Sample records for repressuring extraction loss

  1. High potential recovery -- Gas repressurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, M.P.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to demonstrate that small independent oil producers can use existing gas injection technologies, scaled to their operations, to repressurize petroleum reservoirs and increase their economic oil production. This report gives background information for gas repressurization technologies, the results of workshops held to inform small independent producers about gas repressurization, and the results of four gas repressurization field demonstration projects. Much of the material in this report is based on annual reports (BDM-Oklahoma 1995, BDM-Oklahoma 1996, BDM-Oklahoma 1997), a report describing the results of the workshops (Olsen 1995), and the four final reports for the field demonstration projects which are reproduced in the Appendix. This project was designed to demonstrate that repressurization of reservoirs with gas (natural gas, enriched gas, nitrogen, flue gas, or air) can be used by small independent operators in selected reservoirs to increase production and/or decrease premature abandonment of the resource. The project excluded carbon dioxide because of other DOE-sponsored projects that address carbon dioxide processes directly. Two of the demonstration projects, one using flue gas and the other involving natural gas from a deeper coal zone, were both technical and economic successes. The two major lessons learned from the projects are the importance of (1) adequate infrastructure (piping, wells, compressors, etc.) and (2) adequate planning including testing compatibility between injected gases and fluids, and reservoir gases, fluids, and rocks.

  2. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  3. Arizona Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  4. Arizona Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  5. Illinois Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  6. Nebraska Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  7. Ohio Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  8. Oklahoma Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunFeet) (MillionRepressuring (Million

  9. Oklahoma Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

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  10. U.S. Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  11. West Virginia Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  12. Other States Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan FebYearThousandRepressuring

  13. Simulation and optimization of beam losses during continuous transfer extraction at the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, J B

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proton beams used for the fixed target physics at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) are extracted from the Proton Synchrotron ( PS) by a multiturn technique called continuous transfer (CT). During the CT extraction, large losses are observed in locations where the machine aperture should be large enough to accommodate the circulating beam. This limits the maximum intensity deliverable due to the induced stray radiation outside the PS tunnel. Scattered particles from the interaction with the electrostatic septum are identified as the possible source of these losses. This article presents a detailed study aiming to understand the origin of losses and propose possible cures. The simulations could reproduce accurately the beam loss pattern measured in real machine operation and determine the beam shaving, intrinsic to the extraction process, as the cause for the unexpected losses. Since these losses are unavoidable, the proposed solution implies a new optics scheme displacing the losses to a region with bett...

  14. Physical property changes in hydrate-bearingsediment due to depressurization and subsequent repressurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, Timothy; Waite, W.F.; Kneafsey, T.J.; Winters, W.J.; Mason, D.H.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical property measurements of sediment cores containing natural gas hydrate are typically performed on material exposed at least briefly to non-in situ conditions during recovery. To examine effects of a brief excursion from the gas-hydrate stability field, as can occur when pressure cores are transferred to pressurized storage vessels, we measured physical properties on laboratory-formed sand packs containing methane hydrate and methane pore gas. After depressurizing samples to atmospheric pressure, we repressurized them into the methane-hydrate stability field and remeasured their physical properties. Thermal conductivity, shear strength, acoustic compressional and shear wave amplitudes and speeds are compared between the original and depressurized/repressurized samples. X-ray computed tomography (CT) images track how the gas-hydrate distribution changes in the hydrate-cemented sands due to the depressurization/repressurization process. Because depressurization-induced property changes can be substantial and are not easily predicted, particularly in water-saturated, hydrate-bearing sediment, maintaining pressure and temperature conditions throughout the core recovery and measurement process is critical for using laboratory measurements to estimate in situ properties.

  15. C:\\ANNUAL\\Vol2chps.v8\\ANNUAL2.VP

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    per Thousand Cubic Feet) Table Year Gross Withdrawals Used for Repressuring Nonhydro- carbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Extraction Loss Dry Production...

  16. The extraction of nuclear sea quark distribution and energy loss effect in Drell-Yan experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chun-Gui Duan; Na Liu; Zhan-Yuan Yan

    2006-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The next-to-leading order and leading order analysis are performed on the differential cross section ratio from Drell-Yan process. It is found that the effect of next-to-leading order corrections can be negligible on the differential cross section ratios as a function of the quark momentum fraction in the beam proton and the target nuclei for the current Fermilab and future lower beam proton energy. The nuclear Drell-Yan reaction is an ideal tool to study the energy loss of the fast quark moving through cold nuclei. In the leading order analysis, the theoretical results with quark energy loss are in good agreement with the Fermilab E866 experimental data on the Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios as a function of the momentum fraction of the target parton. It is shown that the quark energy loss effect has significant impact on the Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios. The nuclear Drell-Yan experiment at current Fermilab and future lower energy proton beam can not provide us with more information on the nuclear sea quark distribution.

  17. Photon backgrounds at the CLIC interaction point due to losses in the post-collision extraction line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salt, M D; Elsener, K; Ferrari, A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CLIC beam delivery system focuses 1.5~TeV electron and positron beams to a nanometre-sized cross section when colliding them at the interaction point (IP). The intense focusing leads to large beam-beam effects, causing the production of beamstrahlung photons, coherent and incoherent $e^+e^-$ pairs, as well as a significant disruption of the main beam. The transport of the post-collision beams requires a minimal loss extraction line, with high acceptance for energy deviation and divergence. The current design includes vertical bends close to the IP in order to separate the charged particles with a sign opposite to the main beam into a diagnostic-equipped intermediate dump, whilst transporting the photons and the main beam to the final dump. Photon and charged particle losses on magnet masks and dumps result in a complex radiation field and IP background particle fluxes. In this paper, the electromagnetic backgrounds at the IP arising from the losses occurring closest to the collision point are calculated.

  18. The influence of quark energy loss on extracting nuclear sea quark distribution from nuclear Drell-Yan experimental data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan Chun-Gui; Liu Na

    2008-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    By means of two typical kinds of quark energy loss parametrization and the nuclear parton distributions determined only with lepton-nuclear deep inelastic scattering experimental data, a leading order analysis are performed on the proton-induced Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios of tungsten versus deuterium as a function of the quark momentum fraction in the beam proton and target nuclei. It is found that the theoretical results with quark energy loss are in good agreement with the experimental data. The quark energy loss effect produce approximately 3% to 11% suppression on the Drell-Yan differential cross section ratios $R_{W/D}$ in the range $0.05\\leq x_2\\leq0.3$. The application of nuclear Drell-Yan data with heavy targets is remarkably subject to difficulty in the constraints of the nuclear sea-quark distribution.

  19. Natural Gas Used for Repressuring

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  20. Natural Gas Used for Repressuring

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  1. Property Loss / Damage Report Damage Loss Details

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    Property Loss / Damage Report Damage Loss Details Date & Time of Damage / Loss: Type of damage / loss: Location - specific address / room: Project / Grant associated with damage / loss - grant Police: When was damage / loss first discovered - BY WHOM: Pictures available or attached? Was personal

  2. Possible effects of reinjection at Wairakei goethermal field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allis, R.G.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the two-phase zone of Wairakei Field is in mass flow equilibrium, there is a net heat flow loss (approx. 700 MW) at present. Apart from the heat drawoff from the production borefield (approx. = 1600 MW), the major contributing factor appears to be natural steam flow through thermal areas (approx. = 600 MW). Reinjection of all waste water from the borefield would cause an additional heat flow loss of 400 to 500 MW. In the short-term, reinjection will improve the output of the borefield due to repressuring of the two-phase zone. However, in the long-term (> 5 years), substantial repressuring will reduce the hot, liquid inflow from depth. This inflow has provided most of the heat extracted from the field to date.

  3. Kansas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0DecadeYear Jan FebNov-14 Dec-14

  4. Kansas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Building FloorspaceThousandWithdrawals0.0DecadeYear Jan FebNov-14 Dec-14Year Jan

  5. Kentucky Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) Kenai,Feet)

  6. Kentucky Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  7. Louisiana Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1569 02,208,9204.49 4.65 4.15

  8. Louisiana Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 0 0 0 1569 02,208,9204.49 4.65 4.15Year

  9. Maryland Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0 0.0 0.05.03 5.68 4.61 5.60

  10. Maryland Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million Cubic Feet) 3 00.0 0.0 0.05.03 5.68 4.61 5.60Year Jan

  11. Michigan Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  12. Michigan Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  13. Mississippi Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  14. Mississippi Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  15. Missouri Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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  16. Missouri Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic Feet)SameThousand CubicDecade

  17. Montana Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic32,876 10,889Decade03 4.83 4.53 4.34

  18. Montana Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto China (Million CubicCubic32,876 10,889Decade03 4.83 4.53 4.34Year Jan

  19. Tennessee Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  20. Tennessee Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  1. California Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  2. California Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

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  3. Colorado Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (MillionFeet)2008 2009 2010Decade

  4. Colorado Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,128 2,469 2,321Spain (MillionFeet)2008 2009 2010DecadeYear

  5. Alabama Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996Feet) YearThousandDecade

  6. Alabama Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial andSeptember 25,9,1996Feet) YearThousandDecadeYear

  7. Alaska Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6

  8. Alaska Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5

  9. Arkansas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1Year% ofInputYear(Million

  10. Arkansas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecade Year-0 Year-1Year% ofInputYear(MillionYear Jan

  11. Wyoming Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (MillionAdjustments (Million CubicCubic2009 2010Decade

  12. Wyoming Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (MillionAdjustments (Million CubicCubic2009

  13. Texas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep2009 2010 2011Decade

  14. Texas Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep2009 2010

  15. Utah Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreases (Billion CubicYear Jan2008

  16. Utah Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year Jan FebIncreases (Billion CubicYear Jan2008Year Jan Feb

  17. Virginia Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 (MillionDecade

  18. Virginia Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40 Buildingto17 34 44Year JanDecade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 (MillionDecadeYear Jan Feb

  19. Natural Gas Used for Repressuring (Summary)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade1 Source: Office of(Millionthrough 1996)200971 andEIA1-2015 Colorado

  20. Florida Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May2009 2010Decade

  1. Florida Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May2009 2010DecadeYear

  2. Indiana Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014Year Jan Feb

  3. Indiana Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 TableTotal2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014Year Jan FebYear

  4. Natural Gas Used for Repressuring (Summary)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYear Janthrough2,869,9601. Natural5,1958 20098 2009

  5. Nebraska Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)2009

  6. Nevada Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawals (MillionYearNADecadeand2009 2010Decade

  7. Nevada Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803andYearWithdrawals (MillionYearNADecadeand2009

  8. Ohio Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul9 20102009 2010 2011

  9. Oregon Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan Feb

  10. Oregon Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr MayYear Jan FebYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun

  11. Pennsylvania Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (NumberThousand CubicFuel Consumption (Million2008Year

  12. Modified Extraction Scheme for the CERN PS Multi-Turn Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilardoni, S; Hernalsteens, C; Lachaize, A; Métral, G

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-activation of the extraction magnetic septum of the CERN PS machine was observed due to the losses of the continuous beam extracted via the Multi-Turn Extraction (MTE) method. A possible mitigation measure consists of using an existing electrostatic septum, located upstream of the extraction magnetic septum, to deflect the beam. This would highly decrease the beam losses, and hence the induced activation, during the rise time of the MTE kickers due to the reduced thickness of the electrostatic septum with respect to the magnetic one. The layout of this new extraction will be described in detail and the results of beam measurements presented.

  13. Fluid extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  14. Extractant composition

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Barbara F. (Los Alamos, NM); Jarvinen, Gordon D. (Los Alamos, NM); Ryan, Robert R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An organic extracting solution useful for separating elements of the actinide series of the periodic table from elements of the lanthanide series, where both are in trivalent form. The extracting solution consists of a primary ligand and a secondary ligand, preferably in an organic solvent. The primary ligand is a substituted monothio-1,3-dicarbonyl, which includes a substituted 4-acyl-2-pyrazolin-5-thione, such as 4-benzoyl-2,4-dihydro-5-methyl-2-phenyl-3H-pyrazol-3-thione (BMPPT). The secondary ligand is a substituted phosphine oxide, such as trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO).

  15. Evaluating Transformer Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grun, R. L. Jr.

    therefore are a function of the load squared. No-load losses occur from energizing the transformer steel and fore are continuous regardless of the transformer load. TRANSFORMER DESIGN Both types of losses are a fun ce here ion of design. If losses...

  16. Partonic Energy Loss and the Drell-Yan Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. T. Garvey; J. C. Peng

    2003-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the current status of the extraction of the rate of partonic energy loss in nuclei from A dependent data. The advantages and difficulties of using the Drell-Yan process to measure the energy loss of a parton traversing a cold nuclear medium are discussed. The prospects of using relatively low energy proton beams for a definitive measurement of partonic energy loss are presented.

  17. Metal extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covington, J.W.; Whittemore, R.G.

    1980-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In a process according to the present invention uranium is extracted into solution from its ore by leaching with an aqueous solution containing peroxomonosulphuric acid, the peroxoacid oxidizing the uranium through to its hexavalent state. Preferably the leaching is carried out at a temperature in the range of 50* to 100* C. The leach liquor can initially contain additional amounts of sulphuric acid or merely that present by virtue of the method of making the peroxomonosulphuric acid. In a preferred method of operation, the peroxoacid is introduced progressively into the leach liquor during the course of the leaching so as to maintain an electrochemical potential in the range of 450 to 650 mV. By use of the process, uranium is cleanly extracted into solution.

  18. Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the case of oil and extraction, consumption of natural gasGas, Crude Oil and Distillates NGLs consumption in CALEBOil and Gas Extraction (Mcf) Re-pressuring Lease Fuel Consumption

  19. Unknown: Multifocal scalp hair loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamsadini, Sadollah; Esfandiarpoor, Iraj; Zeinali, Hamid; Kalantari, Behjat; Ebrahimi, Hoseiali

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unknown: Multifocal scalp hair loss Sadllah Shamsadini 1 ,four patches of scalp hair loss. What is your diagnosis?

  20. Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  1. Catalogue of a Loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berger, Larisa (Larisa A.)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalogue of a Loss is a collection of sixty-two prose poems written within the past year and half. The work is printed on 4x6 cards. Each poem may be read individually from a single card or the poems can be read in ...

  2. Midlatitude Ozone: Loss and Trends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    1 Lecture 17 Midlatitude Ozone: Loss and Trends ATOC/CHEM 5151 #12;2 Importance of midlatitude ozone · Covers most of the world's populated areas · Provides protection from UV #12;3 Ozone loss picture, c. 1988 #12;4 Lower vs. Upper stratosphere #12;5 Ozone loss, post 1988 · Discovery of ozone hole

  3. Information extraction system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lemmond, Tracy D; Hanley, William G; Guensche, Joseph Wendell; Perry, Nathan C; Nitao, John J; Kidwell, Paul Brandon; Boakye, Kofi Agyeman; Glaser, Ron E; Prenger, Ryan James

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An information extraction system and methods of operating the system are provided. In particular, an information extraction system for performing meta-extraction of named entities of people, organizations, and locations as well as relationships and events from text documents are described herein.

  4. South Dakota Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6 (MillionDecade Year-0Decade

  5. South Dakota Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial ConsumersThousand CubicCubicIndiaFeet)6 (MillionDecade

  6. West Virginia Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial602 1,397 125 Q 69 (Million Cubic58(Million Cubic Feet)Nov-14

  7. U.S. Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are nowTotal" (Percent) Type: Sulfur Content API GravityDakota" "Fuel, quality",Area: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1) New120,814 136,932 130,902 Federal

  8. New Mexico Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural GasCubic2008Decade

  9. New Mexico Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) New Mexico Natural GasCubic2008DecadeYear

  10. New York Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousandWithdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)Nov-14

  11. New York Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough 1996) inThousandWithdrawals (Million Cubic Feet)Nov-14Year Jan Feb

  12. North Dakota Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthrough

  13. North Dakota Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic Feet)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 1996 223 222

  14. Tax aspects of casualty losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehmann, August Herman

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sudden, unex- 1 pected or unusual nature. The word also signifies an accident, a mishap, or some sudden invasion by a hostile agency. It excludes the progressive deterioration of property through a steadily operating cause, and the loss of an article.... F. T, R. 432, rulings and Court decisions indicate that there may be a tendency to dis- regard suddenness as a requirement for a casualty loss deduction. The casualty loss deduction is allowed only for the loss of pro- 3 perty and the property...

  15. Fission Product Extraction Process

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A new INL technology can simultaneously extract cesium and strontium for reuse. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  16. Photocurrent extraction efficiency in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemp, K. W.; Wong, C. T. O.; Hoogland, S. H.; Sargent, E. H. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G4 (Canada)

    2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency of photocurrent extraction was studied directly inside operating Colloidal Quantum Dot (CQD) photovoltaic devices. A model was derived from first principles for a thin film p-n junction with a linearly spatially dependent electric field. Using this model, we were able to clarify the origins of recent improvement in CQD solar cell performance. From current-voltage diode characteristics under 1 sun conditions, we extracted transport lengths ranging from 39 nm to 86 nm for these materials. Characterization of the intensity dependence of photocurrent extraction revealed that the dominant loss mechanism limiting the transport length is trap-mediated recombination.

  17. Turbine tip clearance loss mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazur, Steven (Steven Andrew)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-dimensional numerical simulations (RANS and URANS) were used to assess the impact of two specific design features, and of aspects of the actual turbine environment, on turbine blade tip loss. The calculations were ...

  18. Beam Loss Studies for the 2-MW LBNE Proton Beam Line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drozhdin, A.I.; Childress, S.R.; Mokhov, N.V.; Tropin, I.S.; Zwaska, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Severe limits are put on allowable beam loss during extraction and transport of a 2.3 MW primary proton beam for the Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) at Fermilab. Detailed simulations with the STRUCT and MARS codes have evaluated the impact of beam loss of 1.6 x 10{sup 14} protons per pulse at 120 GeV, ranging from a single pulse full loss to sustained small fractional loss. It is shown that loss of a single beam pulse at 2.3 MW will result in a catastrophic event: beam pipe destruction, damaged magnets and very high levels of residual radiation inside and outside the tunnel. Acceptable beam loss limits have been determined and robust solutions developed to enable efficient proton beam operation under these constraints.

  19. Extraction Utility Design Specification

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Extraction Utility Design Specification January 11, 2011 Document Version 1.9 1 Revision History Date Version Section and Titles Author Summary of Change January 15, 2010 1.0 All...

  20. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL); Dietz, Mark L. (Evanston, IL)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column is described. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water.

  1. Liquid chromatographic extraction medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for extracting strontium and technetium values from biological, industrial and environmental sample solutions using a chromatographic column. An extractant medium for the column is prepared by generating a solution of a diluent containing a Crown ether and dispersing the solution on a resin substrate material. The sample solution is highly acidic and is introduced directed to the chromatographic column and strontium or technetium is eluted using deionized water. 1 fig.

  2. New method of uranium and plutonium extraction in reprocessing of the spent nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volk, V.; Dvoeglazov, K.; Veslov, S.; Rubisov, V. [JSC - VNIINM Bochvar, Moscow (Russian Federation); Alekseenko, V. [FSUE - Federal Nuclear and Radiation Safety Center, Moscow (Russian Federation); Krivitsky, Y.; Alekseenko, S.; Bondin, V. [FSUE - Mining and Chemical Combine, Zheleznogorsk (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that a two-stage process of uranium and plutonium extraction during the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel solves the problem of obtaining a high-concentrated extract without increasing the loss risk with raffinate and avoids the accumulation of plutonium in the unit. A possible further optimization of the process would be the creation of steps inside the stages.

  3. Efficiency loss in resource allocation games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Yunjian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overarching goals of this thesis are to quantify the efficiency loss due to market participant strategic behavior, and to design proper pricing mechanisms that reduce the efficiency loss. The concept of efficiency loss ...

  4. Cancer Vulnerabilities Unveiled by Genomic Loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nijhawan, Deepak

    Due to genome instability, most cancers exhibit loss of regions containing tumor suppressor genes and collateral loss of other genes. To identify cancer-specific vulnerabilities that are the result of copy number losses, ...

  5. Threshold voltage extraction circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoon, Siew Kuok

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to that of the saturation method. However, instead of fixing Vos ? Vos, the drain current is measured as a function of Vos while Vns is fixed at a constant low voltage of 100mV to ensure operation in the linear MOSFET region. Neglecting channel length modulation effect... transistors are layout next to the DUT of the NMOS and PMOS Vr extraction circuits respectively for extraction of Vr via graphical means. GRAPHICAL METHOD OF THE THRESHOLD-VOLTAGE MEASUREMENT Using the graphical method, the characteristics of 4n versus Vos...

  6. Supercritical fluid extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth (Pullman, WA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated or lipophilic crown ether or fluorinated dithiocarbamate. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  7. Optimization of quantum interferometric metrological sensors in the presence of photon loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tae-Woo Lee; Sean D. Huver; Hwang Lee; Lev Kaplan; Steven B. McCracken; Changjun Min; Dmitry B. Uskov; Christoph F. Wildfeuer; Georgios Veronis; Jonathan P. Dowling

    2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We optimize two-mode, entangled, number states of light in the presence of loss in order to maximize the extraction of the available phase information in an interferometer. Our approach optimizes over the entire available input Hilbert space with no constraints, other than fixed total initial photon number. We optimize to maximize the Fisher information, which is equivalent to minimizing the phase uncertainty. We find that in the limit of zero loss the optimal state is the so-called N00N state, for small loss, the optimal state gradually deviates from the N00N state, and in the limit of large loss the optimal state converges to a generalized two-mode coherent state, with a finite total number of photons. The results provide a general protocol for optimizing the performance of a quantum optical interferometer in the presence of photon loss, with applications to quantum imaging, metrology, sensing, and information processing.

  8. Supercritical Fluid Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, K. P.; Flarsheim, W. M.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    supercritical tetrahydrofuran (583K, 10 MPa) or toluene (668K, 10 MPa) to remove 95% of the organic matter from Athabasca tar sanrls [4J. Compared to oil shale retorting at 870K which extracted 71% of the kerogen, supercritical toluene at 713K and 10 MPa...

  9. Charm Quark Energy Loss in QCD Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. C. Xiang; H. T. Ding; D. C. Zhou; D. Rohrich

    2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy loss of heavy quarks in a quark-gluon plasma of finite size is studied within the light-cone integral approach. A simple analytical formulation of the radiative energy loss of heavy quarks is derived. This provides a convenient way to quantitatively estimate the quark energy loss. Our results show that if the energy of a heavy quark is much larger than its mass, the radiative energy loss approaches the radiative energy loss of light quarks.

  10. CHEM333: Experiment 2: Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taber, Douglass

    ). Combine the aqueous NaOH extractions and back-extract them with ether (15 ml). Combine the ether extracts the stopcock is closed c. Before you attempt to drain the sepfunnel, remove the stopper. 2. Use a ring stand. You will also find that the funnel will not drain properly (if at all) when the stopper is one. 3

  11. Innovative Drying and Nutrients Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the extraction process. This method evaporates the water from the products but also drives off up to 70 percent dimethyl ether to extract the water from the material. The new process does not require the addition of heat to evaporate the water during the extraction process. Dimethyl ether has a lower heat

  12. Inverse hydrochemical models of aqueous extracts tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    years to improve water extraction methods, develop numericalreactions during water extraction, redox processes were notAranyossy, J.F. , 2001. Extraction of water and solutes from

  13. Loss mechanisms in turbine tip clearance flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Arthur (Arthur C.)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulations of tip clearance ow have been carried out to dene the loss generation mechanisms associated with tip leakage in unshrouded axial turbines. Mix- ing loss between the leakage, which takes the form of a ...

  14. Loss of coordination in competitive supply chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teo, Koon Soon

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The loss of coordination in supply chains quantifies the inefficiency (i.e. the loss of total profit) due to the presence of competition in the supply chain. In this thesis, we discuss four models: one model with multiple ...

  15. 7, 1009710129, 2007 Chemical ozone loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ACPD 7, 10097­10129, 2007 Chemical ozone loss in the Arctic winter 1991­1992 S. Tilmes et al. Title Chemistry and Physics Discussions Chemical ozone loss in the Arctic winter 1991­1992 S. Tilmes 1 , R. M Chemical ozone loss in the Arctic winter 1991­1992 S. Tilmes et al. Title Page Abstract Introduction

  16. 4, 21672238, 2004 Ozone loss and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 4, 2167­2238, 2004 Ozone loss and chlorine activation in the Arctic winters 1991­2003 S Union 2004 Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Ozone loss and chlorine activation Correspondence to: S. Tilmes (simone.tilmes@t-online.de) 2167 #12;ACPD 4, 2167­2238, 2004 Ozone loss and chlorine

  17. Technical report Minimizing Calibrated Loss using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Technical report Minimizing Calibrated Loss using Stochastic Low-Rank Newton Descent for large algorithm (SGD) for the minimization of classical Hinge Loss in the primal space. Although com- plexity- imization of any calibrated loss in the primal space. SLND approximates the inverse Hessian by the best low

  18. Fission product solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moyer, B.A.; Bonnesen, P.V.; Sachleben, R.A. [and others

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two main objectives concerning removal of fission products from high-level tank wastes will be accomplished in this project. The first objective entails the development of an acid-side Cs solvent-extraction (SX) process applicable to remediation of the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) and dissolved calcine waste (DCW) at INEEL. The second objective is to develop alkaline-side SX processes for the combined removal of Tc, Cs, and possibly Sr and for individual separation of Tc (alone or together with Sr) and Cs. These alkaline-side processes apply to tank wastes stored at Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge. This work exploits the useful properties of crown ethers and calixarenes and has shown that such compounds may be economically adapted to practical processing conditions. Potential benefits for both acid- and alkaline-side processing include order-of-magnitude concentration factors, high rejection of bulk sodium and potassium salts, and stripping with dilute (typically 10 mM) nitric acid. These benefits minimize the subsequent burden on the very expensive vitrification and storage of the high-activity waste. In the case of the SRTALK process for Tc extraction as pertechnetate anion from alkaline waste, such benefits have now been proven at the scale of a 12-stage flowsheet tested in 2-cm centrifugal contactors with a Hanford supernatant waste simulant. SRTALK employs a crown ether in a TBP-modified aliphatic kerosene diluent, is economically competitive with other applicable separation processes being considered, and has been successfully tested in batch extraction of actual Hanford double-shell slurry feed (DSSF).

  19. Extraction Utility Design Specification

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd of Year 2010Salt |Exelon GenerationExtraction Utility Design

  20. Extracting the Eliashberg Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1,EnergyExploring theExtracellularExtracting the

  1. Extracting the Eliashberg Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1,EnergyExploring theExtracellularExtracting

  2. Extracting the Eliashberg Function

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) /EmailMolecularGE, Ford,Extracting the Eliashberg

  3. QCD Collisional Energy Loss Reexamined

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peshier, A. [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Giessen, 35392 Giessen (Germany)

    2006-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that at a large temperature and E{yields}{infinity} the QCD collisional energy loss reads dE/dx{approx}{alpha}(m{sub D}{sup 2})T{sup 2}. Compared to previous approaches, which led to dE{sup B}/dx{approx}{alpha}{sup 2}T{sup 2}ln(ET/m{sub D}{sup 2}) similar to the Bethe-Bloch formula in QED, we take into account the running of the strong coupling. As one significant consequence, due to asymptotic freedom, dE/dx becomes E independent for large parton energies. Some implications with regard to heavy ion collisions are pointed out.

  4. Genomic Responses to the Loss of LRPPRC MITOCHONDRIAL AND NUCLEAR GENOMIC RESPONSES TO LOSS OF LRPPRC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mootha, Vamsi K.

    of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02446 USA Running head: Genomic Responses to the LossGenomic Responses to the Loss of LRPPRC 1 MITOCHONDRIAL AND NUCLEAR GENOMIC RESPONSES TO LOSS with the loss of LRPPRC. Using this strategy, we discovered a specific role for LRPPRC in the expression of all

  5. The Ether Extract and the Chloroform Extract of Soils.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S.; Rather, J. B.

    1913-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I39-3I3-5m TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS BULLETIN NO. 155 JANUARY, 1913 DIVISION OF CHEMISTRY TECHNICAL BULLETIN THE ETHER EXTRACT AND THE CHLORO? FORM EXTRACT OF SOILS BY G. S. FRAPS and J. B. RATHER POSTOFFICE COLLEGE STATION... postal card will bring these publications. THE ETHER EXTRACT AND THE CHLOROFORM EXTRACT OF SOILS. (t. S. FliAPS , Chemist. ?J. B. o Y . C U G O Assistant Chemist. The soil may coDtarn any of the Substances which are found in plants or animals...

  6. Actinide extraction methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Harrup, Mason K. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Tillotson, Richard D. (Moore, ID) [Moore, ID; Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID) [Pocatello, ID

    2010-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of separating actinides from lanthanides are disclosed. A regio-specific/stereo-specific dithiophosphinic acid having organic moieties is provided in an organic solvent that is then contacted with an acidic medium containing an actinide and a lanthanide. The method can extend to separating actinides from one another. Actinides are extracted as a complex with the dithiophosphinic acid. Separation compositions include an aqueous phase, an organic phase, dithiophosphinic acid, and at least one actinide. The compositions may include additional actinides and/or lanthanides. A method of producing a dithiophosphinic acid comprising at least two organic moieties selected from aromatics and alkyls, each moiety having at least one functional group is also disclosed. A source of sulfur is reacted with a halophosphine. An ammonium salt of the dithiophosphinic acid product is precipitated out of the reaction mixture. The precipitated salt is dissolved in ether. The ether is removed to yield the dithiophosphinic acid.

