DOE complex wide need for a comprehensive and integrated nuclear material management as addressed by the new DOE Order 410.2 titled “Management of Nuclear Materials”. The initial modeling effort developed in this study for a much smaller subset of material (i.e., commercial fuel) and a selected transmutation scheme (i.e., fast reactor recycling) is a necessary first step towards examining a broader set of nuclear material management options, dispositioning strategies and integrated waste management options including potential areas of research leverage. The primary outcome from this initial study has been an enhanced integration among Campaigns and associated insights and analysis methods. Opportunities for improved understanding between the groups abound. The above lanthanide-actinide example highlights the importance of evaluating options via integration across the Campaigns. Plans for Fiscal Year 2010 are being made in a coordinated fashion such that the knowledge gained from the research performed by the Campaigns can benefit on-going work of the study, and that improved understanding of the system relationships can be used to guide the specific research and development (R&D) activities within the Campaigns. In FY-10, the System Losses and Assessment Trade Study will carry-over activities from FY-09. We will continue to refine impurity and loss estimates and impurity limits on fuels by incorporating results from ongoing R&D. And we will begin work on an enhanced nuclear material management model to allow us to continue to improve our overall system understanding of the trade-offs between separations, fuel fabrication, waste forms, waste disposition, SNM losses, reactor performance, and proliferation resistance. In the future, we can also better understand how used fuel and other forms of remote-handled SNM can be better integrated into an overall nuclear material management program that will evolve for the DOE complex via Order 410.2 (DOE 2009).

David Shropshire; Steve Piet; Nick Soelberg; Robert Cherry; Roger Henry; David Meikrantz; Greg Teske; Eric Shaber; Candido Pereira

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Recessed light fixtures: Infiltration energy loss  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article reports that a recent study revealed that fluorescent bulbs can reduce convective energy losses by 15--65% as compared to incandescent bulbs. Recessed light fixtures are commonly installed in offices and homes. However, a problem arises in homes when the fixtures are set in the ceiling such that the top of the light fixture is exposed to the unconditioned air in the attic. Because some air flow is necessary around the light to avoid overheating, the manufacturers do not make all the fixtures leak tight, only those that are rated for lower wattage bulbs. The need for cooling the fixture may conflict with some building efficiency codes.

Bennett, S.M.; Perez-Blanco, H. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

CHARACTERIZING LOSSES IN MICROSTRIP TRANSMISSION LINES Rashmi Pathak  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CHARACTERIZING LOSSES IN MICROSTRIP TRANSMISSION LINES by Rashmi Pathak A dissertation submitted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1 Transmission Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2 Engineering) at the UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MADISON Summer 2005 #12;i Characterizing Losses in Transmission

Timbie, Peter

166

Draft 'Michigan Saves' Loan Loss Reserve Fund Agreement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A sample loan loss reserve agreement between a state or local government and a financial institution setting the terms and conditions of the loan loss reserve fund. Author: State of Michigan

167

Extracting inorganics from scrap tires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Scrap tires contain several inorganic moieties in abundances >0.5% which are impregnated into their carbonaceous matrix. These inorganic species are known to produce acid rain, toxic aerosols, and boiler scale and could produce unwanted catalytic effects as well. It is our position that the potential of recycling scrap tires would be considerably enhanced if the inorganics in question - S, Ca, and Zn - were removed prior to attempts to upgrade the carbonaceous matrix. Using non-mechanical methods, we are attempting to cleave the adherence between the co-polymer matrix and to extract the inorganics. The efficiency of our methods is being measured by wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometry and by other methods.

Cummings, R.; Wertz, D.L. [Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

168

Characterizing Shading Losses on Partially Shaded PV Systems (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presentation on shaded PV power loss, practical issues with modeling shaded PV, and methods of implementing partially shaded PV modeling.

Deline, C.

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

169

Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and americium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU's together with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU's and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and americium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU's together with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU's and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal. 3 figs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1992-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

171

Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and amercium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N.N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU`s to gather with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU`s and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

The Capacity Loss of Dense Constellations Tobias Koch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

high SNR, our results recover the power loss of 1.53dB for square signal constellations without-noise channels for suitably high signal- to-noise ratio. Our expression for the capacity loss recovers the power loss of 1.53dB for square signal constellations. I. INTRODUCTION As it is well known, the channel

173

Advanced EL inspection with predictive estimation of module power loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced EL inspection with predictive estimation of module power loss Ralph Schmidt (Dipl.-Ing) pi4_robotics GmbH Berlin #12;Agenda: - Introduction pi4 - The idea: Estimate power loss at an early stage in production - Investigation of single cells with defects - Estimation of Power loss for PV

174

Cotton Insect Losses 1983 Compiled for National Cotton Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cotton Insect Losses 1983 Compiled for National Cotton Council Robert B. Head, Coordinator consultants and other personnel associated with cotton production. The Cotton Foundation provided funds their respective areas. Table 1 Alabama Cotton Insect Losses for 1983 Loss attributable to: Percent Bales Boll

Ray, David

175

Cotton Insect Losses 1991 Compiled for National Cotton Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cotton Insect Losses 1991 Compiled for National Cotton Council Robert B. Head, Chairman Cooperative to have produced the greatest pest related losses in U. S. cotton in 1991. Aphid losses reported at 2. This is true for sweet potato whiteflies. These insects have been pests of cotton in California and Arizona

Ray, David

176

Loss Factor of the PEP-II Rings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An RF power balance method is used to measure the synchrotron radiation losses and the wake field losses. We present the history of the losses in the Low Energy Ring (LER) and the High Energy Ring (HER) during the last several runs of PEP-II.

Novokhatski, A; Sullivan, M.; /SLAC

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

177

Determination of Extractives in Biomass: Laboratory Analytical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Extractives in Biomass Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 7172005 A. Sluiter, R. Ruiz, C. Scarlata, J. Sluiter, and D. Templeton Technical Report NRELTP-510-42619...

178

Aqueous Enzymatic Extraction Of Wheat Germ Oil.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of this study is to investigate the aqueous enzymatic extraction of wheat germ oil. Four enzymes (Viscozyme L, Multifect CX 13l, Multifect CX… (more)

Xie, Meizhen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Technologies for Extracting...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Technologies for Extracting Valuable Metals and Compounds from Geothermal Fluids Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About...

180

Accelerated solvent extraction of petroleum contaminated sediments.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Attempts have been made in recent years to find acceptable alternatives to classical soxhlet extraction of petroleum contaminated sediments. One such method that is very… (more)

Bauguss, Jeffery Lynn

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Quantum cryptographic system with reduced data loss  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A secure method for distributing a random cryptographic key with reduced data loss is disclosed. Traditional quantum key distribution systems employ similar probabilities for the different communication modes and thus reject at least half of the transmitted data. The invention substantially reduces the amount of discarded data (those that are encoded and decoded in different communication modes e.g. using different operators) in quantum key distribution without compromising security by using significantly different probabilities for the different communication modes. Data is separated into various sets according to the actual operators used in the encoding and decoding process and the error rate for each set is determined individually. The invention increases the key distribution rate of the BB84 key distribution scheme proposed by Bennett and Brassard in 1984. Using the invention, the key distribution rate increases with the number of quantum signals transmitted and can be doubled asymptotically. 23 figs.

Lo, H.K.; Chau, H.F.

1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

182

Global warming, insurance losses and financial industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. They have already caught the attention of the insurance industry, as they suffered massive losses in the last decade. Twenty-one out of the 25 largest catastrophes in the US, mainly in the form of hurricanes have occurred in the last decade. The insurance industry has reacted by taking the risk of global warming in decisions as to pricing and underwriting decisions. But they have yet to take a more active role in regulating the factors that contributes to global warming. How global warming can impact the financial industry and the modern economy is explored. Insurance and modern financial derivatives are key to the efficient functioning of the modern economy, without which the global economy can still function but will take a giant step backward. Any risk as global warming that causes economic surprises will hamper the efficient working of the financial market and the modern economy.

Low, N.C. [UOB Life Assurance Limited, Singapore (Singapore)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Control of transformer losses in Canada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new standard issued by the Canadian Standards Association, CSA C802, imposes maximum losses on transformers 10 MVA and below. Included are Distribution Transformers, small Power Transformers, and Dry Types. Implementation will start though the publishing in mid 1994 of the Gazette by Ontario`s Ministry of Energy. The Gazette will call for conformance to C802 after a lead time of one year to eighteen months, depending on the type of transformer. Other provincial energy ministries have been awaiting this development and are expected to follow suit shortly thereafter. The federal department, Natural Resources Canada, is also attuned to these actions and is expected to issue supportive legislation which will control movement of transformers across provincial and national borders.

Wiegand, D.A. [Canadian Standards Association, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Quantum cryptographic system with reduced data loss  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A secure method for distributing a random cryptographic key with reduced data loss. Traditional quantum key distribution systems employ similar probabilities for the different communication modes and thus reject at least half of the transmitted data. The invention substantially reduces the amount of discarded data (those that are encoded and decoded in different communication modes e.g. using different operators) in quantum key distribution without compromising security by using significantly different probabilities for the different communication modes. Data is separated into various sets according to the actual operators used in the encoding and decoding process and the error rate for each set is determined individually. The invention increases the key distribution rate of the BB84 key distribution scheme proposed by Bennett and Brassard in 1984. Using the invention, the key distribution rate increases with the number of quantum signals transmitted and can be doubled asymptotically.

Lo, Hoi-Kwong (1309, Low Block, Lei Moon House Ap Lei Chau Estate, Hong Kong, HK); Chau, Hoi Fung (Flat C, 42nd Floor, Tower 1, University Heights 23 Pokfield Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, HK)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Multisolvent successive extractive refining of coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A selected group of commercial solvents, namely, anthracene oil (AO), ethylenediamine (EDA), and liquid paraffin (LP), were used for successive extraction of Assam coal. Hot AO provided a wide range of mixed solvents that dissociate chemically and interact favorably with dissociated and undissociated coal macromolecules (like dissolves like). This resulted in the enhancement of the EDA extractability of the AO-pretreated residual coal. EDA is a good swelling solvent and results in physical dissociation of coal molecules. The residual coal obtained after EDA extraction was subjected to extraction with LP, an H-donor, high-boiling (330--360 C) solvent. LP thermally dissociates coal macromolecules and interacts with the coal at its plastic stage at the free radical pockets. The mechanism and molecular dynamics of the multisolvent successive extraction of Assam coal using AO-EDA-LP solvents are discussed. In early attempts, successive extractions did not modify the extraction yield in the single solvent showing the maximum extraction. However, the AO-EDA-LP extraction resulted in the extraction of 70% coal, more than for any of the individual solvents used. Therefore, AO-EDA-LP extraction of coal affords a process yielding a superclean, high-heating value fuel from coal under milder conditions. Several uses of superclean coal have been recommended. Present studies have revealed a new concept concerning the structure of coal having 30% polyaromatic condensed entangled rings and 70% triaromatic-heterocyclic-naphthenic-aliphatic structure. The insolubility of coal is due to the polyfunctional-heterocyclic-condensed structure having a polyaromatic core with intermacromolecular entanglements.

Sharma, D.K.; Singh, S.K. [Indian Inst. of Tech., New Delhi (India)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Summary of Topic1 Fusion Power Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extraction and Tritium Fuel Cycle · What choices are available for material, coolant, breeder, configuration availability of external tritium supply? #12;FW/Blanket concepts for fusion power extraction and tritium&D and facilities strongly overlap RAFM Steel PbLi Breeder Helium Cooled Ceramic Breeder Beryllium Helium Cooled Pb

Abdou, Mohamed

187

Cheaper oil extraction Taking a closer look  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solvent for commercial-scale enhanced oil recovery to increase the amount of crude oil that canCONTENTS Cheaper oil extraction Taking a closer look at the eye Computational Science takes inside for more details #12;Greener, cheaper oil extraction Geographical and geological concerns

188

An investigation of simplified loss formula evaluation of total and incremental power system losses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Program ~ a o o ~ o a o o o o e a o o 11 Incremental Transmission Loss Calculation . . . . . . o 13 The Transmission System ~ a ~ o o ~ ~ o o o o o o 14 IVa RESULTS e ~ o a ~ ~ a a ~ e a o a ~ e ~ o a o o o IQ V SUMMARY a o o o a ~ o ~ a o 0 o o o ~ 0..., 1 X II tf g tf ff tf lt 4 0o9 50/ System Load ? Per Cent of Peak 1o06 f 1. 05 0 Xo1. 04 0 e 5 1, 03 1. 02 Ir 5 F. 1o01 4 tI 1o0 III II 0. 99 5 FIGURE IVa Simplified Loss Formula Evaluation of Pen- alty Faotor ? Bus 1 All...

Malinowski, James Henry

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Cool horizons lead to information loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are two evidences for information loss during black hole evaporation: (i) a pure state evolves to a mixed state and (ii) the map from the initial state to final state is non-invertible. Any proposed resolution of the information paradox must address both these issues. The firewall argument focuses only on the first and this leads to order one deviations from the Unruh vacuum for maximally entangled black holes. The nature of the argument does not extend to black holes in pure states. It was shown by Avery, Puhm and the author that requiring the initial state to final state map to be invertible mandates structure at the horizon even for pure states. The proof works if black holes can be formed in generic states and in this paper we show that this is indeed the case. We also demonstrate how models proposed by Susskind, Papadodimas et al. and Maldacena et al. end up making the initial to final state map non-invertible and thus make the horizon "cool" at the cost of unitarity.

Borun D. Chowdhury

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

190

Detonation propagation in a high loss configuration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work presents an experimental study of detonation wave propagation in tubes with inner diameters (ID) comparable to the mixture cell size. Propane-oxygen mixtures were used in two test section tubes with inner diameters of 1.27 mm and 6.35 mm. For both test sections, the initial pressure of stoichiometric mixtures was varied to determine the effect on detonation propagation. For the 6.35 mm tube, the equivalence ratio {phi} (where the mixture was {phi} C{sub 3}H{sub 8} + 50{sub 2}) was also varied. Detonations were found to propagate in mixtures with cell sizes as large as five times the diameter of the tube. However, under these conditions, significant losses were observed, resulting in wave propagation velocities as slow as 40% of the CJ velocity U{sub CJ}. A review of relevant literature is presented, followed by experimental details and data. Observed velocity deficits are predicted using models that account for boundary layer growth inside detonation waves.

Jackson, Scott I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shepherd, Joseph E [CALTECH

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Remediating pesticide contaminated soils using solvent extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p{prime}-DDT, p,p{prime}-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as solvents over a wide range of operating conditions. It was demonstrated that a six-stage methanol extraction using a solvent-to-soil ratio of 1.6 can decrease pesticide levels in the soil by more than 99% and reduce the volume of material requiring further treatment by 25 times or more. The high solubility of the pesticides in methanol resulted in rapid extraction rates, with the system reaching quasi-equilibrium state in 30 minutes. The extraction efficiency was influenced by the number of extraction stages, the solvent-to-soil ratio, and the soil moisture content. Various methods were investigated to regenerate and recycle the solvent. Evaporation and solvent stripping are low cost and reliable methods for removing high pesticide concentrations from the solvent. For low concentrations, GAC adsorption may be used. Precipitating and filtering pesticides by adding water to the methanol/pesticide solution was not successful when tested with soil extracts. 26 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

Sahle-Demessie, E.; Meckes, M.C.; Richardson, T.L. [National Management Research Lab., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

192

Charm production and energy loss at the LHC with ALICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The latest results on the ALICE performance for production and in-medium QCD energy loss measurements of charm particles at the LHC are presented.

Andrea Dainese; for the ALICE Collaboration

2004-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

193

Structuring Loan Loss Reserve Funds for Clean Energy Finance...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Loan loss reserve funds ("LRF"): * provide partial risk coverage to motivate commercial FIs to offer EERE finance products, pioneer new products, broaden access to finance,...

194

Polarization Losses under Accelerated Stress Test Using Multiwalled...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Accelerated Stress Test Using Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Supported Pt Catalyst in PEM Fuel Cells. Polarization Losses under Accelerated Stress Test Using Multiwalled Carbon...

195

ac losses: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Transport AC loss in high temperature superconducting coils University of Cambridge - Dspace Summary: 's electromagnetic properties and...

196

Microsoft Word - Completion of an Evalution of Impact of Loss...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Completion of an Evaluation of the Impact of the Loss of Two Hydrogen and Methane Monitoring Sampling Lines Dear Mr. Bearzi: As required under Permit Condition...

197

Global Volcano Proportional Economic Loss Risk Distribution Projection: Robinson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Volcano Proportional Economic Loss Risk Distribution Projection: Robinson Like Total Deichmann, Arthur L. Lerner-Lam, and Margaret Arnold. 2005. Natural Disaster Hotspots: A Global Risk

Columbia University

198

Draft Michigan SAVES Loan Loss Reserve Fund Agreement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A sample LRF agreement between a grantee and an financial institution setting the terms and conditions of the loan loss reserve fund.

199

Estimated Business Interruptions Losses of the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A generalized framework of Economic Analysis of natural and man-made disasters is applied to the estimation of business interruption losses associated with an oil spill.… (more)

Vargas, Vanessa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Fluidized bed gasification of extracted coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coal or similar carbonaceous solids are extracted by contacting the solids in an extraction zone (12) with an aqueous solution having a pH above 12.0 at a temperature between 65.degree. C. and 110.degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to remove bitumens from the coal into said aqueous solution and the extracted solids are then gasified at an elevated pressure and temperature in a fluidized bed gasification zone (60) wherein the density of the fluidized bed is maintained at a value above 160 kg/m.sup.3. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, water is removed from the aqueous solution in order to redeposit the extracted bitumens onto the solids prior to the gasification step.

Aquino, Dolores C. (Houston, TX); DaPrato, Philip L. (Westfield, NJ); Gouker, Toby R. (Baton Rouge, LA); Knoer, Peter (Houston, TX)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Fluidized bed gasification of extracted coal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Coal or similar carbonaceous solids are extracted by contacting the solids in an extraction zone with an aqueous solution having a pH above 12.0 at a temperature between 65/sup 0/C and 110/sup 0/C for a period of time sufficient to remove bitumens from the coal into said aqueous solution, and the extracted solids are then gasified at an elevated pressure and temperature in a fluidized bed gasification zone (60) wherein the density of the fluidized bed is maintained at a value above 160 kg/m/sup 3/. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, water is removed from the aqueous solution in order to redeposit the extracted bitumens onto the solids prior to the gasification step. 2 figs., 1 tab.

Aquino, D.C.; DaPrato, P.L.; Gouker, T.R.; Knoer, P.

1984-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

202

Extracting secret keys from integrated circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modern cryptographic protocols are based on the premise that only authorized participants can obtain secret keys and access to information systems. However, various kinds of tampering methods have been devised to extract ...

Lim, Daihyun, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Extraction Steam Controls at EPLA-W  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ExxonMobil's Baton Rouge site encompasses a world-scale refinery, chemical plant and third party power station. Historically, inflexible and unreliable control systems on two high-pressure, extracting/condensing steam turbines prevented the site...

Brinker, J. L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Information Extraction from Voicemail Transcripts Martin Jansche  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information Extraction from Voicemail Transcripts Martin Jansche Department of Linguistics The Ohio State University Columbus, OH 43210, USA jansche.1@osu.edu Steven P. Abney AT&T Labs ­ Research 180 Park

Abney, Steven P.

205

ECG Feature Extraction Techniques - A Survey Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECG Feature Extraction plays a significant role in diagnosing most of the cardiac diseases. One cardiac cycle in an ECG signal consists of the P-QRS-T waves. This feature extraction scheme determines the amplitudes and intervals in the ECG signal for subsequent analysis. The amplitudes and intervals value of P-QRS-T segment determines the functioning of heart of every human. Recently, numerous research and techniques have been developed for analyzing the ECG signal. The proposed schemes were mostly based on Fuzzy Logic Methods, Artificial Neural Networks (ANN), Genetic Algorithm (GA), Support Vector Machines (SVM), and other Signal Analysis techniques. All these techniques and algorithms have their advantages and limitations. This proposed paper discusses various techniques and transformations proposed earlier in literature for extracting feature from an ECG signal. In addition this paper also provides a comparative study of various methods proposed by researchers in extracting the feature from ECG signal.

Karpagachelvi, S; Sivakumar, M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Aromatics Extraction Plant Design Using Synthesis Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to extract an aromatics stream from a C 6 -C o heart cut of hydrogenated pyrolysis gasoline, leaving a raffinate containing paraffins and naphthenes. The Distillation Section distills the aromatics stream into high purity benzene, toluene, and Co... aromatics and a stream of C g and heavier Rromatics. Figure 1 shows the major flows and equipment relevant to this study. A lean solvent extracts the aromatics from the feed in the Extractor and the nonaromatic raffinate is sent to battery limits...

Wilcox, R. J.; Nedwick, R.

207

Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

Dietz, Mark (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Surface and bulk modified high capacity layered oxide cathodes with low irreversible capacity loss  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention includes compositions, surface and bulk modifications, and methods of making of (1-x)Li[Li.sub.1/3Mn.sub.2/3]O.sub.2.xLi[Mn.sub.0.5-yNi.sub.0.5-yCo.sub.2- y]O.sub.2 cathode materials having an O3 crystal structure with a x value between 0 and 1 and y value between 0 and 0.5, reducing the irreversible capacity loss in the first cycle by surface modification with oxides and bulk modification with cationic and anionic substitutions, and increasing the reversible capacity to close to the theoretical value of insertion/extraction of one lithium per transition metal ion (250-300 mAh/g).

Manthiram, Arumugam (Austin, TX); Wu, Yan (Austin, TX)

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

209

Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable Power Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable...

210

Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call:...

211

Investigation of magnetic nanoparticles for the rapid extraction...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanoparticles for the rapid extraction and assay of alpha-emitting radionuclides from urine: Investigation of magnetic nanoparticles for the rapid extraction and assay of...

212

Evaluation and Compensation of Detector Solenoid Effects on Disrupted Beam in the ILC 14 mrad Extraction Line  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents calculations of detector solenoid effects on disrupted primary beam in the ILC 14 mrad extraction line. Particle tracking simulations are performed for evaluation of primary beam loss along the line as well as of beam distribution and polarization at Compton Interaction Point. The calculations are done both without and with solenoid compensation. The results are obtained for the baseline ILC energy of 500 GeV center-of-mass and three options of beam parameters.

Toprek, Dragan; /VINCA Inst. Nucl. Sci., Belgrade; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

213

Legal Access to Geographic Information: Measuring Losses or Developing Responses?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are obvious and a focus on measuring losses in such situations seems misplaced when energies might be better and measurements those in power positions are often able to divert attention and energy away from the goals digital data environments. As a result, widespread loss of access to information and works of knowledge

Onsrud, Harlan J.

214

Modelling and Computation of AC Fields and Losses in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity but inherently has energy losses associated with (joule) heating. Fault current limiters would be installed in transmission and distribution systems, especially for electric utilities and large energy users. High-Tc superconductors experience energy loss when exposed to time-varying magnetic fields or carrying

Sóbester, András

215

Linear-optics manipulations of photon-loss codes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss codes for protecting logical qubits carried by optical fields from the effects of amplitude damping, i.e. linear photon loss. We demonstrate that the correctability condition for one-photon loss imposes limitations on the range of manipulations than can be implemented with passive linear-optics networks.

Konrad Banaszek; Wojciech Wasilewski

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

216

MODELING OF EDDY CURRENT LOSS AND TEMPERATURE OF THE MAGNETS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the performance of the machine. This paper presents the modeling and analysis of eddy current loss in surfaceMODELING OF EDDY CURRENT LOSS AND TEMPERATURE OF THE MAGNETS IN PERMANENT MAGNET MACHINES ¤ XIAOFENG DING Electrical Engineering Department, Northwestern Polytechnical University, 127 Youyi Xilu #352

Mi, Chunting "Chris"

217

The efficiency of voluntary incentive policies for preventing biodiversity loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiversity Conservation Land use Spatial modeling A B S T R A C T Habitat loss is a primary cause of loss of biodiversity but conserving habitat for species presents challenges. Land parcels differ in their ability conservation objectives. This topic is important not just for biodiversity conservation but for any effort

Weiblen, George D

218

Global Volcano Total Economic Loss Risk Distribution Projection: Robinson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Volcano Total Economic Loss Risk Distribution Projection: Robinson Total Economic Loss International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/The World Bank and Columbia University. Volcano Total, Arthur L. Lerner-Lam, and Margaret Arnold. 2005. Natural Disaster Hotspots: A Global Risk Analysis

Columbia University

219

Electron energy-loss spectrum of nanowires G. F. Bertsch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electron energy-loss spectrum of nanowires G. F. Bertsch Institute of Nuclear Theory and Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 Received 8 May 1998 The electronic properties of nanoscale-size fibers can be studied by electron energy-loss spectroscopy with electron beams that pass near the fiber

Bertsch George F.

220

average energy losses: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

average energy losses First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Comparing energy loss...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

additional energy losses: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

additional energy losses First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Comparing energy loss...

