Sample records for represent wells completed

  1. Representative well models for eight geothermal-resource areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, C.C.; Lin, Y.T.; Livesay, B.J.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Representative well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal-resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. The models were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. The nature, construction, and validation of the models are presented.

  2. STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEEP WELL COMPLETIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Wolhart

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a project to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. Phase 1 was recently completed and consisted of assessing deep gas well drilling activity (1995-2007) and an industry survey on deep gas well stimulation practices by region. Of the 29,000 oil, gas and dry holes drilled in 2002, about 300 were drilled in the deep well; 25% were dry, 50% were high temperature/high pressure completions and 25% were simply deep completions. South Texas has about 30% of these wells, Oklahoma 20%, Gulf of Mexico Shelf 15% and the Gulf Coast about 15%. The Rockies represent only 2% of deep drilling. Of the 60 operators who drill deep and HTHP wells, the top 20 drill almost 80% of the wells. Six operators drill half the U.S. deep wells. Deep drilling peaked at 425 wells in 1998 and fell to 250 in 1999. Drilling is expected to rise through 2004 after which drilling should cycle down as overall drilling declines.

  3. Foolproof completions for high rate production wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tosic, Slavko

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    wells, particularly those with subsea wellheads, and the alternative has been to subject the completion to increasingly high drawdown, accepting a high skin effect. A far better solution is to use a HPF completion. Of course the execution of a successful...

  4. Foolproof completions for high rate production wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tosic, Slavko

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    wells, particularly those with subsea wellheads, and the alternative has been to subject the completion to increasingly high drawdown, accepting a high skin effect. A far better solution is to use a HPF completion. Of course the execution of a successful...

  5. Completion of Oil Wells May 4, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudge, John

    Completion of Oil Wells John Rudge May 4, 2003 1 Introduction After the initial drilling of an oil for given , z; i.e. ignore radial variation. Under this assumption these equations can be easily integrated

  6. Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. An assessment of historical deep gas well drilling activity and forecast of future trends was completed during the first six months of the project; this segment of the project was covered in Technical Project Report No. 1. The second progress report covers the next six months of the project during which efforts were primarily split between summarizing rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep reservoirs and contacting operators about case studies of deep gas well stimulation.

  7. Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Wolhart

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

  8. WELL-FORMEDNESS, CONSISTENCY AND COMPLETENESS OF GRAPHIC MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Hong

    WELL-FORMEDNESS, CONSISTENCY AND COMPLETENESS OF GRAPHIC MODELS HONG ZHU Department of Computing@yahoo.com ABSTRACT This paper clarifies the notions of well-formedness, consistency and completeness of graphic languages, Well-formedness, Consistency constraints, Completeness constraints, Type systems, Formal

  9. HPE Fitness and Wellness Certificate Completion Form Instructions As you are nearing completion of (or have already completed) your Fitness and Wellness Credit Certificate, this is the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alabama in Huntsville, University of

    HPE Fitness and Wellness Certificate Completion Form Instructions As you are nearing completion of (or have already completed) your Fitness and Wellness Credit Certificate, this is the final step met, individuals must submit a completed HPE Fitness and Wellness Credit Certificate Completion Form

  10. U.S. Geothermal Completes Second Successful Production Well at...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Completes Second Successful Production Well at Neal Hot Springs Project Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: U.S. Geothermal Completes Second...

  11. Corrosion mitigation--a critical facet of well completion design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradburn, J.B.; Kalra, S.K.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The successful completion and production of deep hot corrosive wells can be accomplished by the development of a corrosion mitigation program during the initial stages of the drilling and completion phases. The mitigation programs that have proven themselves to be safe, reliable and effective address three critical areas: tubing selection, corrosion treatment method, and completion design. These three areas when properly studied and evaluated result in a successful corrosion mitigation program and a well with a low workover frequency.

  12. U.S. Geothermal Announces Successful Completion of First Well...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Announces Successful Completion of First Well at Neal Hot Springs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: U.S. Geothermal Announces...

  13. Corrosion mitigation-A critical facet of well completion design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradburn, J.B.; Karla, S.K.

    1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful completion and production of deep hot corrosive wells can be accomplished by the development of a corrosion mitigation program during the initial stages of the drilling and completion phases. The mitigation programs that have proved safe, reliable, and effective address three critical areas: tubing selection, corrosion treatment method, and completion design. These three areas when properly studied and evaluated result in a successful corrosion mitigation program and a well with a low workover frequency. The development of an effective well completion program in a corrosive well requires input from the drilling, completion, and corrosion engineers. Completion design, tubing selection, and the corrosion treatment method are all critical facets in the economical production of deep hot wells that contain CO/sub 2/ and/or H/sub 2/S in the produced gas. A completion design that limits the application of a corrosion inhibitor could reduce its effectiveness to less than 50%. Industry surveys and field results suggest that the use of low-alloy carbon steels in conjunction with a continuous corrosion inhibitor injection system can effectively and economically control the rate of the corrosion attack. Also evident are the potential problems that can arise if a corrosion mitigation program is designed to rely entirely on the corrosion resistance qualities of an activepassive metal alloy such as stainless steels.

  14. Geopressured-geothermal well report. Volume I. Drilling and completion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gladys McCall site activities are covered through the completion of the test well and salt water disposal well. The test well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet, then plugged back to 15,831 feet. Three 4'' diameter diamond cores were taken for analysis. An existing well on site, the Getty-Butts Gladys McCall No. 1, was reentered and completed to a depth of 3514 feet as a salt water disposal well. The geologic interpretation of the Gladys McCall site indicated target sands for testing at 15,080 feet through 15, 831 feet. Reservoir fluid temperature at this depth is estimated to be approximately 313/sup 0/F and pressure is estimated to be +-12,800 psi. The preliminary reservoir volume estimate is 3.6 billion barrels of brine. The design wells program includes environmental monitoring of the Gladys McCall site by Louisiana State University. Field stations are set up to monitor surface and ground water quality, subsidence, land loss and shoreline erosion, and seismicity. As of December 31, 1981 the study shows no significant impact on the environment by site operations.

  15. Drilling, completing, and maintaining geothermal wells in Baca, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pye, S.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 55-MWe power plant is planned for development in the Baca location in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico. Union Geothermal has contracted to provide the steam for the power plant. This paper uses Baca Well No. 13 as a case history to describe the drilling methods, casing program, cementing program, and completion methods used by Union. The discussion includes aerated-water. Lost circulation control in mud drilling and its effort on the subsequent casing cementing program are discussed. The paper also includes a case history of scale removal methods used in Baca Well No. 11, including drilling the scale out with a turbodrill and attempts at chemical inhibition.

  16. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-5 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 342.6 meters below ground surface. The borehole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 762.0 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 309.9 meters, 40 days after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 18 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 349.6 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data and results from detailed chemical and mineralogical analyses of rock samples. The well penetrated Tertiary-age tuffs of the Thirsty Canyon Group, caldera moat-filling sedimentary deposits, lava of the Beatty Wash Formation, and landslide breccia and tuffs of the Timber Mountain Group. The well reached total depth in welded ashflow tuff of the Ammonia Tanks Tuff after penetrating 440.1 meters of this unit, which is also the main water-producing unit in the well. The geologic interpretation of data from this well constrains the western margin of the Ammonia Tanks caldera to the west of the well location.

  17. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Townsend, M.J.

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth 675.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 566.3 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with three isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 31 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 680 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, the Crater Flat Group, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. The preliminary geologic interpretation of data from Well ER-EC-1 indicates the presence of a structural trough or bench filled with a thick section of post-Rainier Mesa lava. These data also suggest that this site is located on a buried structural ridge that may separate the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

  18. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Townsend

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-4 was drilled for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 263.7 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,062.8 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of 228.3 meters, two months after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 35 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 286.5 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well was collared in basalt and penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Thirsty Canyon Group, the Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon, and the Timber Mountain Group. The preliminary geologic interpretation of data from this well helps pinpoint the location of the western margin of the Timber Mountain caldera complex in the southern Nevada volcanic field.

  19. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-2A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Townsend

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-2A was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in January and February of 2000 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program in the Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 412.9 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,516.1 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 228.0 meters, approximately two months after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 81 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 212 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 30 samples. The well was collared in rhyolite lava and penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon and the Timber Mountain Group. The preliminary geologic interpretation of borehole data indicates that this well was drilled within the margins of the buried Rainier Mesa and Ammonia Tanks calderas, and that caldera collapse in this area was deeper than expected, resulting in a section of Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon (caldera-filling deposit) that is much thicker than expected.

  20. Completion report for Well ER-EC-6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Townsend

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-6 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the DOE's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 66-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 485.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 434.6 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with four isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 33 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 504.4 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. Intense hydrothermal alteration was observed below the depth of 640 m. The preliminary geologic interpretation indicates that this site may be located on a buried structural ridge that separates the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

  1. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-7 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 265.8 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 422.5 meters. The planned depth of 762 meters was not reached due to borehole stability problems. One completion string with two isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of 227.8 meters, 20 days after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings, supplemented by geophysical log data, and incorporating data from detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples. Beneath a thin alluvial deposit, the well penetrated 410 meters of lava and bedded tuff of the Volcanics of Fortymile Canyon Group, deposited in the Timber Mountain caldera moat after caldera collapse. The geologic interpretation of data from this well provides information on the thickness, lithologic composition, and hydrogeologic character of moat-filling rocks in the southern portion of the Timber Mountain caldera complex in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field.

  2. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-8 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 129.8 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 609.6 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 98.4 meters, 24 days after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on evaluation of composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 20 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 157.9 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data and results of detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples. Drilling began in Tertiary-age tuff of the Thirsty Canyon Group, and penetrated tuffs of the Beatty Wash Formation, tuff of Buttonhook Wash, and the upper portion of the Ammonia Tanks Tuff. The geologic interpretation of data from this well helps define the location of the western margin of the Timber Mountain caldera complex in the southwestern Nevada volcanic field. Geologic and hydrologic data from the well will aid in development of models to predict groundwater flow and contaminant migration within and near the Nevada Test Site.

  3. Appendix A Lithologic and Monitor Well Completion Logs

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111A Lithologic and Monitor Well Completion Logs

  4. Site selection, drilling, and completion of two horizontal wells in the Devonian Shales of West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Johnson, H.R.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a summary of the geologic site selection studies, planning, drilling, completing, stimulating, and testing of two horizontal wells drilled in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin in West Virginia. Each horizontal well was designed and managed by BDM as the prime contractor to the Department of Energy. The first well was drilled with industry partner Cabot Oil and Gas Corporation in Putnam County, West Virginia. The second well was drilled with Consolidated Natural Gas Company in Calhoun County, West Virginia. This report summarizes four reports prepared by BDM which detail the site selection rationale and the drilling and completion operations of each well. Each horizontal well is currently producing commercial quantities of hydrocarbons. The successful application of horizontal well technology represent continued development of the technology for application to tight and unconventional natural gas resources of the United States. Continued technology development is expected to ultimately result in commercial horizontal well drilling activity by industry in the Appalachian Basin.

  5. COMPLETION REPORT FOR WELL CLUSTER ER-5-3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECHTEL NEVADA

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well Cluster ER-5-3 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This cluster of 3 wells was drilled in 2000 and 2001 as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program in Frenchman Flat. The first borehole in the cluster, Well ER-5-3, was drilled in February and March 2000. A 47.0-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 374.8 meters. The hole diameter was decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 794.3 meters within welded ash-flow tuff. A piezometer string with 1 slotted interval was installed in the annulus of the surface casing, open to the saturated alluvium. A completion string with 2 slotted intervals was installed in the main hole, open to saturated alluvium and to the welded tuff aquifer. A second piezometer string with 1 slotted interval open to the welded-tuff aquifer was installed outside the completion string. Well ER-5-3 No.2 was drilled about 30 meters west of the first borehole in March 2000, and was recompleted in March 2001. A 66.0-centimeter hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 613.8 meters. The hole diameter was decreased to 44.5 centimeters and the borehole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 849.0 meters. The hole diameter was decreased once more to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,732.2 meters in dolomite. A completion string open to the dolomite (lower carbonate aquifer) was installed. Well ER-5-3 No.3 was drilled approximately 30 meters north of the first 2 boreholes in February 2001. A 66.0-centimeter hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 36.6 meters, then the main 25.1-centimeter-diameter hole was drilled to a total depth of 548.6 meters in alluvium. A slotted stainless-steel tubing string was installed in the saturated alluvium. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 282.6 meters, prior to development and hydrologic testing. Detailed lithologic descriptions and stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 120 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 91 meters in Wells ER-5-3 and ER-5-3 No.2, supplemented by geophysical log data. The wells penetrated Quaternary/Tertiary alluvium to the depth of 622.4 meters, and an 8.5-meter-thick basalt flow was encountered within the alluvium. Tertiary tuff was penetrated to the depth of approximately 1,425.9 meters, where the top of the lower carbonate aquifer was tagged in Well ER-5-3 No.2.

  6. Well completion report on installation of horizontal wells for in-situ remediation tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.; Corey, J.C.; Wright, L.M.

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A project to drill and install two horizontal vapor extraction/air-injection wells at the Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, South Carolina, was performed in September and October of 1988. This study was performed to test the feasibility of horizontal drilling technologies in unconsolidated sediments and to evaluate the effectiveness of in-situ air stripping of volatile organics from the ground water and unsaturated soils. A tremendous amount of knowledge was obtained during the drilling and installation of the two test wells. Factors of importance to be considered during design of another horizontal well drilling program follow. (1) Trips in and out of the borehole should be minimized to maintain hole stability. No reaming to enlarge the hole should be attempted. (2) Drilling fluid performance should be maximized by utilizing a low solids, low weight, moderate viscosity, high lubricity fluid. Interruption of drilling fluid circulation should be minimized. (3) Well materials should possess adequate flexibility to negotiate the curve. A flexible guide should be attached to the front of the well screen to guide the screen downhole. (4) Sands containing a minor amount of clay are recommended for completion targets, as better drilling control in the laterals was obtained in these sections.

  7. Well completion process for formations with unconsolidated sands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, David K. (Kingwood, TX); Mondragon, III, Julius J. (Redondo Beach, CA); Hara, Philip Scott (Monterey Park, CA)

    2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for consolidating sand around a well, involving injecting hot water or steam through well casing perforations in to create a cement-like area around the perforation of sufficient rigidity to prevent sand from flowing into and obstructing the well. The cement area has several wormholes that provide fluid passageways between the well and the formation, while still inhibiting sand inflow.

  8. Completion report for well ER-3-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-3-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project (NV ERP) at the Nevada Test Site. IT Corporation (IT) was the principal environmental contractor for the project. The roles and responsibilities of IT and other contractors involved in the project are described in the Raytheon Services Nevada (RSN) Drilling Program and the Underground Test Area Operable Unit Project Management Plan. The well will become part of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) monitoring well network.

  9. Completion Report for Well ER-2-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-2-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (formerly Nevada Operations Office), in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in February and March of 2003, as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. Well ER-2-1 was drilled as part of the Yucca Flat Corrective Action Unit Phase I drilling initiative. The well is located in north central Yucca Flat within Area 2 of the Nevada Test Site, and provided information regarding the radiological and physical environment near underground nuclear tests conducted in a saturated volcanic aquifer setting. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 83 sidewall samples taken at various depths between 113.7 and 754.4 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, chemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 27 samples of drill cuttings. The well was collared in tuffaceous alluvium, and penetrated Tertiary-age tuffs of the Timber Mountain and Paintbrush Groups, Calico Hills and Wahmonie Formations, Crater Flat Group, Grouse Canyon Formation, before reaching total depth in the Tunnel Bed Formation.

  10. Completion Report for Well ER-8-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-8-1 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in October and November of 2002 as part of a Hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. Well ER-8-1 is located at the north end of Yucca Flat approximately 580 meters south-southeast of the surface exposure of the Climax granitic intrusive. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in this report. These are based on composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, and 21 sidewall samples taken at various depths between 351.1 and 573.0 meters, supplemented by incomplete geophysical log data. Detailed petrographic, geochemical, and mineralogical studies of rock samples were conducted on 22 samples of drill cuttings. Drilling began in tuffaceous alluvium, and the borehole penetrated Tertiary age bedded tuffs of the Volcanics of Oak Spring Butte and carbonate sediments of Paleozoic age, which were encountered at a depth of 334 meters. The borehole unexpectedly penetrated granite at the depth of 538.9 meters in which drilling was stopped. Contact metamorphic rocks and intrusive dikes associated with the Cretaceous-age granitic intrusive and at least one significant fault zone were encountered.

  11. Site selection, drilling, and completion of two horizontal wells in the Devonian Shales of West Virginia. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.; Reeves, T.K.; Johnson, H.R.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a summary of the geologic site selection studies, planning, drilling, completing, stimulating, and testing of two horizontal wells drilled in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin in West Virginia. Each horizontal well was designed and managed by BDM as the prime contractor to the Department of Energy. The first well was drilled with industry partner Cabot Oil and Gas Corporation in Putnam County, West Virginia. The second well was drilled with Consolidated Natural Gas Company in Calhoun County, West Virginia. This report summarizes four reports prepared by BDM which detail the site selection rationale and the drilling and completion operations of each well. Each horizontal well is currently producing commercial quantities of hydrocarbons. The successful application of horizontal well technology represent continued development of the technology for application to tight and unconventional natural gas resources of the United States. Continued technology development is expected to ultimately result in commercial horizontal well drilling activity by industry in the Appalachian Basin.

  12. Geothermal-well completions: a survey and technical evaluation of existing equipment and needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicholson, J.E.; Snyder, R.E.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geothermal environment and associated well completion problems are reviewed. Existing well completion equipment is surveyed and limitations are identified. A technical evaluation of selected completion equipment is presented. The technical evaluation concentrates on well cementing equipment and identifies potential failure mechanisms which limit the effectiveness of these tools. Equipment employed in sand control, perforating, and corrosion control are identified as potential subjects for future technical evaluation.

  13. Instructions to the Applicant 1. The Facility Representative shall complete a "Special Event Application &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Application & Permit". A site and floor plan must be submitted to the Office of the State Fire Marshal with the Fire and Life Safety requirements of Title 19, Title 24, and the conditions noted on this permit. Non. The Facility Representative shall transmit the "Special Event Application & Permit" to the Office of the State

  14. G. M. Koelemay well No. 1, Jefferson County, Texas. Volume I. Completion and testing: testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The acquisition, completion, and testing of a geopressured-geothermal well are described. The following are covered: geology; petrophysics; re-entry and completion operations - test well; drilling and completion operations - disposal well; test objectives; surface testing facilities; pre-test operations; test sequence; test results and analysis; and return of wells and location to operator. (MHR)

  15. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Detailed completion prognosis for geopressured-geothermal well of opportunity, prospect #2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A geopressured-geothermal test of Martin Exploration Company's Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2 will be conducted in the Tuscaloosa Trend. The Crown Zellerbach Well No. 1 will be converted to a saltwater disposal well for disposal of produced brine. The well is located in the Satsuma Area, Livingston parish, Louisiana. Eaton proposes to test the Tuscaloosa by perforating the 7 inch casing from 16,718 feet to 16,754 feet. The reservoir pressure at an intermediate formation depth of 16,736 feet is anticipated to be 12,010 psi and the temperature is anticipated to be 297 F. Calculated water salinity is 16,000 ppm. The well is expected to produce a maximum of 16,000 barrels of water a day with a gas content of 51 SCF/bbl. Eaton will re-enter the test well, clean out to 17,000 feet, run production casing and complete the well. The disposal well will be re-entered and completed in the 9-5/8 inch casing for disposal of produced brine. Testing will be conducted similar to previous Eaton annular flow WOO tests. An optional test from 16,462 feet to 16,490 feet may be performed after the original test and will require a workover with a rig on location to perform the plugback. The surface production equipment utilized on previous tests will be utilized on this test. The equipment has worked satisfactorily and all parties involved in the testing are familiar with its operation. Weatherly Engineering will operate the test equipment. The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) and Mr. Don Clark will handle sampling, testing and reservoir engineering evaluation, respectively. wireline work required will be awarded on basis of bid evaluation. At the conclusion of the test period, the D.O.E. owned test equipment will be removed from the test site, the test and disposal wells plugged and abandoned and the sites restored to the satisfaction of all parties.

  16. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Detailed completion prognosis for geopressured-geothermal well of opportunity, prospect #7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godchaux, Frank A.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is a detailed prognosis covering the acquisition, completion, drilling, testing and abandonment of the Frank A. Godchaux, III, Well No. 1 under the Wells of Opportunity Program. The well is located approximately 12 miles southeast of the city of Abbeville, Louisiana. Eaton Operating Company proposes to test a section of the Planulina sand at a depth ranging from 15,584 to 15,692 feet. The reservoir pressure is estimated to be 14,480 psi and the temperature of the formation water is expected to be 298 F. The water salinity is calculated to be 75,000 ppm. The well is expected to produce 20,000 barrels of water per day with a gas content of 44 standard cubic feet pre barrel. The well was acquired from C and K Petroleu, Inc. on March 20, 1981. C and K abandoned the well at a total depth of 16,000 feet. The well has a 7-5/8 inches liner set at 13,387 feet. Eaton proposes to set 5-1/2 inch casing at 16,000 feet and produce the well through the casing using a 2-3/8 inch tubing string for wireline protection and for pressure control. A 4,600 foot saltwater disposal well will be drilled on the site and testing will be conducted similar to previous Eaton tests. The total estimated cost to perform the work is $2,959,000. An optional test from 14,905 to 15,006 feet may be performed after the original test and will require a workover with a rig on location to perform the plugback. The surface production equipment utilized on previous Eaton WOO tests will be utilized on this test. This equipment has worked satisfactorily and all parties involved in the testing are familiar with its operation. The Institute of Gas Technology and Mr. Don Clark will handle the sampling and testing and reservoir evaluation, respectively, as on the previous Eaton tests.

  17. Well Completion Report for Well ER-20-11, Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-20-11 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Management Operations Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September 2012 as part of the Central and Western Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Unit Phase II drilling program. Well ER-20-11 was constructed to further investigate the nature and extent of radionuclidecontaminated groundwater encountered in two nearby UGTA wells, to help define hydraulic and transport parameters for the contaminated Benham aquifer, and to provide data for the UGTA hydrostratigraphic framework model. The 44.5-centimeter (cm) surface hole was drilled to a depth of 520.0 meters (m) and cased with 34.0-cm casing to 511.5 m. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 cm, and the borehole was drilled to a total depth of 915.6 m. The hole was completed to allow access for hydrologic testing and sampling in the target aquifer, which is a lava-flow aquifer known as the Benham aquifer. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 904.3 m, consists of a string of 6?-inch (in.) stainless-steel casing hanging from a string of 7?-in. carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has one slotted interval at 796.3 to 903.6 m. One piezometer string was installed, which consists of 2?-in. stainless-steel tubing that hangs from 2?-in. carbon-steel tubing via a crossover sub. This string was landed at 903.8 m and is slotted in the interval 795.3 to 903.1 m. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, fluid samples (for groundwater chemistry analysis and tritium measurements), and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 915.6 m of Tertiary volcanic rock, including one saturated lava flow aquifer. Measurements on samples taken from the undeveloped well indicated elevated tritium levels within the Benham aquifer. The maximum tritium level measured with field equipment was 146,131 picocuries per liter from a sample obtained at the depth of 912.0 m. The fluid level was measured in the piezometer string at a depth of 504.5 m on September 26, 2012. All Fluid Management Plan (FMP) requirements for Well ER-20-11 were met. Analysis of monitoring samples and FMP confirmatory samples indicated that fluids generated during drilling at Well ER-20-11 met the FMP criteria for discharge to an unlined sump or designated infiltration area. Well development, hydrologic testing, and sampling will be conducted at a later date.

  18. Effects of stimulation/completion practices on Eastern Devonian Shale well productivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nearing, Timothy Ray

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the degree and density of natural fracturing in the shales . The counties and region designations are summarized in table 1. OH WV KY VA Figure 1 - Study Area of Devonian Gas Production. STATE TABLE 1 Description of Study Area COUNTY REGION...EFFECTS OF STIMULATION/COMPLETION PRACTICES ON EASTERN DEVONIAN SHALE WELL PRODUCTIVITY A Thesis by TIMOTHY RAY NEARING Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  19. Effects of stimulation/completion practices on Eastern Devonian Shale well productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nearing, Timothy Ray

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the Devonian shale, ' then the degree of fracture density and fracture preferential direction caused by these stresses should dictate the choice of stimulation method. Young states that fracture orientation will be dictated by the in-situ stress field...EFFECTS OF STIMULATION/COMPLETION PRACTICES ON EASTERN DEVONIAN SHALE WELL PRODUCTIVITY A Thesis by TIMOTHY RAY NEARING Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  20. Complete Set of Inner Products for a Discrete PT-symmetric Square-well Hamiltonian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miloslav Znojil

    2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A discrete $N-$point Runge-Kutta version $H^{(N)}({\\lambda})$ of one of the simplest non-Hermitian square-well Hamiltonians with real spectrum is studied. A complete set of its possible hermitizations (i.e., of the eligible metrics $\\Theta^{(N)}({\\lambda})$ defining its non-equivalent physical Hilbert spaces of states) is constructed, in closed form, for any coupling ${\\lambda}\\in (-1,1)$ and any matrix dimension $N$.

  1. Unique aspects of drilling and completing hot-dry-rock geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carden, R.S.; Nicholson, R.W.; Pettitt, R.A.; Rowley, J.C.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilling operations at the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock (HDR) Geothermal Test Site have led to numerous developments needed to solve the problems caused by a very harsh downhole environment. A pair of deep wells were drilled to approximately 15,000 ft (4.6 km); formation temperatures were in excess of 600/sup 0/F (300/sup 0/C). The wells were directionally drilled, inclined at 35/sup 0/, one above the other, in a direction orthogonal to the least principal stress field. The well site is near the flank of a young silicic composite volcano in the Jemez Mountains of northern New Mexico. The completion of this pair of wells is unique in reservoir development. The lower well was planned as a cold water injector which will be cooled by the introduced water from the static geothermal gradient to about 80/sup 0/F (25/sup 0/C). The upper well will be heated during production to over 500/sup 0/F (250/sup 0/C). The well pair is designed to perform as a closed loop heat-extraction system connected by hydraulic fractures with a vertical spacing of 1200 ft between the wells. These conditions strongly constrain the drilling technique, casing design, cement formulation, and cementing operations.

  2. Well Completion Report for Corrective Action Unit 443 Central Nevada Test Area Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The drilling program described in this report is part of a new corrective action strategy for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443 at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA). The drilling program included drilling two boreholes, geophysical well logging, construction of two monitoring/validation (MV) wells with piezometers (MV-4 and MV-5), development of monitor wells and piezometers, recompletion of two existing wells (HTH-1 and UC-1-P-1S), removal of pumps from existing wells (MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3), redevelopment of piezometers associated with existing wells (MV-1, MV-2, and MV-3), and installation of submersible pumps. The new corrective action strategy includes initiating a new 5-year proof-of-concept monitoring period to validate the compliance boundary at CNTA (DOE 2007). The new 5-year proof-of-concept monitoring period begins upon completion of the new monitor wells and collection of samples for laboratory analysis. The new strategy is described in the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan addendum (DOE 2008a) that the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection approved (NDEP 2008).

  3. Completion and testing report: INEL Geothermal Exploratory Well One (INEL-1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prestwich, S.M.; Bowman, J.A.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INEL Geothermal Exploratory Well One (INEL-1) was drilled in search of a goethermal resource beneath the Snake River Plain for use at the Chemical Processing Plant (CPP) on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site. The drilling site was selected as the most promising location within reasonable distance of the CPP. The resource was thought to be located at a depth near 7500 ft (2300 m). Neither significant production nor high temperatures were noted at that depth, and the well was then drilled to 10,333 ft (3150 m) with similar findings. Rock cores, geophysical logs, and hydrologic tests of the well to date indicate that no useful geothermal resource exists at this location. Information is presented on the drilling, completion, and testing of INEL-1.

  4. Completion Report for Model Evaluation Well ER-5-5: Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Underground Test Area and Boreholes Programs and Operations

    2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Model Evaluation Well ER-5-5 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of Nevada Environmental Management Operations at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site). The well was drilled in July and August 2012 as part of a model evaluation well program in the Frenchman Flat area of Nye County, Nevada. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed geologic, hydrogeologic, chemical, and radiological data that can be used to test and build confidence in the applicability of the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit flow and transport models for their intended purpose. In particular, this well was designed to obtain data to evaluate the uncertainty in model forecasts of contaminant migration from the upgradient underground nuclear test MILK SHAKE, conducted in Emplacement Hole U-5k in 1968, which were considered to be uncertain due to the unknown extent of a basalt lava-flow aquifer present in this area. Well ER-5-5 is expected to provide information to refine the Phase II Frenchman Flat hydrostratigraphic framework model, if necessary, as well as to support future groundwater flow and transport modeling. The 31.1-centimeter (cm) diameter hole was drilled to a total depth of 331.3 meters (m). The completion string, set at the depth of 317.2 m, consists of 16.8-cm stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-cm carbon-steel casing. The 16.8-cm stainless-steel casing has one slotted interval open to the basalt lava-flow aquifer and limited intervals of the overlying and underlying alluvial aquifer. A piezometer string was also installed in the annulus between the completion string and the borehole wall. The piezometer is composed of 7.3-cm stainless-steel tubing suspended from 6.0-cm carbon-steel tubing. The piezometer string was landed at 319.2 m, to monitor the basalt lava-flow aquifer. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, preliminary water quality measurements, and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 331.3 m of Quaternary–Tertiary alluvium, including an intercalated layer of saturated basalt lava rubble. No well development or hydrologic testing was conducted in this well immediately after completion; however, a preliminary water level was measured in the piezometer string at the depth of 283.4 m on September 25, 2012. No tritium above the minimum detection limit of the field instruments was detected in this hole. Future well development, sampling, and hydrologic testing planned for this well will provide more accurate hydrologic information for this site. The stratigraphy, general lithology, and water level were as expected, though the expected basalt lava-flow aquifer is basalt rubble and not the dense, fractured lava as modeled. The lack of tritium transport is likely due to the difference in hydraulic properties of the basalt lava-flow rubble encountered in the well, compared to those of the fractured aquifer used in the flow and transport models.

  5. Completion Report for Model Evaluation Well ER-11-2: Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Underground Test Area and Boreholes Programs and Operations

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Model Evaluation Well ER-11-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of Nevada Environmental Management Operations at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site). The well was drilled in August 2012 as part of a model evaluation program in the Frenchman Flat area of Nye County, Nevada. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed geologic, hydrogeologic, chemical, and radionuclide data that can be used to test and build confidence in the applicability of the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit flow and transport models for their intended purpose. In particular, this well was designed to provide data to evaluate the uncertainty in model forecasts of contaminant migration from the upgradient underground nuclear test PIN STRIPE, conducted in borehole U-11b in 1966. Well ER-11-2 will provide information that can be used to refine the Phase II Frenchman Flat hydrostratigraphic framework model if necessary, as well as to support future groundwater flow and transport modeling. The main 31.1-centimeter (cm) hole was drilled to a total depth of 399.6 meters (m). A completion casing string was not set in Well ER-11-2. However, a piezometer string was installed in the 31.1-cm open hole. The piezometer is composed of 7.3-cm stainless-steel tubing hung on 6.0-cm carbon-steel tubing via a crossover sub. The piezometer string was landed at 394.5 m, for monitoring the lower tuff confining unit. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, water quality (including tritium and other test-related radionuclides) measurements, and water level measurements. The well penetrated 42.7 m of Quaternary and Tertiary alluvium and 356.9 m of Tertiary volcanic rock. The water-level measured in the piezometer string on September 25, 2012, was 353.8 m below ground surface. No tritium above levels detectable by field methods were encountered in this hole. No well development or hydrologic testing was conducted in this well immediately after completion, and future well development, sampling, and hydrologic testing planned for this well will be limited due to the diameter of the piezometer string. The stratigraphy, general lithology, and the water level are as expected, but the section of geology encountered is higher than expected due to faulting. No tritium above the minimum detection limit of the field equipment was detected because the target aquifer (the Topopah Spring aquifer) at Well ER-11-2 is structurally higher than expected and thus unsaturated.

  6. Multi-Seam Well Completion Technology: Implications for Powder River Basin Coalbed Methane Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Office of Fossil Energy; National Energy Technology Laboratory

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential benefits of applying multiseam [well] completion (MSC) technology to the massive stack of low-rank coals in the Powder River Basin. As part of this, the study objectives are: Estimate how much additional CBM resource would become accessible and technically recoverable--compared to the current practice of drilling one well to drain a single coal seam; Determine whether there are economic benefits associated with MSC technology utilization (assuming its widespread, successful application) and if so, quantify the gains; Briefly examine why past attempts by Powder River Basin CBM operators to use MSC technology have been relatively unsuccessful; Provide the underpinnings to a decision whether a MSC technology development and/or demonstration effort is warranted by DOE. To a great extent, this assessment builds on the previously published study (DOE, 2002), which contains many of the key references that underlie this analysis. It is available on the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy technology Laboratory, Strategic Center for Natural Gas website (www.netl.doe.gov/scng). It is suggested that readers obtain a copy of the original study to complement the current report.