  7. Characteristic losses in metals: Al, Be, and Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madden, H.H.; Landers, R.; Kleiman, G.G. [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Caixa Postal 6165, 13081-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brasil] [Instituto de Fisica Gleb Wataghin, Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Caixa Postal 6165, 13081-970 Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brasil; Zehner, D.M. [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6057 (United States)] [Solid State Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6057 (United States)

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Information about the {ital occupied} portion of the surface density of states of materials can be derived from electron-excited Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), which is a standard experimental technique in most surface science laboratories. Surface sensitive experimental techniques that provide information regarding the {ital unoccupied} portion of the surface density of states are often not standard and are not so readily available. Here we explore the possibility of utilizing the same experimental equipment as in AES to derive information about the unoccupied portion of the surface density of states from a characteristic loss spectroscopy, in particular, from core-level inelastic electron-scattering spectroscopy (CLIESS). An important application of this technique is in comparative studies. CLIESS spectra from clean surfaces of aluminum, beryllium and nickel are presented. These data were taken in the first-derivative mode using the reflection of monoenergetic primary beams of 450 eV energy for Be, and 300 eV for Al and Ni. The Al and Be spectra had to be extracted from overlapping plasmon signals using synthesized plasmon spectra based on the behavior of these spectra between the elastic peak energy and the respective core level threshold energies. After applying loss-deconvolution techniques to remove secondary loss spectral distortions, integral spectra were obtained which compared well to corresponding experimental soft x-ray absorption and transmission electron-energy loss data as well as to theoretical calculations of the unoccupied density-of-states for these materials. Comparison similarities as well as some differences are discussed. Finally, in order to illustrate the potential these signals have in serving as {open_quotes}fingerprints{close_quotes} of surface chemistry, derivative metal-CLIESS curves for the three oxide surfaces of the metals are also presented. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Vacuum Society.}

  8. Passive vapor extraction feasibility study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, V.J.

    1994-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Demonstration of a passive vapor extraction remediation system is planned for sites in the 200 West Area used in the past for the disposal of waste liquids containing carbon tetrachloride. The passive vapor extraction units will consist of a 4-in.-diameter pipe, a check valve, a canister filled with granular activated carbon, and a wind turbine. The check valve will prevent inflow of air that otherwise would dilute the soil gas and make its subsequent extraction less efficient. The granular activated carbon is used to adsorb the carbon tetrachloride from the air. The wind turbine enhances extraction rates on windy days. Passive vapor extraction units will be designed and operated to meet all applicable or relevant and appropriate requirements. Based on a cost analysis, passive vapor extraction was found to be a cost-effective method for remediation of soils containing lower concentrations of volatile contaminants. Passive vapor extraction used on wells that average 10-stdft{sup 3}/min air flow rates was found to be more cost effective than active vapor extraction for concentrations below 500 parts per million by volume (ppm) of carbon tetrachloride. For wells that average 5-stdft{sup 3}/min air flow rates, passive vapor extraction is more cost effective below 100 ppm.

  9. Extraction chromatography: Progress and opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietz, M.L.; Horwitz, E.P.; Bond, A.H. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extraction chromatography provides a simple and effective method for the analytical and preparative-scale separation of a variety of metal ions. Recent advances in extractant design, particularly the development of extractants capable of metal ion recognition or of strong complex formation in highly acidic media, have significantly improved the utility of the technique. Advances in support design, most notably the introduction of functionalized supports to enhance metal ion retention, promise to yield further improvements. Column instability remains a significant obstacle, however, to the process-scale application of extraction chromatography. 79 refs.

  10. Multilayer Platform for Ultra-Low-Loss Waveguide Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1, 2012 Multilayer Platform for Ultra-Low-Loss Waveguidepreviously demonstrated ultra-low-loss technologies. Groupet al. : MULTILAYER PLATFORM FOR ULTRA-LOW-LOSS WAVEGUIDE

  11. Reduce Radiation Losses from Heating Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program tip sheet describes how to save energy and costs by reducing expensive heat losses from industrial heating equipment, such as furnaces.

  12. Analysis of TPV Network Losses (a Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DM DePoy; MW Dashiell; DD Rahner; LR Danielson; JE Oppenlander; JL Vell; RJ Wehrer

    2004-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This talk focuses on the theoretical analysis of electrical losses associated with electrically networking large numbers of TPV cells to produce high power TPV power generators.

  13. Effect of plasmonic losses on light emission enhancement in quantum-wells coupled to metallic gratings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sadi, Toufik; Oksanen, Jani; Tulkki, Jukka [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Sciences, Aalto University, P.O. Box 12200, FI-00076 Aalto (Finland)

    2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experimental work has shown significant luminescence enhancement from near-surface quantum-well (QW) structures using metallic grating to convert surface plasmon (SP) modes into radiative modes. This work introduces a detailed theoretical study of plasmonic losses and the role of SPs in improving light extraction from grated light-emitting QW structures, using the fluctuational electrodynamics method. The method explains experimental results demonstrating emission enhancement, light scattering, and plasmonic coupling in the structures. We study these effects in angle-resolved reflectometry and luminescence setups in InGaN QW structures with silver grating. In contrast to experiments, our model allows direct calculation of the optical losses. The model predicts that the plasmonic coupling and scattering increases light emission by a factor of up to three compared to a flat semiconductor structure. This corresponds to reducing the absorption losses from approximately 93% in the ungrated metallic structure to 75% in the grated structure. Lower losses are associated with a significant emission enhancement enabled by the SPs of silver/GaN interfaces, which are present in the blue/green wavelength range, and can be optimized by carefully nanostructuring the metal layer and by the positioning of the QW. In general, the enhancement results from the interplay of mode scattering, conversion of SP energy directly into light, and losses in the metallic grating. The reported losses are very high when compared to the losses present in modern light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Albeit, our work provides tools needed for further optimization of plasmonic light extraction, eventually leading to highly efficient LEDs.

  14. Beam Cooling with ionisation losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Rubbia; A. Ferrari; Y. Kadi; V. Vlachoudis

    2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel type of particle "cooling", called Ionization Cooling, is applicable to slow (v of the order of 0.1c) ions stored in a small ring. The many traversals through a thin foil enhance the nuclear reaction probability, in a steady configuration in which ionisation losses are recovered at each turn by a RF-cavity. For a uniform target "foil" the longitudinal momentum spread diverges exponentially since faster (slower) particles ionise less (more) than the average. In order to "cool" also longitudinally, a chromaticity has to be introduced with a wedge shaped "foil". Multiple scattering and straggling are then "cooled" in all three dimensions, with a method similar to the one of synchrotron cooling, but valid for low energy ions. Particles then stably circulate in the beam indefinitely, until they undergo for instance nuclear processes in the thin target foil. This new method is under consideration for the nuclear production of a few MeV/A ion beams. Simple reactions, for instance Li 7 + D Li 8 + p, are more favourably exploited with the heavier ion colliding against a gas-jet D2 target. Kinematics is generally very favourable, with emission angles in a narrow angular cone and a relatively concentrated outgoing energy spectrum which allows an efficient collection as a neutral gas in a tiny volume with a technology at high temperatures perfected at ISOLDE. It is however of a much more general applicability. The method appears capable of producing a "table top" storage ring with an accumulation rate in excess of 10**14 Li-8 radioactive ion/s for possible use for radioactive beams for physics studies (for example for beta-beams) or for therapy.

  15. Nutrient Losses in Agriculture: the Role of Biochar and Fungal Associations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Alison

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    whole oat plants were harvested, their live biomass recorded, and root samples taken for mycorrhizal testing. These roots were stored in a 1:1 solution on ethanol and water at 4° C. Mycorrhizal infection was assessed by staining roots segments...?? 16 Nutrient Losses in Agriculture: the Role of Biochar and Fungal Associations Alison King (Faculty Advisor: Dr. Sharon Billings) Ecology & Evolutionary Biology INTRODUCTION Agriculture is a system of extraction: through it we capture...

  16. Kalman Filtering in Correlated Losses Sachin Adlakha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adlakha, Sachin

    Kalman Filtering in Correlated Losses Sachin Adlakha Department of Electrical Engineering Stanford in presence of correlated losses using a Kalman Filter . This scenario arises in performing vehicle tracking for the Kalman estimator to lose some observations. We study the behavior of Kalman filter in such correlated

  17. > MEPS06 Preprint Version Transmission Loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    .phulpin@supelec.fr Abstract - In the deregulated electrical power system, the allocation of transmission losses is becoming a key issue. The electric transmission power system is more and more constrained due to the increasing electrical power system, the allocation of transmission losses is becoming a key issue. The electric

  18. MANAGING JOB LOSS and FINANCIAL STRESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MANAGING JOB LOSS and FINANCIAL STRESS a Personal and Family Guide CENTER ON THE FAMILY #12;2 Managing Job Loss and Financial Stress The issues associated with losing one's job or having hours cut also have other assistance (e.g., job placement, resume preparation, retraining), of which you should

  19. CLASSICAL CEPHEIDS REQUIRE ENHANCED MASS LOSS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neilson, Hilding R.; Langer, Norbert; Izzard, Robert [Argelander Institute for Astronomy, University of Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Engle, Scott G.; Guinan, Ed, E-mail: neilsonh@etsu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 Lancaster Ave. Villanova, PA 19085 (United States)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of rates of period change of Classical Cepheids probe stellar physics and evolution. Additionally, better understanding of Cepheid structure and evolution provides greater insight into their use as standard candles and tools for measuring the Hubble constant. Our recent study of the period change of the nearest Cepheid, Polaris, suggested that it is undergoing enhanced mass loss when compared to canonical stellar evolution model predictions. In this work, we expand the analysis to rates of period change measured for about 200 Galactic Cepheids and compare them to population synthesis models of Cepheids including convective core overshooting and enhanced mass loss. Rates of period change predicted from stellar evolution models without mass loss do not agree with observed rates, whereas including enhanced mass loss yields predicted rates in better agreement with observations. This is the first evidence that enhanced mass loss as suggested previously for Polaris and {delta} Cephei must be a ubiquitous property of Classical Cepheids.

  20. Heat loss from an open cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, C.G. [California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomona, CA (United States). Coll. of Engineering

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cavity type receivers are used extensively in concentrating solar thermal energy collecting systems. The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP) in Shenandoah, Georgia is a large scale field test for the collection of solar thermal energy. The STEP experiment consists of a large field array of solar collectors used to supplement the process steam, cooling and other electrical power requirements of an adjacent knitwear manufacturing facility. The purpose of the tests, conducted for this study, was to isolate and quantify the radiative, conductive, and convective components of total heat loss, and to determine the effects of operating temperature, receiver angle, and aperture size on cavity heat loss. An analytical model for radiative heat loss was developed and compared with two other methods used to determine radiative heat loss. A proposed convective heat loss correlation, including effects of aperture size, receiver operating temperature, and receiver angle is presented. The resulting data is a source to evaluate the STEP measurements.

  1. Sender-Based Heuristics for Distinguishing Congestion Losses from Wireless Transmission Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaidya, Nitin

    Sender-Based Heuristics for Distinguishing Congestion Losses from Wireless Transmission Losses Saad-3112, USA E-mail: saadb@cs.tamu.edu Phone : (409) 845-5007 Fax : (409) 847-8578 Technical Report #98-013 Abstract TCP is a popular transport protocol used in present-day internet. When packet losses occur, TCP

  2. Differentiated Services: A New Direction for Distinguishing Congestion Losses from Wireless Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Differentiated Services: A New Direction for Distinguishing Congestion Losses from Wireless Losses Sa^ad Biaz Nitin H. Vaidya ¡£¢ sbiaz@eng.auburn.edu nhv@crhc.uiuc.edu February 21, 2003 Technical Report # CSSE03-02 Abstract Currently, a TCP sender considers all losses as congestion signals and reacts

  3. SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF PHENOLS FROM WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greminger, Douglas C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste Water Treatment by Solvent Extraction," Canadian J.A.F. Preuss, "Extraction of Phenol from Water with a Liquid1980 SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF PHENOLS FROM WATER LP,WRENCE BERv

  4. Liquid-Liquid Extraction Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid-liquid extraction is the separation of one or more components of a liquid solution by contact with a second immiscible liquid called the solvent. If the components in the original liquid solution distribute themselves differently between...

  5. AC Losses of Prototype HTS Transmission Cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demko, J.A.; Dresner, L.; Hughey, R.L.; Lue, J.W.; Olsen, S.K.; Sinha, U.; Tolbert, J.C.

    1998-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1995 Southwire Company and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have jointly designed, built, and tested nine, l-m long, high temperature superconducting (HTS) transmission cable prototypes. This paper summarizes the AC loss measurements of five of the cables not reported elsewhere, and compares the losses with each other and with theory developed by Dresner. Losses were measured with both a calorimetric and an electrical technique. Because of the broad resistive transition of the HTS tapes, the cables can be operated stably beyond their critical currents. The AC losses were measured in this region as well as below critical currents. Dresner's theory takes into account the broad resistive transition of the HTS tapes and calculates the AC losses both below and above the critical current. The two sets of AC 10SS data agree with each other and with the theory quite welL In particular, at low currents of incomplete penetration, the loss data agree with the theoretical prediction of hysteresis loss based on only the outer two Iayers carrying the total current.

  6. Modeling particle loss in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Empirical equations were developed and applied to predict losses of 0.01-100 {micro}m airborne particles making a single pass through 120 different ventilation duct runs typical of those found in mid-sized office buildings. For all duct runs, losses were negligible for submicron particles and nearly complete for particles larger than 50 {micro}m. The 50th percentile cut-point diameters were 15 {micro}m in supply runs and 25 {micro}m in return runs. Losses in supply duct runs were higher than in return duct runs, mostly because internal insulation was present in portions of supply duct runs, but absent from return duct runs. Single-pass equations for particle loss in duct runs were combined with models for predicting ventilation system filtration efficiency and particle deposition to indoor surfaces to evaluate the fates of particles of indoor and outdoor origin in an archetypal mechanically ventilated building. Results suggest that duct losses are a minor influence for determining indoor concentrations for most particle sizes. Losses in ducts were of a comparable magnitude to indoor surface losses for most particle sizes. For outdoor air drawn into an unfiltered ventilation system, most particles smaller than 1 {micro}m are exhausted from the building. Large particles deposit within the building, mostly in supply ducts or on indoor surfaces. When filters are present, most particles are either filtered or exhausted. The fates of particles generated indoors follow similar trends as outdoor particles drawn into the building.

  7. Complete Bacterial Proteome Extraction Kit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    0800 6931 000 Tel (800) 628-8470 Tel 0115 9430 840 email address for technical inquiries: technical................................................................10 9. Technical Appendix components. Ideally, to avoid protein losses, one would achieve complete sample solubilization in a single

  8. Complete Mammalian Proteome Extraction Kit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    0800 6931 000 Tel (800) 628-8470 Tel 0115 9430 840 email address for technical inquiries: technical................................................................................................................10 9. Technical Appendix components. Ideally, to avoid protein losses, one would achieve complete sample solubilization in a single

  9. Hot water bitumen extraction process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rendall, J.S.

    1989-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method of extracting bitumen oils from tar-sands ore. It includes an initial conditioning step comprising crushing tar-sands ore to yield solid particles of a maximum size required by a log washer conditioner in a second conditioning step; a bitumen extraction step; a bitumen separation step; a solvent recovery step; a sand washing and water clarification step; and a sand solvent recovery step.

  10. Inverse hydrochemical models of aqueous extracts tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    processes may occur during porewater extraction such as dissolution of soluble minerals (processes taking place during aqueous extraction. Identification of GM requires knowing: 1) Aqueous complexes, 2) Mineral

  11. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

  12. Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

  13. Report on fuel pool water loss tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalenski, R.F. [West Valley Nuclear Services Co., West Valley, NY (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    To resolve potential concerns on the integrity of the fuel storage pool at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP), a highly accurate testing technique was developed to quantify water losses from the pool. The fuel pool is an unlined, single wall, reinforced concrete structure containing approximately 818,000 gallons of water. Since an initial test indicated that water losses could possibly be attributed solely to evaporation, a cover was suspended and sealed over the pool to block evaporation losses. High accuracy water level and temperature instrumentation was procured and installed. The conclusions of this report indicate that unaccounted-for water losses from the pool are insignificant and there is no detectable leakage within the range of test accuracy.

  14. Telling Absence: War Widows, Loss and Memory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loipponen, Jaana

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis concerns feminist sociological analysis of war loss and its consequences as experienced and told by Finnish Karelian war widows of World War 2. They lost their partners and had to leave their homes by force, ...

  15. Reduction of Hydrocarbon Losses to Flare Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, J.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    merit consideration because the losses and associated economic penalties are assumed to be small. Flare gas flow is not easily measured and as a result, most plants are unaware of how much product they are actually losing during normal operation...

  16. Corona losses in HVdc bipolar lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbellini, U.; Pelacchi, P. [Univ. of Pisa (Italy). Dept. of Electric Systems and Automation] [Univ. of Pisa (Italy). Dept. of Electric Systems and Automation

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem related to the prediction of corona losses in HVdc bipolar lines has been solved, in the past, by means of semi-empirical monomial formulae. However, the proposed formulae that are simpler to use do not always give adequate calculation precision, while the formulae that provide the closest results require implicit functions of different complexity, which are difficult to apply; moreover, it is not possible to understand clearly what influence the variations of the different line parameters have on the losses themselves. The new monomial semi-empirical relationship, proposed to predict the corona losses in HVdc bipolar lines, is very simple to use; it highlights the dependence of power losses due to the corona effect by the different line parameters. The formula has been developed by elaborating a considerable amount of available experimental data.

  17. Reducing Livestock Losses To Toxic Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan; Machen, Richard V.

    2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    TexasAgriculturalExtensionService The Texas A&M University System Reducing Livestock Losses to Toxic Plants B-1499 Sand Shinnery L Perennial Broomweed Texas Agricultural Extension Service a71 Zerle L. Carpenter, Director a71 The Texas A&M University... ................... ...... ... 6 BehaviorModification.................................. 7 Management Techniques forReducingToxic Plant Losses... 8 LiteratureCited........................................ 9 Poisonous Plants ofTexas...............................10 Editor: Judy Winn...

  18. Reducing Livestock Losses To Toxic Plants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGinty, Allan; Machen, Richard V.

    2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    TexasAgriculturalExtensionService The Texas A&M University System Reducing Livestock Losses to Toxic Plants B-1499 Sand Shinnery L Perennial Broomweed Texas Agricultural Extension Service a71 Zerle L. Carpenter, Director a71 The Texas A&M University... ................... ...... ... 6 BehaviorModification.................................. 7 Management Techniques forReducingToxic Plant Losses... 8 LiteratureCited........................................ 9 Poisonous Plants ofTexas...............................10 Editor: Judy Winn...

  19. Cesium and strontium extraction using a mixed extractant solvent including crown ether and calixarene extractants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocatello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A mixed extractant solvent including calix[4]arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from an acidic solution. The DtBu18C6 may be present from approximately 0.01 M to approximately 0.4M, such as from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The mixed extractant solvent may form an organic phase in an extraction system that also includes an aqueous phase. Methods of extracting cesium and strontium as well as strontium alone are also disclosed.

  20. A study of substitution solvents in asphalt fume extraction and the effects of heating duration and temperature 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curry, Noel Thomas

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    may be used as substitute solvents for the solvent extraction analytical method for asphalt furres proposed by NlnSH and currently in use by OSHA. Benzene is known to orovide IC0% effic- 1 iency in asphalt fume extraction. The results..., rather than the solvents' effic- iency loss, was responsible for the differences. The importance of the data lies in the fact that the other two test solvents exhibited a consiatency equal to that of benzene. 'Ahile the exact coefficient of any...

  1. Running Head: The Autonomic Nervous System's responses to losses Loss aversion in the eye and in the heart: The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yechiam, Eldad

    Running Head: The Autonomic Nervous System's responses to losses Loss aversion in the eye and in the heart: The Autonomic Nervous System's responses to losses Guy Hochman and Eldad Yechiam Technion@tx.technion.ac.il #12;ANS responses to losses 2 Loss aversion in the eye and in the heart: The Autonomic Nervous System

  2. ac loss measurement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tape, tem- perature dependence, total ac loss, transport loss. I. INTRODUCTION HIGH 6 Heat Loss Measurement Using Infrared Imaging Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: in...

  3. Draft "Michigan Saves" Loan Loss Reserve Fund Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A sample loan loss reserve agreement between a state or local government and a financial institution setting the terms and conditions of the loan loss reserve fund.

  4. ac loss characteristics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and solar heat gain characteristics of a home's windows performance by reducing heat loss (in the winter), and cooling loss and solar heat gain (in the summer 86...

  5. Energy Use Loss and Opportunities Analysis: U.S. Manufacturing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Use Loss and Opportunities Analysis: U.S. Manufacturing & Mining Energy Use Loss and Opportunities Analysis: U.S. Manufacturing & Mining energyuselossopportunitiesanalysis.pdf...

  6. Understanding Collection-Related Losses in Organic Solar Cells...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding Collection-Related Losses in Organic Solar Cells Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > Understanding Collection-Related Losses in Organic Solar Cells...

  7. Factors affect offshore production loss control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ash, C.S.

    1986-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Many aspects of petroleum measurement on an offshore production platform are the same as at an onshore facility, but there are some unique differences. Before going into them it should be noted that even in today's climate of low or declining oil prices that stock loss control is still important. Improving measurement of the quantity of oil transfers can help reduce the amount of stock that is ''unaccounted for'' or lost. As stock loss is reduced, the salable quantity increases, the gross revenue increases, and the net revenue increases. Even in cases where transfers are between two departments of the same company, accurate measurement and proper accountability are required because they often are the basis for determining costs and can thus affect the price that is charged on a later custody transfer. Inefficiencies in intracompany transfers can often hide real losses which may occur during intercompany transfers.

  8. Rethinking the QCD collisional energy loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Peshier

    2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that to leading order the collisional energy loss of an energetic parton in the hot quark gluon plasma reads $dE/dx \\sim \\alpha(m_D^2)T^2$, where the scale of the coupling is determined by the (parametrically soft) Debye screening mass. Compared to previous expressions derived by Bjorken and other authors, $dE^B/dx \\sim \\alpha^2 T^2 \\ln(ET/m_D^2)$, the rectified result takes into account the running of the coupling, as dictated by quantum corrections beyond tree level. As one significant consequence, due to asymptotic freedom, the QCD collisional energy loss becomes independent of the jet energy in the limit $E \\gg T$. It is advocated that this resummation improved perturbative result might be useful to (re-)estimate the collisional energy loss for temperatures relevant in heavy ion phenomenology.

  9. Reducing the losses of optical metamaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Anan

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The field of metamaterials is driven by fascinating and far-reaching theoretical visions, such as perfect lenses, invisibility cloaking, and enhanced optical nonlinearities. However, losses have become the major obstacle towards real world applications in the optical regime. Reducing the losses of optical metamaterials becomes necessary and extremely important. In this thesis, two approaches are taken to reduce the losses. One is to construct an indefinite medium. Indefinite media are materials where not all the principal components of the permittivity and permeability tensors have the same sign. They do not need the resonances to achieve negative permittivity, {var_epsilon}. So, the losses can be comparatively small. To obtain indefinite media, three-dimensional (3D) optical metallic nanowire media with different structures are designed. They are numerically demonstrated that they are homogeneous effective indefinite anisotropic media by showing that their dispersion relations are hyperbolic. Negative group refraction and pseudo focusing are observed. Another approach is to incorporate gain into metamaterial nanostructures. The nonlinearity of gain is included by a generic four-level atomic model. A computational scheme is presented, which allows for a self-consistent treatment of a dispersive metallic photonic metamaterial coupled to a gain material incorporated into the nanostructure using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The loss compensations with gain are done for various structures, from 2D simplified models to 3D realistic structures. Results show the losses of optical metamaterials can be effectively compensated by gain. The effective gain coefficient of the combined system can be much larger than the bulk gain counterpart, due to the strong local-field enhancement.

  10. Parton Energy Loss with Detailed Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enke Wang; Xin-Nian Wang

    2001-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Stimulated gluon emission and thermal absorption in addition to induced radiation are considered for an energetic parton propagating inside a quark- gluon plasma. In the presence of thermal gluons, stimulated emission reduces while absorption increases the parton's energy. The net effect is a reduction of the parton energy loss. Though decreasing asymptotically as $T/E$ with the parton energy, the relative reduction is found to be important for intermediate energies. The modified energy dependence of the energy loss will affect the shape of suppression of moderately high $p_T$ hadrons due to jet quenching in high-energy heavy-ion collisions.

  11. The QCD collisional energy loss revised

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Peshier

    2006-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that to leading order the QCD collisional energy loss reads $dE/dx \\sim \\alpha(m_D^2)T^2$. Compared to prevalent expressions, $dE^B/dx \\sim \\alpha^2 T^2 \\ln(ET/m_D^2)$, which could be considered adaptions of the (QED) Bethe-Bloch formula, the rectified result takes into account the running coupling, as dictated by renormalization. As one significant consequence, due to asymptotic freedom, the collisional energy loss becomes independent of the jet energy $E$. Some implications with regard to heavy ion collisions are pointed out.

  12. Obesity & Weight Loss Therapy Krakauer and Krakauer, J Obes Weight Loss Ther 2014, 4:2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krakauer, Nir Y.

    Obesity & Weight Loss Therapy Krakauer and Krakauer, J Obes Weight Loss Ther 2014, 4:2 http the original author and source are credited. Keywords: Waist circumference; Body shape index; Obesity Introduction Obesity has historically been a sign of good health, except at the greatestexcess[1

  13. Loss and thermal noise in plasmonic waveguides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Syms, R. R. A., E-mail: r.syms@imperial.ac.uk; Solymar, L. [Optical and Semiconductor Devices Group, EEE Department, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Rytov's theory of thermally generated radiation is used to find the noise in two-dimensional passive guides based on an arbitrary distribution of lossy isotropic dielectric. To simplify calculations, the Maxwell curl equations are approximated using difference equations that also permit a transmission-line analogy, and material losses are assumed to be low enough for modal losses to be estimated using perturbation theory. It is shown that an effective medium representation of each mode is valid for both loss and noise and, hence, that a one-dimensional model can be used to estimate the best achievable noise factor when a given mode is used in a communications link. This model only requires knowledge of the real and imaginary parts of the modal dielectric constant. The former can be found by solving the lossless eigenvalue problem, while the latter can be estimated using perturbation theory. Because of their high loss, the theory is most relevant to plasmonic waveguides, and its application is demonstrated using single interface, slab, and slot guide examples. The best noise performance is offered by the long-range plasmon supported by the slab guide.

  14. Energy loss of fast quarks in nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, G. T. (Gerald T.); Johnson, Mikkel B.; Leitch, M. J.; McGaughey, P. L. (Patrick L.); Peng, J. C. (Jen-Chieh); Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Moss, J. M. (Joel Marshall)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an analysis of the nuclear dependence of the yield of Drell-Yan (DY) dimuons from the 800 GeV/c proton bombardment of {sup 2}H, C, Ca, Fe, and W targets. A light-cone formulation of the DY process is employed in the rest frame of the nucleus. In this frame, for x{sub 2} <loss and shadowing, in a consistent formulation. Shadowing, involving no free parameters, is calculated within the light-cone dipole formalism. Initial-state energy loss, the only unknown in the problem, is determined from afit to the nuclear-dependence ratio versus x{sub 1}. With the assumption of constant energy loss per unit path length, we find -dE/dz = 2.32 {+-} 0.52 {+-} 0.5 GeV/fm. This is the first observation of a nonzero energy loss of partons traveling in nuclear environment.

  15. Queues with simultaneous loss on Dave Thornley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ould-Khaoua, Mohamed

    London SW7 2BZ England djt@doc.ic.ac.uk #12; 2 Breakdowns and repairs In a uniform multi-processor serverQueues with simultaneous loss on breakdowns Dave Thornley #3; June 15, 2002 Abstract We take a queue with breakdowns and repairs of processors in which the queue length does not change

  16. Queues with simultaneous loss on Dave Thornley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Imperial College, London

    of Computing Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine Huxley Building 180 Queen's Gate London SW7 2BZ England djt@doc.ic.ac.uk #12; 2 Breakdowns and repairs In a uniform multi-processor server, weQueues with simultaneous loss on breakdowns Dave Thornley #3; Abstract We take a queue

  17. Report of Refrigerated Medication Loss UConn Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Report of Refrigerated Medication Loss UConn Health Please complete form & return to John Dempsey Other (Specify): Phone: E-mail: Address: Location of Refrigerator Affected: Date/time refrigerator was out of temperature range: Describe the event below: How long was the refrigerator out of range (hours

  18. Standby and Off-Mode Energy Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Standby and Off-Mode Energy Losses In New Appliances Measured in Shops #12;ISBN: 978 with the University of Coimbra. Its research interests include energyefficient technologies, renewable energies, and energy planning. Recent work includes the coordination of several European projects on market

  19. Revolving Loan Funds and Loan Loss Reserves

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) State Energy Program (SEP) guidance to states, Indian tribes, and overseas U.S. territories receiving SEP grants under the 209 Recovery Act dealing with loan loss reserves for revolving loan funds.

  20. Extracting energies from the vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    She-Sheng Xue

    2000-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present and study a possible mechanism of extracting energies from the vacuum by external classical fields. Taking a constant magnetic field as an example, we discuss why and how the vacuum energy can be released in the context of quantum field theories. In addition, we give a theoretical computation showing how much vacuum energies can be released. The possibilities of experimentally detecting such a vacuum-energy releasing are discussed.

