National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for repressuring extraction loss

  1. High potential recovery -- Gas repressurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, M.P.

    1998-05-01

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate that small independent oil producers can use existing gas injection technologies, scaled to their operations, to repressurize petroleum reservoirs and increase their economic oil production. This report gives background information for gas repressurization technologies, the results of workshops held to inform small independent producers about gas repressurization, and the results of four gas repressurization field demonstration projects. Much of the material in this report is based on annual reports (BDM-Oklahoma 1995, BDM-Oklahoma 1996, BDM-Oklahoma 1997), a report describing the results of the workshops (Olsen 1995), and the four final reports for the field demonstration projects which are reproduced in the Appendix. This project was designed to demonstrate that repressurization of reservoirs with gas (natural gas, enriched gas, nitrogen, flue gas, or air) can be used by small independent operators in selected reservoirs to increase production and/or decrease premature abandonment of the resource. The project excluded carbon dioxide because of other DOE-sponsored projects that address carbon dioxide processes directly. Two of the demonstration projects, one using flue gas and the other involving natural gas from a deeper coal zone, were both technical and economic successes. The two major lessons learned from the projects are the importance of (1) adequate infrastructure (piping, wells, compressors, etc.) and (2) adequate planning including testing compatibility between injected gases and fluids, and reservoir gases, fluids, and rocks.

  2. Arizona Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural Gas 2014ResidentialRepressuring

  3. Nebraska Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172 3,009165,360IndustrialProcessedRepressuring

  4. Ohio Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNew Field DiscoveriesElements)DecadeRepressuring

  5. Oklahoma Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNew FieldDecade Year-0YearYearRepressuring (Million

  6. Oklahoma Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNew FieldDecade Year-0YearYearRepressuring

  7. Tennessee Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672 7,2060 (Million3Repressuring

  8. Other States Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNew FieldDecadeYearDecadeDecadeRepressuring (Million

  9. West Virginia Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of theCubicEstimation10,428CubicFeet)VirginiaRepressuring

  10. Physical property changes in hydrate-bearingsediment due to depressurization and subsequent repressurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, Timothy; Waite, W.F.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2008-06-01

    Physical property measurements of sediment cores containing natural gas hydrate are typically performed on material exposed at least briefly to non-in situ conditions during recovery. To examine effects of a brief excursion from the gas-hydrate stability field, as can occur when pressure cores are transferred to pressurized storage vessels, we measured physical properties on laboratory-formed sand packs containing methane hydrate and methane pore gas. After depressurizing samples to atmospheric pressure, we repressurized them into the methane-hydrate stability field and remeasured their physical properties. Thermal conductivity, shear strength, acoustic compressional and shear wave amplitudes and speeds are compared between the original and depressurized/repressurized samples. X-ray computed tomography (CT) images track how the gas-hydrate distribution changes in the hydrate-cemented sands due to the depressurization/repressurization process. Because depressurization-induced property changes can be substantial and are not easily predicted, particularly in water-saturated, hydrate-bearing sediment, maintaining pressure and temperature conditions throughout the core recovery and measurement process is critical for using laboratory measurements to estimate in situ properties.

  11. The extraction of nuclear sea quark distribution and energy loss effect in Drell-Yan experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chun-Gui Duan; Na Liu; Zhan-Yuan Yan

    2006-09-06

    The next-to-leading order and leading order analysis are performed on the differential cross section ratio from Drell-Yan process. It is found that the effect of next-to-leading order corrections can be negligible on the differential cross section ratios as a function of the quark momentum fraction in the beam proton and the target nuclei for the current Fermilab and future lower beam proton energy. The nuclear Drell-Yan reaction is an ideal tool to study the energy loss of the fast quark moving through cold nuclei. In the leading order analysis, the theoretical results with quark energy loss are in good agreement with the Fermilab E866 experimental data on the Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios as a function of the momentum fraction of the target parton. It is shown that the quark energy loss effect has significant impact on the Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios. The nuclear Drell-Yan experiment at current Fermilab and future lower energy proton beam can not provide us with more information on the nuclear sea quark distribution.

  12. The influence of quark energy loss on extracting nuclear sea quark distribution from nuclear Drell-Yan experimental data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan Chun-Gui; Liu Na

    2008-09-28

    By means of two typical kinds of quark energy loss parametrization and the nuclear parton distributions determined only with lepton-nuclear deep inelastic scattering experimental data, a leading order analysis are performed on the proton-induced Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios of tungsten versus deuterium as a function of the quark momentum fraction in the beam proton and target nuclei. It is found that the theoretical results with quark energy loss are in good agreement with the experimental data. The quark energy loss effect produce approximately 3% to 11% suppression on the Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios $R_{W/D}$ in the range $0.05\\leq x_2\\leq0.3$. The application of nuclear Drell-Yan data with heavy targets is remarkably subject to difficulty in the constraints of the nuclear sea-quark distribution.

  13. Property Loss / Damage Report Damage Loss Details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    Property Loss / Damage Report Damage Loss Details Date & Time of Damage / Loss: Type of damage / loss: Location - specific address / room: Project / Grant associated with damage / loss - grant Police: When was damage / loss first discovered - BY WHOM: Pictures available or attached? Was personal

  14. Steam System Losses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buchanan, M. G.; Sneary, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    % flash loss I 970.3 2. B x % flash loss =Ibs/hr loss Example: 10,000 x 9% =1900 Ibs/hr 10551 3. Lbs/hr loss x 24 =Ibs/day loss Example: _ 900 x 24 =121,600 Ibs/day 10551 4. Lbs/day loss x 365 =Ibs/yr loss Example: 21,600 x 365 =17,884,000 Ibs/yr... 10551 Estimated Dollar Loss: 5. Lbslyr x C = $ loss per year 1000 Example: 7.884.000 x $5.00 = ~39,420 loss per year to flashing I 1000 Estimated Energy Loss: 6. Lbs/yr loss x (F+G) =loss/yr Example: 7,884,000 x (180.70 + 970.30) = 9...

  15. Natural Gas Used for Repressuring

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential2,2,435,222 2,389,991 2,480,107averagethe

  16. Natural Gas Used for Repressuring

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963Residential2,2,435,222 2,389,991 2,480,107averagethe1-2015 Colorado NA

  17. Natural Gas Used for Repressuring

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172 3,009 2,8515,674,120Market83,8793,522,090

  18. Natural Gas Used for Repressuring

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172 3,009

  19. Evaluating Transformer Losses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grun, R. L. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    This paper outlines how to determine what transformer losses cost and how to evaluate transformer bids to optimize the investment....

  20. LHC Beam Loss Monitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arauzo-Garcia, A; Ferioli, G; Gschwendtner, E

    2001-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a beam loss system will be installed for a continuous surveillance of particle losses. These beam particles deposit their energy in the super-conducting coils leading to temperature increase, possible magnet quenches and damages. Detailed simulations have shown that a set of six detectors outside the cryostats of the quadrupole magnets in the regular arc cells are needed to completely diagnose the expected beam losses and hence protect the magnets. To characterize the quench levels different loss rates are identified. In order to cover all possible quench scenarios the dynamic range of the beam loss monitors has to be matched to the simulated loss rates. For that purpose different detector systems (PIN-diodes and ionization chambers) are compared.

  1. BEAM LOSS ESTIMATES AND CONTROL FOR THE BNL NEUTRINO FACILITY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WENG, W.-T.; LEE, Y.Y.; RAPARIA, D.; TSOUPAS, N.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; WEI, J.; ZHANG, S.Y.

    2005-05-16

    The requirement for low beam loss is very important both to protect the beam component, and to make the hands-on maintenance possible. In this report, the design considerations to achieving high intensity and low loss will be presented. We start by specifying the beam loss limit at every physical process followed by the proper design and parameters for realizing the required goals. The process considered in this paper include the emittance growth in the linac, the H{sup -} injection, the transition crossing, the coherent instabilities and the extraction losses.

  2. Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2013-03-19

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  3. Survivorship Clinic Hearing Loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brent, Roger

    of carboplatin High doses of radiation (30 Gy or 3000 cGy/rads or higher) to the head or brain, especially whenSurvivorship Clinic Hearing Loss Some chemotherapy drugs, other medications, or radiation needed are arranged in order of pitch, from low-pitched sounds (such as a man's voice) to very high-pitched sounds

  4. Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2010-01-01

    the case of oil and extraction, consumption of natural gasGas, Crude Oil and Distillates NGLs consumption in CALEBOil and Gas Extraction (Mcf) Re-pressuring Lease Fuel Consumption

  5. Information extraction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lemmond, Tracy D; Hanley, William G; Guensche, Joseph Wendell; Perry, Nathan C; Nitao, John J; Kidwell, Paul Brandon; Boakye, Kofi Agyeman; Glaser, Ron E; Prenger, Ryan James

    2014-05-13

    An information extraction system and methods of operating the system are provided. In particular, an information extraction system for performing meta-extraction of named entities of people, organizations, and locations as well as relationships and events from text documents are described herein.

  6. Midlatitude Ozone: Loss and Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    1 Lecture 17 Midlatitude Ozone: Loss and Trends ATOC/CHEM 5151 #12;2 Importance of midlatitude ozone · Covers most of the world's populated areas · Provides protection from UV #12;3 Ozone loss picture, c. 1988 #12;4 Lower vs. Upper stratosphere #12;5 Ozone loss, post 1988 · Discovery of ozone hole

  7. A method for determining frictional pressure losses in two phase flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, N.N.; Flemmer, R.L.C.

    1984-12-01

    An equation is presented for the extraction of frictional pressure loss from the total pressure drop in churn-turbulent bubble flow in a vertical pipe. This method accounts for the dependence of voidage on frictional loss, which may be a significant factor at high liquid flowrates.

  8. Natural Gas Used for Repressuring (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 View History U.S. 3,638,622 3,522,090 3,431,587 3,365,313 3,277,588 3,331,456 1936-2013 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 1,105 432 110 3,084 4,014 2,832...

  9. Natural Gas Used for Repressuring (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    NA NA NA NA NA NA 1973-2015 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico NA NA NA NA NA NA 1997-2015 Alabama NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Alaska NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2015 Arizona NA NA NA NA...

  10. Alabama Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers THURSDAY,ProvedFeet)ThousandDecade

  11. Alabama Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers THURSDAY,ProvedFeet)ThousandDecadeYear

  12. Alaska Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers4.32Elements) Gas and GasThousandDecade

  13. Alaska Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers4.32Elements) Gas and

  14. Arizona Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural Gas

  15. Arkansas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - Natural

  16. Arkansas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4 Arizona - NaturalYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul

  17. California Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724perSalesFuelMay-15 Jun-15 Jul-15 Aug-15Decade

  18. California Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0ProvedDecade2,948 2,724perSalesFuelMay-15 Jun-15 Jul-15

  19. Colorado Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct NovCubic

  20. Colorado Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct NovCubicYear Jan Feb Mar Apr

  1. Florida Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun JulProved2009

  2. Florida Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun JulProved2009Year Jan

  3. Illinois Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYearYear Jan Feb MarMay-15 Jun-15 Jul-15

  4. Indiana Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYearYear JanDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2

  5. Indiana Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYearYear JanDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Year Jan Feb

  6. Kansas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYearYearDecadeFuel ConsumptionThousandDecade Year-0

  7. Kansas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYearYearDecadeFuel ConsumptionThousandDecade

  8. Kentucky Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012 2013 2014Thousand Cubic Feet)

  9. Kentucky Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012 2013 2014Thousand Cubic Feet)Year Jan Feb Mar

  10. Louisiana Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012 2013(MillionYear Jan FebFuelThousandDecade Year-0

  11. Louisiana Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012 2013(MillionYear Jan FebFuelThousandDecade

  12. Maryland Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012Decade Year-0Year Jan Feb5.79 6.50 7.38 8.78

  13. Maryland Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012Decade Year-0Year Jan Feb5.79 6.50 7.38 8.78Year

  14. Michigan Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal19 15 15 152009 2010 2011

  15. Michigan Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal19 15 15 152009 2010 2011Year Jan Feb

  16. Mississippi Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal19 1522 35Feet)2009 2010 2011Decade

  17. Mississippi Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal19 1522 35Feet)2009 2010

  18. Missouri Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal19Fuel ConsumptionThousandDecade Year-0

  19. Missouri Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr 2012DecadeTotal19Fuel ConsumptionThousandDecade

  20. Montana Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar AprThousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-13.56

  1. Montana Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar AprThousand Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-13.56Year

  2. Nebraska Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172 3,009165,360IndustrialProcessed

  3. Nevada Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172Year Jan Feb (Million Cubic Feet)NA NADecade

  4. Nevada Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172Year Jan Feb (Million Cubic Feet)NA

  5. Ohio Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNew Field DiscoveriesElements)Decade

  6. Oregon Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNew FieldDecadeYear JanElements) Gas4.00

  7. Oregon Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNew FieldDecadeYear JanElements) Gas4.00Year Jan

  8. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNewMajorInput(Million Cubic Feet)NA NAinYear

  9. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear JanNewMajorInput(Million Cubic Feet)NA

  10. Tennessee Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672 7,2060 (Million3

  11. Texas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672 (Million CubicDecade Year-0

  12. Texas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawalsHome6,672 (Million CubicDecade Year-0Year

  13. Utah Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of theCubicEstimation ResultsYear Jan FebCubicDecade Year-0

  14. Utah Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of theCubicEstimation ResultsYear Jan FebCubicDecade

  15. Virginia Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of theCubicEstimation (Million Cubic Feet) VirginiaNAYear

  16. Virginia Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of theCubicEstimation (Million Cubic Feet) VirginiaNAYearYear

  17. Wyoming Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (BillionYearDecade Year-0 Year-1

  18. Wyoming Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments (BillionYearDecade Year-0

  19. TRITIUM EXTRACTION FACILITY ALARA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joye, BROTHERTON

    2005-04-19

    The primary mission of the Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) is to extract tritium from tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) that have been irradiated in a commercial light water reactor and to deliver tritium-containing gas to the Savannah River Site Facility 233-H. The tritium extraction segment provides the capability to deliver three (3) kilograms per year to the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile. The TEF includes processes, equipment and facilities capable of production-scale extraction of tritium while minimizing personnel radiation exposure, environmental releases, and waste generation.

  20. Polyacidic multiloading metal extractants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, R. J.; Campbell, J.; Henderson, D.K.; Henry, D. C. R.; Swart, R. M.; Tasker, P. A.; White, F. J.; Wood, J. L.; Yellowlees, L. J

    2008-01-01

    Novel polynucleating, di- and tri-acidic ligands have been designed to increase the molar and mass transport efficiencies for the recovery of base metals by solvent extraction.

  1. Fission Product Extraction Process

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28

    A new INL technology can simultaneously extract cesium and strontium for reuse. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  2. Gas Water Heater Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biermayer, Peter

    2012-01-01

    including delivered hot water and energy losses. Waterand 17% if hot water energy is included. INTRODUCTION Thedrawn, determines the hot water energy output. The current

  3. The 2mrad Crossing Angle Interaction Region and Extraction Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appleby, R.; U., Manchester; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Dadoun, O.; Bambade, P.; Parker, B.; Keller, L.; Moffeit, K.; Nosochkov, Y.; Seryi, A.; Spencer, C.; Carter, J.; Royal Holloway, U.of London; Napoly, O.; /DAPNIA, Saclay

    2006-07-12

    A complete optics design for the 2mrad crossing angle interaction region and extraction line was presented at Snowmass 2005. Since this time, the design task force has been working on developing and improving the performance of the extraction line. The work has focused on optimizing the final doublet parameters and on reducing the power losses resulting from the disrupted beam transport. In this paper, the most recent status of the 2mrad layout and the corresponding performance are presented.

  4. Naked Stony Corals: Skeleton Loss in Scleractinia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Medina, Monica; Collins, Allen G.; Takaoka, Tori L.; Kuehl, Jennifer; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-01-01

    LBNL-59177 Naked Stony Corals: Skeleton Loss in ScleractiniaKuehl, Jeffrey L. Boore Naked Stony Corals: Skeleton Loss in

  5. Photocurrent extraction efficiency in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemp, K. W.; Wong, C. T. O.; Hoogland, S. H.; Sargent, E. H.

    2013-11-18

    The efficiency of photocurrent extraction was studied directly inside operating Colloidal Quantum Dot (CQD) photovoltaic devices. A model was derived from first principles for a thin film p-n junction with a linearly spatially dependent electric field. Using this model, we were able to clarify the origins of recent improvement in CQD solar cell performance. From current-voltage diode characteristics under 1 sun conditions, we extracted transport lengths ranging from 39 nm to 86 nm for these materials. Characterization of the intensity dependence of photocurrent extraction revealed that the dominant loss mechanism limiting the transport length is trap-mediated recombination.

  6. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-13

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

  7. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

    1994-01-01

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  8. Efficiency loss in resource allocation games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Yunjian

    2012-01-01

    The overarching goals of this thesis are to quantify the efficiency loss due to market participant strategic behavior, and to design proper pricing mechanisms that reduce the efficiency loss. The concept of efficiency loss ...

  9. Modeling particle loss in ventilation ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sippola, M R; Nazaroff, William W

    2003-01-01

    m) (c) 85% ASHRAE filters at air intake high-loss ducts low-loss ducts fractional fate (-) exhausted indoors indoorssurface deposition supply & return duct deposition filtered

  10. Extracting the Eliashberg Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesof Energy8)highlightsNewExtracellularExtractingExtracting

  11. Wetland Losses and Human Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    American Wetlands Peatlands of Alaska and Canada Playa Lakes MAV Prairie Potholes Coastal Wetlands mil ha (89 mil) ·Alaska =69 mil ha United States: =127 mil haCanada: =111 mil ha Manitoba (22.5) Ontario (29.2) = 51.7 mil ha 41% 53% Loss** =238 mil ha Canada 53% Alaska 29% Lower US 18%Lower US 29

  12. Saving Lives and Mitigating Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    Saving Lives and Mitigating Losses Wind and Structural Engineering Research Facility #12;Clemson University's Wind and Structural Engineering Research (WiSER) Facility is a premier laboratory for the study of wind effects on structures. Testing to assess the structural performance of buildings and bridges can

  13. Optimization of quantum interferometric metrological sensors in the presence of photon loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tae-Woo Lee; Sean D. Huver; Hwang Lee; Lev Kaplan; Steven B. McCracken; Changjun Min; Dmitry B. Uskov; Christoph F. Wildfeuer; Georgios Veronis; Jonathan P. Dowling

    2009-08-20

    We optimize two-mode, entangled, number states of light in the presence of loss in order to maximize the extraction of the available phase information in an interferometer. Our approach optimizes over the entire available input Hilbert space with no constraints, other than fixed total initial photon number. We optimize to maximize the Fisher information, which is equivalent to minimizing the phase uncertainty. We find that in the limit of zero loss the optimal state is the so-called N00N state, for small loss, the optimal state gradually deviates from the N00N state, and in the limit of large loss the optimal state converges to a generalized two-mode coherent state, with a finite total number of photons. The results provide a general protocol for optimizing the performance of a quantum optical interferometer in the presence of photon loss, with applications to quantum imaging, metrology, sensing, and information processing.

  14. Solid phase extraction membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carlson, Kurt C [Nashville, TN; Langer, Roger L [Hudson, WI

    2002-11-05

    A wet-laid, porous solid phase extraction sheet material that contains both active particles and binder and that possesses excellent wet strength is described. The binder is present in a relatively small amount while the particles are present in a relatively large amount. The sheet material is sufficiently strong and flexible so as to be pleatable so that, for example, it can be used in a cartridge device.

  15. Innovative Drying and Nutrients Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the extraction process. This method evaporates the water from the products but also drives off up to 70 percent dimethyl ether to extract the water from the material. The new process does not require the addition of heat to evaporate the water during the extraction process. Dimethyl ether has a lower heat

  16. CHEM333: Experiment 2: Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taber, Douglass

    CHEM­333: Experiment 2: Extraction: Prelab Assignment: Read chapter 4. In this lab you will perform an extraction (Chapter 4; Experiment B). Extraction is one of the easiest purification methods in the organic are insoluble in neutral/acidic water but are soluble in basic water. Follow the protocol and make sure that you

  17. CONTINUOUS EXTRACTED BEAM IN THE AGS FAST EXTERNAL BEAM LINE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GLENN,J.W.; TSOUPAS,N.; BROWN,K.A.; BIRYUKOV,V.M.

    2001-06-18

    A method to split off a few percent of the 6 x 10{sup 13} AGS beam delivered to the Slow External Beam (SEB) lines and send it down the Fast External Beam line (FEB) has been developed. The mission is to feed a counter experiment off the FEB that directly measures the neutrino mass using the muon storage ring. The use of normal thin septum splitters would have an excessive loss overhead and been optically difficult. The AGS Slow Extraction uses a third integer resonance with sextuple strength so the resonance width is a few percent of the beam width. This results in a low density tail which will be clipped by a bent crystal and deflected into the FEB channel. This clipping off of the tail should reduce losses in the SEB transport line. Details of modeled orbits, particle distribution and extraction trajectories into and out off the crystal will be given.

  18. Inverse hydrochemical models of aqueous extracts tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2010-01-01

    years to improve water extraction methods, develop numericalreactions during water extraction, redox processes were notAranyossy, J.F. , 2001. Extraction of water and solutes from

  19. Extracting the Eliashberg Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesof Energy8)highlightsNewExtracellular ProteinsExtracting

  20. Extracting the Eliashberg Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesof Energy8)highlightsNewExtracellularExtracting the

  1. Extracting the Eliashberg Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesof Energy8)highlightsNewExtracellularExtracting

  2. Loss mechanisms in turbine tip clearance flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Arthur (Arthur C.)

    2011-01-01

    Numerical simulations of tip clearance ow have been carried out to dene the loss generation mechanisms associated with tip leakage in unshrouded axial turbines. Mix- ing loss between the leakage, which takes the form of a ...

  3. The "skinny" on healthy weight loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shoubridge, Eric

    restrictions One size does not fit all Taboos lead to overconsumption #12;Disadvantages ­Yo-Yo Dieting ENERGY IN ENERGY OUT WEIGHT LOSSWEIGHT GAIN #12;What is "healthy" weight loss? Steady weight loss (1

  4. Country Music and the Expression of Loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmon, Marcus Desmond

    2008-01-01

    Country Music and the Expression of Loss The recipient ofLoss, and mourning in the music of Emmylou Harris by Marcusthe intersection between music and cultural practice. In my

  5. Induction machine stray loss from inter-bar currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Englebretson, Steven Carl

    2009-01-01

    Stray load loss refers generally to the sources of induction machine loss not accounted for by typical calculations of primary or secondary copper loss, no load core loss, or friction and windage loss. Harmonic rotor bar ...

  6. 7, 1009710129, 2007 Chemical ozone loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ACPD 7, 10097­10129, 2007 Chemical ozone loss in the Arctic winter 1991­1992 S. Tilmes et al. Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions Chemical ozone loss in the Arctic winter 1991­1992 S. Tilmes 1 , R. M Chemical ozone loss in the Arctic winter 1991­1992 S. Tilmes et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  7. 4, 21672238, 2004 Ozone loss and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 4, 2167­2238, 2004 Ozone loss and chlorine activation in the Arctic winters 1991­2003 S Union 2004 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Ozone loss and chlorine activation Correspondence to: S. Tilmes (simone.tilmes@t-online.de) 2167 #12;ACPD 4, 2167­2238, 2004 Ozone loss and chlorine

  8. Loss modeling for pricing catastrophic bonds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sircar, Jyotirmoy

    2009-05-15

    loss model in the form of a power curve with upper and lower cut-offs is developed and used in conjunction with the previously defined demand model in order to estimate loss ratios. The loss model is calibrated and validated for different types...

  9. Droplet-Based Segregation and Extraction of Concentrated Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buie, C R; Buckley, P; Hamilton, J; Ness, K D; Rose, K A

    2007-02-23

    Microfluidic analysis often requires sample concentration and separation techniques to isolate and detect analytes of interest. Complex or scarce samples may also require an orthogonal separation and detection method or off-chip analysis to confirm results. To perform these additional steps, the concentrated sample plug must be extracted from the primary microfluidic channel with minimal sample loss and dilution. We investigated two extraction techniques; injection of immiscible fluid droplets into the sample stream (''capping'''') and injection of the sample into an immiscible fluid stream (''extraction''). From our results we conclude that capping is the more effective partitioning technique. Furthermore, this functionality enables additional off-chip post-processing procedures such as DNA/RNA microarray analysis, realtime polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and culture growth to validate chip performance.

  10. Actinide extraction methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Harrup, Mason K. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Tillotson, Richard D. (Moore, ID) [Moore, ID; Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID) [Pocatello, ID

    2010-09-21

    Methods of separating actinides from lanthanides are disclosed. A regio-specific/stereo-specific dithiophosphinic acid having organic moieties is provided in an organic solvent that is then contacted with an acidic medium containing an actinide and a lanthanide. The method can extend to separating actinides from one another. Actinides are extracted as a complex with the dithiophosphinic acid. Separation compositions include an aqueous phase, an organic phase, dithiophosphinic acid, and at least one actinide. The compositions may include additional actinides and/or lanthanides. A method of producing a dithiophosphinic acid comprising at least two organic moieties selected from aromatics and alkyls, each moiety having at least one functional group is also disclosed. A source of sulfur is reacted with a halophosphine. An ammonium salt of the dithiophosphinic acid product is precipitated out of the reaction mixture. The precipitated salt is dissolved in ether. The ether is removed to yield the dithiophosphinic acid.

  11. Crystal extraction at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrigan, Richard A., Jr.; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01

    Luminosity-driven channeling extraction was observed for the first time in a 900 GeV study at the Fermilab Tevatron carried out in the 1995-1996 period. This experiment, Fermilab E853, demonstrated that useful TeV level beams can be extracted from a superconducting accelerator during high luminosity collider operations without unduly affecting the background at the collider detectors. Multipass extraction was found to increase the efficiency of the process significantly. The beam extraction efficiency was in the range of 25%. The history of the experiment is reviewed. Special attention is paid to results related to collimation.

  12. Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses This tip sheet on minimizing boiler short cycling losses provides how-to advice for improving industrial...

  13. Multilayer Platform for Ultra-Low-Loss Waveguide Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01

    1, 2012 Multilayer Platform for Ultra-Low-Loss Waveguidepreviously demonstrated ultra-low-loss technologies. Groupet al. : MULTILAYER PLATFORM FOR ULTRA-LOW-LOSS WAVEGUIDE

  14. INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP BIOMEDICAL INFORMATION EXTRACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP BIOMEDICAL INFORMATION EXTRACTION held in conjunction with the International BIOMEDICAL INFORMATION EXTRACTION PROCEEDINGS Borovets, Bulgaria 18 September 2009 ISBN 978-954-452-013-7 Designed and Printed by INCOMA Ltd. Shoumen, Bulgaria ii #12;Welcome to the Biomedical Information

  15. Parameter extraction from I-V characteristics of PV devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macabebe, Erees Queen B.; Sheppard, Charles J.; Dyk, E. Ernest van

    2011-01-15

    Device parameters such as series and shunt resistances, saturation current and diode ideality factor influence the behaviour of the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of solar cells and photovoltaic modules. It is necessary to determine these parameters since performance parameters are derived from the I-V curve and information provided by the device parameters are useful in analyzing performance losses. This contribution presents device parameters of CuIn(Se,S){sub 2}- and Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2}-based solar cells, as well as, CuInSe{sub 2}, mono- and multicrystalline silicon modules determined using a parameter extraction routine that employs Particle Swarm Optimization. The device parameters of the CuIn(Se,S){sub 2}- and Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S){sub 2}-based solar cells show that the contribution of recombination mechanisms exhibited by high saturation current when coupled with the effects of parasitic resistances result in lower maximum power and conversion efficiency. Device parameters of photovoltaic modules extracted from I-V characteristics obtained at higher temperature show increased saturation current. The extracted values also reflect the adverse effect of temperature on parasitic resistances. The parameters extracted from I-V curves offer an understanding of the different mechanisms involved in the operation of the devices. The parameter extraction routine utilized in this study is a useful tool in determining the device parameters which reveal the mechanisms affecting device performance. (author)

  16. Analysis of TPV Network Losses (a Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DM DePoy; MW Dashiell; DD Rahner; LR Danielson; JE Oppenlander; JL Vell; RJ Wehrer

    2004-12-08

    This talk focuses on the theoretical analysis of electrical losses associated with electrically networking large numbers of TPV cells to produce high power TPV power generators.

  17. Loan Loss Reserves: Lessons from the Field

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar, held on Sept. 20, 2010, provides in formation on loan loss reserve funds and lessons from the field on their use.

  18. Beam Cooling with ionisation losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Rubbia; A. Ferrari; Y. Kadi; V. Vlachoudis

    2006-02-03

    A novel type of particle "cooling", called Ionization Cooling, is applicable to slow (v of the order of 0.1c) ions stored in a small ring. The many traversals through a thin foil enhance the nuclear reaction probability, in a steady configuration in which ionisation losses are recovered at each turn by a RF-cavity. For a uniform target "foil" the longitudinal momentum spread diverges exponentially since faster (slower) particles ionise less (more) than the average. In order to "cool" also longitudinally, a chromaticity has to be introduced with a wedge shaped "foil". Multiple scattering and straggling are then "cooled" in all three dimensions, with a method similar to the one of synchrotron cooling, but valid for low energy ions. Particles then stably circulate in the beam indefinitely, until they undergo for instance nuclear processes in the thin target foil. This new method is under consideration for the nuclear production of a few MeV/A ion beams. Simple reactions, for instance Li 7 + D Li 8 + p, are more favourably exploited with the heavier ion colliding against a gas-jet D2 target. Kinematics is generally very favourable, with emission angles in a narrow angular cone and a relatively concentrated outgoing energy spectrum which allows an efficient collection as a neutral gas in a tiny volume with a technology at high temperatures perfected at ISOLDE. It is however of a much more general applicability. The method appears capable of producing a "table top" storage ring with an accumulation rate in excess of 10**14 Li-8 radioactive ion/s for possible use for radioactive beams for physics studies (for example for beta-beams) or for therapy.

  19. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF PHENOLS FROM WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greminger, Douglas C.