  7. Godchaux Well No. 1, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana: completion and testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Godchaux Well No. 1 was originally drilled too a total depth of 16,000 feet in January, 1981 by C and K Petroleum, Inc. and was temporarily abandoned. The well was re-entered by Eaton on 6 August 1981 in an effort to clean out the original open hole below the 7-5/8 inch liner and test a section of the Planulina sand at a depth ranging from 15,584 to 15,692 feet. The reservoir pressure was estimated to be 14,480 psi, and the temperature of the formation water was expected to be 298/sup 0/F. The water salinity was predicted to be 70,000 ppM. The well was expected to produce up to 20,000 BWPD, was a gas content of 44 SCF per barrel. An optional test of a zone from 14,905 to 15,006 feet was also proposed in the detailed completion prognosis, which preceded the attempted test. In the process of drilling the cement plug set by the original operators, the drill string became side-tracked from the original hole. While drilling at 14,510 feet a severe loss of circulation of drilling fluid occurred through a hole in the intermediate casing. The reduction in hydrostatic head resulting from lost circulation caused the open hole to close around and stick the drill string. Efforts to repair the intermediate casing and return to normal operations were estimated to be prohibitively expensive in view of the expected poor probability of success; accordingly, the decision to plug and abandon was carried out on September 12, 1981.

  8. Device for temporarily closing duct-formers in well completion apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zandmer, H.M.; Zandmer, S.M.

    1981-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A duct-forming device is disclosed for use in a well completion apparatus of the kind, wherein a bore hole casing is positioned in a bore hole and duct-forming devices of alkali- and acid resistant metal-such as steel-are secured at spaced levels to the casing in alignment with holes machined in the casing wall. In accordance with the invention, a closure device is arranged within the duct-forming device which permits flow of predetermined amounts of liquid, such as acid, from the interior of the casing through the duct-forming device and into the producing formation, while gradually being moved by the liquid into a position in which such fluid flow is prevented. After the fluid flow has been stopped by the closure device and when the formation pressure exceeds the pressure within the duct-forming device and the casing, fluid from the formation then forces the closure device toward and into the casing space to permit thereafter free flow of formation fluid into the duct-forming device and the casing or of pressurized treatment liquid from the casing into the formation. The inventive arrangement permits inter alia the establishment of a sufficient and substantially uniform feeding rate of treatment liquid, such as acid, from the casing into the producing formation through all the duct-formers in preparation for subsequent acidification or other treatments, such as sand fracking.

  9. Thermo Flash 2000 Elemental Analyzer Based on the well-known process of Flash Dynamic Combustion, which produces complete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Mathew G. - Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto

    Thermo Flash 2000 Elemental Analyzer Based on the well-known process of Flash Dynamic Combustion, which produces complete combustion of the sample followed by an accurate and precise determination of 1800°C, allowing complete conversion to elemental gas of even those samples containing refractory

  10. An Evaluation of Completion Parameters and Well Performance in the Montney Formation in British Columbia, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeghi, Simin

    2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    have been reviewed. Multivariate regression analysis has been applied to study correlations between production rate indicators (Initial Production, EUR) and completion attributes (Lateral length, number of fracture stages, number of perforation clusters...

  11. Horizontal well construction/completion process in a Gulf of Mexico unconsolidated sand: development of baseline correlations for improved drill-in fluid cleanup practices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacewell, Jason Lawrence

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of well planning, completion and cleanup operations. Our objectives are to present a complete examination of the openhole horizontal well construction/completion process using a new drill-in fluid (DIF). Further, we will establish data critical...

  12. Borehole Completion and Conceptual Hydrogeologic Model for the IFRC Well Field, 300 Area, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Horner, Jacob A.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Lanigan, David C.; Thorne, Paul D.

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A tight cluster of 35 new wells was installed over a former waste site, the South Process Pond (316-1 waste site), in the Hanford Site 300 Area in summer 2008. This report documents the details of the drilling, sampling, and well construction for the new array and presents a summary of the site hydrogeology based on the results of drilling and preliminary geophysical logging.

  13. Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Final report: Beulah Simon No. 2 Well, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, R.J.; Hartsock, J.H.; McCoy, R.L.; Rodgers, J.A.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geopressured-geothermal (Geo{sup 2}) test operations were conducted at the Beulah Simon No. 2 well site during the period from September through December 1979. The well provided the second geopressured-geothermal test to be completed under the DOE-Gruy Well of Opportunity program. The completion in a geopressured aquifer of Oligocene age at approximately 14,700 feet and the testing of hot salt water from this zone were accomplished without significant difficulty. Some problems were encountered with the wireline and wireline high-pressure lubricator associated with the running of bottomhole instruments. The objectives of the project were all accomplished, and good test data were obtained on the flow rates of gas and water. The gas content was 24 standard cubic feet per stock tank barrel of water. The disposal well accepted the full wellhead stream at temperatures as high as 255{sup 0}F (124{sup 0}C). Over the 10-day flow period the hot brine did not appear to adversely affect the clay minerals in the disposal aquifer. A conclusion from this operation is that presently available wirelines and pressure lubricators are not adaptable for use with uninhibited well fluids under flowing conditions. In addition, this test demonstrated that injection of scale inhibitor down the annulus eliminated scale buildup within the flow string and surface facilities. (MHR)

  14. Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2, Livingston Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2, approximately 23 miles east of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is the eighth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the DOE Wells of Opportunity program. The well was tested through the annulus between 7-inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. Two flow tests and one reservoir pressure buildup test were conducted on the lower zone during a 13-day period. A total of 12,489 barrels of water was produced. The highest flow rate achieved was about 3887 BWPD. One flow test followed by a buildup period was conducted on the combined upper and lower zones during a 3-day period. A total of 4739 barrels of water was produced. The highest flow rate achieved was about 3000 BWPD. The gas/water ratio measured during testing was about 32.0 SCF/BBL for the lower zone. The extrapolated latoratory data indicates that the solubility of the gas is 55.7 SCF/BBL. It appears that the reservoir brine is considerably undersaturated. The methane content of the flare line gas averaged 71.0 mole percent. Crown Zellerbach Company carefully studied the commercial feasibility of using the well to produce energy for a wood-drying facility and decided against the project.

  15. Drilling, completion, stimulation, and testing of Hardy HW[number sign]1 well, Putnam County, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the detailed field operations in drilling, logging, casing, completing, stimulating and testing the Hardy HW No. l well located in Union District, Putnam County, West Virginia. The project was designed and managed by BDM in cooperation with Cabot Oil and Gas Corporation. The well was spudded on November 29, 1989 and was completed at a total measured depth of 6406 feet on December 29, 1989. The well was drilled on an average azimuth of 335 degrees with a total horizontal displacement of 2618 feet. Approximately 1035 feet of the well had an inclination higher than 86 degrees, while 2212 feet of the well had an inclination greater than 62 degrees. The well was partitioned into five zones for stimulation purposes. Four zones were stimulated during three stimulation operations (Zones 3 and 4 were stimulated together). Zone 1 stimulation was a successful foam frac while the stimulations on Zones 2, 3-4 were Partially successful. Initial gas production rates were 4.5 times greater than the natural production rate. After 21 months, gas produced from the BDM/Cabot well has declined at a rate about one-half that of a conventional vertical well in the area. This horizontal well is projected to produce 475 million cubic feet of gas over a 30-year period.

  16. Drilling, completion, stimulation, and testing of Hardy HW{number_sign}1 well, Putnam County, West Virginia. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the detailed field operations in drilling, logging, casing, completing, stimulating and testing the Hardy HW No. l well located in Union District, Putnam County, West Virginia. The project was designed and managed by BDM in cooperation with Cabot Oil and Gas Corporation. The well was spudded on November 29, 1989 and was completed at a total measured depth of 6406 feet on December 29, 1989. The well was drilled on an average azimuth of 335 degrees with a total horizontal displacement of 2618 feet. Approximately 1035 feet of the well had an inclination higher than 86 degrees, while 2212 feet of the well had an inclination greater than 62 degrees. The well was partitioned into five zones for stimulation purposes. Four zones were stimulated during three stimulation operations (Zones 3 and 4 were stimulated together). Zone 1 stimulation was a successful foam frac while the stimulations on Zones 2, 3-4 were Partially successful. Initial gas production rates were 4.5 times greater than the natural production rate. After 21 months, gas produced from the BDM/Cabot well has declined at a rate about one-half that of a conventional vertical well in the area. This horizontal well is projected to produce 475 million cubic feet of gas over a 30-year period.

  17. Helsinki Journal, Entry 38, April 22, 2007 Well, we have successfully completed our eleven day trip to Spain. Our itinerary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardsley, John

    Helsinki Journal, Entry 38, April 22, 2007 Well, we have successfully completed our eleven day trip Barcelona to Helsinki. The trip was a good mix of relaxation and hard-core-pavement-pounding travel buildings was the lack of practicality in their exterior design. I have come to love Finland's ultra

  18. Drilling, completion, stimulation, and testing of BDM/CNGD Well 3997, Lee District, Calhoun County, West Virginia. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.; Johnson, H.R.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the detailed field operations in drilling, casing, completing, and stimulating the Hunter Bennett No. 3997 well located in Lee District, Calhoun County West Virginia. The project was designed and managed by BDM in cooperation with CNG Development Company. The well was spudded on November 9, 1990, and drilling was completed on December 14, 1990. The well was drilled on an average asmuth of 312 degrees with a total horizontal displacement of 2459 feet. The well was turned to a 90 degree inclination from the vertical over a measured course length of 1216 feet. Approximately 1381 feet of the well had an inclination higher than 86 degrees, while 2179 feet had an inclination greater than 62 degrees. The well was partitioned into five zones for stimulation purposes. Each zone is a little more than 300 feet long. The well was stimulated with nitrogen gas in zones one and two. Early production results are encouraging. The BDM/CNGD horizontal well averaged 147 mcfd of gas over the first week of production and, in week five, began to produce oil at a rate of about 2 bbl/day.

  19. Drilling, completion, stimulation, and testing of BDM/CNGD Well 3997, Lee District, Calhoun County, West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.; Johnson, H.R.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the detailed field operations in drilling, casing, completing, and stimulating the Hunter Bennett No. 3997 well located in Lee District, Calhoun County West Virginia. The project was designed and managed by BDM in cooperation with CNG Development Company. The well was spudded on November 9, 1990, and drilling was completed on December 14, 1990. The well was drilled on an average asmuth of 312 degrees with a total horizontal displacement of 2459 feet. The well was turned to a 90 degree inclination from the vertical over a measured course length of 1216 feet. Approximately 1381 feet of the well had an inclination higher than 86 degrees, while 2179 feet had an inclination greater than 62 degrees. The well was partitioned into five zones for stimulation purposes. Each zone is a little more than 300 feet long. The well was stimulated with nitrogen gas in zones one and two. Early production results are encouraging. The BDM/CNGD horizontal well averaged 147 mcfd of gas over the first week of production and, in week five, began to produce oil at a rate of about 2 bbl/day.

  20. Prairie Canal Well No. 1, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. Volume 1. Completion and testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Prairie Canal Company, Inc. Well No. 1, approximately 8 miles south of the city of Lake Charles, Louisiana, was tested through the annulus between 5-1/2 inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. The interval tested was from 14,782 to 14,820 feet. The geological section was the Hackberry Sand, a member of the Oligocene Frio formation. Produced water was injected into a disposal well which was perforated in several Miocene Sands from 3070 to 4600 feet. Original plans were to test a section of the Hackberry sand from 14,976 to 15,024 feet. This primary zone, however, produced a large amount of sand, shale, gravel, and rocks during early flow periods and was abandoned in favor of the secondary zone. Four pressure drawdown flow tests and three pressure buildup tests were conducted during a 12-day period. A total of 36,505 barrels of water was produced. The highest sustained flow rate was approximately 7100 BWPD. The gas-to-water ratio, measured during testing, ranged from 41 to 50 SCF/BBL. There is disagreement as to the saturation value of the reservoir brine, which may be between 43.3 and 49.7 SCF/BBL. The methane content of the flare line gas averaged 88.4 mole percent. The CO/sub 2/ content averaged 8.4 mole percent. Measured values of H/sub 2/S in the gas were between 12 and 24 ppM.

  1. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report P. R. Girouard Well No. 1, Lafayette Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The P.R. Girouard No. 1 Well, located approximately 10 miles southeast of Lafayette, Louisiana, was the fourth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the Wells of Opportunity program. The well was tested through 3-1/2 inch tubing set on a packer at 14,570 feet without major problems. The geological section tested was the Oligocene Marginulina Texana No. 1 sand of upper Frio age. The interval tested was from 14,744 to 14,819 feet. Produced water was piped down a disposal well perforated from 2870 to 3000 feet in a Miocene saltwater sand. Four flow tests were conducted for sustained production rates of approximately 4000 BWPD to approximately 15,000 BWPD. The highest achieved, during a fifth short test, was 18,460 BWPD. The test equipment was capable of handling higher rates. The gas-to-water ratio was relatively uniform at approximately 40 SCF/bbl. The heating value of the gas is 970 Btu/SCF. The reservoir tests show that is is doubtful that this well would sustain production rates over 10,000 BWPD for any lengthy period from the sand zone in which it was completed. This limited flow capacity is due to the well's poor location in the reservoir and is not a result of any production deficiencies of the Marginulina Texana sand.

  2. Integrated reservoir fracturing and completion study to maximize productivity of individual Niobrara wells in Yuma County, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blauer, R.E.; Brady, B.D.; Holcomb, D.L.; Robinson, F.L.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Consistently and continuously applied fracturing, reservoir and production engineering used to increase recovery from a marginal production low-permeability and low-pressure dry-gas reservoir has approximately doubled the initial production rate and the estimated ultimate recovery expected from new wells. The on-going costs of the additional engineering and technology to sustain the increased productivity of this reservoir is a few cents per MCF. As a result, new wells can be drilled and produced economically, the selection criteria for acceptable infill and exploration locations is greatly expanded, and proven gas reserves for both the new wells and the region are increased. Significant performance improvement can be achieved using a minimum number of wells, consistently collected data, and continuous review of performance changes caused by completion procedures changes. Exploitation optimization is an evolutionary process, not a one time study.

  3. Complete Solutions and Triality Theory to a Nonconvex Optimization Problem with Double-Well Potential in R^n

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Morales-Silva; David Yang Gao

    2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of this research note is to show that the triality theory can always be used to identify both global minimizer and the biggest local maximizer in global optimization. An open problem left on the double-min duality is solved for a nonconvex optimization problem with double-well potential in $\\real^n$, which leads to a complete set of analytical solutions. Also a convergency theorem is proved for linear perturbation canonical dual method, which can be used for solving global optimization problems with multiple solutions. The methods and results presented in this note pave the way towards the proof of the triality theory in general cases.

  4. Well Completion Report for Corrective Action Unit 447, Project Shoal Area, Churchill County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rick Findlay

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Well Completion Report is being provided as part of the implementation of the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447 (NNSA/NSO, 2006a). The CADD/CAP is part of an ongoing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) funded project for the investigation of CAU 447 at the Project Shoal Area (PSA). All work performed on this project was conducted in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996), and all applicable Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) policies and regulations. Investigation activities included the drilling, construction, and development of three monitoring/validation (MV) wells at the PSA. This report summarizes the field activities and data collected during the investigation.

  5. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-14, Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-14 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Management Operations Underground Test Area (UGTA) Activity at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS; formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September and October 2012, as part of the Central and Western Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Unit Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the Fortymile Canyon composite hydrostratigraphic unit in the Timber Mountain moat area, within the Timber Mountain caldera complex, that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. The main 55.9-centimeter (cm) hole was drilled to a total depth of 325.5 meters (m) and cased with 40.6-cm casing to 308.1 m. The hole diameter was then decreased to 37.5 cm, and drilling continued to a total depth of 724.8 m. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 690.9 m, consists of 16.8-cm stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-cm carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has two slotted intervals open to the Rainier Mesa Tuff. Two piezometer strings were installed in Well ER-EC-14. Both piezometer strings, each with one slotted interval, consist of 6.0-cm carbon-steel tubing at the surface, then cross over to 7.3-cm stainless-steel tubing just above the water table. The shallow piezometer string was landed at 507.8 m, and the deep piezometer string was landed at 688.6 m. Both piezometer strings are set to monitor groundwater within moderately to densely welded Rainier Mesa Tuff. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, water quality (including tritium and other radionuclides) measurements, and water level measurements. The well penetrated 15.2 m of alluvium and 709.6 m of Tertiary volcanic rocks. The stratigraphy and general lithology were not as expected due to the position of Well ER-EC-14 relative to the buried caldera margins of the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The well is located inside the Rainier Mesa caldera, but outside the younger Ammonia Tanks caldera. On November 5, 2012, a preliminary fluid level in the shallow piezometer string was measured at the depth of 311.8 m. This water level depth was taken before installation of the bridge plug (to be placed within the main completion casing to separate the two slotted zones). Well development, hydrologic testing, and sampling, will be conducted at a later date. No tritium above levels detectable by field methods were encountered in this hole. All Fluid Management Plan (FMP) requirements for Well ER-EC-14 were met. Analysis of monitoring samples and FMP confirmatory samples indicated that fluids generated during drilling at Well ER-EC-14 met the FMP criteria for discharge to an unlined sump or designated infiltration area. All sanitary and hydrocarbon waste generated was properly handled and disposed of.

  6. Completion Report for Well ER-20-7: Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-20-7 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in June 2009 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to further investigate migration of radionuclides from the nearby, up-gradient TYBO and BENHAM underground nuclear tests, which originally was discovered at Well Cluster ER-20-5. This well also provided detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section that will reduce uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. The main 44.45-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 681.8 meters and cased with 33.97-centimeter casing to 671.7 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.12 centimeters, and the well was drilled to total depth of 894.9 meters. The completion string, set to the depth of 890.0 meters, consists of 14.13-centimeter stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.37-centimeter carbon-steel casing. The 14.13-centimeter stainless-steel casing has one continuous slotted interval open to the Topopah Spring aquifer. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 meters, sidewall core samples from 20 depth intervals, various geophysical logs, water quality (primarily tritium) measurements, and water level measurements. The well penetrated 894.9 meters of Tertiary volcanic rock, including two saturated welded-tuff aquifers. A fluid level measurement was obtained during open-hole geophysical well logging for the upper, Tiva Canyon, aquifer at the depth of 615.7 meters on June 19, 2009. The fluid level measured in the open hole on June 27, 2009,after the total depth was reached and the upper aquifer was cased off, was also at the depth of 615.7 meters. Preliminary field measurements indicated 1.5 to 4.5 million picocuries per liter of tritium in the Tiva Canyon aquifer and 20 to 61 million picocuries per liter in the underlying Topopah Spring aquifer.

  7. Completion Report for the Well ER-6-2 Site Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat - Climax Mine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-6-2 and its satellite hole, Well ER-6-2 No.1, were drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Well ER-6-2 was drilled in two stages in 1993 and 1994; the satellite hole, Well ER-6-2 No.1 was drilled nearby in 1993 but was abandoned. The wells were drilled as part of a hydrogeologic investigation program for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit Number 97, in the northeastern portion of the Nevada Test Site. The wells are located in Yucca Flat, within Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site. The wells provided information regarding the radiological and hydrogeological environment in a potentially down-gradient position from tests conducted in northern and central Yucca Flat. Construction of Well ER-6-2 began with a 1.2-meter-diameter surface conductor hole, which was drilled and cased off to a depth of 30.8 meters below the surface. A 50.8-centimeter diameter surface hole was then rotary drilled to the depth of 578.5 meters and cased off to the depth of 530.4 meters. The hole diameter was then reduced to 27.0 centimeters, and the borehole was advanced to a temporary depth of 611.4 meters. The borehole was conventionally cored to a total depth of 1,045 meters with a diameter of 14.0 centimeters. Borehole sloughing required cementing and re-drilling of several zones. The open-hole completion accesses the lower carbonate aquifer, the CP thrust fault, and the upper clastic confining unit. A fluid level depth of 543.2 meters was most recently measured in the open borehole in September 2007. No radionuclides were encountered during drilling. The satellite hole Well ER-6-2 No.1 was drilled approximately 15.2 meters north of Well ER-6-2 on the same drill pad. This was planned to be used as an observation well during future hydrologic testing at Well ER-6-2; however, the satellite hole was abandoned at the depth of 399 meters due to stuck drill pipe, and was subsequently cemented to the surface. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments in this report are based on composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3 meters, cores taken between the depths of 619.3 and 1,042.4 meters, and geophysical log data. Stratigraphic assignments within the Paleozoic section are based on paleontological analyses. The well was collared in alluvium and at 30.8 meters penetrated Paleozoic carbonate rocks. These consisted of dolostone with minor shale and limestone of the Bonanza King Formation, and limestone with minor quartzite, sandstone, and dolostone assigned to the Guilmette Formation. The borehole reached total depth in a shale unit assigned to the Chainman Shale. The units below the Bonanza King Formation are overturned due to faulting and folding and, therefore, are stratigraphically upside-down.

  8. What do kets represent?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casey Blood

    2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    It is usually assumed that a ket represents the state of an actually existing particle. But one can show there is no evidence for particles. The particle-like properties of mass, spin and charge, as well as particle-like trajectories, the photoelectric effect, and localized effects from spread-out wave functions can be explained using quantum mechanics alone. It is therefore proposed instead that kets represent particle-like solutions to a pre-representational linear partial differential equation which has Poincar\\'e and internal symmetries. This equation underlies the completely representational character, including mass, spin, charge, internal symmetries, and symmetric and antisymmetric statistics, of current quantum mechanics.

  9. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Saldana well No. 2, Zapata County, Texas. Volume I. Completion and testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saldana Well No. 2, approximately 35 miles Southeast of the city of Laredo, Texas, was the sixth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the DOE Wells of Opportunity Program. The well was tested through the annulus between 7-inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. The interval tested was from 9745 to 9820 feet. The geological section was the 1st Hinnant Sand, an upper member of the Wilcox Group. Produced water was injected into the Saldana Well No. 1, which was also acquired from Riddle Oil Company and converted to a disposal well. A Miocene salt water sand was perforated from 3005 to 3100 feet for disposal. One pressure drawdown flow test and one pressure buildup test were conducted during a 10-day period. A total of 9328 barrels of water was produced. The highest sustained flow rate was 1950 BWPD.

  10. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-11 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-11 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in September and October 2009 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. A main objective was to investigate radionuclide migration down-gradient from Well Cluster ER-20-5 and Well ER-20-7 and across the northern Timber Mountain moat structural zone into the area referred to as the Bench, between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex. A secondary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the shallow- to intermediate-depth Tertiary volcanic section in the Bench area. This well also provided detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section to reduce uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model (Bechtel Nevada, 2002). The main 52.1-centimeter hole was drilled to a depth of 507.5 meters and then opened to a diameter of 66.0 centimeters. It was cased with 50.8-centimeter casing to 504.9 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 47.0 centimeters, and drilling continued to a total depth of 979.3 meters. It was then cased with 34.0-centimeter casing set at 965.5 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters and the borehole was drilled to a total depth of 1,264.3 meters. The completion casing string, set to the depth of 1,262.5 meters, consists of 19.4-centimeter stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-centimeter carbon-steel casing. The stainless-steel casing has two slotted intervals open to the Tiva Canyon and Topopah Spring aquifers. Four piezometer strings were installed in Well ER-EC-11. A string of carbon-steel 6.0-centimeter tubing with one slotted interval was inserted outside the 50.8-centimeter casing, within the 66.0-centimeter borehole for access to the Timber Mountain aquifer, and landed at 475.3 meters. A second string of 6.0-centimeter tubing with one slotted interval was inserted outside the 34.0-centimeter casing, within the 47.0-centimeter borehole for access to the Benham aquifer, and landed at 911.7 meters. A third piezometer string consists of 7.3-centimeter stainless-steel tubing that hangs from 6.0-centimeter carbon-steel tubing via a crossover sub. This string was landed at 1,029.5 meters to monitor the Tiva Canyon aquifer. The deepest string of 7.3-centimeter tubing was landed at 1,247.8 meters to monitor the Topopah Spring aquifer. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 meters, 67 percussion gun and rotary sidewall core samples, various geophysical logs, fluid samples (for groundwater chemistry analysis and tritium measurements), and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 1,264.3 meters of Tertiary volcanic rock, including three saturated welded-tuff aquifers and one saturated lava-flow aquifer. A water level was measured in the Timber Mountain aquifer at 449.6 meters, during open-hole geophysical logging on September 20, 2009. The fluid level measured after the total depth was reached and the upper aquifer was cased off was 450.0 meters when measured in the open borehole on October 17, 2009. Measurements on samples taken from the undeveloped well indicated that tritium levels averaging approximately 12,430 picocuries per liter (less than Safe Drinking Water Act levels) were encountered within the Benham aquifer. Tritium was below the minimum detectable activity concentration for samples collected from the Tiva Canyon aquifer and the Topopah Spring aquifer.

  11. Completion Report for Well ER-20-4 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-20-4 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in August and September 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to investigate the possibility of radionuclide transport from up-gradient underground nuclear tests conducted in central Pahute Mesa. This well also provided detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section that will help reduce uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model.

  12. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-12 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-12 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in June and July 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section in the area between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic model. In particular, the well was intended to help define the structural position and hydraulic parameters for volcanic aquifers potentially down-gradient from historic underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. It may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

  13. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-15 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-15 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in October and November 2010, as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section in the area between Pahute Mesa and the Timber Mountain caldera complex that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic model. In particular, the well was intended to help define the structural position and hydraulic parameters of volcanic aquifers potentially down-gradient from underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. It may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

  14. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-13 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-13 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The well was drilled in October 2010 as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. A main objective was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information for the Fortymile Canyon composite unit hydrostratigraphic unit in the Timber Mountain moat area, within the Timber Mountain caldera complex, that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. This well may also be used as a long-term monitoring well.

  15. Eastern Gas Shales Program. Completion and stimulation of five New York State Energy Research and Development Authority Wells Allegany and Cattaraugus Counties, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rdissi, A.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to evaluate the potential of the Devonian Shales as a source of natural gas, DOE/METC in Morgantown, West Virginia, has undertaken the Eastern Gas Shale Program (EGSP); not only to characterize and identify the resource, but also to enhance and improve the productivity of wells completed in the shale. One of the methods used to achieve improved productivity is hydraulic fracturing and, more specifically, foam fracturing. The efforts by DOE/METC included completion and stimulation of five New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) wells; located in western Allegany County and southwestern Cattaraugus County, New York. The five wells were drilled on high shcool and college properties during the months of June and July 1981. DOE/METC's contribution to the program funded the stimulation and completion of the wells. This work was done under the engineering and field supervision of Gruy Federal, Inc. as contractor to DOE. The completion work took place in the months of July and August 1981. This consisted of running a cement bond log in each well. All logs showed good bonding. This was followed by perforating the Marcellus Shale through the 4-1/2-inch casing. During the next phase, the formation was broken down with 1500 gallons of regular HF acid and, then, foam fractured using 50,000 gallons of foam consisting of water and nitrogen; the fractures were propped with 60,000 pounds of sand. After the cleanout operations, open flow potentials and rock pressures were measured in each well. None of the wells had a gas show before fracturing but, after fracturing, open flow ranged from a low of 19 Mcf/D to a high of 73 Mcf/D. 1 reference, 6 figures, 1 table.

  16. Feasibility of Optimizing and Reserves from a Mature and Geological Complex Multiple Turbidite Offshore California Reservoir Through the Drilling and Completion of a Trilateral Horizontal Well.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this project is to devise an effective redevelopment strategy to combat producibility problems related to the Repetto turbidite sequences of the Carpinteria Field. The lack of adequate reservoir characterization, high-water cut production, and scaling problems have in the past contributed to the field`s low productivity. To improve productivity and enhance recoverable reserves, the following specific goals are proposed: (1) Develop an integrated database of all existing data from work done by the former ownership group. (2) Expand reservoir drainage and reduce sand problems through horizontal well drilling and completion. (3) Operate and validate reservoirs` conceptual model by incorporating new data from the proposed trilateral well. (4) Transfer methodologies employed in geologic modeling and drilling multilateral wells to other operators with similar reservoirs. Since the last progress report (January - March, 1997) additional work has been completed in the area of well log interpretation and geological modeling. During this period an extensive effort was made to refine our 3-D geological model both in the area of a refined attribute model and an enhanced structural model. Also, efforts to refine our drilling plans for budget period 11 were completed during this reporting period.

  17. Feasibility of Optimizing and Reserves from a Mature and Geological Complex Multiple Turbidite Offshore California Reservoir Through the Drilling and Completion of a Trilateral Horizontal Well.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this project is to devise an effective re- development strategy to combat producibility problems related to the Repetto turbidite sequences of the Carpinteria Field. The lack of adequate reservoir characterization, high-water cut production, and scaling problems have in the past contributed to the field`s low productivity. To improve productivity and enhance recoverable reserves, the following specific goals were proposed: (1) Develop an integrated database of all existing data from work done by the former ownership group. (2) Expand reservoir drainage and reduce sand problems through horizontal well drilling and completion. (3) Operate and validate reservoir`s conceptual model by incorporating new data from the proposed trilateral well. (4) Transfer methodologies employed in geologic modeling and drilling multilateral wells to other operators with similar reservoirs. Pacific Operators Offshore, Inc. with the cooperation of its team members; the University of Southern California; Schlumberger; Baker Oil Tools; Halliburton Energy Services and Coombs and Associates undertook a comprehensive study to reexamine the reservoir conditions leading to the cent field conditions and to devise methodologies to mitigate the producibility problems. A computer based data retrieval system was developed to convert hard copy documents containing production, well completion and well log data into easily accessible on-line format. To ascertain the geological framework of the reservoir, a thorough geological modeling and subsurface mapping of the Carpinteria field was developed. The model is now used to examine the continuity of the sands, characteristics of the sub-zones, nature of water influx and transition intervals in individual major sands. The geological model was then supplemented with a reservoir engineering study of spatial distribution of voidage in individual layers using the production statistics and pressure surveys. Efforts are continuing in selection of optimal location for drilling and completion of probing wells to obtain new data about reservoir pressure, in-situ saturation and merits of drilling a series of horizontal wells. The probing re-drills and horizontal wells are scheduled for Budget period 11. Information generated on the characteristics of the geology and reservoir setting have been presented at various SPE Meetings and Tech Transfer workshops of PTTC. Oil and gas professionals from State and Federal agencies have visited POOI offices and have received briefings on the Carpinteria re-development progress.

  18. Feasibility of Optimizing Recovery & Reserves from a Mature & Geological Complex Multiple Turbidite Offshore Calif. Reservoir through the Drilling & Completion of a Trilateral Horizontal Well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coombs, Steven F.

    1999-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this project is to devise an effective redevelopment strategy to combat producibility problems related to the Repetto turbidite sequences of the Carpinteria Field. The lack of adequate reservoir characterization, high-water cut production, and scaling problems have in the past contributed to the field's low productivity. To improve productivity and enhance recoverable reserves, the following specific goals are proposed: (1) Develop an integrated database of all existing data from work done by the former ownership group. (2) Expand reservoir drainage and reduce sand problems through horizontal well drilling and completion. (3) Operate and validate reservoirs' conceptual model by incorporating new data from the proposed trilateral well. (4) Transfer methodologies employed in geologic modeling and drilling multilateral wells to other operators with similar reservoirs.

  19. Feasibility of Optimizing Recovery and Reserves from a Mature and Geological Complex Multiple Turbidite Offshore California Reservoir Through the Drilling and Completion of a Trilateral Horizontal Well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven F. Coombs

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this project is to devise an effective redevelopment strategy to combat producibility problems related to the Repetto turbidite sequences of the Carpinteria Field. The lack of adequate reservoir characterization, high-water cut production, and scaling problems have in the past contributed to the field's low productivity. To improve productivity and enhance recoverable reserves, the following specific goals are proposed: ° Develop an integrated database of all existing data from work done by the former ownership group. ° Expand reservoir drainage and reduce sand problems through horizontal well drilling and completion. ° Operate and validate reservoirs? conceptual model by incorporating new data from the proposed trilateral well. ° Transfer methodologies employed in geologic modeling and drilling multilateral wells to other operators with similar reservoirs.

  20. Feasability of Optimizing Recovery and Reserves from a Mature and Geological Complex Multiple Turbidite Offshore California Reservoir Through the Drilling and Completion of a Trilateral Horizontal Well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven F. Coombs

    1996-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this project is to devise an effective redevelopment strategy to combat producibility problems related to the Repetto turbidite sequences of the Carpinteria Field. The lack of adequate reservoir characterization, high-water cut production, and scaling problems have in the past contributed to the field's low productivity. To improve productivity and enhance recoverable reserves, the following specific goals are proposed: ° Develop an integrated database of all existing data from work done by the former ownership group. ° Expand reservoir drainage and reduce sand problems through horizontal well drilling and completion. ° Operate and validate reservoirs? conceptual model by incorporating new data from the proposed trilateral well. ° Transfer methodologies employed in geologic modeling and drilling multilateral wells to other operators with similar reservoirs.