  1. Inverse hydrochemical models of aqueous extracts tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    kinetic mineral dissolution during extraction. 4.3 Types ofextraction such as dissolution of soluble minerals (halite,extraction. Identification of GM requires knowing: 1) Aqueous complexes, 2) Mineral

  2. Titanium metal: extraction to application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gambogi, Joseph (USGS, Reston, VA); Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

  3. Preliminary analysis of NAPL behavior in soil-heated vapor extraction for in-situ environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, S.W.; Phelan, J.M.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulations of soil-heated vapor extraction have been performed to evaluate the NAPL removal performance as a function of borehole vacuum. The possibility of loss of NAPL containment, or NAPL migration into the unheated soil, is also evaluated in the simulations. A practical warning sign indicating migration of NAPL into the unheated zone is discussed.

  4. Extractable soil phosphorus in Blackland Prairie soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd, Robert Claude

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONCLUSIONS . REFERENCES. . APPENDIX. 92 . 94 99 . . 104 Vlh Table LIST OF TABLES Page Extractable soil P ratings for the TAEX, Bray I, Olsen, and TAEX 3 soil P extractants 18 Chemical properties of preliminary soil sample (Fall 1992) taken from..., and 8 0). The authors, however, noted that Olsen and TAEX extractable P also resulted in acceptable correlation values All the above extractants were highly correlated (r& 0. 94) with total P uptake for both the calcareous soil and the slightly acidic...

  5. Understanding Loss Mechanisms and Efficiency Improvement Options for HCCI Engines Using Detailed Exergy Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saxena, Samveg

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Exergy Loss from Cylinder Gases Combustion Heat Loss Exhaustheptane and Natural Gas blends Combustion in HCCI Engines,”from Cylinder Gases (%) Loss Mechanisms Combustion Heat Loss

  6. SchoolFEFLOW Exercise Heat extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kornhuber, Ralf

    the flux: q = 0.15 m/d Pumping (heat extraction) from aquifer and re-injection (of cooled water-injected water: 20°C · T = 20°C Model Extension #12;Summer SchoolHeat extraction from sloped aquifer 22Summer SchoolFEFLOW® Exercise Heat extraction from a sloped sandstone aquifer Vertical cross

  7. Gauge Invariant Spectral Cauchy Characteristic Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey J. Handmer; Béla Szilágyi; Jeffrey Winicour

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present gauge invariant spectral Cauchy characteristic extraction. We compare gravitational waveforms extracted from a head-on black hole merger simulated in two different gauges by two different codes. We show rapid convergence, demonstrating both gauge invariance of the extraction algorithm and consistency between the legacy Pitt null code and the much faster Spectral Einstein Code (SpEC).

  8. Scannerless laser range imaging using loss modulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sandusky, John V. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A scannerless 3-D imaging apparatus is disclosed which utilizes an amplitude modulated cw light source to illuminate a field of view containing a target of interest. Backscattered light from the target is passed through one or more loss modulators which are modulated at the same frequency as the light source, but with a phase delay .delta. which can be fixed or variable. The backscattered light is demodulated by the loss modulator and detected with a CCD, CMOS or focal plane array (FPA) detector to construct a 3-D image of the target. The scannerless 3-D imaging apparatus, which can operate in the eye-safe wavelength region 1.4-1.7 .mu.m and which can be constructed as a flash LADAR, has applications for vehicle collision avoidance, autonomous rendezvous and docking, robotic vision, industrial inspection and measurement, 3-D cameras, and facial recognition.

  9. Tuneable dielectric films having low electrical losses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dimos, Duane Brian (Albuquerque, NM); Schwartz, Robert William (Albuquerque, NM); Raymond, Mark Victor (Albuquerque, NM); Al-Shareef, Husam Niman (Boise, ID); Mueller, Carl (Lakewood, CO); Galt, David (Denver, CO)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a method for forming dielectric thin films having substantially reduced electrical losses at microwave and millimeter wave frequencies relative to conventional dielectric thin films. The reduction in losses is realized by dramatically increasing the grain sizes of the dielectric films, thereby minimizing intergranular scattering of the microwave signal due to grain boundaries and point defects. The increase in grain size is realized by heating the film to a temperature at which the grains experience regrowth. The grain size of the films can be further increased by first depositing the films with an excess of one of the compoents, such that a highly mobile grain boundary phase is formed.

  10. Recent Stirling engine loss - understanding results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tew, R.C.; Thieme, L.G.; Dudenhoefer, J.E.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For several years, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and other US Government agencies have been funding experimental and analytical efforts to improve the understanding of Stirling thermodynamic losses. NASA`s objective is to improve Stirling engine design capability to support the development of new engines for space power. An overview of these efforts was last given at the 1988 IECEC. Recent results of this research are reviewed.

  11. Physical property changes in hydrate-bearing sediment due to depressurization and subsequent repressurization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waite, W.F.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distribution of water, gas and hydrate within a core and thecontaining natural and laboratory-formed gas hydrate, inNatural Gas Hydrate In Oceanic and Permafrost Environments,

  12. Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Repressuring (Million Cubic

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.Gas Proved Reserves, WetGas

  13. Study Medium-induced Parton Energy Loss in Gamma+jet Events of High-Energy Heavy-Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xin-Nian Wang; Zheng Huang

    1997-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of medium-induced parton energy loss on jet fragmentation is studied in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. It is shown that an effective jet fragmentation function can be extracted from the inclusive $p_T$ spectrum of charged particles in the opposite direction of a tagged direct photon with a fixed transverse energy. We study the modification of the effective jet fragmentation function due to parton energy loss in AA as compared to pp collisions, including $E_T$ smearing from initial state radiations for the photon-tagged jets. The effective fragmentation function at $z=p_T/E_T^\\gamma\\sim 1$ in pA collisions is shown to be sensitive to the additional $E_T$ smearing due to initial multiple parton scatterings whose effect must be subtracted out in AA collisions in order to extract the effective parton energy loss. Jet quenching in deeply inelastic lepton-nucleus scatterings as a measure of the parton energy loss in cold nuclear matter is also discussed. We also comment on the experimental feasibilities of the proposed study at the RHIC and LHC energies and some alternative measurements such as using $Z^0$ as a tag at the LHC energy.

  14. System Losses and Assessment Trade Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shropshire; Steve Piet; Nick Soelberg; Robert Cherry; Roger Henry; David Meikrantz; Greg Teske; Eric Shaber; Candido Pereira

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) study has developed new analysis methods to examine old and new technology options toward the goal of improving fuel cycle systems. We have integrated participants and information from AFCI Systems Analysis, Transmutation Fuels, Separations, and Waste Form Campaigns in the Systems Losses and Assessment Trade Study. The initial objectives of this study were to 1) increase understanding of system interdependencies and thereby identify system trade-offs that may yield important insights, 2) define impacts of separations product purity on fuel manufacture and transmutation reactivity, 3) define impacts from transuranic (TRU) losses to waste, 4) identify the interrelationships involved in fuels and separations technology performance, and 5) identify system configuration adjustments with the greatest potential for influencing system losses. While bounding and analyzing this initial problem, we also identified significantly higher-level programmatic drivers with broad implications to the current fuel cycle research charter and the general issue of a DOE complex wide need for a comprehensive and integrated nuclear material management as addressed by the new DOE Order 410.2 titled “Management of Nuclear Materials”. The initial modeling effort developed in this study for a much smaller subset of material (i.e., commercial fuel) and a selected transmutation scheme (i.e., fast reactor recycling) is a necessary first step towards examining a broader set of nuclear material management options, dispositioning strategies and integrated waste management options including potential areas of research leverage. The primary outcome from this initial study has been an enhanced integration among Campaigns and associated insights and analysis methods. Opportunities for improved understanding between the groups abound. The above lanthanide-actinide example highlights the importance of evaluating options via integration across the Campaigns. Plans for Fiscal Year 2010 are being made in a coordinated fashion such that the knowledge gained from the research performed by the Campaigns can benefit on-going work of the study, and that improved understanding of the system relationships can be used to guide the specific research and development (R&D) activities within the Campaigns. In FY-10, the System Losses and Assessment Trade Study will carry-over activities from FY-09. We will continue to refine impurity and loss estimates and impurity limits on fuels by incorporating results from ongoing R&D. And we will begin work on an enhanced nuclear material management model to allow us to continue to improve our overall system understanding of the trade-offs between separations, fuel fabrication, waste forms, waste disposition, SNM losses, reactor performance, and proliferation resistance. In the future, we can also better understand how used fuel and other forms of remote-handled SNM can be better integrated into an overall nuclear material management program that will evolve for the DOE complex via Order 410.2 (DOE 2009).

  15. Collisional energy loss of heavy quarks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Meistrenko; Andre Peshier; Jan Uphoff; Carsten Greiner

    2013-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a transport approach for heavy quarks in a quark-gluon plasma, which is based on improved binary collision rates taking into account quantum statistics, the running of the QCD coupling and an effective screening mass adjusted to hard-thermal loop calculations. We quantify the effects of in-medium collisions by calculating the heavy flavor nuclear modification factor and the elliptic flow for RHIC energies, which are comparable to radiative effects. We also derive an analytic formula for the mean collisional energy loss of an energetic heavy quark in a streaming quark gluon plasma.

  16. Reducing Energy Loss | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuick Guide:U.N.June 8,PastRadiation LossesReducingReducing

  17. CHARACTERIZING LOSSES IN MICROSTRIP TRANSMISSION LINES Rashmi Pathak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Timbie, Peter

    CHARACTERIZING LOSSES IN MICROSTRIP TRANSMISSION LINES by Rashmi Pathak A dissertation submitted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2.1 Transmission Lines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2 Engineering) at the UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MADISON Summer 2005 #12;i Characterizing Losses in Transmission

  18. Draft 'Michigan Saves' Loan Loss Reserve Fund Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A sample loan loss reserve agreement between a state or local government and a financial institution setting the terms and conditions of the loan loss reserve fund. Author: State of Michigan

  19. abrupt mass loss: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of two SNe, 2002ap and 2006jc, for Wolf-Rayet star mass-loss rates and long Gamma-ray bursts. John Eldridge 5 Mass loss and supernova progenitors Astrophysics (arXiv)...

  20. Characterizing Shading Losses on Partially Shaded PV Systems (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deline, C.

    2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation on shaded PV power loss, practical issues with modeling shaded PV, and methods of implementing partially shaded PV modeling.

  1. Status of wake and array loss research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, D.L.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, many projects have evaluated wind turbine wake effects and resultant array losses in both Europe and the United States. This paper examines the status of current knowledge about wake effects and array losses and suggests future research. Single-turbine wake characteristics have been studied extensively and are generally described well by existing theoretical models. Field measurements of wake effects in wind turbine arrays are largely limited to small arrays, with 2 to 4 rows of turbines. Few data have been published on wake effects within large arrays. Measurements of wake deficits downwind of large arrays that deficits are substantially larger and extend farther downwind than expected. Although array design models have been developed, these models have been tested and verified using only limited data from a few rows of wind turbines in complex terrain, whereas some of the largest arrays have more than 40 rows of wind turbines. Planned cooperative efforts with the wind industry will obtain existing data relevant to analyzing energy deficits within large arrays and identifying data sets for potential use in array model verification efforts. Future research being considered include a cooperative research experiment to obtain more definitive data on wake deficits and turbulence within and downwind of large arrays. 16 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  2. An investigation of simplified loss formula evaluation of total and incremental power system losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malinowski, James Henry

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirements i' or the degree of NASTER OF SCIENCE NaF~ 1962 Na)or Sub)ect: Electrical Engineering AN INVESTIGlLTION OF SIMPLIFIED LOSS FORMULA EVALUATION OF TOTAL AND INCREMENTAL POWER SYSTEM LOSSES A Thesis JAMES HENRY MALINOWSKI Approved as to style... e o o o e 0 e 32 BIBLIOGRAPHY ~ e o ~ o ~ a o ~ a a o ~ o o o o o o 37 CHAPTER I IRTRODUCTZOH The past decade, l9$0-1960, has seen the electric power industry of the United States more than double its installed capacity and annual energy...

  3. Extracting inorganics from scrap tires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, R.; Wertz, D.L. [Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Scrap tires contain several inorganic moieties in abundances >0.5% which are impregnated into their carbonaceous matrix. These inorganic species are known to produce acid rain, toxic aerosols, and boiler scale and could produce unwanted catalytic effects as well. It is our position that the potential of recycling scrap tires would be considerably enhanced if the inorganics in question - S, Ca, and Zn - were removed prior to attempts to upgrade the carbonaceous matrix. Using non-mechanical methods, we are attempting to cleave the adherence between the co-polymer matrix and to extract the inorganics. The efficiency of our methods is being measured by wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometry and by other methods.

  4. MODELING OF EDDY CURRENT LOSS AND TEMPERATURE OF THE MAGNETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mi, Chunting "Chris"

    MODELING OF EDDY CURRENT LOSS AND TEMPERATURE OF THE MAGNETS IN PERMANENT MAGNET MACHINES@umich.edu Received 24 November 2010 Accepted 16 June 2011 The eddy current loss in the magnets of permanent magnet- mium-iron-boron (NdFeB), and slot/tooth harmonics, there is eddy current loss generated inside

  5. Arctic ozone loss and climate sensitivity: Updated threedimensional model study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wuhu

    Arctic ozone loss and climate sensitivity: Updated three­dimensional model study Chipperfield winter­spring chemical ozone loss from 1991 2003, its observed correlation with low temperatures. CTM throughout studied. The model reproduces large column winters also captures shape of ozone loss profile

  6. The Capacity Loss of Dense Constellations Tobias Koch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    high SNR, our results recover the power loss of 1.53dB for square signal constellations without-noise channels for suitably high signal- to-noise ratio. Our expression for the capacity loss recovers the power loss of 1.53dB for square signal constellations. I. INTRODUCTION As it is well known, the channel

  7. Silicon on ultra-low-loss waveguide photonic integration platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauters, Jared; Davenport, Michael; Heck, Martijn; Doylend, Jonathan; Chen, Arnold; Fang, Alexander

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. E. Bowers, “Ultra-low-loss high-aspect-ratio Si 3 N 4and K. J. Vahala, “Ultra-low-loss optical delay line on aspiral is 78 mm long. 3. Ultra-low-loss waveguides with and

  8. Loss Factor of the PEP-II Rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novokhatski, A; Sullivan, M.; /SLAC

    2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An RF power balance method is used to measure the synchrotron radiation losses and the wake field losses. We present the history of the losses in the Low Energy Ring (LER) and the High Energy Ring (HER) during the last several runs of PEP-II.

  9. Greed, Leverage, and Potential Losses: A Prospect Theory Perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and losses, reference point, portfolio choice 1 Introduction "Greed" as a non-technical term is fairlyGreed, Leverage, and Potential Losses: A Prospect Theory Perspective Hanqing Jin and Xun Yu Zhou with leverage and potential losses, in the context of a continuous-time behavioral portfolio choice model under

  10. Reducing Energy Usage in Extractive Distillation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saxena, A. C.; Bhandari, V. A.

    , .. ~ REDUCING ENERGY USAGE IN,EXTRACTIVE DISTILLATION A. C. Saxena V. A. Bhandari Polysar Limited Sarnia, Ontario, Canada Abstract Butadiene 1:3 is separated from other C. hydrocarbons by extractive distillation in a sieve plate tower.... To improve the energy efficiency, butadiene recovery and productivity of the extractive distillation process, many process changes have been made. Their rationale, the methodology used to implement the various changes, and how they affected the process...

  11. Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1992-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and americium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N,N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU's together with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU's and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal. 3 figs.

  12. Combined transuranic-strontium extraction process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The transuranic (TRU) elements neptunium, plutonium and amercium can be separated together with strontium from nitric acid waste solutions in a single process. An extractant solution of a crown ether and an alkyl(phenyl)-N.N-dialkylcarbanylmethylphosphine oxide in an appropriate diluent will extract the TRU`s to gather with strontium, uranium and technetium. The TRU`s and the strontium can then be selectively stripped from the extractant for disposal.

  13. Determination of Extractives in Biomass: Laboratory Analytical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    steps. This procedure uses a two-step extraction process to remove water soluble and ethanol soluble material. Water soluble materials may include inorganic material,...

  14. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Technologies for Extracting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technologies for Extracting Valuable Metals and Compounds from Geothermal Fluids Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About...

  15. Quantum cryptographic system with reduced data loss

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong (1309, Low Block, Lei Moon House Ap Lei Chau Estate, Hong Kong, HK); Chau, Hoi Fung (Flat C, 42nd Floor, Tower 1, University Heights 23 Pokfield Road, Pokfulam, Hong Kong, HK)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A secure method for distributing a random cryptographic key with reduced data loss. Traditional quantum key distribution systems employ similar probabilities for the different communication modes and thus reject at least half of the transmitted data. The invention substantially reduces the amount of discarded data (those that are encoded and decoded in different communication modes e.g. using different operators) in quantum key distribution without compromising security by using significantly different probabilities for the different communication modes. Data is separated into various sets according to the actual operators used in the encoding and decoding process and the error rate for each set is determined individually. The invention increases the key distribution rate of the BB84 key distribution scheme proposed by Bennett and Brassard in 1984. Using the invention, the key distribution rate increases with the number of quantum signals transmitted and can be doubled asymptotically.

  16. Quantum cryptographic system with reduced data loss

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lo, H.K.; Chau, H.F.

    1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A secure method for distributing a random cryptographic key with reduced data loss is disclosed. Traditional quantum key distribution systems employ similar probabilities for the different communication modes and thus reject at least half of the transmitted data. The invention substantially reduces the amount of discarded data (those that are encoded and decoded in different communication modes e.g. using different operators) in quantum key distribution without compromising security by using significantly different probabilities for the different communication modes. Data is separated into various sets according to the actual operators used in the encoding and decoding process and the error rate for each set is determined individually. The invention increases the key distribution rate of the BB84 key distribution scheme proposed by Bennett and Brassard in 1984. Using the invention, the key distribution rate increases with the number of quantum signals transmitted and can be doubled asymptotically. 23 figs.

  17. Global warming, insurance losses and financial industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Low, N.C. [UOB Life Assurance Limited, Singapore (Singapore)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Global warming causes extremely bad weather in the near term. They have already caught the attention of the insurance industry, as they suffered massive losses in the last decade. Twenty-one out of the 25 largest catastrophes in the US, mainly in the form of hurricanes have occurred in the last decade. The insurance industry has reacted by taking the risk of global warming in decisions as to pricing and underwriting decisions. But they have yet to take a more active role in regulating the factors that contributes to global warming. How global warming can impact the financial industry and the modern economy is explored. Insurance and modern financial derivatives are key to the efficient functioning of the modern economy, without which the global economy can still function but will take a giant step backward. Any risk as global warming that causes economic surprises will hamper the efficient working of the financial market and the modern economy.

  18. Measurements of Beam Ion Loss from the Compact Helical System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. S. Darrow, M. Isobe, Takashi Kondo, M. Sasao, and the CHS Group National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu, Japan

    2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam ion loss from the Compact Helical System (CHS) has been measured with a scintillator-type probe. The total loss to the probe, and the pitch angle and gyroradius distributions of that loss, have been measured as various plasma parameters were scanned. Three classes of beam ion loss were observed at the probe position: passing ions with pitch angles within 10o of those of transition orbits, ions on transition orbits, and ions on trapped orbits, typically 15o or more from transition orbits. Some orbit calculations in this geometry have been performed in order to understand the characteristics of the loss. Simulation of the detector signal based upon the following of orbits from realistic beam deposition profiles is not able to reproduce the pitch angle distribution of the losses measured. Consequently it is inferred that internal plasma processes, whether magnetohydrodynamic modes, radial electric fields, or plasma turbulence, move previously confined beam ions to transition orbits, resulting in their loss.

  19. Summary of Topic1 Fusion Power Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Extraction and Tritium Fuel Cycle · What choices are available for material, coolant, breeder, configuration availability of external tritium supply? #12;FW/Blanket concepts for fusion power extraction and tritium&D and facilities strongly overlap RAFM Steel PbLi Breeder Helium Cooled Ceramic Breeder Beryllium Helium Cooled Pb

  20. Transposon extraction protocol Maitreya Dunham November 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Maitreya

    Transposon extraction protocol Maitreya Dunham November 2006 modification of the Qiagen HSE precipitate. Mix equal amounts of DNA from each digest if multiple digests. Extraction In a screw-cap tube (Qiagen), and water to bring to 30 µl total. Heat for 15 minutes at 95C with a 100C block on top (blocks

  1. Design of the ILC RTML extraction lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seletskiy, S.; Tenenbaum, P.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ILC [1] Damping Ring to the Main Linac beamline (RTML) contains three extraction lines (EL). Each EL can be used both for an emergency abort dumping of the beam and tune-up continual train-by-train extraction. Two of the extraction lines are located downstream of the first and second stages of the RTML bunch compressor, and must accept both compressed and uncompressed beam with energy spreads of 2.5% and 0.15%, respectively. In this paper we report on an optics design that allowed minimizing the length of the extraction lines while offsetting the beam dumps from the main line by the distance required for acceptable radiation levels in the service tunnel. The proposed extraction lines can accommodate beams with different energy spreads while at the same time providing the beam size acceptable for the aluminum dump window.

  2. Membrane Extraction for Detoxification of Biomass Hydrolysates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grzenia, D. L.; Schell, D. J.; Wickramasinghe, S. R.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Membrane extraction was used for the removal of sulfuric acid, acetic acid, 5-hydroxymethyl furfural and furfural from corn stover hydrolyzed with dilute sulfuric acid. Microporous polypropylene hollow fiber membranes were used. The organic extractant consisted of 15% Alamine 336 in: octanol, a 50:50 mixture of oleyl alcohol:octanol or oleyl alcohol. Rapid removal of sulfuric acid, 5-hydroxymethyl and furfural was observed. The rate of acetic acid removal decreased as the pH of the hydrolysate increased. Regeneration of the organic extractant was achieved by back extraction into an aqueous phase containing NaOH and ethanol. A cleaning protocol consisting of flushing the hydrolysate compartment with NaOH and the organic phase compartment with pure organic phase enabled regeneration and reuse of the module. Ethanol yields from hydrolysates detoxified by membrane extraction using 15% Alamine 336 in oleyl alcohol were about 10% higher than those from hydrolysates detoxified using ammonium hydroxide treatment.

  3. Design of the ILC RTML Extraction Lines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seletskiy, S.; Tenenbaum, P.; Walz, D.; /SLAC; Solyak, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The ILC [1] Damping Ring to the Main Linac beamline (RTML) contains three extraction lines (EL). Each EL can be used both for an emergency abort dumping of the beam and tune-up continual train-by-train extraction. Two of the extraction lines are located downstream of the first and second stages of the RTML bunch compressor, and must accept both compressed and uncompressed beam with energy spreads of 2.5% and 0.15%, respectively. In this paper we report on an optics design that allowed minimizing the length of the extraction lines while offsetting the beam dumps from the main line by the distance required for acceptable radiation levels in the service tunnel. The proposed extraction lines can accommodate beams with different energy spreads while at the same time providing the beam size acceptable for the aluminum dump window. The RTML incorporates three extraction lines, which can be used for either an emergency beam abort or for a train-by-train extraction. The first EL is located downstream of the Damping Ring extraction arc. The other two extraction lines are located downstream of each stage of the two-stage bunch compressor. The first extraction line (EL1) receives 5GeV beam with an 0.15% energy spread. The extraction line located downstream of the first stage of bunch compressor (ELBC1) receives both compressed and uncompressed beam, and therefore must accept beam with both 5 and 4.88GeV energy, and 0.15% and 2.5% energy spread, respectively. The extraction line located after the second stage of the bunch compressor (ELBC2) receives 15GeV beam with either 0.15 or 1.8% energy spread. Each of the three extraction lines is equipped with the 220kW aluminum ball dump, which corresponds to the power of the continuously dumped beam with 5GeV energy, i.e., the beam trains must be delivered to the ELBC2 dump at reduced repetition rate.

  4. Detonation propagation in a high loss configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Scott I [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shepherd, Joseph E [CALTECH

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents an experimental study of detonation wave propagation in tubes with inner diameters (ID) comparable to the mixture cell size. Propane-oxygen mixtures were used in two test section tubes with inner diameters of 1.27 mm and 6.35 mm. For both test sections, the initial pressure of stoichiometric mixtures was varied to determine the effect on detonation propagation. For the 6.35 mm tube, the equivalence ratio {phi} (where the mixture was {phi} C{sub 3}H{sub 8} + 50{sub 2}) was also varied. Detonations were found to propagate in mixtures with cell sizes as large as five times the diameter of the tube. However, under these conditions, significant losses were observed, resulting in wave propagation velocities as slow as 40% of the CJ velocity U{sub CJ}. A review of relevant literature is presented, followed by experimental details and data. Observed velocity deficits are predicted using models that account for boundary layer growth inside detonation waves.

  5. Cool horizons lead to information loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borun D. Chowdhury

    2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two evidences for information loss during black hole evaporation: (i) a pure state evolves to a mixed state and (ii) the map from the initial state to final state is non-invertible. Any proposed resolution of the information paradox must address both these issues. The firewall argument focuses only on the first and this leads to order one deviations from the Unruh vacuum for maximally entangled black holes. The nature of the argument does not extend to black holes in pure states. It was shown by Avery, Puhm and the author that requiring the initial state to final state map to be invertible mandates structure at the horizon even for pure states. The proof works if black holes can be formed in generic states and in this paper we show that this is indeed the case. We also demonstrate how models proposed by Susskind, Papadodimas et al. and Maldacena et al. end up making the initial to final state map non-invertible and thus make the horizon "cool" at the cost of unitarity.

  6. Remediating pesticide contaminated soils using solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahle-Demessie, E.; Meckes, M.C.; Richardson, T.L. [National Management Research Lab., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p{prime}-DDT, p,p{prime}-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as solvents over a wide range of operating conditions. It was demonstrated that a six-stage methanol extraction using a solvent-to-soil ratio of 1.6 can decrease pesticide levels in the soil by more than 99% and reduce the volume of material requiring further treatment by 25 times or more. The high solubility of the pesticides in methanol resulted in rapid extraction rates, with the system reaching quasi-equilibrium state in 30 minutes. The extraction efficiency was influenced by the number of extraction stages, the solvent-to-soil ratio, and the soil moisture content. Various methods were investigated to regenerate and recycle the solvent. Evaporation and solvent stripping are low cost and reliable methods for removing high pesticide concentrations from the solvent. For low concentrations, GAC adsorption may be used. Precipitating and filtering pesticides by adding water to the methanol/pesticide solution was not successful when tested with soil extracts. 26 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Peculiarities of highly burned-up NPP SNF reprocessing and new approach to simulation of solvent extraction processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorov, Y.S.; Zilberman, B.Y.; Goletskiy, N.D.; Puzikov, E.A.; Ryabkov, D.V.; Rodionov, S.A.; Beznosyuk, V.I.; Petrov, Y.Y.; Saprykin, V.F.; Murzin, A.A.; Bibichev, B.A.; Aloy, A.S.; Kudinov, A.S.; Blazheva, I.V. [RPA 'V.G.Khlopin Radium Institute', 28, 2 Murinsky av., St-Petersburg, 194 021 (Russian Federation); Kurenkov, N.V. [Institute of Industrial Nuclear Technology NRNU MEPHI, 31, Kashirskoye shosse, Moscow, 115409 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Substantiation, general description and performance characteristics of a reprocessing flowsheet for WWER-1000 spent fuel with burn-up >60 GW*day/t U is given. Pu and U losses were <0.1%, separation factor > 10{sup 4}; their decontamination factor from ?-emitting fission products was 4*10{sup 4} and 3*10{sup 7}, respectively. Zr, Tc, Np removal was >98% at U and Pu losses <0.05%. A new approach to simulation of extraction equilibrium has been developed. It is based on a set of simultaneous chemical reactions characterized by apparent concentration constants. A software package was created for simulation of spent fuel component distribution in multistage countercurrent extraction processes in the presence of salting out agents. (authors)

  8. Report on the Loss of the Mars Polar Lander and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leveson, Nancy

    ........................................................................................... 1 1.2.1 Investigation of the MCO Loss .................................................................................................................. 1 1.2.2 Post-MCO Corrective Actions for Mars Polar Lander

  9. Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Correlation Of Surface Heat Loss And Total Energy Production For Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Correlation...

  10. Draft Michigan SAVES Loan Loss Reserve Fund Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A sample LRF agreement between a grantee and an financial institution setting the terms and conditions of the loan loss reserve fund.

  11. Polarization Losses under Accelerated Stress Test Using Multiwalled...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerated Stress Test Using Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Supported Pt Catalyst in PEM Fuel Cells. Polarization Losses under Accelerated Stress Test Using Multiwalled Carbon...

  12. Analysis of beam loss induced abort kicker instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang W.; Sandberg, J.; Ahrens, L.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Mi, J.; Pai, C.; Tan, Y.

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Through more than a decade of operation, we have noticed the phenomena of beam loss induced kicker instability in the RHIC beam abort systems. In this study, we analyze the short term beam loss before abort kicker pre-fire events and operation conditions before capacitor failures. Beam loss has caused capacitor failures and elevated radiation level concentrated at failed end of capacitor has been observed. We are interested in beam loss induced radiation and heat dissipation in large oil filled capacitors and beam triggered thyratron conduction. We hope the analysis result would lead to better protection of the abort systems and improved stability of the RHIC operation.