222

Chemical Biology Chemical Screening for Hair Cell Loss and Protection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical Biology Chemical Screening for Hair Cell Loss and Protection in the Zebrafish Lateral Line Rubel,1,2 and David W. Raible1,4 Abstract In humans, most hearing loss results from death of hair cells, the mechanosensory receptors of the inner ear. Two goals of current hearing research are to protect hair cells from

Rubel, Edwin

223

Mechanical Loss in Tantala/Silica Dielectric Mirror Coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current interferometric gravitational wave detectors use test masses with mirror coatings formed from multiple layers of dielectric materials, most commonly alternating layers of SiO2 (silica) and Ta2O5 (tantala). However, mechanical loss in the Ta2O5/SiO2 coatings may limit the design sensitivity for advanced detectors. We have investigated sources of mechanical loss in the Ta2O5/SiO2 coatings, including loss associated with the coating-substrate interface, with the coating-layer interfaces, and with the bulk material. Our results indicate that the loss is associated with the bulk coating materials and that the loss of Ta2O5 is substantially larger than that of SiO2.

Steven D. Penn; Peter H. Sneddon; Helena Armandula; Joseph C. Betzwieser; Gianpietro Cagnoli; Jordan Camp; D. R. M. Crooks; Martin M. Fejer; Andri M. Gretarsson; Gregory M. Harry; Jim Hough; Scott E. Kittelberger; Michael J. Mortonson; Roger Route; Sheila Rowan; Christophoros C. Vassiliou

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

224

Reexamination of Pure Qubit Work Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many work extraction or information erasure processes in the literature involve the raising and lowering of energy levels via external fields. But even if the actual system is treated quantum mechanically, the field is assumed to be classical and of infinite strength, hence not developing any correlations with the system or experiencing back-actions. We extend these considerations to a fully quantum mechanical treatment, by studying a spin-1/2 particle coupled to a finite-sized directional quantum reference frame, a spin-l system, which models an external field. With this concrete model together with a bosonic thermal bath, we analyse the back-action a finite-size field suffers during a quantum-mechanical work extraction process, the effect this has on the extractable work, and highlight a range of assumptions commonly made when considering such processes. The well-known semi-classical treatment of work extraction from a pure qubit predicts a maximum extractable work W = kT log 2 for a quasi-static process, which holds as a strict upper bound in the fully quantum mechanical case, and is only attained in the classical limit. We also address the problem of emergent local time-dependence in a joint system with globally fixed Hamiltonian.

Max F. Frenzel; David Jennings; Terry Rudolph

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

225

IMPLICATIONS OF MASS AND ENERGY LOSS DUE TO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS ON MAGNETICALLY ACTIVE STARS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of a database of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and associated flares over the period 1996-2007 finds well-behaved power-law relationships between the 1-8 A flare X-ray fluence and CME mass and kinetic energy. We extrapolate these relationships to lower and higher flare energies to estimate the mass and energy loss due to CMEs from stellar coronae, assuming that the observed X-ray emission of the latter is dominated by flares with a frequency as a function of energy dn/dE = kE {sup -{alpha}}. For solar-like stars at saturated levels of X-ray activity, the implied losses depend fairly weakly on the assumed value of {alpha} and are very large: M-dot {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and E-dot {approx}0.1 L{sub sun}. In order to avoid such large energy requirements, either the relationships between CME mass and speed and flare energy must flatten for X-ray fluence {approx}> 10{sup 31} erg, or the flare-CME association must drop significantly below 1 for more energetic events. If active coronae are dominated by flares, then the total coronal energy budget is likely to be up to an order of magnitude larger than the canonical 10{sup -3} L {sub bol} X-ray saturation threshold. This raises the question of what is the maximum energy a magnetic dynamo can extract from a star? For an energy budget of 1% of L {sub bol}, the CME mass loss rate is about 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}.

Drake, Jeremy J.; Cohen, Ofer [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Yashiro, Seiji [Interferometrics Inc., Herndon, VA 20171 (United States)] [Interferometrics Inc., Herndon, VA 20171 (United States); Gopalswamy, Nat, E-mail: jdrake@cfa.harvard.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

226

Loss of Fine Particle Ammonium from Denuded Nylon Filters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ammonium is an important constituent of fine particulate mass in the atmosphere, but can be difficult to quantify due to possible sampling artifacts. Losses of semivolatile species such as NH4NO3 can be particularly problematic. In order to evaluate ammonium losses from aerosol particles collected on filters, a series of field experiments was conducted using denuded nylon and Teflon filters at Bondville, Illinois (February 2003), San Gorgonio, California (April 2003 and July 2004), Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona (May, 2003), Brigantine, New Jersey (November 2003), and Great Smoky Mountains National Park (NP), Tennessee (July–August 2004). Samples were collected over 24-hr periods. Losses from denuded nylon filters ranged from 10% (monthly average) in Bondville, Illinois to 28% in San Gorgonio, California in summer. Losses on individual sample days ranged from 1% to 65%. Losses tended to increase with increasing diurnal temperature and relative humidity changes and with the fraction of ambient total N(--III) (particulate NH4+ plus gaseous NH3) present as gaseous NH3. The amount of ammonium lost at most sites could be explained by the amount of NH4NO3 present in the sampled aerosol. Ammonium losses at Great Smoky Mountains NP, however, significantly exceeded the amount of NH4NO3 collected. Ammoniated organic salts are suggested as additional important contributors to observed ammonium loss at this location.

Yu, Xiao-Ying; Lee, Taehyoung; Ayres, Benjamin; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; Malm, William C.; Collett, Jeffrey L.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

PAPER 2004-028 The Effect of Bitumen Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 PAPER 2004-028 The Effect of Bitumen Extraction Shear Conditions on Froth Treatment Performance U processing: extraction and froth treatment. The most common extraction process is hot water bitumen extraction where bitumen is produced in a froth consisting of bitumen, water, and inorganic solids. The froth

Schramm, Laurier L.

228

Hierarchical Iso-Surface Extraction Computer Graphics Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hierarchical Iso-Surface Extraction Ulf Labsik Computer Graphics Group University of Erlangen Kai of our hierarchical iso-surface extraction algorithm. Abstract The extraction and display of iso construct a hierarchy of volumes and extract an iso-surface from the coarsest resolution with a standard

Desbrun, Mathieu

229

Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IL); Binder, Thomas P. (Decatur, IL); Rammelsberg, Anne M. (Decatur, IL)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

230

Impacts of the Venezuelan Crude Oil Production Loss  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This assessment of the Venezuelan petroleum loss examines two areas. The first part of the analysis focuses on the impact of the loss of Venezuelan crude production on crude oil supply for U.S. refiners who normally run a significant fraction of Venezuelan crude oil. The second part of the analysis looks at the impact of the Venezuelan production loss on crude markets in general, with particular emphasis on crude oil imports, refinery crude oil throughput levels, stock levels, and the changes in price differences between light and heavy crude oils.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Energetics of Marine Turbine Arrays - Extraction, Dissipation and Diminution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A two-scale modelling approach is discussed to predict the performance and energetics of a large number (more than a few hundred) of marine turbines installed as a power farm in a general coastal environment. The kernel of this approach is that the outer (coastal-scale) model/simulation is to assess the reduction of flow passing through a given farm area as a function of the increase of head loss across the farm, whereas the inner (device-scale) model/simulation uses this function to account for the (otherwise unknown) effect of coastal dynamics for that farm site. Large-eddy simulations (LES) of periodic open channel flow (with a porous plate model representing turbines) are then presented as the device-scale part of such a two-scale model of large marine turbine arrays. Results demonstrate how the energetics of turbine arrays (i.e. extraction, dissipation and diminution of energy in the entire farm area) may change depending on the characteristics of the farm site, array configuration and operating conditio...

Nishino, Takafumi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Membrane contactor assisted extraction/reaction process employing ionic liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a functionalized membrane contactor extraction/reaction system and method for extracting target species from multi-phase solutions utilizing ionic liquids. One preferred embodiment of the invented method and system relates to an extraction/reaction system wherein the ionic liquid extraction solutions act as both extraction solutions and reaction mediums, and allow simultaneous separation/reactions not possible with prior art technology.

Lin, Yupo J. (Naperville, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL)

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

apical support loss: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

bags. We instead consider the problem of predicting instance labels while learning from data labeled only at the bag level. We propose Rank-Loss Support Instance Machines, which...

234

acute interneuron loss: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sets for previously unseen bags. We instead consider the problem of predicting instance labels while learning from data labeled only at the bag level. We propose Rank-Loss...

235

Control of cooling losses at high pulverized coal injection rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the problems which is encountered by many blast furnace operators is the appropriate control of the cooling losses of the blast furnace. This problem has been aggravated by the introduction of pulverized coal injection. Even with equal burden and coke composition, both Sidmar furnaces behave differently with respect to the cooling losses. This phenomenon is possibly attributable to the different profile and cooling circuitry of the furnaces. Among other parameters the angles of bosh and stack may favor the formation of scabs or not. Some operators experience a decrease of their cooling losses, other operators have problems to limit their cooling losses to an acceptable level. As a result, different operating practices exist with respect to the burden distribution. The increase of the ore to coke ratio with pulverized coal injection suggests that the coke and sinter quality has to be monitored very carefully in order to avoid permeability problems.

Bonte, L.; Nieuwerburgh, H. Van [Sidmar N.V., Gent (Belgium)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

discharge). The conductive loss at or near the surface (shallow heat flow) is a primary signature and indication of the strength of a geothermal system. Using a database of...

237

Return channel loss reduction in multi-stage centrifugal compressors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents concepts for improving the performance of return channels in multi-stage centrifugal compressors. Geometries have been developed to reduce both separation and viscous losses. A number of different ...

Aubry, Anne-Raphaëlle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Habitat loss and the structure of plantanimal mutualistic networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LETTER Habitat loss and the structure of plant­animal mutualistic networks Miguel A. Fortuna Sevilla, Spain *Correspondence: E-mail: fortuna@ebd.csic.es Abstract Recent papers have described

Fortuna, Miguel A.

239

Optimizing hysteretic power loss of magnetic ferrite nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis seeks to correlate hysteretic power loss of tertiary ferrite nanoparticles in alternating magnetic fields to trends predicted by physical models. By employing integration of hysteresis loops simulated from ...

Chen, Ritchie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

appendix gap losses: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

kicker performance and its effect on the beam losses will be described. Kourbanis, I; Biggs, J; Brown, B; Capista, D; Jensen, C C; Krafczyk, G E; Morris, D K; Scott, D; Seiya, K;...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ChitChat : making video chat robust to packet loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Video chat is increasingly popular among Internet users (e.g. Skype, Windows Live Messenger, Google Talk). Often, however, chatting sessions suffer from packet loss, which causes video outage and poor quality. Existing ...

Wang, Jue, 1986-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

ChitChat: Making Video Chat Robust to Packet Loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Video chat is increasingly popular among Internet users. Often, however, chatting sessions suffer from packet loss, which causes video outage and poor quality. Existing solutions however are unsatisfying. Retransmissions ...

Wang, Jue

2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

243

Agricultural science students' perceptions and knowledge of hearing loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

knowledge level of hearing loss and hearing impairment, and its causes, and participants attitudes towards wearing hearing protection. The study design is descriptive and correlational with data collected using a written questionnaire with a controlled...

Slaydon, Sunny Leigh

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Compression effects on pressure loss in flexible HVAC ducts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings.Pressure Loss in Flexible HVAC Ducts Bass Abushakra, Ph.D.to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings.

Abushakra, Bass; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Loan Loss Reserve Fund Impacts on Standard Residential Underwriting Guidelines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

State and local governments can use loan loss reserve (LLR) funds to persuade lenders to offer more flexible terms during the underwriting process. The availability of an LLR can have the following...

246

Motion based seismic design and loss estimation of diagrid structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diagrids are becoming an increasingly popular structural system in high rise design and construction. Little research has been performed on the seismic performance of Diagrids and how it integrates with seismic loss ...

Liptack, Robert J. (Robert Jeffrey)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Loan Loss Reserve Funds and Other Credit Enhancements | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

used by state and local governments to provide partial risk coverage to lenders-meaning that the reserve will cover a prespecified amount of loan losses. For example, an LLR...

248

Mode conversation losses in overmolded millimeter wave transmission lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Millimeter wave transmission lines are integral components for many important applications like nuclear fusion and NMR spectroscopy. In low loss corrugated transmission lines propagating the HE,1 mode with a high waveguide ...

Tax, David S. (David Samuel)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Loan Loss Reserves: Lessons from the Field (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Merrian Fuller: Hi, and welcome to the Department of Energy's webinar on using loan-loss reserves report financing programs. My name is Marian Fuller, I work with Lawrence Berkeley National...

250

Effect of thermalized charm on heavy quark energy loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent experimental results on the flow of $J/\\psi$ at LHC show that ample amount of charm quarks is present in the quark gluon plasma and probably they are thermalized. In the current study we investigate the effect of thermalized charm quarks on the heavy quark energy loss to leading order in the QCD coupling constant. It is seen that the energy loss of charm quark increases considerably due to the inclusion of thermal charm quarks. Running coupling has also been implemented to study heavy quark energy loss and we find substantial increase in the heavy quark energy loss due to heavy-heavy scattering at higher temperature to be realized at LHC energies.

Souvik Priyam Adhya; Mahatsab Mandal; Sreemoyee Sarkar; Pradip K. Roy; Sukalyan Chattopadhyay

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

251

Loss-Resilient Proactive Data Transmission in Wireless Sensor Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environments. Moreover, sensor nodes are con- strained by energy, computation power and storage. Existing to the destination without loss. However, existing reliable transmission techniques either are too costly forecast, structural condition assessment) require reliable data communications, such that a target

Xu, Jianliang

252

Estimate steam-turbine losses to justify maintenance funds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A procedure to estimate steam-turbine losses is described. The estimates are based on analytical calculations and field inspections of turbines with known performance deterioration resulting from their environment, not their construction. They are, therefore, applicable to many types of steam turbines. Common causes of deterioration are the following: solid particle erosion, deposits, increased clearances, and peening or damage from foreign material. Performance losses due to these factors are analyzed. An example of application is given.

Not Available

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Beam Loss Monitors in the NSLS Storage Rings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beam loss monitors (BLM) have been used for more than two decades in the VUV ring at the NSLS. These have proved useful for optimizing injection and operation of the ring. Recently similar monitors have been installed in the X-ray ring and are being used to better understand injection, as well as operation of the ring. These units have been compared with the Bergoz BLMs, which have been mostly useful for understanding operating beam losses.

Kramer,S.L.; Fedurin, M.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

254

Polarization energy loss in hot viscous quark-gluon plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The gluon polarization tensor for the quark-gluon plasma with shear viscosity is derived with the viscous chromohydrodynamics. The longitudinal and transverse dielectric functions are evaluated from the gluon polarization tensor, through which the polarization energy loss suffered by a fast quark traveling through the viscous quark-gluon plasma is investigated. The numerical analysis indicates that shear viscosity significantly reduces the polarization energy loss.

Bing-Feng Jiang; Defu Hou; Jia-Rong Li

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

255

Vapor Extraction Well Performance and Recommendations for Transitioning to Passive Extraction at the Former DUS-II Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This investigation evaluated mass extraction rate from individual wells associated with the Western Sector Treatment System (formerly known as the DUS-II project). This was critical since each individual well can have a radius of influence in excess of 100-ft when operating using an active extraction system. Future soil vapor extraction should use the existing active extraction system, supplemented with deployment of passive extraction where appropriate.

Jackson, Dennis G.; Noonkester, Jay V.; Looney, Brian B.

2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

256

Inverse hydrochemical models of aqueous extracts tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aqueous extract test is a laboratory technique commonly used to measure the amount of soluble salts of a soil sample after adding a known mass of distilled water. Measured aqueous extract data have to be re-interpreted in order to infer porewater chemical composition of the sample because porewater chemistry changes significantly due to dilution and chemical reactions which take place during extraction. Here we present an inverse hydrochemical model to estimate porewater chemical composition from measured water content, aqueous extract, and mineralogical data. The model accounts for acid-base, redox, aqueous complexation, mineral dissolution/precipitation, gas dissolution/ex-solution, cation exchange and surface complexation reactions, of which are assumed to take place at local equilibrium. It has been solved with INVERSE-CORE{sup 2D} and been tested with bentonite samples taken from FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) in situ test. The inverse model reproduces most of the measured aqueous data except bicarbonate and provides an effective, flexible and comprehensive method to estimate porewater chemical composition of clays. Main uncertainties are related to kinetic calcite dissolution and variations in CO2(g) pressure.

Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

257

Extractable soil phosphorus in Blackland Prairie soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Texas Agricultural Extension Service (TAEX) Soil Testing Laboratory currently utilizes a single phosphorus (P) extractant consisting of 1.43 M NH4OAc, 1. 0 M HCl, and 0.025 M EDTA-PH 4.2 to estimate plant available P for all soils in Texas...

Byrd, Robert Claude

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

258

Logical Structure Extraction from Software Requirements Documents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Documents I. INTRODUCTION Requirements management (RM) tools store and manipu- late software requirementsLogical Structure Extraction from Software Requirements Documents Rehan Rauf, Michal Antkiewicz,mantkiew,kczarnec}@gsd.uwaterloo.ca Abstract--Software requirements documents (SRDs) are often authored in general-purpose rich-text editors

Czarnecki, Krzysztof

259

Extracting gluon condensate from the average plaquette  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The perturbative contribution in the average plaquette is subtracted using Borel summation and the remnant of the plaquette is shown to scale as a dim-4 condensate. A critical review is presented of the renormalon subtraction scheme that claimed a dim-2 condensate. The extracted gluon condensate is compared with the latest result employing high order (35-loop) calculation in the stochastic perturbation theory.

Lee, Taekoon

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Extracting Artifact Lifecycle Models from Metadata History  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extracting Artifact Lifecycle Models from Metadata History Olga Baysal, Oleksii Kononenko, Reid, Canada {obaysal, okononen, rtholmes, migod}@cs.uwaterloo.ca Abstract--Software developers and managers make decisions based on the understanding they have of their software systems. This understanding

Godfrey, Michael W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Vapour extraction of heavy oil and bitumen  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the process of vapor extraction for the recovery of petroleum and bitumen. The selection of solvent is critical, and it is shown that butane may be a good solvent for shallow reservoirs. Experiments are described in a Hele-Shaw cell and Packed Visual Model.

Das, K.A.; Butler, R.M. [Univ. of Calgary (Canada)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Organic electroluminescent devices having improved light extraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Organic electroluminescent devices having improved light extraction include a light-scattering medium disposed adjacent thereto. The light-scattering medium has a light scattering anisotropy parameter g in the range from greater than zero to about 0.99, and a scatterance parameter S less than about 0.22 or greater than about 3.

Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY)

2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

263

Extraction and Analysis of Facebook Friendship Relations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 12 Extraction and Analysis of Facebook Friendship Relations Salvatore Catanese, Pasquale De and Social scientists. We present our long-term research effort in analyzing Facebook, the largest and arguably most successful OSN today: it gathers more than 500 million users. Access to data about Facebook

Ferrara, Emilio

264

Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15 and about 70 C and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours. 6 figs.

Wang, D.I.C.; Avgerinos, G.C.

1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

265

Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15.degree. and about 70.degree. C. and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours.

Wang, Daniel I. C. (Belmont, MA); Avgerinos, George C. (Newton Center, MA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Supercritical Fluid Extraction- Process Simulation and Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIMULATION P-1 SFE FEED PUMP SUPERCRITICAL FLUID EXTRACTOR (SFE) 2 T-1 10 7 .r D-2 SFE BOnoMS FLASH 9 222 The extract is decanted and fed to the fractionator to recover solvent carbon dioxide overhead and waterlIPA/carbon dioxide out...

Martin, C. L.; Seibert, A. F.

267

Extractive Institutions in Colonial Africa Federico Tadei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of colonies, such indigenous population density and ease of settlement for the coloniz- ers. Finally, I studyExtractive Institutions in Colonial Africa Thesis by Federico Tadei In Partial Fulfillment on prices to agricultural producers and labor institutions in French Africa, I show that (1

Winfree, Erik

268

Analyzing Losses: Transuranics into Waste and Fission Products into Recycled Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All mass streams from separations and fuel fabrication are products that must meet criteria. Those headed for disposal must meet waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for the eventual disposal sites corresponding to their waste classification. Those headed for reuse must meet fuel or target impurity limits. A “loss” is any material that ends up where it is undesired. The various types of losses are linked in the sense that as the loss of transuranic (TRU) material into waste is reduced, often the loss or carryover of waste into TRU or uranium is increased. We have analyzed four separation options and two fuel fabrication options in a generic fuel cycle. The separation options are aqueous uranium extraction plus (UREX+1), electrochemical, Atomics International reduction oxidation separation (AIROX), and melt refining. UREX+1 and electrochemical are traditional, full separation techniques. AIROX and melt refining are taken as examples of limited separations, also known as minimum fuel treatment. The fuels are oxide and metal. To define a generic fuel cycle, a fuel recycling loop is fed from used light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel (UOX) at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup. The recycling loop uses a fast reactor with TRU conversion ratio (CR) of 0.50. Excess recovered uranium is put into storage. Only waste, not used fuel, is disposed – unless the impurities accumulate to a level so that it is impossible to make new fuel for the fast reactor. Impurities accumulate as dictated by separation removal and fission product generation. Our model approximates adjustment to fast reactor fuel stream blending of TRU and U products from incoming LWR UOX and recycling FR fuel to compensate for impurity accumulation by adjusting TRU:U ratios. Our mass flow model ignores postulated fuel impurity limits; we compare the calculated impurity values with those limits to identify elements of concern. AIROX and melt refining cannot be used to separate used LWR UOX-51 because they cannot separate U from TRU, it is then impossible to make X% TRU for fast reactors with UOX-51 used fuel with 1.3% TRU. AIROX and melt refining can serve in the recycle loop for about 3 recycles, at which point the accumulated impurities displace fertile uranium and the fuel can no longer be as critical as the original fast reactor fuel recipe. UREX+1 and electrochemical can serve in either capacity; key impurities appear to be lanthanides and several transition metals.

Steven J. Piet; Nick R. Soelberg; Samuel E. Bays; Robert E. Cherry; Layne F. Pincock; Eric L. Shaber; Melissa C. Teague; Gregory M. Teske; Kurt G. Vedros; Candido Pereira; Denia Djokic

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Experimental study of head loss and filtration for LOCA debris  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of controlled experiments were conducted to obtain head loss and filtration characteristics of debris beds formed of NUKON{trademark} fibrous fragments, and obtain data to validate the semi-theoretical head loss model developed in NUREG/CR-6224. A thermally insulated closed-loop test set-up was used to conduct experiments using beds formed of fibers only and fibers intermixed with particulate debris. A total of three particulate mixes were used to simulate the particulate debris. The head loss data were obtained for theoretical fiber bed thicknesses of 0.125 inches to 4.0 inches; approach velocities of 0.15 to 1.5 ft/s; temperatures of 75 F and 125 F; and sludge-to-fiber nominal concentration ratios of 0 to 60. Concentration measurements obtained during the first flushing cycle were used to estimate the filtration efficiencies of the debris beds. For test conditions where the beds are fairly uniform, the head loss data were predictable within an acceptable accuracy range by the semi-theoretical model. The model was equally applicable for both pure fiber beds and the mixed beds. Typically the model over-predicted the head losses for very thin beds and for thin beds at high sludge-to-fiber mass ratios. This is attributable to the non-uniformity of such debris beds. In this range the correlation can be interpreted to provide upper bound estimates of head loss. This is pertinent for loss of coolant accidents in boiling water reactors.

Rao, D.V.; Souto, F.J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

System Losses Study - FIT (Fuel-cycle Integration and Tradeoffs)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This team aimed to understand the broad implications of changes of operating performance and parameters of a fuel cycle component on the entire system. In particular, this report documents the study of the impact of changing the loss of fission products into recycled fuel and the loss of actinides into waste. When the effort started in spring 2009, an over-simplified statement of the objective was “the number of nines” – how would the cost of separation, fuel fabrication, and waste management change as the number of nines of separation efficiency changed. The intent was to determine the optimum “losses” of TRU into waste for the single system that had been the focus of the Global Nuclear Energy Program (GNEP), namely sustained recycle in burner fast reactors, fed by transuranic (TRU) material recovered from used LWR UOX-51 fuel. That objective proved to be neither possible (insufficient details or attention to the former GNEP options, change in national waste management strategy from a Yucca Mountain focus) nor appropriate given the 2009-2010 change to a science-based program considering a wider range of options. Indeed, the definition of “losses” itself changed from the loss of TRU into waste to a generic definition that a “loss” is any material that ends up where it is undesired. All streams from either separation or fuel fabrication are products; fuel feed streams must lead to fuels with tolerable impurities and waste streams must meet waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for one or more disposal sites. And, these losses are linked in the sense that as the loss of TRU into waste is reduced, often the loss or carryover of waste into TRU or uranium is increased. The effort has provided a mechanism for connecting these three Campaigns at a technical level that had not previously occurred – asking smarter and smarter questions, sometimes answering them, discussing assumptions, identifying R&D needs, and gaining new insights. The FIT model has been a forcing function, helping the team in this endeavor. Models don’t like “TBD” as an input, forcing us to make assumptions and see if they matter. A major addition in FY 2010 was exploratory analysis of “modified open fuel” cycles, employing “minimum fuel treatment” as opposed to full aqueous or electrochemical separation treatment. This increased complexity in our analysis and analytical tool development because equilibrium conditions do not appear sustainable in minimum fuel treatment cases, as was assumed in FY 2009 work with conventional aqueous and electrochemical separation. It is no longer reasonable to assume an equilibrium situation exists in all cases.