    2012-01-01

    Waste Water Treatment by Solvent Extraction," Canadian J.A.F. Preuss, "Extraction of Phenol from Water with a Liquid1980 SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF PHENOLS FROM WATER LP,WRENCE BERv

  20. Information extraction from broadcast news 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotoh, Yoshihiko; Renals, Steve

    2000-04-15

    This paper discusses the development of trainable statistical models for extracting content from television and radio news broadcasts. In particular, we concentrate on statistical finite-state models for identifying proper ...

  1. Loss characterization in microLoss characterization in micro--cavitiescavities using the thermalusing the thermal bistabilitybistability effecteffect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loss characterization in microLoss characterization in micro--cavitiescavities using Scattering limited Q #12;Quick Test for Loss CharacterizationQuick Test for Loss Characterization #12 to characterize different loss mechanisms in these structuresdifferent loss mechanisms in these structures nn

  2. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

  3. Modeling particle loss in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-04-01

    Empirical equations were developed and applied to predict losses of 0.01-100 {micro}m airborne particles making a single pass through 120 different ventilation duct runs typical of those found in mid-sized office buildings. For all duct runs, losses were negligible for submicron particles and nearly complete for particles larger than 50 {micro}m. The 50th percentile cut-point diameters were 15 {micro}m in supply runs and 25 {micro}m in return runs. Losses in supply duct runs were higher than in return duct runs, mostly because internal insulation was present in portions of supply duct runs, but absent from return duct runs. Single-pass equations for particle loss in duct runs were combined with models for predicting ventilation system filtration efficiency and particle deposition to indoor surfaces to evaluate the fates of particles of indoor and outdoor origin in an archetypal mechanically ventilated building. Results suggest that duct losses are a minor influence for determining indoor concentrations for most particle sizes. Losses in ducts were of a comparable magnitude to indoor surface losses for most particle sizes. For outdoor air drawn into an unfiltered ventilation system, most particles smaller than 1 {micro}m are exhausted from the building. Large particles deposit within the building, mostly in supply ducts or on indoor surfaces. When filters are present, most particles are either filtered or exhausted. The fates of particles generated indoors follow similar trends as outdoor particles drawn into the building.

  4. Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

    2009-04-28

    An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

  5. Cesium and strontium extraction using a mixed extractant solvent including crown ether and calixarene extractants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

    2007-11-06

    A mixed extractant solvent including calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from an acidic solution. The DtBu18C6 may be present from approximately 0.01 M to approximately 0.4M, such as from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may form an organic phase in an extraction system that also includes an aqueous phase. Methods of extracting cesium and strontium as well as strontium alone are also disclosed.

  6. Low loss laser glass: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izumitani, T.; Toratani, H.; Meissner, H.E.

    1987-01-15

    The objective of this work was a process development on making a laser glass with loss coefficient of 10/sup -4/cm/sup -1/ at 1.05..mu... The key issues for making such a low loss glass will be to use pure raw materials, to reduce OH content and to prevent contamination from the melting environment. A sublimation method was tried to prepare pure P/sub 2/O/sub 5/ batch material. In an attempt to distinguish contributions to the overall loss, glasses were melted in furnaces which were controlled in moisture as well as contamination. Evaluation of glass samples at LLNL are expected to provide guidance on the importance of various process parameters. A new 0.5 liter furnace which almost completely prevents contamination by the furnace environment has been constructed to obtain useful information for making a low loss glass on a production scale.

  7. Telling Absence: War Widows, Loss and Memory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loipponen, Jaana

    2009-01-01

    This thesis concerns feminist sociological analysis of war loss and its consequences as experienced and told by Finnish Karelian war widows of World War 2. They lost their partners and had to leave their homes by force, ...

  8. High temperature elemental losses and mineralogical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thy, P.; Jenkins, B. M.; Grundvig, S.; Shiraki, R.; Lesher, C. E.

    2006-01-01

    ashes. The K 2 O loss for wood ash commences at 900–1000 8C.Carbonate is detected in the wood ashes to about 700–800 8Cphases detected in the wood ashes (pericline and larnite)

  9. The connection between mass loss and nucleosynthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacco Th. van Loon

    2008-01-03

    I discuss the relationship between mass loss and nucleosynthesis on the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB). Because of thermal pulses and possibly other mixing processes, products of nucleosynthesis can be brought to the surface of AGB stars, increasingly so as the star becomes more luminous, cooler, and unstable against pulsation of its tenuous mantle. As a result, mass loss is at its most extreme when dredge-up is too. As the high rate of mass loss truncates AGB evolution, it determines the enrichment of interstellar space with the AGB nucleosynthesis products. The changing composition of the stellar atmosphere also affects the mass-loss process, most obviously in the formation of dust grains - which play an important role in driving the wind of AGB stars.

  10. Assessing Phosphorous Loss to Protect Surface Water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Raul

    2005-01-01

    programs. It is an integrated approach that considers soil and landscape features in order tx H2O | pg. 10 Assessing Phosphorus Loss to Protect Surface Water to find appropriate phosphorus management practices by estimating phosphorus delivery...

  11. MATERIALS AND METHODS 1) DNA extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    MATERIALS AND METHODS 1) DNA extraction · DNA was extracted from the ileo-cecal nodes of 475 Holstein cows from two herds using the Qiagen DNA extraction kit (Valencia, CA). 2) Map detection · Map was extracted from ileo-cecal nodes using Ambion's MagMAX Total Nucleic Acid Isolation kit (Austin, TX

  12. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ascari, Matthew

    2012-10-28

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world’s ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today’s state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources.

  13. U.S. Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0Proved ReservesData2009 2010Year Jan FebBarrels) Area:All

  14. U.S. Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal Consumers inYear Jan Feb MarCubic2009 2010Area:

  15. New Mexico Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172YearDecadeElements)Processed

  16. New Mexico Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,Decade Year-03.823,172YearDecadeElements)ProcessedYear Jan Feb

  17. New York Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunPriceElements) Gas21

  18. New York Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunPriceElements) Gas21Year Jan

  19. North Dakota Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan FebElements) Industrial(Million

  20. North Dakota Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYear Jan FebElements) Industrial(MillionYear Jan Feb Mar

  1. South Dakota Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawals (MillionYearProcessed (Million

  2. South Dakota Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear,DecadeYearbyWithdrawals (MillionYearProcessed (MillionYear Jan Feb

  3. West Virginia Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageMonthly","10/2015"4,"Ames5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal,Demand Module of

  4. A study of substitution solvents in asphalt fume extraction and the effects of heating duration and temperature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curry, Noel Thomas

    1981-01-01

    may be used as substitute solvents for the solvent extraction analytical method for asphalt furres proposed by NlnSH and currently in use by OSHA. Benzene is known to orovide IC0% effic- 1 iency in asphalt fume extraction. The results..., rather than the solvents' effic- iency loss, was responsible for the differences. The importance of the data lies in the fact that the other two test solvents exhibited a consiatency equal to that of benzene. 'Ahile the exact coefficient of any...

  5. Uranium Ore Uranium is extracted

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milling of Uranium Ore Uranium is extracted from ore with strong acids or bases. The uranium is concentrated in a solid substance called"yellowcake." Chemical Conversion Plants convert the uranium in yellowcake to uranium hexafluoride (UF6 ), a compound that can be made into nuclear fuel. Enrichment

  6. Facial Feature Extraction Using a Probabilistic Mustafa Berkay Yilmaza

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erdogan, Hakan

    approaches in facial feature extraction accuracy. Keywords: facial feature extraction, probabilistic method feature extraction methods in the literature Facial feature extraction from a face image has beenFacial Feature Extraction Using a Probabilistic Approach Mustafa Berkay Yilmaza , Hakan Erdogana

  7. Reducing the losses of optical metamaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Anan

    2010-12-15

    The field of metamaterials is driven by fascinating and far-reaching theoretical visions, such as perfect lenses, invisibility cloaking, and enhanced optical nonlinearities. However, losses have become the major obstacle towards real world applications in the optical regime. Reducing the losses of optical metamaterials becomes necessary and extremely important. In this thesis, two approaches are taken to reduce the losses. One is to construct an indefinite medium. Indefinite media are materials where not all the principal components of the permittivity and permeability tensors have the same sign. They do not need the resonances to achieve negative permittivity, {var_epsilon}. So, the losses can be comparatively small. To obtain indefinite media, three-dimensional (3D) optical metallic nanowire media with different structures are designed. They are numerically demonstrated that they are homogeneous effective indefinite anisotropic media by showing that their dispersion relations are hyperbolic. Negative group refraction and pseudo focusing are observed. Another approach is to incorporate gain into metamaterial nanostructures. The nonlinearity of gain is included by a generic four-level atomic model. A computational scheme is presented, which allows for a self-consistent treatment of a dispersive metallic photonic metamaterial coupled to a gain material incorporated into the nanostructure using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The loss compensations with gain are done for various structures, from 2D simplified models to 3D realistic structures. Results show the losses of optical metamaterials can be effectively compensated by gain. The effective gain coefficient of the combined system can be much larger than the bulk gain counterpart, due to the strong local-field enhancement.

  8. Draft "Michigan Saves" Loan Loss Reserve Fund Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A sample loan loss reserve agreement between a state or local government and a financial institution setting the terms and conditions of the loan loss reserve fund.

  9. Understanding Collection-Related Losses in Organic Solar Cells...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding Collection-Related Losses in Organic Solar Cells Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Understanding Collection-Related Losses in Organic Solar Cells...

  10. Parton Energy Loss with Detailed Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enke Wang; Xin-Nian Wang

    2001-06-28

    Stimulated gluon emission and thermal absorption in addition to induced radiation are considered for an energetic parton propagating inside a quark- gluon plasma. In the presence of thermal gluons, stimulated emission reduces while absorption increases the parton's energy. The net effect is a reduction of the parton energy loss. Though decreasing asymptotically as $T/E$ with the parton energy, the relative reduction is found to be important for intermediate energies. The modified energy dependence of the energy loss will affect the shape of suppression of moderately high $p_T$ hadrons due to jet quenching in high-energy heavy-ion collisions.

  11. Handling Food and Supplies during Power Loss 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anding, Jenna

    2005-09-30

    or uncertain, reduce your risk of getting sick by buying food that doesn?t require refrigeration or prepara- tion. Suggested Food Handling Food and Supplies during Power Loss ? Ready-to-eat canned/pouched meats/meals (e.g., tuna, chicken, spaghetti... or gas commonly occurs during storms or other natural disasters. However, power loss may continue for weeks after the storm has passed, especially if an area has been damaged by floods or high winds. If you are in an area where power is limited...

  12. Extracting energies from the vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    She-Sheng Xue

    2000-11-27

    We present and study a possible mechanism of extracting energies from the vacuum by external classical fields. Taking a constant magnetic field as an example, we discuss why and how the vacuum energy can be released in the context of quantum field theories. In addition, we give a theoretical computation showing how much vacuum energies can be released. The possibilities of experimentally detecting such a vacuum-energy releasing are discussed.

  13. Loss and thermal noise in plasmonic waveguides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syms, R. R. A. Solymar, L.

    2014-06-07

    Rytov's theory of thermally generated radiation is used to find the noise in two-dimensional passive guides based on an arbitrary distribution of lossy isotropic dielectric. To simplify calculations, the Maxwell curl equations are approximated using difference equations that also permit a transmission-line analogy, and material losses are assumed to be low enough for modal losses to be estimated using perturbation theory. It is shown that an effective medium representation of each mode is valid for both loss and noise and, hence, that a one-dimensional model can be used to estimate the best achievable noise factor when a given mode is used in a communications link. This model only requires knowledge of the real and imaginary parts of the modal dielectric constant. The former can be found by solving the lossless eigenvalue problem, while the latter can be estimated using perturbation theory. Because of their high loss, the theory is most relevant to plasmonic waveguides, and its application is demonstrated using single interface, slab, and slot guide examples. The best noise performance is offered by the long-range plasmon supported by the slab guide.

  14. Polarization conversion loss in birefringent crystalline resonators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polarization conversion loss in birefringent crystalline resonators Ivan S. Grudinin,* Guoping Lin gallery modes in birefringent crystalline resonators are investigated. We experimentally investigate://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OL.38.002410 Crystalline whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are known for compact size

  15. Revolving Loan Funds and Loan Loss Reserves

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) State Energy Program (SEP) guidance to states, Indian tribes, and overseas U.S. territories receiving SEP grants under the 209 Recovery Act dealing with loan loss reserves for revolving loan funds.

  16. Ethanol Production: Energy, Economic, and Environmental Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    of biomass convert solar energy into plant material, but this conversion requires suitable soil, nutrients.1% of the solar energy. Two early studies by the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) con- cerning ethanol productionEthanol Production: Energy, Economic, and Environmental Losses David Pimentel, Tad Patzek

  17. Modification of Phenolic Oximes for Copper Extraction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forgan, Ross Stewart

    2008-01-01

    The thesis deals with the modification of salicylaldoxime-based reagents used in hydrometallurgical extraction, addressing rational ligand design to tune copper(II) extractant strengths and also the development of reagents ...

  18. Annotation for Information Extraction from Mammography Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Daniel L.

    Annotation for Information Extraction from Mammography Reports Selen BOZKURTa , Kemal Hakan to reduce variation in practice. Since radiology reports are created as unstructured text reports, Natural language processing (NLP) techniques are needed to extract structured information from reports in order

  19. Accelerated solvent extraction of petroleum contaminated sediments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauguss, Jeffery Lynn

    1997-01-01

    Attempts have been made in recent years to find acceptable alternatives to classical soxhlet extraction of petroleum contaminated sediments. One such method that is very promising is accelerated solvent extraction also ...

  20. Beam transfer and extraction at LAMPF II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colton, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    Protons will be single-turn extracted from the LAMPF II synchrotron at 30 Hz. On alternate pulses they will be single-turn injected into a storage ring. Both processes utilize fast kickers and Lambertson septum magnets. Half-integer resonant extraction will be used to slow-extract the beam from the storage ring over a time spread of 1/15 s. The slow extraction occurs using electrostatic wire and iron septa.

  1. Extracting Information from Web Documents based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    -Entity Extraction Web pages Conceptual-Entity Representation #12;Conceptual Entities Extraction ­ Parsing Html Structure consists of 3 main steps: Parsing html structure In web pages, the structure and visual clues parse web pages into html structure tree #12;Conceptual Entities Extraction ­ Recognizing Entities

  2. Seismic Fragility Analysis and Loss Estimation for Concrete Structures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bai, Jong Wha

    2012-02-14

    seismic vulnerability of concrete structures and effective in quantifying the uncertainties in the loss estimation process....

  3. SOME THOUGHTS ABOUT THE DESIGN OF LOSS Authors: Christian Hennig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hennig, Christian

    are defined in terms of loss functions in the sense that loss functions define what a "good" estimator to minimize loss functions. The impact of subjective decisions to the design of loss functions is also-estimator, linear regres- sion. AMS Subject Classification: · 62A01, 62C05, 62G09, 62J05, 62M20 #12;2 Hennig

  4. An efficient online feature extraction algorithm for neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bozorgmehr, Pouya

    2009-01-01

    facial feature extraction method. Neurocomputing, 2008. [21]Many feature extraction methods have been proposed that3]. Most feature extraction methods assume access to the

  5. Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandusky, John V. (Albuquerque, NM); Pitts, Todd Alan (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2008-09-02

    Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging methods and apparatus are disclosed for producing three dimensional (3D) images of a target within a scene. Apparatus and methods according to the present invention comprise a light source providing at least three wavelengths (passbands) of illumination that are each loss modulated, phase delayed and simultaneously directed to illuminate the target. Phase delayed light backscattered from the target is spectrally filtered, demodulated and imaged by a planar detector array. Images of the intensity distributions for the selected wavelengths are obtained under modulated and unmodulated (dc) illumination of the target, and the information contained in the images combined to produce a 3D image of the target.

  6. Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandusky, John V. (Albuquerque, NM); Pitts, Todd Alan (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2009-02-24

    Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging methods and apparatus are disclosed for producing three dimensional (3D) images of a target within a scene. Apparatus and methods according to the present invention comprise a light source providing at least three wavelengths (passbands) of illumination that are each loss modulated, phase delayed and simultaneously directed to illuminate the target. Phase delayed light backscattered from the target is spectrally filtered, demodulated and imaged by a planar detector array. Images of the intensity distributions for the selected wavelengths are obtained under modulated and unmodulated (dc) illumination of the target, and the information contained in the images combined to produce a 3D image of the target.

  7. Scannerless laser range imaging using loss modulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandusky, John V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-08-09

    A scannerless 3-D imaging apparatus is disclosed which utilizes an amplitude modulated cw light source to illuminate a field of view containing a target of interest. Backscattered light from the target is passed through one or more loss modulators which are modulated at the same frequency as the light source, but with a phase delay .delta. which can be fixed or variable. The backscattered light is demodulated by the loss modulator and detected with a CCD, CMOS or focal plane array (FPA) detector to construct a 3-D image of the target. The scannerless 3-D imaging apparatus, which can operate in the eye-safe wavelength region 1.4-1.7 .mu.m and which can be constructed as a flash LADAR, has applications for vehicle collision avoidance, autonomous rendezvous and docking, robotic vision, industrial inspection and measurement, 3-D cameras, and facial recognition.

  8. Open quantum systems with loss and gain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hichem Eleuch; Ingrid Rotter

    2015-04-13

    We consider different properties of small open quantum systems coupled to an environment and described by a non-Hermitian Hamilton operator. Of special interest is the non-analytical behavior of the eigenvalues in the vicinity of singular points, the so-called exceptional points (EPs), at which the eigenvalues of two states coalesce and the corresponding eigenfunctions are linearly dependent from one another. The phases of the eigenfunctions are not rigid in approaching an EP and providing therewith the possibility to put information from the environment into the system. All characteristic properties of non-Hermitian quantum systems hold true not only for natural open quantum systems that suffer loss due to their embedding into the continuum of scattering wavefunctions. They appear also in systems coupled to different layers some of which provide gain to the system. Thereby gain and loss, respectively, may be fixed inside every layer, i.e. characteristic of it.

  9. Recent Stirling engine loss - understanding results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tew, R.C.; Thieme, L.G.; Dudenhoefer, J.E.

    1994-09-01

    For several years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and other US Government agencies have been funding experimental and analytical efforts to improve the understanding of Stirling thermodynamic losses. NASA`s objective is to improve Stirling engine design capability to support the development of new engines for space power. An overview of these efforts was last given at the 1988 IECEC. Recent results of this research are reviewed.

  10. Iron loss calculation for synchronous reluctance machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonardi, F.; Matsuo, T.; Lipo, T.A. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A numerical method for iron loss calculation is presented in this paper. The method is suitable for any synchronous and most dc machines, especially if the current waveforms are known a priori . This technique will be principally useful for high speed machines and in particular for the synchronous reluctance machines and in particular for the synchronous reluctance machine, where the iron losses are often an important issue. The calculation is based on Finite Element Analysis, which provides the flux density waveforms in the iron, and on the Fourier Analysis of these waveforms. Several Finite Element Simulations are necessary to obtain the induced voltage versus time waveforms. To reduce the post-processing time the majority of the elements of the model are grouped together to create super elements. Also the periodicity of the motor can be used to reduce the number of required simulations. The method is applied to the calculation of the iron losses of a synchronous reluctance generator, and a number of interesting results are discussed in the paper.

  11. Liquid-Liquid Extraction Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack D. Law; Terry A. Todd

    2008-12-01

    Solvent extraction processing has demonstrated the ability to achieve high decontamination factors for uranium and plutonium while operating at high throughputs. Historical application of solvent extraction contacting equipment implies that for the HA cycle (primary separation of uranium and plutonium from fission products) the equipment of choice is pulse columns. This is likely due to relatively short residence times (as compared to mixer-settlers) and the ability of the columns to tolerate solids in the feed. Savannah River successfully operated the F-Canyon with centrifugal contactors in the HA cycle (which have shorter residence times than columns). All three contactors have been successfully deployed in uranium and plutonium purification cycles. Over the past 20 years, there has been significant development of centrifugal contactor designs and they have become very common for research and development applications. New reprocessing plants are being planned in Russia and China and the United States has done preliminary design studies on future reprocessing plants. The choice of contactors for all of these facilities is yet to be determined.

  12. System Losses and Assessment Trade Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shropshire; Steve Piet; Nick Soelberg; Robert Cherry; Roger Henry; David Meikrantz; Greg Teske; Eric Shaber; Candido Pereira

    2009-09-01

    This Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) study has developed new analysis methods to examine old and new technology options toward the goal of improving fuel cycle systems. We have integrated participants and information from AFCI Systems Analysis, Transmutation Fuels, Separations, and Waste Form Campaigns in the Systems Losses and Assessment Trade Study. The initial objectives of this study were to 1) increase understanding of system interdependencies and thereby identify system trade-offs that may yield important insights, 2) define impacts of separations product purity on fuel manufacture and transmutation reactivity, 3) define impacts from transuranic (TRU) losses to waste, 4) identify the interrelationships involved in fuels and separations technology performance, and 5) identify system configuration adjustments with the greatest potential for influencing system losses. While bounding and analyzing this initial problem, we also identified significantly higher-level programmatic drivers with broad implications to the current fuel cycle research charter and the general issue of a DOE complex wide need for a comprehensive and integrated nuclear material management as addressed by the new DOE Order 410.2 titled “Management of Nuclear Materials”. The initial modeling effort developed in this study for a much smaller subset of material (i.e., commercial fuel) and a selected transmutation scheme (i.e., fast reactor recycling) is a necessary first step towards examining a broader set of nuclear material management options, dispositioning strategies and integrated waste management options including potential areas of research leverage. The primary outcome from this initial study has been an enhanced integration among Campaigns and associated insights and analysis methods. Opportunities for improved understanding between the groups abound. The above lanthanide-actinide example highlights the importance of evaluating options via integration across the Campaigns. Plans for Fiscal Year 2010 are being made in a coordinated fashion such that the knowledge gained from the research performed by the Campaigns can benefit on-going work of the study, and that improved understanding of the system relationships can be used to guide the specific research and development (R&D) activities within the Campaigns. In FY-10, the System Losses and Assessment Trade Study will carry-over activities from FY-09. We will continue to refine impurity and loss estimates and impurity limits on fuels by incorporating results from ongoing R&D. And we will begin work on an enhanced nuclear material management model to allow us to continue to improve our overall system understanding of the trade-offs between separations, fuel fabrication, waste forms, waste disposition, SNM losses, reactor performance, and proliferation resistance. In the future, we can also better understand how used fuel and other forms of remote-handled SNM can be better integrated into an overall nuclear material management program that will evolve for the DOE complex via Order 410.2 (DOE 2009).

  13. Reducing Livestock Losses To Toxic Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan; Machen, Richard V.

    2000-04-25

    AgriculturalExtensionService The Texas A&M University System Reducing Livestock Losses to Toxic Plants B-1499 Sand Shinnery L Perennial Broomweed Texas Agricultural Extension Service a71 Zerle L. Carpenter, Director a71 The Texas A&M University System a71 College Station, Texas Tableof... in diagnosis is to determine *Extension range specialist and Extension livestock- specialist, The Texas A&M University System. whether the cause is plant poisoning or in- fectious disease. To do so it is necessary to carefully observe symptoms exhibited by af...

  14. Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

    1992-01-01

    The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and americium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU's together with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU's and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal.

  15. Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1992-12-08

    The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and americium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU's together with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU's and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal. 3 figs.

  16. Draft 'Michigan Saves' Loan Loss Reserve Fund Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A sample loan loss reserve agreement between a state or local government and a financial institution setting the terms and conditions of the loan loss reserve fund. Author: State of Michigan

  17. Agricultural science students' perceptions and knowledge of hearing loss 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slaydon, Sunny Leigh

    2009-05-15

    This study is designed to examine participants’ view of hearing loss as a critical health issue, the attitudes of people toward a person with a hearing impairment, the knowledge level of OSHA regulations pertaining to hearing loss, the general...

  18. Modeling Delta Smelt Losses at the South Delta Export Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimmerer, Wim J.

    2011-01-01

    Losses at the South Delta Export Facilities Wim J. Kimmererof delta smelt to the water export facilities in the southnow be less vulnerable to export losses than they previously

  19. BONE LOSS IN RELATION TO HYPOTHALAMIC ATROPHY IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loskutova, Natalia Y.

    2011-05-12

    . The body of presented work extends the literature on a relationship between bone loss and AD. Overall, the presented work provides initial evidence that accelerated bone loss observed in individuals in the early stages of AD may be partially due...

  20. Self Describing and Self Extracting Data Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    )..................................................................................7 2.3.2.1 Schema/Contents SQL to File..................................................................................................................................8 2.3.2.4 Data Extraction as SQL-92

  1. Naked Stony Corals: Skeleton Loss in Scleractinia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medina, Monica; Collins, Allen G.; Takaoka, Tori L.; Kuehl,Jennifer; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2005-12-01

    Hexacorallia includes the Scleractinia, or stony corals, characterized by having an external calcareous skeleton made of aragonite, and the Corallimorpharia, or mushroom corals, that lack such a skeleton. Although each group has traditionally been considered monophyletic, some molecular phylogenetic analyses have challenged this, suggesting that skeletal features are evolutionarily plastic, and reviving notions that the scleractinian skeleton may be ephemeral and that the group itself may be polyphyletic. Nevertheless, the most comprehensive phylogenetic study of Hexacorallia supported scleractinian monophyly (REF), and so this remains controversial. In order to resolve this contentious issue, we sequenced the complete mitochondrial genome sequences of nine scleractinians and four corallimorpharians and performed phylogenetic analysis that also included three outgroups (an octocoral and two sea anemones). Our data provide the first strong evidence that Scleractinia is paraphyletic and that the Corallimorpharia is derived from within the group, from which we conclude that skeletal loss has occurred in the latter group secondarily. It is possible that a driving force in such skeletal loss could be the high levels of CO{sub 2} in the ocean during the mid-Cretaceous, which would have impacted aragonite solubility. We estimate from molecular divergence measures that the Corallimorpharia arose in the mid-Cretaceous, approximately 87 million years ago (Ma), supporting this view. These data also permit us to date the origin of Scleractinia to 265 Ma, narrowing the gap between the group's phylogenetic origin and its earliest fossil record.

  2. Characterizing Shading Losses on Partially Shaded PV Systems (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deline, C.

    2010-09-23

    Presentation on shaded PV power loss, practical issues with modeling shaded PV, and methods of implementing partially shaded PV modeling.

  3. Nonlocality of $W$ and Dicke states subject to losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomer Jack Barnea; Gilles Pütz; Jonatan Bohr Brask; Nicolas Brunner; Nicolas Gisin; Yeong-Cherng Liang

    2014-12-18

    We discuss the nonlocality of the $W$ and the Dicke states subject to losses. We consider two noise models, namely loss of excitations and loss of particles, and investigate how much loss can be tolerated such that the final state remains nonlocal. This leads to a measure of robustness of the nonlocality of Dicke states, with a clear physical interpretation. Our results suggest that the relation between nonlocality and entanglement of Dicke states is not monotonous.

  4. MODELING OF EDDY CURRENT LOSS AND TEMPERATURE OF THE MAGNETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mi, Chunting "Chris"

    MODELING OF EDDY CURRENT LOSS AND TEMPERATURE OF THE MAGNETS IN PERMANENT MAGNET MACHINES@umich.edu Received 24 November 2010 Accepted 16 June 2011 The eddy current loss in the magnets of permanent magnet- mium-iron-boron (NdFeB), and slot/tooth harmonics, there is eddy current loss generated inside

  5. Risk Analytics for Estimating and Validating Magnitude of Earthquake Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau-Chaplin, Andrew

    Risk Analytics for Estimating and Validating Magnitude of Earthquake Losses A. Astoul, C. Filliter-time estimation and visualisation of insured losses incurred due to earthquakes is presented. The system incorporates a model for estimating losses due to earthquakes in near real-time and a geo

  6. Silicon on ultra-low-loss waveguide photonic integration platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauters, Jared; Davenport, Michael; Heck, Martijn; Doylend, Jonathan; Chen, Arnold; Fang, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    and J. E. Bowers, “Ultra-low-loss high-aspect-ratio Si 3 N 4and K. J. Vahala, “Ultra-low-loss optical delay line on aspiral is 78 mm long. 3. Ultra-low-loss waveguides with and

  7. Arctic ozone loss and climate sensitivity: Updated threedimensional model study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wuhu

    Arctic ozone loss and climate sensitivity: Updated three­dimensional model study Chipperfield winter­spring chemical ozone loss from 1991 2003, its observed correlation with low temperatures. CTM throughout studied. The model reproduces large column winters also captures shape of ozone loss profile

  8. Aging, Estrogen Loss and Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acids Alison R. Lee1.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    Aging, Estrogen Loss and Epoxyeicosatrienoic Acids (EETs) Alison R. Lee1. , Angela S. Pechenino1 loss, caused by menopause, and aging have inflammatory consequences. Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs cyclooxygenases and lipoxygenases. We hypothesized that aging and estrogen loss would reduce levels of anti

  9. Transposon extraction protocol Maitreya Dunham November 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Maitreya

    Transposon extraction protocol Maitreya Dunham November 2006 modification of the Qiagen HSE precipitate. Mix equal amounts of DNA from each digest if multiple digests. Extraction In a screw-cap tube (Qiagen), and water to bring to 30 µl total. Heat for 15 minutes at 95C with a 100C block on top (blocks

  10. SchoolFEFLOW Exercise Heat extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kornhuber, Ralf

    Summer SchoolFEFLOW® Exercise Heat extraction from a sloped sandstone aquifer Vertical cross · 2D (default) · Problem Class: Flow and Heat (steady flow, steady transport) · Vertical problem-Option) Geothermal gradient: 35 K/km · top: T = 20°C · bottom: T = 90°C Model Set-Up #12;Summer SchoolHeat extraction

  11. 2 Accelerated Isosurface Extraction YARDEN LIVNAT*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    by Kitware, Inc. http://www.kitware.com/products/vtktextbook.html. #12;nature of the octree, enable one2 Accelerated Isosurface Extraction Approaches YARDEN LIVNAT* 2.1 Introduction The marching cubes [7,15] method demonstrated that isosurface extraction can be reduced, using a divide

  12. Energy loss of coasting gold ions and deuterons in RHIC.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu,N.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Brown, K.A.; Butler, J.J.; FischW; Harvey, M.; Tepikian, S.