  13. ac losses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Transport AC loss in high temperature superconducting coils University of Cambridge - Dspace Summary: 's electromagnetic properties and...

  14. Surface and bulk modified high capacity layered oxide cathodes with low irreversible capacity loss

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manthiram, Arumugam (Austin, TX); Wu, Yan (Austin, TX)

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes compositions, surface and bulk modifications, and methods of making of (1-x)Li[Li.sub.1/3Mn.sub.2/3]O.sub.2.xLi[Mn.sub.0.5-yNi.sub.0.5-yCo.sub.2- y]O.sub.2 cathode materials having an O3 crystal structure with a x value between 0 and 1 and y value between 0 and 0.5, reducing the irreversible capacity loss in the first cycle by surface modification with oxides and bulk modification with cationic and anionic substitutions, and increasing the reversible capacity to close to the theoretical value of insertion/extraction of one lithium per transition metal ion (250-300 mAh/g).

  15. Extraction Steam Controls at EPLA-W

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinker, J. L.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ExxonMobil's Baton Rouge site encompasses a world-scale refinery, chemical plant and third party power station. Historically, inflexible and unreliable control systems on two high-pressure, extracting/condensing steam turbines prevented the site...

  16. Cheaper oil extraction Taking a closer look

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be extracted from oil fields. Liquid CO2 is increasingly used industrially to replace common petrochemical-flammable and environmentally responsible alternative to conventional petrochemical solvents. For example, even water

  17. Extracting secret keys from integrated circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Daihyun, 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern cryptographic protocols are based on the premise that only authorized participants can obtain secret keys and access to information systems. However, various kinds of tampering methods have been devised to extract ...

  18. The extraction of work from quantum coherence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamil Korzekwa; Matteo Lostaglio; Jonathan Oppenheim; David Jennings

    2015-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We critically assess the problem of extracting work from a coherent superposition of energy eigenstates of an individual qubit system. By carefully taking into account all the resources involved in the thermodynamic transformations in a fully quantum-mechanical treatment, we show that there exists a thermal machine that can come arbitrarily close to extracting all the coherence as work. The machine only needs to act on individual copies of a state and can be reused. On the other hand, we show that for any thermal machine with finite resources not all the coherence of a state can be extracted as work. We provide explicit protocols extracting work from coherence when the resources of a thermal machine are bounded, a scenario potentially relevant for the thermodynamics at the nanoscale.

  19. Fluidized bed gasification of extracted coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aquino, D.C.; DaPrato, P.L.; Gouker, T.R.; Knoer, P.

    1984-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal or similar carbonaceous solids are extracted by contacting the solids in an extraction zone with an aqueous solution having a pH above 12.0 at a temperature between 65/sup 0/C and 110/sup 0/C for a period of time sufficient to remove bitumens from the coal into said aqueous solution, and the extracted solids are then gasified at an elevated pressure and temperature in a fluidized bed gasification zone (60) wherein the density of the fluidized bed is maintained at a value above 160 kg/m/sup 3/. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, water is removed from the aqueous solution in order to redeposit the extracted bitumens onto the solids prior to the gasification step. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Fluidized bed gasification of extracted coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aquino, Dolores C. (Houston, TX); DaPrato, Philip L. (Westfield, NJ); Gouker, Toby R. (Baton Rouge, LA); Knoer, Peter (Houston, TX)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal or similar carbonaceous solids are extracted by contacting the solids in an extraction zone (12) with an aqueous solution having a pH above 12.0 at a temperature between 65.degree. C. and 110.degree. C. for a period of time sufficient to remove bitumens from the coal into said aqueous solution and the extracted solids are then gasified at an elevated pressure and temperature in a fluidized bed gasification zone (60) wherein the density of the fluidized bed is maintained at a value above 160 kg/m.sup.3. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, water is removed from the aqueous solution in order to redeposit the extracted bitumens onto the solids prior to the gasification step.

  1. Alkaline earth cation extraction from acid solution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietz, Mark (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An extractant medium for extracting alkaline earth cations from an aqueous acidic sample solution is described as are a method and apparatus for using the same. The separation medium is free of diluent, free-flowing and particulate, and comprises a Crown ether that is a 4,4'(5')[C.sub.4 -C.sub.8 -alkylcyclohexano]18-Crown-6 dispersed on an inert substrate material.

  2. Modified two-way protocol for quantum secure direct communication with the presence of channel loss and noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianyong Hu; Bo Yu; Mingyong Jing; Liantuan Xiao; Suotang Jia

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum secure direct communication can effectively save the computing resource and improve the communication rate. In this paper, we present a coding scheme based on the single-photons modulation which can perform the two-way protocol for quantum secure direct communication with the presence of channel loss and noise. To the modified two-way protocol, the information bits can only be extracted from a batch of qubits, therefore, the leakage of a few qubits would not cause the leakage of information bits. The security condition, the information bit rate and the security communication distance are discussed.

  3. Quantifying stream flow loss to groundwater on alluvial valley streams in Sonoma County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janes, Kelly; Carrasco, Jose

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cover, etc. ), and water extraction by adjacent or upstreamcan better plan water extraction to support anadroumous fish

  4. Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems Extracting and Using Data From Tracking Systems Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Data and Evaluation Peer Exchange Call:...

  5. Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable Power Enhanced Geothermal in Nevada: Extracting Heat From the Earth to Generate Sustainable...

  6. aerogel keystones extraction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    level due to evaporation. Threeevaporation for xerogel and supercritical extraction for aerogel. Supercritical extraction enables the removal of interstitial liquid Carrington,...

  7. aromatica extracts correlates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    thus from which any extractable work can only come from correlations. We compute the maximum extractable work for general entangled states, separable states, and states with...

  8. The effects of R/X ratios on power system minimum loss 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denison, John Scott

    1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation of Data Summary e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ Appendix . Bibliography ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ S5 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 89 Case I, Loss vs ~ Angle ~ Case II, Loss vs. Angle Case III, Loss vs ~ Angle Case IV ~ Loss vso Angle... ~ ~ ~ Case V, Line Impedances . . . . . , ~ 17 20 23 27 33 Case V (a), Loss vs. Angle . . ~ Case V (b), Loss vs. Voltage Case V (c), Loss vs. Angle Case VI, Line Impedances ~ Case VI, Loss vs. &ngle ~ Case VII (a), Line Impedances Case VII (a...

  9. Energy Upgrade California in Los Angeles County, Loan Loss Reserve Fund Agreement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Upgrade California in Los Angeles County, Loan Loss Reserve Fund Agreement. Example of loan loss reserve agreement.

  10. Extraction of RNA-Trizol RNA extraction from M. tuberculosis (Mahenthiralingam 1998) is useful for RT-PCR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extraction of RNA-Trizol RNA extraction from M. tuberculosis (Mahenthiralingam 1998) is useful of isopropanol. 10. Precipitate overnight at ­20°C. Prepare cold 70% ethanol with DEPC treated water. Centrifuge DNA is present, repeat Trizol extraction. #12;

  11. Efficient Light Extraction from Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using Plasmonic Scattering Layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rothberg, Lewis

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Our project addressed the DOE MYPP 2020 goal to improve light extraction from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) to 75% (Core task 6.3). As noted in the 2010 MYPP, “the greatest opportunity for improvement is in the extraction of light from [OLED] panels”. There are many approaches to avoiding waveguiding limitations intrinsic to the planar OLED structure including use of textured substrates, microcavity designs and incorporating scattering layers into the device structure. We have chosen to pursue scattering layers since it addresses the largest source of loss which is waveguiding in the OLED itself. Scattering layers also have the potential to be relatively robust to color, polarization and angular distributions. We note that this can be combined with textured or microlens decorated substrates to achieve additional enhancement.

  12. SPOT PRICING FRAMEWORK FOR LOSS GUARANTEED INTERNET SERVICE CONTRACTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalyanaraman, Shivkumar

    . In a two-component approach to pricing, a nonlinear pricing scheme is used for cost recovery and a utility for cost recovery, and (ii) an options-based approach to price the risk of deviations in the loss based QoSPOT PRICING FRAMEWORK FOR LOSS GUARANTEED INTERNET SERVICE CONTRACTS Aparna Gupta Decision

  13. average energy losses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    average energy losses First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Comparing energy loss...

  14. additional energy losses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    additional energy losses First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Comparing energy loss...

  15. How Compatible is Perfect Competition with Transmission Loss Allocation Methods?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    the problem of transmission loss allocation in a power system where the generators, the demands and the system. INTRODUCTION IN power systems where generation and transmission are unbundled, the transmission operationalHow Compatible is Perfect Competition with Transmission Loss Allocation Methods? Jing Dai, Yannick

  16. Estimation of Convection Loss from Paraboloidal Dish Cavity Receivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In general, cavity receivers employed in the sun-tracking paraboloidal dish concentrator are subjected the numerical investigation of natural and combined convection loss from cavity receivers employed in solar is a significant source of energy loss from thermal receivers used with dish solar concentrators. This paper

  17. Modelling and Computation of AC Fields and Losses in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    electricity but inherently has energy losses associated with (joule) heating. Fault current limiters would be installed in transmission and distribution systems, especially for electric utilities and large energy users. High-Tc superconductors experience energy loss when exposed to time-varying magnetic fields or carrying

  18. Linear-optics manipulations of photon-loss codes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konrad Banaszek; Wojciech Wasilewski

    2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss codes for protecting logical qubits carried by optical fields from the effects of amplitude damping, i.e. linear photon loss. We demonstrate that the correctability condition for one-photon loss imposes limitations on the range of manipulations than can be implemented with passive linear-optics networks.

  19. Advanced EL inspection with predictive estimation of module power loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with no relation to its significance on potential power degradation 7pi4_robotics GmbH #12;The idea: Estimate power photovoltaic modules due to micro-cracks" #12;Three step approach to estimate power loss PL1 : power loss

  20. Legal Access to Geographic Information: Measuring Losses or Developing Responses?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onsrud, Harlan J.

    are obvious and a focus on measuring losses in such situations seems misplaced when energies might be better and measurements those in power positions are often able to divert attention and energy away from the goals digital data environments. As a result, widespread loss of access to information and works of knowledge

  1. Analysis of partial loss reward models and its application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telek, Miklós

    Analysis of partial loss reward models and its application #3; M. Telek 1 , S. R#19;acz 2 1. The applicability of partial loss re- ward models and the proposed numerical analysis methods are demonstrated via the performance analysis of a computer system executing long running batch programs with checkpointing. Keywords

  2. Losses in superconducting Niobium Films caused by Interface Tunnel Exchange

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junginger, Tobias; Welsch, Carsten

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Identifying the loss mechanisms of niobium film cavities enables an accurate determination of applications for future accelerator projects and points to research topics required to mitigate their limitations. Measurements on samples show that the electric field is a dominant loss mechanism for niobium films, acting through interface tunneling between localized states in surface oxides and delocalized states in the superconducting niobium.

  3. Predicting Performance of PESQ in Case of Single Frame Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wichmann, Felix

    Predicting Performance of PESQ in Case of Single Frame Losses Christian Hoene, Enhtuya Dulamsuren-Lalla Technical University of Berlin, Germany Fax: +49 30 31423819 Email: hoene@ieee.org Abstract ITU's objective can measure the impact of single frame losses ­ a source of impairment for which PESQ has not been

  4. Technical note Insertion loss testing of active noise reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Willy

    Technical note Insertion loss testing of active noise reduction headsets using acoustic fixture Jie. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto, 10 King's College Road, Toronto, ON measured insertion losses of four types of commercially avail- able ANR headsets using an Acoustic Test

  5. Chemical Biology Chemical Screening for Hair Cell Loss and Protection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubel, Edwin

    Chemical Biology Chemical Screening for Hair Cell Loss and Protection in the Zebrafish Lateral Line Rubel,1,2 and David W. Raible1,4 Abstract In humans, most hearing loss results from death of hair cells, the mechanosensory receptors of the inner ear. Two goals of current hearing research are to protect hair cells from

  6. Mechanical Loss in Tantala/Silica Dielectric Mirror Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven D. Penn; Peter H. Sneddon; Helena Armandula; Joseph C. Betzwieser; Gianpietro Cagnoli; Jordan Camp; D. R. M. Crooks; Martin M. Fejer; Andri M. Gretarsson; Gregory M. Harry; Jim Hough; Scott E. Kittelberger; Michael J. Mortonson; Roger Route; Sheila Rowan; Christophoros C. Vassiliou

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Current interferometric gravitational wave detectors use test masses with mirror coatings formed from multiple layers of dielectric materials, most commonly alternating layers of SiO2 (silica) and Ta2O5 (tantala). However, mechanical loss in the Ta2O5/SiO2 coatings may limit the design sensitivity for advanced detectors. We have investigated sources of mechanical loss in the Ta2O5/SiO2 coatings, including loss associated with the coating-substrate interface, with the coating-layer interfaces, and with the bulk material. Our results indicate that the loss is associated with the bulk coating materials and that the loss of Ta2O5 is substantially larger than that of SiO2.

  7. A fluctuational electrodynamics model for the optimization of light-extraction efficiency in thin-film light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heikkilä, Oskari, E-mail: oskari.heikkila@aalto.fi; Oksanen, Jani; Tulkki, Jukka [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Aalto University, Helsinki (Finland)

    2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid development of thin film light-emitting diodes (LEDs) has enabled the enhancement of the light extraction beyond geometrical limits but more quantitative understanding of the underlying optical processes is required to fully optimize the extraction. We present first-principle calculations of the light extraction efficiency and optical energy flow in thin-film LEDs. The presented model generalizes the methods of fluctuational electrodynamics to excited semiconductors and simultaneously accounts for wave optical effects, e.g., interference and near-field coupling as well as the internal absorption of the light-emitting material in determining the rate of light emission and internal dissipation in the optical cavity formed by a planar LED. The calculations show that in structures with a metallic mirror, the emissivity of the active region can approach unity at selected wavelengths, even when the nominal emissivity of the active region is only moderate. However, the results also show that near-field coupling of emission from the active region to the mirror can provide a substantial non-radiative loss channel reducing the maximum light extraction efficiency to 0.67 in our example setup. These losses can be partly compensated by the efficient photon recycling enabled by thick active regions that quench emission to confined modes and thereby reduce parasitic absorption.

  8. IMPLICATIONS OF MASS AND ENERGY LOSS DUE TO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS ON MAGNETICALLY ACTIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, Jeremy J.; Cohen, Ofer [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Yashiro, Seiji [Interferometrics Inc., Herndon, VA 20171 (United States)] [Interferometrics Inc., Herndon, VA 20171 (United States); Gopalswamy, Nat, E-mail: jdrake@cfa.harvard.edu [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of a database of solar coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and associated flares over the period 1996-2007 finds well-behaved power-law relationships between the 1-8 A flare X-ray fluence and CME mass and kinetic energy. We extrapolate these relationships to lower and higher flare energies to estimate the mass and energy loss due to CMEs from stellar coronae, assuming that the observed X-ray emission of the latter is dominated by flares with a frequency as a function of energy dn/dE = kE {sup -{alpha}}. For solar-like stars at saturated levels of X-ray activity, the implied losses depend fairly weakly on the assumed value of {alpha} and are very large: M-dot {approx}5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} and E-dot {approx}0.1 L{sub sun}. In order to avoid such large energy requirements, either the relationships between CME mass and speed and flare energy must flatten for X-ray fluence {approx}> 10{sup 31} erg, or the flare-CME association must drop significantly below 1 for more energetic events. If active coronae are dominated by flares, then the total coronal energy budget is likely to be up to an order of magnitude larger than the canonical 10{sup -3} L {sub bol} X-ray saturation threshold. This raises the question of what is the maximum energy a magnetic dynamo can extract from a star? For an energy budget of 1% of L {sub bol}, the CME mass loss rate is about 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} M {sub Sun} yr{sup -1}.

  9. Reexamination of Pure Qubit Work Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Max F. Frenzel; David Jennings; Terry Rudolph

    2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Many work extraction or information erasure processes in the literature involve the raising and lowering of energy levels via external fields. But even if the actual system is treated quantum mechanically, the field is assumed to be classical and of infinite strength, hence not developing any correlations with the system or experiencing back-actions. We extend these considerations to a fully quantum mechanical treatment, by studying a spin-1/2 particle coupled to a finite-sized directional quantum reference frame, a spin-l system, which models an external field. With this concrete model together with a bosonic thermal bath, we analyse the back-action a finite-size field suffers during a quantum-mechanical work extraction process, the effect this has on the extractable work, and highlight a range of assumptions commonly made when considering such processes. The well-known semi-classical treatment of work extraction from a pure qubit predicts a maximum extractable work W = kT log 2 for a quasi-static process, which holds as a strict upper bound in the fully quantum mechanical case, and is only attained in the classical limit. We also address the problem of emergent local time-dependence in a joint system with globally fixed Hamiltonian.

  10. DATA ACQUISITION FOR SNS BEAM LOSS MONITOR SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    YENG,Y.GASSNER,D.HOFF,L.WITKOVER,R.

    2003-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) beam loss monitor system uses VME based electronics to measure the radiation produced by lost beam. Beam loss signals from cylindrical argon-filled ion chambers and neutron detectors will be conditioned in analog front-end (AFE) circuitry. These signals will be digitized and further processed in a dedicated VME crate. Fast beam inhibit and low-level, long-term loss warnings will be generated to provide machine protection. The fast loss data will have a bandwidth of 35kHz. While the low level, long-term loss data will have much higher sensitivity. This is further complicated by the 3 decade range of intensity as the Ring accumulates beam. Therefore a bandwidth of 100kHz and dynamic range larger than 21 bits data acquisition system will be required for this purpose. Based on the evaluation of several commercial ADC modules in preliminary design phase, a 24 bits Sigma-Delta data acquisition VME bus card was chosen as the SNS BLM digitizer. An associated vxworks driver and EPICS device support module also have been developed at BNL. Simulating test results showed this system is fully qualified for both fast loss and low-level, long-term loss application. The first prototype including data acquisition hardware setup and EPICS software (running database and OPI clients) will be used in SNS Drift Tube Linac (DTL) system commissioning.

  11. GeothermalHeat Extraction Anna Przybycin Feliks Nueske Mark Riesland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kornhuber, Ralf

    : 70% 32.8 m3/d water extraction - Extraction temperature: 12°C = aquifer temperature Injection the cold-water plume reaches the extraction well Is this realistic under practical considerations? ProbablyGeothermal­Heat Extraction Anna Przybycin ­ Feliks Nueske ­ Mark Riesland #12;1) Hydrogeological

  12. PAPER 2004-028 The Effect of Bitumen Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schramm, Laurier L.

    1 PAPER 2004-028 The Effect of Bitumen Extraction Shear Conditions on Froth Treatment Performance U processing: extraction and froth treatment. The most common extraction process is hot water bitumen extraction where bitumen is produced in a froth consisting of bitumen, water, and inorganic solids. The froth

  13. Hierarchical Iso-Surface Extraction Computer Graphics Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desbrun, Mathieu

    Hierarchical Iso-Surface Extraction Ulf Labsik Computer Graphics Group University of Erlangen Kai of our hierarchical iso-surface extraction algorithm. Abstract The extraction and display of iso construct a hierarchy of volumes and extract an iso-surface from the coarsest resolution with a standard

  14. Energetics of Marine Turbine Arrays - Extraction, Dissipation and Diminution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishino, Takafumi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-scale modelling approach is discussed to predict the performance and energetics of a large number (more than a few hundred) of marine turbines installed as a power farm in a general coastal environment. The kernel of this approach is that the outer (coastal-scale) model/simulation is to assess the reduction of flow passing through a given farm area as a function of the increase of head loss across the farm, whereas the inner (device-scale) model/simulation uses this function to account for the (otherwise unknown) effect of coastal dynamics for that farm site. Large-eddy simulations (LES) of periodic open channel flow (with a porous plate model representing turbines) are then presented as the device-scale part of such a two-scale model of large marine turbine arrays. Results demonstrate how the energetics of turbine arrays (i.e. extraction, dissipation and diminution of energy in the entire farm area) may change depending on the characteristics of the farm site, array configuration and operating conditio...

  15. MHD Induced Neutral Beam Ion Loss from NSTX Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.S. Darrow, E.D. Fredrickson, N.N. Gorelenkov, A.L. Roquemore, and K. Shinohara

    2007-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Bursts of ~60 kHz activity on Mirnov coils occur frequently in NSTX plasmas and these are accompanied by bursts of neutral beam ion loss over a range in pitch angles. These losses have been measured with a scintillator type loss probe imaged with a high speed (>10,000 frames/s) video camera, giving the evolution of the energy and pitch angle distributions of the lost neutral beam ions over the course of the events. The instability occurs below the TAE frequency in NSTX (~100 kHz) in high beta plasmas and may be a beta driven Alfvén acoustic (BAAE) mode.

  16. Elucidating Jet Energy Loss Using Jets: Prospects from ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Grau; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Jets at the LHC are expected to provide the testing ground for studying QCD energy loss. In this contribution, we briefly outline the strategy that will be used to measure jets in ATLAS and how we will go about studying energy loss. We describe the utility of measuring the jet $R_{AA}$, the fragmentation function, and heavy flavor jets. Utilizing the collision energy provided by the LHC and the nearly hermetic and highly segmented calorimeter, ATLAS is expected to make important contributions to the understanding of parton energy loss using fully reconstructed jets.

  17. Impacts of the Venezuelan Crude Oil Production Loss

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This assessment of the Venezuelan petroleum loss examines two areas. The first part of the analysis focuses on the impact of the loss of Venezuelan crude production on crude oil supply for U.S. refiners who normally run a significant fraction of Venezuelan crude oil. The second part of the analysis looks at the impact of the Venezuelan production loss on crude markets in general, with particular emphasis on crude oil imports, refinery crude oil throughput levels, stock levels, and the changes in price differences between light and heavy crude oils.

  18. Mode imaging and loss evaluation of semiconductor waveguides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mochizuki, Toshimitsu [Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Fukushima Renewable Energy Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, 2-2-9 Machiike-dai, Koriyama, Fukushima (Japan); Kim, Changsu; Yoshita, Masahiro; Nakamura, Takahiro; Akiyama, Hidefumi [Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwanoha 5-1-5, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan); Pfeiffer, Loren N.; West, Ken W. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Princeton University, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An imaging and loss evaluation method for semiconductor waveguides coupled with non-doped quantum wells is presented. Using the internal emission of the wells as a probe light source, the numbers and widths of the modes of waveguides with various ridge sizes were evaluated by CCD imaging, and the obtained values were consistent with effective index method calculation. Waveguide internal losses were obtained from analyses of the Fabry-Pérot fringes of waveguide emission spectra. We quantified the quality of 29 single-mode waveguide samples as an internal loss and variation of 10.2 ± 0.6??cm{sup ?1}.

  19. Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbas, Charles (Champaign, IL); Beery, Kyle E. (Decatur, IL); Binder, Thomas P. (Decatur, IL); Rammelsberg, Anne M. (Decatur, IL)

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

  20. Equilibrium of molybdenum in selected extraction systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tkac, Peter; Paulenova, Alena [Radiation Center, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331-5903 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concentration of molybdenum(VI) in dissolved irradiated nuclear fuel is comparable with the concentrations of Tc, Am and Np. Therefore it is of big interest to understand its behavior under conditions related to the UREX/TRUEX process. The effect of the poly-speciation of molybdenum in aqueous solution on its extraction by neutral solvents TBP and CMPO/TBP was studied. Extraction yields of molybdenum decreased significantly when AHA was added to aqueous phase. Our investigation confirmed a strong ability of the aceto-hydroxamic acid to form complexes with Mo in high acidic solutions. Spectroscopic data (UV-Vis) confirmed that a fraction of the Mo(VI)-AHA complex is present in the organic phase after extraction. (authors)

  1. Membrane contactor assisted extraction/reaction process employing ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lin, Yupo J. (Naperville, IL); Snyder, Seth W. (Lincolnwood, IL)

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a functionalized membrane contactor extraction/reaction system and method for extracting target species from multi-phase solutions utilizing ionic liquids. One preferred embodiment of the invented method and system relates to an extraction/reaction system wherein the ionic liquid extraction solutions act as both extraction solutions and reaction mediums, and allow simultaneous separation/reactions not possible with prior art technology.

  2. Energy-loss- and thickness-dependent contrast in atomic-scale electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, Haiyan [Universit_e de Toulouse, Toulouse, France (Europe); National Institute of Standards Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Xin, Huolin L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Zhu, Ye [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Dwyer, Christian [Peter Grunberg Institute, Julich, Germany (Europe)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic-scale elemental maps of materials acquired by core-loss inelastic electron scattering often exhibit an undesirable sensitivity to the unavoidable elastic scattering, making the maps counter-intuitive to interpret. Here, we present a systematic study that scrutinizes the energy-loss and sample-thickness dependence of atomic-scale elemental maps acquired using 100 keV incident electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope. For single-crystal silicon, the balance between elastic and inelastic scattering means that maps generated from the near-threshold Si-L signal (energy loss of 99 eV) show no discernible contrast for a thickness of 0.5? (? is the electron mean-free path, here approximately 110 nm). At greater thicknesses we observe a counter-intuitive “negative” contrast. Only at much higher energy losses is an intuitive “positive” contrast gradually restored. Our quantitative analysis shows that the energy-loss at which a positive contrast is restored depends linearly on the sample thickness. This behavior is in very good agreement with our double-channeling inelastic scattering calculations. We test a recently-proposed experimental method to correct the core-loss inelastic scattering and restore an intuitive “positive” chemical contrast. The method is demonstrated to be reliable over a large range of energy losses and sample thicknesses. The corrected contrast for near-threshold maps is demonstrated to be (desirably) inversely proportional to sample thickness. Implications for the interpretation of atomic-scale elemental maps are discussed.

  3. Mode conversation losses in overmolded millimeter wave transmission lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tax, David S. (David Samuel)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Millimeter wave transmission lines are integral components for many important applications like nuclear fusion and NMR spectroscopy. In low loss corrugated transmission lines propagating the HE,1 mode with a high waveguide ...

  4. Loan Loss Reserve Fund Impacts on Standard Residential Underwriting Guidelines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    State and local governments can use loan loss reserve (LLR) funds to persuade lenders to offer more flexible terms during the underwriting process. The availability of an LLR can have the following...

  5. altitudinal field loss: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roe et al.'s model as DFT (decision field theory) and Usher and McClelland's model as the LCA (leaky, competing accumulator) model. Does Loss Aversion Pose a Problem for DFT? As...

  6. alloying element losses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 141 Turbine tip clearance loss mechanisms MIT - DSpace Summary: Three-dimensional numerical...

  7. Applying thresholds to forecast potential biodiversity loss from human development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilderbrand, Robert H.

    thresholds to projected increases in residential development in the Middle Patuxent River watershed by 2030 in the Potapsco River watershed of Maryland could result in the loss of nearly 60% of the benthic

  8. Rapid Spatial Distribution Seismic Loss Analysis for Multistory Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshmukh, Pankaj Bhagvatrao

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    and incremental dynamic analysis along with the commercial software SAP2000 are used to establish demands from which story damage and financial losses are computed directly and aggregated for the entire structure. Rigorous and simplified methods are developed...

  9. Habitat loss and the structure of plantanimal mutualistic networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fortuna, Miguel A.

    LETTER Habitat loss and the structure of plant­animal mutualistic networks Miguel A. Fortuna Sevilla, Spain *Correspondence: E-mail: fortuna@ebd.csic.es Abstract Recent papers have described

  10. Loan Loss Reserves: Lessons from the Field (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Merrian Fuller: Hi, and welcome to the Department of Energy's webinar on using loan-loss reserves report financing programs. My name is Marian Fuller, I work with Lawrence Berkeley National...

  11. Ovarian hormone loss induces bioenergetic deficits and mitochondrial -amyloid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinton, Roberta Diaz

    Ovarian hormone loss induces bioenergetic deficits and mitochondrial -amyloid Jia Yaoa , Ronald by ovariectomy (OVX) in nontransgenic mice significantly decreased brain bioenergetics, and induced mitochondrial. Treatment with E2 at OVX prevented OVX-induced mitochondrial deficits, sustained mitochondrial bioenergetic

  12. array wake losses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 UZOL & CAMCI1 ENDWALL HEAT TRANSFER, TOTAL PRESSURE LOSS AND WAKE FLOW FIELD Engineering Websites Summary: . The...

  13. Optimizing hysteretic power loss of magnetic ferrite nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ritchie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis seeks to correlate hysteretic power loss of tertiary ferrite nanoparticles in alternating magnetic fields to trends predicted by physical models. By employing integration of hysteresis loops simulated from ...

  14. apical support loss: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    bags. We instead consider the problem of predicting instance labels while learning from data labeled only at the bag level. We propose Rank-Loss Support Instance Machines, which...

  15. acute interneuron loss: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sets for previously unseen bags. We instead consider the problem of predicting instance labels while learning from data labeled only at the bag level. We propose Rank-Loss...

  16. Control of cooling losses at high pulverized coal injection rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonte, L.; Nieuwerburgh, H. Van [Sidmar N.V., Gent (Belgium)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the problems which is encountered by many blast furnace operators is the appropriate control of the cooling losses of the blast furnace. This problem has been aggravated by the introduction of pulverized coal injection. Even with equal burden and coke composition, both Sidmar furnaces behave differently with respect to the cooling losses. This phenomenon is possibly attributable to the different profile and cooling circuitry of the furnaces. Among other parameters the angles of bosh and stack may favor the formation of scabs or not. Some operators experience a decrease of their cooling losses, other operators have problems to limit their cooling losses to an acceptable level. As a result, different operating practices exist with respect to the burden distribution. The increase of the ore to coke ratio with pulverized coal injection suggests that the coke and sinter quality has to be monitored very carefully in order to avoid permeability problems.