Steven J. Piet; Nick R. Soelberg; Samuel E. Bays; Robert S. Cherry; Denia Djokic; Candido Pereira; Layne F. Pincock; Eric L. Shaber; Melissa C. Teague; Gregory M. Teske; Kurt G. Vedros

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Volatile organic compound losses from sewage sludge-amended soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) applied to soil in sludge have been assumed to disappear quickly and completely. The VOC behavior in sludge-amended soils has been studied previously only in laboratory systems where the sludged soil has been spiked with compounds of interest. Behavior in these systems may not necessarily represent compound behavior in field soils to which contaminated sludge is added. A series of laboratory microcosm experiments were designed therefore to investigate the behavior of toluene, ethyl benzene, o-, m-, and p-xylene applied to soil in contaminated sludge, and factors influencing loss processes. The VOC loss from sludge-amended soil was well described by a simple one step pseudo-first-order model but in certain soils was better described by a two step first-order model. Volatilization was the predominant loss process. Rates of loss depended on sludge application rate, method of sludge application, soil properties, and on compound characteristics. Experiments indicated that spiking sludge-amended soils gave a reasonable indication of VOC loss rates from systems amended with contaminated sludge at least over a period of 23 d. The majority of VOCs applied to soils in sludge volatilizes quickly to the atmosphere over a few to 10s of days with a small fraction lost more slowly. Potential for VOC crop uptake, livestock ingestion, and contamination of ground water is low under routine, managed applications of sewage sludge to agricultural land.

Wilson, S.C.; Jones, K.C.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

The role of space charge compensation for ion beam extraction and ion beam transport (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Depending on the specific type of ion source, the ion beam is extracted either from an electrode surface or from a plasma. There is always an interface between the (almost) space charge compensated ion source plasma, and the extraction region in which the full space charge is influencing the ion beam itself. After extraction, the ion beam is to be transported towards an accelerating structure in most cases. For lower intensities, this transport can be done without space charge compensation. However, if space charge is not negligible, the positive charge of the ion beam will attract electrons, which will compensate the space charge, at least partially. The final degree of Space Charge Compensation (SCC) will depend on different properties, like the ratio of generation rate of secondary particles and their loss rate, or the fact whether the ion beam is pulsed or continuous. In sections of the beam line, where the ion beam is drifting, a pure electrostatic plasma will develop, whereas in magnetic elements, these space charge compensating electrons become magnetized. The transport section will provide a series of different plasma conditions with different properties. Different measurement tools to investigate the degree of space charge compensation will be described, as well as computational methods for the simulation of ion beams with partial space charge compensation.

Spädtke, Peter, E-mail: p.spaedtke@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)] [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Benefits of solvent extracted pitch in the densification of carbon-carbon composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As new commercial/industrial applications for carbon-carbon develop, it is necessary to adjust the matrix to the needs of the application, and reduce the cost of carbon-carbon. In addition, the environmental impact of current pitch production has resulted in the closing of coke ovens, and the loss of sources of raw material. To over come these problems, a new source of pitch is being developed utilizing a unique process involving the solvent extraction of coal. This process, developed at West Virginia University, has resulted in a number of pitch materials which are currently undergoing studies to determine the feasibility of their use in carbon-carbon composites. Work to date has centered on comparison of the microstructure of coked samples of the new pitches with those of currently used coal tar and petroleum pitches. Because of the ability to vary process parameters, it is possible to very closely replicate the microstructure of a typical carbon-carbon composites using solvent extracted pitch. Additional work will completely characterize the new materials to ensure they have similar properties as currently used pitches. Future work will alter and improve the properties of solvent extracted pitch to produce composites with special properties and at lower cost.

Baker, C.F. [Fiber Materials, Inc., Biddeford, ME (United States); Stiller, A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

274

images/logoetsf Introduction Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy Applications: Nanotubes and Graphene Perspectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

images/logoetsf Introduction Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy Applications: Nanotubes and Graphene excitations Francesco Sottile #12;Introduction Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy Applications: Nanotubes excitations Francesco Sottile #12;Introduction Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy Applications: Nanotubes

Botti, Silvana

275

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

276

Extracting metals directly from metal oxides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Phelps, Cindy (Moscow, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Geochemical Modeling of ILAW Lysimeter Water Extracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geochemical modeling results of water extracts from simulated immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glasses, placed in lysimeters for eight years suggest that the secondary phase reaction network developed using product consistency test (PCT) results at 90°C may need to be modified for field conditions. For sediment samples that had been collected from near the glass samples, the impact of glass corrosion could be readily observed based upon the pH of their water extracts. For unimpacted sediments the pH ranged from 7.88 to 8.11 with an average of 8.04. Sediments that had observable impacts from glass corrosion exhibited elevated pH values (as high as 9.97). For lysimeter sediment samples that appear to have been impacted by glass corrosion to the greatest extent, saturation indices determined for analcime, calcite, and chalcedony in the 1:1 water extracts were near equilibrium and were consistent with the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. Fe(OH)3(s) also appears to be essentially at equilibrium in extracts impacted by glass corrosion, but with a solubility product (log Ksp) that is approximately 2.13 units lower than that used in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The solubilities of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) also appear to be much lower than that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The extent that the solubility of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) were reduced relative to that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C could not be quantified because the concentrations of Ti and Zr in the extracts were below the estimated quantification limit. Gibbsite was consistently highly oversaturated in the extract while dawsonite was at or near equilibrium. This suggests that dawsonite might be a more suitable phase for the secondary phase reaction network than gibbsite under field conditions. This may be due to the availability of carbonate that exists in the Hanford sediments as calcite. A significant source of carbonate was not available in the PCTs and this may account for why this phase did not appear in the PCTs. Sepiolite was consistently highly undersaturated, suggesting that another phase controls the solubility of magnesium. For samples that were most impacted by the effects of glass corrosion, magnesite appears to control glass corrosion. For samples that show less impacts from glass corrosion, clinochlore-7A or saponite-Mg appears to control the magnesium concentrations. For zinc, it appears that zincite is a better candidate than Zn(OH)2-? for controlling zinc concentrations in the extracts; however, in some samples all zinc phases considered were highly oversaturated. As a result the phase that controls zinc concentrations in the lysimeter extracts remains uncertain.

Cantrell, Kirk J.

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

278

Natural gas monthly, November 1988  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gross withdrawals of natural gas (wet, after lease separation) from gas and oil wells in the United States during November 1988, were estimated at 1755 billion cubic feet, 1.3 percent above withdrawals during November 1987. Of the total quantity, an estimated 215 billion cubic feet were returned to gas and oil reservoirs for repressuring, pressure maintenance, and cycling; 35 billion cubic feet of nonhydrocarbon gases were removed; and 13 billion cubic feet were vented or flared. The remaining wet marketed production totaled 1492 billion cubic feet. Dry gas production (wet marketed production minus 70 billion cubic feet of extraction loss) totaled an estimated 1422 billion cubic feet, similar to the November 1987 level. The total dry gas supply available for disposition in November 1988 was estimated at 1702 billion cubic feet, including 173 billion cubic feet withdrawn from storage, 12 billion cubic feet of supplemental supplies, and 95 billion cubic feet that were imported. In November 1987, dry gas available for disposition totaled 1684 billion cubic feet. Of the total dry gas supply available for disposition in November 1988, an estimated 1467 billion cubic feet were consumed, 148 billion cubic feet were injected into underground storage reservoirs, and 5 billion cubic feet were exported, leaving 82 billion cubic feet unaccounted for.

Not Available

1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Natural gas monthly, May 1988. [Contains glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gross withdrawals of natural gas (wet, after lease separation) from gas and oil wells in the United States during May 1988, were estimated at 1632 billion cubic feet, 1.3 percent above withdrawals during May 1987. Of the total quantity, an estimated 179 billion cubic feet were returned to gas and oil reservoirs for repressuring, pressure maintenance, and cycling; 10 billion cubic feet were vented or flared; and 33 billion cubic feet of nonhydrocarbon gases were removed. The remaining wet marketed production totaled 1410 billion cubic feet. Dry gas production (wet marketed production minus 67 billion cubic feet of extraction loss) totaled an estimated 1343 billion cubic feet, 1.7 percent above the May 1987 level. The total dry gas supply available for disposition in May 1988 was estimated at 1490 billion cubic feet, including 35 billion cubic feet withdrawn from storage, 11 billion cubic feet of supplemental supplies, and 101 billion cubic feet that were imported. In May 1987, dry gas available for disposition totaled 1419 billion cubic feet. Of the total dry gas supply available for disposition in May 1988, an estimated 1259 billion cubic feet were consumed, 294 billion cubic feet were injected into underground storage reservoirs, and 5 billion cubic feet were exported, leaving 68 billion cubic feet unaccounted for.

Not Available

1988-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

280

Natural gas monthly, March 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gross withdrawals of natural gas (wet, after lease separation) from gas and oil wells in the United States during March 1989, were estimated at 1777 billion cubic feet, 0.4 percent below withdrawals during March 1988. Of the total quantity, an estimated 211 billion cubic feet were returned to gas and oil reservoirs for repressuring, pressure maintenance, and cycling; 36 billion cubic feet of nonhydrocarbon gases were removed; and 12 billion cubic feet were vented or flared. The remaining wet marketed production totaled 1518 billion cubic feet. Dry gas production (wet marketed production minus 71 billion cubic feet of extraction loss) totaled an estimated 1447 billion cubic feet, similar to the March 1988 level. The total dry gas supply available for disposition in March 1989 was estimated at 1881 billion cubic feet, including 319 billion cubic feet withdrawn from storage, 14 billion cubic feet of supplemental supplies, and 101 billion cubic feet that were imported. In March 1988, dry gas available for disposition totaled 1841 billion cubic feet. Of the total dry gas supply available for disposition in March 1989, an estimated 1837 billion cubic feet were consumed, 93 billion cubic feet were injected into underground storage reservoirs and 8 billion cubic feet were exported, leaving 57 billion cubic feet unaccounted for.

Not Available

1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Extracting TMDs from CLAS12 data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present studies of double longitudinal spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering using a new dedicated Monte Carlo generator, which includes quark intrinsic transverse momentum within the generalized parton model based on the fully differential cross section for the process. Additionally we employ Bessel-weighting to the MC events to extract transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions and also discuss possible uncertainties due to kinematic correlation effects.

Aghasyan, Mher M. [INFN-Frascati (Italy); Avakian, Harut A. [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Extraction of Transversity and Collins Functions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a global re-analysis of recent experimental data on azimuthal asymmetries in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering, from the HERMES and COMPASS Collaborations, and in e{sup +}e{sup -} --> h_1h_2X processes, from the Belle Collaboration. The transversity distribution and the Collins functions are extracted simultaneously, in a revised analysis which also takes into account a new parameterization of the unknown functions.

Anselmino, Mauro [INFN-Torino (Italy); Boglione, Mariaelena [INFN-Torino (Italy); D'Alesio, Umberto [INFN Cagliari (Italy); Melis, Stefano [INFN-Torino (Italy); Murgia, Francesco [INFN Cagliari (Italy); Prokudin, Alexei [JLAB, Newport News, VA (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Extraction of nitrosoruthenium by tributyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ruthenium is one of the elements that complicate regeneration of the spent nuclear fuel. A study has been made of distribution of highly extractable nitrosoruthenium complex RuNO(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} (RuT) between aqueous solutions and tributyl phosphate (TBP) in n-dodecane. Short phase contact ({approximately}30 s) was employed to minimize possible mutual conversion of nitrosoruthenium species, which takes place in the case of prolonged phase contact. The distribution coefficient {alpha}{sub RuT} is independent of hydrogen ion concentration and the presence of various salts in aqueous phase, i.e., RuT is extracted as nonelectrolyte. Experiments in which the TBP concentration was varied by dilution or binding TBP with nitric acid and uranyl nitrate indicates formation of trisolvate (as main complex characterized by extraction constant K{sub 3}=72) and disolvate (K{sub 2} = 5). At high nitric acid and/or uranyl nitrate concentration, {alpha}{sub RuT} is insignificantly reduced, while solvate number decrease substantially, Probably, nitrosoruthenium tetranitrate, e.g., RuNO(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{center_dot}HNO{sub 3}{center_dot}TBP, and/or complex of RuT with uranyl nitrate is formed. The decontamination of valuable fuel components from ruthenium may be improved by a factor 10{sup 3} by binding TBP with nitric acid and uranyl nitrate. Another way to reduce {alpha}{sub RuT} is to convert RuT into poorly extractable RuD form. The time of RuT half-conversion into RuD was found to be 15 min in the presence of HNO{sub 3}, 9 min in the presence of uranyl nitrate, and 5 min at 50-60{degrees}C (simultaneously {alpha}{sub RuT} decreases by an order of magnitude).

Rozen, A.M.; Kartasheva, N.A.; Nikolotova, Z.N. [Bochvar Russian Inst. of Inorganic Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Optimization of a Solvent Extraction Desalination Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is usually determined by economical considerations with other factors sometimes exert. ing strong influ- ences Processes currently showing good potentials are various forms of distillation, freezing, electrodialysis, reverse osmosis, and solvent..., electrodialysis, reverse osmosis, and others. This thesis concerns the optimization of a Solvent Extraction Desalination Plant with respect to the "Standardized Procedure for Estimating Costs of Saline Water Conversions" (16). The two most im- portant...

Beighle, Phillip Lew

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Nanomaterials for Extracting Hydrogen from Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to catalyze water oxidation. K E Y A C C O M P L I S H M E N T S Produced highly active iron oxide (hematiteNanomaterials for Extracting Hydrogen from Water P R O J E C T L E A D E R : Veronika Szalai (NIST water. R E F E R E N C E Effect of tin doping on -Fe2 O3 photoanodes for water splitting, C. D. Bohn, A

286

Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Molten Metal Technology was awarded a contract to demonstrate the applicability of the Catalytic Extraction Process, a proprietary process that could be applied to US DOE`s inventory of low level mixed waste. This paper is a description of that technology, and included within this document are discussions of: (1) Program objectives, (2) Overall technology review, (3) Organic feed conversion to synthetic gas, (4) Metal, halogen, and transuranic recovery, (5) Demonstrations, (6) Design of the prototype facility, and (7) Results.

Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.; Zeitoon, B.M.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Configuration and Validation of the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The LHC Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is one of the most complex instrumentation systems deployed in the LHC. As well as protecting the machine, the system is also used as a means of diagnosing machine faults, and providing feedback of losses to the control room and several systems such as the Collimation, the Beam Dump and the Post-Mortem. The system has to transmit and process signals from over 4’000 monitors, and has approaching 3 million configurable parameters. This paper describes the types of configuration data needed, the means used to store and deploy all the parameters in such a distributed system and how operators are able to alter the operating parameters of the system, particularly with regard to the loss threshold values. The various security mechanisms put in place, both at the hardware and software level, to avoid accidental or malicious modification of these BLM parameters are also shown for each case.

Zamantzas, C; Emery, J; Fitzek, J; Follin, F; Jackson, S; Kain, V; Kruk, G; Misiowiec, M; Roderick, C; Sapinski, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

ANALYZING SURFACE ROUGHNESS DEPENDENCE OF LINEAR RF LOSSES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topographic structure on Superconductivity Radio Frequency (SRF) surfaces can contribute additional cavity RF losses describable in terms of surface RF reflectivity and absorption indices of wave scattering theory. At isotropic homogeneous extent, Power Spectrum Density (PSD) of roughness is introduced and quantifies the random surface topographic structure. PSD obtained from different surface treatments of niobium, such Buffered Chemical Polishing (BCP), Electropolishing (EP), Nano-Mechanical Polishing (NMP) and Barrel Centrifugal Polishing (CBP) are compared. A perturbation model is utilized to calculate the additional rough surface RF losses based on PSD statistical analysis. This model will not consider that superconductor becomes normal conducting at fields higher than transition field. One can calculate the RF power dissipation ratio between rough surface and ideal smooth surface within this field range from linear loss mechanisms.

Reece, Charles E. [JLAB; Kelley, Michael J. [JLAB, W& M College; Xu, Chen [JLAB, W& M College

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Computer-based Stroke Extraction in Historical Manuscripts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computer-based Stroke Extraction in Historical Manuscripts Rainer; 1 Computer-based Stroke Extraction in Historical Manuscripts Rainer Herzog Recovering individual strokes in historical manuscripts can provide a valuable basis

Hamburg,.Universität

290

Supercritical Fluid Extraction Applications in the Process Industries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solutions. Other examples of potential applications for SFE technology are the extraction of tar sands and oil shale [17J; separations of biomolecules such as triglycerides, alkaloids, and olefins [18J; extraction of coal liquids [19J; and the isolation...

Lahiere, R. J.; Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

291

Loss of purity by wave packet scattering at low energies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the quantum entanglement produced by a head-on collision between two gaussian wave packets in three-dimensional space. By deriving the two-particle wave function modified by s-wave scattering amplitudes, we obtain an approximate analytic expression of the purity of an individual particle. The loss of purity provides an indicator of the degree of entanglement. In the case the wave packets are narrow in momentum space, we show that the loss of purity is solely controlled by the ratio of the scattering cross section to the transverse area of the wave packets.

Jia Wang; C. K. Law; M. -C. Chu

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

292

Passive magnetic bearing element with minimal power losses  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems employing passive magnetic bearing elements having minimal power losses are provided. Improved stabilizing elements are shown, employing periodic magnet arrays and inductively loaded circuits, but with improved characteristics compared to the elements disclosed in US Patent No. 5,495,221 entitled ``Dynamically Stable Magnetic Suspension/Bearing System.`` The improvements relate to increasing the magnitude of the force derivative, while at the same time reducing the power dissipated during the normal operation of the bearing system, to provide a passive bearing system that has virtually no losses under equilibrium conditions, that is, when the supported system is not subject to any accelerations except those of gravity. 8 figs.

Post, R.F.

1998-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

293

Passive magnetic bearing element with minimal power losses  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Systems employing passive magnetic bearing elements having minimal power losses are provided. Improved stabilizing elements are shown, employing periodic magnet arrays and inductively loaded circuits, but with improved characteristics compared to the elements disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 5,495,221 entitled "Dynamically Stable Magnetic Suspension/Bearing System." The improvements relate to increasing the magnitude of the force derivative, while at the same time reducing the power dissipated during the normal operation of the bearing system, to provide a passive bearing system that has virtually no losses under equilibrium conditions, that is, when the supported system is not subject to any accelerations except those of gravity.

Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Energy Loss in Nuclear Drell-Yan Process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By means of the nuclear parton distributions which can be used to provide a good explanation for the EMC effect in the whole x range, we investigate the energy loss effect in nuclear Drell-Yan process. When the cross section of lepton pair production is considered varying with the center-of-mass energy of the nucleon-nucleon collision, we find that the nuclear Drell-Yan(DY) ratio is suppressed due to the energy loss, which balances the overestimate of the DY ratio only in consideration of the effect of nuclear parton distributions.

Jian-Jun Yang; Guang-Lie Li

1998-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

295

COLLOQUIUM: "The Environmental Footprint of Shale Gas Extraction...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: "The Environmental Footprint of Shale Gas Extraction and Hydraulic Fracturing" Professor Robert Jackson Duke University Presentation:...

296

Measurement of limiter heating due to fusion product losses during high fusion power deuterium-tritium operation of TFTR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary analysis has been completed on measurements of limiter heating during high fusion power deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation of TFTR, in an attempt to identify heating from alpha particle losses. Recent operation of TFTR with a 50-50 mix of D-T has resulted in fusion power output ({approx} 6.2 MW) orders of magnitude above what was previously achieved on TFTR. A significantly larger absolute number of particles and energy from fusion products compared to D-D operation is expected to be lost to the limiters. Measurements were made in the vicinity of the midplane ({plus_minus} 30{degree}) with thermocouples mounted on the tiles of an outboard limiter. Comparisons were made -between discharges which were similar except for the mix of deuterium and tritium beam sources. Power and energy estimates of predicted alpha losses were as high as 0.13 MW and 64 kJ. Depending on what portion of the limiters absorbed this energy, temperature rises of up to 42 {degrees}C could be expected, corresponding to a heat load of 0.69 MJ/m{sup 2} over a 0.5 sec period, or a power load of 1.4 MW/m{sup 2}. There was a measurable increase in the limiter tile temperature as the fusion power yield increased with a more reactive mixture of D and T at constant beam power during high power D-T operation. Analysis of the data is being conducted to see if the alpha heating component can be extracted. Measured temperature increases were no greater than 1 {degree}C, indicating that there was probably neither an unexpectedly large fraction of lost particles nor unexpected localization of the losses. Limits on the stochastic ripple loss contribution from alphas can be deduced.

Janos, A.; Owens, D.K.; Darrow, D.; Redi, M.; Zarnstorff, M.; Zweben, S.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

A Tool for Personal Data Extraction Daniela Vianna  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Tool for Personal Data Extraction Daniela Vianna DCS, Rutgers University dvianna, we have developed a personal data extraction tool as a first step toward this vision. In this paper, we present this extraction tool, along with some preliminary statistics about personal data gath

Marian, Amélie

298

Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Multidocument Summarization via Information Extraction Michael White and Tanya Korelsky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the initial version of RIPTIDES, a system that combines information extraction (IE), extraction describe the initial implementation and evaluation of the RIPTIDES IE­ supported summarization system. We to be reported in the summary. RIPTIDES next applies its Information Extraction subsystem to generate a database

Cardie, Claire

300

Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 4 figs.

Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

302

Parton energy loss due to synchrotron-like gluon emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a quasiclassical theory of the synchrotron-like gluon radiation. Our calculations show that the parton energy loss due to the synchrotron gluon emission may be important in the jet quenching phenomenon if the plasma instabilities generate a sufficiently strong chromomagnetic field. Our gluon spectrum disagrees with that obtained by Shuryak and Zahed within the Schwinger's proper time method.

B. G. Zakharov

2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

303

DETERMINATION OF LOSS FACTORS IN A DEREGULATED SYSTEM Ashikur Bhuiya  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alberta Electric System Operator e-mail: arb397@mail.usask.ca N. Chowdhury Department of Electrical to the operation and control of a system, typical tasks of an ISO may also include accepting bids from generators, providing access to the successful bidders and allocating transmission loss among the generators. Based

Saskatchewan, University of

304

Computationally Efficient Winding Loss Calculation with Multiple Windings, Arbitrary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

windings occurs at the level of individual turns, the method could be applied, but its advantages are lessComputationally Efficient Winding Loss Calculation with Multiple Windings, Arbitrary Waveforms and Two- or Three-Dimensional Field Geometry C. R. Sullivan From IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics

305

PHENOLICS BUILDUP INHIBITS CARBON LOSS IN UNSATURATED PEATLANDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

feedback loop" between carbon emission and drought in peatlands is down regulated in the long term. WePHENOLICS BUILDUP INHIBITS CARBON LOSS IN UNSATURATED PEATLANDS Hongjun Wang, Mengchi Ho, Neal carbon. Drought/drainage coupled with climate warming presents a vital threat to those stores

306

Loss of Daylight Vision in Retinal Degeneration: Are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Loss of Daylight Vision in Retinal Degeneration: Are Oxidative Stress and Metabolic Dysregulation, particularly in cones, the type of photoreceptors that mediate daylight and color vision. The evidence, providing our daylight vision, and have many of the same features and vulnerabilities as rod photoreceptors

Tabin, Cliff

307

Dimensioning hospital wards using the Erlang loss model Corresponding author  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-2006. Finally, we demonstrate the efficiency of merging departments. Keywords: hospital resource allocationDimensioning hospital wards using the Erlang loss model Corresponding author: A.M. de Bruin (MSc of Sciences Department of Mathematics Assistant professor Optimization of Business Processes L. van Zanten

308

The Energy Harvesting Multiple Access Channel with Energy Storage Losses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Energy Harvesting Multiple Access Channel with Energy Storage Losses Kaya Tutuncuoglu and Aylin considers a Gaussian multiple access channel with two energy harvesting transmitters with lossy energy storage. The power allocation policy maximizing the average weighted sum rate given the energy harvesting

Yener, Aylin

309

Way to reduce arc voltage losses in hybrid thermionic converters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental results are reported concerning the output and emission characteristics of the arc and hybrid regimes in a plane-parallel thermionic converter with Pt--Zr--O electrode pair. It is shown that arc voltage losses can be reduced to values below those obtainable in ordinary arc thermionic converters.

Tskhakaya, V.K.; Yarygin, V.I.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Improved Calculation of Core Loss With Nonsinusoidal Waveforms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Comparison with experimental measure- ments in MnZn ferrite shows improved accuracy. The result may be op machines, transformers, inductors, and other static reactors, loss in the magnetic material is often pre of the flux density. It can be directly calculated from geometry and bulk resistivity in ferrites, and

311

OLA -11.15,2012 DATA LOSS PREVENTION POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 OLA -11.15,2012 DATA LOSS PREVENTION POLICY 1.0 PURPOSE This Policy establishes z e d disclosure of Protected Information by electronic means. The specific purposes of this Policy for monitoring and reporting compliance with the College's Privacy Policy (http://policy.cofc.edu/documents/11

Kasman, Alex

312

Panel Damping Loss Factor Estimation Using The Random Decrement Technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of the Random Decrement Technique (RDT) for estimating panel damping loss factors ranging from 1% to 10% is examined in a systematic way, with a focus on establishing the various parameters one must specify to use the technique to the best...