    2008-06-23

    The total energy loss of coasting gold ion beams was measured at RHIC at two energies, corresponding to a gamma of 75.2 and 107.4. We describe the experiment and observations and compare the measured total energy loss with expectations from ionization losses at the residual gas, the energy loss due to impedance and synchrotron radiation. We find that the measured energy losses are below what is expected from free space synchrotron radiation. We believe that this shows evidence for suppression of synchrotron radiation which is cut off at long wavelength by the presence of the conducting beam pipe.

  13. Global warming, insurance losses and financial industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Low, N.C.

    1996-12-31

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. They have already caught the attention of the insurance industry, as they suffered massive losses in the last decade. Twenty-one out of the 25 largest catastrophes in the US, mainly in the form of hurricanes have occurred in the last decade. The insurance industry has reacted by taking the risk of global warming in decisions as to pricing and underwriting decisions. But they have yet to take a more active role in regulating the factors that contributes to global warming. How global warming can impact the financial industry and the modern economy is explored. Insurance and modern financial derivatives are key to the efficient functioning of the modern economy, without which the global economy can still function but will take a giant step backward. Any risk as global warming that causes economic surprises will hamper the efficient working of the financial market and the modern economy.

  14. Quantum cryptographic system with reduced data loss

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lo, H.K.; Chau, H.F.

    1998-03-24

    A secure method for distributing a random cryptographic key with reduced data loss is disclosed. Traditional quantum key distribution systems employ similar probabilities for the different communication modes and thus reject at least half of the transmitted data. The invention substantially reduces the amount of discarded data (those that are encoded and decoded in different communication modes e.g. using different operators) in quantum key distribution without compromising security by using significantly different probabilities for the different communication modes. Data is separated into various sets according to the actual operators used in the encoding and decoding process and the error rate for each set is determined individually. The invention increases the key distribution rate of the BB84 key distribution scheme proposed by Bennett and Brassard in 1984. Using the invention, the key distribution rate increases with the number of quantum signals transmitted and can be doubled asymptotically. 23 figs.

  15. Quantum cryptographic system with reduced data loss

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong (1309, Low Block, Lei Moon House Ap Lei Chau Estate, Hong Kong, HK); Chau, Hoi Fung (Flat C, 42nd Floor, Tower 1, University Heights 23 Pokfield Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, HK)

    1998-01-01

    A secure method for distributing a random cryptographic key with reduced data loss. Traditional quantum key distribution systems employ similar probabilities for the different communication modes and thus reject at least half of the transmitted data. The invention substantially reduces the amount of discarded data (those that are encoded and decoded in different communication modes e.g. using different operators) in quantum key distribution without compromising security by using significantly different probabilities for the different communication modes. Data is separated into various sets according to the actual operators used in the encoding and decoding process and the error rate for each set is determined individually. The invention increases the key distribution rate of the BB84 key distribution scheme proposed by Bennett and Brassard in 1984. Using the invention, the key distribution rate increases with the number of quantum signals transmitted and can be doubled asymptotically.

  16. BWR/4 loss of feedwater transient analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, M.S.; Levine, M.M.; Shier, W.G.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of a series of loss of feedwater (LOF) transients for a typical BWR/4 reactor. These calculations were prompted by the events that occurred during the TMI incident and hence include various assumed failures in the safety/relief valve system and the assumed inoperability of various safety systems. This analysis provides transient results necessary to evaluate the potential for core uncovery and excessive average fuel temperatures which can then be used in the evaluation of the adequacy of the engineered safety features and the plant operating procedures. The RELAP5/MOD1 computer code was used for this analysis. The version of the code is designated as Cycle 13 with additional modifications provided by INEL. The modifications affect the jet pump model, interphase drag model and separator model.

  17. Application of extraction chromatography to actinide decontamination of hydrochloric acid effluent streams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulte, L.D.; McKee, S.D.; Salazar, R.R.

    1996-05-01

    Extraction chromatography is under development as a method to lower actinide activity levels in effluent steams. Successful application of this technique for radioactive liquid waste treatment would provide a low activity feed stream for HCl recycle, reduce the loss of radioactivity to the environment in aqueous effluents, and would lower the quantity and reduce the hazard of the associated solid waste. The extraction of Pu and Am from HCl solutions was examined for several commercial and laboratory-produced sorbed resin materials. Inert supports included silica and polymer beads of differing mesh sizes. The support material was coated with either n-octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (O-CMPO) or di-(4-t-butylphenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethylphosphine oxide (D-CMPO) as an extractant, and using either tributyl phosphate (TBP) or diamyl amylphosphonate (DAAP) as a diluent. Solutions tested were effluent streams generated by ion exchange and solvent extraction recovery of Pu. A finer mesh silica support material demonstrated advantages in removal of trivalent Am in some tests, but also showed a tendency toward plugging and channeling as column sizes and flow rates were increased. Larger bead sizes showed better physical properties as the process was scaled up to removal of gram quantities of Am from large effluent volumes. The ratio of extractant to diluent also appeared to play a role in the retention of Am. In direct comparative studies, when loaded on identical supports and diluent conditions, D-CMPO demonstrated better Am retention than O-CMPO from HCl process effluents.

  18. Measurements of Beam Ion Loss from the Compact Helical System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. S. Darrow, M. Isobe, Takashi Kondo, M. Sasao, and the CHS Group National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, Japan

    2010-02-03

    Beam ion loss from the Compact Helical System (CHS) has been measured with a scintillator-type probe. The total loss to the probe, and the pitch angle and gyroradius distributions of that loss, have been measured as various plasma parameters were scanned. Three classes of beam ion loss were observed at the probe position: passing ions with pitch angles within 10o of those of transition orbits, ions on transition orbits, and ions on trapped orbits, typically 15o or more from transition orbits. Some orbit calculations in this geometry have been performed in order to understand the characteristics of the loss. Simulation of the detector signal based upon the following of orbits from realistic beam deposition profiles is not able to reproduce the pitch angle distribution of the losses measured. Consequently it is inferred that internal plasma processes, whether magnetohydrodynamic modes, radial electric fields, or plasma turbulence, move previously confined beam ions to transition orbits, resulting in their loss.

  19. Design of the ILC RTML Extraction Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seletskiy, S.; Tenenbaum, P.; Walz, D.; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-10-17

    The ILC [1] Damping Ring to the Main Linac beamline (RTML) contains three extraction lines (EL). Each EL can be used both for an emergency abort dumping of the beam and tune-up continual train-by-train extraction. Two of the extraction lines are located downstream of the first and second stages of the RTML bunch compressor, and must accept both compressed and uncompressed beam with energy spreads of 2.5% and 0.15%, respectively. In this paper we report on an optics design that allowed minimizing the length of the extraction lines while offsetting the beam dumps from the main line by the distance required for acceptable radiation levels in the service tunnel. The proposed extraction lines can accommodate beams with different energy spreads while at the same time providing the beam size acceptable for the aluminum dump window. The RTML incorporates three extraction lines, which can be used for either an emergency beam abort or for a train-by-train extraction. The first EL is located downstream of the Damping Ring extraction arc. The other two extraction lines are located downstream of each stage of the two-stage bunch compressor. The first extraction line (EL1) receives 5GeV beam with an 0.15% energy spread. The extraction line located downstream of the first stage of bunch compressor (ELBC1) receives both compressed and uncompressed beam, and therefore must accept beam with both 5 and 4.88GeV energy, and 0.15% and 2.5% energy spread, respectively. The extraction line located after the second stage of the bunch compressor (ELBC2) receives 15GeV beam with either 0.15 or 1.8% energy spread. Each of the three extraction lines is equipped with the 220kW aluminum ball dump, which corresponds to the power of the continuously dumped beam with 5GeV energy, i.e., the beam trains must be delivered to the ELBC2 dump at reduced repetition rate.

  20. ROSE Process Offers Energy Savings for Solvent Extraction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gearheart, J. A.; Nelson, S. R.

    1983-01-01

    Kerr-McGee has developed and commercialized an energy-efficient solvent extraction process known as ROSE (Residuum Oil Supercritical Extraction) in which the extraction solvent is recovered as a supercritical fluid. The energy requirement...

  1. Information Extraction Jerry R. Hobbs, University of Southern California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riloff, Ellen

    present an overview of different learning-based methods for information extraction, including supervisedChapter 21 Information Extraction Jerry R. Hobbs, University of Southern California Ellen Riloff ....................................... 16 21.5 How Good is Information Extraction? .................................. 21 21

  2. Parton Energy Loss in Two-Stream Plasma System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. E. Carrington; K. Deja; St. Mrowczynski

    2012-01-06

    The energy loss of a fast parton scattering elastically in a weakly coupled quark-gluon plasma is formulated as an initial value problem. The approach is designed to study an unstable plasma, but it also reproduces the well known result of energy loss in an equilibrium plasma. A two-stream system, which is unstable due to longitudinal chromoelectric modes, is discussed here some detail. In particular, a strong time and directional dependence of the energy loss is demonstrated.

  3. The extraction of work from quantum coherence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamil Korzekwa; Matteo Lostaglio; Jonathan Oppenheim; David Jennings

    2015-06-25

    We critically assess the problem of extracting work from a coherent superposition of energy eigenstates of an individual qubit system. By carefully taking into account all the resources involved in the thermodynamic transformations in a fully quantum-mechanical treatment, we show that there exists a thermal machine that can come arbitrarily close to extracting all the coherence as work. The machine only needs to act on individual copies of a state and can be reused. On the other hand, we show that for any thermal machine with finite resources not all the coherence of a state can be extracted as work. We provide explicit protocols extracting work from coherence when the resources of a thermal machine are bounded, a scenario potentially relevant for the thermodynamics at the nanoscale.

  4. Extracting Security Control Requirements University of Tulsa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamble, R. F.

    Extracting Security Control Requirements J. Hosey University of Tulsa 800 S Tucker Drive Tulsa, OK 74104 918.631.2228 john-hosey@utulsa.edu R. Gamble University of Tulsa 800 S Tucker Drive Tulsa, OK

  5. Fluidized bed gasification of extracted coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aquino, Dolores C. (Houston, TX); DaPrato, Philip L. (Westfield, NJ); Gouker, Toby R. (Baton Rouge, LA); Knoer, Peter (Houston, TX)

    1986-01-01

    Coal or similar carbonaceous solids are extracted by contacting the solids in an extraction zone (12) with an aqueous solution having a pH above 12.0 at a temperature between 65.degree. C. and 110.degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to remove bitumens from the coal into said aqueous solution and the extracted solids are then gasified at an elevated pressure and temperature in a fluidized bed gasification zone (60) wherein the density of the fluidized bed is maintained at a value above 160 kg/m.sup.3. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, water is removed from the aqueous solution in order to redeposit the extracted bitumens onto the solids prior to the gasification step.

  6. Fluidized bed gasification of extracted coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aquino, D.C.; DaPrato, P.L.; Gouker, T.R.; Knoer, P.

    1984-07-06

    Coal or similar carbonaceous solids are extracted by contacting the solids in an extraction zone with an aqueous solution having a pH above 12.0 at a temperature between 65/sup 0/C and 110/sup 0/C for a period of time sufficient to remove bitumens from the coal into said aqueous solution, and the extracted solids are then gasified at an elevated pressure and temperature in a fluidized bed gasification zone (60) wherein the density of the fluidized bed is maintained at a value above 160 kg/m/sup 3/. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, water is removed from the aqueous solution in order to redeposit the extracted bitumens onto the solids prior to the gasification step. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Extracting secret keys from integrated circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Daihyun, 1976-

    2004-01-01

    Modern cryptographic protocols are based on the premise that only authorized participants can obtain secret keys and access to information systems. However, various kinds of tampering methods have been devised to extract ...

  8. Novel Concept of the Magmatic Heat Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Labinov, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems are the primary sources of interest nowadays. The paper presents a novel concept for the extraction of the magmatic heat directly from the magma chamber by utilizing the thermodynamic Retrograde Condensation curve.

  9. Extraction Steam Controls at EPLA-W 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinker, J. L.

    2004-01-01

    ExxonMobil's Baton Rouge site encompasses a world-scale refinery, chemical plant and third party power station. Historically, inflexible and unreliable control systems on two high-pressure, extracting/condensing steam turbines prevented the site...

  10. Advanced Water Removal via Membrane Solvent Extraction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Water Removal via Membrane Solvent Extraction Reduction in energy and water use for the ethanol industry Ethanol is the leading biofuel in the U.S. with 13 Billion gallons produced...

  11. Aromatics Extraction Plant Design Using Synthesis Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcox, R. J.; Nedwick, R.

    1987-01-01

    and condenser duties and temperatures and estimating the traffic and number of trays in each column to estimate its capital cost. APPUCATION TO THE SPECIFIC DESIGN A new plant was designed to produce benzene, toluene, and xylene by extraction... to extract an aromatics stream from a C 6 -C o heart cut of hydrogenated pyrolysis gasoline, leaving a raffinate containing paraffins and naphthenes. The Distillation Section distills the aromatics stream into high purity benzene, toluene, and Co...

  12. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietz, Mark (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

    2003-01-01

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  13. Weight Loss Regime for Massive Low Temperature Electrons | The...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weight Loss Regime for Massive Low Temperature Electrons A compound made out of ytterbium (Yb), platinum (Pt), and bismuth (Bi) offers researchers the opportunity to watch the...

  14. Draft Michigan SAVES Loan Loss Reserve Fund Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A sample LRF agreement between a grantee and an financial institution setting the terms and conditions of the loan loss reserve fund.

  15. Charm production and energy loss at the LHC with ALICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Dainese; for the ALICE Collaboration

    2004-09-29

    The latest results on the ALICE performance for production and in-medium QCD energy loss measurements of charm particles at the LHC are presented.

  16. Microsoft Word - Completion of an Evalution of Impact of Loss...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Completion of an Evaluation of the Impact of the Loss of Two Hydrogen and Methane Monitoring Sampling Lines Dear Mr. Bearzi: As required under Permit Condition...

  17. Alternating current loss reduction for rectangular busbars by...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Alternating current loss reduction for rectangular busbars by covering their edges with low permeable magnetic caps Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Alternating current...

  18. Instrumentation for Evaluating PV System Performance Losses from Snow: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marion, B.; Rodriguez, J.; Pruett, J.

    2009-04-01

    Describes the use of a pyranometer with a heater and a digital camera to determine losses related to snow for PV systems located at National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  19. Analysis of beam loss induced abort kicker instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang W.; Sandberg, J.; Ahrens, L.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mi, J.; Pai, C.; Tan, Y.

    2012-05-20

    Through more than a decade of operation, we have noticed the phenomena of beam loss induced kicker instability in the RHIC beam abort systems. In this study, we analyze the short term beam loss before abort kicker pre-fire events and operation conditions before capacitor failures. Beam loss has caused capacitor failures and elevated radiation level concentrated at failed end of capacitor has been observed. We are interested in beam loss induced radiation and heat dissipation in large oil filled capacitors and beam triggered thyratron conduction. We hope the analysis result would lead to better protection of the abort systems and improved stability of the RHIC operation.

  20. The temperature dependence of ultra-cold neutron wall losses...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: The temperature dependence of ultra-cold neutron wall losses in material bottles coated with deuterated polystryene Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The...

  1. Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses, Energy Tips: STEAM, Steam...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses Boiler "short cycling" occurs when an oversized boiler quickly satisfies process or space heating demands, and then shuts down until heat is...

  2. Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production For Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Correlation...

  3. Reduce Radiation Losses from Heating Equipment; Industrial Technologie...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in which opening size cannot be reduced, you can use flexible materials such as ceramic strips, chains, or ceramic textiles as "curtains." These generally reduce heat loss...

  4. Extraction of furfural with carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamse, T.; Marr, R.; Froeschl, F.; Siebenhofer, M.

    1997-01-01

    A new approach to separate furfural from aqueous waste has been investigated. Recovery of furfural and acetic acid from aqueous effluents of a paper mill has successfully been applied on an industrial scale since 1981. The process is based on the extraction of furfural and acetic acid by the solvent trooctylphosphineoxide (TOPO). Common extraction of both substances may cause the formation of resin residues. Improvement was expected by selective extraction of furfural with chlorinated hydrocarbons, but ecological reasons stopped further development of this project. The current investigation is centered in the evaluation of extraction of furfural by supercritical carbon dioxide. The influence of temperature and pressure on the extraction properties has been worked out. The investigation has considered the multi-component system furfural-acetic acid-water-carbon dioxide. Solubility of furfural in liquid and supercritical carbon dioxide has been measured, and equilibrium data for the ternary system furfural-water-CO{sub 2} as well as for the quaternary system furfural-acetic acid-water-CO{sub 2} have been determined. A high-pressure extraction column has been used for evaluation of mass transfer rates.

  5. Test Plan for Solvent Extraction Data Acquisition to Support...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Test Plan for Solvent Extraction Data Acquisition to Support Modeling Efforts Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Test Plan for Solvent Extraction Data...

  6. Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable Power Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable...

  7. Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call:...

  8. After More Than 20 Years Operating, Hanford's Soil Vapor Extraction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    After More Than 20 Years Operating, Hanford's Soil Vapor Extraction Project Nears Completion After More Than 20 Years Operating, Hanford's Soil Vapor Extraction Project Nears...

  9. Requirements for a Dynamic Solvent Extraction Module to Support...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    FUELS; PERFORMANCE; SAFEGUARDS; SAFETY; SECURITY; SIMULATION; SOLVENT EXTRACTION; SOLVENTS; WASTE FORMS dynamic; model; solvent extraction Word Cloud More Like This Full Text...

  10. Algal Lipid Extraction and Upgrading to Hydrocarbons Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for the algal lipid extraction and upgrading pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Algal Lipid Extraction and...

  11. Feature Extraction and Classification of Clouds in High Resolution Panchromatic Satellite Imagery /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharghi, Elan

    2013-01-01

    3 3. Feature Extraction Methods and ProposedChapter 3 Feature Extraction Methods and Proposed AlgorithmExtraction Methods..

  12. Surface and bulk modified high capacity layered oxide cathodes with low irreversible capacity loss

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manthiram, Arumugam (Austin, TX); Wu, Yan (Austin, TX)

    2010-03-16

    The present invention includes compositions, surface and bulk modifications, and methods of making of (1-x)Li[Li.sub.1/3Mn.sub.2/3]O.sub.2.xLi[Mn.sub.0.5-yNi.sub.0.5-yCo.sub.2- y]O.sub.2 cathode materials having an O3 crystal structure with a x value between 0 and 1 and y value between 0 and 0.5, reducing the irreversible capacity loss in the first cycle by surface modification with oxides and bulk modification with cationic and anionic substitutions, and increasing the reversible capacity to close to the theoretical value of insertion/extraction of one lithium per transition metal ion (250-300 mAh/g).

  13. Efficient Light Extraction from Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using Plasmonic Scattering Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothberg, Lewis

    2012-11-30

    Our project addressed the DOE MYPP 2020 goal to improve light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) to 75% (Core task 6.3). As noted in the 2010 MYPP, “the greatest opportunity for improvement is in the extraction of light from [OLED] panels”. There are many approaches to avoiding waveguiding limitations intrinsic to the planar OLED structure including use of textured substrates, microcavity designs and incorporating scattering layers into the device structure. We have chosen to pursue scattering layers since it addresses the largest source of loss which is waveguiding in the OLED itself. Scattering layers also have the potential to be relatively robust to color, polarization and angular distributions. We note that this can be combined with textured or microlens decorated substrates to achieve additional enhancement.

  14. Quantifying stream flow loss to groundwater on alluvial valley streams in Sonoma County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janes, Kelly; Carrasco, Jose

    2012-01-01

    cover, etc. ), and water extraction by adjacent or upstreamcan better plan water extraction to support anadroumous fish

  15. Modified two-way protocol for quantum secure direct communication with the presence of channel loss and noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianyong Hu; Bo Yu; Mingyong Jing; Liantuan Xiao; Suotang Jia

    2015-03-02

    Quantum secure direct communication can effectively save the computing resource and improve the communication rate. In this paper, we present a coding scheme based on the single-photons modulation which can perform the two-way protocol for quantum secure direct communication with the presence of channel loss and noise. To the modified two-way protocol, the information bits can only be extracted from a batch of qubits, therefore, the leakage of a few qubits would not cause the leakage of information bits. The security condition, the information bit rate and the security communication distance are discussed.

  16. The effects of R/X ratios on power system minimum loss 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denison, John Scott

    1949-01-01

    Presentation of Data Summary e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Appendix . Bibliography ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ S5 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 89 Case I, Loss vs ~ Angle ~ Case II, Loss vs. Angle Case III, Loss vs ~ Angle Case IV ~ Loss vso Angle... ~ ~ ~ Case V, Line Impedances . . . . . , ~ 17 20 23 27 33 Case V (a), Loss vs. Angle . . ~ Case V (b), Loss vs. Voltage Case V (c), Loss vs. Angle Case VI, Line Impedances ~ Case VI, Loss vs. &ngle ~ Case VII (a), Line Impedances Case VII (a...

  17. Energy Upgrade California in Los Angeles County, Loan Loss Reserve Fund Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Upgrade California in Los Angeles County, Loan Loss Reserve Fund Agreement. Example of loan loss reserve agreement.

  18. MODELING OF EDDY CURRENT LOSS AND TEMPERATURE OF THE MAGNETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mi, Chunting "Chris"

    MODELING OF EDDY CURRENT LOSS AND TEMPERATURE OF THE MAGNETS IN PERMANENT MAGNET MACHINES the performance of the machine. This paper presents the modeling and analysis of eddy current loss in surface- mounted-magnets PM synchronous motors (SPMSM) and interior-magnets PM synchronous motors (IPMSM), operated

  19. Linear-optics manipulations of photon-loss codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konrad Banaszek; Wojciech Wasilewski

    2007-02-09

    We discuss codes for protecting logical qubits carried by optical fields from the effects of amplitude damping, i.e. linear photon loss. We demonstrate that the correctability condition for one-photon loss imposes limitations on the range of manipulations than can be implemented with passive linear-optics networks.

  20. Hearing Safety What causes noiseinduced hearing loss (NIHL)?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    1 Hearing Safety What causes noiseinduced hearing loss (NIHL)? Noise exposure, whether occupational or recreational, is the leading preventable cause of hearing loss. Peter M. Rabinowitz, M.D., M caused in part by excessive noise exposure in the workplace or during recreational activities

  1. Testing a model of IR radiative losses Frank Vignola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    losses associated with the pyranometers. High quality data from the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory Energy Laboratory (NREL) operates a very high quality solar monitoring station at the Solar Radiation Energy Laboratory ABSTRACT Thermopile pyranometers exhibit IR radiative losses that affect global

  2. SPOT PRICING FRAMEWORK FOR LOSS GUARANTEED INTERNET SERVICE CONTRACTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalyanaraman, Shivkumar

    . In a two-component approach to pricing, a nonlinear pricing scheme is used for cost recovery and a utility for cost recovery, and (ii) an options-based approach to price the risk of deviations in the loss based QoSPOT PRICING FRAMEWORK FOR LOSS GUARANTEED INTERNET SERVICE CONTRACTS Aparna Gupta Decision

  3. Loss-induced lasing: new findings in laser theory?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longhi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    In a recent work, using a coupled microresonator system with tailored gain and loss parameters B. Peng et al. [Science 346, 328 (2014)] have experimentally reported on an apparently counterintuitive effect in laser theory, namely the possibility to enhance lasing by increasing loss in the system. The observed phenomenon was related to the existence of an exceptional point in the system and was presented somehow as an unexpected and novel effect, especially by some reporters and scientific blogs. In this communication it is pointed out that the phenomenon of loss-induced lasing does not come as a surprise in known laser theory and that it is not necessarily related to the physics of exceptional points. Loss-induced lasing is basically the lasing mechanism that occurs in loss-coupled distributed feedback lasers. This mechanism dates back to the 1970's, has a simple physical explanation and does not rely on the physics of exceptional points.

  4. High-speed synchronous reluctance machine with minimized rotor losses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hofmann, H.; Sanders, S.R.

    2000-04-01

    This paper presents a refined design of a high-speed synchronous reluctance machine with minimized eddy-current losses in the rotor. Design criteria are the ability of the rotor to withstand high speeds, ability to operate in vacuum, negligible zero-torque spinning losses, high reliability, high efficiency, and low manufacturing cost. The rotor of the synchronous reluctance machine consists of bonded sections of ferromagnetic and non-magnetic steels. Finite-element code, incorporating rotor rotation, has been developed in MATLAB that calculates steady-state eddy currents (and losses) in the rotor. A stator iron and stator winding have been designed to minimize rotor losses, and two such prototype machines have been fabricated. Experimental results show an efficiency of 91% at a 10-kW 10,000-r/min operating point, and rotor losses less than 0.5% of input power.

  5. Procedures control total mud losses while drilling in deep water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewar, J. ); Halkett, D. )

    1993-11-01

    In the deepwater (830-1,000 m) drilling program offshore Philippines, reefal limestones were encountered in which total mud losses could be expected because of the presence of large fractures. The danger was that a sudden drop in hydrostatic head (resulting from the losses) could allow any natural gas to enter the well bore quickly. The gas could then migrate up the well bore and form hydrates in the blowout preventers (BOPs). Once hydrates form, they are difficult to remove and can make a BOP stack inoperable. To combat this potential problem, containment procedures were developed to cope with these fluid losses. The philosophy behind the procedures was to prevent hydrocarbons from entering the well bore and, if they did enter, to ensure that they did not move up the well bore and into the riser. Additionally, procedures were developed to allow drilling to continue during the losses and the curing of losses.

  6. Reexamination of Pure Qubit Work Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max F. Frenzel; David Jennings; Terry Rudolph

    2014-11-19

    Many work extraction or information erasure processes in the literature involve the raising and lowering of energy levels via external fields. But even if the actual system is treated quantum mechanically, the field is assumed to be classical and of infinite strength, hence not developing any correlations with the system or experiencing back-actions. We extend these considerations to a fully quantum mechanical treatment, by studying a spin-1/2 particle coupled to a finite-sized directional quantum reference frame, a spin-l system, which models an external field. With this concrete model together with a bosonic thermal bath, we analyse the back-action a finite-size field suffers during a quantum-mechanical work extraction process, the effect this has on the extractable work, and highlight a range of assumptions commonly made when considering such processes. The well-known semi-classical treatment of work extraction from a pure qubit predicts a maximum extractable work W = kT log 2 for a quasi-static process, which holds as a strict upper bound in the fully quantum mechanical case, and is only attained in the classical limit. We also address the problem of emergent local time-dependence in a joint system with globally fixed Hamiltonian.

  7. Global crop yield losses from recent warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobell, D; Field, C

    2006-06-02

    Global yields of the world-s six most widely grown crops--wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, sorghum--have increased since 1961. Year-to-year variations in growing season minimum temperature, maximum temperature, and precipitation explain 30% or more of the variations in yield. Since 1991, climate trends have significantly decreased yield trends in all crops but rice, leading to foregone production since 1981 of about 12 million tons per year of wheat or maize, representing an annual economic loss of $1.2 to $1.7 billion. At the global scale, negative impacts of climate trends on crop yields are already apparent. Annual global temperatures have increased by {approx}0.4 C since 1980, with even larger changes observed in several regions (1). While many studies have considered the impacts of future climate changes on food production (2-5), the effects of these past changes on agriculture remain unclear. It is likely that warming has improved yields in some areas, reduced them in others, and had negligible impacts in still others; the relative balance of these effects at the global scale is unknown. An understanding of this balance would help to anticipate impacts of future climate changes, as well as to more accurately assess recent (and thereby project future) technologically driven yield progress. Separating the contribution of climate from concurrent changes in other factors--such as crop cultivars, management practices, soil quality, and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels--requires models that describe the response of yields to climate. Studies of future global impacts of climate change have typically relied on a bottom-up approach, whereby field scale, process-based models are applied to hundreds of representative sites and then averaged (e.g., ref 2). Such approaches require input data on soil and management conditions, which are often difficult to obtain. Limitations on data quality or quantity can thus limit the utility of this approach, especially at the local scale (6-8). At the global scale, however, many of the processes and impacts captured by field scale models will tend to cancel out, and therefore simpler empirical/statistical models with fewer input requirements may be as accurate (8, 9). Empirical/statistical models also allow the effects of poorly modeled processes (e.g., pest dynamics) to be captured and uncertainties to be readily quantified (10). Here we develop new, empirical/statistical models of global yield responses to climate using datasets on broad-scale yields, crop locations, and climate variability. We focus on global average yields for the six most widely grown crops in the world: wheat, rice, maize, soybeans, barley, and sorghum. Production of these crops accounts for over 40% of global cropland area (11). 55% of non-meat calories, and over 70% of animal feed (12).

  8. View Dependent Isosurface Extraction Yarden Livnat Charles Hansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Livnat, Yarden

    triangles and is accomplished by the graphics hardware. While the latest isosurface extraction methods have isosurface extraction (NOISE) method. Both NOISE and the later optimal isosurface extraction methodView Dependent Isosurface Extraction Yarden Livnat Charles Hansen University of Utah Abstract We

  9. IMPLICATIONS OF MASS AND ENERGY LOSS DUE TO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS ON MAGNETICALLY ACTIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Cohen, Ofer; Yashiro, Seiji; Gopalswamy, Nat

    2013-02-20

    Analysis of a database of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and associated flares over the period 1996-2007 finds well-behaved power-law relationships between the 1-8 A flare X-ray fluence and CME mass and kinetic energy. We extrapolate these relationships to lower and higher flare energies to estimate the mass and energy loss due to CMEs from stellar coronae, assuming that the observed X-ray emission of the latter is dominated by flares with a frequency as a function of energy dn/dE = kE {sup -{alpha}}. For solar-like stars at saturated levels of X-ray activity, the implied losses depend fairly weakly on the assumed value of {alpha} and are very large: M-dot {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and E-dot {approx}0.1 L{sub sun}. In order to avoid such large energy requirements, either the relationships between CME mass and speed and flare energy must flatten for X-ray fluence {approx}> 10{sup 31} erg, or the flare-CME association must drop significantly below 1 for more energetic events. If active coronae are dominated by flares, then the total coronal energy budget is likely to be up to an order of magnitude larger than the canonical 10{sup -3} L {sub bol} X-ray saturation threshold. This raises the question of what is the maximum energy a magnetic dynamo can extract from a star? For an energy budget of 1% of L {sub bol}, the CME mass loss rate is about 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}.