  1. Well descriptions for geothermal drilling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, C.C.; Livesay, B.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generic well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. They were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. Their nature, their construction, and their validation are discussed.

  2. Comparison of Emperical Decline Curve Analysis for Shale Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanfar, Mohammed Sami

    2013-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    methods are benchmarked against simulation. This study compares the decline methods to four simulation cases which represent the common shale declines observed in the field. Shale wells, which are completed with horizontal wells and multiple traverse...

  3. Sweet lake geopressured-geothermal project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco Fee. Annual report, December 1, 1979-February 27, 1981. Volume I. Drilling and completion test well and disposal well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, R.W. (ed.)

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sweet lake site is located approximately 15 miles southeast of Lake Charles in Cameron Parish, Louisiana. A geological study showed that the major structure in this area is a graben. The dip of the beds is northwesterly into the basin. A well drilled into the deep basin would find the target sand below 18,000', at high pressures and temperatures. However, since there is no well control in the basin, the specific site was chosen on the 15,000' contour of the target sand in the eastern, more narrow part of the garben. Those key control wells are present within one mile of the test well. The information acquired by drilling the test well confirmed the earlier geologic study. The target sand was reached at 15,065', had a porosity of over 20% and a permeability to water of 300 md. The original reservoir pressure was 12,060 psi and the bottom hole temperature 299{sup 0}F. There are approximately 250 net feet of sand available for the perforation. The disposal well was drilled to a total depth of 7440'.

  4. Completion Report for Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-8#2 Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Wells ER-20-8 and ER-20-8#2 were drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly Nevada Test Site), Nye County, Nevada. The holes were drilled in July and August 2009, as part of the Pahute Mesa Phase II drilling program. The primary purpose of these wells was to provide detailed hydrogeologic information in the Tertiary volcanic section that will help address uncertainties within the Pahute Mesa–Oasis Valley hydrostratigraphic framework model. They may also be used as long-term monitoring wells.

  5. Laboratory tests to evaluate and study formation damage with low-density drill-in fluids (LDDIF) for horizontal well completions in low pressure and depleted reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Guoqiang

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    low concentrations of the HGS so that fluid rheology is not altered. We have conducted extensive laboratory testing to compare performance of the HGS LDDIF with that of conventional horizontal well DIFs. Experiments consisted of permeability regain...

  6. Using Decline Map Anlaysis (DMA) to Test Well Completion Influence on Gas Production Decline Curves in Barnett Shale (Denton, Wise, and Tarrant Counties)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alkassim, Ibrahim

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    production of each vertical well vs. Barnett gross thickness (including Forestburg formation) plot. ...........................................44 3.15 EUR in month 480 vs. Barnett gross thickness (including Forestburg formation) plot... .....................................................................................................46 3.18 EUR in month 480 vs. perforation footage plot ..............................................47 3.19 Common Barnett perforated section ...............................................................48 3.20 EUR in month...

  7. Hanford wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details.

  8. Feasibility of optimizing recovery and reserves from a mature and geological complex multiple turbidite offshore California reservoir through the drilling and completion of a trilateral horizontal well. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coombs, S.F.

    1996-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this project is to devise an effective re-development strategy to combat producibility problems related to the Repetto turbidite sequences of the Carpinteria Field. The lack of adequate reservoir characterization, high-water cut production, and scaling problems have in the past contributed to the field`s low productivity. To improve productivity and enhance recoverable reserves, the following specific goals are proposed: develop an integrated database of all existing data from work done by the former ownership group; expand reservoir drainage and reduce sand problems through horizontal well drilling and completion; operate and validate reservoir`s conceptual model by incorporating new data from the proposed trilateral well; transfer methodologies employed in geologic modeling and drilling multilateral wells to other operators with similar reservoirs. This report is an overview of the work that has been completed since the prior reporting period and is broken out by task number.

  9. Feasibility of optimizing recovery and reserves from a mature and geological complex multiple turbidite offshore California reservoir through the drilling and completion of a trilateral horizontal well. Annual report, September 1, 1995--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coombs, S.; Edwards, E.; Fleckenstein, W.; Ershaghi, I.; Sobbi, F.; Coombs, S.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this project is to devise an effective re-development strategy to combat producibility problems related to the Repetto turbidite sequences of the Carpinteria Field. The lack of adequate reservoir characterization, high-water cut production, and scaling problems have in the past contributed to the field`s low productivity. To improve productivity and enhance recoverable reserves, the following specific goals were proposed: develop an integrated database of all existing data from work done by the former ownership group; expand reservoir drainage and reduce sand problems through horizontal well drilling and completion; operate and validate reservoir`s conceptual model by incorporating new data from the proposed trilateral well; and transfer methodologies employed in geologic modeling and drilling multilateral wells to other operators with similar reservoirs. A computer based data retrieval system was developed to convert hard copy documents containing production, well completion and well log data into easily accessible on-line format. To ascertain the geological framework of the reservoir, a thorough geological modeling and subsurface mapping of the Carpinteria field was developed. The model is now used to examine the continuity of the sands, characteristics of the sub-zones, nature of water influx and transition intervals in individual major sands. The geological model was then supplemented with a reservoir engineering study of spatial distribution of voidage in individual layers using the production statistics and pressure surveys. Efforts are continuing in selection of optimal location for drilling and completion of probing wells to obtain new data about reservoir pressure, in-situ saturation and merits of drilling a series of horizontal wells.

  10. Feasibility of optimizing recovery and reserves from a mature and geological complex multiple turbidite offshore California reservoir through the drilling and completion of a trilateral horizontal well. [Quarterly report], May 9--November 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coombs, S.F.

    1996-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this project is to devise an effective re- development strategy to combat producibility problems related to the Repetto turbidite sequences of the Carpinteria Field. The lack of adequate reservoir characterization, high-water cut production, and scaling problems have in the past contributed to the field`s low productivity. To improve productivity and enhance recoverable reserves, the following specific goals are proposed: develop an integrated database of all existing data from work done by the former ownership group; expand reservoir drainage and reduce sand problems through horizontal well drilling and completion; operate and validate reservoir`s conceptual model by incorporating new data from the proposed trilateral well; and transfer methodologies employed in geologic modeling and drilling multilateral wells to other operators with similar reservoirs. Pacific Operators Offshore, Inc. received pre-award authorization for this project effective May 9, 1995 and final approvals were obtained effective September 1, 1995 and as such began work on the database tasks set forth in the proposal. To date a significant amount of progress has been made on development of a database, which includes production data (project task 1.1.1), well log data (project task 1.1.2), well completion data (task 1.1.3) well test and PVT data (project task 1.1.4). As of this writing only preliminary efforts have been directed toward other tasks in budget period 1. This report is an overview of the work that has been completed and is broken out by task number.

  11. INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Education Course on Well Completion and Stimulation, Feb.to provide a reasonable well completion opportunity. Duringinterpretation and well completion strategy. In addition, a

  12. Geothermal Well Completion Tests | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park,2005)Energy InformationInformationGeothermal

  13. PSA_Well_Completion_Report.book

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1 8 7 +NewAugust 4,P -.,. ~iR

  14. ANALYTIC COMPLETION (DRAFT) CHARLES REZK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rezk, Charles

    "Ext-p completion", and is well-known to be closely linked to computing the homotopy groups of p-completionsANALYTIC COMPLETION (DRAFT) CHARLES REZK Abstract. This is an expository treatment of what we call "analytic completion" of R- modules, which is a kind of completion defined in terms of quotients of power

  15. Representing Trees with Constraints 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curry, Benjamin; Wiggins, Geraint; Hayes, Gillian

    This paper presents a method for representing trees using constraint logic programming over finite domains. We describe a class of trees that is of particular interest to us and how we can represent the set of trees belonging to that class using...

  16. COMPLETE LISTING:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding Removal OngoingCERCLA SitesCHICAGOofCOMPLETE LISTING:

  17. General Engineer/Physical Scientist (Facility Representative)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A successful candidate in this position will serve as an on-site technical representative to identify and evaluate environmental, safety, and health issues and concerns; as well as diagnose root...

  18. Feasibility of Optimizing Recovery and Reserves from a Mature and Geological Complex Multiple Turbidite Offshore Calif. Reservoir through the Drilling and Completion of a Trilateral Horizontal Well, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacific Operators Offshore, Inc.

    2001-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this project was to increase production and extend the economic life of this mature field through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and drilling technology, demonstrating the efficacy of these technologies to other small operators of aging fields. Two study periods were proposed; the first to include data assimilation and reservoir characterization and the second to drill the demonstration well. The initial study period showed that a single tri-lateral well would not be economically efficient in redevelopment of Carpinteria's multiple deep water turbidite sand reservoirs, and the study was amended to include the drilling of a series of horizontal redrills from existing surplus well bores on Pacific Operators' Platform Hogan.

  19. Dimensions of Wellness Staying Well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    to protect your physical health by eating a well-balanced diet, getting plenty of physical activity-evaluation and self-assessment. Wellness involves continually learning and making changes to enhance your state) A state in which your mind is engaged in lively interaction with the world around you. Intellectual

  20. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

  1. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

    1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

  2. Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source -Sound Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Wave represents displacement Wave represents pressure Source - Sound Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency Wave represents pressure Target - Radio Waves Distance between crests is wavelength Number of crests passing a point in 1 second is frequency

  3. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a monitoring well which includes an enclosure defining a cavity and a water reservoir enclosed within the cavity and wherein the reservoir has an inlet and an outlet. The monitoring well further includes a porous housing borne by the enclosure and which defines a fluid chamber which is oriented in fluid communication with the outlet of the reservoir, and wherein the porous housing is positioned in an earthen soil location below-grade. A geophysical monitoring device is provided and mounted in sensing relation relative to the fluid chamber of the porous housing; and a coupler is selectively moveable relative to the outlet of reservoir to couple the porous housing and water reservoir in fluid communication. An actuator is coupled in force transmitting relation relative to the coupler to selectively position the coupler in a location to allow fluid communication between the reservoir and the fluid chamber defined by the porous housing.

  4. Subsurface well apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubbo, R.B.; Bangert, D.S.

    1993-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is described for completing a subterranean well, comprising: a tubular conduit portion made up within a tubular conduit string of the type extending from a point near the surface of the earth to a remote point downwardly within said well and which is in contact with a fluid source within said well, said tubular conduit portion forming an imperforate wall and defining a central bore radially inward and further defining an exterior surface; an activating fluid body in communication with, and disposed at least in-part within, said central bore of tubular conduit portion; signal generating means including at least one sensor member coupled to said exterior surface of said tubular conduit portion for detecting circumferential stress in said imperforate wall defined by said tubular conduit portion and for producing an output signal corresponding thereto; a well bore tool disposed exteriorly of said tubular conduit portion, and including an actuating member for performing at least one desired completion function; and control means responsive to a predetermined output signal from said signal generating means for selectively activating said well bore tool and causing said actuating member to perform at least one desired completion function.

  5. Compatibility of monitor well completion methods with geologic conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ten Wolde, Eric Jozef

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the expansive properties of annular seal materials. Both bentonite and cement seals were tested. Unidirectional swell and reserve expansion of bentonite was also examined. Bentonite pellets were found to have a greater reserve (potential) expansion than...

  6. BACHELOR THESIS The High Representative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellekoop, Michel

    BACHELOR THESIS The High Representative and the Libya Crisis An Assessment Dominique Prescher 8 and the Libya Crisis 2 Table of Content 1. Summary 4 2. Introduction 4 3. Theoretical Framework 8 3.1 Neo 34 9. Bibliography 36 #12;Bachelor Thesis The High Representative and the Libya Crisis 3 List

  7. Representing Periodic Functions by Fourier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    Representing Periodic Functions by Fourier Series 23.2 Introduction In this Section we show how, then the Fourier series expansion takes the form: f(t) = a0 2 + n=1 (an cos nt + bn sin nt) Our main purpose here Fourier coefficients of a function of period 2 calculate Fourier coefficients of a function of general

  8. Well control procedures for extended reach wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gjorv, Bjorn

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The limits of directional drilling continue to be pushed back as horizontal or near-horizontal reservoir sections are being drilled, cased, cemented and completed to tap reserves at extreme distances. Continuous development of new technology...

  9. Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes Lesson Topics ·WhatisDiabetes? ·Nutrition­FirstSteptoDiabetesManagement ·OneDiabetesDiet­NoLongertheSoleOption ·ManagingYourBloodGlucose ·NutritionalLabels ·DiabetesandExercise ·ForGoodMeasureatHomeandEatingOut ·DiabetesMedicines ·Preventingand

  10. General Engineer / Physical Scientist (Facility Representative)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Facility Representatives (FRs) are line management's on-site technical representative with responsibility for identifying and evaluating environmental, safety and health issues and concerns,...

  11. Temperature behavior in the build section of multilateral wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero Lugo, Analis Alejandra

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intelligent well completions are increasingly being used in horizontal, multilateral, and multi-branching wells. Such completions are equipped with permanent sensors to measure temperature and pressure profiles, which must ...

  12. Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    wells that are sampled one season cannot be sampled the next. In addition, information on well construction, completion, and production is often unreliable or not available. These...

  13. Well-posedness for Systems Representing Electromagnetic/Acoustic Wavefront Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    interrogation.) In one such class of electromagnetic interrogation techniques, one uses a superconductive (also and applications for techniques which employ superconductive metal backings and standing acoustic waves as re are absorbing on the left (z = 0) and superconductive on the right (z = 1). We use general initial conditions

  14. Quantum states representing perfectly secure bits are always distillable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawel Horodecki; Remigiusz Augusiak

    2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    It is proven that recently introduced states with perfectly secure bits of cryptographic key (private states representing secure bit) [K. Horodecki et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 160502 (2005)] as well as its multipartite and higher dimension generalizations always represent distillable entanglement. The corresponding lower bounds on distillable entanglement are provided. We also present a simple alternative proof that for any bipartite quantum state entanglement cost is an upper bound on distillable cryptographic key in bipartite scenario.

  15. Pennsylvania House of Representatives Republican Policy Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Don

    Pennsylvania House of Representatives Republican Policy Committee Westmoreland County Community, Chairman Turzai and Representative Stairs, for inviting me here this morning to talk to you about funding for higher education in the Commonwealth. I would be remiss if I did not note that Representative Stairs

  16. USING GALOIS LATTICES TO REPRESENT NETWORK DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    USING GALOIS LATTICES TO REPRESENT NETWORK DATA Linton C. Freeman* Douglas R. White* Galois-binary adjacency matrix,where each row and each column in the matrix represents a social actor. A cell entry is 1 to represent the networks they study. Graph theoretic representations permit the visu- *University

  17. Reservoir studies of new multilateral well architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarfare, Manoj Dnyandeo

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    to optimize slot usage, commercially develop lower-quality reserves in the Brent sequence and when applied with complementary technologies of underbalanced drilling and intelligent well completions help optimize field development The economic benefits...

  18. BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

  19. Regulations of Wells (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Environmental Protection regulates the construction, repair, and abandonment of wells, as well as the persons and businesses undertaking such practices. Governing boards of water...

  20. Groundwater and Wells (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section describes regulations relating to groundwater protection, water wells, and water withdrawals, and requires the registration of all water wells in the state.

  1. Industry survey for horizontal wells. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D.D.; Kaback, D.S. [CDM Federal Programs Corp., Denver, CO (United States); Denhan, M.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Watkins, D. [CDM Federal Programs Corp., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An international survey of horizontal environmental wells was performed during May and June of 1993. The purpose of the survey was to provide the environmental industry with an inventory of horizontal environmental wells and information pertaining to the extent of the use of horizontal environmental wells, the variety of horizontal environmental well applications, the types of geologic and hydrogeologic conditions within which horizontal environmental wells have been installed, and the companies that perform horizontal environmental well installations. Other information, such as the cost of horizontal environmental well installations and the results of tests performed on the wells, is not complete but is provided as general information with the caveat that the information should not be used to compare drilling companies. The result of the survey is a catalogue of horizontal environmental wells that are categorized by the objective or use of the wells, the vertical depth of the wells, and the drilling company contracted to install the wells.

  2. Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells. Final report, Tenneco Fee N No. 1 Well Terrebonne Paris, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, R.J.; Hartsock, J.H.; McCoy, R.L.; Rodgers, J.A.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reservoir conditions that led to the choice of this well as the fifth well of opportunity are described as well as the attempts to complete the well for high-volume brine production. Individual opinions concerning underlying and conributing causes for the liner failure which aborted the completion attempt are included. (MHR)

  3. On the meaning of logical completeness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basaldella, Michele

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Goedel's completeness theorem is concerned with provability, while Girard's theorem in ludics (as well as full completeness theorems in game semantics) are concerned with proofs. Our purpose is to look for a connection between these two disciplines. Following a previous work [3], we consider an extension of the original ludics with contraction and universal nondeterminism, which play dual roles, in order to capture a polarized fragment of linear logic and thus a constructive variant of classical propositional logic. We then prove a completeness theorem for proofs in this extended setting: for any behaviour (formula) A and any design (proof attempt) P, either P is a proof of A or there is a model M of the orthogonal of A which defeats P. Compared with proofs of full completeness in game semantics, ours exhibits a striking similarity with proofs of Goedel's completeness, in that it explicitly constructs a countermodel essentially using Koenig's lemma, proceeds by induction on formulas, and implies an analogue o...

  4. Certificate of Completion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, Jeff W.

    2003-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    T e xas 4-H Pr esent ed t o For commitment t o t he 4-H pr ogr am and successfully completing w ork in (R ecognition) A w ar ded t his _____________ da y of ________________________ 20_______ SignatureSignature 4-H 2.040 C e r t i f i c a t e o f C... o m p l e t i o n T exas AgriLife Extension Service ? The T exas A&M University System ? College Station, T exas 77843 ...

  5. Complete Experiment Safety Documentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization and Innovation2010 2010About UsComplementary mComplete

  6. Complete Safety Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization and Innovation2010 2010About UsComplementaryComplete

  7. Complete Safety Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization and Innovation2010 2010AboutComplete Safety Training

  8. Complete Safety Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting theCommercialization and Innovation2010 2010AboutComplete Safety

  9. Complete Experiment Safety Documentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingthMeasurements |Competitive OverviewComplete

  10. Complete Safety Training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the followingthMeasurements |CompetitiveComplete Safety

  11. Franklin Completed Jobs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA)Budget(DANCE) TargetForms &Francis G.Completed Jobs

  12. Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Hall, R. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Colina, K. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3’s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The survey’s purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

  13. Underground Wells (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Class I, III, IV and V injection wells require a permit issued by the Executive Director of the Department of Environmental Quality; Class V injection wells utilized in the remediation of...

  14. Plugging Abandoned Water Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This brochure explains the threat of abandoned water wells to groundwater resources and the responsibility and liability of Texas property owners. It offers information to landowners on ways to plug such wells....

  15. Horizontal well circulation tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an apparatus for securement onto one end of a continuous length of remedial tubing introducible into a subterranean well and concentrically insertable through production tubing previously positioned within the well. The well having a deviated configuration including an entry portion communicating with a curved portion extending downwardly in the well from the entry portion, and a generally linear end portion traversable with a production formation.

  16. Plugging Abandoned Water Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    is one of our state?s most precious resources. Groundwater from aquifers (underground layers of porous rock or sand containing water, into which wells can be drilled) supplies over half of the water used in the state. Protecting the quality of this vital... of Licensing and Regulation (TDLR). Abandoned wells are a threat to our water supply An abandoned well is a direct channel from the surface to the aquifer below. Contaminants that enter a well are introduced directly into the aquifer with no opportunity...

  17. An Introduction to Venture Capital Granite representatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    May 2006 An Introduction to Venture Capital #12;2 Granite representatives Sam Kingsland ­ Managing;3 Introduction to Granite Ventures Founded in 1992 Granite has 9 investment professionals Over $1B under

  18. Facility Representative Program, Criteria & Review Approach Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS) to assist Facility Representatives. Please submit your CRADS for posting by sending them to the HQ FR Program Manager. Please include the subject, date, and a contact person.

  19. Representing Information Collections for Visual Cognition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Eunyee

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of digital information collections is growing. Collections are typically represented with text-only, in a linear list format, which turns out to be a weak representation for cognition. We learned this from empirical research...

  20. Stratigraphic correlation of well logs using relational tree

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.H.; Tsay, F.; Lai, P.F.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heuristic waveform correlation scheme of well logs is based on a relational tree matching. Waveforms (well logs) are represented in a data structure known as a relational tree. A relational tree provides a complete description of the contextural relationships, as defined by peaks and valleys of the waveforms. The correlational scheme consists of a distance-measuring process using all possible peak attributes. First, a distance function is defined for any two nodes in terms of peak attributes. To find the best match for a given node of a given waveform, the authors measure the distance between the given node and each node from a predefined subset of the second waveform. The closest one is considered to be the matched node. The process is repeated for every node in the waveform. This quantitative correlation method has been implemented and tested with well logs from the Black Warrior basin, north Alabama. Results showed that the procedure has the capability of handling the thickening and thinning strata, as well as missing intervals.

  1. Penrose Well Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopherson, Karen

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Penrose Well Temperatures Geothermal waters have been encountered in several wells near Penrose in Fremont County, Colorado. Most of the wells were drilled for oil and gas exploration and, in a few cases, production. This ESRI point shapefile utilizes data from 95 wells in and around the Penrose area provided by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database at http://cogcc.state.co.us/ . Temperature data from the database were used to calculate a temperature gradient for each well. This information was then used to estimate temperatures at various depths. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Extent: West -105.224871 East -105.027633 North 38.486269 South 38.259507 Originators: Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) Karen Christopherson

  2. On the completeness of the Manakov integrals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimir Dragovic; Borislav Gajic; Bozidar Jovanovic

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this note is to present simple proofs of the completeness of Manakov's integrals for a motion of a rigid body fixed at a point in $\\mathbb R^n$, as well as for geodesic flows on a class of homogeneous spaces $SO(n)/SO(n_1)\\times\\dots\\times SO(n_r)$.

  3. U.S. Geothermal Announces Successful Completion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Geothermal Inc. (“U.S. Geothermal”), a renewable energy company focused on the production of electricity from geothermal energy, announced today that the first full size production well (NHS-1) at the Neal Hot Springs Project was successfully completed on May 23 and an initial flow test confirms the presence of a geothermal reservoir.

  4. Technical basis document for the release from contaminated facility representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OBERG, B.D.

    2003-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document supports the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the release from contaminated facility representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions. The representative accidents qualitatively considered are fires, deflagrations, and load drops in contaminated areas. The risks from a separate evaluation of compressed gas hazards are also summarized.

  5. Geothermal well stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, A.R.; Pittard, F.J.; Hanold, R.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All available data on proppants and fluids were examined to determine areas in technology that need development for 300 to 500/sup 0/F (150/sup 0/ to 265/sup 0/C) hydrothermal wells. While fluid properties have been examined well into the 450/sup 0/F range, proppants have not been previously tested at elevated temperatures except in a few instances. The latest test data at geothermal temperatures is presented and some possible proppants and fluid systems that can be used are shown. Also discussed are alternative stimulation techniques for geothermal wells.

  6. Isobaric groundwater well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of measuring a parameter in a well, under isobaric conditions, including such parameters as hydraulic gradient, pressure, water level, soil moisture content and/or aquifer properties the method as presented comprising providing a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends, the casing supporting a transducer having a reference port; placing the casing lengthwise into the well, second end first, with the reference port vented above the water table in the well; and sealing the first end. A system is presented for measuring a parameter in a well, the system comprising a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends and being configured to be placed lengthwise into a well second end first; a transducer, the transducer having a reference port, the reference port being vented in the well above the water table, the casing being screened across and above the water table; and a sealing member sealing the first end. In one embodiment, the transducer is a tensiometer transducer and in other described embodiments, another type transducer is used in addition to a tensiometer.

  7. A general framework for complete positivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jason M. Dominy; Alireza Shabani; Daniel A. Lidar

    2015-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Complete positivity of quantum dynamics is often viewed as a litmus test for physicality, yet it is well known that correlated initial states need not give rise to completely positive evolutions. This observation spurred numerous investigations over the past two decades attempting to identify necessary and sufficient conditions for complete positivity. Here we describe a complete and consistent mathematical framework for the discussion and analysis of complete positivity for correlated initial states of open quantum systems. This formalism is built upon a few simple axioms and is sufficiently general to contain all prior methodologies going back to Pechakas, PRL (1994). The key observation is that initial system-bath states with the same reduced state on the system must evolve under all admissible unitary operators to system-bath states with the same reduced state on the system, in order to ensure that the induced dynamical maps on the system are well-defined. Once this consistency condition is imposed, related concepts like the assignment map and the dynamical maps are uniquely defined. In general, the dynamical maps may not be applied to arbitrary system states, but only to those in an appropriately defined physical domain. We show that the constrained nature of the problem gives rise to not one but three inequivalent types of complete positivity. Using this framework we elucidate the limitations of recent attempts to provide conditions for complete positivity using quantum discord and the quantum data-processing inequality. The problem remains open, and may require fresh perspectives and new mathematical tools. The formalism presented herein may be one step in that direction.

  8. Geothermal wells: a forecast of drilling activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, G.L.; Mansure, A.J.; Miewald, J.N.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numbers and problems for geothermal wells expected to be drilled in the United States between 1981 and 2000 AD are forecasted. The 3800 wells forecasted for major electric power projects (totaling 6 GWe of capacity) are categorized by type (production, etc.), and by location (The Geysers, etc.). 6000 wells are forecasted for direct heat projects (totaling 0.02 Quads per year). Equations are developed for forecasting the number of wells, and data is presented. Drilling and completion problems in The Geysers, The Imperial Valley, Roosevelt Hot Springs, the Valles Caldera, northern Nevada, Klamath Falls, Reno, Alaska, and Pagosa Springs are discussed. Likely areas for near term direct heat projects are identified.

  9. Thermal indicator for wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaven, Jr., Joseph V. (Oakton, VA); Bak, Chan S. (Newbury Park, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

  10. Spacer for deep wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, G. D.

    1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A spacer for use in a deep well that is to have a submersible pump situated downhole and with a string of tubing attached to the pump for delivering the pumped fluid. The pump is electrically driven, and power is supplied via an armored cable which parallels the string of tubing. Spacers are clamped to the cable and have the tubing running through an eccentrically located passage in each spacer. The outside dimensions of a spacer fit freely inside any casing in the well.

  11. An iconic approach to representing climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    1 An iconic approach to representing climate change Saffron Jessica O'Neill A thesis submitted-experts to be meaningfully engaged with the issue of climate change. This thesis investigates the value of engaging non-experts with climate change at the individual level. Research demonstrates that individuals perceive climate change

  12. The Simplicity Device: Your Personal Mobile Representative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Simplicity Device: Your Personal Mobile Representative Giovanni Bartolomeo1, Francesca Martire1 mobile phone that stores and handles personal information about the user. The Simplicity Device can be connected (e.g. via Bluetooth) to several other devices thus allowing personalization of services

  13. C-26A well sets new standard for ER horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andresen, S.; Hovda, S. [Norsk Hydro Production a.s, Bergen (Norway); Olsen, T.L. [Baker Hughes INTEQ, Bergen (Norway)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well 30/6-C-26A in the Norwegian North Sea has a horizontal reach of 25,758 ft, which was briefly a new world record in extended reach drilling. The last 6,888 ft was drilled horizontally in the reservoir 20--26 ft vertically above the oil-water contact. The Oseberg field was discovered in 1979. To develop this giant (16.8 x 3.1 mile, 27 x 5 km) field, two platforms were placed 9.3 miles apart. To drain the oil between the platforms, two subsea wells were drilled and completed. The first horizontal well in the Oseberg field was drilled in 1992. Since then 17 horizontal wells have been successfully drilled and completed. The general trend during this period is that both the length of the horizontal reservoir section and the total depth for the wells have increased. New equipment and technology, as well as general field experience, played an important role when deciding to drill well C-26A. The paper describes well C-26A objectives, well bore stability, well path considerations, the casing program, hydraulics and hole cleaning and well completion.

  14. Representing Information Collections for Visual Cognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Eunyee

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 1. Yahoo Buzz with ResultDistributor . . . . . . . . . . 99 B. Balancing the Search Processing with Results . . . . . . . 99 C. ResultDistributor Evaluation with Mixed-Initiative Com- position... of text surrogate candidates in the Complete Set. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 15 2D PCA scatter plot of image surrogate candidates in the Com- plete Set...

  15. PrimeEnergy/DOE/GRI slant well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.; Carden, R.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents final results of the Sterling Boggs 1240 slant well. Objectives of the project were (1) to test the potential for improved recovery efficiency in a fractured Devonian Shale reservoir from a directionally drilled well, (2) to perform detailed tests of reservoir properties and completion methods, and (3) to provide technology to industry which may ultimately improve the economics of drilling in the Devonian Shale and thereby stimulate development of its resources.

  16. Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Asa S.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample UsingSimulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Usingcalibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes

  17. Selection of bioclimatically representative biological reserve systems under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pyke, C R; Fischer, Douglas T

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of bioclimatically representative biological reserve systemsthat are bioclimatically representative across a range ofa ?at line (i.e. a representative sample of current climate

  18. Drug representatives: Giving you lunch or stealing your soul?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Higgins, Steven P

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with pharmaceutical representatives are too useful topharmaceutical sales representatives. JAMA. 1995 Apr 26;273(Drug representatives: Giving you lunch or stealing your

  19. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples Timothy J.Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples Timothy J.Introduction Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing

  20. Well valve control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwendemann, K.L.; McCracken, O.W.; Mondon, C.G.; Wortham, L.C.

    1987-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for controlling well testing through an upper and lower test string with a subsea test tree connected therebetween and latch means to release the upper test string from the subsea test tree comprising: a. first and second selectively programmable microprocessor means; b. means for storing system operating limits in each microprocessor means; c. means for changing the operating limits in response to changes in well conditions; d. means for communicating operating fluid pressure to the subsurface test tree and the latch means; e. solenoid pilot valves controlling the flow of the operating fluid pressure to the subsea test tree and the latch means; f. the first microprocessor means located at a central control console; g. the second microprocessor means located near the solenoid valves; h. means for transmitting signals between the first and second microprocessor means and validating the accuracy of the signals; and i. electronic circuits to control operation of the solenoid valves in response to validated signals.

  1. Shock Chlorination of Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.; Dozier, Monty

    2003-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    method) will be necessary to ensure the safety of the water supply. Shock chlorination introduces very high levels of chlorine into a water system. During the disinfec- tion process, water from the system is not suitable for consumption and neither people... system or other continuous disinfection sys- tem. For more information about wellhead protection, see the Tex-A-Syst rural water well assessment pub- lications (B-6023 through B-6032) available from Texas Cooperative Extension. 3 This publication...

  2. Decontaminating Flooded Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boellstorff, Diana; Dozier, Monty; Provin, Tony; Dictson, Nikkoal; McFarland, Mark L.

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ER-011 6-06 Mark L. McFarland, Associate Professor and Extension Water Resources Specialist; Diane E. Boellstorff, Program Specialist Water Quality; Tony L. Provin, Associate Professor and Extension Soil Chemist; Monty C. Dozier, Assistant... and local hospitals may also test water samples for bacteria. The cost of the test ranges from $8 to $30, depending on the lab. Well disinfection does not eliminate hydrocarbons (fuels, oils), pesticides, heavy metals or other types of nonbiological...

  3. Data structures and apparatuses for representing knowledge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hohimer, Ryan E; Thomson, Judi R; Harvey, William J; Paulson, Patrick R; Whiting, Mark A; Tratz, Stephen C; Chappell, Alan R; Butner, Robert S

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Data structures and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

  4. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR THE NUCLEAR CRITICALITY REPRESENTATIVE ACCIDENT & ASSOCIATED REPRESENTED HAZARDOUS CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRIGSBY, J.M.

    2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Technical Basis Document for the Nuclear Criticality Representative Accident and Associate Represented Hazardous Conditions. Revision 2 of RPP-12371 provides accident consequence estimates for a hypothetical criticality event in an above grade facility (e.g. DBVS, CH-TRUM, and S-109 PWRS). This technical basis document was developed to support RPP-13033, ''Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA)'', and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the nuclear criticality representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls.

  5. Dissertation Completion Fellowships Council for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Ning

    Mellon-CES Dissertation Completion Fellowships Council for European Studies The Council for European Studies (CES) invites eligible graduate students to apply for the 2013 Mellon-CES Dissertation and candidacy fees. Winners of the Mellon-CES Dissertation Completion Fellowships are also expected

  6. Non-representative quantum mechanical weak values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. E. Y. Svensson

    2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The operational definition of a weak value for a quantum mechanical system involves the limit of the weak measurement strength tending to zero. I study how this limit compares to the situation for the undisturbed (no weak measurement) system. Under certain conditions, which I investigate, this limit is discontinuous in the sense that it does not merge smoothly to the Hilbert space description of the undisturbed system. Hence, in these discontinuous cases, the weak value does not represent the undisturbed system. As a result, conclusions drawn from such weak values regarding the properties of the studied system cannot be upheld. Examples are given.