Dande, Himanshu Amol

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

313

Predicting pressure losses in two-phase flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be considered. C~ane and Carleton, Vogt 4 and White, and Pinkus have previously accounted for this loss by the "nodified" Fanning equation. 2 2S p ? sLD Vs J d s f where fs, the friction factor, accounts for the resistance of the par- ticles and walls...

Dietz, Frederic Henri

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Assessing and Communicating the Loss of Biodiversity and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessing and Communicating the Loss of Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services with Remote Sensing impacts on biodiversity, ecosystems and the services they provide. The summer school's goal is to learn about innovations in information technologies to generate information on changes of biodiversity

Schmidt, Matthias

315

AN INVESTIGATION OF CERTAIN THERMODYNAMIC LOSSES IN MINIATURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of gas temperatures and power losses for a compression volume that included a regenerative heat exchanger for flows between the piston/cylinder volume and the regenerator. The temperature profiles exhibited results for high pressure and low frequency were very unstable with significant high frequency components

316

Tracking eelgrass loss in estuarine sediments of West Falmouth Harbor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

lignin concentrations and trends in lignin 13C values reflect recent eelgrass cover change from three in sedimentary lignin concentration indicate recent eelgrass cover change when the lignin 13C reflects may determine whether or not a stressor will promote eelgrass loss. Key Words: Eelgrass, lignin

Vallino, Joseph J.

317

The Community Loss Index: A New Social Indicator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and an aggregator of individ- ual experiences. Building on the relationship between loss and stress, the index at is growing due to mounting demand for accountability, outcome measures, evidence-based research, and indicators that reveal what works. In response, researchers like Jochen Albrecht and Laxmi Ramasubramanian Ă°

Qiu, Weigang

318

Modelling and Measurements of Power Losses and Turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at Middelgrunden Offshore Wind Farm R. J. Barthelmie*, , S. T. Frandsen and M. N. Nielsen, Wind Energy Department and turbulence increase due to wind turbine wake interac- tions in large offshore wind farms is crucial interactions in large offshore wind farms is crucial to optimizing wind farm design. Power losses due

Pryor, Sara C.

319

1. Introduction: current issues in hair loss-related disorders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. Introduction: current issues in hair loss-related disorders 2. Basic biology of hair follicles 3. Physiological regeneration: modulating the regeneration of existing hair follicles by the extra-hair follicle environment and systemic hormone factors 4. Regeneration of hair fibers from existing follicles after hair

Chuong, Cheng-Ming

320

Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays Page 1 of 23 Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays Page 1 of 23 Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays the amount of data to be processed. This work is a first example in feature extraction from tin-oxide sensors element array of tin-oxide sensors is presented. Results are extrapolated to other arrays of chemical

Roppel, Thaddeus A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Direct extraction of oil from sunflower seeds by twin-screw extruder according to an aqueous extraction process: Feasibility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct extraction of oil from sunflower seeds by twin-screw extruder according to an aqueous the feasibility of an aqueous process to extract sunflower seed oil using a co-rotating twin-screw extruder. Aqueous extraction was carried out using whole seeds and the influence of the operating conditions on oil

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

322

Theoretical mass loss rates of cool main-sequence stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a model for the wind properties of cool main-sequence stars, which comprises their wind ram pressures, mass fluxes, and terminal wind velocities. The wind properties are determined through a polytropic magnetised wind model, assuming power laws for the dependence of the thermal and magnetic wind parameters on the stellar rotation rate. We use empirical data to constrain theoretical wind scenarios, which are characterised by different rates of increase of the wind temperature, wind density, and magnetic field strength. Scenarios based on moderate rates of increase yield wind ram pressures in agreement with most empirical constraints, but cannot account for some moderately rotating targets, whose high apparent mass loss rates are inconsistent with observed coronal X-ray and magnetic properties. For fast magnetic rotators, the magneto-centrifugal driving of the outflow can produce terminal wind velocities far in excess of the surface escape velocity. Disregarding this aspect in the analyses of wind ram pressures leads to overestimations of stellar mass loss rates. The predicted mass loss rates of cool main-sequence stars do not exceed about ten times the solar value. Our results are in contrast with previous investigations, which found a strong increase of the stellar mass loss rates with the coronal X-ray flux. Owing to the weaker dependence, we expect the impact of stellar winds on planetary atmospheres to be less severe and the detectability of magnetospheric radio emission to be lower then previously suggested. Considering the rotational evolution of a one solar-mass star, the mass loss rates and the wind ram pressures are highest during the pre-main sequence phase.

V. Holzwarth; M. Jardine

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

323

Apparatus for extracting and sequestering carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method associated therewith to extract and sequester carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) from a stream or volume of gas wherein said apparatus hydrates CO.sub.2 and reacts the resulting carbonic acid with carbonate. Suitable carbonates include, but are not limited to, carbonates of alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, preferably carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Waste products are metal cations and bicarbonate in solution or dehydrated metal salts, which when disposed of in a large body of water provide an effective way of sequestering CO.sub.2 from a gaseous environment.

Rau, Gregory H. (Castro Valley, CA); Caldeira, Kenneth G. (Livermore, CA)

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

324

Enhanced Attenuation Technologies: Passive Soil Vapor Extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) is an enhanced attenuation (EA) approach that removes volatile contaminants from soil. The extraction is driven by natural pressure gradients between the subsurface and atmosphere (Barometric Pumping), or by renewable sources of energy such as wind or solar power (Assisted PSVE). The technology is applicable for remediating sites with low levels of contamination and for transitioning sites from active source technologies such as active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) to natural attenuation. PSVE systems are simple to design and operate and are more cost effective than active systems in many scenarios. Thus, PSVE is often appropriate as an interim-remedial or polishing strategy. Over the past decade, PSVE has been demonstrated in the U.S. and in Europe. These demonstrations provide practical information to assist in selecting, designing and implementing the technology. These demonstrations indicate that the technology can be effective in achieving remedial objectives in a timely fashion. The keys to success include: (1) Application at sites where the residual source quantities, and associated fluxes to groundwater, are relatively low; (2) Selection of the appropriate passive energy source - barometric pumping in cases with a deep vadose zone and barrier (e.g., clay) layers that separate the subsurface from the atmosphere and renewable energy assisted PSVE in other settings and where higher flow rates are required. (3) Provision of sufficient access to the contaminated vadose zones through the spacing and number of extraction wells. This PSVE technology report provides a summary of the relevant technical background, real-world case study performance, key design and cost considerations, and a scenario-based cost evaluation. The key design and cost considerations are organized into a flowchart that dovetails with the Enhanced Attenuation: Chlorinated Organics Guidance of the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC). The PSVE flowchart provides a structured process to determine if the technology is, or is not, reasonable and defensible for a particular site. The central basis for that decision is the expected performance of PSVE under the site specific conditions. Will PSVE have sufficient mass removal rates to reduce the release, or flux, of contamination into the underlying groundwater so that the site can meet it overall remedial objectives? The summary technical information, case study experiences, and structured decision process provided in this 'user guide' should assist environmental decision-makers, regulators, and engineers in selecting and successfully implementing PSVE at appropriate sites.

Vangelas, K.; Looney, B.; Kamath, R.; Adamson, D.; Newell, C.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Hot cell shield plug extraction apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus is provided for moving shielding plugs into and out of holes in concrete shielding walls in hot cells for handling radioactive materials without the use of external moving equipment. The apparatus provides a means whereby a shield plug is extracted from its hole and then swung approximately 90 degrees out of the way so that the hole may be accessed. The apparatus uses hinges to slide the plug in and out and to rotate it out of the way, the hinge apparatus also supporting the weight of the plug in all positions, with the load of the plug being transferred to a vertical wall by means of a bolting arrangement.

Knapp, Philip A. (Moore, ID); Manhart, Larry K. (Pingree, ID)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Method for extracting and sequestering carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus to extract and sequester carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) from a stream or volume of gas wherein said method and apparatus hydrates CO.sub.2, and reacts the resulting carbonic acid with carbonate. Suitable carbonates include, but are not limited to, carbonates of alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, preferably carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Waste products are metal cations and bicarbonate in solution or dehydrated metal salts, which when disposed of in a large body of water provide an effective way of sequestering CO.sub.2 from a gaseous environment.

Rau, Gregory H. (Castro Valley, CA); Caldeira, Kenneth G. (Livermore, CA)

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

327

Accelerated solvent extraction of petroleum contaminated sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were repeated on these extracts and results were virtually the same (within 500mg/kg). It is unknown why these samples have such a discrepancy from the rest of the data. The ASE data was compared to soxhlet oil and grease values and it was found... recoveries were compared individually at each sampling event and as total target analytes. These comparisons are shown in Table 8. Target compounds below the MDL and within analytical instrument background levels were discarded. This was done as a result...

Bauguss, Jeffery Lynn

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Kerogen extraction from subterranean oil shale resources  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to methods for extracting a kerogen-based product from subsurface (oil) shale formations, wherein such methods rely on fracturing and/or rubblizing portions of said formations so as to enhance their fluid permeability, and wherein such methods further rely on chemically modifying the shale-bound kerogen so as to render it mobile. The present invention is also directed at systems for implementing at least some of the foregoing methods. Additionally, the present invention is also directed to methods of fracturing and/or rubblizing subsurface shale formations and to methods of chemically modifying kerogen in situ so as to render it mobile.

Looney, Mark Dean (Houston, TX); Lestz, Robert Steven (Missouri City, TX); Hollis, Kirk (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig (Los Alamos, NM); Kinkead, Scott (Los Alamos, NM); Wigand, Marcus (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

329

Energy loss characteristics of heavy ions in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, hydrocarbon gases and tradescantia tissue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy loss characteristics of heavy ions in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, hydrocarbon gases and tradescantia tissue

Dennis, J A

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Feature extraction for structural dynamics model validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focuses on defining and comparing response features that can be used for structural dynamics model validation studies. Features extracted from dynamic responses obtained analytically or experimentally, such as basic signal statistics, frequency spectra, and estimated time-series models, can be used to compare characteristics of structural system dynamics. By comparing those response features extracted from experimental data and numerical outputs, validation and uncertainty quantification of numerical model containing uncertain parameters can be realized. In this study, the applicability of some response features to model validation is first discussed using measured data from a simple test-bed structure and the associated numerical simulations of these experiments. issues that must be considered were sensitivity, dimensionality, type of response, and presence or absence of measurement noise in the response. Furthermore, we illustrate a comparison method of multivariate feature vectors for statistical model validation. Results show that the outlier detection technique using the Mahalanobis distance metric can be used as an effective and quantifiable technique for selecting appropriate model parameters. However, in this process, one must not only consider the sensitivity of the features being used, but also correlation of the parameters being compared.

Hemez, Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nishio, Mayuko [UNIV OF TOKYO; Worden, Keith [UNIV OF SHEFFIELD; Takeda, Nobuo [UNIV OF TOKYO

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

331

Quantum computer architecture for fast entropy extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If a quantum computer is stabilized by fault-tolerant quantum error correction (QEC), then most of its resources (qubits and operations) are dedicated to the extraction of error information. Analysis of this process leads to a set of central requirements for candidate computing devices, in addition to the basic ones of stable qubits and controllable gates and measurements. The logical structure of the extraction process has a natural geometry and hierarchy of communication needs; a computer whose physical architecture is designed to reflect this will be able to tolerate the most noise. The relevant networks are dominated by quantum information transport, therefore to assess a computing device it is necessary to characterize its ability to transport quantum information, in addition to assessing the performance of conditional logic on nearest neighbours and the passive stability of the memory. The transport distances involved in QEC networks are estimated, and it is found that a device relying on swap operations for information transport must have those operations an order of magnitude more precise than the controlled gates of a device which can transport information at low cost.

Andrew M. Steane

2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

332

White LED with High Package Extraction Efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop a high efficiency phosphor converting (white) Light Emitting Diode (pcLED) 1-Watt package through an increase in package extraction efficiency. A transparent/translucent monolithic phosphor is proposed to replace the powdered phosphor to reduce the scattering caused by phosphor particles. Additionally, a multi-layer thin film selectively reflecting filter is proposed between blue LED die and phosphor layer to recover inward yellow emission. At the end of the project we expect to recycle approximately 50% of the unrecovered backward light in current package construction, and develop a pcLED device with 80 lm/W{sub e} using our technology improvements and commercially available chip/package source. The success of the project will benefit luminous efficacy of white LEDs by increasing package extraction efficiency. In most phosphor-converting white LEDs, the white color is obtained by combining a blue LED die (or chip) with a powdered phosphor layer. The phosphor partially absorbs the blue light from the LED die and converts it into a broad green-yellow emission. The mixture of the transmitted blue light and green-yellow light emerging gives white light. There are two major drawbacks for current pcLEDs in terms of package extraction efficiency. The first is light scattering caused by phosphor particles. When the blue photons from the chip strike the phosphor particles, some blue light will be scattered by phosphor particles. Converted yellow emission photons are also scattered. A portion of scattered light is in the backward direction toward the die. The amount of this backward light varies and depends in part on the particle size of phosphors. The other drawback is that yellow emission from phosphor powders is isotropic. Although some backward light can be recovered by the reflector in current LED packages, there is still a portion of backward light that will be absorbed inside the package and further converted to heat. Heat generated in the package may cause a deterioration of encapsulant materials, affecting the performance of both the LED die and phosphor, leading to a decrease in the luminous efficacy over lifetime. Recent studies from research groups at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute found that, under the condition to obtain a white light, about 40% of the light is transmitted outward of the phosphor layer and 60% of the light is reflected inward.1,2 It is claimed that using scattered photon extraction (SPE) technique, luminous efficacy is increased by 60%. In this project, a transparent/translucent monolithic phosphor was used to replace the powdered phosphor layer. In the normal pcLED package, the powdered phosphor is mixed with silicone either to be deposited on the top of LED die forming a chip level conversion (CLC) white LED or to be casted in the package forming a volume conversion white LED. In the monolithic phosphors there are no phosphor powder/silicone interfaces so it can reduce the light scattering caused by phosphor particles. Additionally, a multi-layer thin film selectively reflecting filter is inserted in the white LED package between the blue LED die and phosphor layer. It will selectively transmit the blue light from the LED die and reflect the phosphor's yellow inward emission outward. The two technologies try to recover backward light to the outward direction in the pcLED package thereby improving the package extraction efficiency.

Yi Zheng; Matthew Stough

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Plutonium and Americium from Soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of plutonium and americium from soil was successfully demonstrated using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide solvent augmented with organophosphorus and beta-diketone complexants. Spiked Idaho soils were chemically and radiologically characterized, then extracted with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide at 2,900 psi and 65 C containing varying concentrations of tributyl phosphate (TBP) and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA). A single 45 minute SFE with 2.7 mol% TBP and 3.2 mol% TTA provided as much as 88% {+-} 6.0 extraction of americium and 69% {+-} 5.0 extraction of plutonium. Use of 5.3 mol% TBP with 6.8 mol% of the more acidic beta-diketone hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFA) provided 95% {+-} 3.0 extraction of americium and 83% {+-} 5.0 extraction of plutonium in a single 45 minute SFE at 3,750 psi and 95 C. Sequential chemical extraction techniques were used to chemically characterize soil partitioning of plutonium and americium in pre-SFE soil samples. Sequential chemical extraction techniques demonstrated that spiked plutonium resides primarily (76.6%) in the sesquioxide fraction with minor amounts being absorbed by the oxidizable fraction (10.6%) and residual fractions (12.8%). Post-SFE soils subjected to sequential chemical extraction characterization demonstrated that 97% of the oxidizable, 78% of the sesquioxide and 80% of the residual plutonium could be removed using SFE. These preliminary results show that SFE may be an effective solvent extraction technique for removal of actinide contaminants from soil.

Fox, R.V.; Mincher, B.J.

2002-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

334

Supercritical Fluid Extraction of Plutonium and Americium from Soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) of plutonium and americium from soil was successfully demonstrated using supercritical fluid carbon dioxide solvent augmented with organophosphorus and beta-diketone complexants. Spiked Idaho soils were chemically and radiologically characterized, then extracted with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide at 2,900 psi and 65°C containing varying concentrations of tributyl phosphate (TBP) and thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA). A single 45 minute SFE with 2.7 mol% TBP and 3.2 mol% TTA provided as much as 88% ± 6.0 extraction of americium and 69% ± 5.0 extraction of plutonium. Use of 5.3 mol% TBP with 6.8 mol% of the more acidic beta-diketone hexafluoroacetylacetone (HFA) provided 95% ± 3.0 extraction of americium and 83% ± 5.0 extraction of plutonium in a single 45 minute SFE at 3,750 psi and 95°C. Sequential chemical extraction techniques were used to chemically characterize soil partitioning of plutonium and americium in pre-SFE soil samples. Sequential chemical extraction techniques demonstrated that spiked plutonium resides primarily (76.6%) in the sesquioxide fraction with minor amounts being absorbed by the oxidizable fraction (10.6%) and residual fractions (12.8%). Post-SFE soils subjected to sequential chemical extraction characterization demonstrated that 97% of the oxidizable, 78% of the sesquioxide and 80% of the residual plutonium could be removed using SFE. These preliminary results show that SFE may be an effective solvent extraction technique for removal of actinide contaminants from soil.

Fox, Robert Vincent; Mincher, Bruce Jay

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

New Beam Loss Monitor for 12 GeV Upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes a new VME based machine protection Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) signal processing board designed at Jefferson Lab to replace the current CAMAC based BLM board. The new eight-channel BLM signal processor has linear, logarithmic, and integrating amplifiers that simultaneously provide the optimal signal processing for each application. Amplified signals are digitized and then further processed through a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). Combining both the diagnostic and machine protection functions in each channel allows the operator to tune-up and monitor beam operations while the machine protection is integrating the same signal. Other features include extensive built-in-self-test, fast shutdown interface (FSD), and 16-Mbit buffers for beam loss transient play-back. The new VME BLM board features high sensitivity, high resolution, and low cost per channel.

Jianxun Yan, Kelly Mahoney

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

702 IEEEJOURNAL OF QUAKTUM ELECTRONICS OCTOBER phases of the q pump modes. asis the single pass power loss of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power loss of the signal modes, and allidler modes are assumed to have the same single pass loss ai. K

Teich, Malvin C.

337

Submillimeter residual losses in high-{Tc} superconductors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bolometry was used obtain accurate submillimeter residual loss data for epitaxial films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO), Tl{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10}, Tl{sub 2}CaBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 8} (TCBCO), and Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}BiO{sub 3} (BKBO). We were able to fit the absorptivity measured for Nb films to an Eliashberg strong coupling calculation; excellent agreement resulted between parameters from best fits and measured Residual Resistivity Ratio. Microwave surface resistance measurements made on the same YBCO and TCBCO films are in excellent agreement with submillimeter measurements. Absorptivities for all YBCO films studied are qualitatively similar, increasing smoothly with frequency, with no gap-like features below the well known absorption edge at 450 cm{sup {minus}1}. Losses in YBCO films were fit to a weakly coupled grain model for the a-b plane conductivity. Strong phonon structure was observed in TCBCO films between 60 and 700 cm{sup {minus}1} (2 THz and 23 THz); these losses could not be fitted to the simple weakly coupled grain model, in contrast to the case for other high-{Tc} superconductors where phonon structure observed in ceramics are is absent in epitaxial oriented films and crystals because of electronic screening due to high conductivity of a-b planes. Absorptivity data for the BKBO films all show a strong absorption onset near the BCS tunneling gap of 3.5 k{sub B}{Tc}. Comparison with strong coupling Eliashberg predictions and of a Kramers-Kronig analysis indicate that the absorption onset is consistent with a superconducting energy gap. Effects of magnetic field on residual losses in YBCO films show a resonant absorption feature in vicinity of predicted

Miller, D.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Energy-Efficiency Options for Insurance Loss Prevention  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy-efficiency improvements offer the insurance industry two areas of opportunity: reducing ordinary claims and avoiding greenhouse gas emissions that could precipitate natural disaster losses resulting from global climate change. We present three vehicles for taking advantage of this opportunity, including research and development, in- house energy management, and provision of key information to insurance customers and risk managers. The complementary role for renewable energy systems is also introduced.

Mills, E. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Div.; Knoepfel, I. [Swiss Reinsurance Co., Zurich (Switzerland)

1997-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

339

BONE LOSS IN RELATION TO HYPOTHALAMIC ATROPHY IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

considerable burden on the health system, patients, and caregivers. 1.2 Alzheimer’s Disease and Bone Loss Bone health is an important issue in aging and AD. Osteoporosis–related fractures are among the major health and socioeconomic concerns in aging... of bone fractures, and a determining factor in clinical diagnosis of osteoporosis (Ammann and Rizzoli 2003). Several studies in women suggest that low BMD is associated with poorer cognitive function and subsequent cognitive decline (Yaffe, Browner et al...

Loskutova, Natalia Y.

2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

340

GOALS, EXPECTATIONS, AND SATISFACTION IN THE MAINTENANCE OF WEIGHT LOSS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, gallbladder disease, respiratory dysfunction, gout, osteoarthritis, and certain cancers (Fontaine, Redden, Wang, Westfall, & Allison, 2003; Must et al., 1999). Obesity is attributable to an estimated 112,000 to 280,000 deaths in the United States each year... various interventions, such as very low calorie 3 diets and pharmacotherapy, with behavior modification to accomplish more significant weight losses (Brownell, 1982; Brownell & Wadden, 1986; 1992). Thus, the philosophy of obesity treatment...

Chang, Olivia L.

2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Electron loss from fast heavy ions: Target-scaling dependence  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The target dependence for projectile electron loss is investigated using experimental data taken from the literature. Impact energies range from a few tens of eV/u to tens of MeV/u. For energies less than several MeV/u, the target dependences are shown to be very similar, independent of projectile species and charge state. Overall, however, with increasing impact energy the cross-section dependence on the target nuclear charge systematically increases. It is shown that none of the existing cross-section target scaling models reproduce these features. A model, based on Born scaling and including both the antiscreening and screening contributions to projectile electron loss, is developed. With the inclusion of relativistic effects, which increase the contribution from both channels at high energies, and ''target saturation'' effects, which reduce the contribution from the screening term for heavy targets and lower impact energies, this model describes quite reasonably all available experimental data. A simple scaling formula that reproduces the measured atomic number and impact velocity dependences is provided. This formula is applicable for projectile electron loss in collisions with either atomic or molecular targets and for impact energies ranging from a few to tens of MeV/u.

DuBois, R. D. [Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Santos, A. C. F.; Montenegro, E. C. [Instituto de Fisica, UFRJ, Caixa Postal 68528 Rio de Janeiro, BR-21941-972 RJ (Brazil); Sigaud, G. M. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 38071, Rio de Janeiro, BR-22452-970 RJ (Brazil)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Episodic Mass Loss and Pre-SN Circumstellar Envelopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I discuss observational clues concerning episodic mass-loss properties of massive stars in the time before the final supernova explosion. In particular, I will focus on the mounting evidence that LBVs and related stars are candidates for supernova progenitors, even though current paradigms place them at the end of core-H burning. Namely, conditions in the immediate circumstellar environment within a few 10$^2$ AU of Type IIn supernovae require very high progenitor mass-loss rates. Those rates are so high that the only known stars that come close are LBVs during rare giant eruptions. I will highlight evidence from observations of some recent extraordinary supernovae suggesting that explosive or episodic mass loss (a.k.a. LBV eruptions like the 19th century eruption of Eta Car) occur in the 5-10 years immediately preceding the SN. Finally, I will discuss some implications for stellar evolution from these SNe, the most important of which is the observational fact that the most massive stars can indeed make it to the ends of their lives with substantial H envelopes intact, even at Solar metallicity.

Nathan Smith

2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

343

Effects of mass loss for highly-irradiated giant planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present calculations for the evolution and surviving mass of highly-irradiated extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) at orbital semimajor axes ranging from 0.023 to 0.057 AU using a generalized scaled theory for mass loss, together with new surface-condition grids for hot EGPs and a consistent treatment of tidal truncation. Theoretical estimates for the rate of energy-limited hydrogen escape from giant-planet atmospheres differ by two orders of magnitude, when one holds planetary mass, composition, and irradiation constant. Baraffe et al. (2004, A&A 419, L13-L16) predict the highest rate, based on the theory of Lammer et al. (2003, Astrophys. J. 598, L121-L124). Scaling the theory of Watson et al. (1981, Icarus 48, 150-166) to parameters for a highly-irradiated exoplanet, we find an escape rate ~102 lower than Baraffe's. With the scaled Watson theory we find modest mass loss, occurring early in the history of a hot EGP. In this theory, mass loss including the effect of Roche-lobe overflow becomes significant primarily for masses below a Saturn mass, for semimajor axes = 0.023 AU. This contrasts with the Baraffe model, where hot EGPs are claimed to be remnants of much more massive bodies, originally several times Jupiter and still losing substantial mass fractions at present.