  17. Written emotional expression: Effects on weight loss and maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hockemeyer, Jill Renee

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    the negative effects of distress on weight loss and maintenance through improved emotional self-regulatory processes. This study examined the effects of expressive writing on weight regain, stress, and emotional eating among individuals who have recently lost...

  18. appendix gap losses: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    kicker performance and its effect on the beam losses will be described. Kourbanis, I; Biggs, J; Brown, B; Capista, D; Jensen, C C; Krafczyk, G E; Morris, D K; Scott, D; Seiya, K;...

  19. ChitChat : making video chat robust to packet loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jue, 1986-

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Video chat is increasingly popular among Internet users (e.g. Skype, Windows Live Messenger, Google Talk). Often, however, chatting sessions suffer from packet loss, which causes video outage and poor quality. Existing ...

  20. ChitChat: Making Video Chat Robust to Packet Loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jue

    2010-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Video chat is increasingly popular among Internet users. Often, however, chatting sessions suffer from packet loss, which causes video outage and poor quality. Existing solutions however are unsatisfying. Retransmissions ...

  1. Compression effects on pressure loss in flexible HVAC ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abushakra, Bass; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings.Pressure Loss in Flexible HVAC Ducts Bass Abushakra, Ph.D.to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings.

  2. Motion based seismic design and loss estimation of diagrid structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liptack, Robert J. (Robert Jeffrey)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diagrids are becoming an increasingly popular structural system in high rise design and construction. Little research has been performed on the seismic performance of Diagrids and how it integrates with seismic loss ...

  3. Effect of thermalized charm on heavy quark energy loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Souvik Priyam Adhya; Mahatsab Mandal; Sreemoyee Sarkar; Pradip K. Roy; Sukalyan Chattopadhyay

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent experimental results on the flow of $J/\\psi$ at LHC show that ample amount of charm quarks is present in the quark gluon plasma and probably they are thermalized. In the current study we investigate the effect of thermalized charm quarks on the heavy quark energy loss to leading order in the QCD coupling constant. It is seen that the energy loss of charm quark increases considerably due to the inclusion of thermal charm quarks. Running coupling has also been implemented to study heavy quark energy loss and we find substantial increase in the heavy quark energy loss due to heavy-heavy scattering at higher temperature to be realized at LHC energies.

  4. Loss-Resilient Proactive Data Transmission in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Jianliang

    environments. Moreover, sensor nodes are con- strained by energy, computation power and storage. Existing to the destination without loss. However, existing reliable transmission techniques either are too costly forecast, structural condition assessment) require reliable data communications, such that a target

  5. Polarization energy loss in hot viscous quark-gluon plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bing-Feng Jiang; Defu Hou; Jia-Rong Li

    2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The gluon polarization tensor for the quark-gluon plasma with shear viscosity is derived with the viscous chromohydrodynamics. The longitudinal and transverse dielectric functions are evaluated from the gluon polarization tensor, through which the polarization energy loss suffered by a fast quark traveling through the viscous quark-gluon plasma is investigated. The numerical analysis indicates that shear viscosity significantly reduces the polarization energy loss.

  6. Agricultural science students' perceptions and knowledge of hearing loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slaydon, Sunny Leigh

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    very large part of the personal lives of most farmers? (Lankford 2002) In 1996 Woodford, Lawrence, Fazalare, and Martin designed a study ?to determine the extent of hearing loss experienced by high school agriculture teachers in West Virginia... AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE STUDENTS? PERCEPTIONS AND KNOWLEDGE OF HEARING LOSS A Thesis by SUNNY LEIGH SLAYDON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  7. Beam Loss Monitors in the NSLS Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer,S.L.; Fedurin, M.

    2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Beam loss monitors (BLM) have been used for more than two decades in the VUV ring at the NSLS. These have proved useful for optimizing injection and operation of the ring. Recently similar monitors have been installed in the X-ray ring and are being used to better understand injection, as well as operation of the ring. These units have been compared with the Bergoz BLMs, which have been mostly useful for understanding operating beam losses.

  8. GOALS, EXPECTATIONS, AND SATISFACTION IN THE MAINTENANCE OF WEIGHT LOSS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Olivia L.

    2009-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ......................................................................25 Satisfaction and Weight Loss 37 Measurement of Goals, Expectations, and Satisfaction with Weight Loss...............41 Goals, Expectations, and Satisfaction in the Treatment of Obesity 43 Limitations of Previous Research... of approximately 15-25% of initial weight in 2 to 4 months of treatment, but may also result in substantially greater weight regain than more conventional, calorie-restrictive diets (Wadden & Osei, 2002). Pharmacological interventions have been presented...

  9. Vapor Extraction Well Performance and Recommendations for Transitioning to Passive Extraction at the Former DUS-II Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Dennis G.; Noonkester, Jay V.; Looney, Brian B.

    2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation evaluated mass extraction rate from individual wells associated with the Western Sector Treatment System (formerly known as the DUS-II project). This was critical since each individual well can have a radius of influence in excess of 100-ft when operating using an active extraction system. Future soil vapor extraction should use the existing active extraction system, supplemented with deployment of passive extraction where appropriate.

  10. AC Loss Measurements on a 2G YBCO Coil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rey, Christopher M [ORNL] [ORNL; Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL] [ORNL; Schwenterly, S W [ORNL] [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is collaborating with Waukesha Electric Systems (WES) to continue development of HTS power transformers. For compatibility with the existing power grid, a commercially viable HTS transformer will have to operate at high voltages in the range of 138 kV and above, and will have to withstand 550-kV impulse voltages as well. Second-generation (2G) YBCO coated conductors will be required for an economically-competitive design. In order to adequately size the refrigeration system for these transformers, the ac loss of these HTS coils must be characterized. Electrical AC loss measurements were conducted on a prototype high voltage (HV) coil with co-wound stainless steel at 60 Hz in a liquid nitrogen bath using a lock-in amplifier technique. The prototype HV coil consisted of 26 continuous (without splice) single pancake coils concentrically centered on a stainless steel former. For ac loss measurement purposes, voltage tap pairs were soldered across each set of two single pancake coils so that a total of 13 separate voltage measurements could be made across the entire length of the coil. AC loss measurements were taken as a function of ac excitation current. Results show that the loss is primarily concentrated at the ends of the coil where the operating fraction of critical current is the highest and show a distinct difference in current scaling of the losses between low current and high current regimes.

  11. Analyzing Losses: Transuranics into Waste and Fission Products into Recycled Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; Nick R. Soelberg; Samuel E. Bays; Robert E. Cherry; Layne F. Pincock; Eric L. Shaber; Melissa C. Teague; Gregory M. Teske; Kurt G. Vedros; Candido Pereira; Denia Djokic

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All mass streams from separations and fuel fabrication are products that must meet criteria. Those headed for disposal must meet waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for the eventual disposal sites corresponding to their waste classification. Those headed for reuse must meet fuel or target impurity limits. A “loss” is any material that ends up where it is undesired. The various types of losses are linked in the sense that as the loss of transuranic (TRU) material into waste is reduced, often the loss or carryover of waste into TRU or uranium is increased. We have analyzed four separation options and two fuel fabrication options in a generic fuel cycle. The separation options are aqueous uranium extraction plus (UREX+1), electrochemical, Atomics International reduction oxidation separation (AIROX), and melt refining. UREX+1 and electrochemical are traditional, full separation techniques. AIROX and melt refining are taken as examples of limited separations, also known as minimum fuel treatment. The fuels are oxide and metal. To define a generic fuel cycle, a fuel recycling loop is fed from used light water reactor (LWR) uranium oxide fuel (UOX) at 51 MWth-day/kg-iHM burnup. The recycling loop uses a fast reactor with TRU conversion ratio (CR) of 0.50. Excess recovered uranium is put into storage. Only waste, not used fuel, is disposed – unless the impurities accumulate to a level so that it is impossible to make new fuel for the fast reactor. Impurities accumulate as dictated by separation removal and fission product generation. Our model approximates adjustment to fast reactor fuel stream blending of TRU and U products from incoming LWR UOX and recycling FR fuel to compensate for impurity accumulation by adjusting TRU:U ratios. Our mass flow model ignores postulated fuel impurity limits; we compare the calculated impurity values with those limits to identify elements of concern. AIROX and melt refining cannot be used to separate used LWR UOX-51 because they cannot separate U from TRU, it is then impossible to make X% TRU for fast reactors with UOX-51 used fuel with 1.3% TRU. AIROX and melt refining can serve in the recycle loop for about 3 recycles, at which point the accumulated impurities displace fertile uranium and the fuel can no longer be as critical as the original fast reactor fuel recipe. UREX+1 and electrochemical can serve in either capacity; key impurities appear to be lanthanides and several transition metals.

  12. C. Livadas and I. Keidar, "The Case for Exploiting Packet Loss Locality in Multicast Loss Recovery," Technical Report MIT/LCS/TR-867, Lab. for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Nancy

    C. Livadas and I. Keidar, "The Case for Exploiting Packet Loss Locality in Multicast Loss Recovery," Technical Report MIT/LCS/TR-867, Lab. for Computer Science, MIT, Cambridge, MA, Oct. 2002. The Case for Exploiting Packet Loss Locality in Multicast Loss Recovery Carolos Livadas Laboratory for Computer Science

  13. Extraction and Analysis of Facebook Friendship Relations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Emilio

    Chapter 12 Extraction and Analysis of Facebook Friendship Relations Salvatore Catanese, Pasquale De and Social scientists. We present our long-term research effort in analyzing Facebook, the largest and arguably most successful OSN today: it gathers more than 500 million users. Access to data about Facebook

  14. Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, D.I.C.; Avgerinos, G.C.

    1983-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15 and about 70 C and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours. 6 figs.

  15. Selective solvent extraction of cellulosic material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Daniel I. C. (Belmont, MA); Avgerinos, George C. (Newton Center, MA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cellulosic products having a high hemicellulose to lignin weight ratio are obtained by extracting a cellulosic composition with basic ethanol-water solution having a pH between about 12 and about 14 at a temperature between about 15.degree. and about 70.degree. C. and for a time period between about 2 and about 80 hours.

  16. Logical Structure Extraction from Software Requirements Documents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Czarnecki, Krzysztof

    Documents I. INTRODUCTION Requirements management (RM) tools store and manipu- late software requirementsLogical Structure Extraction from Software Requirements Documents Rehan Rauf, Michal Antkiewicz,mantkiew,kczarnec}@gsd.uwaterloo.ca Abstract--Software requirements documents (SRDs) are often authored in general-purpose rich-text editors

  17. Extracting gluon condensate from the average plaquette

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Taekoon

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The perturbative contribution in the average plaquette is subtracted using Borel summation and the remnant of the plaquette is shown to scale as a dim-4 condensate. A critical review is presented of the renormalon subtraction scheme that claimed a dim-2 condensate. The extracted gluon condensate is compared with the latest result employing high order (35-loop) calculation in the stochastic perturbation theory.

  18. Extracting Artifact Lifecycle Models from Metadata History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Godfrey, Michael W.

    Extracting Artifact Lifecycle Models from Metadata History Olga Baysal, Oleksii Kononenko, Reid, Canada {obaysal, okononen, rtholmes, migod}@cs.uwaterloo.ca Abstract--Software developers and managers make decisions based on the understanding they have of their software systems. This understanding

  19. Inverse hydrochemical models of aqueous extracts tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, L.; Samper, J.; Montenegro, L.

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Aqueous extract test is a laboratory technique commonly used to measure the amount of soluble salts of a soil sample after adding a known mass of distilled water. Measured aqueous extract data have to be re-interpreted in order to infer porewater chemical composition of the sample because porewater chemistry changes significantly due to dilution and chemical reactions which take place during extraction. Here we present an inverse hydrochemical model to estimate porewater chemical composition from measured water content, aqueous extract, and mineralogical data. The model accounts for acid-base, redox, aqueous complexation, mineral dissolution/precipitation, gas dissolution/ex-solution, cation exchange and surface complexation reactions, of which are assumed to take place at local equilibrium. It has been solved with INVERSE-CORE{sup 2D} and been tested with bentonite samples taken from FEBEX (Full-scale Engineered Barrier EXperiment) in situ test. The inverse model reproduces most of the measured aqueous data except bicarbonate and provides an effective, flexible and comprehensive method to estimate porewater chemical composition of clays. Main uncertainties are related to kinetic calcite dissolution and variations in CO2(g) pressure.

  20. Vapour extraction of heavy oil and bitumen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, K.A.; Butler, R.M. [Univ. of Calgary (Canada)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the process of vapor extraction for the recovery of petroleum and bitumen. The selection of solvent is critical, and it is shown that butane may be a good solvent for shallow reservoirs. Experiments are described in a Hele-Shaw cell and Packed Visual Model.

  1. Organic electroluminescent devices having improved light extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY)

    2007-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Organic electroluminescent devices having improved light extraction include a light-scattering medium disposed adjacent thereto. The light-scattering medium has a light scattering anisotropy parameter g in the range from greater than zero to about 0.99, and a scatterance parameter S less than about 0.22 or greater than about 3.

  2. Evolutionary Algorithms for Definition Extraction Claudia Borg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Gordon J.

    Evolutionary Algorithms for Definition Extraction Claudia Borg Dept. of I.C.S. University of Malta claudia.borg@um.edu.mt Mike Rosner Dept. of I.C.S. University of Malta mike.rosner@um.edu.mt Gordon Pace Dept. of Computer Science University of Malta gordon.pace@um.edu.mt Abstract Books and other text

  3. Experimental study of head loss and filtration for LOCA debris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rao, D.V.; Souto, F.J. [Science and Engineering Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of controlled experiments were conducted to obtain head loss and filtration characteristics of debris beds formed of NUKON{trademark} fibrous fragments, and obtain data to validate the semi-theoretical head loss model developed in NUREG/CR-6224. A thermally insulated closed-loop test set-up was used to conduct experiments using beds formed of fibers only and fibers intermixed with particulate debris. A total of three particulate mixes were used to simulate the particulate debris. The head loss data were obtained for theoretical fiber bed thicknesses of 0.125 inches to 4.0 inches; approach velocities of 0.15 to 1.5 ft/s; temperatures of 75 F and 125 F; and sludge-to-fiber nominal concentration ratios of 0 to 60. Concentration measurements obtained during the first flushing cycle were used to estimate the filtration efficiencies of the debris beds. For test conditions where the beds are fairly uniform, the head loss data were predictable within an acceptable accuracy range by the semi-theoretical model. The model was equally applicable for both pure fiber beds and the mixed beds. Typically the model over-predicted the head losses for very thin beds and for thin beds at high sludge-to-fiber mass ratios. This is attributable to the non-uniformity of such debris beds. In this range the correlation can be interpreted to provide upper bound estimates of head loss. This is pertinent for loss of coolant accidents in boiling water reactors.

  4. The role of space charge compensation for ion beam extraction and ion beam transport (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spädtke, Peter, E-mail: p.spaedtke@gsi.de [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)] [GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung GmbH (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Depending on the specific type of ion source, the ion beam is extracted either from an electrode surface or from a plasma. There is always an interface between the (almost) space charge compensated ion source plasma, and the extraction region in which the full space charge is influencing the ion beam itself. After extraction, the ion beam is to be transported towards an accelerating structure in most cases. For lower intensities, this transport can be done without space charge compensation. However, if space charge is not negligible, the positive charge of the ion beam will attract electrons, which will compensate the space charge, at least partially. The final degree of Space Charge Compensation (SCC) will depend on different properties, like the ratio of generation rate of secondary particles and their loss rate, or the fact whether the ion beam is pulsed or continuous. In sections of the beam line, where the ion beam is drifting, a pure electrostatic plasma will develop, whereas in magnetic elements, these space charge compensating electrons become magnetized. The transport section will provide a series of different plasma conditions with different properties. Different measurement tools to investigate the degree of space charge compensation will be described, as well as computational methods for the simulation of ion beams with partial space charge compensation.

  5. Kinetic and Friction Head Loss Impacts on Horizontal Water Supply and Aquifer Storage and Recovery Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumenthal, Benjamin

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    well construction or intra-wellbore head loss. Currently no analytical groundwater model rigorously accounts for intra-wellbore kinetic and friction head loss. We have developed a semi-analytical, intra-wellbore head loss model dynamically linked...

  6. Ultra-low-loss high-aspect-ratio Si3N4 wavequides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. Gao, and A. Garito, “Ultra-Low-Loss Polymer Waveguides,”Ultra-low-loss high-aspect-ratio Si 3 N 4 waveguides Jaredan approach to make ultra-low-loss waveguides using stable

  7. System Losses Study - FIT (Fuel-cycle Integration and Tradeoffs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven J. Piet; Nick R. Soelberg; Samuel E. Bays; Robert S. Cherry; Denia Djokic; Candido Pereira; Layne F. Pincock; Eric L. Shaber; Melissa C. Teague; Gregory M. Teske; Kurt G. Vedros

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This team aimed to understand the broad implications of changes of operating performance and parameters of a fuel cycle component on the entire system. In particular, this report documents the study of the impact of changing the loss of fission products into recycled fuel and the loss of actinides into waste. When the effort started in spring 2009, an over-simplified statement of the objective was “the number of nines” – how would the cost of separation, fuel fabrication, and waste management change as the number of nines of separation efficiency changed. The intent was to determine the optimum “losses” of TRU into waste for the single system that had been the focus of the Global Nuclear Energy Program (GNEP), namely sustained recycle in burner fast reactors, fed by transuranic (TRU) material recovered from used LWR UOX-51 fuel. That objective proved to be neither possible (insufficient details or attention to the former GNEP options, change in national waste management strategy from a Yucca Mountain focus) nor appropriate given the 2009-2010 change to a science-based program considering a wider range of options. Indeed, the definition of “losses” itself changed from the loss of TRU into waste to a generic definition that a “loss” is any material that ends up where it is undesired. All streams from either separation or fuel fabrication are products; fuel feed streams must lead to fuels with tolerable impurities and waste streams must meet waste acceptance criteria (WAC) for one or more disposal sites. And, these losses are linked in the sense that as the loss of TRU into waste is reduced, often the loss or carryover of waste into TRU or uranium is increased. The effort has provided a mechanism for connecting these three Campaigns at a technical level that had not previously occurred – asking smarter and smarter questions, sometimes answering them, discussing assumptions, identifying R&D needs, and gaining new insights. The FIT model has been a forcing function, helping the team in this endeavor. Models don’t like “TBD” as an input, forcing us to make assumptions and see if they matter. A major addition in FY 2010 was exploratory analysis of “modified open fuel” cycles, employing “minimum fuel treatment” as opposed to full aqueous or electrochemical separation treatment. This increased complexity in our analysis and analytical tool development because equilibrium conditions do not appear sustainable in minimum fuel treatment cases, as was assumed in FY 2009 work with conventional aqueous and electrochemical separation. It is no longer reasonable to assume an equilibrium situation exists in all cases.

  8. Natural gas monthly, November 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Gross withdrawals of natural gas (wet, after lease separation) from gas and oil wells in the United States during November 1988, were estimated at 1755 billion cubic feet, 1.3 percent above withdrawals during November 1987. Of the total quantity, an estimated 215 billion cubic feet were returned to gas and oil reservoirs for repressuring, pressure maintenance, and cycling; 35 billion cubic feet of nonhydrocarbon gases were removed; and 13 billion cubic feet were vented or flared. The remaining wet marketed production totaled 1492 billion cubic feet. Dry gas production (wet marketed production minus 70 billion cubic feet of extraction loss) totaled an estimated 1422 billion cubic feet, similar to the November 1987 level. The total dry gas supply available for disposition in November 1988 was estimated at 1702 billion cubic feet, including 173 billion cubic feet withdrawn from storage, 12 billion cubic feet of supplemental supplies, and 95 billion cubic feet that were imported. In November 1987, dry gas available for disposition totaled 1684 billion cubic feet. Of the total dry gas supply available for disposition in November 1988, an estimated 1467 billion cubic feet were consumed, 148 billion cubic feet were injected into underground storage reservoirs, and 5 billion cubic feet were exported, leaving 82 billion cubic feet unaccounted for.

  9. Natural gas monthly, May 1988. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Gross withdrawals of natural gas (wet, after lease separation) from gas and oil wells in the United States during May 1988, were estimated at 1632 billion cubic feet, 1.3 percent above withdrawals during May 1987. Of the total quantity, an estimated 179 billion cubic feet were returned to gas and oil reservoirs for repressuring, pressure maintenance, and cycling; 10 billion cubic feet were vented or flared; and 33 billion cubic feet of nonhydrocarbon gases were removed. The remaining wet marketed production totaled 1410 billion cubic feet. Dry gas production (wet marketed production minus 67 billion cubic feet of extraction loss) totaled an estimated 1343 billion cubic feet, 1.7 percent above the May 1987 level. The total dry gas supply available for disposition in May 1988 was estimated at 1490 billion cubic feet, including 35 billion cubic feet withdrawn from storage, 11 billion cubic feet of supplemental supplies, and 101 billion cubic feet that were imported. In May 1987, dry gas available for disposition totaled 1419 billion cubic feet. Of the total dry gas supply available for disposition in May 1988, an estimated 1259 billion cubic feet were consumed, 294 billion cubic feet were injected into underground storage reservoirs, and 5 billion cubic feet were exported, leaving 68 billion cubic feet unaccounted for.

  10. Natural gas monthly, March 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Gross withdrawals of natural gas (wet, after lease separation) from gas and oil wells in the United States during March 1989, were estimated at 1777 billion cubic feet, 0.4 percent below withdrawals during March 1988. Of the total quantity, an estimated 211 billion cubic feet were returned to gas and oil reservoirs for repressuring, pressure maintenance, and cycling; 36 billion cubic feet of nonhydrocarbon gases were removed; and 12 billion cubic feet were vented or flared. The remaining wet marketed production totaled 1518 billion cubic feet. Dry gas production (wet marketed production minus 71 billion cubic feet of extraction loss) totaled an estimated 1447 billion cubic feet, similar to the March 1988 level. The total dry gas supply available for disposition in March 1989 was estimated at 1881 billion cubic feet, including 319 billion cubic feet withdrawn from storage, 14 billion cubic feet of supplemental supplies, and 101 billion cubic feet that were imported. In March 1988, dry gas available for disposition totaled 1841 billion cubic feet. Of the total dry gas supply available for disposition in March 1989, an estimated 1837 billion cubic feet were consumed, 93 billion cubic feet were injected into underground storage reservoirs and 8 billion cubic feet were exported, leaving 57 billion cubic feet unaccounted for.

  11. Energy-loss- and thickness-dependent contrast in atomic-scale electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tan, Haiyan; Xin, Huolin L.; Zhu, Ye; Dwyer, Christian

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic-scale elemental maps of materials acquired by core-loss inelastic electron scattering often exhibit an undesirable sensitivity to the unavoidable elastic scattering, making the maps counter-intuitive to interpret. Here, we present a systematic study that scrutinizes the energy-loss and sample-thickness dependence of atomic-scale elemental maps acquired using 100 keV incident electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope. For single-crystal silicon, the balance between elastic and inelastic scattering means that maps generated from the near-threshold Si-L signal (energy loss of 99 eV) show no discernible contrast for a thickness of 0.5? (? is the electron mean-free path, here approximately 110 nm). Atmore »greater thicknesses we observe a counter-intuitive “negative” contrast. Only at much higher energy losses is an intuitive “positive” contrast gradually restored. Our quantitative analysis shows that the energy-loss at which a positive contrast is restored depends linearly on the sample thickness. This behavior is in very good agreement with our double-channeling inelastic scattering calculations. We test a recently-proposed experimental method to correct the core-loss inelastic scattering and restore an intuitive “positive” chemical contrast. The method is demonstrated to be reliable over a large range of energy losses and sample thicknesses. The corrected contrast for near-threshold maps is demonstrated to be (desirably) inversely proportional to sample thickness. Implications for the interpretation of atomic-scale elemental maps are discussed.« less

  12. Geochemical Modeling of ILAW Lysimeter Water Extracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Geochemical modeling results of water extracts from simulated immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glasses, placed in lysimeters for eight years suggest that the secondary phase reaction network developed using product consistency test (PCT) results at 90°C may need to be modified for field conditions. For sediment samples that had been collected from near the glass samples, the impact of glass corrosion could be readily observed based upon the pH of their water extracts. For unimpacted sediments the pH ranged from 7.88 to 8.11 with an average of 8.04. Sediments that had observable impacts from glass corrosion exhibited elevated pH values (as high as 9.97). For lysimeter sediment samples that appear to have been impacted by glass corrosion to the greatest extent, saturation indices determined for analcime, calcite, and chalcedony in the 1:1 water extracts were near equilibrium and were consistent with the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. Fe(OH)3(s) also appears to be essentially at equilibrium in extracts impacted by glass corrosion, but with a solubility product (log Ksp) that is approximately 2.13 units lower than that used in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The solubilities of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) also appear to be much lower than that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The extent that the solubility of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) were reduced relative to that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C could not be quantified because the concentrations of Ti and Zr in the extracts were below the estimated quantification limit. Gibbsite was consistently highly oversaturated in the extract while dawsonite was at or near equilibrium. This suggests that dawsonite might be a more suitable phase for the secondary phase reaction network than gibbsite under field conditions. This may be due to the availability of carbonate that exists in the Hanford sediments as calcite. A significant source of carbonate was not available in the PCTs and this may account for why this phase did not appear in the PCTs. Sepiolite was consistently highly undersaturated, suggesting that another phase controls the solubility of magnesium. For samples that were most impacted by the effects of glass corrosion, magnesite appears to control glass corrosion. For samples that show less impacts from glass corrosion, clinochlore-7A or saponite-Mg appears to control the magnesium concentrations. For zinc, it appears that zincite is a better candidate than Zn(OH)2-? for controlling zinc concentrations in the extracts; however, in some samples all zinc phases considered were highly oversaturated. As a result the phase that controls zinc concentrations in the lysimeter extracts remains uncertain.

  13. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, C.M.; Smart, N.G.; Phelps, C.

    1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of {beta}-diketones, halogenated {beta}-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process. 4 figs.

  14. Extracting metals directly from metal oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Smart, Neil G. (Moscow, ID); Phelps, Cindy (Moscow, ID)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metals directly from metal oxides by exposing the oxide to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. Preferably, the metal is an actinide or a lanthanide. More preferably, the metal is uranium, thorium or plutonium. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid, thereby allowing direct removal of the metal from the metal oxide. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is selected from the group consisting of .beta.-diketones, halogenated .beta.-diketones, phosphinic acids, halogenated phosphinic acids, carboxylic acids, halogenated carboxylic acids, and mixtures thereof. In especially preferred embodiments, at least one of the chelating agents is fluorinated. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing metals from metal oxides without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the metal recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  15. Aromatics Extraction Plant Design Using Synthesis Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcox, R. J.; Nedwick, R.

    were changed. The process modified design has process conditions altered to create opportunities for heat integration. Distillation column pressure changes were the primary modifications. In this design the plant was also divided into two sections... the aid of modern synthesis techniques. The only heat integration in the Extraction Section is the Recovery Column bottoms preheating the Regenerator feed then the Stripper feed. The Distillation Section has no heat integration. This design uses 73...

  16. Extraction of Freshwater and Energy from Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Author offers and researches a new, cheap method for the extraction of freshwater from the Earth atmosphere. The suggected method is fundamentally dictinct from all existing methods that extract freshwater from air. All other industrial methods extract water from a saline water source (in most cases from seawater). This new method may be used at any point in the Earth except Polar Zones. It does not require long-distance freshwater transportation. If seawater is not utilized for increasing its productivity, this inexpensive new method is very environment-friendly. The author method has two working versions: (1) the first variant the warm (hot) atmospheric air is lifted by the inflatable tube in a high altitude and atmospheric steam is condenced into freswater: (2) in the second version, the warm air is pumped 20-30 meters under the sea-surface. In the first version, wind and solar heating of air are used for causing air flow. In version (2) wind and propeller are used for causing air movment. The first method does not need energy, the second needs a small amount. Moreover, in variant (1) the freshwater has a high pressure (>30 or more atm.) and can be used for production of energy such as electricity and in that way the freshwater cost is lower. For increasing the productivity the seawater is injected into air and solar air heater may be used. The solar air heater produces a huge amount of electricity as a very powerful electricity generation plant. The offered electricity installation in 100 - 200 times cheaper than any common electric plant of equivalent output. Key words: Extraction freshwater, method of getting freshwater, receiving energy from atmosphere, powerful renewal electric plant.

  17. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.; Zeitoon, B.M.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molten Metal Technology was awarded a contract to demonstrate the applicability of the Catalytic Extraction Process, a proprietary process that could be applied to US DOE`s inventory of low level mixed waste. This paper is a description of that technology, and included within this document are discussions of: (1) Program objectives, (2) Overall technology review, (3) Organic feed conversion to synthetic gas, (4) Metal, halogen, and transuranic recovery, (5) Demonstrations, (6) Design of the prototype facility, and (7) Results.