  7. On Positive Integers Represented as Arithmetic Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitris Sardelis

    2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the present article is to explore the possibilities of representing positive integers as sums of other positive integers and highlight certain fundamental connections between their multiplicative and additive properties. In particular, we shall be concerned with the representation of positive integers as arithmetic series of the simplest kind, i.e., either as sums of successive odd positive numbers, or as sums of successive even positive numbers (both treated as Problem 1), or as sums of consecutive positive integers (treated as Problem 2).

  8. Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Salt Wells Area...

  9. Completeness for sparse potential scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Zhongwei, E-mail: zzs0004@auburn.edu [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)] [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper is devoted to the scattering theory of a class of continuum Schrödinger operators with deterministic sparse potentials. We first establish the limiting absorption principle for both modified free resolvents and modified perturbed resolvents. This actually is a weak form of the classical limiting absorption principle. We then prove the existence and completeness of local wave operators, which, in particular, imply the existence of wave operators. Under additional assumptions on the sparse potential, we prove the completeness of wave operators. In the context of continuum Schrödinger operators with sparse potentials, this paper gives the first proof of the completeness of wave operators.

  10. TECHNICAL BASIS FOR THE NUCLEAR CRITICALITY REPRESENTATIVE ACCIDENT & ASSOCIATED REPRESENTED HAZARDOUS CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOETZ, T.G.

    2003-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document was developed to support the documented safety analysis (DSA) and describes the process and basis for assigning risk bins for the nuclear criticality representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. Revision 1 incorporates ORP IRT comments to enhance the technical presentation and also makes editorial changes. This technical basis document was developed to support the documented safety analysis (DSA), and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the nuclear criticality representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence.

  11. Training a 3-Node Neural Network is NP-Complete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivest, Ronald L.

    . A good discussion of the theory of NP-completeness, as well as a description of several hundreds of NPTraining a 3-Node Neural Network is NP-Complete Avrim L. Blum and Ronald L. Rivest* MIT Laboratory-propagation algorithm promises just that. In practice, however, the back-propagation algorithm often runs very slowly

  12. DIRECT SINGULARITIES AND COMPLETELY INVARIANT ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1910-70-20T23:59:59.000Z

    a completely invariant domain, then all critical values (and thus all critical points) of f are ..... This material is not used anywhere else in the paper, but may be of ...

  13. Complete Bacterial Proteome Extraction Kit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    0800 6931 000 Tel (800) 628-8470 Tel 0115 9430 840 email address for technical inquiries: technical................................................................10 9. Technical Appendix components. Ideally, to avoid protein losses, one would achieve complete sample solubilization in a single

  14. Complete Mammalian Proteome Extraction Kit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    0800 6931 000 Tel (800) 628-8470 Tel 0115 9430 840 email address for technical inquiries: technical................................................................................................................10 9. Technical Appendix components. Ideally, to avoid protein losses, one would achieve complete sample solubilization in a single

  15. Representing the vacuum polarization on de Sitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, Katie E.; Woodard, Richard P. [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Prokopec, Tomislav [Institute of Theoretical Physics (ITP) and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Postbus 80195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)] [Institute of Theoretical Physics (ITP) and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University, Postbus 80195, 3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies of the vacuum polarization on de Sitter have demonstrated that there is a simple, noncovariant representation of it in which the physics is transparent. There is also a cumbersome, covariant representation in which the physics is obscure. Despite being unwieldy, the latter form has a powerful appeal for those who are concerned about de Sitter invariance. We show that nothing is lost by employing the simple, noncovariant representation because there is a closed form procedure for converting its structure functions to those of the covariant representation. We also present a vastly improved technique for reading off the noncovariant structure functions from the primitive diagrams. And we discuss the issue of representing the vacuum polarization for a general metric background.

  16. Well Monitoring Systems for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    cost for well stimulation and improves reservoir tracking. * Well stimulation through hydro-fracturing is very expensive - Our system can be in the well before stimulation,...

  17. Lyme Carditis with Transient Complete Heart Block

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolbec, Katherine W D; Higgins, George L; Saucier, John R

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demonstrating complete heart block Volume XI, no . 2 : Maywith Transient Complete Heart Block Katherine W. D. Dolbecsecond-degree to first-degree heart block before complete

  18. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the twelfth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Drafting and releasing the 2007 Request for Proposals; (2) Securing a meeting facility, scheduling and drafting plans for the 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; (3) Conducting elections and announcing representatives for the four 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; (4) 2005 Final Project Reports; (5) Personal Digital Assistant Workshops scheduled; and (6) Communications and outreach.

  19. Evaluation of polymer free drill-in fluids for use in high productivity, horizontal well completions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falla Ramirez, Jorge H

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    acid as clean-up fluid. 40 4. 9 Regained permeability correlation for acetic acid cleaning treatment . . . . . . . . . . 41 4. 10 Sand face after acetic acid cleaning treatment (DS = 6%, acid = 10% case). 42 FIGURE Page 4. 11 General rheology... acid cleaning treatment. . . . . 40 4. 17 Regained permeability regression statistics for acetic acid cleaning treatment. 40 4. 18 Regained permeability regression coefficients for acetic acid cleaning treatment. 41 1. INTRODUCTION During the last...

  20. Construction of MV-6 Well Pad at the Central Nevada Test Area Completed |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. DepartmentEnergy This partAs theFebruary09 FY1,The1, 2015

  1. U.S. Geothermal Announces Successful Completion of First Well at Neal Hot

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas, Texas2022WindU S ArmyRoadmapsSprings |

  2. U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs Completes

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri Global Energy LLC Place: Dallas, Texas2022WindU S ArmyRoadmapsSprings

  3. U.S. Geothermal Completes Second Successful Production Well at Neal Hot

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown of Ladoga, IndianaTurtle Airships JumpType B:7-15:Web Site: U.S.

  4. Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic...

  5. Technical basis for the nuclear criticality representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARSON, D.M.

    2003-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document was developed to support the Tank Farms Documented Safety Analysis (DSA), and describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the nuclear criticality representative accident and associated hazardous conditions. The purpose of the risk binning process is to determine the need for safety-significant structures, systems, and components (SSC) and technical safety requirement (TSR)-level controls for a given representative accident or represented hazardous condition based on an evaluation of the frequency and consequence. Note that the risk binning process is not applied to facility workers, because all facility worker hazardous conditions are considered for safety-significant SSCs and/or TSR-level controls. Determination of the need for safety-class SSCs was performed in accordance with DOE-STD-3009-94, ''Preparation Guide for US Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Facility Documented Safety Analyses'', as described in this report.

  6. Greening the U.S. House of Representatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diamond,, Rick

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Officer, U.S. House of Representatives, June 21, 2007. Finalof the U.S. House of Representatives, and the Federal EnergyGreening the U.S. House of Representatives Rick Diamond and

  7. HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU CLEANUP COMPLETION STRATEGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BERGMAN TB

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Cleanup of the Hanford Site is a complex and challenging undertaking. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has developed a comprehensive vision for completing Hanford's cleanup mission including transition to post-cleanup activities. This vision includes 3 principle components of cleanup: the {approx}200 square miles ofland adjacent to the Columbia River, known as the River Corridor; the 75 square miles of land in the center of the Hanford Site, where the majority of the reprocessing and waste management activities have occurred, known as the Central Plateau; and the stored reprocessing wastes in the Central Plateau, the Tank Wastes. Cleanup of the River Corridor is well underway and is progressing towards completion of most cleanup actions by 2015. Tank waste cleanup is progressing on a longer schedule due to the complexity of the mission, with construction of the largest nuclear construction project in the United States, the Waste Treatment Plant, over 50% complete. With the progress on the River Corridor and Tank Waste, it is time to place increased emphasis on moving forward with cleanup of the Central Plateau. Cleanup of the Hanford Site has been proceeding under a framework defmed in the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). In early 2009, the DOE, the State of Washington Department of Ecology, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency signed an Agreement in Principle in which the parties recognized the need to develop a more comprehensive strategy for cleanup of the Central Plateau. DOE agreed to develop a Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy as a starting point for discussions. This DOE Strategy was the basis for negotiations between the Parties, discussions with the State of Oregon, the Hanford Advisory Board, and other Stakeholder groups (including open public meetings), and consultation with the Tribal Nations. The change packages to incorporate the Central Plateau Cleanup Completion Strategy were signed by the Parties on October 26,2010, and are now in the process of being implemented.

  8. Segmentation of complex geophysical structures with well Running title: Image segmentation with well data.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    with well data. Authors: Christian Gout§, and Carole Le Guyader. Complete affiliation: § Universit´e de 96822-2273 , USA. chris gout@cal.berkeley.edu : INSA de Rennes 20 Avenue des Buttes de Co¨esmes CS 14315 35043 Rennes, France. carole.le-guyader@insa-rennes.fr Corresponding author : Christian Gout

  9. New wells architectures to access deep geothermal reservoirsand increase well productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    with the higher costs of well drilling and completion. Our first step in tackling theproblem,was to consider with the wellbore flow which is modelled by a 1D momentum equation describing the conservation of the fluid in the wellbore fluid coupled to the heat transfer in the reservoir.We apply this coupled wellbore and reservoir

  10. French gas-storage project nearing completion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laguerie, P. de (Geostock, Rueil-Malmaison (France)); Durup, J.G. (Gaz de France, La Pluine St. Denis (France))

    1994-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Geomethane, jointly formed by Gaz de France and Geostock, is currently converting 7 of 36 solution-mined salt cavities at Manosque in southeast France from liquid hydrocarbon storage to natural-gas storage. In view of the large diameter (13 3/8 in.) of the original production wells and safety requirements, a unique high-capacity well completion has been developed for this project. It will have two fail-safe valves and a flow crossover 30 m below ground to isolate the production well in the event of problems at the surface. The project lies in the wooded Luberon Nature Reserve and due consideration has been given to locating the surface plant and blending it with the surroundings. The production wellheads are extra-low designs, the main plant was located outside the sensitive area, and the pipeline routes were landscaped. The paper discusses the history of salt cavern storage of natural gas; site characteristics; Manosque salt geology; salt mining and early storage; siting; engineering and construction; completion and monitoring; nature reserve protection; and fire and earthquake hazard mitigation.

  11. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4B Albuquerque, New...

  12. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  13. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  14. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  15. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  16. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  17. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  18. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4A Baltimore, Maryland Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative...

  19. 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report...

  20. 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    7 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Attached...

  1. Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr Saeid Ghamaty

    2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at <$0.35/W. This price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

  2. The Korarchaeota: Archaeal orphans representing an ancestral lineage of life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elkins, James G.; Kunin, Victor; Anderson, Iain; Barry, Kerrie; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Hedlund, Brian; Hugenholtz, Phil; Kyrpides, Nikos; Graham, David; Keller, Martin; Wanner, Gerhard; Richardson, Paul; Stetter, Karl O.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on conserved cellular properties, all life on Earth can be grouped into different phyla which belong to the primary domains Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. However, tracing back their evolutionary relationships has been impeded by horizontal gene transfer and gene loss. Within the Archaea, the kingdoms Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota exhibit a profound divergence. In order to elucidate the evolution of these two major kingdoms, representatives of more deeply diverged lineages would be required. Based on their environmental small subunit ribosomal (ss RNA) sequences, the Korarchaeota had been originally suggested to have an ancestral relationship to all known Archaea although this assessment has been refuted. Here we describe the cultivation and initial characterization of the first member of the Korarchaeota, highly unusual, ultrathin filamentous cells about 0.16 {micro}m in diameter. A complete genome sequence obtained from enrichment cultures revealed an unprecedented combination of signature genes which were thought to be characteristic of either the Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, or Eukarya. Cell division appears to be mediated through a FtsZ-dependent mechanism which is highly conserved throughout the Bacteria and Euryarchaeota. An rpb8 subunit of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified which is absent from other Archaea and has been described as a eukaryotic signature gene. In addition, the representative organism possesses a ribosome structure typical for members of the Crenarchaeota. Based on its gene complement, this lineage likely diverged near the separation of the two major kingdoms of Archaea. Further investigations of these unique organisms may shed additional light onto the evolution of extant life.

  3. Well-pump alignment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

  4. Completing Your Dissertation Without Tears

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Champagne, Frances A.

    Completing Your Dissertation Without Tears Your dissertation is your union card. It is your entry into the academy. But writing a dissertation can seem overwhelming. It's scary to imagine writing a work 200 is psychological. To be sure, a dissertation involves far more research than you have ever done before

  5. Administration Policy Complete Policy Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haykin, Simon

    Administration Policy Complete Policy Title: McMaster University Alcohol Policy Policy Number, 1998 Supersedes/Amends Policy dated: May 11, 1998 Responsible Executive: Vice-President (Administration policy and the written copy held by the policy owner, the written copy prevails. INTRODUCTION Mc

  6. Administration Policy Complete Policy Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitchcock, Adam P.

    Administration Policy Complete Policy Title: Engagement of Independent Contractors Policy Number of Original Approval: Supersedes/Amends Policy dated: Payments to Individuals (Independent Contractors) versus between this electronic policy and the written copy held by the policy owner, the written copy prevails

  7. Representative Atmospheric Plume Development for Elevated Releases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Lowrey, Justin D.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Prichard, Andrew W.

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An atmospheric explosion of a low-yield nuclear device will produce a large number of radioactive isotopes, some of which can be measured with airborne detection systems. However, properly equipped aircraft may not arrive in the region where an explosion occurred for a number of hours after the event. Atmospheric conditions will have caused the radioactive plume to move and diffuse before the aircraft arrives. The science behind predicting atmospheric plume movement has advanced enough that the location of the maximum concentrations in the plume can be determined reasonably accurately in real time, or near real time. Given the assumption that an aircraft can follow a plume, this study addresses the amount of atmospheric dilution expected to occur in a representative plume as a function of time past the release event. The approach models atmospheric transport of hypothetical releases from a single location for every day in a year using the publically available HYSPLIT code. The effective dilution factors for the point of maximum concentration in an elevated plume based on a release of a non-decaying, non-depositing tracer can vary by orders of magnitude depending on the day of the release, even for the same number of hours after the release event. However, the median of the dilution factors based on releases for 365 consecutive days at one site follows a power law relationship in time, as shown in Figure S-1. The relationship is good enough to provide a general rule of thumb for estimating typical future dilution factors in a plume starting at the same point. However, the coefficients of the power law function may vary for different release point locations. Radioactive decay causes the effective dilution factors to decrease more quickly with the time past the release event than the dilution factors based on a non-decaying tracer. An analytical expression for the dilution factors of isotopes with different half-lives can be developed given the power law expression for the non-decaying tracer. If the power-law equation for the median dilution factor, Df, based on a non-decaying tracer has the general form Df=a?×t?^(-b) for time t after the release event, then the equation has the form Df=e^(-?t)×a×t^(-b) for a radioactive isotope, where ? is the decay constant for the isotope.

  8. Well Permits (District of Columbia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Well permits are required for the installation of wells in private and public space. Wells are defined as any trest hole, shaft, or soil excavation created by any means including, but not limited...

  9. Geothermal completion technology life-cycle cost model (GEOCOM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansure, A.J.; Carson, C.C.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GEOCOM is a model developed to evaluate the cost effectiveness of alternative technologies used in the completion, production, and maintenance of geothermal wells. The model calculates the ratio of life-cycle cost to life-cycle production or injection and thus is appropriate for evaluating the cost effectiveness of a geothermal well even when the most economically profitable well completion strategies do not result in lowest capital costs. The project to develop the GEOCOM model included the establishment of a data base for studying geothermal completions and preliminary case/sensitivity studies. The code has the data base built into its structure as default parameters. These parameters include geothermal resource characteristics; costs of geothermal wells, workovers, and equipment; and other data. The GEOCOM model has been written in ANSI (American National Standard Institute) FORTRAN 1966 version.

  10. Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Complete FiberCopper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells Complete FiberCopper Cable Solution for Long-Term...

  11. ER-12-1 completion report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, C.E.; Gillespie, D.; Cole, J.C.; Drellack, S.L. [and others

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of drillhole ER-12-1 was to determine the hydrogeology of paleozoic carbonate rocks and of the Eleana Formation, a regional aquitard, in an area potentially downgradient from underground nuclear testing conducted in nearby Rainier Mesa. This objective was addressed through the drilling of well ER-12-1 at N886,640.26 E640,538.85 Nevada Central Coordinates. Drilling of the 1094 m (3588 ft) well began on July 19, 1991 and was completed on October 17, 1991. Drilling problems included hole deviation and hole instability that prevented the timely completion of this borehole. Drilling methods used include rotary tri-cone and rotary hammer drilling with conventional and reverse circulation using air/water, air/foam (Davis mix), and bentonite mud. Geologic cuttings and geophysical logs were obtained from the well. The rocks penetrated by the ER-12-1 drillhole are a complex assemblage of Silurian, Devonian, and Mississippian sedimentary rocks that are bounded by numerous faults that show substantial stratigraphic offset. The final 7.3 m (24 ft) of this hole penetrated an unusual intrusive rock of Cretaceous age. The geology of this borehole was substantially different from that expected, with the Tongue Wash Fault encountered at a much shallower depth, paleozoic rocks shuffled out of stratigraphic sequence, and the presence of an altered biotite-rich microporphyritic igneous rock at the bottom of the borehole. Conodont CAI analyses and rock pyrolysis analyses indicate that the carbonate rocks in ER-12-1, as well as the intervening sheets of Eleana siltstone, have been thermally overprinted following movement on the faults that separate them. The probable source of heat for this thermal disturbance is the microporphyritic intrusion encountered at the bottom of the hole, and its age establishes that the major fault activity must have occurred prior to 102.3+0.5 Ma (middle Cretaceous).

  12. Complete liquefaction methods and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are described to provide complete gas utilization in the liquefaction operation from a source of gas without return of natural gas to the source thereof from the process and apparatus. The mass flow rate of gas input into the system and apparatus may be substantially equal to the mass flow rate of liquefied product output from the system, such as for storage or use.

  13. Well-pump alignment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

  14. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and statisticians used carefully thought out designs that systematically and economically provided plans for data collection from the DWPF process. Key shared features of the sampling designs used at DWPF and the Gy sampling methodology were the specification of a standard for sample representativeness, an investigation that produced data from the process to study the sampling function, and a decision framework used to assess whether the specification was met based on the data. Without going into detail with regard to the seven errors identified by Pierre Gy, as excellent summaries are readily available such as Pitard [1989] and Smith [2001], SRS engineers understood, for example, that samplers can be biased (Gy?s extraction error), and developed plans to mitigate those biases. Experiments that compared installed samplers with more representative samples obtained directly from the tank may not have resulted in systematically partitioning sampling errors into the now well-known error categories of Gy, but did provide overall information on the suitability of sampling systems. Most of the designs in this report are related to the DWPF vessels, not the large SRS Tank Farm tanks. Samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), which contains the feed to the DWPF melter, are characterized using standardized analytical methods with known uncertainty. The analytical error is combined with the established error from sampling and processing in DWPF to determine the melter feed composition. This composition is used with the known uncertainty of the models in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to ensure that the wasteform that is produced is comfortably within the acceptable processing and product performance region. Having the advantage of many years of processing that meets the waste glass product acceptance criteria, the DWPF process has provided a considerable amount of data about itself in addition to the data from many special studies. Demonstrating representative sampling directly from the large Tank Farm tanks is a difficult, if not unsolvable enterprise due to li

  15. Complete genome sequence of Tolumonas auensis type strain (TA 4T)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Olga; Copeland, Alex; Lucas1, Susa; Lapidus, Alla; Berry, KerrieW.; Detter, JohnC.; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Hammon, Nancy; Dalin, Eileen; Tice, Hope; Pitluck, Sam; Richardson, Paul; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, Cliff; Tapia, Roxanne; Saunders, Elizabeth; Schmutz, Jeremy; Brettin, Thomas; Larimer, Frank; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Spring, Stefan; Rohde, Manfred; Kyrpides, NikosC.; Ivanova, Natalia; Göker, Markus; Beller, HarryR.; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Woyke, Tanja

    2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Tolumonas auensis (Fischer-Romero et al. 1996) is currently the only validly named species of the genus Tolumonas in the family Aeromonadaceae. The strain is of interest because of its ability to produce toluene from phenylalanine and other phenyl precursors, as well as phenol from tyrosine. This is of interest because toluene is normally considered to be a tracer of anthropogenic pollution in lakes, but T. auensis represents a biogenic source of toluene. Other than Aeromonas hydrophila subsp. hydrophila, T. auensis strain TA 4T is the only other member in the family Aeromonadaceae with a completely sequenced type-strain genome. The 3,471,292-bp chromosome with a total of 3,288 protein-coding and 116 RNA genes was sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute Program JBEI 2008.

  16. 9731: First building completed at Y-12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First building completed at Y-12 Building 9731 has a rich history at Y-12. Completed in March 1943, it was the first building completed on the site. It was also the first building...

  17. The Yamabe equation on complete manifolds with finite volume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Große, Nadine

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove the existence of a solution of the Yamabe equation on complete manifolds with finite volume and positive Yamabe invariant. In order to circumvent the standard methods on closed manifolds which heavily rely on global (compact) Sobolev embeddings we approximate the solution by eigenfunctions of certain conformal complete metrics. This also gives rise to a new proof of the well-known result for closed manifolds and positive Yamabe invariant.

  18. A representative particle approach to coagulation and fragmentation of dust aggregates and fluid droplets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Zsom; C. P. Dullemond

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Context: There is increasing need for good algorithms for modeling the aggregation and fragmentation of solid particles (dust grains, dust aggregates, boulders) in various astrophysical settings, including protoplanetary disks, planetary- and sub-stellar atmospheres and dense molecular cloud cores. Here we describe a new algorithm that combines advantages of various standard methods into one. Aims: The aim is to develop a method that 1) can solve for aggregation and fragmentation, 2) can easily include the effect and evolution of grain properties such as compactness, composition, etc., and 3) can be built as a coagulation/fragmentation module into a hydrodynamics simulations. Methods: We develop a Monte-Carlo method in which we follow the 'life' of a limited number of representative particles. Each of these particles is associated with a certain fraction of the total dust mass and thereby represents a large number of true particles which all are assumed to have the same properties as their representative particle. Under the assumption that the total number of true particles vastly exceeds the number of representative particles, the chance of a representative particle colliding with another representative particle is negligibly small, and we therefore ignore this possibility. This now makes it possible to employ a statistical approach to the evolution of the representative particles. Results: The method reproduces the known analytic solutions of simplified coagulation kernels, and compares well to numerical results for Brownian motion using other methods. For reasonably well-behaved kernels it produces good results even for moderate number of swarms.

  19. Summary of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production: Milestone Completion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electrolytic Hydrogen Production: Milestone Completion Report Summary of Electrolytic Hydrogen Production: Milestone Completion Report This report provides an overview of the...

  20. INSTRUCTIONS for COMPLETING SCHEDULE CARD WEB FORMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly Beranger

    2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 22, 2012 ... Instructions for completing schedule card web forms. The following students are required to complete schedule card web forms. • all returning ...

  1. Completed EISs | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.Space DataEnergy SuperiorWorkshop |Complete

  2. Thermal well-test method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu (Albany, CA); Doughty, Christine A. (Berkeley, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

  3. Horizontal well turbulizer and method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopmann, M.E.

    1990-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an apparatus for securement onto one end of a continuous length of remedial tubing introduceable into a subterranean well and concentrically insertable through production tubing previously positioned within the well. The well having a deviated configuration including an entry portion communicating with a curved portion extending downwardly in the well from the entry portion, and a generally linear end portion traversable with a production formation.

  4. What does motor efference copy represent? evidence from speech production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niziolek, CA; Nagarajan, SS; Houde, JF

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    What does motor efference copy represent? Evidence fromAbbreviated title: What does motor efference copy represent?SJ, Wang X (2003) Sensory-Motor Interaction in the Primate

  5. Visualizing Scalar Fields Represented by Adaptive Square Triangulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    [Sabella 88], ab­ sorption and reflection [Max 95] providing a means of representing the field by a colored

  6. Characterization Well R-7 Geochemistry Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.Longmire; F.Goff

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides analytical results for four groundwater-sampling rounds conducted at characterization well R-7. The goal of the characterization efforts was to assess the hydrochemistry and to determine if contaminants from Technical Area (TA)-2 and TA-21 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) are present in the regional aquifer in the vicinity of the well. Figure 1.0-1 shows the well's location in the narrow upper part of Los Alamos Canyon, between the inactive Omega West reactor and the mouth of DP Canyon. Well R-7 is in an excellent location to characterize the hydrology and groundwater chemistry in both perched groundwater and the regional aquifer near sites of known Laboratory effluent release, including radionuclides and inorganic chemicals (Stone et al. 2002, 72717). The Risk Reduction and Environmental Stewardship-Remediation (RRES-R) Program (formerly the Environmental Restoration [ER] Project) installed well R-7 as part of groundwater investigations to satisfy requirements of the ''Hydrogeologic Workplan'' (LANL 1998, 59599) and to support the Laboratory's ''Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan'' (LANL 1996, 70215). Well R-7 was designed primarily to provide geochemical or water quality and hydrogeologic data for the regional aquifer within the Puye Formation. This report also presents a geochemical evaluation of the analytical results for well R-7 and provides hydrogeochemical interpretations using analytical results for groundwater samples collected at the well. Discussion of other hydrogeochemical data collected within the east-central portion of the Laboratory, however, is deferred until they can be evaluated in the context of sitewide information collected from other RRES and Hydrogeologic Workplan characterization wells (R-8A, R-9, and R-9i). Once all deep groundwater investigations in the east-central portion of the Laboratory are completed, geochemical and hydrogeologic conceptual models for the Los Alamos Canyon watershed may be included in a groundwater risk analysis. These models will include an evaluation of potential contaminant transport pathways. Well R-7 was completed on March 9, 2001, with three screens (363.2 to 379.2 ft, 730.4 to 746.4 ft, and 895.5 to 937.4 ft). Screen No.2 was dry during characterization sampling. Four rounds of groundwater characterization samples, collected from a perched zone and the regional aquifer from depths of 378.0 ft (screen No.1) and 915.0 ft (screen No.3), were chemically characterized for radionuclides, metals and trace elements, major ions, high-explosive (HE) compounds, total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, organic compounds, and stable isotopes (H, N, and O). Although well R-7 is primarily a characterization well, its design and construction also meet the requirements of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant monitoring well as described in the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) document ''RCRA Groundwater Monitoring: Draft Technical Guidance,'' November 1992, EPA 530-R-93- 001. Incorporation of this well into a Laboratory-wide groundwater-monitoring program will be considered, and more specifically evaluated (e.g., sampling frequency, analytes, etc.), when the results of the well R-7 characterization activities are comprehensively evaluated in conjunction with other groundwater investigations in the ''Hydrogeologic Workplan'' (LANL 1998, 59599).

  7. Well having inhibited microbial growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Brady D.; Dooley, Kirk J.

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes methods of inhibiting microbial growth in a well. A packing material containing a mixture of a first material and an antimicrobial agent is provided to at least partially fill a well bore. One or more access tubes are provided in an annular space around a casing within the well bore. The access tubes have a first terminal opening located at or above a ground surface and have a length that extends from the first terminal opening at least part of the depth of the well bore. The access tubes have a second terminal opening located within the well bore. An antimicrobial material is supplied into the well bore through the first terminal opening of the access tubes. The invention also includes well constructs.

  8. Containment and Analysis Capability Insights Gained from Drop Testing Representative Spent Nuclear Fuel Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morton, Dana Keith; Snow, Spencer David; Rahl, Tommy Ervin; Ware, Arthur Gates

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Spent Nuclear Fuel Program (NSNFP), operating from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), developed the standardized Department of Energy (DOE) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) canister. This canister is designed to be loaded with DOE SNF (including other radioactive materials) and then be used during interim storage, during transportation to the nation’s repository, and for final disposal at the repository without having to be reopened. The canister has been fully designed and has completed significant testing that clearly demonstrates that it can safely achieve its intended design goals. During 1999, nine 457-mm diameter test canisters were fabricated at the INEEL to represent the standardized DOE SNF canister design. Various "worst case" internals were incorporated. Seven of the test canisters were 4.57 m long and weighed approximately 2721 kg, while two were 3.00 m long and weighed approximately 1360 kg and 1725 kg. Seven of the test canisters were dropped from 9 m onto an essentially unyielding flat surface and one of the test canisters was dropped from 1 m onto a 15-cm diameter puncture post. The final test canister was dropped from 61 cm onto a 50.8 mm thick vertically oriented steel plate, and then fell over to impact another 50.8 mm thick vertically oriented steel plate. This last test represented a canister dropping onto another larger container such as a repository disposal container or waste package. The 1999 drop testing was performed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The nine test canisters experienced varying degrees of damage to their skirts, lifting rings, and pressure boundary components (heads and main body). However, all of the canisters were shown to have maintained their pressure boundary (through pressure testing). Four heavily damaged canisters were also shown to be leaktight via helium leak testing. Pre- and post-drop finite element (FE) analyses were also performed. The results clearly indicated that accurate predictions of canister responses to the drop tests were achieved. The results achieved for the standardized canister can also be applicable to other well-constructed containers (canisters, casks, cans, vessels, etc.) subjected to similar loads. Properly designed containers can maintain a containment system after being subjected to dynamically induced high strains and FE computer analyses can accurately predict the resulting responses.

  9. Asymptotic Completeness for Compton Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Froehlich; M. Griesemer; B. Schlein

    2003-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Scattering in a model of a massive quantum-mechanical particle, an ``electron'', interacting with massless, relativistic bosons, ``photons'', is studied. The interaction term in the Hamiltonian of our model describes emission and absorption of ``photons'' by the ``electron''; but ``electron-positron'' pair production is suppressed. An ultraviolet cutoff and an (arbitrarily small, but fixed) infrared cutoff are imposed on the interaction term. In a range of energies where the propagation speed of the dressed ``electron'' is strictly smaller than the speed of light, unitarity of the scattering matrix is proven, provided the coupling constant is small enough; (asymptotic completeness of Compton scattering). The proof combines a construction of dressed one--electron states with propagation estimates for the ``electron'' and the ``photons''.

  10. Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnado, S. G.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is an impediment to the timely development of geothermal resources in the US. The Division of Geothermal Energy (DGE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a development program aimed at reducing well costs through improvements in the technology used to drill and complete geothermal wells. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been selected to manage this program for DOE/DGE. Based on analyses of existing well costs, cost reduction goals have been set for the program. These are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987. To meet these goals, technology development in a wide range of areas is required. The near-term goal will be approached by improvements in conventional, rotary drilling technology. The long-term goal will require the development of an advanced drilling and completion system. Currently, the program is emphasizing activities directed at the near-term cost reduction goal, but increased emphasis on advanced system development is anticipated as time progresses. The program is structured into six sub-elements: Drilling Hardware, Drilling Fluids, Completion Technology, Lost Circulation Control Methods, Advanced Drilling Systems, and Supporting Technology. Technology development in each of these areas is conducted primarily through contracts with private industries and universities. Some projects are conducted internally by Sandia. This report describes the program, status, and results of ongoing R and D within the program for the 1980 fiscal year.

  11. Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartsock, J.H.; Rodgers, J.A.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the life of the project, 1143 wildcat wells were screened for possible use. Although many did not meet the program's requirement for sand development, a surprisingly large number were abandoned because of downhole mechanical problems. Only 94 of these wells were completed as commercial hydrocarbon producers. Five wells of opportunity were funded for testing. Of these, two were evaluated for their hydraulic energy, thermal energy, and recoverable methane, and three were abandoned because of mechanical problems. (MHR)

  12. Thermal well-test method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

    1984-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

  13. Well Monitoring System for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Peer Review Well Monitoring Systems for EGS Principal Investigator Randy Normann Perma Works LLC May 19, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or...