W. B. Hubbard; M. F. Hattori; A. Burrows; I. Hubeny; D. Sudarsky

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

344

Evolution Effects on Parton Energy Loss with Detailed Balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The initial conditions in the chemical non-equilibrated medium and Bjorken expanding medium at RHIC are determined. With a set of rate equations describing the chemical equilibration of quarks and gluons based on perturbative QCD, we investigate the consequence for parton evolution at RHIC. With considering parton evolution, it is shown that the Debye screening mass and the inverse mean free-path of gluons reduce with increasing proper time in the QGP medium. The parton evolution affects the parton energy loss with detailed balance, both parton energy loss from stimulated emission in the chemical non-equilibrated expanding medium and in Bjorken expanding medium are linear dependent on the propagating distance rather than square dependent in the static medium. The energy absorption can not be neglected at intermediate jet energies and small propagating distance of the energetic parton in contrast with that it is important only at intermediate jet energy in the static medium. This will increase the energy and propagating distance dependence of the parton energy loss and will affect the shape of suppression of moderately high P_T hadron spectra.

Luan cheng; Enke Wang

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

345

Flow Effects on Jet Energy Loss with Detailed Balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the presence of collective flow a new model potential describing the interaction of the hard jet with scattering centers is derived based on the static color-screened Yukawa potential. The flow effect on jet quenching with detailed balance is investigated in pQCD. It turns out, considering the collective flow with velocity $v_z$ along the jet direction, the collective flow decreases the LPM destructive interference comparing to that in the static medium. The gluon absorption plays a more important role in the moving medium. The collective flow increases the energy gain from gluon absorption, however, decreases the energy loss from gluon radiation, which is $(1 - v_z )$ times as that in the static medium to the first order of opacity. In the presence of collective flow, the second order in opacity correction is relatively small compared to the first order. So that the total effective energy loss is decreased. The flow dependence of the energy loss will affect the suppression of high $p_T$ hadron spectrum and anisotropy parameter $v_2$ in high-energy heavy-ion collisions.

Luan Cheng; Jia Liu; Enke Wang

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

346

Optimization of the Low Loss SRF Cavity for the ILC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Low-Loss shape cavity design has been proposed as a possible alternative to the baseline TESLA cavity design for the ILC main linacs. The advantages of this design over the TESLA cavity are its lower cryogenic loss, and higher achievable gradient due to lower surface fields. High gradient prototypes for such designs have been tested at KEK (ICHIRO) and TJNAF (LL). However, issues related to HOM damping and multipacting still need to be addressed. Preliminary numerical studies of the prototype cavities have shown unacceptable damping factors for some higher-order dipole modes if the typical TESLA HOM couplers are directly adapted to the design. The resulting wakefield will dilute the beam emittance thus reducing the machine luminosity. Furthermore, high gradient tests on a 9-cell prototype at KEK have experienced multipacting barriers although a single LL cell had achieved a high gradient. From simulations, multipacting activities are found to occur in the end-groups of the cavity. In this paper, we will present the optimization results of the end-groups for the Low-Loss designs for effective HOM damping and alleviation of multipacting.

Sekutowicz, J.S.; /DESY; Kneisel, P.; /Jefferson Lab; Higo, T.; Morozumi, Y.; Saito, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Ge, L.; Ko, Yong-kyu; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.K.; Schussman, G.L.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

347

The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor Readout System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor System is required to detect any loss radiation seen by the FEL undulators. The undulator segments consist of permanent magnets which are very sensitive to radiation damage. The operational goal is to keep demagnetization below 0.01% over the life of the LCLS. The BLM system is designed to help achieve this goal by detecting any loss radiation and indicating a fault condition if the radiation level exceeds a certain threshold. Upon reception of this fault signal, the LCLS Machine Protection System takes appropriate action by either halting or rate limiting the beam. The BLM detector consists of a PMT coupled to a Cherenkov radiator located near the upstream end of each undulator segment. There are 33 BLMs in the system, one per segment. The detectors are read out by a dedicated system that is integrated directly into the LCLS MPS. The BLM readout system provides monitoring of radiation levels, computation of integrated doses, detection of radiation excursions beyond set thresholds, fault reporting and control of BLM system functions. This paper describes the design, construction and operational performance of the BLM readout system.

Dusatko, John; Browne, M.; Fisher, A.S.; Kotturi, D.; Norum, S.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

348

Lactic acid fermentation of crude sorghum extract  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crude extract from sweet sorghum supplemented with vetch juice was utilized as the carbohydrate source for fermentative production of lactic acid. Fermentation of media containing 7% (w/v) total sugar was completed in 60-80 hours by Lactobacillus plantarum, product yield averaging 85%. Maximum acid production rates were dependent on pH, initial substrate distribution, and concentration, the rates varying from 2 to 5 g/liter per hour. Under limited medium supplementation the lactic acid yield was lowered to 67%. The fermented ammoniated product contained over eight times as much equivalent crude protein (N x 6.25) as the original medium. Unstructured kinetic models were developed for cell growth, lactic acid formation, and substrate consumption in batch fermentation. With the provision of experimentally determined kinetic parameters, the proposed models accurately described the fermentation process. 15 references.

Samuel, W.A.; Lee, Y.Y.; Anthony, W.B.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Extracting Geospatial Preferences Using Relational Neighbors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the increasing popularity of location-based social media applications and devices that automatically tag generated content with locations, large repositories of collaborative geo-referenced data are appearing on-line. Efficiently extracting user preferences from these data to determine what information to recommend is challenging because of the sheer volume of data as well as the frequency of updates. Traditional recommender systems focus on the interplay between users and items, but ignore contextual parameters such as location. In this paper we take a geospatial approach to determine locational preferences and similarities between users. We propose to capture the geographic context of user preferences for items using a relational graph, through which we are able to derive many new and state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms, including combinations of them, requiring changes only in the definition of the edge weights. Furthermore, we discuss several solutions for cold-start scenarios. Finally, we con...

Marinho, Leandro Balby; Sandholm, Thomas; Nunes, Iury; Nóbrega, Caio; Araújo, Jordăo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Soft Multiple Winners for Sparse Feature Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A simple and computationally inexpensive neural network method for generating sparse representations is presented. The network has a single layer of linear neurons and, on top of it, a mechanism, which assigns a winning strength for each neuron. Both input and output are real valued in contrast to many earlier methods, where either input or output must have been binary valued. Also, the sum of winning strengths does not have to be normalized as in some other approaches. The ability of the algorithm to find meaningful features is demonstrated in a simulation with images of handwritten numerals. 1. Introduction The objective of a feature extraction system is to refine data in such a way that further processing becomes easier. In classification, such a system has two basic goals. One is to remove redundancies from the data. This helps cutting down computational costs later on. Another, contradictory goal is to discriminate data, which helps in distinguishing between similar inputs. A fe...

351

Extraction efficiency and quantification of mutagenic chemicals in soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Dr. K. W. Brown Lack of established extraction procedures for quantification of mutagenic compounds in soil is a major technical limitation to monitoring and assessing the performance of a hazardous waste land treatment facility. In this study... for extracting organic mutagens from the waste or soil/waste mixture. The use of combined biological and chemical testing protocol provided the most practical means of determining extraction efficiency. The bioassay detected additive, synergistic...

Maggard, Lea Ann

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Extracting Operating Modes from Building Electrical Load Data: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Empirical techniques for characterizing electrical energy use now play a key role in reducing electricity consumption, particularly miscellaneous electrical loads, in buildings. Identifying device operating modes (mode extraction) creates a better understanding of both device and system behaviors. Using clustering to extract operating modes from electrical load data can provide valuable insights into device behavior and identify opportunities for energy savings. We present a fast and effective heuristic clustering method to identify and extract operating modes in electrical load data.

Frank, S.; Polese, L. G.; Rader, E.; Sheppy, M.; Smith, J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

automated concise extraction: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Computer Science, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel 4 Center for Automation Research, University of Maryland Plaza, Antonio J. 5 Automated Pointcut Extraction...

354

automated rna extraction: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Computer Science, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel 4 Center for Automation Research, University of Maryland Plaza, Antonio J. 5 Automated Pointcut Extraction...

355

Penguin pollution estimates relevant for phi_2/alpha extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A review of methods to extract the standard CKM unitarity triangle angle alpha is provided. The sizes of related theoretical errors are reviewed.

Jure Zupan

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

356

Fluid Circulation and Heat Extraction from Engineered Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

from Engineered Geothermal Reservoirs Abstract A large amount of fluid circulation and heat extraction (i.e., thermal power production) research and testing has been conducted...

357

automatically extracting molecular: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University of Malta 2 Department of Computer Science, University of Malta claudia.borg|mike.rosner|gordon.pace@um.edu.mt Abstract. Definition extraction can be useful Pace,...

358

automatic contour extraction: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University of Malta 2 Department of Computer Science, University of Malta claudia.borg|mike.rosner|gordon.pace@um.edu.mt Abstract. Definition extraction can be useful Pace,...

359

automatically extracting ts: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University of Malta 2 Department of Computer Science, University of Malta claudia.borg|mike.rosner|gordon.pace@um.edu.mt Abstract. Definition extraction can be useful Pace,...

360

Extraction of Additives from Polystyrene and Subsequent Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The extraction of fifteen (15) polymer additives with supercritical carbon dioxide which are used as antioxidants, uv stabilizers, process lubes, flame retardants and antistats from eight formulations of polystyrene is demonstrated and compared to traditional dissolution/precipitation extractions. The purpose of the study was twofold: 1) the development of a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method(s) for the additives and 2) the determination of the viability of supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) for the additives from polystyrene. Separation of some of the additives was achieved using reversed phase liquid chromatography. Nine of the additives were assayed in this manner while, the remaining six additives could not be assayed using reversed phase liquid chromatography. In order to develop an extraction method for the additives, the effects of static extraction time, CO2 density, and temperature were first investigated. These preliminary extractions revealed that a static extraction period which afforded an opportunity for the polymer to swell combined with a high CO2 density and extraction temperature above the glass transition (Tg) yielded quantitative recoveries of the additives. Triplicate extractions of the

Susan H. Smith; Larry T. Taylor; Gary L. Long; James F. Wolfe; Susan H. Smith

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

andongensis extract aloe: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Documents Articles, Books DocbookIndexer PDFBox PDF Metadata from content & context Fill in generated... Droogmans, Lieven; Bosman, Ben 2005-07-07 70 Point Source Extraction...

362

aloe andongensis extract: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Documents Articles, Books DocbookIndexer PDFBox PDF Metadata from content & context Fill in generated... Droogmans, Lieven; Bosman, Ben 2005-07-07 70 Point Source Extraction...

363

Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of algal biomass followed by further lipid extraction and upgrading to hydrocarbon biofuels. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the algal...

364

Source fabrication and lifetime for Li{sup +} ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm{sup 2} have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of {approx}1275 deg. C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J{>=} 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, {<=}0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of {approx}40 h at {approx}1275 deg. C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of {approx}6 {mu}s each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. The source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Source fabrication and lifetime for Li{sup +} ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm{sup 2} have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of ?1275{degrees}C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J ? 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A source with an alumino-silicate coating 6.35 mm in diameter and ?0.25 mm thick, has a lifetime of ?40 hours at ?1275{degrees}C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of ?6 ?s each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. Furthermore, the source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

Greenway, W. G.; Kwan, J. W.

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

366

Source fabrication and lifetime for Li+ ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm{sup 2} have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of #24;~1275#14;{degrees} C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J #21;{>=} 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, {<=}#20;0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of ~#24;40 hours at ~#24;1275#14;{degrees} C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of #24;~6 μs each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. The source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W

2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

367

Measurements of DT alpha particle loss near the outer midplane of TFTR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of DT alpha particle loss to the outer midplane region of TFTR have been made using a radially movable scintillator detector. The conclusion from this data is that mechanisms determining the DT alpha loss to the outer midplane are not substantially different from those for DD fusion products. Some of these results are compared with a simplified theoretical model for TF ripple-induced alpha loss, which is expected to be the dominant classical alpha loss mechanism near the outer midplane. An example of plasma-driven MHD-induced alpha particle loss is shown, but no signs of any ``collective`` alpha instability-induced alpha loss have yet been observed.

Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.; Redi, M.H.; Schivell, J.; White, R.B.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a 'wait-and-scan' group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dose to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.

Rasmussen, Rune, E-mail: rune333@gmail.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Claesson, Magnus [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Stangerup, Sven-Eric [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Roed, Henrik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Christensen, Ib Jarle [Finsen Laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Finsen Laboratory, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Caye-Thomasen, Per [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Ear, Nose, and Throat Department, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Juhler, Marianne [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Application of ultrasound in solvent extraction of nickel and gallium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of ultrasound on the rate of solvent extraction of nickel with Lix 65N and Lix 70, and gallium with Kelex 100 were investigated. These solvent extraction systems are noted by their sluggish nature. Low frequency (20 kHz) ultrasound increased the rates of extraction of nickel by factors of four to seven. The ultrasound had no effect on the final chemical equilibrium. Gallium extraction rates were enhanced with the use of ultrasound by as much as a factor of 15. Again, the ultrasound had no effect on extraction equilibrium. For both nickel and gallium, the enhanced rates were attributed to increased interfacial surface area associated with ultrasonically induced cavitation and microdroplet formation. The stability of the microdroplets permitted intermittent application of ultrasound with corresponding decreases in ultrasonic energy requirements. The lowest energy consumption was observed with short (0.25 to 5 s) bursts of high power (41 to 61 W) ultrasonic inputs. The study also provided insight into the factors that affect the complex extraction of gallium from sodium aluminate solutions. The rate controlling step was found to be the dehydration of the gallate ion, Ga(OH)4, and the first complex formation between gallium and Kelex 100. Sodium was found to enhance the extraction rate up to a point, beyond which increased concentration was detrimental. Increasing aluminum concentration was found to slow extraction rates. Modifiers and diluents were shown to markedly affect extraction rates even without ultrasound. Ketone modifiers, particularly 2-undecanone, when used with Kermac 470B or Escaid 200 diluents enhanced extraction rates of gallium to the point that the use of ultrasound provided no additional benefits. The positive effects of ketone modifiers for the solvent extraction of gallium had not been previously reported.

Pesic, B.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Optical loss due to diffraction by concentrator Fresnel lenses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fresnel lenses are widely used in concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems as a primary optical element. They focus sunlight on small solar cells or on the entrance apertures of secondary optical elements. A Fresnel lens consists of several prism rings and diffraction by these prism rings is unavoidable. Some of the light that would reach a designated target area according to geometric optics will miss it due to diffraction. This diffraction loss may be of relevant magnitude for CPV applications. The results of published analytical calculations are evaluated, discussed, and compared to computer simulations and measurements.

Hornung, Thorsten, E-mail: thorsten.hornung@ise.fraunhofer.de; Nitz, Peter, E-mail: thorsten.hornung@ise.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)

2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

371

Method for reducing energy losses in laser crystals  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for reducing energy losses in crystals is disclosed which comprises: a. heating a crystal to a temperature sufficiently high as to cause dissolution of microscopic inclusions into the crystal, thereby converting said inclusions into point-defects, and b. maintaining said crystal at a given temperature for a period of time sufficient to cause said point-defects to diffuse out of said crystal. Also disclosed are crystals treated by the process, and lasers utilizing the crystals as a source of light. 12 figs.

Atherton, L.J.; DeYoreo, J.J.; Roberts, D.H.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

372

Dose estimates in a loss of lead shielding truck accident.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiological transportation risk & consequence program, RADTRAN, has recently added an updated loss of lead shielding (LOS) model to it most recent version, RADTRAN 6.0. The LOS model was used to determine dose estimates to first-responders during a spent nuclear fuel transportation accident. Results varied according to the following: type of accident scenario, percent of lead slump, distance to shipment, and time spent in the area. This document presents a method of creating dose estimates for first-responders using RADTRAN with potential accident scenarios. This may be of particular interest in the event of high speed accidents or fires involving cask punctures.

Dennis, Matthew L.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Heames, Terence John (Alion Science & Technology Albuquerque, NM)

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Electron energy loss spectroscopy studies of MgO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. HREELS studies were conducted on ultra-thin films of MgO(100) formed on Mo(100) in order to establish a new approach to investigate adsorbate vibrations on oxide surfaces. The conductive nature of the Mo substrate prevented the occurrence of charging...-specular scattering geometry of 8'-10' were the optimum conditions for circumventing the problem posed by the intensity of the phonon losses and thus observing the HREELS vibrational spectra of adsorbates on MgO. Water, deuterium dioxide, methanol, acetic acid...

Estrada, Cesar Antonio

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Evaluation of friction loss in flexible and galvanized duct  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/d ratios ranging from 1 to 5. Statistical analysis of the data indicated that there was a difference in the equivalent length mean data and that the interaction between r/d ratio and duct size, r/d ratio and duct type, and duct type and duct size.... . . 51 APPENDIX F ADC STANDARD REPORTING FORMS ()E AND ()E(M). . . 55 APPENDIX G EQUATIONS UTILIZED TO CONVERT FRICTION LOSS DATA TO EQUIVALENT LENGTHS APPENDIX H 58 RESULTS FROM AIR FLOW VOLUME REPRODUCIBILITY TEST. APPENDIX I 61 DATA...

Zimmermann, Carlos Michael Alberto

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Statistical methods for detecting loss of materials using NRTA data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors selected eight sequential statistical tests and studied their performance on near-real-time-accounting (NRTA) data that is nominally what is expected from the proposed Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant in Japan. The effort divided into three main activities: (1) use process-flow information to determine process vessel inventories and transfers at the time of material balance closure, (2) use variance propagation methods to estimate the variance-covariance matrix of a sequence of material balances, and (3) study the performance of eight sequential tests on a variety of loss scenarios. This paper describes the results of these three activities.

Burr, T.; Coulter, A.; Hakkila, A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ai, H.; Kadokura, I.; Fujimaki, K. [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

JGI data loss in /projectb/sandbox area [purge]  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFunInfrared LandResponsesIon/SurfacePump-TestingJEDI: Jobs andJGI data loss in

377

On automating the extraction of programs from termination proofs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On automating the extraction of programs from termination proofs Fairouz Kamareddine , Fran to use termination techniques such as those in rewriting theory. We overcome this difficulty the incorporation of termination techniques used in other areas while still extracting programs. Keywords: Program

Ayala-Rincón, Mauricio

378

Heng Ji & Ralph Grishman Collaborative Entity Extraction and Translation 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTENTS Heng Ji & Ralph Grishman Collaborative Entity Extraction and Translation 1 Index of Subjects and Terms 13 #12;vi CONTENTS #12;Collaborative Entity Extraction and Translation Heng Ji & Ralph s in language S from the #12;2 HENG JI & RALPH GRISHMAN properties of the sequence of tokens t with which

379

Information Extraction in the KELP Framework Robert Dale, Marc Tilbrook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Information Extraction in the KELP Framework Robert Dale, Marc Tilbrook Centre for Language In this paper, we describe some early steps in a new approach to information extraction. The aim of the kelp, to reconcile and combine the informational elements found in a text. 2 Background The goal of the kelp1 project

Dale, Robert

380

Heuristically Driven Front Propagation for Fast Geodesic Extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heuristically Driven Front Propagation for Fast Geodesic Extraction Gabriel Peyr´e Laurent D. Cohen to quickly extract geodesic paths on images and 3D meshes. We use a heuristic to drive the front propagation that is similar to the A algorithm used in artificial intelli- gence. In order to find very quickly geodesic paths

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Extracting Business Rules from COBOL: A Model-Based Tool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extracting Business Rules from COBOL: A Model-Based Tool Valerio Cosentino AtlanMod, INRIA, EMN and we provide a set of model transformations to identify and visualize the embedded business rules at this point. This model will be then manipulated in the next steps to extract the business rules

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

382

Extracting the Green's function from measurements of the energy flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extracting the Green's function from measurements of the energy flux Roel Sniedera) Center for Wave, Cambridge CB3 0EL, United Kingdom ivasconc@gmail.com Abstract: Existing methods for Green's function extraction give the Green's function from the correlation of field fluctuations recorded at those points

Snieder, Roel

383

BEaST: Brain extraction using multiresolution nonlocal segmentation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BEaST: Brain extraction using multiresolution nonlocal segmentation Simon F. Eskildsen1 Ă?stergaard2 , D. Louis Collins1 , and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 1 McConnell Brain. Brain extraction is an important step in the analysis of brain images. Variability in brain morphology

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

384

Dynamic View Dependent Isosurface Extraction Yarden Livnat, Charles Hansen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-004 Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute University of Utah Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA Enter date here1 Dynamic View Dependent Isosurface Extraction Yarden Livnat, Charles Hansen UUSCI-2003 Extraction Yarden Livnat Charles Hansen Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute School of Computing

Livnat, Yarden

385

Extraction of Neutrino Flux from the Inclusive Muon Cross Section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied a method to extract neutrino flux from the data of neutrino-nucleus reaction by using maximum entropy method. We demonstrate a promising example to extract neutrino flux from the inclusive cross section of muon production without selecting a particular reaction process such as quasi-elastic nucleon knockout.

Murata, Tomoya

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Extraction of Neutrino Flux from the Inclusive Muon Cross Section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have studied a method to extract neutrino flux from the data of neutrino-nucleus reaction by using maximum entropy method. We demonstrate a promising example to extract neutrino flux from the inclusive cross section of muon production without selecting a particular reaction process such as quasi-elastic nucleon knockout.

Tomoya Murata; Toru Sato

2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

387

Method of underground mining by pillar extraction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of sublevel caving and pillar and top coal extraction for mining thick coal seams includes the advance mining of rooms and crosscuts along the bottom of a seam to a height of about eight feet, and the retreat mining of the top coal from the rooms, crosscuts and portions of the pillars remaining from formation of the rooms and cross-cuts. In the retreat mining, a pocket is formed in a pillar, the top coal above the pocket is drilled, charged and shot, and then the fallen coal is loaded by a continuous miner so that the operator remains under a roof which has not been shot. The top coal from that portion of the room adjacent the pocket is then mined, and another pocket is formed in the pillar. The top coal above the second pocket is mined followed by the mining of the top coal of that portion of the room adjacent the second pocket, all by use of a continuous miner which allows the operator to remain under a roof portion which has not been shot.

Bowen, Ray J. (1879 Delann, Salt Lake City, UT 84121); Bowen, William R. (1636 Sunnydale La., Salt Lake City, UT 84108)

1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

388

Solvent extraction of bitumen from tar sands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the measurement of mass transfer rates for the extraction of bitumen from tar sands using organic solvents. The experiment was carried out in an agitated vessel using a six-blade turbine mixer on a laboratory scale. To facilitate the determination of absolute mass transfer coefficients, tar sands were specially prepared in the form of spherical particles so that mass transfer area can be computed. The variables investigated in the study included: (1) solvent type (kerosene, toluene, benzene), (2) stirrer speed, 25 rpm to 1000 rpm, and (3) particle diameter, 0.4 cm to 1.2 cm. The results indicated that solvency power varied markedly with the various solvents used and that high aromatic content promoted rapid dissolution when compared with paraffinic solvents. The mass transfer rates increased with increasing stirrer speed in accordance with the relationship: k {alpha} N{sup 0.56} where k is the mass transfer coefficient and N the stirrer speed. Increasing particle diameter also resulted in decreased mass transfer rates. The results were satisfactorily correlated in terms of a Frossling type equation, Sh {alpha} Re{sub p}{sup a}Sc{sup b}.

Hoon, A.Y.; Thomas, S. [Univ. of West Indies, St. Augustine (Trinidad and Tobago)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

389

DNAPL Extraction/Oleofilter Test Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A short term, low flow DNAPL extraction test was performed from May 29 - 30, 1997, to gather additional information about the possibility of using monitoring well MSB-3D to recover source contamination from the M-Area Aquifer. Although no visible, free phase material was recovered, the groundwater did contain perchloroethylene (PCE) at and above aqueous solubility. Improvements in the pumping configuration were identified for future trials. Prior to final treatment in the M1 air stripper, the groundwater was passed through an Oleofiltration system to evaluate its capability as a treatment technology. The Oleofilter uses a combination of conventional gravity assisted separation with coalescing plates and a final polishing filter using proprietary coated granules to remove hydrocarbons. Although free phase DNAPL was not processed through the Oleofilter, the groundwater containing high levels of dissolved PCE was treated efficiently. Initially the Oleofilter removed 99 percent of the PCE. As the test progressed, this removal rate decreased to 83 percent as the granules became loaded with PCE. Longer term testing, perhaps with periodic backflushing, is required to determine the effective granule capacity.

White, R.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Hazel, C.

1997-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

390

Extracting hot carriers from photoexcited semiconductor nanocrystals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research program addresses a fundamental question related to the use of nanomaterials in solar energy -- namely, whether semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) can help surpass the efficiency limits, the so-called “Shockley-Queisser” limit, in conventional solar cells. In these cells, absorption of photons with energies above the semiconductor bandgap generates “hot” charge carriers that quickly “cool” to the band edges before they can be utilized to do work; this sets the solar cell efficiency at a limit of ~31%. If instead, all of the energy of the hot carriers could be captured, solar-to-electric power conversion efficiencies could be increased, theoretically, to as high as 66%. A potential route to capture this energy is to utilize semiconductor nanocrystals. In these materials, the quasi-continuous conduction and valence bands of the bulk semiconductor become discretized due to confinement of the charge carriers. Consequently, the energy spacing between the electronic levels can be much larger than the highest phonon frequency of the lattice, creating a “phonon bottleneck” wherein hot-carrier relaxation is possible via slower multiphonon emission. For example, hot-electron lifetimes as long as ~1 ns have been observed in NCs grown by molecular beam epitaxy. In colloidal NCs, long lifetimes have been demonstrated through careful design of the nanocrystal interfaces. Due to their ability to slow electronic relaxation, semiconductor NCs can in principle enable extraction of hot carriers before they cool to the band edges, leading to more efficient solar cells.