  10. Calibrations of a tritium extraction facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bretscher, M.M.; Oliver, B.M.; Farrar, H. IV

    1983-01-01

    A tritium extraction facility has been built for the purpose of measuring the absolute tritium concentration in neutron-irradiated lithium metal samples. Two independent calibration procedures have been used to determine what fraction, if any, of tritium is lost during the extraction process. The first procedure compares independently measured /sup 4/He and /sup 3/H concentrations from the /sup 6/Li(n,..cap alpha..)T reaction. The second procedure compared measured /sup 6/Li(n,..cap alpha..)T//sup 197/Au (n,..gamma..)/sup 198/Au thermal neutron reaction rate ratios with those obtained from Monte Carlo calculations using well-known cross sections. Both calibration methods show that within experimental errors (approx. 1.5%) no tritium is lost during the extraction process.

  11. Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IL); Binder, Thomas P. (Decatur, IL); Rammelsberg, Anne M. (Decatur, IL)

    2010-11-16

    The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

  12. Energetics of Marine Turbine Arrays - Extraction, Dissipation and Diminution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishino, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    A two-scale modelling approach is discussed to predict the performance and energetics of a large number (more than a few hundred) of marine turbines installed as a power farm in a general coastal environment. The kernel of this approach is that the outer (coastal-scale) model/simulation is to assess the reduction of flow passing through a given farm area as a function of the increase of head loss across the farm, whereas the inner (device-scale) model/simulation uses this function to account for the (otherwise unknown) effect of coastal dynamics for that farm site. Large-eddy simulations (LES) of periodic open channel flow (with a porous plate model representing turbines) are then presented as the device-scale part of such a two-scale model of large marine turbine arrays. Results demonstrate how the energetics of turbine arrays (i.e. extraction, dissipation and diminution of energy in the entire farm area) may change depending on the characteristics of the farm site, array configuration and operating conditio...

  13. Catalog solvent extraction: anticipate process adjustments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, S.G.; Brass, E.A.; Brown, S.J.; Geeting, M.W.

    2008-07-01

    The Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU) utilizes commercially available centrifugal contactors to facilitate removal of radioactive cesium from highly alkaline salt solutions. During the fabrication of the contactor assembly, demonstrations revealed a higher propensity for foaming than was initially expected. A task team performed a series of single-phase experiments that revealed that the shape of the bottom vanes and the outer diameter of those vanes are key to the successful deployment of commercial contactors in the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process. (authors)

  14. Process for extracting technetium from alkaline solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sachleben, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A process for extracting technetium values from an aqueous alkaline solution containing at least one alkali metal hydroxide and at least one alkali metal nitrate, the at least one alkali metal nitrate having a concentration of from about 0.1 to 6 molar. The solution is contacted with a solvent consisting of a crown ether in a diluent for a period of time sufficient to selectively extract the technetium values from the aqueous alkaline solution. The solvent containing the technetium values is separated from the aqueous alkaline solution and the technetium values are stripped from the solvent.

  15. On statistical methods of structure function extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. N. Sevbitov; T. V. Shishkina; I. L. Solovtsov

    2007-11-29

    Several methods of statistical analysis are proposed and analyzed in application for a specific task -- extraction of the structure functions from the cross sections of deep inelastic interactions of any type. We formulate the method based on the orthogonal weight functions and on an optimization procedure of errors minimization as well as methods underlying common $\\chi^2$ minimization. Effectiveness of these methods usage is analyzed by comparison of the statistical parameters such as bias, extraction variance etc., for sample deep inelastic scattering data set.

  16. A Study of Terpeneless Lemon Extracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spilman, C. Clay

    1912-01-01

    . The alcohol was recovered as soon as used. A still was set up consisting of two electric hot plates upon which were placed two one liter German flasks. These two flasks were connected to the same small Liebig condenser. It is not stated in the method....3 An increase of 2$ of lemon oil per liter costs 3.78 cents while an increase of 5$ of alcohol costs 4.4 cents. The above figures indicate that a 5$ lemon oil 55$ alcohol extract would be the cheapest, such an extract was made and tested for strength...

  17. Membrane contactor assisted extraction/reaction process employing ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Yupo J. (Naperville, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL)

    2012-02-07

    The present invention relates to a functionalized membrane contactor extraction/reaction system and method for extracting target species from multi-phase solutions utilizing ionic liquids. One preferred embodiment of the invented method and system relates to an extraction/reaction system wherein the ionic liquid extraction solutions act as both extraction solutions and reaction mediums, and allow simultaneous separation/reactions not possible with prior art technology.

  18. Geothermal-Heat Extraction As a source of renewable energy, geothermal-heat extraction has become increasingly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kornhuber, Ralf

    period before the injected cold water significantly affects the groundwater temperature at the extraction horizontal (steady) flow and (transient) heat-transport model for a warm-water extraction / cold-waterGeothermal-Heat Extraction As a source of renewable energy, geothermal-heat extraction has become

  19. A Fast Texture FeatureA Fast Texture Feature Extraction Method for RegionExtraction Method for Region--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritts, Jason

    A Fast Texture FeatureA Fast Texture Feature Extraction Method for RegionExtraction Method-level Texture Features #12;Fast Texture Feature Extraction Basic Idea · Usually the neighboring pixels texture solid color #12;Fast Texture Feature Extraction Basic Steps 1. Divide the target image into high

  20. Radiative energy loss in an anisotropic quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Pradip; Dutt-Mazumder, Abhee K.

    2011-04-15

    We calculate radiative energy loss of heavy and light quarks in an anisotropic medium (static) in a first-order opacity expansion. Such an anisotropy can result from the initial rapid longitudinal expansion of the matter created in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. Significant dependency of the energy loss on the anisotropy parameter {xi} and the direction of propagation of the partons with respect to the anisotropy axis is found. It is shown that the introduction of early-time momentum-space anisotropy can enhance the fractional energy loss in the direction of the anisotropy, whereas it decreases when the parton propagates perpendicular to the direction of the anisotropy.

  1. Mode imaging and loss evaluation of semiconductor waveguides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mochizuki, Toshimitsu [Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Fukushima Renewable Energy Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 2-2-9 Machiike-dai, Koriyama, Fukushima (Japan); Kim, Changsu; Yoshita, Masahiro; Nakamura, Takahiro; Akiyama, Hidefumi [Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Pfeiffer, Loren N.; West, Ken W. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    An imaging and loss evaluation method for semiconductor waveguides coupled with non-doped quantum wells is presented. Using the internal emission of the wells as a probe light source, the numbers and widths of the modes of waveguides with various ridge sizes were evaluated by CCD imaging, and the obtained values were consistent with effective index method calculation. Waveguide internal losses were obtained from analyses of the Fabry-Pérot fringes of waveguide emission spectra. We quantified the quality of 29 single-mode waveguide samples as an internal loss and variation of 10.2 ± 0.6??cm{sup ?1}.

  2. Modern Visualization of Industrial Energy Use and Loss 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brueske, S.

    2015-01-01

    of Manufacturing Energy Use and Loss June 4, 2015 Presented by: Sabine Brueske ESL-IE-15-06-20 Proceedings of the Thrity-Seventh Industrial Energy Technology Conference New Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 Slide 2/46 1. Manufacturing Energy Use and Loss 2. U... New Orleans, LA. June 2-4, 2015 Slide 3/46 Shedding Light on U.S. Manufacturing Energy Use • Manufacturing ? one quarter of nation’s energy consumption • What types of energy? • Where is the energy used? • Where do the greatest losses occur? 2010...

  3. Impacts of the Venezuelan Crude Oil Production Loss

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    This assessment of the Venezuelan petroleum loss examines two areas. The first part of the analysis focuses on the impact of the loss of Venezuelan crude production on crude oil supply for U.S. refiners who normally run a significant fraction of Venezuelan crude oil. The second part of the analysis looks at the impact of the Venezuelan production loss on crude markets in general, with particular emphasis on crude oil imports, refinery crude oil throughput levels, stock levels, and the changes in price differences between light and heavy crude oils.

  4. Energy-loss- and thickness-dependent contrast in atomic-scale electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, Haiyan [Universit_e de Toulouse, Toulouse, France (Europe); National Institute of Standards Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Xin, Huolin L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zhu, Ye [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Dwyer, Christian [Peter Grunberg Institute, Julich, Germany (Europe)

    2014-12-01

    Atomic-scale elemental maps of materials acquired by core-loss inelastic electron scattering often exhibit an undesirable sensitivity to the unavoidable elastic scattering, making the maps counter-intuitive to interpret. Here, we present a systematic study that scrutinizes the energy-loss and sample-thickness dependence of atomic-scale elemental maps acquired using 100 keV incident electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope. For single-crystal silicon, the balance between elastic and inelastic scattering means that maps generated from the near-threshold Si-L signal (energy loss of 99 eV) show no discernible contrast for a thickness of 0.5? (? is the electron mean-free path, here approximately 110 nm). At greater thicknesses we observe a counter-intuitive “negative” contrast. Only at much higher energy losses is an intuitive “positive” contrast gradually restored. Our quantitative analysis shows that the energy-loss at which a positive contrast is restored depends linearly on the sample thickness. This behavior is in very good agreement with our double-channeling inelastic scattering calculations. We test a recently-proposed experimental method to correct the core-loss inelastic scattering and restore an intuitive “positive” chemical contrast. The method is demonstrated to be reliable over a large range of energy losses and sample thicknesses. The corrected contrast for near-threshold maps is demonstrated to be (desirably) inversely proportional to sample thickness. Implications for the interpretation of atomic-scale elemental maps are discussed.

  5. Vapor Extraction Well Performance and Recommendations for Transitioning to Passive Extraction at the Former DUS-II Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Dennis G.; Noonkester, Jay V.; Looney, Brian B.

    2013-04-03

    This investigation evaluated mass extraction rate from individual wells associated with the Western Sector Treatment System (formerly known as the DUS-II project). This was critical since each individual well can have a radius of influence in excess of 100-ft when operating using an active extraction system. Future soil vapor extraction should use the existing active extraction system, supplemented with deployment of passive extraction where appropriate.

  6. Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Daniel I. C. (Belmont, MA); Avgerinos, George C. (Newton Center, MA)

    1983-01-01

    Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15.degree. and about 70.degree. C. and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours.

  7. Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, D.I.C.; Avgerinos, G.C.

    1983-07-26

    Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15 and about 70 C and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours. 6 figs.

  8. Sequential Pattern Classification Without Explicit Feature Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krovi, Venkat

    classification framework of SVM. We present experiments with off­line digit images where the pixels are simplySequential Pattern Classification Without Explicit Feature Extraction by Hansheng Lei October 21st. A suitable similarity measure can also be used to increase the classification efficiency of traditional

  9. Organic electroluminescent devices having improved light extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY)

    2007-07-17

    Organic electroluminescent devices having improved light extraction include a light-scattering medium disposed adjacent thereto. The light-scattering medium has a light scattering anisotropy parameter g in the range from greater than zero to about 0.99, and a scatterance parameter S less than about 0.22 or greater than about 3.

  10. Reproducible Surface Extraction for Variance Comparison in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reproducible Surface Extraction for Variance Comparison in 3D Computed Tomography Christoph Heinzl1 surfaces models from distorted volume datasets in 3D computed tomography (3D-CT). As all 3D-CT datasets common 3D image processing filters: First of all we use an edge preserving diffusion filter to reduce

  11. Analytical theory of multipass crystal extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biryukov, V.; Murphy, C.T.

    1997-10-01

    An analytical theory for the efficiency of particle extraction from an accelerator by means of a bent crystal is proposed. The theory agrees with all the measurements performed in the broad energy range of 14 to 900 GeV, where the efficiency range also spans over two decades, from {approximately}0.3% to {approximately}30%.

  12. Resonance Extraction from the SAID Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ron Workman; Alfred Svarc

    2015-10-28

    Resonances are extracted from a number of energy-dependent and single-energy fits to scattering data. The influence of recent, precise EPECUR data is investigated. Results for the single-energy fits are derived using the L+P method of analysis and are compared to those obtained using contour integration applied to the global energy-dependent fits.

  13. Extractable soil phosphorus in Blackland Prairie soils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd, Robert Claude

    1995-01-01

    crop P response, evaluate crop response to P fertilizer placement and rate, and compare extractable P levels from TAEX, Bray 1, Olsen, TAEX 1, TAEX 2, and TAEX 3 in selected Blackland Prairie soils. Five field locations were established with replicated...

  14. Extracting gluon condensate from the average plaquette

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taekoon Lee

    2015-03-27

    The perturbative contribution in the average plaquette is subtracted using Borel summation and the remnant of the plaquette is shown to scale as a dim-4 condensate. A critical review is presented of the renormalon subtraction scheme that claimed a dim-2 condensate. The extracted gluon condensate is compared with the latest result employing high order (35-loop) calculation in the stochastic perturbation theory.

  15. Extraction and Analysis of Facebook Friendship Relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Emilio

    Chapter 12 Extraction and Analysis of Facebook Friendship Relations Salvatore Catanese, Pasquale De and Social scientists. We present our long-term research effort in analyzing Facebook, the largest and arguably most successful OSN today: it gathers more than 500 million users. Access to data about Facebook

  16. Ovarian hormone loss induces bioenergetic deficits and mitochondrial -amyloid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    Ovarian hormone loss induces bioenergetic deficits and mitochondrial -amyloid Jia Yaoa , Ronald by ovariectomy (OVX) in nontransgenic mice significantly decreased brain bioenergetics, and induced mitochondrial. Treatment with E2 at OVX prevented OVX-induced mitochondrial deficits, sustained mitochondrial bioenergetic

  17. Control of cooling losses at high pulverized coal injection rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonte, L.; Nieuwerburgh, H. Van [Sidmar N.V., Gent (Belgium)

    1996-12-31

    One of the problems which is encountered by many blast furnace operators is the appropriate control of the cooling losses of the blast furnace. This problem has been aggravated by the introduction of pulverized coal injection. Even with equal burden and coke composition, both Sidmar furnaces behave differently with respect to the cooling losses. This phenomenon is possibly attributable to the different profile and cooling circuitry of the furnaces. Among other parameters the angles of bosh and stack may favor the formation of scabs or not. Some operators experience a decrease of their cooling losses, other operators have problems to limit their cooling losses to an acceptable level. As a result, different operating practices exist with respect to the burden distribution. The increase of the ore to coke ratio with pulverized coal injection suggests that the coke and sinter quality has to be monitored very carefully in order to avoid permeability problems.

  18. Bremsstrahlung Energy Losses for Cosmic Ray Electrons and Positrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widom, A; Srivastava, R

    2015-01-01

    Recently cosmic ray electrons and positrons, i.e. cosmic ray charged leptons, have been observed. To understand the distances from our solar system to the sources of such lepton cosmic rays, it is important to understand energy losses from cosmic electrodynamic fields. Energy losses for ultra-relativistic electrons and/or positrons due to classical electrodynamic bremsstrahlung are computed. The energy losses considered are (i) due to Thompson scattering from fluctuating electromagnetic fields in the background cosmic thermal black body radiation and (ii) due to the synchrotron radiation losses from quasi-static domains of cosmic magnetic fields. For distances to sources of galactic length proportions, the lepton cosmic ray energy must be lass than about a TeV.

  19. Bremsstrahlung Energy Losses for Cosmic Ray Electrons and Positrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Widom; J. Swain; R. Srivastava

    2015-09-24

    Recently cosmic ray electrons and positrons, i.e. cosmic ray charged leptons, have been observed. To understand the distances from our solar system to the sources of such lepton cosmic rays, it is important to understand energy losses from cosmic electrodynamic fields. Energy losses for ultra-relativistic electrons and/or positrons due to classical electrodynamic bremsstrahlung are computed. The energy losses considered are (i) due to Thompson scattering from fluctuating electromagnetic fields in the background cosmic thermal black body radiation and (ii) due to the synchrotron radiation losses from quasi-static domains of cosmic magnetic fields. For distances to sources of galactic length proportions, the lepton cosmic ray energy must be lass than about a TeV.

  20. ChitChat : making video chat robust to packet loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jue, 1986-

    2010-01-01

    Video chat is increasingly popular among Internet users (e.g. Skype, Windows Live Messenger, Google Talk). Often, however, chatting sessions suffer from packet loss, which causes video outage and poor quality. Existing ...

  1. Determining Pressure Losses For Airflow In Residential Ductwork 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Kevin Douglas

    2012-02-14

    Airflow pressure losses through rigid metallic and non-metallic flexible ducts were studied and recommendations to improve the rating of flexible ducts were made as part of this study. The testing was done in compliance with ASHRAE Standard 120...

  2. Return channel loss reduction in multi-stage centrifugal compressors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubry, Anne-Raphaëlle

    2012-01-01

    This thesis presents concepts for improving the performance of return channels in multi-stage centrifugal compressors. Geometries have been developed to reduce both separation and viscous losses. A number of different ...

  3. Microsoft Word - notification of sampling line loss.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    under Permit Condition IV.F.5.e, the Permittees are hereby notifying the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) of the loss of two (2) hydrogen and methane monitoring...

  4. Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses - Steam Tip Sheet #16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    This revised AMO tip sheet on minimizing boiler short cycling losses provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  5. Minimize Boiler Short Cycling Losses - Steam Tip Sheet #16

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-01-01

    This revised AMO tip sheet on minimizing boiler short cycling losses provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

  6. ChitChat: Making Video Chat Robust to Packet Loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jue

    2010-07-05

    Video chat is increasingly popular among Internet users. Often, however, chatting sessions suffer from packet loss, which causes video outage and poor quality. Existing solutions however are unsatisfying. Retransmissions ...

  7. Elegiac Rhetorics: From Loss to Dialogue in Lyric Poetry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Sarah Elizabeth

    2012-10-19

    Committee Members, C. Jan Swearingen Marian Eide Linda Radzik Head of Department, Nancy Bradley Warren August 2012 Major Subject: English iii ABSTRACT Elegiac Rhetorics: From Loss to Dialogue in Lyric Poetry. (August 2012) Sarah Elizabeth...

  8. Damping and electromechanical energy losses in the piezoelectric polymer PVDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damping and electromechanical energy losses in the piezoelectric polymer PVDF Aleksandra M and actuators. The electromechanical properties of PVDF are commonly defined by the constitutive equations of piezoelectricity have certain limitations in terms of representing adequately the electromechanical properties

  9. Loan Loss Reserves: Lessons from the Field (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Merrian Fuller: Hi, and welcome to the Department of Energy's webinar on using loan-loss reserves report financing programs. My name is Marian Fuller, I work with Lawrence Berkeley National...

  10. Mitigating Flood Loss through Local Comprehensive Planning in Florida 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jung Eun

    2010-10-12

    Planning researchers believe that property losses from natural hazards, such as floods can be reduced if governments address this issue and adopt appropriate policies in their plans. However, little empirical research has examined the relationship...

  11. Effects of the Hemlock Woolly Adelgid on Nitrogen Losses from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Templer, Pamela

    of nitrogen losses via leachate were more than ten times greater, at the Arnold Arboretum compared to Harvard Forest. Nitrate that was lost via leachate at Harvard Forest came predominantly from atmospheric

  12. Motion based seismic design and loss estimation of diagrid structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liptack, Robert J. (Robert Jeffrey)

    2013-01-01

    Diagrids are becoming an increasingly popular structural system in high rise design and construction. Little research has been performed on the seismic performance of Diagrids and how it integrates with seismic loss ...

  13. Mode conversation losses in overmolded millimeter wave transmission lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tax, David S. (David Samuel)

    2008-01-01

    Millimeter wave transmission lines are integral components for many important applications like nuclear fusion and NMR spectroscopy. In low loss corrugated transmission lines propagating the HE,1 mode with a high waveguide ...

  14. Loan Loss Reserve Fund Impacts on Standard Residential Underwriting Guidelines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State and local governments can use loan loss reserve (LLR) funds to persuade lenders to offer more flexible terms during the underwriting process. The availability of an LLR can have the following...

  15. A Flexible, Low Cost, Beam Loss Monitor Evaluation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoyes, George Garnet; Pimol, Piti; Juthong, Nawin; Attaphibal, Malee

    2007-01-19

    A flexible, low cost, Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) Evaluation System based on Bergoz BLMs has been developed. Monitors can easily be moved to any location for beam loss investigations and/or monitor usefulness evaluations. Different PC pulse counting cards are compared and tested for this application using the display software developed based on LabVIEW. Beam problems uncovered with this system are presented.

  16. Analyzing Losses: Transuranics into Waste and Fission Products into Recycled Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; Nick R. Soelberg; Samuel E. Bays; Robert E. Cherry; Layne F. Pincock; Eric L. Shaber; Melissa C. Teague; Gregory M. Teske; Kurt G. Vedros; Candido Pereira; Denia Djokic

    2010-11-01

    All mass streams from separations and fuel fabrication are products that must meet criteria. Those headed for disposal must meet waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for the eventual disposal sites corresponding to their waste classification. Those headed for reuse must meet fuel or target impurity limits. A “loss” is any material that ends up where it is undesired. The various types of losses are linked in the sense that as the loss of transuranic (TRU) material into waste is reduced, often the loss or carryover of waste into TRU or uranium is increased. We have analyzed four separation options and two fuel fabrication options in a generic fuel cycle. The separation options are aqueous uranium extraction plus (UREX+1), electrochemical, Atomics International reduction oxidation separation (AIROX), and melt refining. UREX+1 and electrochemical are traditional, full separation techniques. AIROX and melt refining are taken as examples of limited separations, also known as minimum fuel treatment. The fuels are oxide and metal. To define a generic fuel cycle, a fuel recycling loop is fed from used light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel (UOX) at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup. The recycling loop uses a fast reactor with TRU conversion ratio (CR) of 0.50. Excess recovered uranium is put into storage. Only waste, not used fuel, is disposed – unless the impurities accumulate to a level so that it is impossible to make new fuel for the fast reactor. Impurities accumulate as dictated by separation removal and fission product generation. Our model approximates adjustment to fast reactor fuel stream blending of TRU and U products from incoming LWR UOX and recycling FR fuel to compensate for impurity accumulation by adjusting TRU:U ratios. Our mass flow model ignores postulated fuel impurity limits; we compare the calculated impurity values with those limits to identify elements of concern. AIROX and melt refining cannot be used to separate used LWR UOX-51 because they cannot separate U from TRU, it is then impossible to make X% TRU for fast reactors with UOX-51 used fuel with 1.3% TRU. AIROX and melt refining can serve in the recycle loop for about 3 recycles, at which point the accumulated impurities displace fertile uranium and the fuel can no longer be as critical as the original fast reactor fuel recipe. UREX+1 and electrochemical can serve in either capacity; key impurities appear to be lanthanides and several transition metals.

  17. "I just wasnae me anymore": Individual Experiences of Identity Loss, Identity Negotiation, Acceptance and ‘Adjustment’ in Acquired Hearing Loss 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Suzie

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: There appears to be growing evidence that living with acquired hearing loss (AHL) results in people experiencing increased psychological distress. However, there is currently a dearth of research examining ...

  18. Steam generator behavior during loss-of-feedwater and loss-of-offsite-power ATWS experiments in LOFT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koizumi, Y.; Behling, S.R.; Grush, W.H.

    1983-11-01

    Two Anticipated Transient Without Scram (ATWS) experiments, L9-3 and L9-4, were conducted in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility. The LOFT facility is a volumetrically scaled (1/44) pressurized water reactor (PWR) system with a nuclear core and is designed for integral loss-of-coolant accident/emergency core cooling experiments. Experiment L9-3 simulated a loss-of-feedwater ATWS in a commercial PWR; Experiment L9-4 simulated a loss-of-offsite-power ATWS. The system transient behavior in each experiment was dominated by interaction between the primary-to-secondary heat removal rate in the steam generator and by reactor kinetics in the core. Comparisons of RELAP5/MOD1 calculational results to the measured test data show that the degradation of the primary-to-secondary heat transfer and the transient response of the primary coolant system in both experiments were calculated well.

  19. Extraction of Plutonium From Spiked INEEL Soil Samples Using the Ligand-Assisted Supercritical Fluid Extraction (LA-SFE) Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, R.V.; Mincher, B.J.; Holmes, R.G.G.

    1999-08-01

    In order to investigate the effectiveness of ligand-assisted supercritical fluid extraction for the removal of transuranic contaminations from soils an Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) silty-clay soil sample was obtained from near the Radioactive Waste Management Complex area and subjected to three different chemical preparations before being spiked with plutonium. The spiked INEEL soil samples were subjected to a sequential aqueous extraction procedure to determine radionuclide portioning in each sample. Results from those extractions demonstrate that plutonium consistently partitioned into the residual fraction across all three INEEL soil preparations whereas americium partitioned 73% into the iron/manganese fraction for soil preparation A, with the balance partitioning into the residual fraction. Plutonium and americium were extracted from the INEEL soil samples using a ligand-assisted supercritical fluid extraction technique. Initial supercritical fluid extraction runs produced plutonium extraction technique. Initial supercritical fluid extraction runs produced plutonium extraction efficiencies ranging from 14% to 19%. After a second round wherein the initial extraction parameters were changed, the plutonium extraction efficiencies increased to 60% and as high as 80% with the americium level in the post-extracted soil samples dropping near to the detection limits. The third round of experiments are currently underway. These results demonstrate that the ligand-assisted supercritical fluid extraction technique can effectively extract plutonium from the spiked INEEL soil preparations.

  20. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

    1997-02-25

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

  1. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Phelps, Cindy (Moscow, ID)

    1997-01-01

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  2. Geochemical Modeling of ILAW Lysimeter Water Extracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2014-12-22

    Geochemical modeling results of water extracts from simulated immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glasses, placed in lysimeters for eight years suggest that the secondary phase reaction network developed using product consistency test (PCT) results at 90°C may need to be modified for field conditions. For sediment samples that had been collected from near the glass samples, the impact of glass corrosion could be readily observed based upon the pH of their water extracts. For unimpacted sediments the pH ranged from 7.88 to 8.11 with an average of 8.04. Sediments that had observable impacts from glass corrosion exhibited elevated pH values (as high as 9.97). For lysimeter sediment samples that appear to have been impacted by glass corrosion to the greatest extent, saturation indices determined for analcime, calcite, and chalcedony in the 1:1 water extracts were near equilibrium and were consistent with the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. Fe(OH)3(s) also appears to be essentially at equilibrium in extracts impacted by glass corrosion, but with a solubility product (log Ksp) that is approximately 2.13 units lower than that used in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The solubilities of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) also appear to be much lower than that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The extent that the solubility of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) were reduced relative to that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C could not be quantified because the concentrations of Ti and Zr in the extracts were below the estimated quantification limit. Gibbsite was consistently highly oversaturated in the extract while dawsonite was at or near equilibrium. This suggests that dawsonite might be a more suitable phase for the secondary phase reaction network than gibbsite under field conditions. This may be due to the availability of carbonate that exists in the Hanford sediments as calcite. A significant source of carbonate was not available in the PCTs and this may account for why this phase did not appear in the PCTs. Sepiolite was consistently highly undersaturated, suggesting that another phase controls the solubility of magnesium. For samples that were most impacted by the effects of glass corrosion, magnesite appears to control glass corrosion. For samples that show less impacts from glass corrosion, clinochlore-7A or saponite-Mg appears to control the magnesium concentrations. For zinc, it appears that zincite is a better candidate than Zn(OH)2-? for controlling zinc concentrations in the extracts; however, in some samples all zinc phases considered were highly oversaturated. As a result the phase that controls zinc concentrations in the lysimeter extracts remains uncertain.

  3. Nanomaterials for Extracting Hydrogen from Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanomaterials for Extracting Hydrogen from Water P R O J E C T L E A D E R : Veronika Szalai (NIST to catalyze water oxidation. K E Y A C C O M P L I S H M E N T S Produced highly active iron oxide (hematite water. R E F E R E N C E Effect of tin doping on -Fe2 O3 photoanodes for water splitting, C. D. Bohn, A

  4. Optimization of a Solvent Extraction Desalination Plant 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beighle, Phillip Lew

    1969-01-01

    , a dynamic mathematical model was developed embodying the solvent extraction principles to find a set of flow rates and temper- atures consistent. with the specifications. The model was subjected to the physical restrictions normally associated... temperature, feed temperature, and feed rate, a set of feasible solutions was calculated. Another set of feasible solutions was then calculated using t. he previous set by allowing the solvent recycle temperature, product temperature, and steam rate...

  5. Reducing Energy Usage in Extractive Distillation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saxena, A. C.; Bhandari, V. A.

    1985-01-01

    flooded reflux drum. When a liquid-vapor interface is detected in the reflux drum, an automatic vent valve opens to purge the vapours. This control strategy had resulted in poorer control of extractor tower, lower unit productivity, higher energy...--boilup control has greatly improved extraction tower performance. The venting of non-condensable from the reflux drum does not destabilize tower operation. * Table 1 summarizes some of the process conditions prior to and during various stages...

  6. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.; Zeitoon, B.M.

    1995-12-01

    Molten Metal Technology was awarded a contract to demonstrate the applicability of the Catalytic Extraction Process, a proprietary process that could be applied to US DOE`s inventory of low level mixed waste. This paper is a description of that technology, and included within this document are discussions of: (1) Program objectives, (2) Overall technology review, (3) Organic feed conversion to synthetic gas, (4) Metal, halogen, and transuranic recovery, (5) Demonstrations, (6) Design of the prototype facility, and (7) Results.