  14. Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Asa S.; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, James; Rosenquist, Gregory; Gu, Lixing

    2011-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a new simulation tool under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This tool uses EnergyPlus to simulate each single-family home in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), and generates a calibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes whose energy use is statistically indistinguishable from the energy use of the single-family homes in the RECS sample. This research builds upon earlier work by Ritchard et al. for the Gas Research Institute and Huang et al. for LBNL. A representative national sample allows us to evaluate the variance in energy use between individual homes, regions, or other subsamples; using this tool, we can also evaluate how that variance affects the impacts of potential policies. The RECS contains information regarding the construction and location of each sampled home, as well as its appliances and other energy-using equipment. We combined this data with the home simulation prototypes developed by Huang et al. to simulate homes that match the RECS sample wherever possible. Where data was not available, we used distributions, calibrated using the RECS energy use data. Each home was assigned a best-fit location for the purposes of weather and some construction characteristics. RECS provides some detail on the type and age of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment in each home; we developed EnergyPlus models capable of reproducing the variety of technologies and efficiencies represented in the national sample. This includes electric, gas, and oil furnaces, central and window air conditioners, central heat pumps, and baseboard heaters. We also developed a model of duct system performance, based on in-home measurements, and integrated this with fan performance to capture the energy use of single- and variable-speed furnace fans, as well as the interaction of duct and fan performance with the efficiency of heating and cooling equipment. Comparison with RECS revealed that EnergyPlus did not capture the heating-side behavior of heat pumps particularly accurately, and that our simple oil furnace and boiler models needed significant recalibration to fit with RECS. Simulating the full RECS sample on a single computer would take many hours, so we used the 'cloud computing' services provided by Amazon.com to simulate dozens of homes at once. This enabled us to simulate the full RECS sample, including multiple versions of each home to evaluate the impact of marginal changes, in less than 3 hours. Once the tool was calibrated, we were able to address several policy questions. We made a simple measurement of the heat replacement effect and showed that the net effect of heat replacement on primary energy use is likely to be less than 5%, relative to appliance-only measures of energy savings. Fuel switching could be significant, however. We also evaluated the national and regional impacts of a variety of 'overnight' changes in building characteristics or occupant behavior, including lighting, home insulation and sealing, HVAC system efficiency, and thermostat settings. For example, our model shows that the combination of increased home insulation and better sealed building shells could reduce residential natural gas use by 34.5% and electricity use by 6.5%, and a 1 degree rise in summer thermostat settings could save 2.1% of home electricity use. These results vary by region, and we present results for each U.S. Census division. We conclude by offering proposals for future work to improve the tool. Some proposed future work includes: comparing the simulated energy use data with the monthly RECS bill data; better capturing the variation in behavior between households, especially as it relates to occupancy and schedules; improving the characterization of recent construction and its regional variation; and extending the general framework of this simulation tool to capture multifamily housing units, such as apartment buildings.

  15. A representative sample of Be stars III: H band spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. A. Steele; J. S. Clark

    2001-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present H band (1.53 - 1.69 micron) spectra of 57 isolated Be stars of spectral types O9-B9 and luminosity classes III,IV & V. The HI Brackett (n-4) series is seen in emission from Br 11-18, and FeII emission is also apparent for a subset of those stars with HI emission. No emission from species with a higher excitation temperature, such as He II or CIII is seen, and no forbidden line emission is present. A subset of 12 stars show no evidence for emission from any species; these stars appear indistinguishable from normal B stars of a comparable spectral type. In general the line ratios constructed from the transitions in the range Br 11-18 do not fit case B recombination theory particularly well. Strong correlations between the line ratios with Br-gamma and spectral type are found. These results most likely represent systematic variations in the temperature and ionization of the circumstellar disc with spectral type. Weak correlations between the line widths and projected rotational velocity of the stars are observed; however no systematic trend for increasing line width through the Brackett series is observed.

  16. Optimization of fractured well performance of horizontal gas wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magalhaes, Fellipe Vieira

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In low-permeability gas reservoirs, horizontal wells have been used to increase the reservoir contact area, and hydraulic fracturing has been further extending the contact between wellbores and reservoirs. This thesis presents an approach...

  17. Impact of common problems in geothermal drilling and completion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, C.C.; Lin, Y.T.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Problems that arise in geothermal drilling and completion account for a significant portion of geothermal well costs. In order to evaluate new technologies for combatting these problems, the relative frequencies and severities of different problems have been estimated. The estimates were based on both subjective judgements and analysis of available drilling records. The most common problems include lost circulation, stuck pipe and cementing, and their impact is to increase well cost by an average of at least 15%.

  18. Deactivation completed at historic Hanford Fuels Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses deactivation work which was completed as of March 31, 1994 at the 308 Fuels Development Laboratory (FDL) at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The decision to deactivate the structure, formerly known as the Plutonium Fabrication Pilot Plant (PFPP), was driven by a 1980s Department of Energy (DOE) decision that plutonium fuels should not be fabricated in areas near the Site`s boundaries, as well as by changing facility structural requirements. Inventory transfer has been followed by the cleanout and stabilization of plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) and enriched uranium oxide (UO{sub 2}) residues and powders in the facility`s equipment and duct work. The Hanford Site, located in southeastern Washington state, was one of America`s primary arsenals of nuclear defense production for nearly 50 years beginning in World War II. Approximately 53 metric tons of weapons grade plutonium, over half of the national supply and about one quarter of the world`s supply, were produced at Hanford between 1944 and 1989. Today, many Site buildings are undergoing deactivation, a precursor phase to decontamination and decommissioning (D&D). The primary difference between the two activities is that equipment and structural items are not removed or torn down in deactivation. However, utilities are disconnected, and special nuclear materials (SNM) as well as hazardous and pyrophoric substances are removed from structures undergoing this process.

  19. Complete positivity of non-Markovian quantum dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Björn Witt; ?ukasz Rudnicki; Florian Mintert

    2015-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a purely algebraic framework for the identification of hierarchy equations of motion that induce completely positive dynamics. As we show with several explicit examples, this permits to construct well-behaved phenomenological models with strongly non-Markovian revivals of quantum coherence.

  20. acid phosphatase representing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manager Meeting Representatives Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: with security requirements associated with imaging, use only the DP form located at either of...

  1. ambassador permanent representative: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manager Meeting Representatives Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: with security requirements associated with imaging, use only the DP form located at either of...

  2. alheiras represents considerable: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manager Meeting Representatives Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: with security requirements associated with imaging, use only the DP form located at either of...

  3. alternative values representing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manager Meeting Representatives Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: with security requirements associated with imaging, use only the DP form located at either of...

  4. active demethylation represent: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Manager Meeting Representatives Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: with security requirements associated with imaging, use only the DP form located at either of...

  5. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order established procedures governing the selection, appointment and termination of Department of Energy contracting officers and contracting officer representatives. Cancels DOE O 541.1A.

  6. 4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered...

  7. A Class Representative Model for Pure Parsimony Haplotyping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Catanzaro

    2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 10, 2008 ... A Class Representative Model for Pure Parsimony Haplotyping. Daniele Catanzaro (dacatanz ***at*** ulb.ac.be) Alessandra Godi (godi ***at*** ...

  8. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    akfairbankspre1980v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 8 Fairbanks, Alaska Reference Buildings by Climate Zone...

  9. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    minneapolispre1980v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6A Minneapolis, Minnesota Reference Buildings by...

  10. Accountable Property Representatives List and Property Pass Signer...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Accountable Property RepresentativesProperty Pass Authorization 1202015 Employee Authorized Organization Phone APR Primary Property Pass Signer PETEET, LISA J. ALL ORGS (202)...

  11. Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaffin, R.J.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1983-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

  12. Bitumen production through a horizontal well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livesey, D.B.; Toma, P.

    1987-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method for thermal stimulation and production of a viscous hydrocarbon from a reservoir having a productive layer which retains the hydrocarbon until the latter is made flowable by contact with a hot stimulating medium. The method includes the steps of: forming a borehole having a substantially horizontal segment which transverses the productive layer, registering a well completion in the borehole which includes; an elongated perforate well liner, a fluid conduit extending through the liner and having a discharge end, and a well head at the liner upper end communicated with the fluid conduit, positioning a variable length flow diverter in the liner adjacent to the fluid conduit discharge end, whereby to define a quasi-barrier in the liner which is pervious to passage of the hot stimulating medium, and which divides the liner into injection and production segments respectively, heating the productive layer about the substantially horizontal segment of the elongated liner, introducing a pressurized stream of the hot stimulant through the fluid conduit and into the liner injection segment, and producing hydrocarbon emulsion which flows into the liner production segment.

  13. Simulating the Effect of Water on the Fracture System of Shale Gas Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamam, Hassan Hasan H.

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    It was observed that many hydraulically fractured horizontal shale gas wells exhibit transient linear flow behavior. A half-slope on a type curve represents this transient linear flow behavior. Shale gas wells show a significant skin effect which...

  14. Modelling regulations Completing an incomplete regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Torre, Leon

    Objectives Modelling regulations Completing an incomplete regulation Examples Discussion Consistency and Completeness of Regulations Laurence Cholvy1 St´ephanie Roussel1,2 1ONERA Centre de Toulouse 2ISAE, Toulouse NorMAS 2008, Luxembourg, July 2008 cholvy Consistency and Completeness of Regulations

  15. My PhD Plan Completed Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruina, Andy L.

    Background My PhD Plan Completed Work Planned Work Hierarchical Biped Control A Exam Matthew Kelly August 4, 2014 Matthew Kelly Hierarchical Biped Control 1 / 34 #12;Background My PhD Plan Completed Work Planned Work Table of Contents 1 Background 2 My PhD Plan 3 Completed Work 4 Planned Work Push Hold Free

  16. Knowledge-based stratigraphic well-log correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denton, Michael A.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    represents the formations, and new rules for the knowledge-base that can correlate formations in reservoirs with secondary stratification. This expert system has correlated ovei' 3, 500 ft. of well-log data from three different types of rock sequences... inspirational support. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT nl DEDICATION ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES x1 LIST OF FIGURES xl1 CHAPTER I ? INTRODUCTION 1. 1 Well-Logs 1. 2 Stratigraphic Well-Log Correlation . 1. 3 Well-Log Correlation...

  17. Representing a Robotic Domain Using Temporal Description Logics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franconi, Enrico

    Representing a Robotic Domain Using Temporal Description Logics Alessandro Artale artale@irst.itc effects; effects may not directly follow the action but more complex temporal relations may hold describes a collection of properties of the world holding at a certain time. Actions are represented through

  18. Well funneled nuclear structure landscape: renormalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Idini, A; Barranco, F; Vigezzi, E; Broglia, R A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete characterization of the structure of nuclei can be obtained by combining information arising from inelastic scattering, Coulomb excitation and $\\gamma-$decay, together with one- and two-particle transfer reactions. In this way it is possible to probe the single-particle and collective components of the nuclear many-body wavefunction resulting from their mutual coupling and diagonalising the low-energy Hamiltonian. We address the question of how accurately such a description can account for experimental observations. It is concluded that renormalizing empirically and on equal footing bare single-particle and collective motion in terms of self-energy (mass) and vertex corrections (screening), as well as particle-hole and pairing interactions through particle-vibration coupling allows theory to provide an overall, quantitative account of the data.

  19. Well funneled nuclear structure landscape: renormalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Idini; G. Potel; F. Barranco; E. Vigezzi; R. A. Broglia

    2015-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A complete characterization of the structure of nuclei can be obtained by combining information arising from inelastic scattering, Coulomb excitation and $\\gamma-$decay, together with one- and two-particle transfer reactions. In this way it is possible to probe the single-particle and collective components of the nuclear many-body wavefunction resulting from their mutual coupling and diagonalising the low-energy Hamiltonian. We address the question of how accurately such a description can account for experimental observations. It is concluded that renormalizing empirically and on equal footing bare single-particle and collective motion in terms of self-energy (mass) and vertex corrections (screening), as well as particle-hole and pairing interactions through particle-vibration coupling allows theory to provide an overall, quantitative account of the data.

  20. In-well vapor stripping drilling and characterization work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koegler, K.J.

    1994-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This work plan provides the information necessary for drilling, sampling, and hydrologic testing of wells to be completed in support of a demonstration of the in-well vapor stripping system. The in-well vapor stripping system is a remediation technology designed to preferentially extract volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater by converting them to a vapor phase. Air-lift pumping is used to lift and aerate groundwater within the well. The volatiles escaping the aerated water are drawn off by a slight vacuum and treated at the surface while the water is allowed to infiltrate the vadose zone back to the watertable.

  1. U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Completes Production Wells Needed for Project Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: U.S. Geothermal Drills Another Prolific Well at Neal Hot...

  2. ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

  3. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN), Blocksome; Michael A. (Rochester, MN), Parker; Jeffrey J. (Rochester, MN)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for DMA transfer completion notification that include: inserting, by an origin DMA on an origin node in an origin injection FIFO, a data descriptor for an application message; inserting, by the origin DMA, a reflection descriptor in the origin injection FIFO, the reflection descriptor specifying a remote get operation for injecting a completion notification descriptor in a reflection injection FIFO on a reflection node; transferring, by the origin DMA to a target node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; in response to completing the message transfer, transferring, by the origin DMA to the reflection node, the completion notification descriptor in dependence upon the reflection descriptor; receiving, by the origin DMA from the reflection node, a completion packet; and notifying, by the origin DMA in response to receiving the completion packet, the origin node's processing core that the message transfer is complete.

  4. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Blocksome, Michael A. (Rochester, MN); Parker, Jeffrey J. (Rochester, MN)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    DMA transfer completion notification includes: inserting, by an origin DMA engine on an origin node in an injection first-in-first-out (`FIFO`) buffer, a data descriptor for an application message to be transferred to a target node on behalf of an application on the origin node; inserting, by the origin DMA engine, a completion notification descriptor in the injection FIFO buffer after the data descriptor for the message, the completion notification descriptor specifying a packet header for a completion notification packet; transferring, by the origin DMA engine to the target node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; sending, by the origin DMA engine, the completion notification packet to a local reception FIFO buffer using a local memory FIFO transfer operation; and notifying, by the origin DMA engine, the application that transfer of the message is complete in response to receiving the completion notification packet in the local reception FIFO buffer.

  5. Sampling for Bacteria in Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling for Bacteria in Wells E-126 11/01 Water samples for bacteria tests must always be col- lected in a sterile container. The procedure for collect- ing a water sample is as follows: 1. Obtain a sterile container from a Health Department...

  6. Process for cementing geothermal wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eilers, Louis H. (Inola, OK)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

  7. PrimeEnergy/DOE/GRI slant well. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.; Carden, R.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents final results of the Sterling Boggs 1240 slant well. Objectives of the project were (1) to test the potential for improved recovery efficiency in a fractured Devonian Shale reservoir from a directionally drilled well, (2) to perform detailed tests of reservoir properties and completion methods, and (3) to provide technology to industry which may ultimately improve the economics of drilling in the Devonian Shale and thereby stimulate development of its resources.

  8. Horizontal well successfully drilled in Black Warrior basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, J.R. [Mississippi Valley Gas Co., Jackson, MS (United States); Skeen, B. [Sperry-Sun Drilling Services, Dallas, TX (United States)

    1996-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The first horizontal well successfully drilled and completed in the very abrasive Black Warrior basin required the use of several state-of-the-art drilling technologies and quick decision making at the well site. Mississippi Valley Gas Co.`s first horizontal well in the Goodwin natural gas storage field has a deliverability about six times that of a conventional vertical well in the same reservoir. The MVG Howard 35-4 No. 1 was drilled in 23 days during September and October 1995. The well reached 1,805 ft true vertical depth (TVD) and 3,660 ft measured depth. The horizontal section length was 1,650 ft. The well reached the target, and the economics were favorable. The paper describes the geology of the basin, Goodwin field, the decision for a horizontal well, the difficulties encountered, and evaluation of the technologies used.

  9. Acid Placement in Acid Jetting Treatments in Long Horizontal Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sasongko, Hari

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of Vertically Extensive, Heterogeneous Gas Reservoirs. SPE Prod & Fac 25 (3): 388-397. SPE-124881-PA. http://dx.doi.org/10.2118/124881-PA. Ritchie, B., Abbasy, I., Pitts, M.J., and White, B. 2008. Challenges in Completing Long Horizontal Wells Selectively...

  10. A new well surveying tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haghighi, Manuchehr Mehdizabeh

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A NEW WELL SURVEYING TOOL A Thesis By MANUCHEHR MEHDIZABEH HAGHIGHI Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ANM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Major Subject: PETROLEUM... by Surveying Device for S and 19 , N and 41 . 21 3. Comparison of Measured Angles and Angles Indicated by Surveying Device for NE snd 9 , W and 45 . . . . . . . ~ 22 ABSTRNl T Ever since the advent of rotary drilling the petroleum industry has been...

  11. Geopressured geothermal drilling and completions technology development needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maish, A.B.

    1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geopressured geothermal formations found in the Texas and Louisiana gulf coast region and elsewhere have the potential to supply large quantities of energy in the form of natural gas and warm brine (200 to 300/sup 0/F). Advances are needed, however, in hardware technology, well design technology, and drilling and completion practices to enable production and testing of exploratory wells and to enable economic production of the resource should further development be warranted. This report identifies needed technology for drilling and completing geopressured geothermal source and reinjection wells to reduce the cost and to accelerate commercial recovery of this resource. A comprehensive prioritized list of tasks to develop necessary technology has been prepared. Tasks listed in this report address a wide range of technology needs including new diagnostic techniques, control technologies, hardware, instrumentation, operational procedure guidelines and further research to define failure modes and control techniques. Tasks are organized into the functional areas of well design, drilling, casing installation, cementing, completions, logging, brine reinjection and workovers.

  12. Department of Defense Representatives Visit Hanford to Benchmark Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash., December 16, 2005, Representatives of the Department of Defense's (DoD's) Voluntary Protection Program Center of Excellence (VPP CX) working to reduce injuries at selected (DoD)...

  13. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Baltimore, Maryland Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4A Baltimore, Maryland In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view...

  14. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Chicago, Illinois Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5A Chicago, Illinois In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  15. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B Helena, Montana Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 6B Helena, Montana In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  16. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B Boulder, Colorado Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 5B Boulder, Colorado In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  17. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1A Miami, Florida Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 1A Miami, Florida In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  18. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    7 Duluth, Minnesota Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 7 Duluth, Minnesota In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  19. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B Phoenix, Arizona Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2B Phoenix, Arizona In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  20. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B Las Vegas, Nevada Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Las Vegas, Nevada In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  1. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    B Los Angeles, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3B Los Angeles, California In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can...

  2. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C San Francisco, California Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3C San Francisco, California In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can...

  3. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Atlanta, Georgia Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3A Atlanta, Georgia In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  4. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    A Houston, Texas Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the...

  5. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C Seattle, Washington Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4C Seattle, Washington In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view...

  6. Changes to the Facility Representative Program, 10/26/1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Effective October 1, 1999, the Deputy Secretary tasked this office to manage the Facility Representative Program. We look forward to working with you in continuing and improving this very important...

  7. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    new2004v1.35.0.zip refbldg3ausagaatlantanew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 3A Atlanta, Georgia...

  8. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    new2004v1.35.0.zip refbldg1ausaflmiaminew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 1A Miami, Florida...

  9. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    new2004v1.35.0.zip refbldg2ausatxhoustonnew2004v1-47-2.zip More Documents & Publications Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 2A Houston, Texas...

  10. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish procedures governing the selection, appointment, and termination of contracting officers and for the appointment of contracting officer representatives. Cancels DOE Order 4200.4A. Canceled by DOE O 541.1A.

  11. Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City:...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    B Albuquerque, New Mexico Reference Buildings by Climate Zone and Representative City: 4B Albuquerque, New Mexico In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can...

  12. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Blocksome, Michael A. (Rochester, MN); Parker, Jeffrey J. (Rochester, MN)

    2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for DMA transfer completion notification that include: inserting, by an origin DMA engine on an origin compute node in an injection FIFO buffer, a data descriptor for an application message to be transferred to a target compute node on behalf of an application on the origin compute node; inserting, by the origin DMA engine, a completion notification descriptor in the injection FIFO buffer after the data descriptor for the message, the completion notification descriptor specifying an address of a completion notification field in application storage for the application; transferring, by the origin DMA engine to the target compute node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; and notifying, by the origin DMA engine, the application that the transfer of the message is complete, including performing a local direct put operation to store predesignated notification data at the address of the completion notification field.

  13. CASING-HEADING PHENOMENON IN GAS-LIFTED WELL AS A LIMIT CYCLE OF A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    phenomenon occurring on gas- lift artificially lifted well. This behavior is well represented by a 2D model: Process Control, Dynamic Systems, Limit Cycles, Switching System, Gas-Lifted Well. 1. INTRODUCTIONCASING-HEADING PHENOMENON IN GAS-LIFTED WELL AS A LIMIT CYCLE OF A 2D MODEL WITH SWITCHES Laure Sin

  14. GEOFRAC: an explosives stimulation technique for a geothermal well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mumma, D.M.; McCullough, F. Jr.; Schmidt, E.W.; Pye, D.S.; Allen, W.C.; Pyle, D.; Hanold, R.J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first known use of explosives for stimulating a geothermal well was successfully conducted in December 1981 with a process called GEOFRAC. The 260/sup 0/C well was located at the Union Oil Company's Geysers Field in northern California. For the initial test, 364 kg of a new explosive called HITEX II was placed at a depth of 2256 meters and detonated to verify techniques. The explosive was contained in an aluminum canister to separate it from the well fluids. In the second test, 5000 kg of explosive was used representing a column length of approximately 191 meters. The explosive was detonated at a depth of 1697 meters in the same well. The results of these tests show that HITEX II can be safely emplaced and successfully detonated in a hot geothermal well without causing damage to the well bore or casing.

  15. First trillion particle cosmological simulation completed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    trillion particle cosmological simulation completed A team of astrophysicists and computer scientists has created high-resolution cyber images of our cosmos. December 3, 2014...

  16. Uranium Processing Facility Site Readiness Subproject Completed...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Field Offices Welcome to the NNSA Production Office NPO News Releases Uranium Processing Facility Site Readiness Subproject Completed ... Uranium Processing Facility Site...

  17. Semidefinite Programming Reformulation of Completely Positive ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 6, 2014 ... can replace the completely positive programming characterization of the moment ...... actual water storage in the reservoir across the n periods:.

  18. Implicit Multifunction Theorems in complete metric spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Implicit Multifunction Theorems in complete metric spaces. Huynh Van Ngai ? Nguyen Huu Tron† and. Michel Théra ‡. Abstract. In this paper, we establish some ...

  19. Sandia National Laboratories: extend the complete combustion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    extend the complete combustion zone Sandia Maps Multiple Paths to Cleaner, Low-Temp Diesels On October 22, 2013, in CRF, Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Partnership,...

  20. Sampling for Bacteria in Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling for Bacteria in Wells E-126 11/01 Water samples for bacteria tests must always be col- lected in a sterile container. The procedure for collect- ing a water sample is as follows: 1. Obtain a sterile container from a Health Department... immediately after collecting water sample. Refrigerate the sample and transport it to the laborato- ry (in an ice chest) as soon after collection as possible (six hours is best, but up to 30 hours). Many labs will not accept bacteria samples on Friday so check...

  1. Well Deepening | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-fTri GlobalJump to: navigation,Goff, 2002) |Weedpatch,Welcome NewWell

  2. Production Wells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska:Precourt Institute for EnergyWister|Production Wells (Redirected

  3. Observation Wells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth AmericaNorthwestOakdale Electric CoopWells Jump to:

  4. Integrated services help drill horizontal well ahead of schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rizk, G. (Baker Hughes Inteq, Houston, TX (United States)); Clough, M. (Baker Hughes Inteq, Aberdeen (United Kingdom))

    1994-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Integrated services and incentive contracts helped deliver an onshore horizontal gas well ahead of schedule. Elf Petroland BV's Harlingen 8 well in Holland was drilled and completed in 26 days, instead of the 33 days planned. Incentive bonuses were awarded, and the gas well began production early. Elf Petroland used one supplier to coordinate service operations and make rig site operations more efficient. The streamlined organization on site improved communication and simplified administration and logistics. Rig site problems were addressed quickly, and solutions implemented effectively because of the integrated-services structure. The paper discusses the organizational plan and how it was carried out.

  5. Galilean symmetry in a noncommutative gravitational quantum well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saha, Anirban [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, West Bengal State University, Barasat, West Bengal (India)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A thorough analysis of Galilean symmetries for the gravitational well problem on a noncommutative plane is presented. A complete closure of the one-parameter centrally extended Galilean algebra is realized for the model. This implies that the field theoretic model constructed to describe noncommutative gravitational quantum well in [A. Saha, Eur. Phys. J. C 51, 199 (2007).] is indeed independent of the coordinate choice. Hence the energy spectrum predicted by the model can be associated with the experimental results to establish the upper bound on a time-space noncommutative parameter. Interestingly, noncommutativity is shown to increase the gravitational pull on the neutron trapped in the gravitational well.

  6. Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Z. Adam Szybinski

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault, are range-bounding and display numerous characteristics typical of strike-slip fault systems. These characteristics, when combined with geophysical data from Shore (2005), indicate the presence of a pull-apart basin, formed within the releasing bend of the Pumpernickel Valley – Edna Mountain fault system. A substantial body of evidence exists, in the form of available geothermal, geological and geophysical information, to suggest that the property and the pull-apart basin host a structurally controlled, extensive geothermal field. The most evident manifestations of the geothermal activity in the valley are two areas with hot springs, seepages, and wet ground/vegetation anomalies near the Pumpernickel Valley fault, which indicate that the fault focuses the fluid up-flow. There has not been any geothermal production from the Pumpernickel Valley area, but it was the focus of a limited exploration effort by Magma Power Company. In 1974, the company drilled one exploration/temperature gradient borehole east of the Pumpernickel Valley fault and recorded a thermal gradient of 160oC/km. The 1982 temperature data from five unrelated mineral exploration holes to the north of the Magma well indicated geothermal gradients in a range from 66 to 249oC/km for wells west of the fault, and ~283oC/km in a well next to the fault. In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley fault, and suggests that the main plume is controlled, at least in part, by flow from this fault system. The temperature data also defines the geothermal resource with gradients >100oC/km, which covers an area a minimum of 8 km2. Structural blocks, down dropped with respect to the Pumpernickel Valley fault, may define an immediate reservoir. The geothermal system almost certainly continues beyond the recently drilled holes and might be open to the east and south, whereas the heat source responsible for the temperatures associated with this plume has not been intersected and must be at a depth greater than 920 meters (depth of the deepest well – Magma well). The geological and structural setting and other characteristics of the Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area are markedly similar to the portions of the nearby Dixie Valley geothermal field. These similarities include, among others, the numerous, unexposed en echelon faults and large-scale pull-apart structure, which in Dixie Valley may host part of the geothermal field. The Pumpernickel Valley project area, for the majority of which Nevada Geothermal Power Company has geothermal rights, represents a geothermal site with a potential for the discovery of a relatively high temperature reservoir suitable for electric power production. Among locations not previously identified as having high geothermal potential, Pumpernickel Valley has been ranked as one of four sites with the highest potential for electrical power production in Nevada (Shevenell and Garside, 2003). Richards and Blackwell (2002) estimated the total heat loss and the preliminary production capacity for the entire Pumpernickel Valley geothermal system to be at 35MW. A more conservative estimate, for

  7. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnado, S.G.; Kelsey, J.R.; Wesenberg, D.L.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A long-range plan for the development of new technology that will reduce the cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells is presented. The role of this program in relation to the total Federal Geothermal Energy Program is defined and specific program goals are identified. Then, the current status of the program, initiated in FY 1978, is presented, and research and development activities planned through 1987 are described. Budget and milestone estimates for each task are provided. The management plan for implementing the program is also discussed. The goals of this program are to develop the technology required to reduce the cost of drilling and completing geothermal wells by 25% in the near term and by 50% in the long term. Efforts under this program to date have resulted in new roller bit designs that will reduce well costs by 2% to 4%, new drag bits that have demonstrated marked increases in penetration rate, and the field verification of the effectiveness of inert drilling fluids in reducing drill pipe corrosion. Activities planned for the next six years for achieving the program goals are described. Technical activities include work in the areas of drilling hardware, drilling fluids, lost circulation control methods, completion technology, advanced drilling systems, and supporting technology.

  8. Completion processing for data communications instructions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Kumar, Sameer; Parker, Jeffrey J.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Completion processing of data communications instructions in a distributed computing environment with computers coupled for data communications through communications adapters and an active messaging interface (`AMI`), injecting for data communications instructions into slots in an injection FIFO buffer a transfer descriptor, at least some of the instructions specifying callback functions; injecting a completion descriptor for each instruction that specifies a callback function into an injection FIFO buffer slot having a corresponding slot in a pending callback list; listing in the pending callback list callback functions specified by data communications instructions; processing each descriptor in the injection FIFO buffer, setting a bit in a completion bit mask corresponding to the slot in the FIFO where the completion descriptor was injected; and calling by the AMI any callback functions in the pending callback list as indicated by set bits in the completion bit mask.

  9. Multilateral completions prepare to take off

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockman, M. [Baker Oil Tools, Houston, TX (United States); Gann, C. [Baker Hughes INTEQ, Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development and evolutionary process of multilateral drilling and completion technology is an event in technological oil field history analogous to horizontal technology. In the same way operators and service companies integrated horizontal technology, the next 3 to 5 years will see multilateral technology grow to optimize production and lower per-barrel cost over the life of a reservoir. Chief among the remaining challenges to multilateral completion techniques is integration of drilling and completion methods that allow operators to perform future interventions while maintaining control of individual sections. The key difference between horizontal and multilateral technology is that the former was drilling-driven while the latter is completion-driven. This paper reviews the technology and equipment that is making multilateral completion come of age.

  10. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

  11. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

    Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

  12. Production Well Performance Enhancement using Sonication Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adewumi, Michael A; Ityokumbul, M Thaddeus; Watson, Robert W; Eltohami, Eltohami; Farias, Mario; Heckman, Glenn; Houlihan, Brendan; Karoor, Samata Prakash; Miller, Bruce G; Mohammed, Nazia; Olanrewaju, Johnson; Ozdemir, Mine; Rejepov, Dautmamed; Sadegh, Abdallah A; Quammie, Kevin E; Zaghloul, Jose; Hughes, W Jack; Montgomery, Thomas C

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to develop a sonic well performance enhancement technology that focused on near wellbore formation damage. In order to successfully achieve this objective, a three-year project was defined. The entire project was broken into four tasks. The overall objective of all this was to foster a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in sonic energy interactions with fluid flow in porous media and adapt such knowledge for field applications. The fours tasks are: • Laboratory studies • Mathematical modeling • Sonic tool design and development • Field demonstration The project was designed to be completed in three years; however, due to budget cuts, support was only provided for the first year, and hence the full objective of the project could not be accomplished. This report summarizes what was accomplished with the support provided by the US Department of Energy. Experiments performed focused on determining the inception of cavitation, studying thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions, investigating sonic energy interactions with glass beads and oil, and studying the effects of sonication on crude oil properties. Our findings show that the voltage threshold for onset of cavitation is independent of transducer-hydrophone separation distance. In addition, thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions contributed to the mobilization of deposited paraffins and waxes. Our preliminary laboratory experiments suggest that waxes are mobilized when the fluid temperature approaches 40°C. Experiments were conducted that provided insights into the interactions between sonic wave and the fluid contained in the porous media. Most of these studies were carried out in a slim-tube apparatus. A numerical model was developed for simulating the effect of sonication in the nearwellbore region. The numerical model developed was validated using a number of standard testbed problems. However, actual application of the model for scale-up purposes was limited due to funding constraints. The overall plan for this task was to perlorm field trials with the sonication tooL These trials were to be performed in production and/or injection wells located in Pennsylvania, New York, and West Virginia. Four new wells were drilled in preparation for the field demonstration. Baseline production data were collected and reservoir simulator tuned to simulate these oil reservoirs. The sonication tools were designed for these wells. However, actual field testing could not be carried out because of premature termination of the project.

  13. Chimeras in random non-complete networks of phase oscillators Carlo R. Laing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laing, Carlo R.

    Chimeras in random non-complete networks of phase oscillators Carlo R. Laing Institute capable of displaying a "chimera" state (namely, two subnetworks with strong coupling within whose fixed points describe a typical chimera state in a representative network of phase os- cillators

  14. Complete Residential Urban Area Reconstruction from Dense Aerial LiDAR Point Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    Complete Residential Urban Area Reconstruction from Dense Aerial LiDAR Point Clouds Qian-Yi Zhou area modeling and residential area modeling is that the latter usually con- tains rich vegetation. Thus representing the 3D urban reality of residential areas. Keywords: urban modeling, LiDAR, residential area

  15. 66 Academic Nurse Program representatives assist the School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grishok, Alla

    interviews, professional development, and dealing with the unknown. Anesthesia Program Representative: Laura of safe surgery and anesthesia practices. Since gradua- tion, he has been involved in global anesthesia also currently serves on the Anesthesia Committee for the Global Alliance for Surgical and Anesthesia

  16. Does convective aggregation need to be represented in cumulus parameterizations?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Does convective aggregation need to be represented in cumulus parameterizations? Isabelle Tobin,1 in phenomena such as ``hot spots'' or the Madden-Julian Oscillation. These findings support the need climate models lack any such representation. The ability of a cloud system- resolving model to reproduce

  17. Representing Topological Relationships between Complex Regions by F-Histograms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matsakis, Pascal

    Representing Topological Relationships between Complex Regions by F-Histograms Lukasz Wawrzyniak between two regions in terms of the thirteen Allen relations. An index to measure the complexity Work in the modeling of topological relationships often relies on an extension into the spatial domain

  18. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer's Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish procedures governing the selection, appointment, and termination of contracting officers and for the appointment of contracting officer's representatives. To ensure that only trained and qualified procurement and financial assistance professionals, within the scope of this Order, serve as contracting officers. Cancels DOE O 541.1. Canceled by DOE O 541.1B.