Zhu, Xiaoyang

2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

391

Optimal information extractable in a measurement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In any measurement of a parameter, effect of finite resource is manifested in a finite number ($M$) of probable values for the estimate. Here it is shown that this count of the discrete number of measurement outcomes leads to a pair of equivalent bounds:$\\delta \\geq 1/M$ on precision($\\delta$) and $I \\leq \\log(M)$ on \\textit{mutual information} ($I$) between the parameter and its estimate. Furthermore, the probe particle symmetry is found to play a significant role in limiting $M$ and thereby, in limiting extractable information in a measurement. In particular, for $N$ indistinguishable spin-half probe particles, it is shown that $M$ is tightly bounded to $O(N^2)$. The corresponding operator that saturates this bound represents a non interferometric measurement. While inherently Heisenberg limited, this measurement is precise up to $\\delta \\sim 1/N^2$. These results can be used to benchmark any precision measurement thereby establishing a particular link between information theory and metrology.

H. M. Bharath; Saikat Ghosh

2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

392

Uncertainty, loss aversion, and markets for energy efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increasing energy efficiency is critical to mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from fossil-fuel combustion, reducing oil dependence, and achieving a sustainable global energy system. The tendency of markets to neglect apparently cost-effective energy efficiency options has been called the efficiency gap or energy paradox. The market for energy efficiency in new, energy-using durable goods, however, appears to have a bias that leads to undervaluation of future energy savings relative to their expected value. This paper argues that the bias is chiefly produced by the combination of substantial uncertainty about the net value of future fuel savings and the loss aversion of typical consumers. This framework relies on the theory of contextdependent preferences. The uncertainty-loss aversion bias against energy efficiency is quantifiable, making it potentially correctible by policy measures. The welfare economics of such policies remains unresolved. Data on the costs of increased fuel economy of new passenger cars, taken from a National Research Council study, illustrate how an apparently cost-effective increase in energy efficiency would be uninteresting to lossaverse consumers.

Greene, David L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Black Hole Remnants and the Information Loss Paradox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forty years after the discovery of Hawking radiation, its exact nature remains elusive. If Hawking radiation does not carry any information out from the ever shrinking black hole, it seems that unitarity is violated once the black hole completely evaporates. On the other hand, attempts to recover information via quantum entanglement lead to the firewall controversy. Amid the confusions, the possibility that black hole evaporation stops with a "remnant" has remained unpopular and is often dismissed due to some "undesired properties" of such an object. Nevertheless, as in any scientific debate, the pros and cons of any proposal must be carefully scrutinized. We fill in the void of the literature by providing a timely review of various types of black hole remnants, and provide some new thoughts regarding the challenges that black hole remnants face in the context of information loss paradox and its latest incarnation, namely the firewall controversy. The importance of understanding the role of curvature singularity is also emphasized, after all there remains a possibility that singularity cannot be cured even by quantum gravity. In this context a black hole remnant conveniently serves as a cosmic censor. We conclude that a remnant remains a possible end state of Hawking evaporation, and if it contains large interior geometry, may help to ameliorate information loss and the firewall paradox. We hope that this will raise some interests in the community to investigate remnants more critically but also more thoroughly.

Pisin Chen; Yen Chin Ong; Dong-han Yeom

2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

394

Reducing pressure loss of large diameter check valves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transcend Inc., a consulting firm that specializes in the use of computer simulation to optimize existing equipment and system designs, was approached by Mannesmann Demag AG, Moenchengladbach, Germany to optimize the design of its DRV-B check valve. In one of the first applications of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technology to valve design, the pressure loss coefficient (K) of the DRV-B valve was lowered to 0.40--0.50 for valve sizes NPS48--NPS12, the lowest possible level for this type of valve. The flow efficiency is three times better than that of the earlier design. As a result, the optimized Mannesmann Demag DRV-B check valve provides a dramatic reduction in operating cost, particularly in transmission service where natural gas is transported over long distances. The reduced pressure loss saves compressor fuel cost. For the optimized valve, the incremental compressor fuel cost is reduced to 1.5-times the capital cost of the valve calculated over a 20-year Life Cycle Cost (LCC) period.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

THE EFFECT OF MASS LOSS ON THE TIDAL EVOLUTION OF EXTRASOLAR PLANET  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

By combining mass loss and tidal evolution of close-in planets, we present a qualitative study on their tidal migrations. We incorporate mass loss in tidal evolution for planets with different masses and find that mass ...

Guo, Jianheng

396

General Comparison of Power Loss in Single-Layer and Multi-Layer Windings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

General Comparison of Power Loss in Single-Layer and Multi-Layer Windings M. E. Dale C. R. Sullivan the IEEE. #12;General Comparison of Power Loss in Single-Layer and Multi-Layer Windings Magdalena E. Dale

397

Regional earthquake loss estimation : role of transportation network, sensitivity and uncertainty, and risk mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large earthquakes near densely populated areas such as the 1994 Northridge and 1995 Kobe events have caused extensive damage to the physical infrastructure and losses to the regional and national economies. Economic losses ...

Karaca, Erdem, 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Miter bend loss and higher order mode content measurements in overmoded millimeter-wave transmission lines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High power applications require an accurate calculation of the losses on overmoded corrugated cylindrical transmission lines. Previous assessments of power loss on these lines have not considered beam polarization or higher ...

Kowalski, Elizabeth J. (Elizabeth Joan)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Computational and experimental investigations into cavity receiver heat loss for solar thermal concentrators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the total, though the losses depend on solar elevation angle; at higher angles, and in low-wind conditions in inclination, temperature and cavity geometry on convective and radiative heat loss. Secondly, a water

400

Ohmic losses in coaxial resonators with longitudinal inner-outer corrugation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, a coaxial resonator with longitudinal inner-outer corrugation is introduced. Its eigen-equation and expression of ohmic losses are derived. Ohmic losses in the cavity are investigated. Results show that ohmic losses in the outer and inner conductors share a similar variation trend, while the former is larger than the later. What's more, changes of the inner and outer slot depth and width induce different variations of ohmic losses on the surface of the inner and outer conductors.

Shenyong Hou, A. [Terahertz Science and Technology Research Center, University of Electronics Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China) [Terahertz Science and Technology Research Center, University of Electronics Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Yangtze Normal University, Chongqing 408001 (China); Sheng Yu, B.; Hongfu Li, C.; Qixiang Zhao, D. [Terahertz Science and Technology Research Center, University of Electronics Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China)] [Terahertz Science and Technology Research Center, University of Electronics Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Xiang Li, E. [Terahertz Science and Technology Research Center, University of Electronics Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China) [Terahertz Science and Technology Research Center, University of Electronics Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Queen Mary University of London, London E1 4NS (United Kingdom)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Geothermal-Heat Extraction As a source of renewable energy, geothermal-heat extraction has become increasingly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geothermal-Heat Extraction As a source of renewable energy, geothermal-heat extraction has become increasingly important in recent years. Proper design of a geothermal system, be it for deep or for shallow well? 40 MWh/a are required for heating the building. Assume an energy efficiency of 70%. Create a 2D

Kornhuber, Ralf

402

Energy loss of relativistic heavy ions in matter B.A. Weaver*, A.J. Westphal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy loss of relativistic heavy ions in matter B.A. Weaver*, A.J. Westphal Space Sciences.50.Bw Keywords: Energy loss; Stopping power; Heavy ions 1. Introduction The theory of energy loss has.: + 1-510-642-9733; fax: + 1- 510-643-7629. E-mail address: weaver@curium.ssl.berkeley.edu (B.A. Weaver

Leung, Pui-Tak "Peter"

403

Accurate Prediction of Ferrite Core Loss with Nonsinusoidal Waveforms Using Only Steinmetz  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accurate Prediction of Ferrite Core Loss with Nonsinusoidal Waveforms Using Only Steinmetz IN POWER ELECTRONICS 1 Accurate Prediction of Ferrite Core Loss with Nonsinusoidal Waveforms Using Only of ferrite core loss for nonsinu- soidal waveforms separates a flux trajectory into major and minor loops via

404

Electromagnetic power loss in open coaxial diodes and the Langmuir-Blodgett law  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The space charge limited current in coaxial diodes with electromagnetic power loss is studied. The Langmuir-Blodgett law is expressed in terms of the electromagnetic power loss and the applied voltage. Particle-in-cell simulations of photodiode-like situations and high power diodes confirm the relation between the applied voltage, diode voltage, and electromagnetic power loss.

Kumar, Raghwendra; Biswas, Debabrata [Theoretical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Mapping defects in a carbon nanotube by momentum transfer dependent electron energy loss spectromicroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping defects in a carbon nanotube by momentum transfer dependent electron energy loss nanotubes Electron microscopy Electron energy loss spectroscopy q-dependence Electron linear dichroism a b s t r a c t Momentum resolved electron energy loss (EELS) spectra of multi-walled carbon nanotubes

Hitchcock, Adam P.

406

A Scaleless Snake: Tests of the Role of Reptilian Scales in Water Loss and Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Scaleless Snake: Tests of the Role of Reptilian Scales in Water Loss and Heat Transfer Reprinted: Tests of the Role of Reptilian Scales in Water Loss and Heat Transfer A unique specimen of gopher snake of pulmocutaneous water loss and heat transfer, no difference was observed between the scale- less animal

Bennett, Albert F.

407

Passive Loss Inference in Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Network Coding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Passive Loss Inference in Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Network Coding Yunfeng Lin, Ben Liang, Baochun Li Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Toronto {ylin, bli it desirable to monitor link loss rates in wireless sensor networks. In this paper, we study the loss inference

Li, Baochun

408

Bunch-Length Dependence of Power Loss for the SSC Miguel A. Furman  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SSC-N-143 Bunch-Length Dependence of Power Loss for the SSC Miguel A. Furman SSC Central Design- tarding effect of the longitudinal impedance Z (). For gaussian bunches the power loss is given by [1] P for the different structures, and then use Eq. (4) to calculate the power loss. We also as- sume nominal SSC values

Furman, Miguel

409

Optimal Core Dimensional Ratios for Minimizing Winding Loss in High-Frequency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to optimum provides a 32% savings in power loss compared to another popular core shape. Further improvements in power loss could be achieved by using optimized core shapes. Improvements to software for shape. This optimum aspect ratio is a function of frequency and other parameters. Significant increases in power loss

410

Optimization of inflow waveform phase-difference for minimized total cavopulmonary power loss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimization of inflow waveform phase-difference for minimized total cavopulmonary power loss minimized power loss, inside the TCPC pathway is required for the best optimal surgical outcomes we focused on the characterization of power loss changes due to the temporal variations in between

Pekkan, Kerem

411

Numerical Investigation of Natural Convection Loss in Cavity-Type Solar Receivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Work There have been several previous investigations of natural convection heat loss from open the convective heat loss, i.e., (i) the ability to transfer mass and energy across the aperture and (ii to investigate three cases of geometrically different receivers. The calculated heat loss results shows

412

Closeout of IE Bulletin 80-15: Possible loss of Emergency Notification System (ENS) with loss of offsite power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Documentation is provided in this report for the closeout of IE Bulletin 80-15 for nuclear power reactors. This bulletin pertained to a possible loss of the Emergency Notification System (ENS) upon loss of offsite power. Closeout is based on the implementation and verification of six (6) required actions by licensees of nuclear power reactors in operation or near to receiving an operating license when the bulletin was issued on June 18, 1980. Evaluation of utility responses and NRC/Region inspection reports indicates that the bulletin is closed for all of the 69 nuclear power reactors to which it was issued for action and which were not shut down indefinitely or permanently at the time of issuance of this report. Background information is supplied in the Introduction and Appendix A. Nuclear fuel facilities as well as nuclear power facilities were identified in the enclosures to the bulletin. However, per an NRC memorandum, the closeout of the bulletin for nuclear fuel facilities is not within the scope of this report.

Foley, W.J.; Dean, R.S.; Hennick, A. (Parameter, Inc., Elm Grove, WI (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Penney, W.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

In Situ Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy in Liquids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In situ scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) through liquids is a promising approach for exploring biological and materials processes. However, options for in situ chemical identification are limited: X-ray analysis is precluded because the holder shadows the detector, and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is degraded by multiple scattering events in thick layers. Here, we explore the limits of EELS for studying chemical reactions in their native environments in real time and on the nanometer scale. The determination of the local electron density, optical gap and thickness of the liquid layer by valence EELS is demonstrated for liquids. By comparing theoretical and experimental plasmon energies, we find that liquids appear to follow the free-electron model that has been previously established for solids. Signals at energies below the optical gap and plasmon energy of the liquid provide a high signal-to-background ratio as demonstrated for LiFePO4 in aqueous solution. The potential for using...

Holtz, Megan E; Gao, Jie; Abruńa, Héctor D; Muller, David A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

System transient response to loss of off-site power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simultaneous trip of the reactor, main circulation pumps, secondary coolant pumps, and pressurizer pump due to loss of off-site power at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been analyzed to estimate available safety margin. A computer model based on the Modular Modeling System code has been used to calculate the transient response of the system. The reactor depressurizes from 482.7 psia down to about 23 psia in about 50 seconds and remains stable thereafter. Available safety margin has been estimated in terms of the incipient boiling heat flux ratio. It is a conservative estimate due to assumed less than available primary and secondary flows and higher than normal depressurization rate. The ratio indicates no incipient boiling conditions at the hot spot. No potential damage to the fuel is likely to occur during this transient. 2 refs., 6 figs.

Sozer, A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Superconducting shielded core reactor with reduced AC losses  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting shielded core reactor (SSCR) operates as a passive device for limiting excessive AC current in a circuit operating at a high power level under a fault condition such as shorting. The SSCR includes a ferromagnetic core which may be either closed or open (with an air gap) and extends into and through a superconducting tube or superconducting rings arranged in a stacked array. First and second series connected copper coils each disposed about a portion of the iron core are connected to the circuit to be protected and are respectively wound inside and outside of the superconducting tube or rings. A large impedance is inserted into the circuit by the core when the shielding capability of the superconducting arrangement is exceeded by the applied magnetic field generated by the two coils under a fault condition to limit the AC current in the circuit. The proposed SSCR also affords reduced AC loss compared to conventional SSCRs under continuous normal operation.

Cha, Yung S.; Hull, John R.

2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

417

Levitation pressure and friction losses in superconducting bearings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting bearing having at least one permanent magnet magnetized with a vertical polarization. The lower or stator portion of the bearing includes an array of high-temperature superconducting elements which are comprised of a plurality of annular rings. An annular ring is located below each permanent magnet and an annular ring is offset horizontally from at least one of the permanent magnets. The rings are composed of individual high-temperature superconducting elements located circumferentially along the ring. By constructing the horizontally-offset high-temperature superconducting ring so that the c-axis is oriented in a radial direction, a higher levitation force can be achieved. Such an orientation will also provide substantially lower rotational drag losses in the bearing.

Hull, John R. (Downers Grove, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Electron energy loss spectroscopy of gold nanoparticles on graphene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasmon excitation decay by absorption, scattering, and hot electron transfer has been distinguished from effects induced by incident photons for gold nanoparticles on graphene monolayer using electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Gold nano-ellipses were evaporated onto lithographed graphene, which was transferred onto a silicon nitride transmission electron microscopy grid. Plasmon decay from lithographed nanoparticles measured with EELS was compared in the absence and presence of the graphene monolayer. Measured decay values compared favorably with estimated radiative and non-radiative contributions to decay in the absence of graphene. Graphene significantly enhanced low-energy plasmon decay, increasing mode width 38%, but did not affect higher energy plasmon or dark mode decay. This decay beyond expected radiative and non-radiative mechanisms was attributed to hot electron transfer, and had quantum efficiency of 20%, consistent with previous reports.

DeJarnette, Drew [Microelectronics and Photonics Graduate Program, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Roper, D. Keith, E-mail: dkroper@uark.edu [Microelectronics and Photonics Graduate Program, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States)

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

419

Beam Loss Ion Chamber System Upgrade for Experimental Halls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Beam loss Ion Chamber System (BLICS) was developed to protect Jefferson Labs transport lines, targets and beam dumps from a catastrophic ''burn through''. Range changes and testing was accomplished manually requiring the experiment to be shut down. The new upgraded system is based around an ''off the shelf'' Programmable Logic Controller located in a single control box supporting up to ten individual detectors. All functions that formerly required an entry into the experimental hall and manual adjustment can be accomplished from the Machine Control Center (MCC). A further innovation was the addition of a High Voltage ''Brick'' at the detector location. A single cable supplies the required voltage for the Brick and a return line for the ion chamber signal. The read back screens display range, trip point, and accumulated dose for each location. The new system is very cost effective and significantly reduces the amount of lost experimental time.

D.W. Dotson; D.J. Seidman

2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

420

Analysis of Loss-of-Coolant Accidents in the NBSR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents calculations of the fuel cladding temperature during loss-of-coolant accidents in the NBSR. The probability of a pipe failure is small and procedures exist to minimize the loss of water and assure emergency cooling water flows into the reactor core during such an event. Analysis in the past has shown that the emergency cooling water would provide adequate cooling if the water filled the flow channels within the fuel elements. The present analysis is to determine if there is adequate cooling if the water drains from the flow channels. Based on photographs of how the emergency water flows into the fuel elements from the distribution pan, it can be assumed that this water does not distribute uniformly across the flow channels but rather results in a liquid film flowing downward on the inside of one of the side plates in each fuel element and only wets the edges of the fuel plates. An analysis of guillotine breaks shows the cladding temperature remains below the blister temperature in fuel plates in the upper section of the fuel element. In the lower section, the fuel plates are also cooled by water outside the element that is present due to the hold-up pan and temperatures are lower than in the upper section. For small breaks, the simulation results show that the fuel elements are always cooled on the outside even in the upper section and the cladding temperature cannot be higher than the blister temperature. The above results are predicated on assumptions that are examined in the study to see their influence on fuel temperature.

Baek J. S.; Cheng L.; Diamond, D.

2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

INCREASED UNDERSTANDING OF BEAM LOSSES FROM THE SNS LINAC PROTON EXPERIMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Beam loss is a major concern for high power hadron accelerators such as the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). An unexpected beam loss in the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) was observed during the power ramp up and early operation. Intra-beam-stripping (IBS) loss, in which interactions between H- particles within the accelerated bunch strip the outermost electron, was recently identified as a possible cause of the beam loss. A set of experiments using proton beam acceleration in the SNS linac was conducted, which supports IBS as the primary beam loss mechanism in the SNS SCL.

Aleksandrov, Alexander V [ORNL] [ORNL; Shishlo, Andrei P [ORNL] [ORNL; Plum, Michael A [ORNL] [ORNL; Lebedev, Valerie [FNAL] [FNAL; Laface, Emanuele [ESS] [ESS; Galambos, John D [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Coping with Grief & Loss Losing someone or something you love is very painful. After a significant loss, you may experience all kinds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Crying doesn't mean you are weak. You don't need to "protect" your family or friends by putting experience grief after moving away from home, graduating from college, changing jobs, selling your family the loss, the more intense the grief. However, even subtle losses can lead to grief. For example, you might

Leistikow, Bruce N.

423

A new model for solvent extraction in columns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new model was developed for analyzing solvent extraction processes carried out in columns. Each column is treated as a series of well-defined equilibrium stages where the backmixing (other-phase carryover) between stages can be large. By including all mass transfer effects in the backmixing value, the same number of stages can be used for all extracted components no matter what their distribution coefficients. This greatly simplifies the calculations required when modeling multicomponent solvent extraction processes. Initial testing shows the new model to be better than either the Height of an Equivalent Theoretical Plate (HETP) or the Height of a Transfer Unit (HTU) method.

Leonard, R.A.; Regalbuto, M.C.; Chamberlain, D.B.; Vandegrift, G.F.

1989-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

424

Approaches for regeneration of amine-carboxylic acid extracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extraction processes based on reversible chemical complexation can be useful for separation of polar organics from dilute solution. Tertiary amines are effective extractants for the recovery of carboxylic acids from aqueous solution. The regeneration of aminecarboxylic acid extracts is an important step which strongly influences the economic viability of the separation process. Several regeneration methods are critically reviewed, and the factors that affect swing regeneration processes, including temperature-swing, diluent composition-swing and pH-swing with a volatile base are discussed. Interest in this area comes from interest in treatment of waste streams, particularly in petrochemical and fermentation manufacture.

Dai, Y.; King, C.J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Selective Extraction of Uranium from Liquid or Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current liquid-liquid extraction processes used in recycling irradiated nuclear fuel rely on (1) strong nitric acid to dissolve uranium oxide fuel, and (2) the use of aliphatic hydrocarbons as a diluent in formulating the solvent used to extract uranium. The nitric acid dissolution process is not selective. It dissolves virtually the entire fuel meat which complicates the uranium extraction process. In addition, a solvent washing process is used to remove TBP degradation products, which adds complexity to the recycling plant and increases the overall plant footprint and cost. A liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide (l/sc -CO2) system was designed to mitigate these problems. Indeed, TBP nitric acid complexes are highly soluble in l/sc -CO2 and are capable of extracting uranium directly from UO2, UO3 and U3O8 powders. This eliminates the need for total acid dissolution of the irradiated fuel. Furthermore, since CO2 is easily recycled by evaporation at room temperature and pressure, it eliminates the complex solvent washing process. In this report, we demonstrate: (1) A reprocessing scheme starting with the selective extraction of uranium from solid uranium oxides into a TBP-HNO3 loaded Sc-CO2 phase, (2) Back extraction of uranium into an aqueous phase, and (3) Conversion of recovered purified uranium into uranium oxide. The purified uranium product from step 3 can be disposed of as low level waste, or mixed with enriched uranium for use in a reactor for another fuel cycle. After an introduction on the concept and properties of supercritical fluids, we first report the characterization of the different oxides used for this project. Our extraction system and our online monitoring capability using UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy directly in sc-CO2 is then presented. Next, the uranium extraction efficiencies and kinetics is demonstrated for different oxides and under different physical and chemical conditions: l/sc -CO2 pressure and temperature, TBP/HNO3 complex used, reductant or complexant used for selectivity, and ionic liquids used as supportive media. To complete the extraction and recovery cycle, we then demonstrate uranium back extraction from the TBP loaded sc-CO2 phase into an aqueous phase and the characterization of the uranium complex formed at the end of this process. Another aspect of this project was to limit proliferation risks by either co-extracting uranium and plutonium, or by leaving plutonium behind by selectively extracting uranium. We report that the former is easily achieved, since plutonium is in the tetravalent or hexavalent oxidation state in the oxidizing environment created by the TBP-nitric acid complex, and is therefore co-extracted. The latter is more challenging, as a reductant or complexant to plutonium has to be used to selectively extract uranium. After undertaking experiments on different reducing or complexing systems (e.g., AcetoHydroxamic Acid (AHA), Fe(II), ascorbic acid), oxalic acid was chosen as it can complex tetravalent actinides (Pu, Np, Th) in the aqueous phase while allowing the extraction of hexavalent uranium in the sc-CO2 phase. Finally, we show results using an alternative media to commonly used aqueous phases: ionic liquids. We show the dissolution of uranium in ionic liquids and its extraction using sc-CO2 with and without the presence of AHA. The possible separation of trivalent actinides from uranium is also demonstrated in ionic liquids using neodymium as a surrogate and diglycolamides as the extractant.

Farawila, Anne F.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Wai, Chien M.; Taylor, Harry Z.; Liao, Yu-Jung

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

426

Economic and environmental benefits of reducing standby power loss in DVD/VCD players and copiers in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turns into a Flood: Standby Power Loss in China, Sinosphere,of Reducing Standby Power Loss in DVD/VCD Players ands awareness of standby power loss. Reducing standby power

Lin, Jiang; Li, Tienan; Li, Aizhen; Zhang, Guoqing

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Mercury extraction by the TRUEX process solvent: I. Kinetics, extractable species, dependence on nitric acid concentration and stoichiometry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury extraction from acidic aqueous solutions by the TRUEX process solvent (0.2 M CMPO, 1.4 M TBP in n-dodecane) has not extensively been examined. Research at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant is currently in progress to evaluate the TRUEX process for actinide removal from several acidic waste streams, including liquid sodium-bearing waste (SBW), which contains significant quantities of mercury. Preliminary experiments were performed involving the extraction of Hg{sup 203}, added as HgCl{sub 2}, from 0.01 to 10 M HNO{sub 3} solutions. Mercury distribution coefficients (D{sub Hg}) range between 3 and 60 from 0.01 M to 2 M HNO{sub 3}. At higher nitric acid concentrations, i.e. 5 M HNO{sub 3} or greater, D{sub Hg} significantly decreases to values less than 1. These results indicate mercury is extracted from acidic solutions {<=}{approximately}2 M HNO{sub 3} and stripped with nitric acid solutions {>=}{approximately}5 M HNO{sub 3}. Experimental results indicate the extractable species is HgCl{sub 2} from nitrate media, i.e., chloride must be present in the nitrate feed to extract mercury. Extractions from Hg(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} solutions indicated substantially reduced distribution ratios, typically D{sub Hg}< 1, for the range of nitric acid concentrations examined (0.01 to 8 M HNO{sub 3}). Extraction of mercury, as HgCl{sub 2}, by the individual components of the TRUEX solvent was also examined from 2 M HNO{sub 3}. The diluent, n-dodecane, does not measurably extract mercury. With a 1.4 M TBP/n-dodecane solvent, D{sub Hg} {approximately}3.4 compared with D{sub Hg} {approximately}7 for the TRUEX solvent. Classical slope analysis techniques were utilized to evaluate the stoichiometric coefficients of Hg extraction independently for both CMPO and TBP.