  18. Nanomaterials for Extracting Hydrogen from Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanomaterials for Extracting Hydrogen from Water P R O J E C T L E A D E R : Veronika Szalai (NIST to catalyze water oxidation. K E Y A C C O M P L I S H M E N T S Produced highly active iron oxide (hematite water. R E F E R E N C E Effect of tin doping on -Fe2 O3 photoanodes for water splitting, C. D. Bohn, A

  19. Plutonium Uranium Extraction Facility Documented Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DODD, E.N.

    2003-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the documented safety analysis (DSA) and Central Plateau Remediation Project (CP) requirements that apply to surveillance and maintenance (S&M) activities at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) facility. This DSA was developed in accordance with DOE-STD-1120-98, ''Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health into Facility Disposition Activities''. Upon approval and implementation of this document, the current safety basis documents will be retired.

  20. Bone Growth, Maintenance and Loss in the Neolithic Community of Çatalhöyük, Turkey: Preliminary Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Sabrina; Glencross, Bonnie; Beauchesne, Patrick

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bone Growth, Maintenance and Loss in the Neolithic CommunityThe examination of bone maintenance and loss is another wellchanging patterns of bone maintenance typically observed in

  1. Multiple Events Lead to Dendritic Spine Loss in Triple Transgenic Alzheimer's Disease Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    amyloid deposition leads to local synaptic abnormalities andMultiple Events Lead to Dendritic Spine Loss in Tripleal. (2010) Multiple Events Lead to Dendritic Spine Loss in

  2. Configuration and Validation of the LHC Beam Loss Monitoring System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamantzas, C; Emery, J; Fitzek, J; Follin, F; Jackson, S; Kain, V; Kruk, G; Misiowiec, M; Roderick, C; Sapinski, M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHC Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system is one of the most complex instrumentation systems deployed in the LHC. As well as protecting the machine, the system is also used as a means of diagnosing machine faults, and providing feedback of losses to the control room and several systems such as the Collimation, the Beam Dump and the Post-Mortem. The system has to transmit and process signals from over 4’000 monitors, and has approaching 3 million configurable parameters. This paper describes the types of configuration data needed, the means used to store and deploy all the parameters in such a distributed system and how operators are able to alter the operating parameters of the system, particularly with regard to the loss threshold values. The various security mechanisms put in place, both at the hardware and software level, to avoid accidental or malicious modification of these BLM parameters are also shown for each case.

  3. Accelerator Physics Experiments with Beam Loss Monitors at BESSY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuske, P

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The extended use of beam loss monitoring has led to a better understanding of the linear and non-linear physics involved in the single and multiple particle dynamics at BESSY. This knowledge has been used for improving the performance of the light source in terms of lifetime, beam stability, and stability of the energy. The key to these experiments are loss monitors placed at strategic locations of the ring with high sensitivity to Touschek or Coulomb scattered particles. Coulomb-scattering depends strongly on the transverse dynamics which is determined by the magnetic guiding fields. Losses occur primarily at the vertical aperture restrictions imposed by the flat insertion device vacuum chambers. Tune scan measurements clearly show resonances produced by the lattice magnets and by some of the insertion devices. Touschek scattering depends on the 3-dimensional electron density and the spins of the colliding particles. In transfer function type experiments these dependencies have been used to observe the effec...

  4. LHC Beam Loss Measurements and Quench Level Abort Threshold Accuracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dehning, B; Sapinski, M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHC beam loss measurement system is designed to trigger the beam abort in case the magnet coil transition level from the superconducting to normal conducting sate is approached. The predicted heat deposition in the superconducting coils of the magnets has been determined by particle shower simulation codes, while for transient losses the enthalpy has been calculated. The results have been combined to determine the abort thresholds. Transient loss measurements of the energy depositions of lost protons with injected beams in the LHC are used to determine the accuracy of the beam abort threshold settings. The simulation predictions are reviewed and compared with the measurement results. The relative difference between measurements and simulation are between 30 to 50 %.

  5. Factors influencing the efficiency of arsenic extraction by phosphate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yean, Su Jin

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extraction with sodium phosphate has been used as a method of accessing arsenic in soils. Arsenic extraction efficiency by phosphate from rice-paddy soils of Bangladesh usually has been low and highly variable between ...

  6. Supercritical extraction of organic mixtures from soil-water slurries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Lynda Ann

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supercritical C02was used to extract orgamc rruxtures from soil-water slurries. The extent of extraction and the equilibrium distribution of the mixture and of the individual components were determined. A single stage batch vessel was used...

  7. Supercritical Fluid Extraction Applications in the Process Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lahiere, R. J.; Fair, J. R.; Humphrey, J. L.

    solutions. Other examples of potential applications for SFE technology are the extraction of tar sands and oil shale [17J; separations of biomolecules such as triglycerides, alkaloids, and olefins [18J; extraction of coal liquids [19J; and the isolation...

  8. A medication extraction framework for electronic health records

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodnari, Andreea

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses the problem of concept and relation extraction in medical documents. We present a medical concept and relation extraction system (medNERR) that incorporates hand-built rules and constrained conditional ...

  9. Low-density random matrices for secret key extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Hongchao

    Secret key extraction, the task of extracting a secret key from shared information that is partially known by an eavesdropper, has important applications in cryptography. Motivated by the requirements of high-speed quantum ...

  10. Measurement of limiter heating due to fusion product losses during high fusion power deuterium-tritium operation of TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janos, A.; Owens, D.K.; Darrow, D.; Redi, M.; Zarnstorff, M.; Zweben, S.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary analysis has been completed on measurements of limiter heating during high fusion power deuterium-tritium (D-T) operation of TFTR, in an attempt to identify heating from alpha particle losses. Recent operation of TFTR with a 50-50 mix of D-T has resulted in fusion power output ({approx} 6.2 MW) orders of magnitude above what was previously achieved on TFTR. A significantly larger absolute number of particles and energy from fusion products compared to D-D operation is expected to be lost to the limiters. Measurements were made in the vicinity of the midplane ({plus_minus} 30{degree}) with thermocouples mounted on the tiles of an outboard limiter. Comparisons were made -between discharges which were similar except for the mix of deuterium and tritium beam sources. Power and energy estimates of predicted alpha losses were as high as 0.13 MW and 64 kJ. Depending on what portion of the limiters absorbed this energy, temperature rises of up to 42 {degrees}C could be expected, corresponding to a heat load of 0.69 MJ/m{sup 2} over a 0.5 sec period, or a power load of 1.4 MW/m{sup 2}. There was a measurable increase in the limiter tile temperature as the fusion power yield increased with a more reactive mixture of D and T at constant beam power during high power D-T operation. Analysis of the data is being conducted to see if the alpha heating component can be extracted. Measured temperature increases were no greater than 1 {degree}C, indicating that there was probably neither an unexpectedly large fraction of lost particles nor unexpected localization of the losses. Limits on the stochastic ripple loss contribution from alphas can be deduced.

  11. Energy Loss in Nuclear Drell-Yan Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jian-Jun Yang; Guang-Lie Li

    1998-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    By means of the nuclear parton distributions which can be used to provide a good explanation for the EMC effect in the whole x range, we investigate the energy loss effect in nuclear Drell-Yan process. When the cross section of lepton pair production is considered varying with the center-of-mass energy of the nucleon-nucleon collision, we find that the nuclear Drell-Yan(DY) ratio is suppressed due to the energy loss, which balances the overestimate of the DY ratio only in consideration of the effect of nuclear parton distributions.

  12. Loss of purity by wave packet scattering at low energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia Wang; C. K. Law; M. -C. Chu

    2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the quantum entanglement produced by a head-on collision between two gaussian wave packets in three-dimensional space. By deriving the two-particle wave function modified by s-wave scattering amplitudes, we obtain an approximate analytic expression of the purity of an individual particle. The loss of purity provides an indicator of the degree of entanglement. In the case the wave packets are narrow in momentum space, we show that the loss of purity is solely controlled by the ratio of the scattering cross section to the transverse area of the wave packets.

  13. Passive magnetic bearing element with minimal power losses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems employing passive magnetic bearing elements having minimal power losses are provided. Improved stabilizing elements are shown, employing periodic magnet arrays and inductively loaded circuits, but with improved characteristics compared to the elements disclosed in U.S. Patent No. 5,495,221 entitled "Dynamically Stable Magnetic Suspension/Bearing System." The improvements relate to increasing the magnitude of the force derivative, while at the same time reducing the power dissipated during the normal operation of the bearing system, to provide a passive bearing system that has virtually no losses under equilibrium conditions, that is, when the supported system is not subject to any accelerations except those of gravity.

  14. Characterizing and Controlling Beam Losses at the LANSCE Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rybarcyk, Lawrence J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) currently provides 100-MeV H{sup +} and 800-MeV H{sup -} beams to several user facilities that have distinct beam requirements, e.g. intensity, micropulse pattern, duty factor, etc. Minimizing beam loss is critical to achieving good performance and reliable operation, but can be challenging in the context of simultaneous multi-beam delivery. This presentation will discuss various aspects related to the observation, characterization and minimization of beam loss associated with normal production beam operations in the linac.

  15. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid.

  16. Process for the extraction of strontium from acidic solutions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horwitz, E.P.; Dietz, M.L.

    1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a process for selectively extracting strontium values from aqueous nitric acid waste solutions containing these and other fission product values. The extractant solution is a macrocyclic polyether in an aliphatic hydrocarbon diluent containing a phase modifier. The process will selectively extract strontium values from nitric acid solutions which are up to 6 molar in nitric acid. 4 figs.

  17. Extracting Team Mental Models Through Textual Analysis Kathleen M. Carley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    Extracting Team Mental Models Through Textual Analysis Kathleen M. Carley Associate Professor of this paper appears in: Kathleen M. Carley, 1997, "Extracting Team Mental Models Through Textual Analysis for this paper, but for future work in this area. #12;-- 1 -- Extracting Team Mental Models Through Textual

  18. Evaluation of Automated Extraction of Organochlorine Contaminants from Freshwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Asit

    by solvent rinses of containers. Breakthrough, assessed by liquid-liquid extraction of water of SPE sample. The extraction of trace organic contaminants from environ- mental water samples has long been accomplished with appropriate solvents in separatory funnels or capped bottles. The need to extract much larger volumes of water

  19. Automatic Extraction of Cartographic Information from Airborne Interferometric SAR Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Helmut A.

    Automatic Extraction of Cartographic Information from Airborne Interferometric SAR Data Reinhold cartographic feature extraction by the airborne AeS--1 instrument is presented. We extract regions corresponding to cartographic features for the classes built--up area, forest, water and open area. Water

  20. Extracting Fish and Water Velocity from Doppler Profiler Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    Extracting Fish and Water Velocity from Doppler Profiler Data ĺ Ð 1 ¸ Ö Ò ×¹ Ò ÝÖ¹Ê Ò 2 1 processing algo- rithms normally used to extract water velocity. We present an alternative method for velocity homogeneity precludes the extraction of fish velocities. Water velocities can sometimes still

  1. Design, demonstration and evaluation of a thermal enhanced vapor extraction system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelan, J.; Reavis, B.; Swanson, J. [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thermal Enhanced Vapor Extraction System (TEVES), which combines powerline frequency heating (PLF) and radio frequency (RF) heating with vacuum soil vapor extraction, was used to effectively remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) from a pit in the chemical waste landfill (CWL) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) within a two month heating period. Volume average temperatures of 83{degrees}C and 112{degrees}C were reached for the PLF and RF heating periods, respectively, within the 15 ft x 45 ft x 18.5 ft deep treated volume. This resulted in the removal of 243 lb of measured toxic organic compounds (VOCs and SVOCs), 55 gallons of oil, and 11,000 gallons of water from the site. Reductions of up to 99% in total chromatographic organics (TCO) was achieved in the heated zone. Energy balance calculations for the PLF heating period showed that 36.4% of the heat added went to heating the soil, 38.5% went to evaporating water and organics, 4.2% went to sensible heat in the water, 7.1% went to heating the extracted air, and 6.6% was lost. For the RF heating period went to heating the soil, 23.5% went to evaporating water and organics, 2.4% went to sensible heat in the water, 7.5% went to heating extracted air, and 9.7% went to losses. Energy balance closure was 92.8% for the PLF heating and 98% for the RF heating. The energy input requirement per unit soil volume heated per unit temperature increase was 1.63 kWH/yd{sup 3}-{degrees}C for PLF heating and 0.73 kWH/yd{sup 3}{degrees}C for RF heating.

  2. Geothermal-Heat Extraction As a source of renewable energy, geothermal-heat extraction has become increasingly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kornhuber, Ralf

    Geothermal-Heat Extraction As a source of renewable energy, geothermal-heat extraction has become increasingly important in recent years. Proper design of a geothermal system, be it for deep or for shallow

  3. Direct extraction of oil from sunflower seeds by twin-screw extruder according to an aqueous extraction process: Feasibility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Direct extraction of oil from sunflower seeds by twin-screw extruder according to an aqueous the feasibility of an aqueous process to extract sunflower seed oil using a co-rotating twin-screw extruder. Aqueous extraction was carried out using whole seeds and the influence of the operating conditions on oil

  4. Colorimetric Determination of Nitrite in Foods Principle: The sample is extracted with distilled water and the aqueous extract clarified

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazarenko, Alexander

    water and the aqueous extract clarified with zinc hydroxide. Sulfanilic acid is diazotisedColorimetric Determination of Nitrite in Foods Principle: The sample is extracted with distilled/50 mL. The absorbance range should extend from 0 to 0.6 approx. E. Extraction Procedure Weigh ca 100g

  5. Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays Page 1 of 23 Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roppel, Thaddeus A.

    Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays Page 1 of 23 Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays the amount of data to be processed. This work is a first example in feature extraction from tin-oxide sensors element array of tin-oxide sensors is presented. Results are extrapolated to other arrays of chemical

  6. Way to reduce arc voltage losses in hybrid thermionic converters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tskhakaya, V.K.; Yarygin, V.I.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results are reported concerning the output and emission characteristics of the arc and hybrid regimes in a plane-parallel thermionic converter with Pt--Zr--O electrode pair. It is shown that arc voltage losses can be reduced to values below those obtainable in ordinary arc thermionic converters.

  7. Burst Mode Message Loss Effects On WAAS Availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    Burst Mode Message Loss Effects On WAAS Availability Richard Fuller, Todd Walter, Per Enge a continental network of reference GPS receivers will create these messages. The geostationary satellites serve both as wide-area differential GPS data links as well as additional ranging sources. The data message

  8. On the Hardness of Pricing Loss-leaders Preyas Popat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yi

    their margin cost. It is shown in [BB06, BBCH07] that by pricing some of the items below cost, the maximumOn the Hardness of Pricing Loss-leaders Preyas Popat New York University popat@cs.nyu.edu Yi Wu IBM Almaden wuyi@us.ibm.com September 30, 2011 Abstract Consider the problem of pricing n items under

  9. STAFF PAPER A Review of Transmission Losses in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    from 5.4 percent to 6.9 percent during 2002 to 2008, based on Energy Commission data. This staff paper of Los Angeles Department of Water and Power. Staff also would like to acknowledge Al Alvarado and distribution loss values in planning studies. In this effort, staff analyzed data, researched literature

  10. Measurements of AC Losses and Current Distribution in Superconducting Cables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Doan A [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Ashworth, Stephen P [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL; Carter, Bill [AMSC; Fleshler, Steven [AMER Superconductor Corp, Devens, MA 01434

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents our new experimental facility and techniques to measure ac loss and current distribution between the layers for High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cables. The facility is powered with a 45 kVA three-phase power supply which can provide three-phase currents up to 5 kA per phase via high current transformers. The system is suitable for measurements at any frequency between 20 and 500 Hz to better understand the ac loss mechanisms in HTS cables. In this paper, we will report techniques and results for ac loss measurements carried out on several HTS cables with and without an HTS shielding layer. For cables without a shielding layer, care must be taken to control the effect of the magnetic fields from return currents on loss measurements. The waveform of the axial magnetic field was also measured by a small pick-up coil placed inside a two-layer cable. The temporal current distribution between the layers can be calculated from the waveform of the axial field.

  11. Parton energy loss due to synchrotron-like gluon emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. G. Zakharov

    2008-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a quasiclassical theory of the synchrotron-like gluon radiation. Our calculations show that the parton energy loss due to the synchrotron gluon emission may be important in the jet quenching phenomenon if the plasma instabilities generate a sufficiently strong chromomagnetic field. Our gluon spectrum disagrees with that obtained by Shuryak and Zahed within the Schwinger's proper time method.

  12. Loss of Daylight Vision in Retinal Degeneration: Are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabin, Cliff

    Loss of Daylight Vision in Retinal Degeneration: Are Oxidative Stress and Metabolic Dysregulation, particularly in cones, the type of photoreceptors that mediate daylight and color vision. The evidence, providing our daylight vision, and have many of the same features and vulnerabilities as rod photoreceptors

  13. Dimensioning hospital wards using the Erlang loss model Corresponding author

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -2006. Finally, we demonstrate the efficiency of merging departments. Keywords: hospital resource allocationDimensioning hospital wards using the Erlang loss model Corresponding author: A.M. de Bruin (MSc of Sciences Department of Mathematics Assistant professor Optimization of Business Processes L. van Zanten

  14. Loss-based risk measures Rama CONT1,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    robustness of risk estimators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3 Sensitivity analysis of risk estimators-7Oct2011 #12;A main focus of quantitative modeling in finance has been to measure the risk of financialLoss-based risk measures Rama CONT1,3 , Romain DEGUEST 2 and Xue Dong HE3 1) Laboratoire de

  15. AN INVESTIGATION OF CERTAIN THERMODYNAMIC LOSSES IN MINIATURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of gas temperatures and power losses for a compression volume that included a regenerative heat exchanger for flows between the piston/cylinder volume and the regenerator. The temperature profiles exhibited results for high pressure and low frequency were very unstable with significant high frequency components

  16. The Energy Harvesting Multiple Access Channel with Energy Storage Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yener, Aylin

    The Energy Harvesting Multiple Access Channel with Energy Storage Losses Kaya Tutuncuoglu and Aylin considers a Gaussian multiple access channel with two energy harvesting transmitters with lossy energy storage. The power allocation policy maximizing the average weighted sum rate given the energy harvesting

  17. Modelling and Measurements of Power Losses and Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pryor, Sara C.

    at Middelgrunden Offshore Wind Farm R. J. Barthelmie*, , S. T. Frandsen and M. N. Nielsen, Wind Energy Department and turbulence increase due to wind turbine wake interac- tions in large offshore wind farms is crucial interactions in large offshore wind farms is crucial to optimizing wind farm design. Power losses due

  18. hal00276700, A Quadratic Loss MultiClass SVM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    margin machine and, by extension, to the 2-norm SVM (see for instance Chapter 7 in [13]). In this report #22; April 30, 2008 #22; 24 pages Abstract: Using a support vector machine requires to set two types. In this report, we introduce a quadratic loss M-SVM, the M-SVM 2 , as a direct extension of the 2-norm SVM

  19. Characterization of bending loss in hollow flexible terahertz waveguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Lowell, University of

    and metal/dielectric coated polycarbonate waveguides were investigated using an optically pumped far infrared (FIR) laser at 215 µm. The bending loss of silver coated polycarbonate waveguides were measured. Pedersen, and E. Mueller, "Hollow polycarbonate waveguides with inner Cu coatings for delivery of terahertz

  20. Fluid system for controlling fluid losses during hydrocarbon recovery operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.H.; Smejkal, K.D.

    1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid system is described for controlling fluid losses during hydrocarbon recovery operations, comprising: water; a distribution of graded calcium carbonate particle sizes; and at least one modified lignosulfonate, which is a lignosulfonate modified by polymerizing it at least to an extent effective to reduce its water solubility.

  1. OLA -11.15,2012 DATA LOSS PREVENTION POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    1 OLA -11.15,2012 DATA LOSS PREVENTION POLICY 1.0 PURPOSE This Policy establishes z e d disclosure of Protected Information by electronic means. The specific purposes of this Policy for monitoring and reporting compliance with the College's Privacy Policy (http://policy.cofc.edu/documents/11

  2. Panel Damping Loss Factor Estimation Using The Random Decrement Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dande, Himanshu Amol

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of the Random Decrement Technique (RDT) for estimating panel damping loss factors ranging from 1% to 10% is examined in a systematic way, with a focus on establishing the various parameters one must specify to use the technique to the best...

  3. The Community Loss Index: A New Social Indicator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Weigang

    and an aggregator of individ- ual experiences. Building on the relationship between loss and stress, the index at is growing due to mounting demand for accountability, outcome measures, evidence-based research, and indicators that reveal what works. In response, researchers like Jochen Albrecht and Laxmi Ramasubramanian ð

  4. 1. Introduction: current issues in hair loss-related disorders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    1. Introduction: current issues in hair loss-related disorders 2. Basic biology of hair follicles 3. Physiological regeneration: modulating the regeneration of existing hair follicles by the extra-hair follicle environment and systemic hormone factors 4. Regeneration of hair fibers from existing follicles after hair

  5. Theoretical mass loss rates of cool main-sequence stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Holzwarth; M. Jardine

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a model for the wind properties of cool main-sequence stars, which comprises their wind ram pressures, mass fluxes, and terminal wind velocities. The wind properties are determined through a polytropic magnetised wind model, assuming power laws for the dependence of the thermal and magnetic wind parameters on the stellar rotation rate. We use empirical data to constrain theoretical wind scenarios, which are characterised by different rates of increase of the wind temperature, wind density, and magnetic field strength. Scenarios based on moderate rates of increase yield wind ram pressures in agreement with most empirical constraints, but cannot account for some moderately rotating targets, whose high apparent mass loss rates are inconsistent with observed coronal X-ray and magnetic properties. For fast magnetic rotators, the magneto-centrifugal driving of the outflow can produce terminal wind velocities far in excess of the surface escape velocity. Disregarding this aspect in the analyses of wind ram pressures leads to overestimations of stellar mass loss rates. The predicted mass loss rates of cool main-sequence stars do not exceed about ten times the solar value. Our results are in contrast with previous investigations, which found a strong increase of the stellar mass loss rates with the coronal X-ray flux. Owing to the weaker dependence, we expect the impact of stellar winds on planetary atmospheres to be less severe and the detectability of magnetospheric radio emission to be lower then previously suggested. Considering the rotational evolution of a one solar-mass star, the mass loss rates and the wind ram pressures are highest during the pre-main sequence phase.

  6. Can ECN Be Used to Differentiate Congestion Losses from Wireless Sa^ad Biaz Xia Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Can ECN Be Used to Differentiate Congestion Losses from Wireless Losses? Sa^ad Biaz Xia Wang.auburn.edu Technical Report CSSE04-04 May 13, 2004 Abstract TCP was designed and tuned to work well on networks where losses are mainly congestion losses. The performance of TCP decreases dramatically when a TCP connection

  7. Accelerated solvent extraction of petroleum contaminated sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauguss, Jeffery Lynn

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were repeated on these extracts and results were virtually the same (within 500mg/kg). It is unknown why these samples have such a discrepancy from the rest of the data. The ASE data was compared to soxhlet oil and grease values and it was found... recoveries were compared individually at each sampling event and as total target analytes. These comparisons are shown in Table 8. Target compounds below the MDL and within analytical instrument background levels were discarded. This was done as a result...

  8. Permeability extraction: A sonic log inversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbar, N.; Kim, J.J. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the authors provide the missing important link between permeability and acoustic velocities by generating a permeability-dependent synthetic sonic log in a carbonate reservoir. The computations are based on Akbar`s theory that relates wave velocity to frequency, rock properties (e.g., lithology, permeability, and porosity), and fluid saturation and properties (viscosity, density, and compressibility). An inverted analytical expression of the theory is used to extract permeability from sonic velocity. The synthetic sonic and the computed permeability are compared with the observed sonic log and with plug permeability, respectively. The results demonstrate, as predicted by theory, that permeability can be related directly to acoustic velocities.

  9. Apparatus for extracting and sequestering carbon dioxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rau, Gregory H. (Castro Valley, CA); Caldeira, Kenneth G. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method associated therewith to extract and sequester carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) from a stream or volume of gas wherein said apparatus hydrates CO.sub.2 and reacts the resulting carbonic acid with carbonate. Suitable carbonates include, but are not limited to, carbonates of alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, preferably carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Waste products are metal cations and bicarbonate in solution or dehydrated metal salts, which when disposed of in a large body of water provide an effective way of sequestering CO.sub.2 from a gaseous environment.

  10. Multipole Extraction: A novel, model independent method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Stiliaris; C. N. Papanicolas

    2007-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method for extracting multipole amplitudes in the nucleon resonance region from electroproduction data is presented. The method is based on statistical concepts and it relies heavily on Monte Carlo and simulation techniques; it produces precise identification and determination of the contributing multipole amplitudes in the resonance region and for the first time a rigorous determination of the associated experimental uncertainty. The results are demonstrated to be independent of any model bias. The method is applied in the reanalysis of the $Q^{2}=0.127 GeV^2/c^2$ Bates and Mainz $N\\to \\Delta$ data.

  11. Enhanced Attenuation Technologies: Passive Soil Vapor Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vangelas, K.; Looney, B.; Kamath, R.; Adamson, D.; Newell, C.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) is an enhanced attenuation (EA) approach that removes volatile contaminants from soil. The extraction is driven by natural pressure gradients between the subsurface and atmosphere (Barometric Pumping), or by renewable sources of energy such as wind or solar power (Assisted PSVE). The technology is applicable for remediating sites with low levels of contamination and for transitioning sites from active source technologies such as active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) to natural attenuation. PSVE systems are simple to design and operate and are more cost effective than active systems in many scenarios. Thus, PSVE is often appropriate as an interim-remedial or polishing strategy. Over the past decade, PSVE has been demonstrated in the U.S. and in Europe. These demonstrations provide practical information to assist in selecting, designing and implementing the technology. These demonstrations indicate that the technology can be effective in achieving remedial objectives in a timely fashion. The keys to success include: (1) Application at sites where the residual source quantities, and associated fluxes to groundwater, are relatively low; (2) Selection of the appropriate passive energy source - barometric pumping in cases with a deep vadose zone and barrier (e.g., clay) layers that separate the subsurface from the atmosphere and renewable energy assisted PSVE in other settings and where higher flow rates are required. (3) Provision of sufficient access to the contaminated vadose zones through the spacing and number of extraction wells. This PSVE technology report provides a summary of the relevant technical background, real-world case study performance, key design and cost considerations, and a scenario-based cost evaluation. The key design and cost considerations are organized into a flowchart that dovetails with the Enhanced Attenuation: Chlorinated Organics Guidance of the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC). The PSVE flowchart provides a structured process to determine if the technology is, or is not, reasonable and defensible for a particular site. The central basis for that decision is the expected performance of PSVE under the site specific conditions. Will PSVE have sufficient mass removal rates to reduce the release, or flux, of contamination into the underlying groundwater so that the site can meet it overall remedial objectives? The summary technical information, case study experiences, and structured decision process provided in this 'user guide' should assist environmental decision-makers, regulators, and engineers in selecting and successfully implementing PSVE at appropriate sites.

  12. Hot cell shield plug extraction apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Knapp, Philip A. (Moore, ID); Manhart, Larry K. (Pingree, ID)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is provided for moving shielding plugs into and out of holes in concrete shielding walls in hot cells for handling radioactive materials without the use of external moving equipment. The apparatus provides a means whereby a shield plug is extracted from its hole and then swung approximately 90 degrees out of the way so that the hole may be accessed. The apparatus uses hinges to slide the plug in and out and to rotate it out of the way, the hinge apparatus also supporting the weight of the plug in all positions, with the load of the plug being transferred to a vertical wall by means of a bolting arrangement.

  13. Method for extracting and sequestering carbon dioxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rau, Gregory H. (Castro Valley, CA); Caldeira, Kenneth G. (Livermore, CA)

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus to extract and sequester carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) from a stream or volume of gas wherein said method and apparatus hydrates CO.sub.2, and reacts the resulting carbonic acid with carbonate. Suitable carbonates include, but are not limited to, carbonates of alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, preferably carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Waste products are metal cations and bicarbonate in solution or dehydrated metal salts, which when disposed of in a large body of water provide an effective way of sequestering CO.sub.2 from a gaseous environment.

  14. Kerogen extraction from subterranean oil shale resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, Mark Dean (Houston, TX); Lestz, Robert Steven (Missouri City, TX); Hollis, Kirk (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig (Los Alamos, NM); Kinkead, Scott (Los Alamos, NM); Wigand, Marcus (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to methods for extracting a kerogen-based product from subsurface (oil) shale formations, wherein such methods rely on fracturing and/or rubblizing portions of said formations so as to enhance their fluid permeability, and wherein such methods further rely on chemically modifying the shale-bound kerogen so as to render it mobile. The present invention is also directed at systems for implementing at least some of the foregoing methods. Additionally, the present invention is also directed to methods of fracturing and/or rubblizing subsurface shale formations and to methods of chemically modifying kerogen in situ so as to render it mobile.

  15. Kerogen extraction from subterranean oil shale resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, Mark Dean (Houston, TX); Lestz, Robert Steven (Missouri City, TX); Hollis, Kirk (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Craig (Los Alamos, NM); Kinkead, Scott (Los Alamos, NM); Wigand, Marcus (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to methods for extracting a kerogen-based product from subsurface (oil) shale formations, wherein such methods rely on fracturing and/or rubblizing portions of said formations so as to enhance their fluid permeability, and wherein such methods further rely on chemically modifying the shale-bound kerogen so as to render it mobile. The present invention is also directed at systems for implementing at least some of the foregoing methods. Additionally, the present invention is also directed to methods of fracturing and/or rubblizing subsurface shale formations and to methods of chemically modifying kerogen in situ so as to render it mobile.