  19. US House of Representatives Appropriation Committee Report May 18, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US House of Representatives Appropriation Committee Report May 18, 2005 Fusion Energy Sciences The Committee recommendation for fusion energy sciences is $295,155,000, an increase of $5,605,000 over that two-thirds of the proposed increase for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER

  20. Representing Abductive Practical Reasoning as an Action-Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkinson, Katie

    Representing Abductive Practical Reasoning as an Action-Based Alternating Transition System Floris present an approach to abductive reasoning by examin- ing it in the context of an argumentation scheme to rea- son abductively about how an agent might have acted to find itself in a particular sceanrio

  1. Representative Seroprevalences of Brucellosis in Humans and Livestock in Kyrgyzstan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Representative Seroprevalences of Brucellosis in Humans and Livestock in Kyrgyzstan Bassirou Bonfoh), 60 Togolok Moldo Street, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan 3 Veterinary Public Health Institute, Vetsuisse Faculty, Swiss Red Cross, 187/1 Sydykova Street, Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan 5 Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute

  2. Lattices which can be represented as lattices of intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaggelis Felouzis

    2006-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate lattices that can be represented as sublattices of the lattice of all convex subsets of a linearly ordered set $(X, \\leq)$ and as lattices of convex subsets of $(X, \\leq)$. A representation theory for general lattices is presented and also some applications in general topology are given.

  3. REPRESENTING GEO-SCIENTIFIC DOMAIN CONCEPTS Boyan Brodaric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Brandon

    1 REPRESENTING GEO-SCIENTIFIC DOMAIN CONCEPTS Boyan Brodaric Penn State Geography and Geological Survey of Canada brodaric@NRCan.gc.ca 1. Introduction The geo-sciences, including geology, ecology, soil accumulate and change, and (3) are characterized by degrees of uncertainty and granularity. This suggests

  4. Necessary and sufficient conditions for representing general distributions by Coxians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Necessary and sufficient conditions for representing general distributions by Coxians Takayuki University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract A common analytical technique involves using a Coxian distribution to model a general distribution G, where the Coxian distribution agrees with G on the first three moments

  5. Necessary and sufficient conditions for representing general distributions by Coxians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Necessary and sufficient conditions for representing general distributions by Coxians Takayuki University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 Abstract A common analytical technique involves using a Coxian distribution to model a general distribution ˘ , where the Coxian distribution agrees with ˘ on the first three moments

  6. Necessary and Sucient Conditions for Representing General Distributions by Coxians

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harchol-Balter, Mor

    Necessary and SuĆcient Conditions for Representing General Distributions by Coxians Takayuki involves using a Coxian dis- tribution to model a general distribution G, where the Coxian distribu- tion of the Coxian distribution. Algo- rithms for mapping an input distribution G to a Coxian distribution largely

  7. Representing Exceptional Behaviour at the earlier Phases of Software Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent, University of

    Representing Exceptional Behaviour at the earlier Phases of Software Development Rogério de Lemos. Exception handling has been traditionally associated with the design phase of the software lifecycle, during not received enough attention /Avizienes 97/. Ideally, for each identified phase of the software lifecycle

  8. Melanoma Recognition Using Representative and Discriminative Kernel Classifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caputo, Barbara

    Melanoma Recognition Using Representative and Discriminative Kernel Classifiers Tatiana Tommasi1 caputo@nada.kth.se Abstract. Malignant melanoma is the most deadly form of skin lesion. Early diagnosis these algorithms against the (to our knowledge) state-of-the-art method on melanoma recognition, exploring how

  9. DATE: December 11, 2013 MEMO TO: Curricular Representative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Instruction Modes List: This report lists sections with an Instruction Mode not set to `P' in ISIS. · Meets Attendance List: This report lists sections coded in ISIS as optional. · Curricular Representative List can be run in ISIS, and displays real-time curricular data for auditing. In ISIS: Reporting Tools

  10. INTRODUCTION The mammalian hair follicle is a representative but highly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    INTRODUCTION The mammalian hair follicle is a representative but highly complex epithelial organ, hair follicle induction requires complex signaling between the two apposing tissue layers, which to the formation of the hair follicle, which contain the dermal papilla, proliferating matrix cells and slowly

  11. Disco Novo GoGo Integrating Local Search and Complete Search with Restarts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutter, Frank

    @iiia.csic.es Abstract A hybrid algorithm is devised to boost the performance of complete search on under. Numerical results show that this method can speed- up complete search by orders of magnitude. Introduction Local search methods are known to perform well on under- constrained problems where they allow us

  12. Quantifying nonstationary radioactivity concentration fluctuations near Chernobyl: A complete statistical description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    Quantifying nonstationary radioactivity concentration fluctuations near Chernobyl: A complete Chernobyl after the 1986 disaster and find three new results: i the histogram of fluctuations is well.60. x, 02.50.Fz, 05.45.Tp, 87.66.Na I. INTRODUCTION Chernobyl's No. 4 reactor was completely destroyed

  13. Chemical equation set and complete figures set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    represents the electronic supplement of our article "Observed and simulated global distribution and budget Equations 5 Propane (C3H8) Comparison of simulated and observed C3H8 mixing ratios in pmol/mol for all

  14. INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology and Needs for Drilling and Well Testing. . . . .AND NEEDS FOR DRILLING AND WELL TESTING INSTRUMENTATIONand Needs for Drilling and Well Testing Instrumentation W.

  15. Developing a tight gas sand advisor for completion and stimulation in tight gas reservoirs worldwide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogatchev, Kirill Y.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    while completing and stimulating TGS reservoirs. The modules include Perforation Selection and Proppant Selection. Based on input well/reservoir parameters these subroutines provide unambiguous recommendations concerning which perforation strategy...

  16. Dissertations Recently Completed on Latin American Theatre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4 LATIN AMERICAN THEATRE REVIEW Dissertations Recently Completed on Latin American Theatre Ascarrunz-Gilman, Graciela. "El sentido religioso del teatro de Carlos Solór- zano." (California, Davis) Bixler, Jacqueline Eyring. "Theory and Technique...

  17. Knowledge-based stratigraphic well-log correlation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denton, Michael A.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    correlated higher ranking strata. Thus, higher ranking correlations provide heuristics for lower ranking correlations. The system represents strata by symbols from a set of standard symbols which include peaks, troughs, and steps. Symbols replace events.... The zone attributes abstracted from the well-log include the following: interval, lithology ? classified as shale or non-shale, zone position, general zone shape, thickness, average amplitude, zone above name, and zone below name. Thus, the expert system...

  18. Are the TRACE-P measurements representative of the western Pacific during March 2001?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TRACE-P measurements representative of the western PacificTHE TRACE- P MEASUREMENTS REPRESENTATIVE? Pierce, R. B. , etTRACE-P measurements representative of the western Pacific

  19. Representative sampling using single-pulse laser ablation with inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Haichen; Mao, Xianglei; Russo, Richard E.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    U also achieved a representative value at high irradiance.Representative sampling using single-pulse laser ablationvalue close to the representative level. Segregation during

  20. Do women represent women? : gender and policy in Argentina and Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piscopo, Jennifer M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Differences in the Representative and Policymakingaction law and their own representative mandate. Interview,States House of Representatives. ? Policy Studies Journal

  1. Conservationism is not Conservatism: Do Interest Group Endorsements Help Voters Hold Representatives Accountable?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Aaron

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    information about the representative's position on theHelp Voters Hold Representatives Accountable? ” Aaronlearn the positions their representatives take on key issue.

  2. Acceptance of human papillomavirus vaccination among Californian parents of daughters: A representative statewide analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constantine, Norman A.; Jerman, Petra

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    parents of daughters: A representative statewide analysis.Parents of Daughters: A Representative Statewide AnalysisResistance, But Still Representative. Available at: http://

  3. Voter competency, information, and campaign effects in representative and direct democracy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnett, Craig Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Campaign Effects in Representative and Direct Democracyand Campaign Effects in Representative and Direct Democracyand make decisions in representative and direct democracy.

  4. China’s Military Representatives: Striving Toward Professional Contracting and Procurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puska, Susan M; McReynolds, Joe; Geary, Debra

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    di- rection. Military representative reform could raise2011 China’s Military Representatives: Striving Towardreforms is the Military Representative Office (MRO) system

  5. Demographic and Psychological Predictors of Parent–Adolescent Communication About Sex: A Representative Statewide Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerman, Petra; Constantine, Norman A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    here are not precisely representative of the full populationCommunication About Sex: A Representative Statewide Analysismore studies with representative samples are needed to

  6. Complete Fiber/Copper Cable Solution for Long-Term Temperature and Pressure Measurement in Supercritical Reservoirs and EGS Wells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: 1. Optical fibers that resist hydrogen Ťdarkening? for several months instead of hours and days at 300 deg. C and higher. 2. Tube encapsulated cable (TEC) construction that functions as a distributed temperature sensor (DTS) and a power source for a downhole pressure sensor.

  7. Plastic plugbacks can extend oil and gas well productive life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, R.T. (Chevron U.S.A. Inc. (US))

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high rate of successful water reduction has been documented in 21 plastic plugbacks performed on gravel-packed oil and gas well completions in the Gulf of Mexico. This electric wireline plugback method is unique because it is performed inside gravel pack assemblies, utilizing plastic instead of cement. This article presents a case study of field results from 21 jobs performed by Tenneco/Chevron.

  8. Interpretation of well log response in the Austin chalk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinds, Gregory Scott

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional Structure Sedimentology . Diagenesis Petrophysical Properties . PRODUCTION CHARACTERISTICS Introduction . Production and Completion Methods Decline Curve Analysis . Methods . ORGANIC CONTENT Introduction . Source Rock Zonation Oil Types...-1956, technological advances such as acidizing and hydraulic fracturing created renewed interest in Pearsall field. However, oil prices were low ($2 per barrel) at the time and ultimate recoveries of approximately 30, 000 bbls per well were not economical. The Arab...

  9. Quantum reflection and Liouville transformations from wells to walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel Dufour; Romain Guérout; Astrid Lambrecht; Serge Reynaud

    2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Liouville transformations map in a rigorous manner one Schr\\"odinger equation into another, with a changed scattering potential. They are used here to transform quantum reflection of an atom on an attractive well into reflection of the atom on a repulsive wall. While the scattering properties are preserved, the corresponding semiclassical descriptions are completely different. A quantitative evaluation of quantum reflection probabilities is deduced from this method.

  10. Representing cognitive activities and errors in HRA trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gertman, D.I.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A graphic representation method is presented herein for adapting an existing technology--human reliability analysis (HRA) event trees, used to support event sequence logic structures and calculations--to include a representation of the underlying cognitive activity and corresponding errors associated with human performance. The analyst is presented with three potential means of representing human activity: the NUREG/CR-1278 HRA event tree approach; the skill-, rule- and knowledge-based paradigm; and the slips, lapses, and mistakes paradigm. The above approaches for representing human activity are integrated in order to produce an enriched HRA event tree -- the cognitive event tree system (COGENT)-- which, in turn, can be used to increase the analyst's understanding of the basic behavioral mechanisms underlying human error and the representation of that error in probabilistic risk assessment. Issues pertaining to the implementation of COGENT are also discussed.

  11. Representing cognitive activities and errors in HRA trees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gertman, D.I.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A graphic representation method is presented herein for adapting an existing technology--human reliability analysis (HRA) event trees, used to support event sequence logic structures and calculations--to include a representation of the underlying cognitive activity and corresponding errors associated with human performance. The analyst is presented with three potential means of representing human activity: the NUREG/CR-1278 HRA event tree approach; the skill-, rule- and knowledge-based paradigm; and the slips, lapses, and mistakes paradigm. The above approaches for representing human activity are integrated in order to produce an enriched HRA event tree -- the cognitive event tree system (COGENT)-- which, in turn, can be used to increase the analyst`s understanding of the basic behavioral mechanisms underlying human error and the representation of that error in probabilistic risk assessment. Issues pertaining to the implementation of COGENT are also discussed.

  12. Representing the Semantics of Geographic Information in Ontologies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ou, Yang

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    the semantics. This paper describes how to utilise ontologies to capture the semantics of geographic information and further presents a way to represent and store spatial data in a knowledge base within an ontology. By representing geographic information...Interoperability is a key concern in the field of Geographic Information Sciences for the sharing of geographic information and the integration of geospatial processes. Web service technology is a mainstream approach to distribute GIS functionality in the Web environment and provide syntactic interoperability for different processes, and ontologies have been considered as a significant technique to achieve interoperability on the semantic level. This paper describes how the mainstream Web technologies can be applied for interoperability of geospatial processes and implements the methodology with a use case of specific processes....

  13. Processes, data structures, and apparatuses for representing knowledge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hohimer, Ryan E. (West Richland, WA); Thomson, Judi R. (Guelph, CA); Harvey, William J. (Richland, WA); Paulson, Patrick R. (Pasco, WA); Whiting, Mark A. (Richland, WA); Tratz, Stephen C. (Richland, WA); Chappell, Alan R. (Seattle, WA); Butner, R. Scott (Richland, WA)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes, data structures, and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

  14. Wellness assessment in three university populations: undergraduates, graduates, and athletes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Allison Marie

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and growth. Awareness may begin with completing an inventory evaluating wellness and ident1fying areas of strength and weakness, Through educat1on, 1nformation is provided on wellness related topics such as alcohol and drug use. Finally, growth usually... reporting good practices. This was supported by the fact that as age increased and the number of good habits increased, then health status improved. For instance, the people aged 55-64 who followed seven good health habits were at the same health status...

  15. Complete genome sequence of Intrasporangium calvumtype strain (7 KIPT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Yasawong, Montri [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Lucas, Susan [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Deshpande, Shweta [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Cheng, Jan-Fang [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Detter, J. Chris [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Liolios, Konstantinos [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Palaniappan, Krishna [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Pukall, Rudiger [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Bristow, James [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Eisen, Jonathan [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Markowitz, Victor [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intrasporangium calvum Kalakoutskii et al. 1967 is the type species of the genus Intrasporangium, which belongs to the actinobacterial family Intrasporangiaceae. The species is a Gram-positive bacterium that forms a branching mycelium, which tends to break into irregular fragments. The mycelium of this strain may bear intercalary vesicles but does not contain spores. The strain described in this study is an airborne organism that was isolated from a school dining room in 1967. One particularly interesting feature of I. calvum is that the type of its menaquinone is different from all other representatives of the family Intrasporangiaceae. This is the first completed genome sequence from a member of the genus Intrasporangium and also the first sequence from the family Intrasporangiaceae. The 4,024,382 bp long genome with its 3,653 protein-coding and 57 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  16. IMPROVED NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James C. Furness; Donald O. Johnson; Michael L. Wilkey; Lynn Furness; Keith Vanderlee; P. David Paulsen

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the research conducted during Budget Period One on the project ''Improved Natural Gas Storage Well Remediation''. The project team consisted of Furness-Newburge, Inc., the technology developer; TechSavants, Inc., the technology validator; and Nicor Technologies, Inc., the technology user. The overall objectives for the project were: (1) To develop, fabricate and test prototype laboratory devices using sonication and underwater plasma to remove scale from natural gas storage well piping and perforations; (2) To modify the laboratory devices into units capable of being used downhole; (3) To test the capability of the downhole units to remove scale in an observation well at a natural gas storage field; (4) To modify (if necessary) and field harden the units and then test the units in two pressurized injection/withdrawal gas storage wells; and (5) To prepare the project's final report. This report covers activities addressing objectives 1-3. Prototype laboratory units were developed, fabricated, and tested. Laboratory testing of the sonication technology indicated that low-frequency sonication was more effective than high-frequency (ultrasonication) at removing scale and rust from pipe sections and tubing. Use of a finned horn instead of a smooth horn improves energy dispersal and increases the efficiency of removal. The chemical data confirmed that rust and scale were removed from the pipe. The sonication technology showed significant potential and technical maturity to warrant a field test. The underwater plasma technology showed a potential for more effective scale and rust removal than the sonication technology. Chemical data from these tests also confirmed the removal of rust and scale from pipe sections and tubing. Focusing of the underwater plasma's energy field through the design and fabrication of a parabolic shield will increase the technology's efficiency. Power delivered to the underwater plasma unit by a sparkplug repeatedly was interrupted by sparkplug failure. The lifecycle for the plugs was less than 10 hours. An electrode feed system for delivering continuous power needs to be designed and developed. As a result, further work on the underwater plasma technology was terminated. It needs development of a new sparking system and a redesign of the pulsed power supply system to enable the unit to operate within a well diameter of less than three inches. Both of these needs were beyond the scope of the project. Meanwhile, the laboratory sonication unit was waterproofed and hardened, enabling the unit to be used as a field prototype, operating at temperatures to 350 F and depths of 15,000 feet. The field prototype was extensively tested at a field service company's test facility before taking it to the field site. The field test was run in August 2001 in a Nicor Gas storage field observation well at Pontiac, Illinois. Segmented bond logs, gamma ray neutron logs, water level measurements and water chemistry samples were obtained before and after the downhole demonstration. Fifteen tests were completed in the field. Results from the water chemistry analysis showed an increase in the range of calcium from 1755-1984 mg/l before testing to 3400-4028 mg/l after testing. For magnesium, the range increased from 285-296 mg/l to 461-480 mg/l. The change in pH from a range of 3.11-3.25 to 8.23-8.45 indicated a buffering of the acidic well water, probably due to the increased calcium available for buffering. The segmented bond logs showed no damage to the cement bond in the well and the gamma ray neutron log showed no increase in the amount of hydrocarbons present in the formation where the testing took place. Thus, the gas storage bubble in the aquifer was not compromised. A review of all the field test data collected documents the fact that the application of low-frequency sonication technology definitely removes scale from well pipe. Phase One of this project took sonication technology from the concept stage through a successful ''proof-of-concept'' downhole application in a natural gas storage field

  17. Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes 2014 1 Wrap-Up Form for People with Diabetes Wrap-Up Form for People with Diabetes 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes ­ 2014 1 Wrap-Up Form for People with Diabetes Wrap-Up Form for People with Diabetes ­ 2014 Please complete this form ONLY IF YOU HAVE DIABETES. Thank you. A. The month. _____ Walk or do some other similar activity at least 30 minutes on 5 days each week 3. _____ Take diabetes

  18. Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes 2014 1 Registration Form for People with Diabetes Registration Form for People with Diabetes 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes ­ 2014 1 Registration Form for People with Diabetes Registration Form for People with Diabetes ­ 2014 Please complete this form ONLY IF YOU HAVE DIABETES. Thank you. A numbers of my telephone number are __ __ __ __. C. I will attend diabetes education classes

  19. Completion processing for data communications instructions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blocksome, Michael A; Kumar, Sameer; Parker, Jeffrey J

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Completion processing of data communications instructions in a distributed computing environment, including receiving, in an active messaging interface (`AMI`) data communications instructions, at least one instruction specifying a callback function; injecting into an injection FIFO buffer of a data communication adapter, an injection descriptor, each slot in the injection FIFO buffer having a corresponding slot in a pending callback list; listing in the pending callback list any callback function specified by an instruction, incrementing a pending callback counter for each listed callback function; transferring payload data as per each injection descriptor, incrementing a transfer counter upon completion of each transfer; determining from counter values whether the pending callback list presently includes callback functions whose data transfers have been completed; calling by the AMI any such callback functions from the pending callback list, decrementing the pending callback counter for each callback function called.

  20. Detecting and modeling cement failure in high pressure/ high temperature wells using finite-element method 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahri, Mehdi Abbaszadeh

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A successful cement job results in complete zonal isolation while saving time and money. To achieve these goals, various factors such as well security, casing centralization, effective mud removal, and gas migration must be considered in the design...

  1. Detection of water or gas entry into horizontal wells by using permanent downhole monitoring systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoshioka, Keita

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    distributed temperature sensors (DTS) in intelligent completions. Analyzing such changes will potentially aid the diagnosis of downhole flow conditions. In vertical wells, temperature logs have been used successfully to diagnose the downhole flow conditions...

  2. NP-complete Problems and Physical Reality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Aaronson

    2005-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Can NP-complete problems be solved efficiently in the physical universe? I survey proposals including soap bubbles, protein folding, quantum computing, quantum advice, quantum adiabatic algorithms, quantum-mechanical nonlinearities, hidden variables, relativistic time dilation, analog computing, Malament-Hogarth spacetimes, quantum gravity, closed timelike curves, and "anthropic computing." The section on soap bubbles even includes some "experimental" results. While I do not believe that any of the proposals will let us solve NP-complete problems efficiently, I argue that by studying them, we can learn something not only about computation but also about physics.

  3. Health and Wellness Guide for Students Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dimensions of health and wellness. The 7 dimensions are: Physical Wellness ­ Taking care of your body Wellness ­ Taking care of what's around you 2Health andWellness Guide for Students #12;Physical Wellness · Communicate with your partner if you have questions or concerns · Meet with a Health Care Provider on campus

  4. Facility Representative of the Year Award | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport in RepresentativeDepartment of Energy Score Maturity Value TargetFacility

  5. Decision Matrix Screening Tool to Identify the Best Artificial Lift Method for Liquid-loaded Gas Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soponsakulkaew, Nitsupon

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid loading is a serious problem in gas wells. Many proven artificial lift methods have been used to alleviate this problem. However, a complete workflow to determine the most suitable artificial lift method for given well conditions does...

  6. Oil and Gas Wells: Regulatory Provisions (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It shall be unlawful for any person, firm or corporation having possession or control of any natural gas well, oil well or coalbed natural gas well, whether as a contractor, owner, lessee, agent or...

  7. New multilateral well architecture in heterogeneous reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Hongqiao

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . The performance of new multilateral well in heterogeneous reservoirs is studied, and that is compared with vertical well architecture also. In order to study the productivity of new multilateral wells, we use a numerical simulation method to set up heterogeneous...

  8. Completely distinguishable projections of spatial graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikkuni, Ryo

    . 1.1. We can obtain the eight spatial embeddings g1, g2, . . . , g8 of G from ^f as illustrated 2 3 4 5 6 g1 g2 g3 g4 g5 g6 g7 g8 Fig. 1.2. 2 #12;2. Completely distinguishable projections

  9. quantph/9811020 Complete quantum teleportation by nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crépeau, Claude

    quant­ph/9811020 8 Nov 1998 Complete quantum teleportation by nuclear magnetic resonance M. A operation over inter­atomic distances using liquid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The inclusion. Finally, we demonstrate a controlled exploitation of decoherence as a tool to assist in the performance

  10. Semidefinite programs for completely bounded norms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Watrous

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The completely bounded trace and spectral norms in finite dimensions are shown to be expressible by semidefinite programs. This provides an efficient method by which these norms may be both calculated and verified, and gives alternate proofs of some known facts about them.

  11. Faculty Member Complete the Paid Parental Leave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Faculty Member Complete the Paid Parental Leave (PPL) Request Form Human Resources Evaluate determination notice to the employee with copies to the department Enroll faculty member in the PPL Leave Plan and endorse the faculty member's PPL Request Form Review contingency planning and forward supporting rationale

  12. INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETING THE BONUS PAY FORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provancher, William

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR COMPLETING THE BONUS PAY FORM Prepared By: Payment: A. Department Name: Enter the employee's Pay Group. E. F. Amount : Enter the gross amount of the Bonus to be paid. G. H. Chartfield on the Bonus Pay form, this is who will be contacted. Omitting this information will cause delays in processing

  13. Functionalized Graphene Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. Functionalized Graphene Nanoroads for Quantum Well Device. Abstract: Using density functional theory, a series of calculations of structural and...

  14. Transient productivity index for numerical well test simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanc, G.; Ding, D.Y.; Ene, A. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Pau (France)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most difficult aspect of numerical simulation of well tests is the treatment of the Bottom Hole Flowing (BHF) Pressure. In full field simulations, this pressure is derived from the Well-block Pressure (WBP) using a numerical productivity index which accounts for the grid size and permeability, and for the well completion. This productivity index is calculated assuming a pseudo-steady state flow regime in the vicinity of the well and is therefore constant during the well production period. Such a pseudo-steady state assumption is no longer valid for the early time of a well test simulation as long as the pressure perturbation has not reached several grid-blocks around the well. This paper offers two different solutions to this problem: (1) The first one is based on the derivation of a Numerical Transient Productivity Index (NTPI) to be applied to Cartesian grids; (2) The second one is based on the use of a Corrected Transmissibility and Accumulation Term (CTAT) in the flow equation. The representation of the pressure behavior given by both solutions is far more accurate than the conventional one as shown by several validation examples which are presented in the following pages.

  15. Horizontal wells enhance development of thin offshore gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gidman, B. [Chevron USA, Lafayette, LA (United States); Hammons, L.R.B.; Paulk, M.D. [Baker Hughes INTEQ, Lafayette, LA (United States)

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Horizontal wells in clastic rocks can reduce water coning problems and increase production rates as much as six-fold. They are now practical to drill for developing Gulf of Mexico gas reservoirs that may be less than 10 ft thick. In 1991, Chevron USA began exploring the feasibility of developing thin gas reservoirs in western Gulf of Mexico (GOM) fields. A critical element that needed to be addressed was the minimum target thickness that is geologically and operationally practical to drill with current horizontal well technology. Chevron`s first GOM horizontal well spudded in February 1992. The target was 31 ft of net effective gas on water in a massive Pleistocene sand at 1,700 ft TVD. Chevron spudded a second horizontal well in the same field during June 1993. This well was geosteered into a 19-ft gas sand with no immediate water contact at 1,650 ft TVD. The entire 1,000-ft horizontal section was interpreted as gas from the MWD tool response. A spinner survey was not run in this hole. At 19 MMcfd of gas, this well also proved to be a major economic success because of its low cost. After the second completion, Chevron`s next proposed well targeted a gas reservoir with a maximum thickness of only 7 ft.

  16. Productivity and Injectivity of Horizontal Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arababi, Sepehr; Aziz, Khalid; Hayashida, Yasuyuki; Hewett, Thomas

    1999-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This quarterly report is based on the last activity above. It gives a brief account of the work and the complete study will be included in the next Annual Report of the project.

  17. Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness

  18. Volume 63, Numbers 3&4 (Complete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickson, Donald

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were so one-sided in their design, instigation and result. During the early decades of European settlements in the New World, many Native Americans actively sought treaties to gain some advantage over their local rivals. To foster their own agendas... represented individual rather than collective agendas.” Glover offers a deeper understanding of this complex, if often unofficial, interaction in New England by pointing to a shift in the English court’s legal notions about treaties in general. Based on Ro...

  19. REPRESENTING AEROSOL DYNAMICS AND PROPERTIES IN CHEMICAL TRANSPORT MODELS BY THE METHOD OF MOMENTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCHWARTZ,S.E.; MCGRAW,R.; BENKOVITZ,C.M.; WRIGHT,D.L.

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric aerosols, suspensions of solid or liquid particles, are an important multi-phase system. Aerosols scatter and absorb shortwave (solar) radiation, affecting climate (Charlson et al., 1992; Schwartz, 1996) and visibility; nucleate cloud droplet formation, modifying the reflectivity of clouds (Twomey et al., 1984; Schwartz and Slingo, 1996) as well as contributing to composition of cloudwater and to wet deposition (Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998); and affect human health through inhalation (NRC, 1998). Existing and prospective air quality regulations impose standards on concentrations of atmospheric aerosols to protect human health and welfare (EPA, 1998). Chemical transport and transformation models representing the loading and geographical distribution of aerosols and precursor gases are needed to permit development of effective and efficient strategies for meeting air quality standards, and for examining aerosol effects on climate retrospectively and prospectively for different emissions scenarios. Important aerosol properties and processes depend on their size distribution: light scattering, cloud nucleating properties, dry deposition, and penetration into airways of lungs. The evolution of the mass loading itself depends on particle size because of the size dependence of growth and removal processes. For these reasons it is increasingly recognized that chemical transport and transformation models must represent not just the mass loading of atmospheric particulate matter but also the aerosol microphysical properties and the evolution of these properties if aerosols are to be accurately represented in these models. If the size distribution of the aerosol is known, a given property can be evaluated as the integral of the appropriate kernel function over the size distribution. This has motivated the approach of determining aerosol size distribution, and of explicitly representing this distribution and its evolution in chemical transport models.

  20. Tests of Complete Positivity in Fiber Optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Benatti; R. Floreanini

    2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the propagation of polarized photons in optical fibers under the action of randomly generated noise. In such situation, the change in time of the photon polarization can be described by a quantum dynamical semigroup. We show that the hierarchy among the decay constants of the polarization density matrix elements as prescribed by complete positivity can be experimentally probed using standard laboratory set-ups.

  1. completed-storage | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , ., ..., ,+ . :,2013 NETLProjects Completed

  2. Analysis of gas deliverability curves for predicting future well performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbett, Thomas Gary

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Texas Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. W. D. Von Gonten Transient testing techniques represent the state-of-the-art in gas well testing. However, valuable data is already available in the form of stabilized backpressure tests. A recurring problem... is how to use backpressure test data to determine reservoir characteristics and predict fu tu re reservoir p er f orma nc e. The commonly used deliverability equation does not adequately consider the effects of real gas behavior or non-Darcy flow...

  3. Vapor port and groundwater sampling well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Wylie, A.H.

    1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus have been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing. 10 figs.

  4. Vapor port and groundwater sampling well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

  5. Using coiled tubing in HP/HT corrosive gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High-yield-strength (100,000 psi) coiled tubing (CT) material has allowed for CT intervention in Mobile Bay Norphlet completions. These wells are approximately 22,000-ft-vertical-depth, high-pressure, hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) gas wells. Operations performed on the Norphlet wells include a scale cleanout to approximately 22,000 ft, a hydrochloric acid (HCl) job at 415 F, and buildup removal from a safety valve. The scale cleanout was performed first with a spiral wash tool. The well was killed with 10-lbm/gal sodium bromide (NaBr) brine; the same brine was used for cleanout fluid. Cost savings of 60% were realized. A HCl matrix acid job at 415 F was performed next, followed by a scale cleanout across the downhole safety valve. The safety valve was cleared of debris in 1 operational day. Estimated cost of the CT operation was 5 to 10% less than that of a rig workover. The 100,000-psi-yield Ct material used for the Mobile Bay operations does not comply with the (NACE) Standard MR-0175. But on the basis of extensive laboratory testing by the CT manufacturer, the decision was made that the material would pass a modified test performed with decreased H{sub 2}S levels. A maximum level of 400 ppm H{sub 2}S was determined as the safe working limit. Because the maximum H{sub 2}S content in the wells described later was 120 ppm, the risk of sulfide-stress cracking (SSC) was considered acceptably low. Elevated bottomhole temperatures (BHT`s) increase the corrosion rate of metals exposed to corrosives. Extensive laboratory testing of corrosion inhibitors allowed for design of a matrix-acidizing treatment to remove near-wellbore damage caused by lost zinc bromide (ZnBr) completion brine.

  6. Do Emergency Department Patients Receive a Pathological Diagnosis? A Nationally-Representative Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wen, Leana S.; Espinola, Janice A.; Kosowsky, Joshua M.; Camargo Jr, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Diagnosis? A Nationally-Representative Sample Leana S. Wen,of a nationally-representative database of ED visits, manysubset of a nationally-representative database of ED visits

  7. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  8. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Annual progress report, October 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  9. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, October-December 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

  10. Geothermal drilling and completion technology development program. Quarterly progress report, April-June 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnado, S.G.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing research and development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are reported. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, completion technology, and lost circulation control methods. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1983 and by 50% by 1987.

  11. Geothermal drilling ad completion technology development program. Semi-annual progress report, April-September 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnado, S.G. (ed.)

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress, status, and results of ongoing Research and Development (R and D) within the Geothermal Drilling and Completion Technology Development Program are described. The program emphasizes the development of geothermal drilling hardware, drilling fluids, and completion technology. Advanced drilling systems are also under development. The goals of the program are to develop the technology required to reduce well costs by 25% by 1982 and by 50% by 1986.

  12. Representing the influence of subgrid topography on hydrology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leung, L.R.; Ghan, S.J.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates of the impact of global climate change on land surface hydrology require climate information on scales far smaller than those explicitly resolved by global climate models of today and the foreseeable future. To bridge the gap between what is required and what is resolved, we propose a subgrid-scale parameterization of the influence of topography on clouds, precipitation, and land surface hydrology. The parameterization represents subgrid variations in surface elevation in terms of discrete elevation classes. Separate cloud and surface processes are calculated for each elevation class. The simulated surface temperature, precipitation, snowpack, and soil moisture for each elevation class can then be distributed according to the spatial distribution of surface elevation within each grid cell. The scheme is being applied to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s climate version of the Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model. Validation is being addressed by driving the model with observed lateral boundary conditions for the Pacific Northwest and comparing with surface observations. Preliminary results from the simulation will be presented.