Herbst, R.S.; Brewer, K.N.; Tranter, T.J.; Todd, T.A.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

E-Print Network 3.0 - amine-carboxylic acid extracts Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- YPD (yeast extract peptone dextrose): 1% yeast extract 10 g 2% peptone 20... g 2% agar 20 g 2% dextrose (glucose) 20 g H2O to 1 l - YPG (yeast extract peptone glycerol): 1......

429

Experimental studies of flapping foils for energy extraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

For centuries scientists have looked to nature for inspiration for novel and efficient solutions to engineering problems. Recently, research on fish and other marine mammals has shown their ability to efficiently extract ...

Simpson, Bradley James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Classification and Feature Extraction in Man and Machine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Classification and Feature Extraction in Man and Machine Dissertation zur Erlangung des Grades stimuli and for their subsequent classification. A methodology combining human psychophysics and machine learning is introduced, where feature extractors are modeled using methods from unsupervised machine

431

Using Clustering to extract Personality Information from socio economic data.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Clustering to extract Personality Information from socio economic data. Alexandros Ladas, Uwe. Keywords-component; Data Mining; Clustering; Behavior Mining; Personality Psychology; I. INTRODUCTION psychological information regarding the Personalities of the individuals in order to enhance Data Mining methods

Aickelin, Uwe

432

Development of novel contactor for nuclear solvent extraction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For current designs of radiochemical plants, solvent-extraction contactors with no periodic maintenance like pulse column are the first choice. In addition, as costs of specialty solvents for nuclear extraction are quite high, there is a demand for operation at extreme phase ratios. Recently a novel mixer-settler was visualized and developed for this kind of service. The mixer of the novel contactor is based on rotated helical tubes and does not involve any mechanical moving part. Mass-transfer runs were carried out with aqueous nitric acid and 30% TBP solvent at A/O of 0.25-200 (in extraction) and A/O of 0.25-10 (in back-extraction mode). The developed contactor exhibited nearly 100% efficiency for all the cases. (authors)

Kumar, Shekhar; Kumar, Rajnish; Sivakumar, D.; Balamurugan, M.; Koganti, S.B. [Reprocessing R and D Division, Reprocessing Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603102 (India)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Extractive Industries and Sustainable Development EXECUTIVE TRAINING PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Industries and Sustainable Development EXECUTIVE TRAINING PROGRAM Vale Columbia Center UNIVERSITY Center on Globalization and Sustainable Development EARTH INSTITUTE | COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY #12; Extractive Industries and Sustainable Development Executive Training

434

Factors influencing the efficiency of arsenic extraction by phosphate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, phosphate concentration, principal counterion, reaction pH, and reaction time. The extraction efficiency was impacted by the influence of these individual factors on reaction kinetics and accessibility of arsenic adsorption sites for ligand exchange...

Yean, Su Jin

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Simplified building models extraction from Ultra-light UAV Imagery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

facades and the cameras' position in an editing software such as Pointools3 or Google Sketchup: Colorized dense cloud of points Figure 4: Refined extracted building models in Sketchup #12;

Fua, Pascal

436

Extracting clinically-actionable information from wearable physiological monitors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis I examine several ways of extracting information from wearable monitors so as to help make clinical decisions. Wearable physiological sensors are developing rapidly, and pose a possible part of the solution ...

Haslam, Bryan (Bryan Todd)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Electromagnetic extraction and annihilation of antiprotons for spacecraft propulsion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel concept for the extraction and long-term trapping of antiprotons from planetary magnetospheres is developed. The excitation via rotating magnetic field of an electron population within a distributed neutral plasma ...

Zayas, Daniel Antonio

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Electromagnetic Extraction and Annihilation of Antiprotons for Spacecraft Propulsion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Zayas, Raymond J. Sedwick May, 2008 SSL # 3-08 #12;#12;Electromagnetic Extraction and Annihilation of Antiprotons for Spacecraft Propulsion Daniel A. Zayas, Raymond J. Sedwick May, 2008 SSL # 3-08 This work

439

Determination of uncertainty in parameters extracted from single spectroscopic measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The ability to quantify uncertainty in information extracted from spectroscopic measurements is important in numerous fields. The traditional approach of repetitive measurements may be impractical or impossible in some ...

Bechtel, Kate L.

440

Construction of prototype system for directional solvent extraction desalination  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Directional solvent extraction has been demonstrated as a low temperature, membrane free desalination process. This method dissolves the water into an inexpensive, benign directional solvent, rejects the contaminants, then ...

Fowler, Michael James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Improved mass transport efficiency in copper solvent extraction   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis considers methods which can be employed to increase the mass of copper transferred into and out of the organic phase during the load and strip stages of commercial solvent extraction processes. Conventional ...

Gordon, Ross John

2009-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

442

Process to upgrade coal liquids by extraction prior to hydrodenitrogenation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Oxygen compounds are removed, e.g., by extraction, from a coal liquid prior to its hydrogenation. As a result, compared to hydrogenation of such a non-treated coal liquid, the rate of nitrogen removal is increased.

Schneider, Abraham (Overbrook Hills, PA); Hollstein, Elmer J. (Wilmington, DE); Janoski, Edward J. (Havertown, PA); Scheibel, Edward G. (Media, PA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Far field RF power extraction circuits and systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this thesis, I describe efficient methods for extracting DC power from electromagnetic radiation. This will become an important necessity for a number of applications involving remotely powered devices, such as Radio ...

Mandal, Soumyajit, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

PHASE: Progressive Hardware Assisted IsoSurface Extraction Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Charles Hansen UUSCI-2002-001 Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute University of Utah Salt Lake City, Charles Hansen Abstract-- Isosurface extraction is an important tech- nique for visualizing three

Livnat, Yarden

445

Evaluation and prevention of explosions in soil vapor extraction systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the widespread and long term use of petroleum derived fuels and solvents, many areas have subsurface soils contaminated with petroleum derivatives. This contamination can migrate to groundwater, which is frequently used to supply drinking water needs. A common method of cleaning up that contamination is soil vapor extraction (SVE). SVE is a technique where several extraction wells are installed in the contaminated area, with screens in the appropriate vertical locations. The soil vapors re extracted form the wells using a positive displacement blower. To prevent this subsurface contamination from becoming air pollution, the extracted vapors are then sent to some hydrocarbon removal device, such as a carbon adsorption system or a thermal oxidizer. The data used in this investigation were collected as part of a Radian Corporation project for a client. The site is a former petroleum refinery, and the hydrocarbons are primarily gasoline and diesel.

Hower, J.W. [Radian Corp., El Segundo, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

446

Structural analysis of extracts from spent hydroprocessing catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solvent extracts from spent commercial naphtha and gas oil hydrotreating catalysts were examined in order to elucidate the structure of adsorbed poisons. Amides were identified in the extracts and made up 20-30% of the basic compounds. The oxygen content of the extracts was as high as 28% by weight. Some of this oxygen may be associated with metal complexes or present as inorganic material. Infrared spectroscopic analysis revealed very strong absorptions due to carbonyls, suggesting that compounds such as ketones and carboxylic acids were present. The extracted compounds consisted of saturated (paraffinic and naphthenic) structures and aromatic groups, with >50% boiling at +343/sup 0/c. These results suggest polymerization of species on the surface of the catalyst, rather than condensation of aromatic structures to form coke.

Choi, J.H.K.; Gray, M.R.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Technologies for Extracting Valuable Metals and Compounds from Geothermal Fluids  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Demonstrate geothermal mineral extraction; Demonstrate technical and economic feasibility; Produce products for market development; Generate operational data and scale up data so a commercial scale plant can be designed and built.

448

Extraction and recovery of plutonium and americium from nitric acid waste solutions by the TRUEX process - continuing development studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work done to date on the application of the TRUEX solvent extraction process for removing and separately recovering plutonium and americium from a nitric acid waste solution containing these elements, uranium, and a complement of inert metal ions. This simulated waste stream is typical of a raffinate from a tributyl phosphate (TBP)-based solvent extraction process for removing uranium and plutonium from dissolved plutonium-containing metallurgical scrap. The TRUEX process solvent in these experiments was a solution of TBP and octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (CMPO) dissolved in carbon tetrachloride. A flowsheet was designed on the basis of measured batch distribution ratios to reduce the TRU content of the solidified raffinate to less than or equal to 10 nCi/g and was tested in a countercurrent experiment performed in a 14-stage Argonne-model centrifugal contractor. The process solvent was recycled without cleanup. An unexpectedly high evaporative loss of CCl/sub 4/ resulted in concentration of the active extractant, CMPO, to nearly 0.30M in the solvent. Results are consistent with this higher CMPO concentration. The raffinate contained only 2 nCi/g of TRU, but the higher CMPO concentration resulted in reduced effectiveness in the stripping of americium from the solvent. Conditions can be easily adjusted to give high yields and good separation of americium and plutonium. Experimental studies of the hydrolytic and gamma-radiolytic degradation of the TRUEX-CCl/sub 4/ showed that solvent degradation would be (1) minimal for a year of processing this typical feed, which contained no fission products, and (2) could be explained almost entirely by hydrolytic and radiolytic damage to TBP. Even for gross amounts of solvent damage, scrubbing with aqueous sodium carbonate solution restored the original americium extraction and stripping capability of the solvent. 43 refs., 5 figs., 36 tabs.

Leonard, R.A.; Vandegrift, G.F.; Kalina, D.G.; Fischer, D.F.; Bane, R.W.; Burris, L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Chiarisia, R.; Diamond, H.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

A unified theory on electro-kinetic extraction of contaminants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of contaminants from fine-grained soils. Here, the experimental and the theoretical studies conducted to date are reviewed briefly 2. 3. 1. Experimental Studies The technique of electro-kinetic extraction of salts from alkaline soils was investigated by Puri...A VNIFIED THEORY ON ELECTRO-KINETIC EXTRACTION OF CONTAMINANTS A Thesis by SUBBARAJU DATLA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

Datla, Subbaraju

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Extraction of cesium and strontium from nuclear waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cesium is extracted from acidified nuclear waste by contacting the waste with a bis 4,4[prime](5) [1-hydroxy-2-ethylhexyl]benzo 18-crown-6 compound and a cation exchanger in a matrix solution. Strontium is extracted from acidified nuclear waste by contacting the waste with a bis 4,4[prime](5[prime]) [1-hydroxyheptyl]cyclohexo 18-crown-6 compound, and a cation exchanger in a matrix solution. 3 figs.

Davis, M.W. Jr.; Bowers, C.B. Jr.

1988-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

451

Extraction of cesium and strontium from nuclear waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Cesium is extracted from acidified nuclear waste by contacting the waste with a bis 4,4'(5) [1-hydroxy-2-ethylhexyl]benzo 18-crown-6 compound and a cation exchanger in a matrix solution. Strontium is extracted from acidified nuclear waste by contacting the waste with a bis 4,4'(5') [1-hydroxyheptyl]cyclohexo 18-crown-6 compound, and a cation exchanger in a matrix solution.

Davis, Jr., Milton W. (Lexington, SC); Bowers, Jr., Charles B. (Columbia, SC)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Method for liquid chromatographic extraction of strontium from acid solutions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Extraction of uranium from spent fuels using liquefied gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For reprocessing of spent nuclear fuels, a novel method to extract actinides from spent fuel using highly compressed gases, nitrogen dioxide and carbon dioxide was proposed. As a fundamental study, the nitrate conversion with liquefied nitrogen dioxide and the nitrate extraction with supercritical carbon dioxide were demonstrated by using uranium dioxide powder, uranyl nitrate and tri-n-butylphosphate complex in the present study. (authors)

Sawada, Kayo; Hirabayashi, Daisuke; Enokida, Youichi [EcoTopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8603 (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

A study of a solvent extraction desalination process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, low extraction column efficiencies were obtained with the amine phase dispersed and much higher effi. cienci. es were obtained with the water phase dispersed in the Scheibel Column. In an attempt to partially explain the result. s, an effort... Flow Diagram of Hydrocyclone System. Effect of Amine Solubility in Water on Ratio of Na 53 and Cl Selectivities. 54 Selectivity of NaC1 in Amines. Selectivity of. NaC1 in Diisopropylamine. Selectivity of KCI in Diisopropylamine Extraction...

McFerrin, Arthur Ransom

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Extractable work from ensembles of quantum batteries. Entanglement helps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by the recent interest in thermodynamics of micro- and mesoscopic quantum systems we study the maximal amount of work that can be reversibly extracted from a quantum system used to store temporarily energy. Guided by the notion of passivity of a quantum state we show that entangling unitary controls extract in general more work than independent ones. In the limit of large number of copies one can reach the thermodynamical bound given by the variational principle for free energy.

Robert Alicki; Mark Fannes

2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

456

A novel method of bitumen extraction from asphalt pavement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method of extracting bitumen from asphalt pavement mixtures has been developed which does not require chlorinated or aromatic compounds for solvents. The preferred solvent is cyclohexane (although cyclopentane may be used) at high temperatures and pressures. The new method requires equipment that is less costly than the centrifuge method currently used and takes less time than extractions with Bioact but more time than when chlorocompounds are used.

Houser, T.J. (Western Michigan Univ., Kalamazoo (United States))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Extraction of metals using supercritical fluid and chelate forming legand  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Extraction of metals using supercritical fluid and chelate forming ligand  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated {beta}-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated {beta}-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated {beta}-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated {beta}-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 7 figs.

Wai, C.M.; Laintz, K.E.

1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

459

High Extraction Phosphors for Solid State Lighting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed high-index, high efficiency bulk luminescent materials and novel nano-sized phosphors for improved solid-state white LED lamps. These advances can potentially contribute to reducing the loss in luminous efficiencies due to scattering, re-absorption, and thermal quenching. The bulk and nanostructured luminescent materials investigated are index matched to GaN and have broad and size-tunable absorption bands, size and impurity tuned emission bands, size-driven elimination of scattering effects, and a separation between absorption and emission bands. These innovations were accomplished through the use of novel synthesis techniques suitable for high volume production for LED lamp applications. The program produced a full-color set of high quantum yield phosphors with high chemical stability. In the bulk phosphor study, the ZnSeS:Cu,Ag phosphor was optimized to achieve >91% efficiency using erbium (Er) and other activators as sensitizers. Detailed analysis of temperature quenching effects on a large number of ZnSeS:Cu,Ag,X and strontium- and calcium-thiogallate phosphors lead to a breakthrough in the understanding of the â??anti-quenchingâ?ť behavior and a physical bandgap model was developed of this phenomena. In a follow up to this study, optimized phosphor blends for high efficiency and color performance were developed and demonstrated a 2-component phosphor system with good white chromaticity, color temperature, and high color rendering. By extending the protocols of quantum dot synthesis, â??largeâ?ť nanocrystals, greater than 20 nm in diameter were synthesized and exhibited bulk-like behavior and blue light absorption. The optimization of ZnSe:Mn nanophosphors achieved ~85% QE The limitations of core-shell nanocrystal systems were addressed by investigating alternative deltadoped structures. To address the manufacturability of these systems, a one-pot manufacturing protocol was developed for ZnSe:Mn nanophosphors. To enhance the stability of these material systems, the encapsulation of ZnSeS particle phosphors and ZnSeS screens with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} using ALD was shown to improve the stability by >8X and also increased the luminescence efficiency due to improved surface passivation and optical coupling. A large-volume fluidized bed ALD system was designed that can be adapted to a commercial ALD or vapor deposition system. Throughout the program, optical simulations were developed to evaluate and optimize various phosphor mixtures and device configurations. For example, to define the scattering properties of nanophosphors in an LED device or in a stand-off screen geometry. Also this work significantly promoted and assisted in the implementation of realistic phosphor material models into commercial modeling programs.

Chris Summers; Hisham Menkara; Brent Wagner

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

460

Ovarian carcinomas with genetic and epigenetic BRCA1 loss have distinct molecular abnormalities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subclassification of ovarian carcinomas can be used to guide treatment and determine prognosis. Germline and somatic mutations, loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and epigenetic events such as promoter hypermethylation can lead to decreased expression of BRCA1/2 in ovarian cancers. The mechanism of BRCA1/2 loss is a potential method of subclassifying high grade serous carcinomas. A consecutive series of 49 ovarian cancers was assessed for mutations status of BRCA1 and BRCA2, LOH at the BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci, methylation of the BRCA1 promoter, BRCA1, BRCA2, PTEN, and PIK3CA transcript levels, PIK3CA gene copy number, and BRCA1, p21, p53, and WT-1 immunohistochemistry. Eighteen (37%) of the ovarian carcinomas had germline or somatic BRCA1 mutations, or epigenetic loss of BRCA1. All of these tumors were high-grade serous or undifferentiated type. None of the endometrioid (n=5), clear cell (n=4), or low grade serous (n=2) carcinomas showed loss of BRCA1, whereas 47% of the 38 high-grade serous or undifferentiated carcinomas had loss of BRCA1. It was possible to distinguish high grade serous carcinomas with BRCA1 mutations from those with epigenetic BRCA1 loss: tumors with BRCA1 mutations typically had decreased PTEN mRNA levels while those with epigenetic loss of BRCA1 had copy number gain of PIK3CA. Overexpression of p53 with loss of p21 expression occurred significantly more frequently in high grade serous carcinomas with epigenetic loss of BRCA1, compared to high grade serous tumors without loss of BRCA1. High grade serous carcinomas can be subclassified into three groups: BRCA1 loss (genetic), BRCA1 loss (epigenetic), and no BRCA1 loss. Tumors in these groups show distinct molecular alterations involving the PI3K/AKT and p53 pathways.

Gilks, C. Blake; Press, Joshua Z.; De Luca, Alessandro; Boyd, Niki; Young, Sean; Troussard, Armelle; Ridge, Yolanda; Kaurah, Pardeep; Kalloger, Steve E.; Blood, Katherine A.; Smith, Margaret; Spellman, Paul T.; Wang, Yuker; Miller, Dianne M.; Horsman, Doug; Faham, Malek; Gilks, C. Blake; Gray, Joe; Huntsman, David G.

2008-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Ovarian carcinomas with genetic and epigenetic BRCA1 loss havedistinct molecular abnormalities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subclassification of ovarian carcinomas can be used to guide treatment and determine prognosis. Germline and somatic mutations, loss of heterozygosity (LOH), and epigenetic events such as promoter hypermethylation can lead to decreased expression of BRCA1/2 in ovarian cancers. The mechanism of BRCA1/2 loss is a potential method of subclassifying high grade serous carcinomas. A consecutive series of 49 ovarian cancers was assessed for mutations status of BRCA1 and BRCA2, LOH at the BRCA1 and BRCA2 loci, methylation of the BRCA1 promoter, BRCA1, BRCA2, PTEN, and PIK3CA transcript levels, PIK3CA gene copy number, and BRCA1, p21, p53, and WT-1 immunohistochemistry. Eighteen (37%) of the ovarian carcinomas had germline or somatic BRCA1 mutations, or epigenetic loss of BRCA1. All of these tumors were high-grade serous or undifferentiated type. None of the endometrioid (n = 5), clear cell (n = 4), or low grade serous (n = 2) carcinomas showed loss of BRCA1, whereas 47% of the 38 high-grade serous or undifferentiated carcinomas had loss of BRCA1. It was possible to distinguish high grade serous carcinomas with BRCA1 mutations from those with epigenetic BRCA1 loss: tumors with BRCA1 mutations typically had decreased PTEN mRNA levels while those with epigenetic loss of BRCA1 had copy number gain of PIK3CA. Overexpression of p53 with loss of p21 expression occurred significantly more frequently in high grade serous carcinomas with epigenetic loss of BRCA1, compared to high grade serous tumors without loss of BRCA1. High grade serous carcinomas can be subclassified into three groups: BRCA1 loss (genetic), BRCA1 loss (epigenetic), and no BRCA1 loss. Tumors in these groups show distinct molecular alterations involving the PI3K/AKT and p53 pathways.

Press, Joshua Z.; De Luca, Alessandro; Boyd, Niki; Young, Sean; Troussard, Armelle; Ridge, Yolanda; Kaurah, Pardeep; Kalloger, Steve E.; Blood, Katherine A.; Smith, Margaret; Spellman, Paul T.; Wang, Yuker; Miller, Dianne M.; Horsman, Doug; Faham, Malek; Gilks, C. Blake; Gray,Joe; Huntsman, David G.

2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

462

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic road extraction Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with no tuning, as well as extracting the road midline using residual... and watershed image processing techniques to extract a road network in the vicinity of the vehicle,...

463

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatable method extract Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on Candidate Data for Collocation Extraction Stefan Evert and Hannah Kermes Summary: .de Abstract The paper describes ongoing work on the evaluation of methods for extract- ing...

464

Pitch Production Using Solvent Extraction of Coal: Suitability as Carbon Anode Precursor.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Albertan coal has been used to produce extracts as precursor for production of anode coke. Coal extractability was studied using digestion with Tetralin in a… (more)

Mohammad Ali Pour, Mehdi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Advanced Extraction Methods for Actinide/Lanthanide Separations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The separation of An(III) ions from chemically similar Ln(III) ions is perhaps one of the most difficult problems encountered during the processing of nuclear waste. In the 3+ oxidation states, the metal ions have an identical charge and roughly the same ionic radius. They differ strictly in the relative energies of their f- and d-orbitals, and to separate these metal ions, ligands will need to be developed that take advantage of this small but important distinction. The extraction of uranium and plutonium from nitric acid solution can be performed quantitatively by the extraction with the TBP (tributyl phosphate). Commercially, this process has found wide use in the PUREX (plutonium uranium extraction) reprocessing method. The TRUEX (transuranium extraction) process is further used to coextract the trivalent lanthanides and actinides ions from HLLW generated during PUREX extraction. This method uses CMPO [(N, N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl) octylphenylphosphineoxide] intermixed with TBP as a synergistic agent. However, the final separation of trivalent actinides from trivalent lanthanides still remains a challenging task. In TRUEX nitric acid solution, the Am(III) ion is coordinated by three CMPO molecules and three nitrate anions. Taking inspiration from this data and previous work with calix[4]arene systems, researchers on this project have developed a C3-symmetric tris-CMPO ligand system using a triphenoxymethane platform as a base. The triphenoxymethane ligand systems have many advantages for the preparation of complex ligand systems. The compounds are very easy to prepare. The steric and solubility properties can be tuned through an extreme range by the inclusion of different alkoxy and alkyl groups such as methyoxy, ethoxy, t-butoxy, methyl, octyl, t-pentyl, or even t-pentyl at the ortho- and para-positions of the aryl rings. The triphenoxymethane ligand system shows promise as an improved extractant for both tetravalent and trivalent actinide recoveries form high level liquid wastes and a general actinide clean-up procedure. The selectivity of the standard extractant for tetravalent actinides, (N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl) octylphenylphosphineoxide (CMPO), was markedly improved by the attachment of three CMPO-like functions onto a triphenoxymethane platform, and a ligand that is both highly selective and effective for An(IV) ions was isolated. A 10 fold excess of ligand will remove virtually all of the 4+ actinides from the acidic layer without extracting appreciable quantities of An(III) and Ln(III) unlike simple CMPO ligands. Inspired by the success of the DIAMEX industrial process for extractions, three new tripodal chelates bearing three diglycolamide and thiodiglycolamide units precisely arranged on a triphenoxymethane platform have been synthesized for an highly efficient extraction of trivalent f-element cations from nitric acid media. A single equivalent of ligand will remove 80% of the Ln(III) ion from the acidic layer since the ligand is perfectly suited to accommodate the tricapped trigonal prismatic geometry preferred by the metal center. The ligand is perhaps the most efficient binder available for the heavier lanthanides and due to this unique attribute, the extraction event can be easily followed by 1H NMR spectroscopy confirming the formation of a TPP complex. The most lipophilic di-n-butyl tris-diglycolamide was found to be a significantly weaker extractant in comparison to the di-isopropyl analogs. The tris-thiodiglycolamide derivative proved to be an ineffective chelate for f-elements and demonstrated the importance of the etheric oxygens in the metal binding. The results presented herein clearly demonstrate a cooperative action of these three ligating groups within a single molecule, confirmed by composition and structure of the extracted complexes, and since actinides prefer to have high coordination numbers, the ligands should be particularly adept at binding with three arms. The use of such an extractant permits the extraction of metal ions form highly acidic environment through the ability

Scott, M.J.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Method for reducing iron losses in an iron smelting process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of smelting iron that comprises the steps of: a) introducing a source of iron oxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and a source of carbonaceous fuel to a smelting reactor, at least some of said oxygen being continuously introduced through an overhead lance; b) maintaining conditions in said reactor to cause (i) at least some of the iron oxide to be chemically reduced, (ii) a bath of molten iron to be created and stirred in the bottom of the reactor, surmounted by a layer of slag, and (iii) carbon monoxide gas to rise through the slag; c) causing at least some of said carbon monoxide to react in the reactor with the incoming oxygen, thereby generating heat for reactions taking place in the reactor; and d) releasing from the reactor an offgas effluent, is run in a way that keeps iron losses in the offgas relatively low. After start-up of the process is complete, steps (a) and (b) are controlled so as to: e) keep the temperature of the molten iron at or below about 1550.degree. C. and f) keep the slag weight at or above about 0.8 tonne per square meter.