  7. Extraction of Freshwater and Energy from Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-04-19

    Author offers and researches a new, cheap method for the extraction of freshwater from the Earth atmosphere. The suggected method is fundamentally dictinct from all existing methods that extract freshwater from air. All other industrial methods extract water from a saline water source (in most cases from seawater). This new method may be used at any point in the Earth except Polar Zones. It does not require long-distance freshwater transportation. If seawater is not utilized for increasing its productivity, this inexpensive new method is very environment-friendly. The author method has two working versions: (1) the first variant the warm (hot) atmospheric air is lifted by the inflatable tube in a high altitude and atmospheric steam is condenced into freswater: (2) in the second version, the warm air is pumped 20-30 meters under the sea-surface. In the first version, wind and solar heating of air are used for causing air flow. In version (2) wind and propeller are used for causing air movment. The first method does not need energy, the second needs a small amount. Moreover, in variant (1) the freshwater has a high pressure (>30 or more atm.) and can be used for production of energy such as electricity and in that way the freshwater cost is lower. For increasing the productivity the seawater is injected into air and solar air heater may be used. The solar air heater produces a huge amount of electricity as a very powerful electricity generation plant. The offered electricity installation in 100 - 200 times cheaper than any common electric plant of equivalent output. Key words: Extraction freshwater, method of getting freshwater, receiving energy from atmosphere, powerful renewal electric plant.

  8. Extraction of Freshwater and Energy from Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bolonkin, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Author offers and researches a new, cheap method for the extraction of freshwater from the Earth atmosphere. The suggected method is fundamentally dictinct from all existing methods that extract freshwater from air. All other industrial methods extract water from a saline water source (in most cases from seawater). This new method may be used at any point in the Earth except Polar Zones. It does not require long-distance freshwater transportation. If seawater is not utilized for increasing its productivity, this inexpensive new method is very environment-friendly. The author method has two working versions: (1) the first variant the warm (hot) atmospheric air is lifted by the inflatable tube in a high altitude and atmospheric steam is condenced into freswater: (2) in the second version, the warm air is pumped 20-30 meters under the sea-surface. In the first version, wind and solar heating of air are used for causing air flow. In version (2) wind and propeller are used for causing air movment. The first method...

  9. System Losses Study - FIT (Fuel-cycle Integration and Tradeoffs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; Nick R. Soelberg; Samuel E. Bays; Robert S. Cherry; Denia Djokic; Candido Pereira; Layne F. Pincock; Eric L. Shaber; Melissa C. Teague; Gregory M. Teske; Kurt G. Vedros

    2010-09-01

    This team aimed to understand the broad implications of changes of operating performance and parameters of a fuel cycle component on the entire system. In particular, this report documents the study of the impact of changing the loss of fission products into recycled fuel and the loss of actinides into waste. When the effort started in spring 2009, an over-simplified statement of the objective was “the number of nines” – how would the cost of separation, fuel fabrication, and waste management change as the number of nines of separation efficiency changed. The intent was to determine the optimum “losses” of TRU into waste for the single system that had been the focus of the Global Nuclear Energy Program (GNEP), namely sustained recycle in burner fast reactors, fed by transuranic (TRU) material recovered from used LWR UOX-51 fuel. That objective proved to be neither possible (insufficient details or attention to the former GNEP options, change in national waste management strategy from a Yucca Mountain focus) nor appropriate given the 2009-2010 change to a science-based program considering a wider range of options. Indeed, the definition of “losses” itself changed from the loss of TRU into waste to a generic definition that a “loss” is any material that ends up where it is undesired. All streams from either separation or fuel fabrication are products; fuel feed streams must lead to fuels with tolerable impurities and waste streams must meet waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for one or more disposal sites. And, these losses are linked in the sense that as the loss of TRU into waste is reduced, often the loss or carryover of waste into TRU or uranium is increased. The effort has provided a mechanism for connecting these three Campaigns at a technical level that had not previously occurred – asking smarter and smarter questions, sometimes answering them, discussing assumptions, identifying R&D needs, and gaining new insights. The FIT model has been a forcing function, helping the team in this endeavor. Models don’t like “TBD” as an input, forcing us to make assumptions and see if they matter. A major addition in FY 2010 was exploratory analysis of “modified open fuel” cycles, employing “minimum fuel treatment” as opposed to full aqueous or electrochemical separation treatment. This increased complexity in our analysis and analytical tool development because equilibrium conditions do not appear sustainable in minimum fuel treatment cases, as was assumed in FY 2009 work with conventional aqueous and electrochemical separation. It is no longer reasonable to assume an equilibrium situation exists in all cases.

  10. A medication extraction framework for electronic health records

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodnari, Andreea

    2012-01-01

    This thesis addresses the problem of concept and relation extraction in medical documents. We present a medical concept and relation extraction system (medNERR) that incorporates hand-built rules and constrained conditional ...

  11. Soil and Plant Responses to Lipid-Extracted Algae 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Katie

    2014-08-25

    following lipid extraction that might be used as a soil amendment for agricultural production. The overall objective of this series of experiments was to determine the feasibility and management strategies required to best utilize lipid-extracted algae...

  12. Towards Answer Extraction: An Application to Technical Domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliod, Diego Mollá

    those parts of documents that contain the information requested. Answer Extrac­ tion (AE) systems aim with Information Ex­ traction applications of the complex type (Template Extraction, Sce­ nario Extraction

  13. Towards Answer Extraction: An Application to Technical Domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliod, Diego Mollá

    of documents that contain the information requested. Answer Extrac- tion (AE) systems aim to satisfy this need Extraction, Sce- nario Extraction) is that the system is normally tailored to the pre- defined templates

  14. The Beam Loss Detection System of the LHC Ring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gschwendtner, E; Ferioli, G; Friesenbichler, W; Kain, V

    2002-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) a beam loss system will be installed in the arc, dispersion suppressor and the straight regions for a continuous surveillance of particle losses. These beam particles deposit their energy partially in the super-conducting coils leading to temperature increase, possible magnet quenches and damages. The primary and secondary halo of the beam is absorbed by the collimation system. The tertiary halo will be lost at aperture limits in the ring. Its loss distribution along the magnets has been studies. At the positions, where most of the beam losses are expected, simulations of the particle fluences outside the cryostat and induced by lost protons at the aperture have been performed with the Monte Carlo Code Geant 3.2.1. This allows determining the most suitable positions of the detectors, the needed number of monitors and the impact on the dynamic range of the detectors. The design of the beam loss monitor system is presented that meet the required sensitivity, dynamic range and ...

  15. eXsight: An Analytical Framework for Quantifying Financial Loss in the Aftermath of Catastrophic Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rau-Chaplin, Andrew

    , and hurricanes) caused a total economic loss of $192 billion dollars (USD) [1]. Of this total economic loss, $45, and the insurance for lost use or business interruption covered, the total loss will be know. Until then, insurers

  16. Ultra-low-loss high-aspect-ratio Si3N4 wavequides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    R. Gao, and A. Garito, “Ultra-Low-Loss Polymer Waveguides,”Ultra-low-loss high-aspect-ratio Si 3 N 4 waveguides Jaredan approach to make ultra-low-loss waveguides using stable

  17. Proceedings of ISEC 2008, International Solvent Extraction Conference - Solvent Extraction: Fundamentals to Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, Bruce A.

    2008-07-01

    The North American industry has employed major solvent-extraction processes to support a wide range of separations including but not limited to chemical, metallurgical, nuclear, biochemical, pharmaceutical, and petroleum applications. The knowledge enabling these separations has been obtained through fundamental studies in academe, government and industry. The International Solvent Extraction Conferences have been and continue to be a major gathering of scientists, engineers, operators, and vendors from around the world, who present new findings since the last meeting, exchange ideas, make business contacts, and conduct collegial discussions. The ISEC 2008 program emphasizes fundamentals to industrial applications of solvent extraction, particularly how this broad spectrum of activities is interconnected and has led to the implementation of novel processes. The oral and poster sessions have been organized into seven topics: Fundamentals; Novel Reagents, Materials and Techniques; Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing; Hydrometallurgy and Metals Extraction; Analytical and Preparative Applications; Biotechnology, Pharmaceuticals, Life-Science Products, and Organic Products; and Process Chemistry and Engineering. Over 350 abstracts were received, resulting in more than 260 manuscripts published in these proceedings. Five outstanding plenary presentations have been identified, with five parallel sessions for oral presentations and posters. In recognition of the major role solvent extraction (SX) plays in the hydrometallurgical and nuclear industries, these proceedings begin with sections focusing on hydrometallurgy, process chemistry, and engineering. More fundamental topics follow, including sections on novel reagents, materials, and techniques, featuring novel applications in analytical and biotechnology areas. Despite the diversity of topics and ideas represented, however, the primary focus of the ISEC community continues to be metals extraction. Four papers from these proceedings have been entered already in INIS in the form of individual reports. Among the remaining papers, 60 have been selected from the following sessions: Plenary Lectures, Hydrometallurgy and Metals Extraction, Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing, Analytical and Preparative Applications, Fundamentals, and Novel Reagents, Materials, and Techniques.

  18. Energy-loss- and thickness-dependent contrast in atomic-scale electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, Haiyan; Zhu, Ye; Dwyer, Christian; Xin, Huolin L.

    2014-12-31

    Atomic-scale elemental maps of materials acquired by core-loss inelastic electron scattering often exhibit an undesirable sensitivity to the unavoidable elastic scattering, making the maps counter-intuitive to interpret. Here, we present a systematic study that scrutinizes the energy-loss and sample-thickness dependence of atomic-scale elemental maps acquired using 100 keV incident electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope. For single-crystal silicon, the balance between elastic and inelastic scattering means that maps generated from the near-threshold Si-L signal (energy loss of 99 eV) show no discernible contrast for a thickness of 0.5? (? is the electron mean-free path, here approximately 110 nm). Atmore »greater thicknesses we observe a counter-intuitive “negative” contrast. Only at much higher energy losses is an intuitive “positive” contrast gradually restored. Our quantitative analysis shows that the energy-loss at which a positive contrast is restored depends linearly on the sample thickness. This behavior is in very good agreement with our double-channeling inelastic scattering calculations. We test a recently-proposed experimental method to correct the core-loss inelastic scattering and restore an intuitive “positive” chemical contrast. The method is demonstrated to be reliable over a large range of energy losses and sample thicknesses. The corrected contrast for near-threshold maps is demonstrated to be (desirably) inversely proportional to sample thickness. As a result, implications for the interpretation of atomic-scale elemental maps are discussed.« less

  19. Energy-loss- and thickness-dependent contrast in atomic-scale electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Haiyan; Zhu, Ye; Dwyer, Christian; Xin, Huolin L.

    2014-12-31

    Atomic-scale elemental maps of materials acquired by core-loss inelastic electron scattering often exhibit an undesirable sensitivity to the unavoidable elastic scattering, making the maps counter-intuitive to interpret. Here, we present a systematic study that scrutinizes the energy-loss and sample-thickness dependence of atomic-scale elemental maps acquired using 100 keV incident electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope. For single-crystal silicon, the balance between elastic and inelastic scattering means that maps generated from the near-threshold Si-L signal (energy loss of 99 eV) show no discernible contrast for a thickness of 0.5? (? is the electron mean-free path, here approximately 110 nm). At greater thicknesses we observe a counter-intuitive “negative” contrast. Only at much higher energy losses is an intuitive “positive” contrast gradually restored. Our quantitative analysis shows that the energy-loss at which a positive contrast is restored depends linearly on the sample thickness. This behavior is in very good agreement with our double-channeling inelastic scattering calculations. We test a recently-proposed experimental method to correct the core-loss inelastic scattering and restore an intuitive “positive” chemical contrast. The method is demonstrated to be reliable over a large range of energy losses and sample thicknesses. The corrected contrast for near-threshold maps is demonstrated to be (desirably) inversely proportional to sample thickness. As a result, implications for the interpretation of atomic-scale elemental maps are discussed.

  20. Vegetable oil extraction using liquid CO/sub 2/

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrum, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    SC-CO/sub 2/ extraction of oil from peanuts is an alternative to hexane extraction or the mechanical oil press. Oil was successfully extracted using SC-CO/sub 2/ at temperatures of 25-120/sup 0/C and pressures of 140 -690 Bar. Pressure, temperature and particle size affected the extraction of oil. In the range studied, the highest values of temperature and pressure gave highest solubilities.

  1. CONVERSION EXTRACTION DESULFURIZATION (CED) PHASE III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Boltz

    2005-03-01

    This project was undertaken to refine the Conversion Extraction Desulfurization (CED) technology to efficiently and economically remove sulfur from diesel fuel to levels below 15-ppm. CED is considered a generic term covering all desulfurization processes that involve oxidation and extraction. The CED process first extracts a fraction of the sulfur from the diesel, then selectively oxidizes the remaining sulfur compounds, and finally extracts these oxidized materials. The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Petro Star Inc. a contract to fund Phase III of the CED process development. Phase III consisted of testing a continuous-flow process, optimization of the process steps, design of a pilot plant, and completion of a market study for licensing the process. Petro Star and the Degussa Corporation in coordination with Koch Modular Process Systems (KMPS) tested six key process steps in a 7.6-centimeter (cm) (3.0-inch) inside diameter (ID) column at gas oil feed rates of 7.8 to 93.3 liters per hour (l/h) (2.1 to 24.6 gallons per hour). The team verified the technical feasibility with respect to hydraulics for each unit operation tested and successfully demonstrated pre-extraction and solvent recovery distillation. Test operations conducted at KMPS demonstrated that the oxidation reaction converted a maximum of 97% of the thiophenes. The CED Process Development Team demonstrated that CED technology is capable of reducing the sulfur content of light atmospheric gas oil from 5,000-ppm to less than 15-ppm within the laboratory scale. In continuous flow trials, the CED process consistently produced fuel with approximately 20-ppm of sulfur. The process economics study calculated an estimated process cost of $5.70 per product barrel. The Kline Company performed a marketing study to evaluate the possibility of licensing the CED technology. Kline concluded that only 13 refineries harbored opportunity for the CED process. The Kline study and the research team's discussions with prospective refineries led to the conclusion that there were not likely prospects for the licensing of the CED process.

  2. Automatic Extraction of Cartographic Information from Airborne Interferometric SAR Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Helmut A.

    Automatic Extraction of Cartographic Information from Airborne Interferometric SAR Data Reinhold cartographic feature extraction by the airborne AeS--1 instrument is presented. We extract regions corresponding to cartographic features for the classes built--up area, forest, water and open area. Water

  3. Extracting Fish and Water Velocity from Doppler Profiler Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Extracting Fish and Water Velocity from Doppler Profiler Data ĺ Ð 1 ¸ Ö Ò ×¹ Ò ÝÖ¹Ê Ò 2 1 processing algo- rithms normally used to extract water velocity. We present an alternative method for velocity homogeneity precludes the extraction of fish velocities. Water velocities can sometimes still

  4. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  5. Arsenic extraction and speciation in plants: Method comparison and development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    Arsenic extraction and speciation in plants: Method comparison and development Di Zhao a , Hong T S · An optimized extraction method for As speciation in plants based on three differ- ent plants and four different methods was developed. · The optimized method was based on ethanol/water extraction and used 50% less

  6. Customized Information Extraction as a Basis for Resource Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Michael F.

    users to associate specialized extraction methods with ordinary files, providing the illusion information extraction methods tailored to each specific environment. As an example, consider the problem as objects, with attached content extraction methods. Because a good deal of information currently exists

  7. A General Method for Feature Matching and Model Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Clark F.

    A General Method for Feature Matching and Model Extraction Clark F. Olson Jet Propulsion Laboratory is extracted from or #12;t to data that draws bene#12;ts from both generate-and-test methods and those based that are ecient and robust. We apply this method to object recognition, geometric primitive extraction, robust

  8. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-06

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 4 figs.

  9. GeothermalHeat Extraction Anna Przybycin Feliks Nueske Mark Riesland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kornhuber, Ralf

    - Dirichlet and Well-boundary conditions for hydraulic head - Dirichlet-boundary conditions for heat #12 between two wells for more than 50 years (Extraction - Injection) distance between the extraction into the extraction well - convectivity cold plume in groundwater-flowdirection - conductivity radial expansion

  10. LHC Beam Loss Measurements and Quench Level Abort Threshold Accuracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dehning, B; Sapinski, M

    2010-01-01

    The LHC beam loss measurement system is designed to trigger the beam abort in case the magnet coil transition level from the superconducting to normal conducting sate is approached. The predicted heat deposition in the superconducting coils of the magnets has been determined by particle shower simulation codes, while for transient losses the enthalpy has been calculated. The results have been combined to determine the abort thresholds. Transient loss measurements of the energy depositions of lost protons with injected beams in the LHC are used to determine the accuracy of the beam abort threshold settings. The simulation predictions are reviewed and compared with the measurement results. The relative difference between measurements and simulation are between 30 to 50 %.

  11. Geothermal-Heat Extraction As a source of renewable energy, geothermal-heat extraction has become increasingly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kornhuber, Ralf

    Geothermal-Heat Extraction As a source of renewable energy, geothermal-heat extraction has become increasingly important in recent years. Proper design of a geothermal system, be it for deep or for shallow

  12. Multiple Events Lead to Dendritic Spine Loss in Triple Transgenic Alzheimer's Disease Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    amyloid deposition leads to local synaptic abnormalities andMultiple Events Lead to Dendritic Spine Loss in Tripleal. (2010) Multiple Events Lead to Dendritic Spine Loss in

  13. Energy Use, Loss, and Opportunities Analysis for U.S. Manufacturing and Mining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellegrino, Joan L.; Margolis, Nancy; Justiniano, Mauricio; Miller, Melanie; Thedki, Arvind

    2004-12-01

    An analysis of the energy consumption and losses associated with industrial energy systems in the top energy-intensive industries and opportunities for reducing losses.

  14. Passive magnetic bearing element with minimal power losses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, R.F.

    1998-12-08

    Systems employing passive magnetic bearing elements having minimal power losses are provided. Improved stabilizing elements are shown, employing periodic magnet arrays and inductively loaded circuits, but with improved characteristics compared to the elements disclosed in US Patent No. 5,495,221 entitled ``Dynamically Stable Magnetic Suspension/Bearing System.`` The improvements relate to increasing the magnitude of the force derivative, while at the same time reducing the power dissipated during the normal operation of the bearing system, to provide a passive bearing system that has virtually no losses under equilibrium conditions, that is, when the supported system is not subject to any accelerations except those of gravity. 8 figs.

  15. Passive magnetic bearing element with minimal power losses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1998-01-01

    Systems employing passive magnetic bearing elements having minimal power losses are provided. Improved stabilizing elements are shown, employing periodic magnet arrays and inductively loaded circuits, but with improved characteristics compared to the elements disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 5,495,221 entitled "Dynamically Stable Magnetic Suspension/Bearing System." The improvements relate to increasing the magnitude of the force derivative, while at the same time reducing the power dissipated during the normal operation of the bearing system, to provide a passive bearing system that has virtually no losses under equilibrium conditions, that is, when the supported system is not subject to any accelerations except those of gravity.

  16. Characterizing and Controlling Beam Losses at the LANSCE Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J.

    2012-09-12

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) currently provides 100-MeV H{sup +} and 800-MeV H{sup -} beams to several user facilities that have distinct beam requirements, e.g. intensity, micropulse pattern, duty factor, etc. Minimizing beam loss is critical to achieving good performance and reliable operation, but can be challenging in the context of simultaneous multi-beam delivery. This presentation will discuss various aspects related to the observation, characterization and minimization of beam loss associated with normal production beam operations in the linac.

  17. Energy Loss in Nuclear Drell-Yan Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Jun Yang; Guang-Lie Li

    1998-05-21

    By means of the nuclear parton distributions which can be used to provide a good explanation for the EMC effect in the whole x range, we investigate the energy loss effect in nuclear Drell-Yan process. When the cross section of lepton pair production is considered varying with the center-of-mass energy of the nucleon-nucleon collision, we find that the nuclear Drell-Yan(DY) ratio is suppressed due to the energy loss, which balances the overestimate of the DY ratio only in consideration of the effect of nuclear parton distributions.

  18. Loss of purity by wave packet scattering at low energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia Wang; C. K. Law; M. -C. Chu

    2006-01-06

    We study the quantum entanglement produced by a head-on collision between two gaussian wave packets in three-dimensional space. By deriving the two-particle wave function modified by s-wave scattering amplitudes, we obtain an approximate analytic expression of the purity of an individual particle. The loss of purity provides an indicator of the degree of entanglement. In the case the wave packets are narrow in momentum space, we show that the loss of purity is solely controlled by the ratio of the scattering cross section to the transverse area of the wave packets.

  19. Power losses in electrical networks depending on weather conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhelezko, Yu. S.; Kostyushko, V. A.; Krylov, S. V.; Nikiforov, E. P.; Savchenko, O. V.; Timashova, L. V.; Solomonik, E. A. [Electric Power Research Institute (VNIIE) (Russian Federation)

    2005-01-15

    Specific power losses to corona and to leakage currents over overhead insulators are presented for 110 - 750-kV transmission lines with different phase design and pole types for different weather conditions. Consumption of electric energy for ice melting on conductors of various cross sections is evaluated. Meteorological data of 1372 weather stations in Russia are processed for a period of 10 years. The territory of the country is divided into 7 regions with approximately homogeneous weather conditions. Specific power losses to corona and leakage currents over overhead insulators are presented for every region.

  20. Design, demonstration and evaluation of a thermal enhanced vapor extraction system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelan, J.; Reavis, B.; Swanson, J.

    1997-08-01

    The Thermal Enhanced Vapor Extraction System (TEVES), which combines powerline frequency heating (PLF) and radio frequency (RF) heating with vacuum soil vapor extraction, was used to effectively remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) from a pit in the chemical waste landfill (CWL) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) within a two month heating period. Volume average temperatures of 83{degrees}C and 112{degrees}C were reached for the PLF and RF heating periods, respectively, within the 15 ft x 45 ft x 18.5 ft deep treated volume. This resulted in the removal of 243 lb of measured toxic organic compounds (VOCs and SVOCs), 55 gallons of oil, and 11,000 gallons of water from the site. Reductions of up to 99% in total chromatographic organics (TCO) was achieved in the heated zone. Energy balance calculations for the PLF heating period showed that 36.4% of the heat added went to heating the soil, 38.5% went to evaporating water and organics, 4.2% went to sensible heat in the water, 7.1% went to heating the extracted air, and 6.6% was lost. For the RF heating period went to heating the soil, 23.5% went to evaporating water and organics, 2.4% went to sensible heat in the water, 7.5% went to heating extracted air, and 9.7% went to losses. Energy balance closure was 92.8% for the PLF heating and 98% for the RF heating. The energy input requirement per unit soil volume heated per unit temperature increase was 1.63 kWH/yd{sup 3}-{degrees}C for PLF heating and 0.73 kWH/yd{sup 3}{degrees}C for RF heating.

  1. Extraction abilities of methods used for estimating of different phosphorus fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulhanek, Martin; Balik, Jiri; Cerny, Jindrich; Kozlovsky, Ondrej; Nedved, Vaclav

    2009-01-01

    Comparison of different extractions methods (P ar =100%) Pand Williams extraction method. Correlation analysis wasthe extraction ability of different methods. Table 1 shows

  2. Self-adaptive methods for acoustic focusing and mode extraction in a shallow ocean waveguide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Shane C.

    2005-01-01

    of MRMF and MI method mode extractions using simulated83 MI method mode extraction results using ultrasonictransducers. The mode extraction method is applied to both

  3. Colorimetric Determination of Nitrite in Foods Principle: The sample is extracted with distilled water and the aqueous extract clarified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazarenko, Alexander

    water and the aqueous extract clarified with zinc hydroxide. Sulfanilic acid is diazotisedColorimetric Determination of Nitrite in Foods Principle: The sample is extracted with distilled/50 mL. The absorbance range should extend from 0 to 0.6 approx. E. Extraction Procedure Weigh ca 100g

  4. Direct extraction of oil from sunflower seeds by twin-screw extruder according to an aqueous extraction process: Feasibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Direct extraction of oil from sunflower seeds by twin-screw extruder according to an aqueous the feasibility of an aqueous process to extract sunflower seed oil using a co-rotating twin-screw extruder. Aqueous extraction was carried out using whole seeds and the influence of the operating conditions on oil

  5. Lerner et al.:Feature Extraction by NN Nonlinear Mapping 1 Feature Extraction by Neural Network Nonlinear Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lerner, Boaz

    of feature extraction methods based on statistical pattern recognition or on artificial neural networks(x) and by the criteria they have to optimize. Feature extraction methods can be grouped into four categories [4] based, unsupervized methods are the only way to perform feature extraction. In other cases, supervized paradigms

  6. Extraction of Proteins Glass Bead Method For preparation of protein extracts, the glass bead method is preferred. Some researchers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extraction of Proteins ­ Glass Bead Method For preparation of protein extracts, the glass bead method is preferred. Some researchers suggest more than one wash step (Step 1) to remove any residual. Protein Extraction Buffer 3. SDS-Page Sample Buffer 4. 15 mL conical tubes 5. 2 mL sardstedt tubes 6

  7. Kerogen extraction from subterranean oil shale resources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Looney, Mark Dean (Houston, TX); Lestz, Robert Steven (Missouri City, TX); Hollis, Kirk (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig (Los Alamos, NM); Kinkead, Scott (Los Alamos, NM); Wigand, Marcus (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-09-07

    The present invention is directed to methods for extracting a kerogen-based product from subsurface (oil) shale formations, wherein such methods rely on fracturing and/or rubblizing portions of said formations so as to enhance their fluid permeability, and wherein such methods further rely on chemically modifying the shale-bound kerogen so as to render it mobile. The present invention is also directed at systems for implementing at least some of the foregoing methods. Additionally, the present invention is also directed to methods of fracturing and/or rubblizing subsurface shale formations and to methods of chemically modifying kerogen in situ so as to render it mobile.

  8. Kerogen extraction from subterranean oil shale resources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Looney, Mark Dean (Houston, TX); Lestz, Robert Steven (Missouri City, TX); Hollis, Kirk (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig (Los Alamos, NM); Kinkead, Scott (Los Alamos, NM); Wigand, Marcus (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-03-10

    The present invention is directed to methods for extracting a kerogen-based product from subsurface (oil) shale formations, wherein such methods rely on fracturing and/or rubblizing portions of said formations so as to enhance their fluid permeability, and wherein such methods further rely on chemically modifying the shale-bound kerogen so as to render it mobile. The present invention is also directed at systems for implementing at least some of the foregoing methods. Additionally, the present invention is also directed to methods of fracturing and/or rubblizing subsurface shale formations and to methods of chemically modifying kerogen in situ so as to render it mobile.

  9. Permeability extraction: A sonic log inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbar, N.; Kim, J.J. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1994-12-31

    In this paper the authors provide the missing important link between permeability and acoustic velocities by generating a permeability-dependent synthetic sonic log in a carbonate reservoir. The computations are based on Akbar`s theory that relates wave velocity to frequency, rock properties (e.g., lithology, permeability, and porosity), and fluid saturation and properties (viscosity, density, and compressibility). An inverted analytical expression of the theory is used to extract permeability from sonic velocity. The synthetic sonic and the computed permeability are compared with the observed sonic log and with plug permeability, respectively. The results demonstrate, as predicted by theory, that permeability can be related directly to acoustic velocities.

  10. Multipole Extraction: A novel, model independent method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Stiliaris; C. N. Papanicolas

    2007-03-20

    A novel method for extracting multipole amplitudes in the nucleon resonance region from electroproduction data is presented. The method is based on statistical concepts and it relies heavily on Monte Carlo and simulation techniques; it produces precise identification and determination of the contributing multipole amplitudes in the resonance region and for the first time a rigorous determination of the associated experimental uncertainty. The results are demonstrated to be independent of any model bias. The method is applied in the reanalysis of the $Q^{2}=0.127 GeV^2/c^2$ Bates and Mainz $N\\to \\Delta$ data.

  11. Hot cell shield plug extraction apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knapp, Philip A. (Moore, ID); Manhart, Larry K. (Pingree, ID)

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for moving shielding plugs into and out of holes in concrete shielding walls in hot cells for handling radioactive materials without the use of external moving equipment. The apparatus provides a means whereby a shield plug is extracted from its hole and then swung approximately 90 degrees out of the way so that the hole may be accessed. The apparatus uses hinges to slide the plug in and out and to rotate it out of the way, the hinge apparatus also supporting the weight of the plug in all positions, with the load of the plug being transferred to a vertical wall by means of a bolting arrangement.

  12. Enhanced Attenuation Technologies: Passive Soil Vapor Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vangelas, K.; Looney, B.; Kamath, R.; Adamson, D.; Newell, C.

    2010-03-15

    Passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) is an enhanced attenuation (EA) approach that removes volatile contaminants from soil. The extraction is driven by natural pressure gradients between the subsurface and atmosphere (Barometric Pumping), or by renewable sources of energy such as wind or solar power (Assisted PSVE). The technology is applicable for remediating sites with low levels of contamination and for transitioning sites from active source technologies such as active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) to natural attenuation. PSVE systems are simple to design and operate and are more cost effective than active systems in many scenarios. Thus, PSVE is often appropriate as an interim-remedial or polishing strategy. Over the past decade, PSVE has been demonstrated in the U.S. and in Europe. These demonstrations provide practical information to assist in selecting, designing and implementing the technology. These demonstrations indicate that the technology can be effective in achieving remedial objectives in a timely fashion. The keys to success include: (1) Application at sites where the residual source quantities, and associated fluxes to groundwater, are relatively low; (2) Selection of the appropriate passive energy source - barometric pumping in cases with a deep vadose zone and barrier (e.g., clay) layers that separate the subsurface from the atmosphere and renewable energy assisted PSVE in other settings and where higher flow rates are required. (3) Provision of sufficient access to the contaminated vadose zones through the spacing and number of extraction wells. This PSVE technology report provides a summary of the relevant technical background, real-world case study performance, key design and cost considerations, and a scenario-based cost evaluation. The key design and cost considerations are organized into a flowchart that dovetails with the Enhanced Attenuation: Chlorinated Organics Guidance of the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC). The PSVE flowchart provides a structured process to determine if the technology is, or is not, reasonable and defensible for a particular site. The central basis for that decision is the expected performance of PSVE under the site specific conditions. Will PSVE have sufficient mass removal rates to reduce the release, or flux, of contamination into the underlying groundwater so that the site can meet it overall remedial objectives? The summary technical information, case study experiences, and structured decision process provided in this 'user guide' should assist environmental decision-makers, regulators, and engineers in selecting and successfully implementing PSVE at appropriate sites.