  13. Fluctuations, Correlation and Representative Elementary Volume (REV) in Granular Materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Evesque

    2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In general, the mechanics of granular matter is described using continuum mechanics approach; this requires to introduce the concepts of stress and strain, which are averaged quantities, so that this needs also to introduce the notion of representative elementary volume (REV) above which averaged quantities have some physical meaning. As local quantities fluctuate spatially in granular matter; a local measure of stress and strain shall exhibit fluctuations too, whose typical amplitude depends on the sampling size L. This paper discusses this problem and the causes for large scale correlation. The mean stress s applied to a plane surface of size L*L is calculated and its fluctuation amplitude Ds is found when local forces are not correlated; it is found that Ds/s scales as 1/L . It is shown also that large scale fluctuations of stress can always be interpreted as an inhomogeneous stress field and that static equilibrium modifies the mean stress applied to a rod (in 2d), even if it does not perturb the contact force distribution. This last result is compared to experiment, which indicates that the number N of contacts per rod (in 2d) is 2

  14. Examination of representative drum from 618-9 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, D.R. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Bunnell, L.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work described in this report was conducted in pursuance of Task E of the Pacific Northwest Laboratory Solid Waste Technology Support Program for Westinghouse Hanford Company. Task E calls for a determination of the corrosion rate of low-carbon steels under typical Hanford Site conditions. To meet this objective, Pacific Northwest Laboratory examined one intact drum that was judged to be representative of the largely intact drums excavated at the 618-9 Burial Ground located west of the 300 Area at the Hanford Site. Six samples were examined to characterize the drum, its composition, and its corrosion and corrosion products. The drum, which was found empty, was constructed of low-carbon steel. Its surface appeared relatively sound. The drum metal varied in thickness, but the minimum thickness in the samples was near 0.020 in. The corrosion corresponds to approximately 25 to 35 mils of metal loss, roughly a 1 mil/yr corrosion rate. Corrosion products were goethite and maghymite, expected products of iron buried in soil. Apparently, the drum leaked some time ago, but the cause of the leakage is unknown because records of the drums and their burial are limited. The drum was empty when found, and it is possible that it could have failed by pitting rather than by general corrosion. A pitting rate of about 3.5 mils/yr would have caused loss of drum integrity in the time since burial.

  15. RFI Well Integrity 06 JUL 1400

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This PowerPoint report entitled "Well Integrity During Shut - In Operations: DOE/DOI Analyses" describes risks and suggests risk management recommendations associated with shutting in the well.

  16. INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discharge Using Ground- Water Storage," Trans. , AGU (1935),of a well using ground-water storage: ~n. Geophys. Unionof a Well Using Ground-Water Storage," Trans. , AGU (1935),

  17. Production Trends of Shale Gas Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Waqar A.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    To obtain better well performance and improved production from shale gas reservoirs, it is important to understand the behavior of shale gas wells and to identify different flow regions in them over a period of time. It is also important...

  18. Horizontal well applications in complex carbonate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahman, M.; Al-Awami, H.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past four years, Saudi Aramco has drilled over eighty horizontal wells, onshore and offshore. It has successfully applied this technology to develop new reservoirs as well as enhance recovery from its mature fields. This paper presents the reservoir engineering aspects of `horizontal` and `high angle` wells drilled in a major offshore field in Saudi Arabia. It shows how horizontal wells have (a) increased the recovery of bypassed oil, (b) improved well productivity in tight reservoirs, (c) increased production from thin oil zones underlain by water, and (d) improved peripheral injection. The paper discusses the actual performance of the horizontal wells and compares them with offset conventional wells. It presents the results of logging and testing of these wells, and highlights actual field data on (a) relationship between productivity gain and horizontal length, (b) pressure loss along the horizontal wellbore, and (c) effect of heterogeneity on coning an inflow performance.

  19. Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    If your well has been flooded, it must be shock chlorinated before it can be used as a source of drinking water. This publication explains how to disinfect a well using either dry chlorine or liquid household bleach....

  20. Well performance graph simplifies field calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Ghetto, G.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphic Methods are widely employed in order to understand overall well behavior using only surface parameters. The authors propose a new graphic method, used successfully by Agip for oil and gas wells in Italy, Libya, Nigeria and Tunisia. The well performance graph helps solve many production problems, including estimation of: inflow performance relationship; causes of rate decline throughout well life; and production rate and bottomhole flowing pressure for various pressures upstream of the surface choke, and vice-versa. This method differs from others by using flow behavior through the choke for both critical and subcritical conditions. Equations describing flow through the formation, string and surface choke are also used. Results are quite reliable when these theoretical equations are calibrated with field data, either from the well concerned or from nearby wells producing the same fluid. This article describes the technique as it applies to oil wells. The methodology for gas wells is similar.

  1. Economic evaluation of smart well technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Omair, Abdullatif A.

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    comprehensive review of this technology has been discussed. The possible reservoir environments in which smart well technology could be used and also, the possible benefits that could be realized by utilizing smart well technology has been discussed...

  2. Calendar years 1989 and 1990 monitoring well installation program Y-12 plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the well-construction activities at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, Tennessee during 1989 and 1990. The well- construction program consisted of installing seventy-five monitoring wells. Geologists from ERCE (formally the Engineering, Design and Geosciences Group) and Martin Marietta Energy Systems (Energy Systems), supervised and documented well-construction activities and monitored for health and safety concerns. Sixty-seven monitoring wells were installed under the supervision of an ERCE geologist from March 1989 to September 1990. Beginning in September 1990, Energy Systems supervised drilling activities for eight monitoring wells, the last of which was completed in December 1990. 9 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Summary of field operations Tijeras Arroyo Well TJA-2. Site-Wide Hydrogeologic Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foutz, W.L. [Lamb Associates, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McCord, J.P. [INTERA, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a basic data report for field operations associated with the drilling, logging, completion, and development of Tijeras Arroyo well TJA-2. This test/monitoring well was installed as part of Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, Environmental Restoration Project.

  4. Completely positive maps within the framework of direct-sum decomposition of state space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longjiang Liu; D. M. Tong

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate completely positive maps for an open system interacting with its environment. The families of the initial states for which the reduced dynamics can be described by a completely positive map are identified within the framework of direct-sum decomposition of state space. They includes not only separable states with vanishing or nonvanishing quantum discord but also entangled states. A general expression of the families as well as the Kraus operators for the completely positive maps are explicitly given. It significantly extends the previous results.

  5. Capping of Water Wells for Future Use 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Water wells that are not being used, but that might be needed in the future, can be sealed with a cap that covers the top of the well casing pipe to prevent unauthorized access and contamination of the well. This publication explains how to cap a...

  6. Complete Fuel Combustion for Diesel Engines Resulting in Greatly...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Complete Fuel Combustion for Diesel Engines Resulting in Greatly Reduced Emissions and Improved Fuel Efficiency Complete Fuel Combustion for Diesel Engines Resulting in Greatly...

  7. Los Alamos County Completes Abiquiu Hydropower Project, Bringing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    County Completes Abiquiu Hydropower Project, Bringing New Clean Energy Resources to New Mexico Los Alamos County Completes Abiquiu Hydropower Project, Bringing New Clean Energy...

  8. Temporary Bridging Agents for Use in Drilling and Completions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Temporary Bridging Agents for Use in Drilling and Completions of EGS Temporary Bridging Agents for Use in Drilling and Completions of EGS DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 -...

  9. Secretary Bodman Celebrates Clean Up Completion of Three Former...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Clean Up Completion of Three Former Weapons Research and Production Sites in Ohio Secretary Bodman Celebrates Clean Up Completion of Three Former Weapons Research and Production...

  10. Security Improvements Project Completed Ahead of Schedule, $20...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Field Offices Welcome to the NNSA Production Office NPO News Releases Security Improvements Project Completed Ahead of Schedule, ... Security Improvements Project Completed...

  11. Transition for Pantex and Y-12 Contract Completed | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Field Offices Welcome to the NNSA Production Office NPO News Releases Transition for Pantex and Y-12 Contract Completed Transition for Pantex and Y-12 Contract Completed The...

  12. Ball State University Completes Nation's Largest Ground-Source...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    University Completes Nation's Largest Ground-Source Geothermal System with Support from Recovery Act Ball State University Completes Nation's Largest Ground-Source Geothermal...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: Solar Test Facility Upgrades Complete...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Test Facility Upgrades Complete, Leading to Better Sandia Capabilities to Support Power Industry Solar Test Facility Upgrades Complete, Leading to Better Sandia Capabilities to...

  14. Active-space completely-renormalized equation-of-motioncoupled...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    space completely-renormalized equation-of-motion coupled-clusterformalism: Excited-state studies of green fluorescent Active-space completely-renormalized equation-of-motion...

  15. Energy Department Completes Salt Coolant Material Transfer to...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Completes Salt Coolant Material Transfer to Czech Republic for Advanced Reactor Research Energy Department Completes Salt Coolant Material Transfer to Czech Republic for Advanced...

  16. AMO Announces Successful Completion of Industrial-Scale Combined...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Announces Successful Completion of Industrial-Scale Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and Power System AMO Announces Successful Completion of Industrial-Scale Combined Heat, Hydrogen, and...

  17. JEA successfully completes world's largest CFB demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    JEA (formerly the Jacksonville Electric Authority) has successfully completed an eighth year landmark demonstration project that continues in baseload commercial operation. It scales up atmospheric fluidized-bed technology demonstration to the near-300-MW size, providing important data on a technology that can achieve > 90% SO{sub 2} removal and 60% NOx reduction at relatively high efficiencies and at costs comparable to those of conventional pulverized coal plants. The article recounts the history of the project. Performance tests showed a blend of coal and petcoke were most efficient as a feedstock. 3 figs.

  18. Deactivation Completion and Turnover | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAboutStatement99 DOE-STD-3025-99IdahoDavidCompletion and Turnover

  19. 1 Ma 15200 Lesson 18 Section 1.7 I Representing an Inequality ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Ma 15200 Lesson 18 Section 1.7. I. Representing an Inequality. There are 3 ways to represent an inequality. (1) Using the inequality symbol (sometime.

  20. 1 Ma 15200 Lesson 18 Section 1.7 I Representing an Inequality ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    charlotb

    2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Ma 15200 Lesson 18 Section 1.7. I. Representing an Inequality. There are 3 ways to represent an inequality. (1) Using the inequality symbol (sometime.

  1. Improved oil recovery using horizontal wells at Elk Hills, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangle, F.J.; Schultz, K.L.; McJannet, G.S.; Ezekwe, N.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eight horizontal wells have been drilled and completed in a steeply dipping Stevens sand reservoir in the Elk Hills field, Kern County, California. The subject reservoir, called the Stevens 26R, is a turbidite channel sand deposit one mile wide, three miles long, and one mile deep. Formation beds have a gross thickness up to 1,500 feet and dips as high as 60 degrees on the flanks. The original oil column of 1,810 feet has been pulled down to 200 feet by continual production since 1976. The reservoir management operating strategy has been full pressure maintenance by crestal gas injection since 1976. The steep dip of the formation makes gravity drainage the dominant drive mechanism. Additionally, improved recovery is coming from cycling dry gas through the large secondary gas cap region. The prudent placement of the horizontal wells above the oil/water contact promises to improve oil recovery and extend the operating life of the reservoir. Field results are given to compare the performance of the horizontal wells with the conventional wells. The horizontal wells produce at higher rates, lower draw downs, and lower gas/oil ratio which will extend the life of the project and result in higher recovery.

  2. Representing Cloud Processing of Aerosol in Numerical Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mechem, D.B.; Kogan, Y.L.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The satellite imagery in Figure 1 provides dramatic examples of how aerosol influences the cloud field. Aerosol from ship exhaust can serve as nucleation centers in otherwise cloud-free regions, forming ship tracks (top image), or can enhance the reflectance/albedo in already cloudy regions. This image is a demonstration of the first indirect effect, in which changes in aerosol modulate cloud droplet radius and concentration, which influences albedo. It is thought that, through the effects it has on precipitation (drizzle), aerosol can also affect the structure and persistence of planetary boundary layer (PBL) clouds. Regions of cellular convection, or open pockets of cloudiness (bottom image) are thought to be remnants of strongly drizzling PBL clouds. Pockets of Open Cloudiness (POCs) (Stevens et al. 2005) or Albrecht's ''rifts'' are low cloud fraction regions characterized by anomalously low aerosol concentrations, implying they result from precipitation. These features may in fact be a demonstration of the second indirect effect. To accurately represent these clouds in numerical models, we have to treat the coupled cloud-aerosol system. We present the following series of mesoscale and large eddy simulation (LES) experiments to evaluate the important aspects of treating the coupled cloud-aerosol problem. 1. Drizzling and nondrizzling simulations demonstrate the effect of drizzle on a mesoscale forecast off the California coast. 2. LES experiments with explicit (bin) microphysics gauge the relative importance of the shape of the aerosol spectrum on the 3D dynamics and cloud structure. 3. Idealized mesoscale model simulations evaluate the relative roles of various processes, sources, and sinks.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Desulfarculus baarsii type strain (2st14T)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Christine [University of California, Berkeley; Spring, Stefan [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Lapidus, Alla L. [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Davenport, Karen W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Tice, Hope [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Nolan, Matt [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Lucas, Susan [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pagani, Ioanna [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Palaniappan, Krishna [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Detter, J. Chris [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Brambilla, Evelyne-Marie [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Bristow, James [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Eisen, Jonathan [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Markowitz, Victor [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Land, Miriam L [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Desulfarculus baarsii (Widdel 1981) Kuever et al. 2006 is the type and only species of the genus Desulfarculus, which represents the family Desulfarculaceae and the order Desulfarculales. This species is a mesophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium with the capability to oxidize acetate and fatty acids of up to 18 carbon atoms completely to CO2. The acetyl-CoA/CODH (Wood-Ljungdahl) pathway is used by this species for the complete oxidation of carbon sources and autotrophic growth on formate. The type strain 2st14T was isolated from a ditch sediment collected near the University of Konstanz, Germany. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the order Desulfarculales. The 3,655,731 bp long single replicon genome with its 3,303 protein-coding and 52 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  4. Slant hole completion test (1991) sidetrack ``as built`` report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myal, F.R.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the summer of 1990, a slant hole test well, funded by the US Department of Energy, was drilled to 9,466 ft to evaluate the effectiveness of directional drilling in the tight, naturally fractured gas sands and coals of the Mesaverde Group. The surface location of the SHCT No. 1 is 700 ft south of the DOE Multiwell Experiment (MWX) site in Section 34, T6S, R94W, Garfield County, Colorado, approximately 7.5 miles west of Rifle. Mechanical problems following cementing of a production liner resulted in loss of the completion interval, and operations were suspended. In early 1991, DOE decided to sidetrack the hole to permit production testing of the lost interval. The sidetrack was designed to parallel the original wellbore, but to be drilled 1,000 ft to the east to minimize the chances of encountering formation damage from the original hole. The sidetrack, like the original hole, was to intersect the paludal lenticular sands and coals at 60{degrees} and to penetrate the underlying Cozzette sand horizonally. The sidetrack was spudded May 12, 1991. After re-entering the well in late 1991, early production testing of the Cozzette showed that the 300 ft of in-pay horizontal hole can produce at rate 5 to 10 times higher than vertical wells in the same area. This report contains the geological summary and sidetrack drilling operations summary.

  5. Slant hole completion test (1991) sidetrack as built'' report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myal, F.R.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the summer of 1990, a slant hole test well, funded by the US Department of Energy, was drilled to 9,466 ft to evaluate the effectiveness of directional drilling in the tight, naturally fractured gas sands and coals of the Mesaverde Group. The surface location of the SHCT No. 1 is 700 ft south of the DOE Multiwell Experiment (MWX) site in Section 34, T6S, R94W, Garfield County, Colorado, approximately 7.5 miles west of Rifle. Mechanical problems following cementing of a production liner resulted in loss of the completion interval, and operations were suspended. In early 1991, DOE decided to sidetrack the hole to permit production testing of the lost interval. The sidetrack was designed to parallel the original wellbore, but to be drilled 1,000 ft to the east to minimize the chances of encountering formation damage from the original hole. The sidetrack, like the original hole, was to intersect the paludal lenticular sands and coals at 60{degrees} and to penetrate the underlying Cozzette sand horizonally. The sidetrack was spudded May 12, 1991. After re-entering the well in late 1991, early production testing of the Cozzette showed that the 300 ft of in-pay horizontal hole can produce at rate 5 to 10 times higher than vertical wells in the same area. This report contains the geological summary and sidetrack drilling operations summary.

  6. DOWNHOLE POWER GENERATION AND WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS FOR INTELLIGENT COMPLETIONS APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Tubel

    2003-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The first quarter of the Downhole Power Generation and Wireless Communications for Intelligent Completions Applications was characterized by the evaluation and determination of the specifications required for the development of the system for permanent applications in wellbores to the optimization of hydrocarbon production. The system will monitor and transmit in real time pressure and temperature information from downhole using the production tubing as the medium for the transmission of the acoustic waves carrying digital information. The most common casing and tubing sizes were determined by interfacing with the major oil companies to obtain information related to their wells. The conceptual design was created for both the wireless gauge section of the tool as well as the power generation module. All hardware for the wireless gauge will be placed in an atmospheric pressure chamber located on the outside of a production tubing with 11.4 centimeter (4-1/2 inch) diameter. This mounting technique will reduce cost as well as the diameter and length of the tool and increase the reliability of the system. The power generator will use piezoelectric wafers to generate electricity based on the flow of hydrocarbons through an area in the wellbore where the tool will be deployed. The goal of the project is to create 1 Watt of power continuously.

  7. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Pauline Kraft Well No. 1, Nueces County, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pauline Kraft Well No. 1 was originally drilled to a depth of 13,001 feet and abandoned as a dry hole. The well was re-entered in an effort to obtain a source of GEO/sup 2/ energy for a proposed gasohol manufacturing plant. The well was tested through a 5-inch by 2-3/8 inch annulus. The geological section tested was the Frio-Anderson sand of Mid-Oligocene age. The interval tested was from 12,750 to 12,860 feet. A saltwater disposal well was drilled on the site and completed in a Micocene sand section. The disposal interval was perforated from 4710 to 4770 feet and from 4500 to 4542 feet. The test well failed to produce water at substantial rates. Initial production was 34 BWPD. A large acid stimulation treatment increased productivity to 132 BWPD, which was still far from an acceptable rate. During the acid treatment, a failure of the 5-inch production casing occurred. The poor production rates are attributed to a reservoir with very low permeability and possible formation damage. The casing failure is related to increased tensile strain resulting from cooling of the casing by acid and from the high surface injection pressure. The location of the casing failure is now known at this time, but it is not at the surface. Failure as a result of a defect in a crossover joint at 723 feet is suspected.

  8. Potential hydrologic characterization wells in Amargosa Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyles, B.; Mihevc, T.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 500 domestic, agricultural, and monitoring wells were identified in the Amargosa Valley. From this list, 80 wells were identified as potential hydrologic characterization wells, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Underground Test Area/Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (UGTA/RIFS). Previous hydrogeologic studies have shown that groundwater flow in the basin is complex and that aquifers may have little lateral continuity. Wells located more than 10 km or so from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) boundary may yield data that are difficult to correlate to sources from the NTS. Also, monitoring well locations should be chosen within the guidelines of a hydrologic conceptual model and monitoring plan. Since these do not exist at this time, recompletion recommendations will be restricted to wells relatively close (approximately 20 km) to the NTS boundary. Recompletion recommendations were made for two abandoned agricultural irrigation wells near the town of Amargosa Valley (previously Lathrop Wells), for two abandoned wildcat oil wells about 10 km southwest of Amargosa Valley, and for Test Well 5 (TW-5), about 10 km east of Amargosa Valley.

  9. Directional drilling equipment and techniques for deep hot granite wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brittenham, T.L.; Sursen, G.; Neudecker, J.W.; Rowley, J.C.; Williams, R.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional directional drilling technology has been extended and modified to drill the first well of a subsurface geothermal energy extraction system at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, Hot dry Rock (HDR) experimental site. Completing the first of a two-wellbore HDR system has resulted in the definition of operational limitations of many conventional directional drilling tools, instrumentation and techniques. The successful completion of the first wellbore, Energy Extraction Well No. 2 (EE-2), to a measured depth of 15,300 ft (4.7 km) in granite reservoir rock with a bottomhole temperature of 530/sup 0/F (275/sup 0/C) required the development of a new high temperature downhole motor and modification of existing wireline-conveyed steering tool systems. Conventional rotary-driven directional assemblies were successfully modified to accommodate the very hard and abrasive rock encountered while drilling nearly 8500 ft (2.6 km) of directional hole to a final inclination of 35/sup 0/ from the vertical at a controlled azimuthal orientation.

  10. Acid diversion is critical in horizontal gas well treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, S.A. [Chevron USA Production Co., New Orleans, LA (United States); Bui, H.N. [Chevron USA Production Co., Lafayette, LA (United States); Edwards, M.B. [Baker Hughes INTEQ, Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An acid treatment design for a horizontal well in the West Cameron area of the Gulf of Mexico successfully used alternating stages of foamed and nitrified 15% HCl for diversion. The subject well was drilled with a sized-salt fluid system to 3,493-ft MD including a 1,274-ft, 8{1/2}-in. horizontal openhole section. The horizontal openhole section was completed with 1,042 ft of 5-in., 0.008-gauge, 40.60-mesh dual prepack screen. Following placement of the completion assembly, the 10.5-ppg sized salt system used in the horizontal section was dislaced with a 50-bbl, sheared, high-viscosity push pill, followed by 50 bbl of 10.0-ppg filtered, NaCl solution. A 50-bbl, 15% HCl acid breaker solution was then spotted across the formation and allowed to soak on the remaining filter cake for 6 hours. The breaker was then circulated out with 9.5-ppg NaCl brine. Chlorides were monitored to determine the relative amount of filter cake cleanup. This paper reviews the operation and resulting performance of this treatment.

  11. Characterization of an Eastern Kentucky Devonian Shales well using a naturally fractured, layered reservoir description 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochen, John Edward

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and pressure transient data for a single gas well completed in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin in Pike Co. , KY. This well was part of a three-well research program sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI) to study the Devonian Shales.... , KY). From the tests conducted on the Preece No. 1, Hopkins et al. concluded that large Devonian Shales intervals which were treated jointly in a single wellbore often were not stimulated effectively, because small intervals accepted a...

  12. Well purge and sample apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schalla, R.; Smith, R.M.; Hall, S.H.; Smart, J.E.; Gustafson, G.S.

    1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion. 8 figs.

  13. Well purge and sample apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schalla, Ronald (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Ronald M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Stephen H. (Kennewick, WA); Smart, John E. (Richland, WA); Gustafson, Gregg S. (Redmond, WA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

  14. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles M. Boyer II; Ronald J. MacDonald P.G.

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger--Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden and Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners previously provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We have enhanced and streamlined our software, and we are beta-testing the final stages of our new Microsoft{trademark} Access/Excel based software. We have processed all well information and identified potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate the new methodologies. In addition, the final technical report is almost finished and a draft version is being reviewed by Gary Covatch.

  15. An informationally-complete unification of quantum spacetime and matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng-Bing Chen

    2015-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    It was known long ago that quantum theory and general relativity, two pillars of modern physics, are in sharp conflict in their foundations. Their fundamental inconsistencies render a consistent theory of quantum gravity the most challenging problem in physics. Here we propose an informationally-complete quantum field theory (ICQFT), which describes elementary particles, their gauge fields and gravity as a trinity without the Hilbert-space inconsistency of Einstein's equation. We then argue that the ICQFT provides a coherent picture and conceptual framework of unifying matter and spacetime. The trinary field is characterized by dual entanglement and dual dynamics. Spacetime-matter entanglement allows us to give a natural explanation of the holographic principle, as well as two conjectures on black-hole states and on a possible candidate to dark matter/energy.

  16. Complete genome sequence of Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiel, Teresa [University of Missouri, St. Louis] [University of Missouri, St. Louis; Pratte, Brenda S. [University of Missouri, St. Louis] [University of Missouri, St. Louis; Zhong, Jinshun [University of Missouri, St. Louis] [University of Missouri, St. Louis; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute] [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute] [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute] [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL] [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute] [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute] [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413 is a filamentous, heterocyst-forming cyanobacterium that has served as a model organism, with an extensive literature extending over 40 years. The strain has three distinct nitrogenases that function under different environmental conditions and is capable of photoautotrophic growth in the light and true heterotrophic growth in the dark using fructose as both carbon and energy source. While this strain was first isolated in 1964 in Mississippi and named Ana-baena flos-aquae MSU A-37, it clusters phylogenetically with cyanobacteria of the genus Nostoc. The strain is a moderate thermophile, growing well at approximately 40 C. Here we provide some additional characteristics of the strain, and an analysis of the complete genome sequence.

  17. Final Design Completion The Comprehensive Final Design Review1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

    a complete and satisfactory design basis for the system design. FMEAs should be performed and documented

  18. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Dong (Croton on Hudson, NY); Giampapa, Mark E. (Irvington, NY); Heidelberger, Philip (Cortlandt Manor, NY); Kumar, Sameer (White Plains, NY); Parker, Jeffrey J. (Rochester, MN); Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard D. (Esslingen, DE); Vranas, Pavlos (Danville, CA)

    2010-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods, compute nodes, and computer program products are provided for direct memory access (`DMA`) transfer completion notification. Embodiments include determining, by an origin DMA engine on an origin compute node, whether a data descriptor for an application message to be sent to a target compute node is currently in an injection first-in-first-out (`FIFO`) buffer in dependence upon a sequence number previously associated with the data descriptor, the total number of descriptors currently in the injection FIFO buffer, and the current sequence number for the newest data descriptor stored in the injection FIFO buffer; and notifying a processor core on the origin DMA engine that the message has been sent if the data descriptor for the message is not currently in the injection FIFO buffer.

  19. Completing fault models for abductive diagnosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knill, E. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Cox, P.T.; Pietrzykowski, T. (Technical Univ., NS (Canada))

    1992-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In logic-based diagnosis, the consistency-based method is used to determine the possible sets of faulty devices. If the fault models of the devices are incomplete or nondeterministic, then this method does not necessarily yield abductive explanations of system behavior. Such explanations give additional information about faulty behavior and can be used for prediction. Unfortunately, system descriptions for the consistency-based method are often not suitable for abductive diagnosis. Methods for completing the fault models for abductive diagnosis have been suggested informally by Poole and by Cox et al. Here we formalize these methods by introducing a standard form for system descriptions. The properties of these methods are determined in relation to consistency-based diagnosis and compared to other ideas for integrating consistency-based and abductive diagnosis.

  20. Approximation algorithms for QMA-complete problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sevag Gharibian; Julia Kempe

    2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximation algorithms for classical constraint satisfaction problems are one of the main research areas in theoretical computer science. Here we define a natural approximation version of the QMA-complete local Hamiltonian problem and initiate its study. We present two main results. The first shows that a non-trivial approximation ratio can be obtained in the class NP using product states. The second result (which builds on the first one), gives a polynomial time (classical) algorithm providing a similar approximation ratio for dense instances of the problem. The latter result is based on an adaptation of the "exhaustive sampling method" by Arora et al. [J. Comp. Sys. Sci. 58, p.193 (1999)] to the quantum setting, and might be of independent interest.

  1. The complete sequence of human chromosome 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Martin, Joel; Terry, Astrid; Couronne, Olivier; Grimwood, Jane; Lowry, State; Gordon, Laurie A.; Scott, Duncan; Xie, Gary; Huang, Wayne; Hellsten, Uffe; Tran-Gyamfi, Mary; She, Xinwei; Prabhakar, Shyam; Aerts, Andrea; Altherr, Michael; Bajorek, Eva; Black, Stacey; Branscomb, Elbert; Caoile, Chenier; Challacombe, Jean F.; Chan, Yee Man; Denys, Mirian; Detter, Chris; Escobar, Julio; Flowers, Dave; Fotopulos, Dea; Glavina, Tijana; Gomez, Maria; Gonzales, Eidelyn; Goodstenin, David; Grigoriev, Igor; Groza, Matthew; Hammon, Nancy; Hawkins, Trevor; Haydu, Lauren; Israni, Sanjay; Jett, Jamie; Kadner, Kristen; Kimbal, Heather; Kobayashi, Arthur; Lopez, Frederick; Lou, Yunian; Martinez, Diego; Medina, Catherine; Morgan, Jenna; Nandkeshwar, Richard; Noonan, James P.; Pitluck, Sam; Pollard, Martin; Predki, Paul; Priest, James; Ramirez, Lucia; Rash, Sam; Retterer, James; Rodriguez, Alex; Rogers, Stephanie; Salamov, Asaf; Salazar, Angelica; Thayer, Nina; Tice, Hope; Tsai, Ming; Ustaszewska, Anna; Vo, Nu; Wheeler, Jeremy; Wu, Kevin; Yang, Joan; Dickson, Mark; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Eichler, Evan E.; Olsen, Anne; Pennacchio, Len A.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.; Richardson, Paul; Lucas, Susan M.; Myers, Richard M.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Chromosome 5 is one of the largest human chromosomes yet has one of the lowest gene densities. This is partially explained by numerous gene-poor regions that display a remarkable degree of noncoding and syntenic conservation with non-mammalian vertebrates, suggesting they are functionally constrained. In total, we compiled 177.7 million base pairs of highly accurate finished sequence containing 923 manually curated protein-encoding genes including the protocadherin and interleukin gene families and the first complete versions of each of the large chromosome 5 specific internal duplications. These duplications are very recent evolutionary events and play a likely mechanistic role, since deletions of these regions are the cause of debilitating disorders including spinal muscular atrophy (SMA).

  2. Slant hole completion test. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, R.L.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Strategies and Objectives in the Natural Gas Program is to conduct activities to transfer technology from R&D programs to potential users. The Slant Hole Completion Test has achieved exactly this objective. The Slant Hole site is essentially the same as the Multiwell site and is located in the southeastern portion of the Piceance Basin near Rifle, Colorado. The Piceance Basin is typical of the Western low permeability basins that contain thick sequences of sands, silts and coals deposited during the Cretaceous period. These sequences contain vast amounts of natural gas but have proven to be resistant to commercial production because of the low permeability of the host rocks. Using the knowledge gained from the DOE`s earlier Multiwell experiment, the SHCT-1 was drilled to demonstrate that by intersecting the natural fractures found in these ``tight rocks,`` commercial gas production can be obtained.

  3. Rfam: annotating non-coding RNAs in complete genomes Sam Griffiths-Jones*, Simon Moxon, Mhairi Marshall, Ajay Khanna1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eddy, Sean

    Rfam: annotating non-coding RNAs in complete genomes Sam Griffiths-Jones*, Simon Moxon, Mhairi-coding RNA families, represented by multiple sequence alignments and profile stochastic context free grammars profile stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs), analogous to profile hidden Markov models (HMMs

  4. Rfam: annotating non-coding RNAs in complete Sam Griffiths-Jones*, Simon Moxon, Mhairi Marshall, Ajay Khanna1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eddy, Sean

    Rfam: annotating non-coding RNAs in complete genomes Sam Griffiths-Jones*, Simon Moxon, MhairiRNA) families, represented by multiple sequence alignments and profile stochastic context- free grammars. Rfam profile stochastic context-free grammars (SCFGs), analogous to profile hidden Markov models (HMMs

  5. Quasi Regular Polyhedra and Their Duals with Coxeter Symmetries Represented by Quaternions II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehmet Koca; Mudhahir Al Ajmi; Saleh Al- Shidhani

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we construct the quasi regular polyhedra and their duals which are the generalizations of the Archimedean and Catalan solids respectively. This work is an extension of two previous papers of ours which were based on the Archimedean and Catalan solids obtained as the orbits of the Coxeter groups . When these groups act on an arbitrary vector in 3D Euclidean space they generate the orbits corresponding to the quasi regular polyhedra. Special choices of the vectors lead to the platonic and Archimedean solids. In general, the faces of the quasi regular polyhedra consist of the equilateral triangles, squares, regular pentagons as well as rectangles, isogonal hexagons, isogonal octagons, and isogonal decagons depending on the choice of the Coxeter groups of interest. We follow the quaternionic representation of the group elements of the Coxeter groups which necessarily leads to the quaternionic representation of the vertices. We note the fact that the molecule can best be represented by a truncated icosahedron where the hexagonal faces are not regular, rather, they are isogonal hexagons where single bonds and double bonds of the carbon atoms are represented by the alternating edge lengths of isogonal hexagons.

  6. Completely Reducible maps in Quantum Information Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Cariello

    2015-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to compute the Schmidt decomposition of $A\\in M_k\\otimes M_m$, we must consider an associated self-adjoint map. Here, we show that if $A$ is positive under partial transposition (PPT) or symmetric with positive coefficients (SPC) or invariant under realignment then its associated self-adjoint map is completely reducible. We give applications of this fact in Quantum Information Theory. We recover some theorems recently proved for PPT and SPC matrices and we prove these theorems for matrices invariant under realignment using theorems of Perron-Frobenius theory. We also provide a new proof of the fact that if $\\mathbb{C}^{k}$ contains $k$ mutually unbiased bases then $\\mathbb{C}^{k}$ contains $k+1$. We search for other types of matrices that could have the same property. We consider a group of linear transformations acting on $M_k\\otimes M_k$, which contains the partial transpositions and the realignment map. For each element of this group, we consider the set of matrices in $M_k\\otimes M_k\\simeq M_{k^2}$ that are positive and remain positive, or invariant, under the action of this element. Within this family of sets, we have the set of PPT matrices, the set of SPC matrices and the set of matrices invariant under realignment. We show that these three sets are the only sets of this family such that the associated self-adjoint map of each matrix is completely reducible. We also show that every matrix invariant under realignment is PPT in $M_2\\otimes M_2$ and we present a counterexample in $M_k\\otimes M_k$, $k\\geq 3$.