  16. Feature extraction for structural dynamics model validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemez, Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nishio, Mayuko [UNIV OF TOKYO; Worden, Keith [UNIV OF SHEFFIELD; Takeda, Nobuo [UNIV OF TOKYO

    2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focuses on defining and comparing response features that can be used for structural dynamics model validation studies. Features extracted from dynamic responses obtained analytically or experimentally, such as basic signal statistics, frequency spectra, and estimated time-series models, can be used to compare characteristics of structural system dynamics. By comparing those response features extracted from experimental data and numerical outputs, validation and uncertainty quantification of numerical model containing uncertain parameters can be realized. In this study, the applicability of some response features to model validation is first discussed using measured data from a simple test-bed structure and the associated numerical simulations of these experiments. issues that must be considered were sensitivity, dimensionality, type of response, and presence or absence of measurement noise in the response. Furthermore, we illustrate a comparison method of multivariate feature vectors for statistical model validation. Results show that the outlier detection technique using the Mahalanobis distance metric can be used as an effective and quantifiable technique for selecting appropriate model parameters. However, in this process, one must not only consider the sensitivity of the features being used, but also correlation of the parameters being compared.

  17. Non-Ideal Behavior in Solvent Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Zalupski

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a summary of the work performed to meet FCR&D level 3 milestone M31SW050801, 'Complete the year-end report summarizing FY11 experimental and modeling activities.' This work was carried out under the auspices of the Non-Ideality in Solvent Extraction Systems FCR&D work package. The report summarizes our initial considerations of potential influences that non-ideal chemistry may impose on computational prediction of outcomes in solvent extraction systems. The report is packaged into three separate test cases where a robustness of the prediction by SXFIT program is under scrutiny. The computational exercises presented here emphasize the importance of accurate representation of both an aqueous and organic mixtures when modeling liquid-liquid distribution systems. Case No.1 demonstrates that non-ideal behavior of HDEHP in aliphatic diluents, such as n-dodecane, interferes with the computation. Cases No.2 and No.3 focus on the chemical complexity of aqueous electrolyte mixtures. Both exercises stress the need for an improved thermodynamic model of an aqueous environment present in the europium distribution experiments. Our efforts for year 2 of this project will focus on the improvements of aqueous and non-aqueous solution models using fundamental physical properties of mixtures acquired experimentally in our laboratories.

  18. 702 IEEEJOURNAL OF QUAKTUM ELECTRONICS OCTOBER phases of the q pump modes. asis the single pass power loss of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teich, Malvin C.

    power loss of the signal modes, and allidler modes are assumed to have the same single pass loss ai. K

  19. White LED with High Package Extraction Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yi Zheng; Matthew Stough

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to develop a high efficiency phosphor converting (white) Light Emitting Diode (pcLED) 1-Watt package through an increase in package extraction efficiency. A transparent/translucent monolithic phosphor is proposed to replace the powdered phosphor to reduce the scattering caused by phosphor particles. Additionally, a multi-layer thin film selectively reflecting filter is proposed between blue LED die and phosphor layer to recover inward yellow emission. At the end of the project we expect to recycle approximately 50% of the unrecovered backward light in current package construction, and develop a pcLED device with 80 lm/W{sub e} using our technology improvements and commercially available chip/package source. The success of the project will benefit luminous efficacy of white LEDs by increasing package extraction efficiency. In most phosphor-converting white LEDs, the white color is obtained by combining a blue LED die (or chip) with a powdered phosphor layer. The phosphor partially absorbs the blue light from the LED die and converts it into a broad green-yellow emission. The mixture of the transmitted blue light and green-yellow light emerging gives white light. There are two major drawbacks for current pcLEDs in terms of package extraction efficiency. The first is light scattering caused by phosphor particles. When the blue photons from the chip strike the phosphor particles, some blue light will be scattered by phosphor particles. Converted yellow emission photons are also scattered. A portion of scattered light is in the backward direction toward the die. The amount of this backward light varies and depends in part on the particle size of phosphors. The other drawback is that yellow emission from phosphor powders is isotropic. Although some backward light can be recovered by the reflector in current LED packages, there is still a portion of backward light that will be absorbed inside the package and further converted to heat. Heat generated in the package may cause a deterioration of encapsulant materials, affecting the performance of both the LED die and phosphor, leading to a decrease in the luminous efficacy over lifetime. Recent studies from research groups at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute found that, under the condition to obtain a white light, about 40% of the light is transmitted outward of the phosphor layer and 60% of the light is reflected inward.1,2 It is claimed that using scattered photon extraction (SPE) technique, luminous efficacy is increased by 60%. In this project, a transparent/translucent monolithic phosphor was used to replace the powdered phosphor layer. In the normal pcLED package, the powdered phosphor is mixed with silicone either to be deposited on the top of LED die forming a chip level conversion (CLC) white LED or to be casted in the package forming a volume conversion white LED. In the monolithic phosphors there are no phosphor powder/silicone interfaces so it can reduce the light scattering caused by phosphor particles. Additionally, a multi-layer thin film selectively reflecting filter is inserted in the white LED package between the blue LED die and phosphor layer. It will selectively transmit the blue light from the LED die and reflect the phosphor's yellow inward emission outward. The two technologies try to recover backward light to the outward direction in the pcLED package thereby improving the package extraction efficiency.

  20. Optimal steering of inertial particles diffusing anisotropically with losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yongxin Chen; Tryphon T. Georgiou; Michele Pavon

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Exploiting a fluid dynamic formulation for which a probabilistic counterpart might not be available, we extend the theory of Schroedinger bridges to the case of inertial particles with losses and general, possibly singular diffusion coefficient. We find that, as for the case of constant diffusion coefficient matrix, the optimal control law is obtained by solving a system of two p.d.e.'s involving adjoint operators and coupled through their boundary values. In the linear case with quadratic loss function, the system turns into two matrix Riccati equations with coupled split boundary conditions. An alternative formulation of the control problem as a semidefinite programming problem allows computation of suboptimal solutions. This is illustrated in one example of inertial particles subject to a constant rate killing.

  1. Elucidating Jet Energy Loss in Heavy Ion Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Grau; for the ATLAS Collaboration

    2008-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Very soon the LHC will provide beams for heavy ion collisions at 5.52 TeV/nucleon. This center-of-mass energy results in a large cross-section for producing high-$E_T$ ($>$ 50 GeV) jets that are distinct from the soft, underlying event. This brings with it the possibility of performing full jet reconstruction to directly study jet energy loss in the medium produced in heavy ion collisions. In this note, we present the current state of jet reconstruction performance studies in heavy ion events using the ATLAS detector. We also discuss the possibilities of energy loss measurements available with full jet reconstruction: single jet $R_{AA}$ and di-jet and $\\gamma$-jet correlations.

  2. Magnetic-field dependent trap loss of ultracold metastable helium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. S. Borbely; R. van Rooij; S. Knoop; W. Vassen

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We have experimentally studied the magnetic-field dependence of the decay of a Bose-Einstein condensate of metastable 4He atoms confined in an optical dipole trap, for atoms in the m=+1 and m=-1 magnetic substates, and up to 450 G. Our measurements confirm long-standing calculations of the two-body loss rate coefficient that show an increase above 50 G. We demonstrate that for m=-1 atoms, decay is due to three-body recombination only, with a three-body loss rate coefficient of 6.5(0.4)(0.6)10^(-27)cm^6s^(-1), which is interesting in the context of universal few-body theory. We have also searched for a recently-predicted d-wave Feshbach resonance, but did not observe it.

  3. BONE LOSS IN RELATION TO HYPOTHALAMIC ATROPHY IN ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loskutova, Natalia Y.

    2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    considerable burden on the health system, patients, and caregivers. 1.2 Alzheimer’s Disease and Bone Loss Bone health is an important issue in aging and AD. Osteoporosis–related fractures are among the major health and socioeconomic concerns in aging... of bone fractures, and a determining factor in clinical diagnosis of osteoporosis (Ammann and Rizzoli 2003). Several studies in women suggest that low BMD is associated with poorer cognitive function and subsequent cognitive decline (Yaffe, Browner et al...

  4. Low-loss binder for hot pressing boron nitride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maya, Leon (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Borazine derivatives used as low-loss binders and precursors for making ceramic boron nitride structures. The derivative forms the same composition as the boron nitride starting material, thereby filling the voids with the same boron nitride material upon forming and hot pressing. The derivatives have a further advantage of being low in carbon thus resulting in less volatile byproduct that can result in bubble formation during pressing.

  5. Limiting Energy Loss Distributions for Multiphoton Channeling Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bondarenco, M V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results in the theory of multiphoton spectra for coherent radiation sources are overviewed, with the emphasis on channeling radiation. For the latter case, the importance of the order of resummation and averaging is illustrated. Limiting shapes of multiphoton spectra at high intensity are discussed for different channeling regimes. In some spectral regions, there emerges an approximate correspondence between the radiative energy loss and the electron integrals of motion.

  6. Submillimeter residual losses in high-{Tc} superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bolometry was used obtain accurate submillimeter residual loss data for epitaxial films of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} (YBCO), Tl{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10}, Tl{sub 2}CaBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 2}O{sub 8} (TCBCO), and Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}BiO{sub 3} (BKBO). We were able to fit the absorptivity measured for Nb films to an Eliashberg strong coupling calculation; excellent agreement resulted between parameters from best fits and measured Residual Resistivity Ratio. Microwave surface resistance measurements made on the same YBCO and TCBCO films are in excellent agreement with submillimeter measurements. Absorptivities for all YBCO films studied are qualitatively similar, increasing smoothly with frequency, with no gap-like features below the well known absorption edge at 450 cm{sup {minus}1}. Losses in YBCO films were fit to a weakly coupled grain model for the a-b plane conductivity. Strong phonon structure was observed in TCBCO films between 60 and 700 cm{sup {minus}1} (2 THz and 23 THz); these losses could not be fitted to the simple weakly coupled grain model, in contrast to the case for other high-{Tc} superconductors where phonon structure observed in ceramics are is absent in epitaxial oriented films and crystals because of electronic screening due to high conductivity of a-b planes. Absorptivity data for the BKBO films all show a strong absorption onset near the BCS tunneling gap of 3.5 k{sub B}{Tc}. Comparison with strong coupling Eliashberg predictions and of a Kramers-Kronig analysis indicate that the absorption onset is consistent with a superconducting energy gap. Effects of magnetic field on residual losses in YBCO films show a resonant absorption feature in vicinity of predicted

  7. Determining Pressure Losses For Airflow In Residential Ductwork

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Kevin Douglas

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    . 2002)9. Unfortunately, no previous work has produced an equation for evaluating the static pressure loss through flexible duct without the use of ASHRAE correction factors. Research by Harris centered on leakage testing in very early forms... of flexible duct. The ducts studied were used for transferring ventilation air within coal mines. Harris conducted several porosity and leakage tests on various types of ducts ranging from woven fabrics to soft plastics to PVC impregnated fabrics (Harris...

  8. Energy-Efficiency Options for Insurance Loss Prevention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, E. [Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Div.; Knoepfel, I. [Swiss Reinsurance Co., Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy-efficiency improvements offer the insurance industry two areas of opportunity: reducing ordinary claims and avoiding greenhouse gas emissions that could precipitate natural disaster losses resulting from global climate change. We present three vehicles for taking advantage of this opportunity, including research and development, in- house energy management, and provision of key information to insurance customers and risk managers. The complementary role for renewable energy systems is also introduced.

  9. Optimization of the Low Loss SRF Cavity for the ILC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sekutowicz, J.S.; /DESY; Kneisel, P.; /Jefferson Lab; Higo, T.; Morozumi, Y.; Saito, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Ge, L.; Ko, Yong-kyu; Lee, L.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.K.; Schussman, G.L.; Xiao, L.; /SLAC

    2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Low-Loss shape cavity design has been proposed as a possible alternative to the baseline TESLA cavity design for the ILC main linacs. The advantages of this design over the TESLA cavity are its lower cryogenic loss, and higher achievable gradient due to lower surface fields. High gradient prototypes for such designs have been tested at KEK (ICHIRO) and TJNAF (LL). However, issues related to HOM damping and multipacting still need to be addressed. Preliminary numerical studies of the prototype cavities have shown unacceptable damping factors for some higher-order dipole modes if the typical TESLA HOM couplers are directly adapted to the design. The resulting wakefield will dilute the beam emittance thus reducing the machine luminosity. Furthermore, high gradient tests on a 9-cell prototype at KEK have experienced multipacting barriers although a single LL cell had achieved a high gradient. From simulations, multipacting activities are found to occur in the end-groups of the cavity. In this paper, we will present the optimization results of the end-groups for the Low-Loss designs for effective HOM damping and alleviation of multipacting.

  10. Effects of mass loss for highly-irradiated giant planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. B. Hubbard; M. F. Hattori; A. Burrows; I. Hubeny; D. Sudarsky

    2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present calculations for the evolution and surviving mass of highly-irradiated extrasolar giant planets (EGPs) at orbital semimajor axes ranging from 0.023 to 0.057 AU using a generalized scaled theory for mass loss, together with new surface-condition grids for hot EGPs and a consistent treatment of tidal truncation. Theoretical estimates for the rate of energy-limited hydrogen escape from giant-planet atmospheres differ by two orders of magnitude, when one holds planetary mass, composition, and irradiation constant. Baraffe et al. (2004, A&A 419, L13-L16) predict the highest rate, based on the theory of Lammer et al. (2003, Astrophys. J. 598, L121-L124). Scaling the theory of Watson et al. (1981, Icarus 48, 150-166) to parameters for a highly-irradiated exoplanet, we find an escape rate ~102 lower than Baraffe's. With the scaled Watson theory we find modest mass loss, occurring early in the history of a hot EGP. In this theory, mass loss including the effect of Roche-lobe overflow becomes significant primarily for masses below a Saturn mass, for semimajor axes = 0.023 AU. This contrasts with the Baraffe model, where hot EGPs are claimed to be remnants of much more massive bodies, originally several times Jupiter and still losing substantial mass fractions at present.

  11. Evolution Effects on Parton Energy Loss with Detailed Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luan cheng; Enke Wang

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial conditions in the chemical non-equilibrated medium and Bjorken expanding medium at RHIC are determined. With a set of rate equations describing the chemical equilibration of quarks and gluons based on perturbative QCD, we investigate the consequence for parton evolution at RHIC. With considering parton evolution, it is shown that the Debye screening mass and the inverse mean free-path of gluons reduce with increasing proper time in the QGP medium. The parton evolution affects the parton energy loss with detailed balance, both parton energy loss from stimulated emission in the chemical non-equilibrated expanding medium and in Bjorken expanding medium are linear dependent on the propagating distance rather than square dependent in the static medium. The energy absorption can not be neglected at intermediate jet energies and small propagating distance of the energetic parton in contrast with that it is important only at intermediate jet energy in the static medium. This will increase the energy and propagating distance dependence of the parton energy loss and will affect the shape of suppression of moderately high P_T hadron spectra.

  12. Flow Effects on Jet Energy Loss with Detailed Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luan Cheng; Jia Liu; Enke Wang

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In the presence of collective flow a new model potential describing the interaction of the hard jet with scattering centers is derived based on the static color-screened Yukawa potential. The flow effect on jet quenching with detailed balance is investigated in pQCD. It turns out, considering the collective flow with velocity $v_z$ along the jet direction, the collective flow decreases the LPM destructive interference comparing to that in the static medium. The gluon absorption plays a more important role in the moving medium. The collective flow increases the energy gain from gluon absorption, however, decreases the energy loss from gluon radiation, which is $(1 - v_z )$ times as that in the static medium to the first order of opacity. In the presence of collective flow, the second order in opacity correction is relatively small compared to the first order. So that the total effective energy loss is decreased. The flow dependence of the energy loss will affect the suppression of high $p_T$ hadron spectrum and anisotropy parameter $v_2$ in high-energy heavy-ion collisions.

  13. Episodic Mass Loss and Pre-SN Circumstellar Envelopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nathan Smith

    2008-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss observational clues concerning episodic mass-loss properties of massive stars in the time before the final supernova explosion. In particular, I will focus on the mounting evidence that LBVs and related stars are candidates for supernova progenitors, even though current paradigms place them at the end of core-H burning. Namely, conditions in the immediate circumstellar environment within a few 10$^2$ AU of Type IIn supernovae require very high progenitor mass-loss rates. Those rates are so high that the only known stars that come close are LBVs during rare giant eruptions. I will highlight evidence from observations of some recent extraordinary supernovae suggesting that explosive or episodic mass loss (a.k.a. LBV eruptions like the 19th century eruption of Eta Car) occur in the 5-10 years immediately preceding the SN. Finally, I will discuss some implications for stellar evolution from these SNe, the most important of which is the observational fact that the most massive stars can indeed make it to the ends of their lives with substantial H envelopes intact, even at Solar metallicity.

  14. Electron loss from fast heavy ions: Target-scaling dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DuBois, R. D. [Department of Physics, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States); Santos, A. C. F.; Montenegro, E. C. [Instituto de Fisica, UFRJ, Caixa Postal 68528 Rio de Janeiro, BR-21941-972 RJ (Brazil); Sigaud, G. M. [Departamento de Fisica, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Caixa Postal 38071, Rio de Janeiro, BR-22452-970 RJ (Brazil)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The target dependence for projectile electron loss is investigated using experimental data taken from the literature. Impact energies range from a few tens of eV/u to tens of MeV/u. For energies less than several MeV/u, the target dependences are shown to be very similar, independent of projectile species and charge state. Overall, however, with increasing impact energy the cross-section dependence on the target nuclear charge systematically increases. It is shown that none of the existing cross-section target scaling models reproduce these features. A model, based on Born scaling and including both the antiscreening and screening contributions to projectile electron loss, is developed. With the inclusion of relativistic effects, which increase the contribution from both channels at high energies, and ''target saturation'' effects, which reduce the contribution from the screening term for heavy targets and lower impact energies, this model describes quite reasonably all available experimental data. A simple scaling formula that reproduces the measured atomic number and impact velocity dependences is provided. This formula is applicable for projectile electron loss in collisions with either atomic or molecular targets and for impact energies ranging from a few to tens of MeV/u.

  15. Effect of Loss on Multiplexed Single-Photon Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damien Bonneau; Gabriel J. Mendoza; Jeremy L. O'Brien; Mark G. Thompson

    2015-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An on-demand single-photon source is a key requirement for scaling many optical quantum technologies. A promising approach to realize an on-demand single-photon source is to multiplex an array of heralded single-photon sources using an active optical switching network. However, the performance of multiplexed sources is degraded by photon loss in the optical components and the non-unit detection efficiency of the heralding detectors. We provide a theoretical description of a general multiplexed single-photon source with lossy components and derive expressions for the output probabilities of single-photon emission and multi-photon contamination. We apply these expressions to three specific multiplexing source architectures and consider their tradeoffs in design and performance. To assess the effect of lossy components on near- and long-term experimental goals, we simulate the multiplexed sources when used for many-photon state generation under various amounts of component loss. We find that with a multiplexed source composed of switches with ~0.2-0.4 dB loss and high efficiency number-resolving detectors, a single-photon source capable of efficiently producing 20-40 photon states with low multi-photon contamination is possible, offering the possibility of unlocking new classes of experiments and technologies.

  16. The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor Readout System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dusatko, John; Browne, M.; Fisher, A.S.; Kotturi, D.; Norum, S.; Olsen, J.; /SLAC

    2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The LCLS Undulator Beam Loss Monitor System is required to detect any loss radiation seen by the FEL undulators. The undulator segments consist of permanent magnets which are very sensitive to radiation damage. The operational goal is to keep demagnetization below 0.01% over the life of the LCLS. The BLM system is designed to help achieve this goal by detecting any loss radiation and indicating a fault condition if the radiation level exceeds a certain threshold. Upon reception of this fault signal, the LCLS Machine Protection System takes appropriate action by either halting or rate limiting the beam. The BLM detector consists of a PMT coupled to a Cherenkov radiator located near the upstream end of each undulator segment. There are 33 BLMs in the system, one per segment. The detectors are read out by a dedicated system that is integrated directly into the LCLS MPS. The BLM readout system provides monitoring of radiation levels, computation of integrated doses, detection of radiation excursions beyond set thresholds, fault reporting and control of BLM system functions. This paper describes the design, construction and operational performance of the BLM readout system.

  17. Extracting Geospatial Preferences Using Relational Neighbors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinho, Leandro Balby; Sandholm, Thomas; Nunes, Iury; Nóbrega, Caio; Araújo, Jordão

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the increasing popularity of location-based social media applications and devices that automatically tag generated content with locations, large repositories of collaborative geo-referenced data are appearing on-line. Efficiently extracting user preferences from these data to determine what information to recommend is challenging because of the sheer volume of data as well as the frequency of updates. Traditional recommender systems focus on the interplay between users and items, but ignore contextual parameters such as location. In this paper we take a geospatial approach to determine locational preferences and similarities between users. We propose to capture the geographic context of user preferences for items using a relational graph, through which we are able to derive many new and state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms, including combinations of them, requiring changes only in the definition of the edge weights. Furthermore, we discuss several solutions for cold-start scenarios. Finally, we con...

  18. Soft Multiple Winners for Sparse Feature Extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A simple and computationally inexpensive neural network method for generating sparse representations is presented. The network has a single layer of linear neurons and, on top of it, a mechanism, which assigns a winning strength for each neuron. Both input and output are real valued in contrast to many earlier methods, where either input or output must have been binary valued. Also, the sum of winning strengths does not have to be normalized as in some other approaches. The ability of the algorithm to find meaningful features is demonstrated in a simulation with images of handwritten numerals. 1. Introduction The objective of a feature extraction system is to refine data in such a way that further processing becomes easier. In classification, such a system has two basic goals. One is to remove redundancies from the data. This helps cutting down computational costs later on. Another, contradictory goal is to discriminate data, which helps in distinguishing between similar inputs. A fe...

  19. Energy usage in oil and gas extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honeycutt, B.D.

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared in partial fulfillment of Subcontract No. C90-103207 by Baxter D. Honeycutt, P.E., Richardson Texas, for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the US DOE, INEL requirements, for the requested report were outlined by letter dated September 4, 1990, included the following: process flow diagrams and descriptive discussions of technical operations; mass and energy balances; a summary of energy-saving opportunities with the cross-cutting technologies emphasized; trends of oil and gas production versus energy expended to achieve new production; conclusions and recommendations for future research. The National Energy Account (NEA) data on energy usage in oil and gas related extraction processes are reproduced for reference. Energy cost and production are given for oil and gas well drilling, crude oil and production, national gas production, and natural gas liquid production.

  20. Extracting Operating Modes from Building Electrical Load Data: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, S.; Polese, L. G.; Rader, E.; Sheppy, M.; Smith, J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Empirical techniques for characterizing electrical energy use now play a key role in reducing electricity consumption, particularly miscellaneous electrical loads, in buildings. Identifying device operating modes (mode extraction) creates a better understanding of both device and system behaviors. Using clustering to extract operating modes from electrical load data can provide valuable insights into device behavior and identify opportunities for energy savings. We present a fast and effective heuristic clustering method to identify and extract operating modes in electrical load data.

  1. Extraction efficiency and quantification of mutagenic chemicals in soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maggard, Lea Ann

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Dr. K. W. Brown Lack of established extraction procedures for quantification of mutagenic compounds in soil is a major technical limitation to monitoring and assessing the performance of a hazardous waste land treatment facility. In this study... for extracting organic mutagens from the waste or soil/waste mixture. The use of combined biological and chemical testing protocol provided the most practical means of determining extraction efficiency. The bioassay detected additive, synergistic...

  2. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li{sup +} ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm{sup 2} have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of {approx}1275 deg. C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J{>=} 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, {<=}0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of {approx}40 h at {approx}1275 deg. C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of {approx}6 {mu}s each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. The source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  3. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li{sup +} ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenway, W. G.; Kwan, J. W.

    2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm{sup 2} have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of ?1275{degrees}C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J ? 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A source with an alumino-silicate coating 6.35 mm in diameter and ?0.25 mm thick, has a lifetime of ?40 hours at ?1275{degrees}C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of ?6 ?s each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. Furthermore, the source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  4. Source fabrication and lifetime for Li+ ion beams extracted from alumino-silicate sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, Prabir K.; Greenway, Wayne G.; Kwan, Joe W

    2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A space-charge-limited beam with current densities (J) exceeding 1 mA/cm{sup 2} have been measured from lithium alumino-silicate ion sources at a temperature of #24;~1275#14;{degrees} C. At higher extraction voltages, the source appears to become emission limited with J #21;{>=} 1.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, and J increases weakly with the applied voltage. A 6.35 mm diameter source with an alumino-silicate coating, {<=}#20;0.25 mm thick, has a measured lifetime of ~#24;40 hours at ~#24;1275#14;{degrees} C, when pulsed at 0.05 Hz and with pulse length of #24;~6 μs each. At this rate, the source lifetime was independent of the actual beam charge extracted due to the loss of neutral atoms at high temperature. The source lifetime increases with the amount of alumino-silicate coated on the emitting surface, and may also be further extended if the temperature is reduced between pulses.

  5. andongensis extract aloe: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Documents Articles, Books DocbookIndexer PDFBox PDF Metadata from content & context Fill in generated... Droogmans, Lieven; Bosman, Ben 2005-07-07 70 Point Source Extraction...

  6. aloe andongensis extract: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Documents Articles, Books DocbookIndexer PDFBox PDF Metadata from content & context Fill in generated... Droogmans, Lieven; Bosman, Ben 2005-07-07 70 Point Source Extraction...

  7. automatic road extraction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of Malta 2 Department of Computer Science, University of Malta claudia.borg|mike.rosner|gordon.pace@um.edu.mt Abstract. Definition extraction can be useful Pace,...

  8. automatable method extract: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of Malta 2 Department of Computer Science, University of Malta claudia.borg|mike.rosner|gordon.pace@um.edu.mt Abstract. Definition extraction can be useful Pace,...

  9. automatically extracting molecular: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of Malta 2 Department of Computer Science, University of Malta claudia.borg|mike.rosner|gordon.pace@um.edu.mt Abstract. Definition extraction can be useful Pace,...

  10. automatic feature extraction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of Malta 2 Department of Computer Science, University of Malta claudia.borg|mike.rosner|gordon.pace@um.edu.mt Abstract. Definition extraction can be useful Pace,...

  11. automatic contour extraction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of Malta 2 Department of Computer Science, University of Malta claudia.borg|mike.rosner|gordon.pace@um.edu.mt Abstract. Definition extraction can be useful Pace,...

  12. automatically extracting ts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    University of Malta 2 Department of Computer Science, University of Malta claudia.borg|mike.rosner|gordon.pace@um.edu.mt Abstract. Definition extraction can be useful Pace,...

  13. aqueous plant extracts: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protein Synthesis Inhibition Activity by Strawberry Tissue Protein Extracts during Plant Life Cycle and under Biotic and Abiotic Stresses CiteSeer Summary: Abstract:...

  14. Fluid Circulation and Heat Extraction from Engineered Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A large amount of fluid circulation and heat extraction (i.e., thermal power production) research and testing has been conducted on engineered geothermal reservoirs in the...

  15. automated concise extraction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Computer Science, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel 4 Center for Automation Research, University of Maryland Plaza, Antonio J. 5 Automated Pointcut Extraction...

  16. automated rna extraction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Computer Science, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel 4 Center for Automation Research, University of Maryland Plaza, Antonio J. 5 Automated Pointcut Extraction...

  17. automated relation extraction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Computer Science, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 52900, Israel 4 Center for Automation Research, University of Maryland Plaza, Antonio J. 6 Automated Pointcut Extraction...

  18. automated dna extraction: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Crop Cleaning PCR Products. . Labeling Cleaned... 5 56 57 . . . 57 CHAPTER IV AUTOMATION POTENTIAL . . . . . . . 59 Introduction . . Collecting Field Data . DNA Extraction....

  19. Penguin pollution estimates relevant for phi_2/alpha extraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jure Zupan

    2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A review of methods to extract the standard CKM unitarity triangle angle alpha is provided. The sizes of related theoretical errors are reviewed.

  20. Theory of AC Loss in Cables with 2G HTS Wire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clem, J.R.; Malozemoff, A.P.

    2009-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    While considerable work has been done to understand AC losses in power cables made of first generation (1G) high temperature superconductor (HTS) wires, use of second generation (2G) HTS wires brings in some new considerations. The high critical current density of the HTS layer 2G wire reduces the surface superconductor hysteretic losses. Instead, gap and polygonal losses, flux transfer losses in imbalanced two layer cables and ferromagnetic losses for wires with NiW substrates constitute the principal contributions. Current imbalance and losses associated with the magnetic substrate can be minimized by orienting the substrates of the inner winding inward and the outer winding outward.

  1. Measurements of DT alpha particle loss near the outer midplane of TFTR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zweben, S.J.; Darrow, D.S.; Herrmann, H.W.; Redi, M.H.; Schivell, J.; White, R.B.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of DT alpha particle loss to the outer midplane region of TFTR have been made using a radially movable scintillator detector. The conclusion from this data is that mechanisms determining the DT alpha loss to the outer midplane are not substantially different from those for DD fusion products. Some of these results are compared with a simplified theoretical model for TF ripple-induced alpha loss, which is expected to be the dominant classical alpha loss mechanism near the outer midplane. An example of plasma-driven MHD-induced alpha particle loss is shown, but no signs of any ``collective`` alpha instability-induced alpha loss have yet been observed.