  13. Apparatus for extracting and sequestering carbon dioxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rau, Gregory H. (Castro Valley, CA); Caldeira, Kenneth G. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-02-02

    An apparatus and method associated therewith to extract and sequester carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) from a stream or volume of gas wherein said apparatus hydrates CO.sub.2 and reacts the resulting carbonic acid with carbonate. Suitable carbonates include, but are not limited to, carbonates of alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, preferably carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Waste products are metal cations and bicarbonate in solution or dehydrated metal salts, which when disposed of in a large body of water provide an effective way of sequestering CO.sub.2 from a gaseous environment.

  14. Massive global ozone loss predicted following regional nuclear conflict

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    that nuclear war could be winnable, and preceded the first significant reductions in nuclear weapons stockpiles, the proliferation of nuclear weapons has produced greater risks of a regional nuclear conflict. At the same timeMassive global ozone loss predicted following regional nuclear conflict Michael J. Mills* , Owen B

  15. Modelling and Measurements of Power Losses and Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    at Middelgrunden Offshore Wind Farm R. J. Barthelmie*, , S. T. Frandsen and M. N. Nielsen, Wind Energy Department and turbulence increase due to wind turbine wake interac- tions in large offshore wind farms is crucial interactions in large offshore wind farms is crucial to optimizing wind farm design. Power losses due

  16. The Energy Harvesting Multiple Access Channel with Energy Storage Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    The Energy Harvesting Multiple Access Channel with Energy Storage Losses Kaya Tutuncuoglu and Aylin considers a Gaussian multiple access channel with two energy harvesting transmitters with lossy energy storage. The power allocation policy maximizing the average weighted sum rate given the energy harvesting

  17. Precise parametrizations of muon energy losses in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. I. Klimushin; E. V. Bugaev; I. A. Sokalski

    2001-06-01

    The description of muon propagation through large depths of matter, based on a concept of the correction factor, is proposed. The results of Monte-Carlo calculations of this correction factor are presented. The parametrizations for continuous energy loss coefficients, valid in the broad interval of muon energies, and for the correction factor are given. The concrete calculations for pure water are presented.

  18. The Community Loss Index: A New Social Indicator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    and an aggregator of individ- ual experiences. Building on the relationship between loss and stress, the index at is growing due to mounting demand for accountability, outcome measures, evidence-based research, and indicators that reveal what works. In response, researchers like Jochen Albrecht and Laxmi Ramasubramanian ð

  19. STAFF PAPER A Review of Transmission Losses in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from 5.4 percent to 6.9 percent during 2002 to 2008, based on Energy Commission data. This staff paper of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. Staff also would like to acknowledge Al Alvarado and distribution loss values in planning studies. In this effort, staff analyzed data, researched literature

  20. NASA/TM2013218030 The Chorus Conflict and Loss of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Ricky W.

    NASA/TM­2013­218030 The Chorus Conflict and Loss of Separation Resolution Algorithms Ricky W. Butler, George Hagen, Jeffrey M. Maddalon Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia August 2013 #12;NASA STI Program . . . in Profile Since its founding, NASA has been dedicated to the advancement

  1. Bait Loss From Halibut Longline Gear Observed From a Submersible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bait Loss From Halibut Longline Gear Observed From a Submersible WILLIAM L. HIGH Introduction Demersal longline gear is fished along the west coast of the United States for Pacific halibut is avail- able on the behavior of fish around the gear and bait, bait durability on hooks, predators other

  2. Anomalous loss in blue-green wavelength discrimination with very

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, David H.

    Anomalous loss in blue-green wavelength discrimination with very brief monochromatic stimuli to yield non-uniform increases in discrimination thresholds in the blue-green region of the spectrum that the effect was not attributable to the reduced energy of the short flash. One of the most significant

  3. Mar./Apr. 2002 Winter Losses, Again Organic Beekeeping Conf.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishida, Yuko

    Mar./Apr. 2002 Winter Losses, Again Organic Beekeeping Conf. Diagnosing and Treating Nosema is extremely hard to see, because the bees look OK while the stored food reserves in their bodies just aren of the honey bee midgut stimulate germination. The organism penetrates a midgut cell and grows by absorbing

  4. DETERMINATION OF LOSS FACTORS IN A DEREGULATED SYSTEM Ashikur Bhuiya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    is computationally efficient and can be utilized to calculate the loss factors associated with the generators of the world electric utilities are facing the challenge of transformation - from regulated monopoly market plays the role of a supervisor for system planning and security. An ISO may also work as a spot market

  5. Bridge-Node Selection and Loss Recovery in Island Multicast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Shueng-Han Gary

    Bridge-Node Selection and Loss Recovery in Island Multicast W.-P. Ken Yiu K.-F. Simon Wong S multicast-capable domains (the so-called islands) while overlay connections are used to bridge islands. In the previously proposed scheme, the number of ping measurements to find good bridge-nodes is at least

  6. Bone loss during energy restriction: mechanistic role of leptin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baek, Kyunghwa

    2009-05-15

    Mechanical unloading and food restriction (FR) are leading causes of bone loss, which increase the risk of fracture later in life. Leptin, a 16kDa cytokine like hormone principally produced by white adipocytes, may be involved in bone metabolism...

  7. Low loss liquid crystals for infrared applications Fenglin Penga

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    contender for phase modulation, such as spatial light modula- tors (SLMs),[1] laser beam steering,[2,3] adaptive optics, adaptive lenses,[4] and phase shifters in the microwave [5,6] and terahertz [7­9] regions, in which light scattering loss would be intolerable. After having taken this factor of 10

  8. Multiple hit hypotheses for dopamine neuron loss in Parkinson's disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sulzer, David

    State Psychiatric Institute, New York City, NY 10032, USA Parkinson's disease arises from geneticMultiple hit hypotheses for dopamine neuron loss in Parkinson's disease David Sulzer Departments features. Although many genetic mutations have been suggested as causes or risk factors for Parkinson

  9. Modelling and Computation of AC Fields and Losses in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    and improves machine efficiency. These reductions in losses result in lower operating costs than is expected to protect and reduce the cost of utility system components. Reduced operating impedance, which reduced by a factor of two, which will increase existing substation capacity, reduce land area needed

  10. Computationally Efficient Winding Loss Calculation with Multiple Windings, Arbitrary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is valid, it produces a frequency-independent model that may be used to calculate losses for any set and Two- or Three-Dimensional Field Geometry C. R. Sullivan From IEEE Transactions on Power Electronics of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE. #12;142 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER ELECTRONICS, VOL

  11. STREAMLINING THE SUPPLY CHAIN: GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONSAND DRY MATTER LOSSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    supply chains · Dry matter, lost energy and quality changes · Focusing on: · Wood chip storage and greenhouse gas emissions from wood chip storage? · Cap layer forms on outside · Mouldy and very dampSTREAMLINING THE SUPPLY CHAIN: GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONSAND DRY MATTER LOSSES FROM WOOD CHIP STACKS

  12. Low-loss guided modes in photonic crystal waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    @fisicavolta.unipv.it Abstract: We study disorder-induced propagation losses of guided modes in photonic crystal slabs with line-defects. Meade, and J. N. Winn, Photonic Crystals: Molding the Flow of Light (Princeton University Press. Takahashi, and I. Yokohama, "Structural tuning of guiding modes of line-defect waveguides of Silicon

  13. OLA -11.15,2012 DATA LOSS PREVENTION POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    1 OLA -11.15,2012 DATA LOSS PREVENTION POLICY 1.0 PURPOSE This Policy establishes z e d disclosure of Protected Information by electronic means. The specific purposes of this Policy for monitoring and reporting compliance with the College's Privacy Policy (http://policy.cofc.edu/documents/11

  14. Modeling IR Radiative Loss from Eppley PSP Pyranometers Frank Vignola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    Renewable Energy Laboratory ABSTRACT A method has been developed to estimate IR radiative losses using solar, irradiance, IR, modeling, global, diffuse, PSP 1. INTRODUCTION Since the 1970s, solar radiation data has been Energy Laboratory (NREL) data page3 along with the original global data. Corrections to the PSP

  15. Burst Mode Message Loss Effects On WAAS Availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Burst Mode Message Loss Effects On WAAS Availability Richard Fuller, Todd Walter, Per Enge, the satellite ranging-source increases the percentage of time that the precise signal is available. In this way, availability, and continuity. The WAAS Signal-In-Space (SIS) has a limited data message bandwidth of 250 bits

  16. Acoustic Transmission Loss of Perforated Plates Vincent Phong1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papamoschou, Dimitri

    Acoustic Transmission Loss of Perforated Plates Vincent Phong1 and Dimitri Papamoschou2 University of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA A study has been conducted on the acoustic response of perforated plates coefficient of the perforate. The theoretical analysis is based on planar wave propagation through a single

  17. On the Hardness of Pricing Loss-leaders Preyas Popat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yi

    their margin cost. It is shown in [BB06, BBCH07] that by pricing some of the items below cost, the maximumOn the Hardness of Pricing Loss-leaders Preyas Popat New York University popat@cs.nyu.edu Yi Wu IBM Almaden wuyi@us.ibm.com September 30, 2011 Abstract Consider the problem of pricing n items under

  18. Theoretical mass loss rates of cool main-sequence stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Holzwarth; M. Jardine

    2006-11-14

    We develop a model for the wind properties of cool main-sequence stars, which comprises their wind ram pressures, mass fluxes, and terminal wind velocities. The wind properties are determined through a polytropic magnetised wind model, assuming power laws for the dependence of the thermal and magnetic wind parameters on the stellar rotation rate. We use empirical data to constrain theoretical wind scenarios, which are characterised by different rates of increase of the wind temperature, wind density, and magnetic field strength. Scenarios based on moderate rates of increase yield wind ram pressures in agreement with most empirical constraints, but cannot account for some moderately rotating targets, whose high apparent mass loss rates are inconsistent with observed coronal X-ray and magnetic properties. For fast magnetic rotators, the magneto-centrifugal driving of the outflow can produce terminal wind velocities far in excess of the surface escape velocity. Disregarding this aspect in the analyses of wind ram pressures leads to overestimations of stellar mass loss rates. The predicted mass loss rates of cool main-sequence stars do not exceed about ten times the solar value. Our results are in contrast with previous investigations, which found a strong increase of the stellar mass loss rates with the coronal X-ray flux. Owing to the weaker dependence, we expect the impact of stellar winds on planetary atmospheres to be less severe and the detectability of magnetospheric radio emission to be lower then previously suggested. Considering the rotational evolution of a one solar-mass star, the mass loss rates and the wind ram pressures are highest during the pre-main sequence phase.

  19. Property Loss Notice Instructions on filing a Property Loss Notice with the Office of Risk Management can be found in the Administrative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berdichevsky, Victor

    Acquired Cost New/Replacement Repair 1. 2. 3. 4. CLAIMS INVOLVING UNIVERSITY PROPERTY OR EQUIPMENT A $500 that a loss occurred, e.g., no visible signs of forced entry, forcible theft, etc. Loss adjustment is subject

  20. SANS Study of Cellulose Extracted from Switchgrass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pingali, Sai Venkatesh [ORNL; Urban, Volker S [ORNL; Heller, William T [ORNL; McGaughey, Joseph [ORNL; O'Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL; Foston, Marcus B [ORNL; Myles, Dean A A [ORNL; Ragauskas, Arthur J [ORNL; Evans, Barbara R [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    AbstractLignocellulosic biomass, an abundant renewable natural resource, has the potential to play a major role in generation of renewable biofuels through its conversion to bio-ethanol. Unfortunately, it is a complex biological composite material that shows significant recalcitrance making it a cost-ineffective feedstock for bioethanol production. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) was employed to probe the multi-scale structure of cellulosic materials. Cellulose was extracted from milled native switchgrass and switchgrass that had undergone the dilute acid pretreatment method to disrupt the lignocellulose structure. The high-Q structural feature (Q > 0.07 -1) can be assigned to cellulose fibrils based on comparison with the switchgrass purified by solvent extraction of native and dilute acid pretreated and a commercial preparation of microcrystalline cellulose. Dilute acid pretreatment results in an increase in the smallest structural size, a decrease in the interconnectivity of the fibrils; and no change in the smooth domain boundaries at length scales larger than 1000 .

  1. Feature extraction for structural dynamics model validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemez, Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nishio, Mayuko [UNIV OF TOKYO; Worden, Keith [UNIV OF SHEFFIELD; Takeda, Nobuo [UNIV OF TOKYO

    2010-11-08

    This study focuses on defining and comparing response features that can be used for structural dynamics model validation studies. Features extracted from dynamic responses obtained analytically or experimentally, such as basic signal statistics, frequency spectra, and estimated time-series models, can be used to compare characteristics of structural system dynamics. By comparing those response features extracted from experimental data and numerical outputs, validation and uncertainty quantification of numerical model containing uncertain parameters can be realized. In this study, the applicability of some response features to model validation is first discussed using measured data from a simple test-bed structure and the associated numerical simulations of these experiments. issues that must be considered were sensitivity, dimensionality, type of response, and presence or absence of measurement noise in the response. Furthermore, we illustrate a comparison method of multivariate feature vectors for statistical model validation. Results show that the outlier detection technique using the Mahalanobis distance metric can be used as an effective and quantifiable technique for selecting appropriate model parameters. However, in this process, one must not only consider the sensitivity of the features being used, but also correlation of the parameters being compared.

  2. Non-Ideal Behavior in Solvent Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Zalupski

    2011-09-01

    This report presents a summary of the work performed to meet FCR&D level 3 milestone M31SW050801, 'Complete the year-end report summarizing FY11 experimental and modeling activities.' This work was carried out under the auspices of the Non-Ideality in Solvent Extraction Systems FCR&D work package. The report summarizes our initial considerations of potential influences that non-ideal chemistry may impose on computational prediction of outcomes in solvent extraction systems. The report is packaged into three separate test cases where a robustness of the prediction by SXFIT program is under scrutiny. The computational exercises presented here emphasize the importance of accurate representation of both an aqueous and organic mixtures when modeling liquid-liquid distribution systems. Case No.1 demonstrates that non-ideal behavior of HDEHP in aliphatic diluents, such as n-dodecane, interferes with the computation. Cases No.2 and No.3 focus on the chemical complexity of aqueous electrolyte mixtures. Both exercises stress the need for an improved thermodynamic model of an aqueous environment present in the europium distribution experiments. Our efforts for year 2 of this project will focus on the improvements of aqueous and non-aqueous solution models using fundamental physical properties of mixtures acquired experimentally in our laboratories.

  3. Solvent-extraction purification of neptunium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyser, E.A.; Hudlow, S.L.

    2008-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has recovered {sup 237}Np from reactor fuel that is currently being processed into NpO{sub 2} for future production of {sup 238}Pu. Several purification flowsheets have been utilized. An oxidizing solvent-extraction (SX) flowsheet was used to remove Fe, sulfate ion, and Th while simultaneously {sup 237}Np, {sup 238}Pu, u, and nonradioactive Ce(IV) was extracted into the tributyl phosphate (TBP) based organic solvent. A reducing SX flowsheet (second pass) removed the Ce and Pu and recovered both Np and U. The oxidizing flowsheet was necessary for solutions that contained excessive amounts of sulfate ion. Anion exchange was used to perform final purification of Np from Pu, U, and various non-actinide impurities. The Np(IV) in the purified solution was then oxalate-precipitated and calcined to an oxide for shipment to other facilities for storage and future target fabrication. Performance details of the SX purification and process difficulties are discussed. (authors)

  4. White LED with High Package Extraction Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi Zheng; Matthew Stough

    2008-09-30

    The goal of this project is to develop a high efficiency phosphor converting (white) Light Emitting Diode (pcLED) 1-Watt package through an increase in package extraction efficiency. A transparent/translucent monolithic phosphor is proposed to replace the powdered phosphor to reduce the scattering caused by phosphor particles. Additionally, a multi-layer thin film selectively reflecting filter is proposed between blue LED die and phosphor layer to recover inward yellow emission. At the end of the project we expect to recycle approximately 50% of the unrecovered backward light in current package construction, and develop a pcLED device with 80 lm/W{sub e} using our technology improvements and commercially available chip/package source. The success of the project will benefit luminous efficacy of white LEDs by increasing package extraction efficiency. In most phosphor-converting white LEDs, the white color is obtained by combining a blue LED die (or chip) with a powdered phosphor layer. The phosphor partially absorbs the blue light from the LED die and converts it into a broad green-yellow emission. The mixture of the transmitted blue light and green-yellow light emerging gives white light. There are two major drawbacks for current pcLEDs in terms of package extraction efficiency. The first is light scattering caused by phosphor particles. When the blue photons from the chip strike the phosphor particles, some blue light will be scattered by phosphor particles. Converted yellow emission photons are also scattered. A portion of scattered light is in the backward direction toward the die. The amount of this backward light varies and depends in part on the particle size of phosphors. The other drawback is that yellow emission from phosphor powders is isotropic. Although some backward light can be recovered by the reflector in current LED packages, there is still a portion of backward light that will be absorbed inside the package and further converted to heat. Heat generated in the package may cause a deterioration of encapsulant materials, affecting the performance of both the LED die and phosphor, leading to a decrease in the luminous efficacy over lifetime. Recent studies from research groups at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute found that, under the condition to obtain a white light, about 40% of the light is transmitted outward of the phosphor layer and 60% of the light is reflected inward.1,2 It is claimed that using scattered photon extraction (SPE) technique, luminous efficacy is increased by 60%. In this project, a transparent/translucent monolithic phosphor was used to replace the powdered phosphor layer. In the normal pcLED package, the powdered phosphor is mixed with silicone either to be deposited on the top of LED die forming a chip level conversion (CLC) white LED or to be casted in the package forming a volume conversion white LED. In the monolithic phosphors there are no phosphor powder/silicone interfaces so it can reduce the light scattering caused by phosphor particles. Additionally, a multi-layer thin film selectively reflecting filter is inserted in the white LED package between the blue LED die and phosphor layer. It will selectively transmit the blue light from the LED die and reflect the phosphor's yellow inward emission outward. The two technologies try to recover backward light to the outward direction in the pcLED package thereby improving the package extraction efficiency.

  5. Energy loss characteristics of heavy ions in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, hydrocarbon gases and tradescantia tissue

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis, J A

    1971-01-01

    Energy loss characteristics of heavy ions in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, hydrocarbon gases and tradescantia tissue

  6. Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction: Prediction of Cesium Extraction for Actual Wastes and Actual Waste Simulants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delmau, L.H.; Haverlock, T.J.; Sloop, F.V., Jr.; Moyer, B.A.

    2003-02-01

    This report presents the work that followed the CSSX model development completed in FY2002. The developed cesium and potassium extraction model was based on extraction data obtained from simple aqueous media. It was tested to ensure the validity of the prediction for the cesium extraction from actual waste. Compositions of the actual tank waste were obtained from the Savannah River Site personnel and were used to prepare defined simulants and to predict cesium distribution ratios using the model. It was therefore possible to compare the cesium distribution ratios obtained from the actual waste, the simulant, and the predicted values. It was determined that the predicted values agree with the measured values for the simulants. Predicted values also agreed, with three exceptions, with measured values for the tank wastes. Discrepancies were attributed in part to the uncertainty in the cation/anion balance in the actual waste composition, but likely more so to the uncertainty in the potassium concentration in the waste, given the demonstrated large competing effect of this metal on cesium extraction. It was demonstrated that the upper limit for the potassium concentration in the feed ought to not exceed 0.05 M in order to maintain suitable cesium distribution ratios.

  7. Extraction of information from unstructured text

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irwin, N.H.; DeLand, S.M.; Crowder, S.V.

    1995-11-01

    Extracting information from unstructured text has become an emphasis in recent years due to the large amount of text now electronically available. This status report describes the findings and work done by the end of the first year of a two-year LDRD. Requirements of the approach included that it model the information in a domain independent way. This means that it would differ from current systems by not relying on previously built domain knowledge and that it would do more than keyword identification. Three areas that are discussed and expected to contribute to a solution include (1) identifying key entities through document level profiling and preprocessing, (2) identifying relationships between entities through sentence level syntax, and (3) combining the first two with semantic knowledge about the terms.

  8. Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McHood, M D

    2000-10-12

    A geotechnical investigation program has been completed for the Commercial Light Water Reactor - Tritium Extraction Facility (CLWR-TEF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The program consisted of reviewing previous geotechnical and geologic data and reports, performing subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing, and geologic and engineering analyses. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the subsurface conditions for the CLWR-TEF in terms of subsurface stratigraphy and engineering properties for design and to perform selected engineering analyses. The objectives of the evaluation were to establish site-specific geologic conditions, obtain representative engineering properties of the subsurface and potential fill materials, evaluate the lateral and vertical extent of any soft zones encountered, and perform engineering analyses for slope stability, bearing capacity and settlement, and liquefaction potential. In addition, provide general recommendations for construction and earthwork.

  9. Maximal energy extraction under discrete diffusive exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael J. Hay; Jeremy Schiff; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2015-08-14

    Waves propagating through a bounded plasma can rearrange the densities of states in the six-dimensional velocity-configuration phase space. Depending on the rearrangement, the wave energy can either increase or decrease, with the difference taken up by the total plasma energy. In the case where the rearrangement is diffusive, only certain plasma states can be reached. It turns out that the set of reachable states through such diffusive rearrangements has been described in very different contexts. Building upon those descriptions, and making use of the fact that the plasma energy is a linear functional of the state densities, the maximal extractable energy under diffusive rearrangement can then be addressed through linear programming.

  10. Maximal energy extraction under discrete diffusive exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hay, Michael J; Fisch, Nathaniel J

    2015-01-01

    Waves propagating through a bounded plasma can rearrange the densities of states in the six-dimensional velocity-configuration phase space. Depending on the rearrangement, the wave energy can either increase or decrease, with the difference taken up by the total plasma energy. In the case where the rearrangement is diffusive, only certain plasma states can be reached. It turns out that the set of reachable states through such diffusive rearrangements has been described in very different contexts. Building upon those descriptions, and making use of the fact that the plasma energy is a linear functional of the state densities, the maximal extractable energy under diffusive rearrangement can then be addressed through linear programming.

  11. Quantum master equation with balanced gain and loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennis Dast; Daniel Haag; Holger Cartarius; Günter Wunner

    2014-11-20

    We present a quantum master equation describing a Bose-Einstein condensate with particle loss on one lattice site and particle gain on the other lattice site whose mean-field limit is a non-Hermitian PT-symmetric Gross-Pitaevskii equation. It is shown that the characteristic properties of PT-symmetric systems, such as the existence of stationary states and the phase shift of pulses between two lattice sites, are also found in the many-particle system. Visualizing the dynamics on a Bloch sphere allows us to compare the complete dynamics of the master equation with that of the Gross-Pitaevskii equation. We find that even for a relatively small number of particles the dynamics are in excellent agreement and the master equation with balanced gain and loss is indeed an appropriate many-particle description of a PT-symmetric Bose-Einstein condensate.

  12. Numerical simulation of electron energy loss near inhomogeneous dielectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia de Abajo, F.J.

    1997-12-01

    The nonrelativistic energy loss suffered by fast electrons passing near dielectric interfaces of arbitrary shape is calculated by solving Poisson{close_quote}s equation using the boundary-charge method. The potential induced by a moving electron is expressed in terms of surface-charge distributions placed at the interfaces. These surface charges, obtained by self-consistently solving the resulting integral equation, act back on the electron producing a retarding force and hence energy loss. The dielectrics are described by frequency-dependent dielectric functions. Two particular cases are discussed in further detail: interfaces invariant under translation along one particular direction and axially symmetric interfaces. Previous results for simple geometries, such as planes, spheres, and cylinders, based upon analytical solutions, are fully reproduced within this approach. Calculations are presented for electrons moving near wedges, coupled parallel cylinders, coupled spheres, and toroidal surfaces. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Theoretical analysis of sound transmission loss through graphene sheets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natsuki, Toshiaki; Ni, Qing-Qing

    2014-11-17

    We examine the potential of using graphene sheets (GSs) as sound insulating materials that can be used for nano-devices because of their small size, super electronic, and mechanical properties. In this study, a theoretical analysis is proposed to predict the sound transmission loss through multi-layered GSs, which are formed by stacks of GS and bound together by van der Waals (vdW) forces between individual layers. The result shows that the resonant frequencies of the sound transmission loss occur in the multi-layered GSs and the values are very high. Based on the present analytical solution, we predict the acoustic insulation property for various layers of sheets under both normal incident wave and acoustic field of random incidence source. The scheme could be useful in vibration absorption application of nano devices and materials.

  14. PWR loss of feedwater ATWS: analysis and sensitivity study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shier, W.G.; Lu, M.S.; Levine, M.M.; Diamond, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The incident at the Salem Nuclear plant has presented a renewed interest in the analysis of the consequences of anticipated transients without scram (ATWS). This paper presents the results of an analysis of a complete loss of feedwater ATWS for a typical 4-loop PWR. The loss of feedwater transient was selected since previous analyses have shown that this transient produces one of the more limiting overpressure conditions in the primary system. These results provide a detailed analysis of this transient using current analytical techniques and show the sensitivity to several important parameters and plant modeling techniques. The RELAP5/MOD1 computer code has been used for this analysis. The code version is designated as Cycle 13 with additional modifications provided by both INEL and BNL.

  15. Universal Relation for the Inelastic Two-Body Loss Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric Braaten; H. -W. Hammer

    2014-01-08

    Strongly-interacting systems consisting of particles that interact through a large scattering length satisfy universal relations that relate many of their central properties to the contact, which measures the number of pairs with small separations. We use the operator product expansion of quantum field theory to derive the universal relation for the inelastic 2-body loss rate. A simple universal relation between the loss rate and the contact is obtained by truncating the expansion after the lowest dimension operator. We verify the universal relation explicitly by direct calculations in the low-density limit at nonzero temperature. This universal relation can be tested experimentally using ultracold quantum gases of atoms in hyperfine states that have an inelastic spin-relaxation channel.

  16. Computational study of ion beam extraction phenomena through multiple apertures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Wanpeng; Sang, Chaofeng; Tang, Tengfei; Wang, Dezhen, E-mail: wangdez@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion, and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Materials Modification by Laser, Ion, and Electron Beams (Ministry of Education), School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Li, Ming; Jin, Dazhi; Tan, Xiaohua [Institute of Electronic Engineering, Mianyang, 621900 (China)] [Institute of Electronic Engineering, Mianyang, 621900 (China)

    2014-03-15

    The process of ion extraction through multiple apertures is investigated using a two-dimensional particle-in-cell code. We consider apertures with a fixed diameter with a hydrogen plasma background, and the trajectories of electrons, H{sup +} and H{sub 2}{sup +} ions in the self-consistently calculated electric field are traced. The focus of this work is the fundamental physics of the ion extraction, and not particular to a specific device. The computed convergence and divergence of the extracted ion beam are analyzed. We find that the extracted ion flux reaching the extraction electrode is non-uniform, and the peak flux positions change according to operational parameters, and do not necessarily match the positions of the apertures in the y-direction. The profile of the ion flux reaching the electrode is mainly affected by the bias voltage and the distance between grid wall and extraction electrode.

  17. Bayesian methods of astronomical source extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard S. Savage; Seb Oliver

    2007-02-09

    We present two new source extraction methods, based on Bayesian model selection and using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC). The first is a source detection filter, able to simultaneously detect point sources and estimate the image background. The second is an advanced photometry technique, which measures the flux, position (to sub-pixel accuracy), local background and point spread function. We apply the source detection filter to simulated Herschel-SPIRE data and show the filter's ability to both detect point sources and also simultaneously estimate the image background. We use the photometry method to analyse a simple simulated image containing a source of unknown flux, position and point spread function; we not only accurately measure these parameters, but also determine their uncertainties (using Markov-Chain Monte Carlo sampling). The method also characterises the nature of the source (distinguishing between a point source and extended source). We demonstrate the effect of including additional prior knowledge. Prior knowledge of the point spread function increase the precision of the flux measurement, while prior knowledge of the background has onlya small impact. In the presence of higher noise levels, we show that prior positional knowledge (such as might arise from a strong detection in another waveband) allows us to accurately measure the source flux even when the source is too faint to be detected directly. These methods are incorporated in SUSSEXtractor, the source extraction pipeline for the forthcoming Akari FIS far-infrared all-sky survey. They are also implemented in a stand-alone, beta-version public tool that can be obtained at http://astronomy.sussex.ac.uk/$\\sim$rss23/sourceMiner\\_v0.1.2.0.tar.gz

  18. Low-loss binder for hot pressing boron nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maya, Leon (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01

    Borazine derivatives used as low-loss binders and precursors for making ceramic boron nitride structures. The derivative forms the same composition as the boron nitride starting material, thereby filling the voids with the same boron nitride material upon forming and hot pressing. The derivatives have a further advantage of being low in carbon thus resulting in less volatile byproduct that can result in bubble formation during pressing.

  19. Losses of Vitamin A and Carotene from Feeds During Storage. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Kemmerer, A. R. (Arthur Russell)

    1937-01-01

    . CONNER, 1)IRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY, TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 557 OCTOBER, 1937 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY Losses of Vitamin A and Carotene From Feeds During Storage LIBRARY Agricultural & Mechanical ,l~l!egge of Texas AGRICULTURAL... liver oils, fish liver oil concentrates or solutions of carotene in oil, or yellow corn or alfalfa leaf meal of high potency. Since vitamin A and carotene are both unstable, it is important to know whether these substances would remain in commercial...

  20. Evolution Effects on Parton Energy Loss with Detailed Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luan cheng; Enke Wang

    2010-04-30

    The initial conditions in the chemical non-equilibrated medium and Bjorken expanding medium at RHIC are determined. With a set of rate equations describing the chemical equilibration of quarks and gluons based on perturbative QCD, we investigate the consequence for parton evolution at RHIC. With considering parton evolution, it is shown that the Debye screening mass and the inverse mean free-path of gluons reduce with increasing proper time in the QGP medium. The parton evolution affects the parton energy loss with detailed balance, both parton energy loss from stimulated emission in the chemical non-equilibrated expanding medium and in Bjorken expanding medium are linear dependent on the propagating distance rather than square dependent in the static medium. The energy absorption can not be neglected at intermediate jet energies and small propagating distance of the energetic parton in contrast with that it is important only at intermediate jet energy in the static medium. This will increase the energy and propagating distance dependence of the parton energy loss and will affect the shape of suppression of moderately high P_T hadron spectra.