  7. Characterization Well R-22 Geochemistry Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Longmire

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides analytical results for groundwater collected during four characterization-sampling rounds conducted at well R-22 from March 2001 through March 2002. Characterization well R-22 was sampled from March 6 through 13, 2001; June 19 through 26, 2001; November 30 through December 10, 2001; and February 27 through March 7, 2002. The goal of the characterization efforts was to assess the hydrochemistry and to determine whether or not contaminants are present in the regional aquifer in the vicinity of the well. A geochemical evaluation of the analytical results for the well is also presented in this report.

  8. Wells, Borings, and Underground Uses (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section regulates wells, borings, and underground storage with regards to protecting groundwater resources. The Commissioner of the Department of Health has jurisdiction, and can grant permits...

  9. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

    2004-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow in the wellbore); and (3) accurate approaches to account for the effects of reservoir heterogeneity and for the optimization of nonconventional well deployment. An overview of our progress in each of these main areas is as follows. A general purpose object-oriented research simulator (GPRS) was developed under this project. The GPRS code is managed using modern software management techniques and has been deployed to many companies and research institutions. The simulator includes general black-oil and compositional modeling modules. The formulation is general in that it allows for the selection of a wide variety of primary and secondary variables and accommodates varying degrees of solution implicitness. Specifically, we developed and implemented an IMPSAT procedure (implicit in pressure and saturation, explicit in all other variables) for compositional modeling as well as an adaptive implicit procedure. Both of these capabilities allow for efficiency gains through selective implicitness. The code treats cell connections through a general connection list, which allows it to accommodate both structured and unstructured grids. The GPRS code was written to be easily extendable so new modeling techniques can be readily incorporated. Along these lines, we developed a new dual porosity module compatible with the GPRS framework, as well as a new discrete fracture model applicable for fractured or faulted reservoirs. Both of these methods display substantial advantages over previous implementations. Further, we assessed the performance of different preconditioners in an attempt to improve the efficiency of the linear solver. As a result of this investigation, substantial improvements in solver performance were achieved.

  10. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas is placed in a sample, then the sample is flooded with water and cooled [Priest et al., 2009]. We have performed a number of tests in which hydrate was formed and the uniformity of the hydrate formation was examined. These tests have primarily used a variety of modifications of the excess gas method to make the hydrate, although we have also used a version of the excess water technique. Early on, we found difficulties in creating uniform samples with a particular sand/ initial water saturation combination (F-110 Sand, {approx} 35% initial water saturation). In many of our tests we selected this combination intentionally to determine whether we could use a method to make the samples uniform. The following methods were examined: Excess gas, Freeze/thaw/form, Freeze/pressurize/thaw, Excess gas followed by water saturation, Excess water, Sand and kaolinite, Use of a nucleation enhancer (SnoMax), and Use of salt in the water. Below, each method, the underlying hypothesis, and our results are briefly presented, followed by a brief conclusion. Many of the hypotheses investigated are not our own, but were presented to us. Much of the data presented is from x-ray CT scanning our samples. The x-ray CT scanner provides a three-dimensional density map of our samples. From this map and the physics that is occurring in our samples, we are able to gain an understanding of the spatial nature of the processes that occur, and attribute them to the locations where they occur.

  11. April 27, 2010 Well Logging I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    wells and may be drilled to tap into water or oil/natural gas. Core samples are usually not taken4/26/2010 1 GG450 April 27, 2010 Well Logging I Today's material comes from p. 501-541 in the text book. Please read and understand all of this material! Drilling ­ Exploration and Scientific Holes

  12. Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each of the following types of well stimulation techniques are summarized and explained: hydraulic fracturing; thermal; mechanical, jetting, and drainhole drilling; explosive and implosive; and injection methods. Current stimulation techniques, stimulation techniques for geothermal wells, areas of needed investigation, and engineering calculations for various techniques. (MHR)

  13. Optimization of well length in waterflooding a five-spot pattern of horizontal wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez, Zulay J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the horizontal wells and provide a good return on investment. Horizontal Wells in Waterflood Pr t A worldwide interest exists today in drilling horizontal wells to increase productivity, Horizontal wells can be used in any phase of reservoir recovery... efficiency7. Several investigatorss-ic have studied waterflooding using horizontal wells. droman et al, s reported a field application using horizontal wells in the Prudhoe Bay Unit where the main reservoir drive mechanism is gas cap expansion...

  14. Sediment Properties: E-Area Completion Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millings, M.; Bagwell, L.; Amidon, M.; Dixon, K.

    2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    To accommodate a future need for additional waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site, the Solid Waste Management Division (SWMD) designated nine additional plots for development (Kasraii 2007; SRS 2010); these plots are collectively known as the E Area Completion Project (ECP). Subsurface samples were collected from ECP plots 6, 7, 8 and 9 (Figure 1) for chemical and physical property analyses to support Performance Assessment (PA) and Special Analyses (SA) modeling. This document summarizes the sampling and analysis scheme and the resultant data, and provides interpretations of the data particularly in reference to existing soil property data. Analytical data in this document include: gamma log, cone penetrometer log, grain size (sieve and hydrometer), water retention, saturated hydraulic conductivity (falling head permeameter), porosity, dry bulk density, total organic carbon, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence data. SRNL provided technical and safety oversight for the fieldwork, which included completion of eight soil borings, four geophysical logs, and the collection of 522 feet of core and 33 Shelby tubes from ECP plots 6, 7, 8, and 9. Boart Longyear provided sonic drilling and logging services. Two soil borings were completed at each location. The first set of boreholes extended into (but did not fully penetrate) the Warley Hill Formation. These boreholes were continuously cored, then geophysically (gamma ray) logged. The recovered core was split, photographed, and described; one half of the core was archived at SRS's Core Lab facilities, and the remaining half was consumed as necessary for testing at SRS and off-site labs. Core descriptions and geophysical data were used to calculate target elevations for Shelby tube samples, which were obtained from the second set of boreholes. Shelby tubes were shipped to MACTEC Engineering and Consulting Inc. (MACTEC) in Atlanta for physical property testing. SRNL deployed their Site Characterization and Analysis Penetrometer System (SCAPS) cone penetrometer test (CPT) truck at ECP plots 6, 7, 8 and 9 to collect inferred lithology data for the vadose zone. Results from this study are used to make recommendations for future modeling efforts involving the ECP plots. The conceptual model of the ECP hydrogeology differs from the conceptual model of the current ELLWF disposal area in that for the ECP plots, the topography (ground surface) is generally lower in elevation; The Upland and top of Tobacco Road lithostratigraphic units are missing (eroded); The water table occurs lower in elevation (i.e., it occurs in lower stratigraphic units); and the Tan Clay Confining Zone (TCCZ) often occurs within the vadose zone (rather than in the saturated zone). Due to the difference in the hydrogeology between the current ELLWF location and the ECP plots, different vadose zone properties are recommended for the ECP plots versus the properties recommended by Phifer et al. (2006) for the current disposal units. Results from this study do not invalidate or conflict with the current PA's use of the Upper and Lower Vadose Zone properties as described by Phifer et al. (2006) for the current ELLWF disposal units. The following modeling recommendations are made for future modeling of the ECP plots where vadose zone properties are required: (1) If a single vadose zone property is preferred, the properties described by Phifer et al. (2006) for the Upper Vadose Zone encompass the general physical properties of the combined sands and clays in the ECP vadose zone sediments despite the differences in hydrostratigraphic units. (2) If a dual zone system is preferred, a combination of the Lower Zone properties and the Clay properties described by Phifer et al. (2006) are appropriate for modeling the physical properties of the ECP vadose zone. The Clay properties would be assigned to the Tan Clay Confining Zone (TCCZ) and any other significant clay layers, while the Lower Zone properties would be assigned for the remainder of the vadose zone. No immediate updates or changes are recommended for

  15. Completion optimization in the Black Warrior basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Black Warrior basin continues to be an active area for development of coalbed methane. The majority of the successful wells have been in areas with relatively high permeability. A study was initiated to determine whether stimulation results could be improved by implementing specific optimization procedures for each of the coal groups. The optimization process included extensive prefracture formation evaluation, injection/falloff testing, in-situ-stress testing, fracture modeling with a three-dimensional (3D) simulator, and radioactive tracing of individual fluid and proppant stages with time-lapse monitoring. Several practical innovations were developed during the study that will aid in the design of the optimum treatment for each well.

  16. Application of high powered lasers to drilling and completing deep walls.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, C. B.; Xu, Z.; Parker, R. A.; Gahan, B. C.; Batarseh, S.; Graves, R. M.; Figueroa, H.; Deeg, W.

    2003-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    High powered laser rock drilling was studied as a revolutionary method for drilling and completing deep gas and oil wells. The objectives of this 2002 to 2003 fiscal year research were to study the concept that large diameter holes can be created by multiple overlapping small beam spots, to determine the ability of lasers to drill rock submerged to some depth in water, to demonstrate the possibilities of lasers for perforating application, and to determine the wavelength effects on rock removal. Laser technology applied to well drilling and completion operations is attractive because it has the potential to reduce drilling time, create a ceramic lining that may eliminate the need for steel casing, provide additional monitor-on-drilling laser sensors and improve well performance through improved perforation. The results from this research will help engineering design on a laser-based well drilling system.

  17. Effect of oil and gas well drilling fluids on shallow groundwater in western North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, E.C.; Kehew, A.E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Upon completion of an oil and gas well in North Dakota, the drilling fluid is buried in the reserve pit at the site. Reclamation of the drill site is expedited by digging a series of trenches which radiate out from the reserve pit. The majority of buried drilling fluid is ultimately contained within these 5-7-metre deep trenches. These fluids are commonly salt-based, i.e., they contain a concentration of 300,000 +- 20,000 ppM NaCl. In addition, these drilling fluids also contain additives including toxic trace-metal compounds. Four reclaimed oil and gas well sites were chosen for study in western North Dakota. The ages of these sites ranged from 2 to 23 years. A total of 31 piezometers and 22 soil water samplers were installed in and around the drill sites, and quarterly groundwater samples were obtained from these instruments. The local groundwater flow conditions were also determined at these sites. Results of both the water analyses and earth resistivity surveys indicate that leachate is being generated at all of the study sites. Water obtained from the unsaturated zone beneath the buried drilling fluid at all of the four study sites exceeds some of the recommended concentration limits and maximum permissible concentration limits for trace elements and major ions (As, Cl/sup -/, Pb, Se, and NO/sub 3//sup -/). These values are greatly reduced in the unsaturated zone as the depth from the buried drilling fluid increases. This reduction is assumed to be the result of attenuation of these ions by cation exchange on Na montmorillonitic clays. Two of these study sites represent the typical geohydrologic setting for the majority of oil and gas well sites in this area. At these sites the saturated zone was not monitored. The reduction in ion concentration in the unsaturated zone suggests that there would be very little impact on the groundwater from this buried drilling fluid at these two sites. 46 references, 58 figures, 3 tables.

  18. Slant Hole Completion Test, Cozzette and Paludal production testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, R.L.; Malinowsky, M.S.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Slant Hole Completion Test has been successful in providing good technology transfer to the oil and gas industry. The gas-producing rate from the Cozzette horizontal open-hole interval was significantly greater than from offset vertical wells. The source of water production from the Cozzette is not presently understood. Diagnosis of the water production mechanism is vital to economic exploitation of the Cozzette gas resource using horizontal well technology. Stimulation in a high-angle cased and cemented wellbore, such as the Paludal 2, 3 and 4 intervals in SHCT No. 1, is more difficult because of high near-wellbore stress that results in higher treating pressures. Low gas production potential following the Paludal 2, 3 and 4 stimulation may result from damage to the natural fracture system resulting from casing cementing operations. Comparison of gas production rates in SHCT No. 1 and MWX No. 1 following similar stimulations in the Paludal 3 and 4 intervals, indicate there is no advantage to a hydraulic fracture treatment in a slant wellbore when compared to a vertical wellbore.

  19. Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adeyeye, Adedeji Ayoola

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Company. The well was producing a gas condensate reservoir and questions were raised about how much drop in flowing bottomhole pressure below dewpoint would be appropriate. Condensate damage in the hydraulic fracture was expected to be of significant...

  20. Groundwater well with reactive filter pack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Holdren, Jr., George R. (Kennewick, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

  1. RMOTC - Field Information - Wells and Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sale of RMOTC equipment and materials click here. Partners may test in RMOTC's large inventory of cased, uncased, vertical, high-angle, and horizontal wells. Cased and open-hole...

  2. MARGINAL EXPENSE OIL WELL WIRELESS SURVEILLANCE MEOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason M. Medizade; John R. Ridgely; Donald G. Nelson

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A marginal expense oil well wireless surveillance system to monitor system performance and production from rod-pumped wells in real time from wells operated by Vaquero Energy in the Edison Field, Main Area of Kern County in California has been successfully designed and field tested. The surveillance system includes a proprietary flow sensor, a programmable transmitting unit, a base receiver and receiving antenna, and a base station computer equipped with software to interpret the data. First, the system design is presented. Second, field data obtained from three wells is shown. Results of the study show that an effective, cost competitive, real-time wireless surveillance system can be introduced to oil fields across the United States and the world.

  3. INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wei I is being dri lied underbalanced, whether H2S is to beis occurring, the well is underbalanced and the threat of ain, the wei I may become underbalanced and the threat of a

  4. Geological well log analysis. Third ed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pirson, S.J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Until recently, well logs have mainly been used for correlation, structural mapping, and quantitive evaluation of hydrocarbon bearing formations. This third edition of Geologic Well Log Analysis, however, describes how well logs can be used for geological studies and mineral exploration. This is done by analyzing well logs for numerous parameters and indices of significant mineral accumulation, primarily in sediments. Contents are: SP and Eh curves as redoxomorphic logs; sedimentalogical studies by log curve shapes; exploration for stratigraphic traps; continuous dipmeter as a structural tool; continuous dipmeter as a sedimentation tool; Paleo-facies logging and mapping; hydrogeology 1--hydrodynamics of compaction; hydrogeology 2--geostatic equilibrium; and hydrogeology 3--hydrodynamics of infiltration. Appendixes cover: Computer program for calculating the dip magnitude, azimuth, and the degree and orientation of the resistivity anisotrophy; a lithology computer program for calculating the curvature of a structure; and basic log analysis package for HP-41CV programmable calculator.

  5. Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Nurudeen

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only...

  6. Modeling techniques for simulating well behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rattu, Bungen Christina

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is a catalog of modeling techniques useful in simulating well behavior in certain types of reservoirs that are often encountered in petroleum reservoirs. Emphasis has been placed on techniques that can be used with any conventional...

  7. Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Nurudeen

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only...

  8. Groundwater well with reactive filter pack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, T.J.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques. 3 figs.

  9. New method for sand control and well stimulation in unconsolidated dirty sands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aslesen, K.S.; Short, C.J.; Terwilliger, P.L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new technique, the Solder Glass sand consolidation well completion method, has been developed which allows unlimited drawdown and improves productivity in wells completed in unconsolidated formations containing shales and clays. This technique eliminates the problems of sand production and fines migration by artificially consolidating a volume of reservoir sand near the wellbore. The consolidation is resistant to high temperature, chemical attack, and degradation resulting from high velocity fluid flow. Additionally, porosity and permeability in the consolidated volume of reservoir sand are improved as a result of irreversible dehydration of clays. 12 refs.

  10. Generic effluent monitoring system certification for salt well portable exhauster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glissmeyer, J.A.; Maughan, A.D.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests were conducted to verify that the Generic Effluent Monitoring System (GEMS), as it is applied to the Salt Well Portable Exhauster, meets all applicable regulatory performance criteria for air sampling systems at nuclear facilities. These performance criteria address both the suitability of the air sampling probe location and the transport of the sample to the collection devices. The criteria covering air sampling probe location ensure that the contaminants in the stack are well mixed with the airflow at the probe location such that the extracted sample represents the whole. The sample transport criteria ensure that the sampled contaminants are quantitatively delivered to the collection device. The specific performance criteria are described in detail in the report. The tests demonstrated that the GEMS/Salt Well Exhauster system meets all applicable performance criteria. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted the testing using a mockup of the Salt Well Portable Exhauster stack at the Numatec Hanford Company`s 305 Building. The stack/sampling system configuration tested was designed to provide airborne effluent control for the Salt Well pumping operation at some U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) radioactive waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site, Washington. The portable design of the exhauster allows it to be used in other applications and over a range of exhaust air flowrates (approximately 200 - 1100 cubic feet per minute). The unit includes a stack section containing the sampling probe and another stack section containing the airflow, temperature and humidity sensors. The GEMS design features a probe with a single shrouded sampling nozzle, a sample delivery line, and sample collection system. The collection system includes a filter holder to collect the sample of record and an in-line detector head and filter for monitoring beta radiation-emitting particles.

  11. Alpine field, Alaska: openhole completion and wellbore cleanup methods in an Artic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leeftink, Gerrit J.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study compares the practices used to drill and complete three horizontal, openhole wells in the Alpine field on the north slope of Alaska. This study is a continuation of the work performed in conjunction with CEA-73. In the first phase of CEA...

  12. Convergence of the complete electromagnetic fluid system to the full compressible magnetohydrodynamic equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song Jiang; Fucai Li

    2015-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The full compressible magnetohydrodynamic equations can be derived from the complete electromagnetic fluid system as the dielectric constant tends to zero. In this paper we justify this singular limit rigorously in the framework of smooth solutions for well-prepared initial data.

  13. MyhillNerode Relations on Automatic Systems and the Completeness of Kleene Algebra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozen, Dexter

    Myhill­Nerode Relations on Automatic Systems and the Completeness of Kleene Algebra Dexter Kozen. It is well known that finite square matrices over a Kleene algebra again form a Kleene algebra. This is also infinite systems of inequalities over a Kleene algebra. Automatic systems are a special class of infinite

  14. Automatic well log correlation using neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habiballah, Walid Abdulrahim

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AUTOMATIC WELL LOG CORRELATION USING NEURAL NETWORKS A Thesis by WALID ABDULHAHIM HABIBALLAH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AaM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1991 Major Subject; Petroleum Engineering AUTOMATIC WELL LOG CORRELATION USING NEURAL NETWORKS A Thesis by WALID ABDULRAHIM HABIBALLAH Approved as to style and content by: R. A. St tzman (Chair of Committee) S. W. Poston (Member) R. R...

  15. Volume 66, Numbers 3&4 (Complete)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickson, Donald

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tyacke. Woodbridge, Suffolk: Boydell Press, 2006. xiv + 254 pp. + 1 illus. $85.00. Review by P. G. st a n w o o d , un i v e r s i t y o f Br i t i s h co l u m B i a . Nicholas Tyacke is well known to literary and church historians? and to all... EVENTEENTH- ENTURY EWS FALL - WINTER 2008 Vol. 66 Nos. 3&4 Including THE NEO-LATIN NEWS Vol. 56, Nos. 3&4 Se v e n t e e n t h -Ce n t u r y ne w S VOLUME 66, Nos. 3&4 FALL...

  16. 2010 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 19)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike Lewis

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 2010 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 19) provides water use information (monthly annual average and total annual volume) for production and potable water wells at the Idaho National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2010. It also provides detailed information for new, modified, and abandoned (decommissioned) wells and holes. Five new wells were drilled and completed in the latter part of Calendar Years 2009 and 2010. Two wells were modified in Calendar Year 2010 and 66 wells and boreholes reported as abandoned (decommissioned). Detailed construction information for the new and modified wells, along with abandonment information for older wells, is provided. Location maps are provided if survey information was available. This report is being submitted in accordance with the Water Rights Agreement between the State of Idaho and the United States, for the United States Department of Energy (dated 1990) and the subsequent Partial Decree for Water Right 34-10901 issued June 20, 2003.

  17. 2011 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 20)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renee Bowser

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This 2011 Idaho National Laboratory Water Use Report and Comprehensive Well Inventory (Revision 20) provides water use information (monthly annual average and total annual volume) for production and potable water wells at the Idaho National Laboratory for Calendar Year 2011. It also provides detailed information for new, modified, and abandoned (decommissioned) wells and holes. One new well was drilled and completed and one well was modified in Calendar Year 2011. A total of 14 wells and boreholes were reported as decommissioned. Detailed construction information for the new and modified wells is provided. Details are provided for the wells and boreholes that have been decommissioned, and if available, construction diagrams. Location maps are included, provided survey information was available. This report is being submitted in accordance with the Water Rights Agreement between the State of Idaho and the United States, for the United States Department of Energy (dated 1990) and the subsequent Partial Decree for Water Right 34-10901 issued June 20, 2003.

  18. North Fork well, Shoshone National Forest, Park County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilling of a 5000-foot exploratory gas and oil well by Marathon Oil Company is proposed for Section 34, T52N, R106W, near Pagoda Creek in the Shoshone National Forest, Park County, Wyoming. An area 75 feet by 80 feet would be cleared of all vegetation and graded nearly flat for the drill pad and reserve pit. The drilling rig, pipe rack, generator, tool house, living facilities, drilling mud pump, pit, and supply platform all would be built on the drill pad. A blooie hole would contain cuttings and dust from the air drilling. Support facilities would include a helicopter staging area along Clocktower Creek approximately one mile south of the Yellowstone Highway and a 2550-foot temporary water pipeline from Pagoda Creek to the well site. Personnel, equipment, and supplies would be trucked to the helicopter staging area and shuttled to the proposed location by helicopters. Lease stipulations prohibit drilling before September 8; therefore, the starting date would be the late fall of the respective year and would have to be completed by the following January 1. Approval of the exploratory well would not include approval of production facilities.

  19. Horizontal wells improve recovery at the Elk Hills Petroleum Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rintoul, B.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1988 the US Department of Energy and Bechtel implemented a program to slow production declines in the Elk Hills 26R pool sand of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1. It was also hoped horizontal wells would increase the production rate, decrease gas production and extend economic life of the reservoir. The Stevens sand pool targeted for the project is a high-quality, sand-rich turbidite channel system encapsulated within Miocene Monterey siliceous shales, mudstones and associated sediments. The pool is about 3-miles long by 3/4-mile wide. The paper describes the specifications and drilling of the first four out of the 14 horizontal wells drilled at this facility. Horizontal drilling technology has completely altered the future of the 26R pool. In 1980 estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) from the sand was 211 million bbl. With the latest horizontal well drilling campaign, the pool is expected to pass that estimate in 1997 when oil production is forecasted to be at least 13,000 b/d. EUR form the 26R sand now is more than 250 million bbl, and even that estimate is being revised upward.

  20. A complete backbone spectral assignment of human apolipoprotein...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    complete backbone spectral assignment of human apolipoprotein AI on a 38 kDa pre?HDL (Lp1-AI) particle . A complete backbone spectral assignment of human apolipoprotein AI on...

  1. EM Completes Salt Waste Disposal Units $8 Million under Budget...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EM Completes Salt Waste Disposal Units 8 Million under Budget at Savannah River Site EM Completes Salt Waste Disposal Units 8 Million under Budget at Savannah River Site February...

  2. Completing the CCT mission: The challenge of change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monk, J.R. [Illinois Energy Association, Springfield, IL (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to complete the clean coal technology mission it will be necessary to determine CCT`s role in the restructured electricity industry and develop a strategy to promote that role. First, one must understand where the industry is headed and how clean coal technology fits into that future. Then, one needs to develop a strategy for getting from here to there, from where CCT is today to where it must be in five, ten or twenty years to be a viable option for decision-makers. Coal makes sense for the United States for several important reasons, not the least of which is its abundance here. It also makes sense in terms of its economic impact on large areas of the nation. And if coal makes sense, especially economically, then clean coal technology makes even more sense because of its potential to capitalize on this abundant resource in an environmentally friendly manner. But after nearly thirty years of involvement in the political world at all levels from Washington, D.C. to Washington, Indiana, the author has learned the hard way that ``common sense`` does not always, or even often, carry the day in the policymaking process. He believes that the future of clean coal technology hinges on the ability in the next few months and years to mobilize all those who favor that technology to move forward in a cohesive and coordinated effort to affect the policymaking and political process and thereby promote and accelerate CCT development. If this can be done, then the nation will be well on the way to completing the clean coal technology mission and meeting the challenge of change.

  3. Efficient Energy Use and Well-Being: The Swedish Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schipper, Lee; Lichtenberg, A.J.

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1970- 1972 as our comparison period, because complete e datajare available and because energy prices

  4. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles M. Boyer II; Ronald J. MacDonald P.G.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger-Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden & Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We have continued to enhance and streamline our software, and we are testing the final stages of our new Microsoft{trademark} Access/Excel based software. We are continuing to process the information and are identifying potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate the new methodologies. In addition, preparation of the final technical report is underway. During this quarter, we have presented our project and discussed the software to numerous Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) workshops located in various regions of the United States.

  5. Office of River Protection Mission Completion Strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiegman, S. A.; Hewitt, W. M.; Yuracko, K.; Holbrook, J. H.

    2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE's Office of River Protection (ORP) is readying itself to commence construction of a Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) that will start the process of turning Hanford tank waste into glass. The plant is state-of-the art and includes reasonable flexibility to improve operations as technology and operational understandings improve. During its 40 year design life the plant has the capability to treat half of the total volume of tank waste and reduce risk to the public by up to ninety percent. Looking beyond initial processing towards the project end state, however, it is apparent that ORP's baseline approach is part of the issue raised by the DOE Secretary when he said that $300 billion and 75 years is too costly and too long for DOE's environmental cleanups. ORP has reviewed its cost and schedule drivers and has started identifying areas where better technologies and risk-based strategies could substantially decrease its life cycle cost and schedule. Specific technologies under consideration will be discussed along with expected return on investment. ORP is totally committed to taking all steps necessary during cleanup to protect human health and the environment and to comply with appropriate regulations and commitments. But, ORP is also very conscious of the fact that the history of Hanford production and tank farm operations has resulted in very large tank-to-tank variabilities in the waste constituents. Not all tank wastes demand the same high level of rigor in treatment as provided by the WTP in order to protect people and the environment. Parallel treatment paths, keyed to the hazards and chemical challenges each tank presents, need to be developed. The WTP vitrification capabilities should be deployed for the higher risk wastes that require vitrification. By getting wastes in the proper paths for treatment based upon their chemical characteristics and inherent risks, ORP will be able to both accelerate the cleanup schedule and bring its life cycle and annual funding requirements into line. The WTP needs to be managed and its throughput enhanced to vitrify all of the HLW and approximately 50% of the low-level tank waste by about 2030. That represents the lion's share of the current and long-term risk presented by the tanks.

  6. Changes in Inflammatory Biomarkers Across Weight Classes in a Representative US Population: A Link Between Obesity and Inflammation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Xuan-Mai T.; Lane, John; Smith, Brian R.; Nguyen, Ninh T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weight Classes in a Representative US Population: A Linkexamines a nationally representative complex, multistageeach weight class for a representative US population. The

  7. Structures of Domains I and IV from YbbR are representative of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Domains I and IV from YbbR are representative of a widely distributed protein family. Structures of Domains I and IV from YbbR are representative of a widely distributed protein...

  8. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Government Reform Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform March 20, 2003 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on...

  9. Technical basis for the aboveground structure failure and associated represented hazardous conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GOETZ, T.G.

    2003-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical basis document describes the risk binning process and the technical basis for assigning risk bins for the aboveground structure failure representative accident and associated represented hazardous conditions. This document was developed to support the documented safety analysis.

  10. Construction of Complete Embedded Self-Similar Surfaces Under ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    THE 3RD SYMPOSIUM ON ANALYSIS AND PDES. PURDUE UNIVERSITY, MAY 27–30, 2007. CONSTRUCTION OF COMPLETE EMBEDDED SELF-

  11. Definitional Reflection and the Completion Peter Schroeder-Heister *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schroeder-Heister, Peter

    /11-1, and by Esprit Basic Research Working Group 7232 (GENTZEN). #12;334 which is the completed definition

  12. Optimization Online - A Simpler Approach to Matrix Completion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Recht

    2009-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 4, 2009 ... Keywords: Matrix completion, low-rank matrices, convex optimization, nuclear norm minimization, random matrices, operator Chernoff bound, ...

  13. China’s Military Representatives: Striving Toward Professional Contracting and Procurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Puska, Susan M; McReynolds, Joe; Geary, Debra

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    effect of specialization could be to develop military representatives who are experts in specific areas of the weapons and

  14. Apparatus for the concurrent inspection of partially completed welds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Johnson, John A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Larsen, Eric D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bitsoi, Rodney J. (Ririe, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID); Miller, Karen S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pace, David P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for the concurrent inspection of partially completed welds is described in which is utilized in combination with a moveable welder for forming a partially completed weld, and an ultrasonic generator mounted on a moveable welder in which is reciprocally moveable along a path of travel which is laterally disposed relative to the partially completed weld.

  15. Dental Hygiene Degree Completion Program 2015 Admission Application Instructions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Michelle

    Dental Hygiene Degree Completion Program 2015 Admission Application Instructions These instructions have been prepared for applicants to The Ohio State University Dental Hygiene Degree Completion Program about the dental hygiene degree completion program is available at www.dent.osu.edu/dhy . Admission

  16. Characterizing and computing minimal cograph completions Daniel Lokshtanov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fomin, Fedor V.

    to often be good enough for practical purposes [4, 2]. In addition, the study of minimal completions gives to pick the one in the sample with fewest fill edges and have good chances to produce a completion closeCharacterizing and computing minimal cograph completions Daniel Lokshtanov Federico Mancini Charis

  17. Directional Drilling and Equipment for Hot Granite Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R. E.; Neudecker, J. W.; Rowley, J.C.; Brittenham, T. L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Directional drilling technology was extended and modified to drill the first well of a subsurface geothermal energy extraction system at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, hot dry rock (HDR) experimental site. Borehole geometries, extremely hard and abrasive granite rock, and high formation temperatures combined to provide a challenging environment for directional drilling tools and instrumentation. Completing the first of the two-wellbore HDR system resulted in the definition of operation limitations of -many conventional directional drilling tools, instrumentation, and techniques. The successful completion of the first wellbore, Energy Extraction Well No. 2 (EE-21), to a measured depth of 4.7 km (15,300 ft) in granite reservoir rock with a bottomhole temperature of 320 C (610 F) required the development of a new high-temperature downhole motor and modification of existing wireline-conveyed steering tool systems. Conventional rotary-driven directional assemblies were successfully modified to accommodate the very hard and abrasive rock encountered while drilling nearly 2.6 km (8,500 ft) of directional hole to a final inclination of 35{sup o} from the vertical at the controlled azimuthal orientation. Data were collected to optimize the drilling procedures far the programmed directional drilling of well EE-3 parallel to, and 370 metres (1,200 ft) above, Drilling equipment and techniques used in drilling wellbores for extraction of geothermal energy from hot granite were generally similar to those that are standard and common to hydrocarbon drilling practices. However, it was necessary to design some new equipment for this program: some equipment was modified especially for this program and some was operated beyond normal ratings. These tools and procedures met with various degrees of success. Two types of shock subs were developed and tested during this project. However, downhole time was limited, and formations were so varied that analysis of the capabilities of these items is not conclusive. Temperature limits of the tools were exceeded. EE-2. Commercial drilling and fishing jars were improved during the drilling program. Three-cone, tungsten-carbide insert bit performance with downhole motors was limited by rapid gauge wear. Rotary drilling was optimized for wells EE-2 and EE-3 using softer (IADS 635 code) bits and provided a balance between gauge,. cutting structure, and bearing life. Problems of extreme drill string drag, drill string twist-off, and corrosion control are discussed.

  18. Pressure buildup characteristics in Austin Chalk wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claycomb, Eddy

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    20 40 60 60 Mr lee IOOKrlemelere EEKAR 6 UA SALMI' WILSON LAVACA hrAVERICK ZAVA' A FRIG ATAECOSA KARNES DE WITT 0 0 IMMIT LA SALLE ~CO o& @g'v Figure I ? Austin Chalk Trend in Texas Early in the development of Clayton W, Williams, Jr..., Henry J. , Jr. : "Well- Test Analysis for Vertically Fractured Wells, " J. Pet. Tech. (Aug. 1972) 1014-1020; Trans. , AINE, 253. VITA Name: Eddy Claycomb Birth Date: March 18, 1956 Birthplace: Tyler, Texas Parents: Mr. and Mrs. Tom Claycomb, Jr...

  19. The Allied Health Faculty Organization invited Representative Ed Bryant (7th Congressional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cui, Yan

    The Allied Health Faculty Organization invited Representative Ed Bryant (7th Congressional District) to visit the University and discuss such topics as health and education. Representative Bryant is a member Commerce Committee Prescription Drug Task Force. Prior to his service in the House, Representative Bryant

  20. Why Think Causally? Published under the title: "Why Represent Causal Relations?"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strevens, Michael

    Why Think Causally? Published under the title: "Why Represent Causal Relations?" Michael Strevens University Press, New York, 2007. A Why do we represent the world around us using causal generalizations to be an ex- cellent vehicle for representing all-important relations of manipulability. The third, based