Sarma, Balu (Airmont, NY); Downing, Kenneth B. (Greenville, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Method for reducing iron losses in an iron smelting process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process of smelting iron that comprises the steps of: (a) introducing a source of iron oxide, oxygen, nitrogen, and a source of carbonaceous fuel to a smelting reactor, at least some of said oxygen being continuously introduced through an overhead lance; (b) maintaining conditions in said reactor to cause (1) at least some of the iron oxide to be chemically reduced, (2) a bath of molten iron to be created and stirred in the bottom of the reactor, surmounted by a layer of slag, and (3) carbon monoxide gas to rise through the slag; (c) causing at least some of said carbon monoxide to react in the reactor with the incoming oxygen, thereby generating heat for reactions taking place in the reactor; and (d) releasing from the reactor an offgas effluent, is run in a way that keeps iron losses in the offgas relatively low. After start-up of the process is complete, steps (a) and (b) are controlled so as to: (1) keep the temperature of the molten iron at or below about 1550 C and (2) keep the slag weight at or above about 0.8 ton per square meter. 13 figs.

Sarma, B.; Downing, K.B.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

468

Lightweighting Impacts on Fuel Economy, Cost, and Component Losses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Future Automotive Systems Technology Simulator (FASTSim) is the U.S. Department of Energy's high-level vehicle powertrain model developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. It uses a time versus speed drive cycle to estimate the powertrain forces required to meet the cycle. It simulates the major vehicle powertrain components and their losses. It includes a cost model based on component sizing and fuel prices. FASTSim simulated different levels of lightweighting for four different powertrains: a conventional gasoline engine vehicle, a hybrid electric vehicle (HEV), a plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV), and a battery electric vehicle (EV). Weight reductions impacted the conventional vehicle's efficiency more than the HEV, PHEV and EV. Although lightweighting impacted the advanced vehicles' efficiency less, it reduced component cost and overall costs more. The PHEV and EV are less cost effective than the conventional vehicle and HEV using current battery costs. Assuming the DOE's battery cost target of $100/kWh, however, the PHEV attained similar cost and lightweighting benefits. Generally, lightweighting was cost effective when it costs less than $6/kg of mass eliminated.

Brooker, A. D.; Ward, J.; Wang, L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Cryogenic loss monitors with FPGA TDC signal processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation hard helium gas ionization chambers capable of operating in vacuum at temperatures ranging from 5K to 350K have been designed, fabricated and tested and will be used inside the cryostats at Fermilab's Superconducting Radiofrequency beam test facility. The chamber vessels are made of stainless steel and all materials used including seals are known to be radiation hard and suitable for operation at 5K. The chambers are designed to measure radiation up to 30 kRad/hr with sensitivity of approximately 1.9 pA/(Rad/hr). The signal current is measured with a recycling integrator current-to-frequency converter to achieve a required measurement capability for low current and a wide dynamic range. A novel scheme of using an FPGA-based time-to-digital converter (TDC) to measure time intervals between pulses output from the recycling integrator is employed to ensure a fast beam loss response along with a current measurement resolution better than 10-bit. This paper will describe the results obtained and highlight the processing techniques used.

Warner, A.; Wu, J.; /Fermilab

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Volatile Loss and Classification of Kuiper Belt Objects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations indicate that some of the largest Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) have retained volatiles in the gas phase, which implies the presence of an atmosphere that can affect their reflectance spectra and thermal balance. Volatile escape rates driven by solar heating of the surface were estimated by Schaller and Brown (2007) (SB) and Levi and Podolak (2009)(LP) using Jeans escape from the surface and a hydrodynamic model respectively. Based on recent molecular kinetic simulations these rates can be hugely in error (e.g., a factor of $\\sim 10^{16}$ for the SB estimate for Pluto). In this paper we estimate the loss of primordial N$_2$ for several large KBOs guided by recent molecular kinetic simulations of escape due to solar heating of the surface and due to UV/EUV heating of the upper atmosphere. For the latter we extrapolate simulations of escape from Pluto (Erwin et al. 2013) using the energy limited escape model recently validated for the KBOs of interest by molecular kinetic simulations (Johnson et al. 2...

Johnson, R E; Young, L A; Volkov, A N; Schmidt, C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Light-extraction enhancement in GaN-based light-emitting diodes using grade-refractive-index amorphous titanium oxide films with porous structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Amorphous titanium oxide (a-TiO{sub x}:OH) films prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition at 200 and 25 deg. C are in turn deposited onto the GaN-based light-emitting diode (LED) to enhance the associated light extraction efficiency. The refractive index, porosity, and photocatalytic effect of the deposited films are correlated strongly with the deposition temperatures. The efficiency is enhanced by a factor of {approx}1.31 over that of the uncoated LEDs and exhibited an excellent photocatalytic property after an external UV light irradiation. The increase in the light extraction is related to the reduction in the Fresnel transmission loss and the enhancement of the light scattering into the escape cone by using the graded-refractive-index a-TiO{sub x}:OH film with porous structures.

Liu, D.-S.; Lin, T.-W.; Huang, B.-W.; Juang, F.-S.; Lei, P.-H. [Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, National Formosa University, Huwei 63201, Taiwan (China); Hu, C.-Z. [Chilin Technology Co. Ltd., Tainan County 71758, Taiwan (China)

2009-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

472

Magnetic and electric contributions to the energy loss in a dynamical QCD medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The computation of radiative energy loss in a finite size QCD medium with dynamical constituents is a key ingredient for obtaining reliable predictions for jet quenching in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions. It was previously shown that energy loss in dynamical QCD medium is significantly higher compared to static QCD medium. To understand this difference, we here analyze magnetic and electric contributions to energy loss in dynamical QCD medium. We find that the significantly higher energy loss in the dynamical case is entirely due to appearance of magnetic contribution in the dynamical medium. While for asymptotically high energies, the energy loss in static and dynamical medium approach the same value, we find that the physical origin of the energy loss in these two cases is different.

Magdalena Djordjevic

2011-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

473

Practical Formula for Bunch Power Loss in Resonators of Almost Arbitrary Quality Factor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SSC-N-142 Practical Formula for Bunch Power Loss in Resonators of Almost Arbitrary Quality Factor a resonant structure with impedance Z() = RS 1 + iQ r - r (1) then the power loss is [1] P = (cf0)2 m in the summation in Eq. (2) yield an accurate estimate for the power loss. If, on the other hand, ~() is very broad

Furman, Miguel

474

Radiative parton energy loss in expanding quark-gluon plasma with magnetic monopoles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study radiative parton energy loss in an expanding quark-gluon plasma with magnetic monopoles. We find that for realistic number density of thermal monopoles obtained in lattice simulations parton rescatterings on monopoles can considerably enhance energy loss for plasma produced in $AA$ collisions at RHIC and LHC energies. However, contrary to previous expectations, monopoles do not lead to the surface dominance of energy loss.

B. G. Zakharov

2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

475

Ceramic tube seals cut heat loss, achieve six month payback  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The methane reformer at the Celanese Chemical Company's Bishop, TX plant operates at approximately 1900/sup 0/F. The reformer has 32 tubes (9'' diameter) that pass through the firebox. Openings around the tubes measure 11'' in diameter to accommodate horizontal and vertical thermal expansion and movement as well as to facilitate tube removal. The gaps around the tubes permitted cool air to be drawn into the firebox (caused by slight negative pressure) and also allowed radiant heat to escape causing the reformer to operate at a lower than desired level of thermal efficiency. Celanese contracted to retrofit the old rigid firebrick roof in the methane reformer with a 10'' thick ceramic fiber module lining. The gaps around the tubes were sealed by using a special tube seal made from Nextel woven ceramic fiber fabric, a 1984 CHEMICAL PROCESSING Vaaler Award winner (Mid-November 1984, p.52). The Nextel fabric used in this application is a heat resistant textile that has a continuous use temperature of 2200/sup 0/F - well above the 1900/sup 0/F operating temperature of the reformer. The tube seals have been working exactly as intended, verified by observation through inspection ports. Temperatures in the penthouse area above the roof dropped from 240/sup 0/F to 150/sup 0/F. The reduction in heat losses has been attributed to the elimination of the gaps around each tube by the seals and to the improved K-factor of the ceramic module lining. The tube seals have paid for themselves within six months of installation. At that time, the seal boots were inspected and showed no signs of wear. With these results, the improved efficiency of the methane reformer promises to yield additional economic benefits.

Not Available

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Cladding embrittlement during postulated loss-of-coolant accidents.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of fuel burnup on the embrittlement of various cladding alloys was examined with laboratory tests conducted under conditions relevant to loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs). The cladding materials tested were Zircaloy-4, Zircaloy-2, ZIRLO, M5, and E110. Tests were performed with specimens sectioned from as-fabricated cladding, from prehydrided (surrogate for high-burnup) cladding, and from high-burnup fuel rods which had been irradiated in commercial reactors. The tests were designed to determine for each cladding material the ductile-to-brittle transition as a function of steam oxidation temperature, weight gain due to oxidation, hydrogen content, pre-transient cladding thickness, and pre-transient corrosion-layer thickness. For short, defueled cladding specimens oxidized at 1000-1200 C, ring compression tests were performed to determine post-quench ductility at {le} 135 C. The effect of breakaway oxidation on embrittlement was also examined for short specimens oxidized at 800-1000 C. Among other findings, embrittlement was found to be sensitive to fabrication processes--especially surface finish--but insensitive to alloy constituents for these dilute zirconium alloys used as cladding materials. It was also demonstrated that burnup effects on embrittlement are largely due to hydrogen that is absorbed in the cladding during normal operation. Some tests were also performed with longer, fueled-and-pressurized cladding segments subjected to LOCA-relevant heating and cooling rates. Recommendations are given for types of tests that would identify LOCA conditions under which embrittlement would occur.

Billone, M.; Yan, Y.; Burtseva, T.; Daum, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

477

Geologic controls influencing CO2 loss from a leaking well.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Injection of CO2 into formations containing brine is proposed as a long-term sequestration solution. A significant obstacle to sequestration performance is the presence of existing wells providing a transport pathway out of the sequestration formation. To understand how heterogeneity impacts the leakage rate, we employ two dimensional models of the CO2 injection process into a sandstone aquifer with shale inclusions to examine the parameters controlling release through an existing well. This scenario is modeled as a constant-rate injection of super-critical CO2 into the existing formation where buoyancy effects, relative permeabilities, and capillary pressures are employed. Three geologic controls are considered: stratigraphic dip angle, shale inclusion size and shale fraction. In this study, we examine the impact of heterogeneity on the amount and timing of CO2 released through a leaky well. Sensitivity analysis is performed to classify how various geologic controls influence CO2 loss. A 'Design of Experiments' approach is used to identify the most important parameters and combinations of parameters to control CO2 migration while making efficient use of a limited number of computations. Results are used to construct a low-dimensional description of the transport scenario. The goal of this exploration is to develop a small set of parametric descriptors that can be generalized to similar scenarios. Results of this work will allow for estimation of the amount of CO2 that will be lost for a given scenario prior to commencing injection. Additionally, two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations are compared to quantify the influence that surrounding geologic media has on the CO2 leakage rate.

Hopkins, Polly L.; Martinez, Mario J.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Klise, Katherine A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

E-Print Network 3.0 - apparent partial loss Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 > >> 1 Apparent partial loss age spectra of Neoarchaean hornblende (Kola Peninsula, Russia): the role of included biotite shown by ArAr laserprobe analysis Summary: Apparent...

479

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute blood loss Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in patients with blood loss requiring massive... (elderly patients with an acute heart attack and a hematocrit less than 30 percent). Still, blood... On the Same Page...

480

Probability distribution of low-altitude propagation loss from radar sea clutter data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: propagation loss estimation, radar clutter, probabilistic inversion Citation: Gerstoft, P., W. S. Hodgkiss, L within the marine atmospheric surface layer [Liu et al., 1979]. The refractivity profile above

Buckingham, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "repressuring extraction loss" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

E-Print Network 3.0 - arctic ozone loss Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemistry Summary: stratospheric ozone losses during cold Arctic Januaries, M. Rex, R. J. Salaw- itch, M. L. Santee, J. W. Waters... , and UARS MLS to demonstrate that the...

482

Structure and Design a Finance Program with Loan Loss Reserve Funds  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The process for structuring and designing a finance program with a loan loss reserve (LLR) fund typically includes research and preparing a finance program design document.

483

Power loss in open cavity diodes and a modified Child Langmuir Law  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diodes used in most high power devices are inherently open. It is shown that under such circumstances, there is a loss of electromagnetic radiation leading to a lower critical current as compared to closed diodes. The power loss can be incorporated in the standard Child-Langmuir framework by introducing an effective potential. The modified Child-Langmuir law can be used to predict the maximum power loss for a given plate separation and potential difference as well as the maximum transmitted current for this power loss. The effectiveness of the theory is tested numerically.

Debabrata Biswas; Raghwendra Kumar; R. R. Puri

2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

484

Bone Growth, Maintenance and Loss in the Neolithic Community of Çatalhöyük, Turkey: Preliminary Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interpreting Bone Loss and Osteoporosis in Past Populations.2005. How many women have osteoporosis? Journal of Bone and1987. Postmenopausal osteoporosis: single screening method

Agarwal, Sabrina; Glencross, Bonnie; Beauchesne, Patrick

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Integration of analysis and experiment for Stirling cycle processes: Part 1, Gas spring hysteresis loss  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heat transfer-related hysteresis loss can be an important factor in the performance of Stirling and other reciprocating machines. Analytical predictions of hysteresis loss have been available to designers, but until now they were not experimentally verified. Hysteresis loss was measured in a piston-cylinder gas spring over a range of speeds, pressures, gases, bore/stroke ratios, volume ratios, and internal extended surface geometries. An analysis of a simplified one-dimensional energy equation produced non-dimensional parameters that were used to correlate the experimental data. The loss expression from the analysis was adjusted to fit the correlated data. 7 refs., 8 figs.

Kornhauser, A.A.; Smith, J.L. Jr.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

E-Print Network 3.0 - ac loss characteristics Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

adjustable part of the excitation, with the DC excitation coils... machine, permanent magnet, flux switching, flux weakening, hybrid excita- tion, magnetic losses. 1......

487

E-Print Network 3.0 - asymmetric loss function Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

losses in semicon- ductor coplanar waveguides, IEEE Trans Microwave... Periodicals, Inc. RF MEMS ASYMMETRIC CAPACITIVE SWITCH WITH HIGH-ISOLATION AT SELECTED LOW-MICROWAVE...

488

The Role of Potential Losses in Adolescent Decision-Making Under Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D.M. (2000). Personality and risk-taking: Common biosocialPeers increase adolescent risk taking by enhancing activityof Loss Aversion and Risk Avoidance in Adolescents and

Barkley-Levenson, Emily Elizabeth

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Deep liquid-chromatographic purification of uranium extract from technetium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recycling of uranium in the nuclear fuel cycle requires the removal of a number of radioactive and stable impurities like {sup 99}Tc from spent fuels. In order to improve the grade of uranium extract purification from technetium the method of liquid chromatography and the apparatus for its performance have been developed. Process of technetium extraction and concentrating in aqueous solution containing reducing agent has been studied on simulated solutions (U-Tc-HNO{sub 3}-30% TBP-isoparM). The dynamic tests of the method have been carried out on the laboratory unit. Solution of diformyl-hydrazine in nitric acid was used as a stationary phase. Silica gel with specific surface of 186 m{sup 2}/g was used as a carrier of the stationary phase. It is shown that the volume of purified extract increases as the solution temperature increases, concentration of reducing agent increases and extract flow rate decreases. It is established that the technetium content in uranium by this method could achieve a value below 0.3 ppm. Some variants of overload and composition of the stationary phase containing the extracted technetium have been offered and tested. It is defined that the method provides reduction of processing medium-active wastes by more than 10 times during finish refining process. (authors)

Volk, V.; Dvoeglazov, K; Podrezova, L.; Vidanov, V.; Pavlyukevich, E. [OAO State Research Center - VNIINM, Rogov str., bld. 5, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Methodology for extracting local constants from petroleum cracking flows  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A methodology provides for the extraction of local chemical kinetic model constants for use in a reacting flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) computer code with chemical kinetic computations to optimize the operating conditions or design of the system, including retrofit design improvements to existing systems. The coupled CFD and kinetic computer code are used in combination with data obtained from a matrix of experimental tests to extract the kinetic constants. Local fluid dynamic effects are implicitly included in the extracted local kinetic constants for each particular application system to which the methodology is applied. The extracted local kinetic model constants work well over a fairly broad range of operating conditions for specific and complex reaction sets in specific and complex reactor systems. While disclosed in terms of use in a Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) riser, the inventive methodology has application in virtually any reaction set to extract constants for any particular application and reaction set formulation. The methodology includes the step of: (1) selecting the test data sets for various conditions; (2) establishing the general trend of the parametric effect on the measured product yields; (3) calculating product yields for the selected test conditions using coupled computational fluid dynamics and chemical kinetics; (4) adjusting the local kinetic constants to match calculated product yields with experimental data; and (5) validating the determined set of local kinetic constants by comparing the calculated results with experimental data from additional test runs at different operating conditions.

Chang, Shen-Lin (Woodridge, IL); Lottes, Steven A. (Naperville, IL); Zhou, Chenn Q. (Munster, IN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Semi-automated Extraction of Digital Objective Prism Spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a method for the extraction of spectra from high dispersion objective prism plates. Our method is a catalogue driven plate solution approach, making use of the Right Ascension and Declination coordinates for the target objects. In contrast to existing methods of photographic plate reduction, we digitize the entire plate and extract spectra off-line. This approach has the advantages that it can be applied to CCD objective prism images, and spectra can be re-extracted (or additional spectra extracted) without having to re-scan the plate. After a brief initial interactive period, the subsequent reduction procedure is completely automatic, resulting in fully-reduced, wavelength justified spectra. We also discuss a method of removing stellar continua using a combination of non-linear filtering algorithms. The method described is used to extract over 12,000 spectra from a set of 92 objective prism plates. These spectra are used in an associated project to develop automated spectral classifiers based on neural networks.

Coryn A. L. Bailer-Jones; Mike Irwin; Ted von Hippel

1998-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

492

Studying Parton Energy Loss in Heavy-Ion Collisions via Direct-Photon and Charged-Particle Azimuthal Correlations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charged-particle spectra associated with direct photon ($\\gamma_{dir} $) and $\\pi^0$ are measured in $p$+$p$ and Au+Au collisions at center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$ GeV with the STAR detector at RHIC. A hower-shape analysis is used to partially discriminate between $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$. Assuming no associated charged particles in the $\\gamma_{dir}$ direction (near side) and small contribution from fragmentation photons ($\\gamma_{frag}$), the associated charged-particle yields opposite to $\\gamma_{dir}$ (away side) are extracted. At mid-rapidity ($|\\eta|<0.9$) in central Au+Au collisions, charged-particle yields associated with $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$ at high transverse momentum ($8< p_{T}^{trig}<16$ GeV/$c$) are suppressed by a factor of 3-5 compared with $p$ + $p$ collisions. The observed suppression of the associated charged particles, in the kinematic range $|\\eta|<1$ and $3< p_{T}^{assoc} < 16$ GeV/$c$, is similar for $\\gamma_{dir}$ and $\\pi^0$, and independent of the $\\gamma_{dir}$ energy within uncertainties. These measurements indicate that the parton energy loss, in the covered kinematic range, is insensitive to the parton path length.

The STAR Collaboration; B. I. Abelev

2009-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

493

Digital Loss-Minimizing Multi-Mode Synchronous Buck Converter Control Angel V. Peterchev Seth R. Sanders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

transition among the modes. An on-line adaptive algorithm to optimize the SR timing, based on power loss reducing the switching losses. In modern portable applications, minimizing power loss at light load in the controller, or can be obtained on-line by dynamically minimizing the converter power loss via multi

Sanders, Seth

494

ReproducedfromJournalofEnvironmentalQuality.PublishedbyASA,CSSA,andSSSA.Allcopyrightsreserved. Simple Models for Phosphorus Loss from Manure during Rainfall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phosphorus (WEP) and a characteristic desorption time. Water- nure for total loss per rainfall event

Walter, M.Todd

495

Reorganization of visual processing in macular degeneration: Replication and clues about the role of foveal loss q  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

study reported reorganization fol- lowing loss of visual input as a result of optic radiation damage

Kanwisher, Nancy

496

Compression Losses In Cryocoolers J.S. Reed, G. Davey, M.W. Dadd and P.B. Bailey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of these losses is related to the irreversible compression of gas in the cylinder, and the magnitude of this loss1 Compression Losses In Cryocoolers J.S. Reed, G. Davey, M.W. Dadd and P.B. Bailey Department and conditions this 'lumped' loss varies with operating frequency, swept volume and pressure swing, suggesting

497

A Model of Stroke Extraction from Chinese Character Images Ruini Cao, Chew Lim Tan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Model of Stroke Extraction from Chinese Character Images Ruini Cao, Chew Lim Tan School a new model of stroke extraction for Chinese characters. One problem for stroke extraction is how to extract primary strokes. Another major problem is to solve the segmentation ambiguities at intersection

Tan, Chew Lim

498

Solvent extraction of heptavalent technetium by tributyl phosphate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solvent extraction of heptavalent technetium from aqueous nitric or hydrochloric acid by tributyl phosphate in n-dodecane (TBP-NDD) has been studied over a wide range of TBP and acid concentrations at 25, 50, and 60/sup 0/C. The extraction was found to proceed according to the reaction 3TBP + H/sup +/ + TcO/sub 4//sup -/ ..-->.. (HTcO/sub 4/ 3TBP). A discussion of possible reaction mechanisms is presented, along with values for ..delta..G, ..delta..H, ..delta..S, and the equilibrium constant for the extraction reaction. Finally, evidence for the coextraction of technetium by uranyl ions is discussed. 10 figures, 5 tables.

Pruett, D.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Management of water extracted from carbon sequestration projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Throughout the past decade, frequent discussions and debates have centered on the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). For sequestration to have a reasonably positive impact on atmospheric carbon levels, the anticipated volume of CO{sub 2} that would need to be injected is very large (many millions of tons per year). Many stakeholders have expressed concern about elevated formation pressure following the extended injection of CO{sub 2}. The injected CO{sub 2} plume could potentially extend for many kilometers from the injection well. If not properly managed and monitored, the increased formation pressure could stimulate new fractures or enlarge existing natural cracks or faults, so the CO{sub 2} or the brine pushed ahead of the plume could migrate vertically. One possible tool for management of formation pressure would be to extract water already residing in the formation where CO{sub 2} is being stored. The concept is that by removing water from the receiving formations (referred to as 'extracted water' to distinguish it from 'oil and gas produced water'), the pressure gradients caused by injection could be reduced, and additional pore space could be freed up to sequester CO{sub 2}. Such water extraction would occur away from the CO{sub 2} plume to avoid extracting a portion of the sequestered CO{sub 2} along with the formation water. While water extraction would not be a mandatory component of large-scale carbon storage programs, it could provide many benefits, such as reduction of pressure, increased space for CO{sub 2} storage, and potentially, 'plume steering.' Argonne National Laboratory is developing information for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to evaluate management of extracted water. If water is extracted from geological formations designated to receive injected CO{sub 2} for sequestration, the project operator will need to identify methods for managing very large volumes of water most of which will contain large quantities of salt and other dissolved minerals. Produced water from oil and gas production also typically contains large quantities of dissolved solids. Therefore, many of the same practices that are established and used for managing produced water also may be applicable for extracted water. This report describes the probable composition of the extracted water that is removed from the formations, options for managing the extracted water, the pros and cons of those options, and some opportunities for beneficial use of the water. Following the introductory material in Chapter 1, the report is divided into chapters covering the following topics: (Chapter 2) examines the formations that are likely candidates for CO{sub 2} sequestration and provides a general evaluation of the geochemical characteristics of the formations; (Chapter 3) makes some preliminary estimates of the volume of water that could be extracted; (Chapter 4) provides a qualitative review of many potential technologies and practices for managing extracted water and for each technology or management practice, pros and cons are provided; (Chapter 5) explores the potential costs of water management; and (Chapter 6) presents the conclusions.

Harto, C. B.; Veil, J. A. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

500

Development of carbon-carbon composites from solvent extracted pitch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are several methods used to fabricate carbon-carbon composites. One used extensively in the fabrication of aerospace components such as rocket nozzles and reentry vehicle nosetips, as well as commercial components for furnace fixturing and glass manufacturing, is the densification of a woven preform with molten pitch, and the subsequent conversion of the pitch to graphite through heat treatment. Two types of pitch are used in this process; coal tar pitch and petroleum pitch. The objective of this program was to determine if a pitch produced by the direct extraction of coal could be used as a substitute for these pitches in the fabrication of carbon-carbon composites. The program involved comparing solvent extracted pitch with currently accepted pitches and rigidizing a carbon-carbon preform with solvent extracted pitch for comparison with carbon-carbon fabricated with currently available pitch.

NONE

1996-06-24T23:59:59.000Z