  1. Flow Effects on Jet Energy Loss with Detailed Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luan Cheng; Jia Liu; Enke Wang

    2014-06-03

    In the presence of collective flow a new model potential describing the interaction of the hard jet with scattering centers is derived based on the static color-screened Yukawa potential. The flow effect on jet quenching with detailed balance is investigated in pQCD. It turns out, considering the collective flow with velocity $v_z$ along the jet direction, the collective flow decreases the LPM destructive interference comparing to that in the static medium. The gluon absorption plays a more important role in the moving medium. The collective flow increases the energy gain from gluon absorption, however, decreases the energy loss from gluon radiation, which is $(1 - v_z )$ times as that in the static medium to the first order of opacity. In the presence of collective flow, the second order in opacity correction is relatively small compared to the first order. So that the total effective energy loss is decreased. The flow dependence of the energy loss will affect the suppression of high $p_T$ hadron spectrum and anisotropy parameter $v_2$ in high-energy heavy-ion collisions.

  2. Effect of Loss on Multiplexed Single-Photon Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damien Bonneau; Gabriel J. Mendoza; Jeremy L. O'Brien; Mark G. Thompson

    2015-04-29

    An on-demand single-photon source is a key requirement for scaling many optical quantum technologies. A promising approach to realize an on-demand single-photon source is to multiplex an array of heralded single-photon sources using an active optical switching network. However, the performance of multiplexed sources is degraded by photon loss in the optical components and the non-unit detection efficiency of the heralding detectors. We provide a theoretical description of a general multiplexed single-photon source with lossy components and derive expressions for the output probabilities of single-photon emission and multi-photon contamination. We apply these expressions to three specific multiplexing source architectures and consider their tradeoffs in design and performance. To assess the effect of lossy components on near- and long-term experimental goals, we simulate the multiplexed sources when used for many-photon state generation under various amounts of component loss. We find that with a multiplexed source composed of switches with ~0.2-0.4 dB loss and high efficiency number-resolving detectors, a single-photon source capable of efficiently producing 20-40 photon states with low multi-photon contamination is possible, offering the possibility of unlocking new classes of experiments and technologies.

  3. Loss of pressurizer water level during station blackout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griggs, D.P.; Riggs, B.K.

    1986-01-01

    Station blackout is the loss of all alternating current (ac) power to both the essential and nonessential electrical buses in a nuclear power plant. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has proposed a requirement that all plants be capable of maintaining adequate core cooling during station blackout events lasting a specified duration. The NRC has also suggested acceptable specified durations of four or eight hours, depending on individual plant susceptibility to blackout events. In a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the occurrence of a station blackout event results in the functional loss of many plant components, including main feedwater, reactor coolant pumps, the emergency core cooling system, and pressurizer heaters and spray. Nevertheless, PWRs have the capability of removing decay heat for some period of time using steam-driven auxiliary feedwater pumps and the natural-circulation capability of the primary system. The purpose of this investigation is to determine the early response of a PWR to station blackout conditions. In particular, the effect of primary coolant shrinkage and inventory loss on pressurizer level is examined to gain insight into the operational and analytical issues associated with the proposed station blackout coping requirement.

  4. Optimization of the Low Loss SRF Cavity for the ILC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekutowicz, J.S.; /DESY; Kneisel, P.; /Jefferson Lab; Higo, T.; Morozumi, Y.; Saito, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Ge, L.; Ko, Yong-kyu; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.K.; Schussman, G.L.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2008-01-18

    The Low-Loss shape cavity design has been proposed as a possible alternative to the baseline TESLA cavity design for the ILC main linacs. The advantages of this design over the TESLA cavity are its lower cryogenic loss, and higher achievable gradient due to lower surface fields. High gradient prototypes for such designs have been tested at KEK (ICHIRO) and TJNAF (LL). However, issues related to HOM damping and multipacting still need to be addressed. Preliminary numerical studies of the prototype cavities have shown unacceptable damping factors for some higher-order dipole modes if the typical TESLA HOM couplers are directly adapted to the design. The resulting wakefield will dilute the beam emittance thus reducing the machine luminosity. Furthermore, high gradient tests on a 9-cell prototype at KEK have experienced multipacting barriers although a single LL cell had achieved a high gradient. From simulations, multipacting activities are found to occur in the end-groups of the cavity. In this paper, we will present the optimization results of the end-groups for the Low-Loss designs for effective HOM damping and alleviation of multipacting.

  5. Episodic Mass Loss and Pre-SN Circumstellar Envelopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2008-02-13

    I discuss observational clues concerning episodic mass-loss properties of massive stars in the time before the final supernova explosion. In particular, I will focus on the mounting evidence that LBVs and related stars are candidates for supernova progenitors, even though current paradigms place them at the end of core-H burning. Namely, conditions in the immediate circumstellar environment within a few 10$^2$ AU of Type IIn supernovae require very high progenitor mass-loss rates. Those rates are so high that the only known stars that come close are LBVs during rare giant eruptions. I will highlight evidence from observations of some recent extraordinary supernovae suggesting that explosive or episodic mass loss (a.k.a. LBV eruptions like the 19th century eruption of Eta Car) occur in the 5-10 years immediately preceding the SN. Finally, I will discuss some implications for stellar evolution from these SNe, the most important of which is the observational fact that the most massive stars can indeed make it to the ends of their lives with substantial H envelopes intact, even at Solar metallicity.

  6. Radiative Energy Loss in Small and Large Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolbe, Isobel

    2015-01-01

    We use perturbative quantum chromodynamics to compute the corrections to the energy loss of a hard particle due to short separation distances between the creation of the particle and the in-medium scattering center that stimulates bremsstrahlung radiation. The result has several surprising features. The correction 1) does not go to zero for large path lengths; 2) breaks color triviality; 3) is formally zero in the large formation time approximation, but numerically dominates at large ~100 GeV parent parton energies out to long ~3 fm paths. Although motivated by the recent shocking evidence of collectivity in small systems, 1) and 3) mean our result has critically important implications for \\emph{all} energy loss model comparisons to data. In particular, 3) shows that a large fraction of the gluons radiated do not have a formation time that is large compared to the Debye screening length of the medium, violating a core approximation used in the derivations of all pQCD-based radiative energy loss formulae.

  7. Extracting Operating Modes from Building Electrical Load Data: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, S.; Polese, L. G.; Rader, E.; Sheppy, M.; Smith, J.

    2012-01-01

    Empirical techniques for characterizing electrical energy use now play a key role in reducing electricity consumption, particularly miscellaneous electrical loads, in buildings. Identifying device operating modes (mode extraction) creates a better understanding of both device and system behaviors. Using clustering to extract operating modes from electrical load data can provide valuable insights into device behavior and identify opportunities for energy savings. We present a fast and effective heuristic clustering method to identify and extract operating modes in electrical load data.

  8. Ultrasound enhanced process for extracting metal species in supercritical fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M.; Enokida, Youichi

    2006-10-31

    Improved methods for the extraction or dissolution of metals, metalloids or their oxides, especially lanthanides, actinides, uranium or their oxides, into supercritical solvents containing an extractant are disclosed. The disclosed embodiments specifically include enhancing the extraction or dissolution efficiency with ultrasound. The present methods allow the direct, efficient dissolution of UO2 or other uranium oxides without generating any waste stream or by-products.

  9. Spin extraction theory and its relevance to spintronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dery, H; Sham, L J

    2007-01-01

    and Its Relevance to Spintronics H. Dery* and L. J. Shamof an extraction theory to spintronics is illustrated by an22], thus enabling spintronics without magnetic ?elds. Our

  10. Novel Slow Extraction Scheme for Proton Accelerators Using Pulsed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ring at Fermilab. The proposed method of non-resonant slow extraction of protons by bent crystals in combination with orbit fast deflectors shows great promise in...

  11. Penguin pollution estimates relevant for phi_2/alpha extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jure Zupan

    2007-08-16

    A review of methods to extract the standard CKM unitarity triangle angle alpha is provided. The sizes of related theoretical errors are reviewed.

  12. Advanced Light Extraction Material for OLED Lighting | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Extraction Material for OLED Lighting Lead Performer: Pixelligent Technologies LLC - Baltimore, MD Partners: OLEDWorks LLC DOE Total Funding: 1,000,000 Project Term: April 6,...

  13. Model independent extraction of the proton magnetic radius from...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on October 20, 2015 Title: Model independent extraction of the proton magnetic radius from electron...

  14. Fermentation of aqueous plant seed extracts by lactic acid bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schafner, D.W.; Beuchat, R.L.

    1986-05-01

    The effects of lactic acid bacterial fermentation on chemical and physical changes in aqueous extracts of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), peanut (Arachis hypogea), soybean (Glycine max), and sorghum (Sorghum vulgare) were studied. The bacteria investigated were Lactobacillus helveticus, L. delbrueckii, L. casei, L. bulgaricus, L. acidophilus, and Streptococcus thermophilus. Organisms were inoculated individually into all of the seed extracts; L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus were also evaluated together as inocula for fermenting the legume extracts. During fermentation, bacterial population and changes in titratable acidity, pH, viscosity, and color were measured over a 72 h period at 37 degrees C. Maximum bacterial populations, titratable acidity, pH, and viscosity varied depending upon the type of extract and bacterial strain. The maximum population of each organism was influenced by fermentable carbohydrates, which, in turn, influenced acid production and change in pH. Change in viscosity was correlated with the amount of protein and titratable acidity of products. Color was affected by pasteurization treatment and fermentation as well as the source of extract. In the extracts inoculated simultaneously with L. bulgaricus and S. thermophilus, a synergistic effect resulted in increased bacterial populations, titratable acidity, and viscosity, and decreased pH in all the legume extracts when compared to the extracts fermented with either of these organisms individually. Fermented extracts offer potential as substitutes for cultured dairy products. 24 references.

  15. Extraction of exchange parameters in transition-metal perovskites...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Extraction of exchange parameters in transition-metal perovskites Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on September 14, 2016 Title:...

  16. COLLOQUIUM: "The Environmental Footprint of Shale Gas Extraction...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4:15pm to 5:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: "The Environmental Footprint of Shale Gas Extraction and Hydraulic Fracturing" Professor Robert Jackson Duke University...

  17. Flowsheet Testing of the Fission Product Extraction Process as...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Extraction Process as Part of Advanced Aqueous Reprocessing As part of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), the reduction in volume and heat generation of spent nuclear...

  18. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li+ ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W

    2012-03-05

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm{sup 2} have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of #24;~1275#14;{degrees} C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J #21;{>=} 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, {<=}#20;0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of ~#24;40 hours at ~#24;1275#14;{degrees} C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of #24;~6 μs each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. The source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  19. Mechanism Design with Information Acquisition: Efficiency and Full Surplus Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bikhchandani, S.; Obara, I.

    2011-01-01

    Correlated information, mechanism design and infor- mationalfrom agent i to the mechanism designer. A social choice rulewe focus on direct mechanisms without loss of generality. A

  20. Low-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy: An atomic-resolution complement to optical spectroscopies and application to graphene

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kapetanakis, Myron; Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P.; Lee, Jaekwang; Prange, Micah P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-09-25

    Photon-based spectroscopies have played a central role in exploring the electronic properties of crystalline solids and thin films. They are a powerful tool for probing the electronic properties of nanostructures, but they are limited by lack of spatial resolution. On the other hand, electron-based spectroscopies, e.g., electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), are now capable of subangstrom spatial resolution. Core-loss EELS, a spatially resolved analog of x-ray absorption, has been used extensively in the study of inhomogeneous complex systems. In this paper, we demonstrate that low-loss EELS in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, which probes low-energy excitations, combined with amore »theoretical framework for simulating and analyzing the spectra, is a powerful tool to probe low-energy electron excitations with atomic-scale resolution. The theoretical component of the method combines density functional theory–based calculations of the excitations with dynamical scattering theory for the electron beam. We apply the method to monolayer graphene in order to demonstrate that atomic-scale contrast is inherent in low-loss EELS even in a perfectly periodic structure. The method is a complement to optical spectroscopy as it probes transitions entailing momentum transfer. The theoretical analysis identifies the spatial and orbital origins of excitations, holding the promise of ultimately becoming a powerful probe of the structure and electronic properties of individual point and extended defects in both crystals and inhomogeneous complex nanostructures. The method can be extended to probe magnetic and vibrational properties with atomic resolution.« less

  1. Wideband current transformers for the surveillance of the beam extraction kicker system of the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Defrance, C; Ducimetière, L; Vossenberg, E

    2007-01-01

    The LHC beam dumping system must protect the LHC machine from damage by reliably and safely extracting and absorbing the circulating beams when requested. Two sets of 15 extraction kicker magnets form the main active part of this system. A separate high voltage pulse generator powers each magnet. Because of the high beam energy and the consequences which could result from significant beam loss due to a malfunctioning of the dump system the magnets and generators are continuously surveyed in order to generate a beam abort as soon as an internal fault is detected. Amongst these surveillance systems, wideband current transformers have been designed to detect any erratic start in one of the generators. Output power should be enough to directly re-trigger all the power trigger units of the remaining 14 generators. The current transformers were developed in collaboration with industry. To minimize losses, high-resistivity cobalt alloy was chosen for the cores. The annealing techniques originally developed for LEP b...

  2. Simultaneous Feature Extraction and Selection Using a Masking Genetic Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Simultaneous Feature Extraction and Selection Using a Masking Genetic Algorithm Michael L. Raymer: identification of functional water molecules bound to protein surfaces, and diagnosis of thyroid deficiency of feature extraction ­ defining new features in terms of the original feature set to facilitate more

  3. Supercritical extraction of organic mixtures from soil-water slurries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Lynda Ann

    1994-01-01

    to perform the extractions, and analyses were performed using either total organic carbon (TOC) analysis or BPLC analysis. The total extraction for the three phase system of soil-water-CO2 was predicted from two phase experimental data and theoretical...

  4. Architectural Extraction in Reverse Engineering by Prototyping: An Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ducasse, Stéphane

    . Commonly, the re-engineering life-cycle has been defined as a succession of the fol- lowing tasks: analysis Esprit Project grant 21975. 1 #12;3 A Pattern for Architectural Extraction In this section we introduceArchitectural Extraction in Reverse Engineering by Prototyping: An Experiment£ Sander Tichelaar

  5. Unexpected Results in Automatic List Extraction on the Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malerba, Donato

    Jiawei Han Donato Malerba University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Università degli Studi di Bari "Aldo Moro" weninge1@illinois.edu, ffumarola@di.uniba.it, barber5@illinois.edu, hanj@illinois Web information extraction can take two forms: (1) extracting in- formation from natural language text

  6. TOWARD GENERIC INTELLIGENT KNOWLEDGE EXTRACTION FROM VIDEO AND AUDIO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    analysis, knowledge extraction components, and metadata management sub-systems in the context of automated/environment planning, resource optimization, disabled/elderly person monitoring, ... 1 Introduction Advances in sensor techniques allowing the automatic extraction of relevant semantic metadata from raw multimedia, to explore

  7. Chinese Sketch Engine and the Extraction of Grammatical Collocations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chinese Sketch Engine and the Extraction of Grammatical Collocations Chu-Ren Huang Inst. This paper introduces a new technology for collocation extraction in Chinese. Sketch Engine (Kilgarriff et al on BNC. We extend Sketch Engine to Chinese based on Gigaword corpus from LDC. We discuss the available

  8. Method for extracting copper, silver and related metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); McDowell, W. J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1990-01-01

    A process for selectively extracting precious metals such as silver and gold concurrent with copper extraction from aqueous solutions containing the same. The process utilizes tetrathiamacrocycles and high molecular weight organic acids that exhibit a synergistic relationship when complexing with certain metal ions thereby removing them from ore leach solutions.

  9. Confidence Estimation Methods for Partially Supervised Relation Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agichtein, Eugene

    Confidence Estimation Methods for Partially Supervised Relation Extraction Eugene Agichtein is a family of partially-supervised re- lation extraction systems that require little manual training. However method on a variety of relations. 1 Overview Text documents convey valuable structured information

  10. A GEOMETRIC METHOD FOR AUTOMATIC EXTRACTION OF SULCAL FUNDI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A GEOMETRIC METHOD FOR AUTOMATIC EXTRACTION OF SULCAL FUNDI By C.-Y. Kao M. Hofer G. Sapiro J and branchings are rarely defined, even for the major sulci. Methods for extracting the cortical surface from MRI­0436 Phone: 612/624-6066 Fax: 612/626-7370 URL: http://www.ima.umn.edu #12;A GEOMETRIC METHOD FOR AUTOMATIC

  11. Method for extracting copper, silver and related metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyer, B.A.; McDowell, W.J.

    1987-10-23

    A process for selectively extracting precious metals such as silver and gold concurrent with copper extraction from aqueous solutions containing the same. The process utilizes tetrathiamacrocycles and high molecular weight organic acids that exhibit a synergistic relationship when complexing with certain metal ions thereby removing them from ore leach solutions.

  12. Factors influencing the efficiency of arsenic extraction by phosphate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yean, Su Jin

    2005-11-01

    of this study were to examine the relationships between phosphate-extractable arsenic and soil iron-oxide composition and to investigate the experimental factors which might influence arsenic-extraction efficiency from rice-paddy soils of Bangladesh by phosphate...

  13. Automatic Extraction of Web Search Interfaces for Interface Schema Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Weiyi

    button, checkbox and selection list (i.e., a pull-down menu) that allow a user to enter searchAutomatic Extraction of Web Search Interfaces for Interface Schema Integration Hai He, Weiyi Meng@cacs.louisiana.edu ABSTRACT This paper provides an overview of a technique for extracting information from the Web search

  14. BLIND EXTRACTION OF SOURCE SIGNALS WITH SPECIFIED STOCHASTIC FEATURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vialatte, François

    interestinmanyapplicationssuchas biomedical signal processing (ECG or EEG), speech recog- nition (cocktail party problem), imageBLIND EXTRACTION OF SOURCE SIGNALS WITH SPECIFIED STOCHASTIC FEATURES Ruck THAWONMAS 3 and Andrzej a neural-network approach which allows se- quential extraction of source signals from a linear mixture

  15. BLIND EXTRACTION OF SOURCE SIGNALS WITH SPECIFIED STOCHASTIC FEATURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thawonmas, Ruck

    is a problem of interest in many applications such as biomedical signal processing (ECG or EEG), speech recogBLIND EXTRACTION OF SOURCE SIGNALS WITH SPECIFIED STOCHASTIC FEATURES Ruck THAWONMAS 3 and Andrzej a neural­network approach which allows se­ quential extraction of source signals from a linear mixture

  16. Extracting hot carriers from photoexcited semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2014-12-10

    This research program addresses a fundamental question related to the use of nanomaterials in solar energy -- namely, whether semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) can help surpass the efficiency limits, the so-called “Shockley-Queisser” limit, in conventional solar cells. In these cells, absorption of photons with energies above the semiconductor bandgap generates “hot” charge carriers that quickly “cool” to the band edges before they can be utilized to do work; this sets the solar cell efficiency at a limit of ~31%. If instead, all of the energy of the hot carriers could be captured, solar-to-electric power conversion efficiencies could be increased, theoretically, to as high as 66%. A potential route to capture this energy is to utilize semiconductor nanocrystals. In these materials, the quasi-continuous conduction and valence bands of the bulk semiconductor become discretized due to confinement of the charge carriers. Consequently, the energy spacing between the electronic levels can be much larger than the highest phonon frequency of the lattice, creating a “phonon bottleneck” wherein hot-carrier relaxation is possible via slower multiphonon emission. For example, hot-electron lifetimes as long as ~1 ns have been observed in NCs grown by molecular beam epitaxy. In colloidal NCs, long lifetimes have been demonstrated through careful design of the nanocrystal interfaces. Due to their ability to slow electronic relaxation, semiconductor NCs can in principle enable extraction of hot carriers before they cool to the band edges, leading to more efficient solar cells.

  17. Method of underground mining by pillar extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowen, Ray J. (1879 Delann, Salt Lake City, UT 84121); Bowen, William R. (1636 Sunnydale La., Salt Lake City, UT 84108)

    1980-08-12

    A method of sublevel caving and pillar and top coal extraction for mining thick coal seams includes the advance mining of rooms and crosscuts along the bottom of a seam to a height of about eight feet, and the retreat mining of the top coal from the rooms, crosscuts and portions of the pillars remaining from formation of the rooms and cross-cuts. In the retreat mining, a pocket is formed in a pillar, the top coal above the pocket is drilled, charged and shot, and then the fallen coal is loaded by a continuous miner so that the operator remains under a roof which has not been shot. The top coal from that portion of the room adjacent the pocket is then mined, and another pocket is formed in the pillar. The top coal above the second pocket is mined followed by the mining of the top coal of that portion of the room adjacent the second pocket, all by use of a continuous miner which allows the operator to remain under a roof portion which has not been shot.

  18. No loss fueling station for liquid natural gas vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cieslukowski, R.E.

    1992-06-16

    This patent describes a no loss fueling station for delivery of liquid natural gas (LNG) to a use device such as a motor vehicle. It comprises: a pressure building tank holding a quantity of LNG and gas head; means for delivering LNG to the pressure building tank; means for selectively building the pressure in the pressure building tank; means for selectively reducing the pressure in the pressure building tank; means for controlling the pressure building and pressure reducing means to maintain a desired pressure in the pressure building tank without venting natural gas to the atmosphere; and means for delivering the LNG from the pressure building tank to the use device.

  19. No loss fueling station for liquid natural gas vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustafson, K.

    1993-07-20

    A no loss liquid natural gas (LNG) delivery system is described comprising: (a) means for storing LNG and natural gas at low pressure; (b) means for delivering LNG from the means for storing to a use device including means for sub-cooling the LNG; (c) means for pre-cooling the means for sub-cooling before the LNG is delivered to the use device to substantially reduce vaporization of the initial LNG delivered to the use device; and (d) means for delivering a selectable quantity of the natural gas in said storing means to said use device with the LNG.

  20. Ultra-low-loss tapered optical fibers with minimal lengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryutaro Nagai; Takao Aoki

    2014-11-09

    We design and fabricate ultra-low-loss tapered optical fibers (TOFs) with minimal lengths. We first optimize variations of the torch scan length using the flame-brush method for fabricating TOFs with taper angles that satisfy the adiabaticity criteria. We accordingly fabricate TOFs with optimal shapes and compare their transmission to TOFs with a constant taper angle and TOFs with an exponential shape. The highest transmission measured for TOFs with an optimal shape is in excess of 99.7 % with a total TOF length of only 23 mm, whereas TOFs with a constant taper angle of 2 mrad reach 99.6 % transmission for a 63 mm TOF length.

  1. Method for early detection of cooling-loss events

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bermudez, Sergio A.; Hamann, Hendrik F.; Marianno, Fernando J.

    2015-12-22

    A method of detecting cooling-loss event early is provided. The method includes defining a relative humidity limit and change threshold for a given space, measuring relative humidity in the given space, determining, with a processing unit, whether the measured relative humidity is within the defined relative humidity limit, generating a warning in an event the measured relative humidity is outside the defined relative humidity limit and determining whether a change in the measured relative humidity is less than the defined change threshold for the given space and generating an alarm in an event the change is greater than the defined change threshold.

  2. Optical loss due to diffraction by concentrator Fresnel lenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hornung, Thorsten Nitz, Peter

    2014-09-26

    Fresnel lenses are widely used in concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems as a primary optical element. They focus sunlight on small solar cells or on the entrance apertures of secondary optical elements. A Fresnel lens consists of several prism rings and diffraction by these prism rings is unavoidable. Some of the light that would reach a designated target area according to geometric optics will miss it due to diffraction. This diffraction loss may be of relevant magnitude for CPV applications. The results of published analytical calculations are evaluated, discussed, and compared to computer simulations and measurements.

  3. Energy Loss at Propagating Jamming Fronts in Granular Gas Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin C. Burton; Peter Y. Lu; Sidney R. Nagel

    2013-10-15

    We explore the initial moments of impact between two dense granular clusters in a two-dimensional geometry. The particles are composed of solid CO$_{2}$ and are levitated on a hot surface. Upon collision, the propagation of a dynamic "jamming front" produces a distinct regime for energy dissipation in a granular gas in which the translational kinetic energy decreases by over 90%. Experiments and associated simulations show that the initial loss of kinetic energy obeys a power law in time, $\\Delta E=-Kt^{3/2}$, a form that can be predicted from kinetic arguments.

  4. Combined Extraction of Cesium and Strontium from Akaline Nitrate Solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delmau, Laetitia Helene; Bonnesen, Peter V; Engle, Nancy L; Haverlock, Tamara; Sloop Jr, Frederick {Fred} V; Moyer, Bruce A

    2006-01-01

    The combined extraction of cesium and strontium from caustic wastes can be achieved by adding a crown ether and a carboxylic acid to the Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction (CSSX) solvent. The ligand 4,4'(5')-di(tert-butyl)cyclohexano-18-crown-6 and one of four different carboxylic acids were combined with the components of the CSSX solvent optimized for the extraction of cesium, allowing for the simultaneous extraction of cesium and strontium from alkaline nitrate media simulating alkaline high level wastes present at the U.S. Department of Energy Savannah River Site. Extraction and stripping experiments were conducted independently and exhibited adequate results for mimicking waste simulant processing through batch contacts. The promising results of these batch tests showed that the system could reasonably be tested on actual waste.

  5. Physical property changes in hydrate-bearing sediment due to depressurization and subsequent repressurization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waite, W.F.

    2008-01-01

    N. Germanovich (2006), Excess pore pressure resulting from4°C and 5.2 MPa methane pore pressure. After 20 hours, the°C and 12 MPa methane pore pressure from initially partially

  6. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)DecadeYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun20032,485,331Gas ProvedDec.12 13

  7. 1 INTRODUCTION In recent years, the massive losses caused by major

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spencer Jr., Billie F.

    Research Council, 1999; and Earthquake Spectra, 1997, special issue). The MCEER loss estimation research. The methodology, which evaluates direct and indirect economic losses from lifeline failures, provides a means

  8. An Economic Analysis of Agricultural Soil Loss in Mitchell County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reneau, D. R.; Taylor, C. R.; Harris, B. L.

    1979-01-01

    -farm consequences of various management practices. These on-farm consequences would include the changes in topsoil loss and the yield losses that result from losing topsoil. Also included are profit levels that could be expected from different management practices...

  9. Rapid Loss Modeling of Death and Downtime Caused By Earthquake Induced Damage to Structures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghorawat, Sandeep

    2012-07-16

    , a similar quantitative risk assessment technique is used to examine the indirect loss associated with death and downtime. The four-step approach is subdivided into four distinct tasks: (a) Hazard analysis, (b) Structural analysis, (c) Loss analysis...

  10. Evaluation of Loss Factor Estimation Techniques for Free Hanging Flat Panels Excited Mechanically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dande, Himanshu Amol

    2013-05-31

    To establish the "best" technique to estimate a damping loss factor for mechanically-excited panels, three loss factor estimation techniques--PIM, IRDM, and RDT--are compared. In experimental and computational analyses, ...

  11. Regional earthquake loss estimation : role of transportation network, sensitivity and uncertainty, and risk mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karaca, Erdem, 1976-

    2005-01-01

    Large earthquakes near densely populated areas such as the 1994 Northridge and 1995 Kobe events have caused extensive damage to the physical infrastructure and losses to the regional and national economies. Economic losses ...

  12. Extracting Strawberry DNA Adapted from http://www.genome.gov/Pages/Education/Modules/StrawberryExtractionInstructions.pdf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruber, Jonathan

    Extracting Strawberry DNA Adapted from http://www.genome.gov/Pages/Education/Modules/StrawberryExtractionInstructions.pdf for a group of 5 students with an adult moderator Strawberries have enormous genomes. Humans have two copies of the cell. Strawberries have up to eight copies of each chromosome (octoploid genome). Today, we

  13. Globular Cluster Mass Loss in the Context of Multiple Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastian, Nate

    2015-01-01

    Many scenarios for the origin of the chemical anomalies observed in globular clusters (GCs; i.e., multiple populations) require that GCs were much more massive at birth, up to $10-100\\times$, than they are presently. This is invoked in order to have enough material processed through first generation stars in order to form the observed numbers of enriched stars (inferred to be second generation stars in these models). If such mass loss was due to tidal stripping, gas expulsion, or tidal interaction with the birth environment, there should be clear correlations between the fraction of enriched stars and other cluster properties, whereas the observations show a remarkably uniform enriched fraction of $0.68\\pm0.07$ (from 33 observed GCs). If interpreted in the heavy mass loss paradigm, this means that all GCs lost the same fraction of their initial mass (between $95-98$\\%), regardless of their mass, metallicity, location at birth or subsequent migration, or epoch of formation. This is incompatible with prediction...

  14. A versatile technique to minimize electrical losses in distribution feeders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyaruzi, A.L.

    1994-12-31

    This dissertation presents a method of minimizing electrical losses in radial distribution feeders by the use of shunt capacitors. The engineering benefits of reducing peak electrical power and energy losses are compared to the costs associated with the current engineering practice of buying, installing and servicing capacitor banks in the distribution feeders. The present analysis defines this cost-benefit problem and the formulation of the problem of nonuniform feeders with different wire gauges at various feeder sections. Standard utility capacitor bank sizes are used to give a more realistic model. An original computer solution methodology based on techniques developed for this study determines: (i) Whether it is economical to install compensating capacitor banks on a particular radial distribution feeder or not. (ii) The locations at which capacitor banks should be installed. (iii) The types and sizes of capacitor banks to be installed. (iv) The time setting of switched capacitor banks. The techniques have been applied to a typical radial distribution feeder in Dar-es-Salaam, Tanzania. The results and the engineering implications of this work are discussed and recommendations for the engineering community made.