  2. Wideband current transformers for the surveillance of the beam extraction kicker system of the Large Hadron Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Defrance, C; Ducimetière, L; Vossenberg, E

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The LHC beam dumping system must protect the LHC machine from damage by reliably and safely extracting and absorbing the circulating beams when requested. Two sets of 15 extraction kicker magnets form the main active part of this system. A separate high voltage pulse generator powers each magnet. Because of the high beam energy and the consequences which could result from significant beam loss due to a malfunctioning of the dump system the magnets and generators are continuously surveyed in order to generate a beam abort as soon as an internal fault is detected. Amongst these surveillance systems, wideband current transformers have been designed to detect any erratic start in one of the generators. Output power should be enough to directly re-trigger all the power trigger units of the remaining 14 generators. The current transformers were developed in collaboration with industry. To minimize losses, high-resistivity cobalt alloy was chosen for the cores. The annealing techniques originally developed for LEP b...

  3. Application of ultrasound in solvent extraction of nickel and gallium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesic, B.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of ultrasound on the rate of solvent extraction of nickel with Lix 65N and Lix 70, and gallium with Kelex 100 were investigated. These solvent extraction systems are noted by their sluggish nature. Low frequency (20 kHz) ultrasound increased the rates of extraction of nickel by factors of four to seven. The ultrasound had no effect on the final chemical equilibrium. Gallium extraction rates were enhanced with the use of ultrasound by as much as a factor of 15. Again, the ultrasound had no effect on extraction equilibrium. For both nickel and gallium, the enhanced rates were attributed to increased interfacial surface area associated with ultrasonically induced cavitation and microdroplet formation. The stability of the microdroplets permitted intermittent application of ultrasound with corresponding decreases in ultrasonic energy requirements. The lowest energy consumption was observed with short (0.25 to 5 s) bursts of high power (41 to 61 W) ultrasonic inputs. The study also provided insight into the factors that affect the complex extraction of gallium from sodium aluminate solutions. The rate controlling step was found to be the dehydration of the gallate ion, Ga(OH)4, and the first complex formation between gallium and Kelex 100. Sodium was found to enhance the extraction rate up to a point, beyond which increased concentration was detrimental. Increasing aluminum concentration was found to slow extraction rates. Modifiers and diluents were shown to markedly affect extraction rates even without ultrasound. Ketone modifiers, particularly 2-undecanone, when used with Kermac 470B or Escaid 200 diluents enhanced extraction rates of gallium to the point that the use of ultrasound provided no additional benefits. The positive effects of ketone modifiers for the solvent extraction of gallium had not been previously reported.

  4. Optical loss due to diffraction by concentrator Fresnel lenses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hornung, Thorsten, E-mail: thorsten.hornung@ise.fraunhofer.de; Nitz, Peter, E-mail: thorsten.hornung@ise.fraunhofer.de [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstr. 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany)

    2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Fresnel lenses are widely used in concentrating photovoltaic (CPV) systems as a primary optical element. They focus sunlight on small solar cells or on the entrance apertures of secondary optical elements. A Fresnel lens consists of several prism rings and diffraction by these prism rings is unavoidable. Some of the light that would reach a designated target area according to geometric optics will miss it due to diffraction. This diffraction loss may be of relevant magnitude for CPV applications. The results of published analytical calculations are evaluated, discussed, and compared to computer simulations and measurements.

  5. Surfactant loss: Effects of temperature, salinity, and wettability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noll, L.A.; Gall, B.L.; Crocker, M.E.; Olsen, D.K.

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adsorption of sodium dodecylsulfate, Triton X-100, decyltrimethylammonium bromide surfactants onto silica gel and Berea sandstone mineral surfaces has been studied as a function of temperature, solution salt concentration, and mineral surface wettability. Adsorption studies using a flow calorimeter were conducted using pure surfactants and minerals. The studies were then extended to the adsorption of one type of commercial surfactant onto both consolidated and crushed Berea sandstone using column techniques. This has allowed the comparison of different methods to evaluate surfactant losses from flowing rather than static surfactant solutions. 20 refs., 15 figs., 37 tabs.

  6. Dose estimates in a loss of lead shielding truck accident.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis, Matthew L.; Osborn, Douglas M.; Weiner, Ruth F.; Heames, Terence John (Alion Science & Technology Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiological transportation risk & consequence program, RADTRAN, has recently added an updated loss of lead shielding (LOS) model to it most recent version, RADTRAN 6.0. The LOS model was used to determine dose estimates to first-responders during a spent nuclear fuel transportation accident. Results varied according to the following: type of accident scenario, percent of lead slump, distance to shipment, and time spent in the area. This document presents a method of creating dose estimates for first-responders using RADTRAN with potential accident scenarios. This may be of particular interest in the event of high speed accidents or fires involving cask punctures.

  7. Statistical methods for detecting loss of materials using NRTA data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burr, T.; Coulter, A.; Hakkila, A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Ai, H.; Kadokura, I.; Fujimaki, K. [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors selected eight sequential statistical tests and studied their performance on near-real-time-accounting (NRTA) data that is nominally what is expected from the proposed Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant in Japan. The effort divided into three main activities: (1) use process-flow information to determine process vessel inventories and transfers at the time of material balance closure, (2) use variance propagation methods to estimate the variance-covariance matrix of a sequence of material balances, and (3) study the performance of eight sequential tests on a variety of loss scenarios. This paper describes the results of these three activities.

  8. Method for reducing energy losses in laser crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atherton, L.J.; DeYoreo, J.J.; Roberts, D.H.

    1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for reducing energy losses in crystals is disclosed which comprises: a. heating a crystal to a temperature sufficiently high as to cause dissolution of microscopic inclusions into the crystal, thereby converting said inclusions into point-defects, and b. maintaining said crystal at a given temperature for a period of time sufficient to cause said point-defects to diffuse out of said crystal. Also disclosed are crystals treated by the process, and lasers utilizing the crystals as a source of light. 12 figs.

  9. Ultra-low-loss tapered optical fibers with minimal lengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryutaro Nagai; Takao Aoki

    2014-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We design and fabricate ultra-low-loss tapered optical fibers (TOFs) with minimal lengths. We first optimize variations of the torch scan length using the flame-brush method for fabricating TOFs with taper angles that satisfy the adiabaticity criteria. We accordingly fabricate TOFs with optimal shapes and compare their transmission to TOFs with a constant taper angle and TOFs with an exponential shape. The highest transmission measured for TOFs with an optimal shape is in excess of 99.7 % with a total TOF length of only 23 mm, whereas TOFs with a constant taper angle of 2 mrad reach 99.6 % transmission for a 63 mm TOF length.

  10. No loss fueling station for liquid natural gas vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cieslukowski, R.E.

    1992-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a no loss fueling station for delivery of liquid natural gas (LNG) to a use device such as a motor vehicle. It comprises: a pressure building tank holding a quantity of LNG and gas head; means for delivering LNG to the pressure building tank; means for selectively building the pressure in the pressure building tank; means for selectively reducing the pressure in the pressure building tank; means for controlling the pressure building and pressure reducing means to maintain a desired pressure in the pressure building tank without venting natural gas to the atmosphere; and means for delivering the LNG from the pressure building tank to the use device.

  11. No loss fueling station for liquid natural gas vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustafson, K.

    1993-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A no loss liquid natural gas (LNG) delivery system is described comprising: (a) means for storing LNG and natural gas at low pressure; (b) means for delivering LNG from the means for storing to a use device including means for sub-cooling the LNG; (c) means for pre-cooling the means for sub-cooling before the LNG is delivered to the use device to substantially reduce vaporization of the initial LNG delivered to the use device; and (d) means for delivering a selectable quantity of the natural gas in said storing means to said use device with the LNG.

  12. Evaluation of friction loss in flexible and galvanized duct 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, Carlos Michael Alberto

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or similar exterior material. 3. When exterior abrasion of the duct can be a factor, a vinyl scuff strip can be glued or plastic welded in spiral fashion on the outside cover. 4. Reduction in flow because of Internal friction can be minimized by using...EVALUATION OF FRICTION LOSS IN FLEXIBLE AND GALVANIZED DUCT A Thesis by CARLOS MICHAEL ALBERTO ZIMMERMANN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfliiment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  13. Evaluation of friction loss in flexible and galvanized duct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, Carlos Michael Alberto

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for Friction Loss in Straight Runs of Duct (a'Ipha=0. 10). 21 Ill Static Pressure Data Converted to Equivalent Lengths. 23 IV Duncan's Multiple Range Test of Variability for Equivalent Lengths of 90 Degree Elbows (al pha=0. IO). 26 V Student t Test... in the system was controlled by a discharge damper and metered with an orifice meter. The static pressure data was collected by the use of a pizometer ring located at the exhaust portion of the test apparatus where the flexible duct was connected...

  14. Material loss angles from direct measurements of broadband thermal noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Principe, Maria; Pierro, Vincenzo; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Taurasi, Ilaria; Villar, Akira E; Black, Eric D; Libbrecht, Kenneth G; Michel, Christophe; Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate the loss angles of the materials currently used in the highly reflective test-mass coatings of interferometric detectors of gravitational waves, namely Silica, Tantala, and Ti-dop ed Tantala, from direct measurement of coating thermal noise in an optical interferometer testbench, the Caltech TNI. We also present a simple predictive theory for the material properties of amorphous glassy oxide mixtures, which gives results in good agreement with our measurements on Ti-doped Tantala. Alternative measure ment methods and results are reviewed, and some critical issues are discussed.

  15. Electron energy loss spectroscopy studies of MgO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estrada, Cesar Antonio

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . HREELS studies were conducted on ultra-thin films of MgO(100) formed on Mo(100) in order to establish a new approach to investigate adsorbate vibrations on oxide surfaces. The conductive nature of the Mo substrate prevented the occurrence of charging...-specular scattering geometry of 8'-10' were the optimum conditions for circumventing the problem posed by the intensity of the phonon losses and thus observing the HREELS vibrational spectra of adsorbates on MgO. Water, deuterium dioxide, methanol, acetic acid...

  16. JGI data loss in /projectb/sandbox area [purge]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh SchoolIn12 Investigation PeerNOON 2004 February 12, 2004JGI data loss

  17. Primary Characteristics of Loan Loss Reserve Funds | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHA AdministrativeofDepartmentEnergyLoan loss reserve (LLR) funds

  18. Loan Loss Reserve Funds and Other Credit Enhancements | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketing | DepartmentComputingEnergy Loan Loss

  19. Reduce Radiation Losses from Heating Equipment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015 < prevQuick Guide:U.N.June 8,PastRadiation Losses from Heating

  20. Miter bend loss and higher order mode content measurements in overmoded millimeter-wave transmission lines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kowalski, Elizabeth J. (Elizabeth Joan)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High power applications require an accurate calculation of the losses on overmoded corrugated cylindrical transmission lines. Previous assessments of power loss on these lines have not considered beam polarization or higher ...

  1. THE EFFECT OF MASS LOSS ON THE TIDAL EVOLUTION OF EXTRASOLAR PLANET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Jianheng

    By combining mass loss and tidal evolution of close-in planets, we present a qualitative study on their tidal migrations. We incorporate mass loss in tidal evolution for planets with different masses and find that mass ...

  2. General Comparison of Power Loss in Single-Layer and Multi-Layer Windings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    General Comparison of Power Loss in Single-Layer and Multi-Layer Windings M. E. Dale C. R. Sullivan the IEEE. #12;General Comparison of Power Loss in Single-Layer and Multi-Layer Windings Magdalena E. Dale

  3. Static Pressure Loss in 12”, 14”, and 16” Non-metallic Flexible Duct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantrill, David Lee

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flow rate for a given duct size. The data gathered showed general agreement with previous studies showing an increase in compression ratio leads to an increase in static pressure loss through the duct. It was determined that pressure losses...

  4. Extracting the Green's function from measurements of the energy flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snieder, Roel

    Extracting the Green's function from measurements of the energy flux Roel Sniedera) Center for Wave, Cambridge CB3 0EL, United Kingdom ivasconc@gmail.com Abstract: Existing methods for Green's function extraction give the Green's function from the correlation of field fluctuations recorded at those points

  5. aqueous fish extract: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aqueous fish extract First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Extracting Fish and Water Velocity...

  6. BEaST: Brain extraction using multiresolution nonlocal segmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BEaST: Brain extraction using multiresolution nonlocal segmentation Simon F. Eskildsen1 Østergaard2 , D. Louis Collins1 , and the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative 1 McConnell Brain. Brain extraction is an important step in the analysis of brain images. Variability in brain morphology

  7. Extracting Business Rules from COBOL: A Model-Based Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Extracting Business Rules from COBOL: A Model-Based Tool Valerio Cosentino AtlanMod, INRIA, EMN and we provide a set of model transformations to identify and visualize the embedded business rules at this point. This model will be then manipulated in the next steps to extract the business rules

  8. Simultaneous Feature Extraction and Selection Using a Masking Genetic Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Simultaneous Feature Extraction and Selection Using a Masking Genetic Algorithm Michael L. Raymer: identification of functional water molecules bound to protein surfaces, and diagnosis of thyroid deficiency of feature extraction ­ defining new features in terms of the original feature set to facilitate more

  9. Heng Ji & Ralph Grishman Collaborative Entity Extraction and Translation 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTENTS Heng Ji & Ralph Grishman Collaborative Entity Extraction and Translation 1 Index of Subjects and Terms 13 #12;vi CONTENTS #12;Collaborative Entity Extraction and Translation Heng Ji & Ralph s in language S from the #12;2 HENG JI & RALPH GRISHMAN properties of the sequence of tokens t with which

  10. Information Extraction in the KELP Framework Robert Dale, Marc Tilbrook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dale, Robert

    Information Extraction in the KELP Framework Robert Dale, Marc Tilbrook Centre for Language In this paper, we describe some early steps in a new approach to information extraction. The aim of the kelp, to reconcile and combine the informational elements found in a text. 2 Background The goal of the kelp1 project

  11. Extracting Provably Correct Rules from Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clausen, Michael

    Extracting Provably Correct Rules from Artificial Neural Networks Sebastian B. Thrun University procedures have been applied successfully to a variety of real­world scenarios, artificial neural networks for extracting symbolic knowledge from Backpropagation­style artificial neural networks. It does

  12. On automating the extraction of programs from termination proofs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayala-Rincón, Mauricio

    On automating the extraction of programs from termination proofs Fairouz Kamareddine , Fran to use termination techniques such as those in rewriting theory. We overcome this difficulty the incorporation of termination techniques used in other areas while still extracting programs. Keywords: Program

  13. New Methods in Automatic Extracting H. P. EDMUNDSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hearst, Marti

    system is parameterized to control and vary the influence of the above four components. The researchNew Methods in Automatic Extracting H. P. EDMUNDSON University of Maryland,* College Park, Maryland ABSTRACT. This paper describes new methods of automatically extracting documents for screening purposes, i

  14. Murphy Tools: Utilizing Extracted GUI Models for Industrial Software Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Memon, Atif M.

    --graphical user interface; GUI test automation; model extraction; reverse engineering; industrial test environment is a technique for using models as a basis for automated test generation. The industrial adoption of MBTMurphy Tools: Utilizing Extracted GUI Models for Industrial Software Testing Pekka Aho VTT

  15. Computational Aspects of Resilient Data Extraction from Semistructured Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Guizhen

    source and maps it into a set of structured or semistructured database objects that can be readilyComputational Aspects of Resilient Data Extraction from Semistructured Sources #3; (Extended Automatic data extraction from semistructured sources such as HTML pages is rapidly growing into a problem

  16. A Comparison of Three Total Variation Based Texture Extraction Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    Goldfarb b , Stanley Osher c aRice University, Department of Computational and Applied Mathematics, 6100 models for signal/image texture extraction based on total variation minimization: the Meyer [2], the Vese using 1D oscillating signals and 2D images reveal their differences: the Meyer model tends to extract

  17. Extraction of Neutrino Flux from the Inclusive Muon Cross Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murata, Tomoya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied a method to extract neutrino flux from the data of neutrino-nucleus reaction by using maximum entropy method. We demonstrate a promising example to extract neutrino flux from the inclusive cross section of muon production without selecting a particular reaction process such as quasi-elastic nucleon knockout.

  18. Extraction of Neutrino Flux from the Inclusive Muon Cross Section

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomoya Murata; Toru Sato

    2015-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied a method to extract neutrino flux from the data of neutrino-nucleus reaction by using maximum entropy method. We demonstrate a promising example to extract neutrino flux from the inclusive cross section of muon production without selecting a particular reaction process such as quasi-elastic nucleon knockout.

  19. Frequency and surface dependence of the mechanical loss in fused silica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven D. Penn; Alexander Ageev; Dan Busby; Gregory M. Harry; Andri M. Gretarsson; Kenji Numata; Phil Willems

    2005-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We have compiled measurements of the mechanical loss in fused silica from samples spanning a wide range of geometries and resonant frequency in order to model the known variation of the loss with frequency and surface-to-volume ratio. This improved understanding of the mechanical loss has contributed significantly to the design of advanced interferometric gravitational wave detectors, which require ultra-low loss materials for their test mass mirrors.

  20. Method of underground mining by pillar extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowen, Ray J. (1879 Delann, Salt Lake City, UT 84121); Bowen, William R. (1636 Sunnydale La., Salt Lake City, UT 84108)

    1980-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of sublevel caving and pillar and top coal extraction for mining thick coal seams includes the advance mining of rooms and crosscuts along the bottom of a seam to a height of about eight feet, and the retreat mining of the top coal from the rooms, crosscuts and portions of the pillars remaining from formation of the rooms and cross-cuts. In the retreat mining, a pocket is formed in a pillar, the top coal above the pocket is drilled, charged and shot, and then the fallen coal is loaded by a continuous miner so that the operator remains under a roof which has not been shot. The top coal from that portion of the room adjacent the pocket is then mined, and another pocket is formed in the pillar. The top coal above the second pocket is mined followed by the mining of the top coal of that portion of the room adjacent the second pocket, all by use of a continuous miner which allows the operator to remain under a roof portion which has not been shot.

  1. Extracting hot carriers from photoexcited semiconductor nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Xiaoyang

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This research program addresses a fundamental question related to the use of nanomaterials in solar energy -- namely, whether semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) can help surpass the efficiency limits, the so-called “Shockley-Queisser” limit, in conventional solar cells. In these cells, absorption of photons with energies above the semiconductor bandgap generates “hot” charge carriers that quickly “cool” to the band edges before they can be utilized to do work; this sets the solar cell efficiency at a limit of ~31%. If instead, all of the energy of the hot carriers could be captured, solar-to-electric power conversion efficiencies could be increased, theoretically, to as high as 66%. A potential route to capture this energy is to utilize semiconductor nanocrystals. In these materials, the quasi-continuous conduction and valence bands of the bulk semiconductor become discretized due to confinement of the charge carriers. Consequently, the energy spacing between the electronic levels can be much larger than the highest phonon frequency of the lattice, creating a “phonon bottleneck” wherein hot-carrier relaxation is possible via slower multiphonon emission. For example, hot-electron lifetimes as long as ~1 ns have been observed in NCs grown by molecular beam epitaxy. In colloidal NCs, long lifetimes have been demonstrated through careful design of the nanocrystal interfaces. Due to their ability to slow electronic relaxation, semiconductor NCs can in principle enable extraction of hot carriers before they cool to the band edges, leading to more efficient solar cells.

  2. Solvent extraction of bitumen from tar sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoon, A.Y.; Thomas, S. [Univ. of West Indies, St. Augustine (Trinidad and Tobago)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the measurement of mass transfer rates for the extraction of bitumen from tar sands using organic solvents. The experiment was carried out in an agitated vessel using a six-blade turbine mixer on a laboratory scale. To facilitate the determination of absolute mass transfer coefficients, tar sands were specially prepared in the form of spherical particles so that mass transfer area can be computed. The variables investigated in the study included: (1) solvent type (kerosene, toluene, benzene), (2) stirrer speed, 25 rpm to 1000 rpm, and (3) particle diameter, 0.4 cm to 1.2 cm. The results indicated that solvency power varied markedly with the various solvents used and that high aromatic content promoted rapid dissolution when compared with paraffinic solvents. The mass transfer rates increased with increasing stirrer speed in accordance with the relationship: k {alpha} N{sup 0.56} where k is the mass transfer coefficient and N the stirrer speed. Increasing particle diameter also resulted in decreased mass transfer rates. The results were satisfactorily correlated in terms of a Frossling type equation, Sh {alpha} Re{sub p}{sup a}Sc{sup b}.

  3. DNAPL Extraction/Oleofilter Test Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, R.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Hazel, C.

    1997-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A short term, low flow DNAPL extraction test was performed from May 29 - 30, 1997, to gather additional information about the possibility of using monitoring well MSB-3D to recover source contamination from the M-Area Aquifer. Although no visible, free phase material was recovered, the groundwater did contain perchloroethylene (PCE) at and above aqueous solubility. Improvements in the pumping configuration were identified for future trials. Prior to final treatment in the M1 air stripper, the groundwater was passed through an Oleofiltration system to evaluate its capability as a treatment technology. The Oleofilter uses a combination of conventional gravity assisted separation with coalescing plates and a final polishing filter using proprietary coated granules to remove hydrocarbons. Although free phase DNAPL was not processed through the Oleofilter, the groundwater containing high levels of dissolved PCE was treated efficiently. Initially the Oleofilter removed 99 percent of the PCE. As the test progressed, this removal rate decreased to 83 percent as the granules became loaded with PCE. Longer term testing, perhaps with periodic backflushing, is required to determine the effective granule capacity.

  4. Mass Loss From Evolved Stars in Elliptical Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parriott, Joel R

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the X-ray emitting gas in early-type galaxies probably originates from red giant mass loss and here we model the interaction between this stellar mass loss and the hot ambient medium. Using two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations, we adopt a temperature for the ambient medium of 3E6 K along with a range of ambient densities and stellar velocities. When the stellar velocity is supersonic relative to the ambient medium, a bow shock occurs, along with a shock driven into the stellar ejecta, which heats only a fraction of the gas. Behind the bow shock, a cool wake develops but the fast flow of the hot medium causes Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities to grow and these fingers are shocked and heated (without radiative cooling). Along with the mixing of this wake material with the hot medium, most of the stellar ejecta is heated to approximately the temperature of the hot ambient medium within 2 pc of the star. With the addition of radiative cooling, some wake material remains cool (< 1E5 K), accounting for ...

  5. Uncertainty, loss aversion, and markets for energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing energy efficiency is critical to mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from fossil-fuel combustion, reducing oil dependence, and achieving a sustainable global energy system. The tendency of markets to neglect apparently cost-effective energy efficiency options has been called the efficiency gap or energy paradox. The market for energy efficiency in new, energy-using durable goods, however, appears to have a bias that leads to undervaluation of future energy savings relative to their expected value. This paper argues that the bias is chiefly produced by the combination of substantial uncertainty about the net value of future fuel savings and the loss aversion of typical consumers. This framework relies on the theory of contextdependent preferences. The uncertainty-loss aversion bias against energy efficiency is quantifiable, making it potentially correctible by policy measures. The welfare economics of such policies remains unresolved. Data on the costs of increased fuel economy of new passenger cars, taken from a National Research Council study, illustrate how an apparently cost-effective increase in energy efficiency would be uninteresting to lossaverse consumers.

  6. Black Hole Remnants and the Information Loss Paradox

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pisin Chen; Yen Chin Ong; Dong-han Yeom

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Forty years after the discovery of Hawking radiation, its exact nature remains elusive. If Hawking radiation does not carry any information out from the ever shrinking black hole, it seems that unitarity is violated once the black hole completely evaporates. On the other hand, attempts to recover information via quantum entanglement lead to the firewall controversy. Amid the confusions, the possibility that black hole evaporation stops with a "remnant" has remained unpopular and is often dismissed due to some "undesired properties" of such an object. Nevertheless, as in any scientific debate, the pros and cons of any proposal must be carefully scrutinized. We fill in the void of the literature by providing a timely review of various types of black hole remnants, and provide some new thoughts regarding the challenges that black hole remnants face in the context of information loss paradox and its latest incarnation, namely the firewall controversy. The importance of understanding the role of curvature singularity is also emphasized, after all there remains a possibility that singularity cannot be cured even by quantum gravity. In this context a black hole remnant conveniently serves as a cosmic censor. We conclude that a remnant remains a possible end state of Hawking evaporation, and if it contains large interior geometry, may help to ameliorate information loss and the firewall paradox. We hope that this will raise some interests in the community to investigate remnants more critically but also more thoroughly.

  7. A Web-Based Task-Tracking Collaboration System for the Florida Public Hurricane Loss Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Ching

    A Web-Based Task-Tracking Collaboration System for the Florida Public Hurricane Loss Model Raul, FL 33199, U.S.A. hamids@fiu.edu Abstract--The Florida Public Hurricane Loss Model (FPHLM) is a large of residential insurance premiums as they relate to insured losses caused by hurricane winds. The modeling

  8. Motoring of a Flexible Resonant Engine to Estimate Associated Damping Losses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    . Introduction The performance of internal combustion engines is limited by heat losses, friction losses, throttling, and combustion losses. These issues become more prevalent as the size of the engine is scaled of applications. One new concept is the development of a resonant heat engine, where combustion happens

  9. Estimating Water Quality Pollution Impacts Based on Economic Loss Models in Urbanization Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Qian

    . Research has targeted the assessment toward economic loss evaluation Grossman and Alan 1995; Ofiara 2001Estimating Water Quality Pollution Impacts Based on Economic Loss Models in Urbanization Process and spatial characteristics of different water quality parameters, and simulating economic loss of water

  10. Analytical Model of Magnet Eddy-Current Volume Losses in Multi-phase PM Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Analytical Model of Magnet Eddy-Current Volume Losses in Multi-phase PM Machines with Concentrated, 94000 Créteil France Abstract--this paper studies magnet eddy-current losses in permanent magnet (PM calculations. Keywords--Traction, Concentrated Winding, Eddy- Current, Volume Magnet Losses, Multiphase Machine

  11. Improvement of the magnetic core for eddy current losses decreasing in cylindrical linear actuators.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Improvement of the magnetic core for eddy current losses decreasing in cylindrical linear actuators the power) increases, the iron losses become high [1]. One classical method for reducing the eddy current the eddy current losses in a longitudinal flux multi-rod actuator and to compute improvement. 2 The linear

  12. Passive Loss Inference in Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Network Coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Passive Loss Inference in Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Network Coding Yunfeng Lin, Ben Liang, Baochun Li Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering University of Toronto {ylin, bli it desirable to monitor link loss rates in wireless sensor networks. In this paper, we study the loss inference

  13. Bunch-Length Dependence of Power Loss for the SSC Miguel A. Furman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furman, Miguel

    SSC-N-143 Bunch-Length Dependence of Power Loss for the SSC Miguel A. Furman SSC Central Design- tarding effect of the longitudinal impedance Z (). For gaussian bunches the power loss is given by [1] P for the different structures, and then use Eq. (4) to calculate the power loss. We also as- sume nominal SSC values

  14. Optimal Core Dimensional Ratios for Minimizing Winding Loss in High-Frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to optimum provides a 32% savings in power loss compared to another popular core shape. Further improvements in power loss could be achieved by using optimized core shapes. Improvements to software for shape. This optimum aspect ratio is a function of frequency and other parameters. Significant increases in power loss

  15. Optimization of inflow waveform phase-difference for minimized total cavopulmonary power loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pekkan, Kerem

    Optimization of inflow waveform phase-difference for minimized total cavopulmonary power loss minimized power loss, inside the TCPC pathway is required for the best optimal surgical outcomes we focused on the characterization of power loss changes due to the temporal variations in between

  16. Integrated Ultra-Low-Loss 4-Bit Tunable Delay for Broadband Phased Array Antenna Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    F. Bauters, et al. , “Ultra-low-loss high-aspect-ratio Si3N4JUNE 15, 2013 Integrated Ultra-Low-Loss 4-Bit Tunable Delaya 4-bit tunable delay in an ultra-low-loss Si 3 N 4 planar

  17. Link Loss Inference in Wireless Sensor Networks with Randomized Network Coding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Vincent

    Link Loss Inference in Wireless Sensor Networks with Randomized Network Coding Vahid Shah that randomized network coding can improve the reliability of wireless sensor networks with lossy links. With network coding, the loss rate of a chosen path in a wireless sensor network is the maximum link loss rate

  18. Accurate Prediction of Ferrite Core Loss with Nonsinusoidal Waveforms Using Only Steinmetz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accurate Prediction of Ferrite Core Loss with Nonsinusoidal Waveforms Using Only Steinmetz IN POWER ELECTRONICS 1 Accurate Prediction of Ferrite Core Loss with Nonsinusoidal Waveforms Using Only of ferrite core loss for nonsinu- soidal waveforms separates a flux trajectory into major and minor loops via

  19. Determination of refractive index, thickness, and the optical losses of thin films from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Determination of refractive index, thickness, and the optical losses of thin films from prism­film.4760, 300.1030. 1. Introduction Transparent thin films find wide applications in optics: coating, sensors and optical losses. The optical losses of a thin film have three different origins: sur- face scattering due

  20. Low-Loss, Tunable Microwave Capacitors Using Bismuth Zinc Niobate Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    York, Robert A.

    Low-Loss, Tunable Microwave Capacitors Using Bismuth Zinc Niobate Thin Films Jaehoon Park, Jiwei in the measured frequency range. The results show that BZN thin films have great potential for low loss, tunable microwave devices. Keyword: low loss, thin film, capacitors, dielectric properties, bismuth zinc niobate I