  15. Understanding Jet Energy Loss with Angular Correlation Studies in PHENIX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Hanks

    2010-05-10

    Angular correlation studies provide powerful insight into the energy loss of hard scattered partons as they traverse the partonic medium produced in heavy ion collisions at RHIC. These results are generally compared to jet correlations in p+p collsisions where all correlation strength is attributed to vacuum fragmentation. Strong modification to di-jet correlations has been observed in A+A collisions at RHIC, most notably for the away side jet. Many different effects, including the opacity of the medium, its response to energy deposited by partons as they propagate, and modifications to the parton fragmentation, are involved in producing the final correlation stuctures. Understanding the interplay between these various effects is essential to developing a complete picture of the medium. Measurements of jet correlations involving direct photons provide a unique probe of jet fragmentation effects, as photons are not strongly interacting. Additionally, systematic studies of the away side structure as a function of $p_{T}$, as well as attempts to include additional high $p_{T}$ trigger requirements, can help to distinguish different energy loss mechanisms. We discuss recent PHENIX results from these detailed studies of jet correlations in A+A and p+p collisions.

  16. Simulated Photoevaporative Mass Loss from Hot Jupiters in 3D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripathi, Anjali; Murray-Clay, Ruth A; Krumholz, Mark R

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing stellar photons heat the upper regions of planetary atmospheres, driving atmospheric mass loss. Gas escaping from several hot, hydrogen-rich planets has been detected using UV and X-ray transmission spectroscopy. Because these planets are tidally locked, and thus asymmetrically irradiated, escaping gas is unlikely to be spherically symmetric. In this paper, we focus on the effects of asymmetric heating on local outflow structure. We use the Athena code for hydrodynamics to produce 3D simulations of hot Jupiter mass loss that jointly model wind launching and stellar heating via photoionization. Our fiducial planet is an inflated, hot Jupiter with radius $R_p=2.14 R_{\\rm Jup}$ and mass $M_p = 0.53 M_{\\rm Jup}$. We irradiate the initially neutral, atomic hydrogen atmosphere with 13.6 eV photons and compute the outflow's ionization structure. There are clear asymmetries in the atmospheric outflow, including a neutral shadow on the planet's nightside. Given an incident ionizing UV flux comparable to that ...

  17. Mass Loss From Evolved Stars in Elliptical Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parriott, Joel R

    2008-01-01

    Most of the X-ray emitting gas in early-type galaxies probably originates from red giant mass loss and here we model the interaction between this stellar mass loss and the hot ambient medium. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we adopt a temperature for the ambient medium of 3E6 K along with a range of ambient densities and stellar velocities. When the stellar velocity is supersonic relative to the ambient medium, a bow shock occurs, along with a shock driven into the stellar ejecta, which heats only a fraction of the gas. Behind the bow shock, a cool wake develops but the fast flow of the hot medium causes Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities to grow and these fingers are shocked and heated (without radiative cooling). Along with the mixing of this wake material with the hot medium, most of the stellar ejecta is heated to approximately the temperature of the hot ambient medium within 2 pc of the star. With the addition of radiative cooling, some wake material remains cool (< 1E5 K), accounting for ...

  18. Troubles with quantum anistropic cosmological models: Loss of unitarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. G. Alvarenga; A. B. Batista; J. C. Fabris; S. V. B. Gonçalves

    2003-04-22

    The anisotropic Bianchi I cosmological model coupled with perfect fluid is quantized in the minisuperspace. The perfect fluid is described by using the Schutz formalism which allows to attribute dynamical degrees of freedom to matter. A Schr\\"odinger-type equation is obtained where the matter variables play the role of time. However, the signature of the kinetic term is hyperbolic. This Schr\\"odinger-like equation is solved and a wave packet is constructed. The norm of the resulting wave function comes out to be time dependent, indicating the loss of unitarity in this model. The loss of unitarity is due to the fact that the effective Hamiltonian is hermitian but not self-adjoint. The expectation value and the bohmian trajectories are evaluated leading to different cosmological scenarios, what is a consequence of the absence of a unitary quantum structure. The consistency of this quantum model is discussed as well as the generality of the absence of unitarity in anisotropic quantum models.

  19. Analysis of mesoscopic loss effects in fine layered fluid-saturated ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    santos,,,

    mechanism). These finely layered sediments behave like viscoelastic transversely isotropic (VTI) media at long wavelengths. Analysis of mesoscopic loss effects ...

  20. Increasing LTC Engine Efficiency by Reducing Pressure-Oscillation-Related Heat Transfer Losses

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This research discusses how reducing heat-transfer losses from pressure oscillation can increase low-temperature combustion engine efficiency.

  1. Solvent extraction of Southern US tar sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Penney, W.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Chemical Engineering at the University of Arkansas, in association with Diversified Petroleum Recovery, Inc. (DPR) of Little Rock, Arkansas, has been developing a solvent extraction process for the recovery of bitumen from tar sands for the past five years. The unique feature of the process is that the bitumen is recovered from the solvent by contacting with a co-solvent, which causes the bitumen to precipitate. The overall purpose of this project is to study both the technical and economic feasibility of applying this technology for recovery of bitumen from tar sands by (1) investigating the socioeconmic factors which affect (a) plant siting and (b) the market value of recovered bitumen; (2) operating a process demonstration unit at the rate of 1 lb/hr recovered bitumen while producing clean sand and recyclable solvents; and (3) determine the economic conditions which will make a bitumen recovery project economical. DPR has analyzed the historical trends of domestic production, consumption, discoveries and reserves of crude oil. They have started an investigation of the volatility in the price of crude oil and of gasoline prices and of the differential between gasoline and crude oil. DPR continues to analyze the geographical movement and demand for asphalt products. Utah does not appear economically attractive as a site for a bitumen from tar sands asphalt plant. Oklahoma sites are now being studied. This report also contains the quarterly progress report from a University of Nevada study to determine bitumen composition, oxygen uptake rates, and viscosities of Alabama and Utah bitumens. Both reports have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  2. TRANSPORT AND REDUCTION POSSIBILITIES DURING TPBAR EXTRACTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korinko, P

    2008-05-19

    In light of the discovery of the activated zinc 65 in the TEF process piping, a discussion of potential sources and mechanisms for the production of this species has been initiated. A suspected source is the presence of Cu as a contaminant in many of the alloy components that comprise the TPBARs and the presence of Zn as a contaminant in the aluminide coating. These two sources are expected to produce metallic transmutation products that could be mobile and be extracted from the metallic components of the TPBARs. Another potential source is the presence of ZnO that is present as part of the crud on the external surfaces of the TPBARs. In addition, it is conceivable to have ZnO within the TPBARs from transmutation products and subsequent oxidation reactions with water. This memo does not attempt to address all of the possible sources, nor does it derive the most likely scenarios as to how Zn or ZnO may be present in the TPBARs it merely posits that it is present as a transmutation product and if present, elementally, it may be mobile under high vacuum conditions at high temperatures as indicated by the pressure temperature curve shown in Fig. 1. Further, this document shows that it is thermodynamically feasible to reduce ZnO to Zn by solid state reactions of the ZnO with other metallic components in the TPBARs. However, for these reactions to occur, the ZnO must be in contact with the more active metal so that the chemical reactions can occur. The proposed reactions are based on equilibrium thermodynamics. For simplicity, they do not take into account the quantities of the various materials, the compositions, the effect of alloying, or other technical issues, they are intended only to provide feasibility for the reduction reactions. A more complete thermodynamic model can be developed, but it will require actual contents and be much more complicated with little value added.

  3. Evaporative water losses of exercising sheep in neutral and hot climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Evaporative water losses of exercising sheep in neutral and hot climates T Othman KG Johnson, DW, Australia Hot climates require an accelerated water loss to allowed for thermoregulation (Rai et al, 1979, Trop Anim Hlth Prod, 11, 51-56). The water losses associated with locomotion should be greater

  4. Dry matter content in silage maize; assessment of the role of growth and water loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Agronomie Dry matter content in silage maize; assessment of the role of growth and water loss JF variations in total dry matter content (MSt) as a function of growth in dry weight and loss of water by plant, as ripening proceeds. Beyond 25% dry matter content the major part of MSt increase was due to loss of water

  5. Analytical Model of Magnet Eddy-Current Volume Losses in Multi-phase PM Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Analytical Model of Magnet Eddy-Current Volume Losses in Multi-phase PM Machines with Concentrated, 94000 Créteil France Abstract--this paper studies magnet eddy-current losses in permanent magnet (PM calculations. Keywords--Traction, Concentrated Winding, Eddy- Current, Volume Magnet Losses, Multiphase Machine

  6. Improvement of the magnetic core for eddy current losses decreasing in cylindrical linear actuators.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Improvement of the magnetic core for eddy current losses decreasing in cylindrical linear actuators the power) increases, the iron losses become high [1]. One classical method for reducing the eddy current the eddy current losses in a longitudinal flux multi-rod actuator and to compute improvement. 2 The linear

  7. ENSC 283: Friction and Minor Losses in Pipelines School of Engineering Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    ENSC 283: Friction and Minor Losses in Pipelines 1 School of Engineering Science Mechatronics and Minor Losses in Pipelines 2 School of Engineering Science Mechatronics Systems Engineering 1 Laboratory Figure 1- Components of experimental apparatus. #12;ENSC 283: Friction and Minor Losses in Pipelines 3

  8. Motoring of a Flexible Resonant Engine to Estimate Associated Damping Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Motoring of a Flexible Resonant Engine to Estimate Associated Damping Losses S.M. Post, B.S. Preetham, C.D. Richards Washington State University School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering. Introduction The performance of internal combustion engines is limited by heat losses, friction losses

  9. Integrated Ultra-Low-Loss 4-Bit Tunable Delay for Broadband Phased Array Antenna Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    F. Bauters, et al. , “Ultra-low-loss high-aspect-ratio Si3N4JUNE 15, 2013 Integrated Ultra-Low-Loss 4-Bit Tunable Delaya 4-bit tunable delay in an ultra-low-loss Si 3 N 4 planar

  10. Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery Article Published.G. and Ravishankara, A.R. (2009) Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery's research outputs online #12;Impact of sudden Arctic sea-ice loss on stratospheric polar ozone recovery J. F

  11. On the Trade-off between Energy Consumption and Food Quality Loss in Supermarket Refrigeration Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    On the Trade-off between Energy Consumption and Food Quality Loss in Supermarket Refrigeration-off between energy consumption and food quality loss, at varying ambient con- ditions, in supermarket for energy savings without extra loss of food quality is demonstrated. We also show that by utilizing

  12. Balancing Energy Consumption and Food Quality Loss in Supermarket Refrigeration System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Balancing Energy Consumption and Food Quality Loss in Supermarket Refrigeration System J. Cai and J energy consumption and food quality loss, at varying ambient condition, in a supermarket refrigeration for energy savings without extra loss of food quality. We also show that by utilizing the relatively slow

  13. NO gas loss from biologically crusted soils in Canyonlands National Park, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barger, Nichole

    , Colorado Plateau, Nitrogen fixation, Nitrogen gas loss, Nitric oxide Abstract. In this study, we examined N pathways. Nitrogen gas loss as NO and N2O have been shown to increase dramatically in soils where N-1 NO gas loss from biologically crusted soils in Canyonlands National Park, Utah NICHOLE N. BARGER

  14. Electron Energy Loss Spectra of Graphite, Graphene and Carbon Nanotubes: Plasmon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botti, Silvana

    Electron Energy Loss Spectra of Graphite, Graphene and Carbon Nanotubes: Plasmon Dispersion in Carbon Systems #12;Outlook dimensionality 1. induced Hartree potentials in low dimensional systems: independent particles energy loss in graphene (in-plane, q = 0.41 °A-1 ) 0 2 4 6 8 10 energy loss (eV) -Im -1

  15. DOE's BestPractices Steam End User Training Blowdown Losses 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    affect on boiler efficiency. [Slide Visual ­Blowdown Losses Title Page] Steam Generation Efficiency 2 ­ Blowdown The next type of loss investigated is blowdown loss. Boiler feedwater is very clean the boiler--the majority of the chemicals entering the boiler with feedwater are not soluble in the steam

  16. High frequency acoustic transmission loss of perforated plates at normal incidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papamoschou, Dimitri

    High frequency acoustic transmission loss of perforated plates at normal incidence Vincent Phonga conducted on the transmission loss of perforated plates at normal incidence. The investigation includes microphone measurements of transmission loss for 11 perforated plates with variable thickness, hole size

  17. A Scaleless Snake: Tests of the Role of Reptilian Scales in Water Loss and Heat Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Albert F.

    A Scaleless Snake: Tests of the Role of Reptilian Scales in Water Loss and Heat Transfer Reprinted: Tests of the Role of Reptilian Scales in Water Loss and Heat Transfer A unique specimen of gopher snake of pulmocutaneous water loss and heat transfer, no difference was observed between the scale- less animal

  18. A Web-Based Task-Tracking Collaboration System for the Florida Public Hurricane Loss Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Ching

    A Web-Based Task-Tracking Collaboration System for the Florida Public Hurricane Loss Model Raul, FL 33199, U.S.A. hamids@fiu.edu Abstract--The Florida Public Hurricane Loss Model (FPHLM) is a large of residential insurance premiums as they relate to insured losses caused by hurricane winds. The modeling

  19. Hurricane, Habitat Degradation, and Land Loss Effects on Brown Pelican Nesting Colonies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karubian, Jordan

    Hurricane, Habitat Degradation, and Land Loss Effects on Brown Pelican Nesting Colonies Scott T.J., and Leberg, P.L., 2013. Hurricane, habitat degradation, and land loss effects on Brown Pelican nesting colonies of coastal avifauna are perennially threatened by hurricanes, land loss, and environmental

  20. SEPARATION OF COPPER FROM METALS IN AN ALLOY BY LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    /L. Extraction. The extraction procedure is the same for the sample, standards and blank (water between sample extractions with water. The chloroform extracts at this point will normally be cloudySEPARATION OF COPPER FROM METALS IN AN ALLOY BY LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION Background Reading: Harris

  1. FEATURE EXTRACTION FOR INTEGRATED PATTERN RECOGNITION SYSTEMS X. Wang and K. K. Paliwal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    methods. However, the drawback of independent feature extraction algorithms is that their optimization criFEATURE EXTRACTION FOR INTEGRATED PATTERN RECOGNITION SYSTEMS X. Wang and K. K. Paliwal School is achieved in two steps: parameter extraction and feature extraction. Feature extraction and pattern

  2. tat de l'art des mthodes d'extraction automatique de termes-cls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Automatic Keyphrase Extraction Methods This article presents the state of the art of the automatic keyphrase extraction methods. The aim of the automatic keyphrase extraction task is to extract the most representative terms of a document. Automatic keyphrase extraction methods can be divided into two categories

  3. Extracting Energy from Black Hole through Transition Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li-Xin Li

    2000-07-24

    A new scenario for extracting energy from a Kerr black hole is proposed. With magnetic field lines connecting plasma particles inside the ergosphere with remote loads, the frame dragging twists the field lines so that energy and angular momentum are extracted from the plasma particles. If the magnetic field is strong enough, the energy extracted from the particles can be so large that the particles have negative energy as they fall into the black hole. So effectively the energy is extracted from the black hole. The particles inside the ergosphere can be continuously replenished with accretion from a disk surrounding the black hole, so a transition region with sufficient amount of plasma is formed between the black hole's horizon and the inner edge of the disk. Thus the energy can be continuously extracted from the black hole through the transition region. This may be the most efficient way for extracting energy from a Kerr black hole: in principle almost all of the rotational energy (up to $\\approx 29%$ of the total energy of the black hole) can be extracted.

  4. Method and apparatus for back-extracting metal chelates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Lin, Y.

    1998-08-11

    A method is described for extracting metal and metalloid species from a solid or liquid substrate using a supercritical fluid solvent containing one or more chelating agents followed by back-extracting the metal and metalloid species from the metal and metalloid chelates formed thereby. The back-extraction acidic solution is performed utilizing an acidic solution. Upon sufficient exposure of the metal and metalloid chelates to the acidic solution, the metal and metalloid species are released from the chelates into the acid solution, while the chelating agent remains in the supercritical fluid solvent. The chelating agent is thereby regenerated and the metal and metalloid species recovered. 3 figs.

  5. Method and apparatus for back-extracting metal chelates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, IA); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, IA); Lin, Yuehe (Moscow, IA)

    1998-01-01

    A method of extracting metal and metalloid species from a solid or liquid substrate using a supercritical fluid solvent containing one or more chelating agents followed by back-extracting the metal and metalloid species from the metal and metalloid chelates formed thereby. The back-extraction acidic solution is performed utilizing an acidic solution. Upon sufficient exposure of the metal and metalloid chelates to the acidic solution, the metal and metalloid species are released from the chelates into the acid solution, while the chelating agent remains in the supercritical fluid solvent. The chelating agent is thereby regenerated and the metal and metalloid species recovered.

  6. First results from bent crystal extraction at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The E853 Collaboration

    1996-07-01

    First results from Fermilab Experiment 953 are presented. E853 is an experiment to test the feasibility and efficiency of extracting a low intensity beam from the halo of the Tevatron using channeling in a bent silicon crystal. The motivation for the experiment is to apply crystal extraction to trans-TeV accelerators like the LHC. Extensive simulation work has been carried out. Two accelerator operating modes have been developed for crystal studies, ``kick`` mode and diffusion mode. Results from the first successful extraction in kick mode are presented.

  7. Step-wise supercritical extraction of carbonaceous residua

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warzinski, Robert P. (Venetia, PA)

    1987-01-01

    A method of fractionating a mixture containing high boiling carbonaceous material and normally solid mineral matter includes processing with a plurality of different supercritical solvents. The mixture is treated with a first solvent of high critical temperature and solvent capacity to extract a large fraction as solute. The solute is released as liquid from solvent and successively treated with other supercritical solvents of different critical values to extract fractions of differing properties. Fractionation can be supplemented by solute reflux over a temperature gradient, pressure let down in steps and extractions at varying temperature and pressure values.

  8. Industrial application of GNEP solvent-extraction processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arm, S.T.; Phillips, C.; Dobson, A.

    2008-07-01

    EnergySolutions is currently studying the feasibility of commercially recycling spent nuclear fuel in the USA as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. Uranium, plutonium, and neptunium recycling are accomplished by employing well-established solvent-extraction technology based on the tributylphosphate extractant and acetohydroxamic complexant stripping in a commercially demonstrated configuration. Americium and curium recycling is best achieved by employing the TRUEX and TALSPEAK solvent-extraction processes or a simplified variant of them. Facility design is not predicated on performing any research and development a priori. Process development and demonstration will proceed in parallel with design by proven design-management techniques. (authors)

  9. Degradation problems with the solvent extraction organic at Roessing uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munyungano, Brodrick; Feather, Angus; Virnig, Michael

    2008-07-01

    Roessing Uranium Ltd recovers uranium from a low-grade ore in Namibia. Uranium is recovered and purified from an ion-exchange eluate in a solvent-extraction plant. The solvent-extraction plant uses Alamine 336 as the extractant for uranium, with isodecanol used as a phase modifier in Sasol SSX 210, an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent. Since the plant started in the mid 1970's, there have been a few episodes where the tertiary amine has been quickly and severely degraded when the plant was operated outside certain operating parameters. The Rossing experience is discussed in more detail in this paper. (authors)

  10. Approaches for regeneration of amine-carboxylic acid extracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Y.; King, C.J.

    1995-07-01

    Extraction processes based on reversible chemical complexation can be useful for separation of polar organics from dilute solution. Tertiary amines are effective extractants for the recovery of carboxylic acids from aqueous solution. The regeneration of aminecarboxylic acid extracts is an important step which strongly influences the economic viability of the separation process. Several regeneration methods are critically reviewed, and the factors that affect swing regeneration processes, including temperature-swing, diluent composition-swing and pH-swing with a volatile base are discussed. Interest in this area comes from interest in treatment of waste streams, particularly in petrochemical and fermentation manufacture.

  11. Selective Extraction of Uranium from Liquid or Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farawila, Anne F.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Wai, Chien M.; Taylor, Harry Z.; Liao, Yu-Jung

    2012-07-31

    Current liquid-liquid extraction processes used in recycling irradiated nuclear fuel rely on (1) strong nitric acid to dissolve uranium oxide fuel, and (2) the use of aliphatic hydrocarbons as a diluent in formulating the solvent used to extract uranium. The nitric acid dissolution process is not selective. It dissolves virtually the entire fuel meat which complicates the uranium extraction process. In addition, a solvent washing process is used to remove TBP degradation products, which adds complexity to the recycling plant and increases the overall plant footprint and cost. A liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide (l/sc -CO2) system was designed to mitigate these problems. Indeed, TBP nitric acid complexes are highly soluble in l/sc -CO2 and are capable of extracting uranium directly from UO2, UO3 and U3O8 powders. This eliminates the need for total acid dissolution of the irradiated fuel. Furthermore, since CO2 is easily recycled by evaporation at room temperature and pressure, it eliminates the complex solvent washing process. In this report, we demonstrate: (1) A reprocessing scheme starting with the selective extraction of uranium from solid uranium oxides into a TBP-HNO3 loaded Sc-CO2 phase, (2) Back extraction of uranium into an aqueous phase, and (3) Conversion of recovered purified uranium into uranium oxide. The purified uranium product from step 3 can be disposed of as low level waste, or mixed with enriched uranium for use in a reactor for another fuel cycle. After an introduction on the concept and properties of supercritical fluids, we first report the characterization of the different oxides used for this project. Our extraction system and our online monitoring capability using UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy directly in sc-CO2 is then presented. Next, the uranium extraction efficiencies and kinetics is demonstrated for different oxides and under different physical and chemical conditions: l/sc -CO2 pressure and temperature, TBP/HNO3 complex used, reductant or complexant used for selectivity, and ionic liquids used as supportive media. To complete the extraction and recovery cycle, we then demonstrate uranium back extraction from the TBP loaded sc-CO2 phase into an aqueous phase and the characterization of the uranium complex formed at the end of this process. Another aspect of this project was to limit proliferation risks by either co-extracting uranium and plutonium, or by leaving plutonium behind by selectively extracting uranium. We report that the former is easily achieved, since plutonium is in the tetravalent or hexavalent oxidation state in the oxidizing environment created by the TBP-nitric acid complex, and is therefore co-extracted. The latter is more challenging, as a reductant or complexant to plutonium has to be used to selectively extract uranium. After undertaking experiments on different reducing or complexing systems (e.g., AcetoHydroxamic Acid (AHA), Fe(II), ascorbic acid), oxalic acid was chosen as it can complex tetravalent actinides (Pu, Np, Th) in the aqueous phase while allowing the extraction of hexavalent uranium in the sc-CO2 phase. Finally, we show results using an alternative media to commonly used aqueous phases: ionic liquids. We show the dissolution of uranium in ionic liquids and its extraction using sc-CO2 with and without the presence of AHA. The possible separation of trivalent actinides from uranium is also demonstrated in ionic liquids using neodymium as a surrogate and diglycolamides as the extractant.

  12. Oblique inlet pressure loss for swirling flow entering a catalyst substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persoons, T.; Vanierschot, M.; Van den Bulck, E. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Celestijnenlaan 300A, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2008-05-15

    This experimental study investigates the oblique inlet pressure loss for the entry of an annular swirling flow into an automotive catalyst substrate. The results are applicable to a wide range of compact heat exchangers. For zero swirl, the total pressure loss agrees with established expressions for pressure loss in developing laminar flow in parallel channels with finite wall thickness. For positive swirl, the additional pressure loss due to oblique flow entry is correlated to the tangential velocity upstream of the catalyst, measured using laser-Doppler anemometry. The obtained oblique inlet pressure loss correlation can improve the accuracy of numerical calculations of the flow distribution in catalysts. (author)

  13. Dynamics of magnetic shells and information loss problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bum-Hoon Lee; Wonwoo Lee; Dong-han Yeom

    2015-07-17

    We investigate dynamics of magnetic thin-shells in three dimensional anti de Sitter background. Because of the magnetic field, an oscillatory solution is possible. This oscillating shell can tunnel to a collapsing shell or a bouncing shell, where both of tunnelings induce an event horizon and a singularity. In the entire path integral, via the oscillating solution, there is a non-zero probability to maintain a trivial causal structure without a singularity. Therefore, due to the path integral, the entire wave function can conserve information. Since an oscillating shell can tunnel after a number of oscillations, in the end, it will allow an infinite number of different branchings to classical histories. This system can be a good model of the effective loss of information, where information is conserved by a solution that is originated from gauge fields.

  14. On the Anomalous Weight Losses of High Voltage Symmetrical Capacitors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elio B. Porcelli; Victo S. Filho

    2015-02-21

    In this work, we analyzed an anomalous effect verified from symmetrical capacitor devices, working in very high electric potentials. The mastery of that effect could mean in the future the possible substitution of propulsion technology based on fuels by single electrical propulsion systems. From experimental measurements, we detected small variations of the device inertia that cannot be associated with known interactions, so that the raised force apparently has not been completely elucidated by current theories. We measured such variations within an accurate range and we proposed that the experimental results can be explained by relations like Clausius-Mossotti one, in order to quantify the dipole forces that appear in the devices. The values of the weight losses in the capacitors were calculated by means of the theoretical proposal and indicated good agreement with our experimental measurements for 7kV and with many other experimental works.

  15. Cascaded'' pilot regulators help reduce LPG loss in hot weather

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-08

    Fina Oil and Chemical Co. and Fisher Controls International used engineering resourcefulness to overcome heat-induced product loss from LPG storage bullets at Fina's Port Arthur, Tex., refinery. Fina had installed Fisher's Easy Joe 399A-6365, a pilot-operated, back-pressure-type regulator, on its LPG storage facility in 1991 as part of a fuel products modernization project. The regulators helped control the accumulation of noncondensible vapors, which collect in the storage bullets above the LPG. But summer heat extremes and surges in the tanks and lines made it possible for the operating pressure to increase so that the safety relief valve was activated before the pilot regulator was able to stabilize the pressure. The installation of pilot-type regulators, in cascaded, or series, formation, reduced product venting through relief valves.

  16. Gravitational mass of positron from LEP synchrotron losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalaydzhyan, Tigran

    2015-01-01

    General relativity (GR) is the current description of gravity in modern physics. One of the cornerstones of GR, as well as Newton's theory of gravity, is the weak equivalence principle (WEP), stating that the trajectory of a freely falling test body is independent of its internal structure and composition. WEP is known to be valid for the normal matter with a high precision. However, due to the rarity of antimatter and weakness of the gravitational forces, the WEP has never been confirmed for antimatter. The current direct bounds on the ratio between the gravitational and inertial masses of the antihydrogen do not rule out a repulsive nature for the antimatter gravity. Here we establish an indirect bound of 0.13% on the difference between the gravitational and inertial masses of the positron (antielectron) from the analysis of synchrotron losses at the Large Electron-Positron collider (LEP). This is the first confirmation of the conventional gravitational properties of antimatter without additional assumption...

  17. Overview of NASA supported Stirling thermodynamic loss research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tew, R.C.; Geng, S.M.

    1994-09-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is funding research to characterize Stirling machine thermodynamic losses. NASA`s primary goal is to improve Stirling design codes to support engine development for space and terrestrial power. However, much of the fundamental data is applicable to Stirling cooler and heat pump applications. The research results are reviewed. Much has been learned about oscillating-flow hydrodynamics, including laminar/turbulent transition, and tabulated data has been documented for further analysis. Now, with a better understanding of the oscillator-flow field, it is time to begin measuring the effects of oscillating flow and oscillating pressure level on heat transfer in heat exchanger flow passages and in cylinders. This critical phase of the work is just beginning.

  18. Instrumentation for Evaluating PV System Performance Losses from Snow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marion, B.; Rodriguez, J.; Pruett, J.

    2009-01-01

    When designing a photovoltaic (PV) system for northern climates, the prospective installation should be evaluated with respect to the potentially detrimental effects of snow preventing solar radiation from reaching the PV cells. The extent to which snow impacts performance is difficult to determine because snow events also increase the uncertainty of the solar radiation measurement, and the presence of snow needs to be distinguished from other events that can affect performance. This paper describes two instruments useful for evaluating PV system performance losses from the presence of snow: (1) a pyranometer with a heater to prevent buildup of ice and snow, and (2) a digital camera for remote retrieval of images to determine the presence of snow on the PV array.

  19. Superconducting shielded core reactor with reduced AC losses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cha, Yung S.; Hull, John R.

    2006-04-04

    A superconducting shielded core reactor (SSCR) operates as a passive device for limiting excessive AC current in a circuit operating at a high power level under a fault condition such as shorting. The SSCR includes a ferromagnetic core which may be either closed or open (with an air gap) and extends into and through a superconducting tube or superconducting rings arranged in a stacked array. First and second series connected copper coils each disposed about a portion of the iron core are connected to the circuit to be protected and are respectively wound inside and outside of the superconducting tube or rings. A large impedance is inserted into the circuit by the core when the shielding capability of the superconducting arrangement is exceeded by the applied magnetic field generated by the two coils under a fault condition to limit the AC current in the circuit. The proposed SSCR also affords reduced AC loss compared to conventional SSCRs under continuous normal operation.

  20. Nonlinear alfv\\'enic fast particle transport and losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneller, Mirjam; García-Muñoz, Manuel; Brüdgam, Michael; Günter, Sibylle

    2012-01-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic instabilities like Toroidal Alfv\\'en Eigenmodes or core-localized modes such as Beta Induced Alfv\\'en Eigenmodes and Reversed Shear Alfv\\'en Eigenmodes driven by fast particles can lead to significant redistribution and losses in fusion devices. This is observed in many ASDEX Upgrade discharges. The present work aims to understand the underlying resonance mechanisms, especially in the presence of multiple modes with different frequencies. Resonant mode coupling mechanisms are investigated using the drift kinetic HAGIS code [Pinches 1998]. Simulations were performed for different plasma equilibria, in particular for different q profiles, employing the availability of improved experimental data. A study was carried out, investigating double-resonant mode coupling with respect to various overlapping scenarios. It was found that, depending on the radial mode distance, double-resonance is able to enhance growth rates as well as mode amplitudes significantly. Small radial mode distances, however...