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Sample records for represent retail at-the-pump

  1. Average household expected to save $675 at the pump in 2015

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Average household expected to save $675 at the pump in 2015 Although retail gasoline prices have risen in recent weeks U.S. consumers are still expected to save about $675 per household in motor fuel costs this year. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration says the average pump price for regular grade gasoline in 2015 will be $2.43 per gallon. That's about 93 cents lower than last year's average. The savings for consumers will be even bigger during the

  2. Save at the Pump and Charge While You Work | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    at the Pump and Charge While You Work Save at the Pump and Charge While You Work May 22, 2013 - 4:46pm Addthis An increasing number of employers are offering workplace charging. | Photo courtesy of Biogen Idec, Inc., a partner of the Workplace Charging Challenge. An increasing number of employers are offering workplace charging. | Photo courtesy of Biogen Idec, Inc., a partner of the Workplace Charging Challenge. Natalie Committee Communications Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and

  3. Top 3 Driving Tools That Will Help Save You Money at the Pump | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy 3 Driving Tools That Will Help Save You Money at the Pump Top 3 Driving Tools That Will Help Save You Money at the Pump November 25, 2013 - 11:33am Addthis Save time and money on your next road trip with our top three driving tools. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/gioadventures. Save time and money on your next road trip with our top three driving tools. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/gioadventures. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Former Digital Communications Specialist,

  4. Efficient Driving Tips to Help Ease the Pain at the Pump | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Efficient Driving Tips to Help Ease the Pain at the Pump Efficient Driving Tips to Help Ease the Pain at the Pump March 15, 2011 - 7:30am Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL No doubt you've heard-or noticed yourself-that gas prices are rising again. It's always painful to fill up when you know the total will be more than it would have been yesterday. I can't do a lot about the total when you fill your tank, but I do have a few tips to help you fill up a little less often

  5. Retail Unbundling

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1999-01-01

    This special report provides a brief summary of the status of retail unbundling programs (also known as "customer choice" programs) for residential natural gas customers in various states,

  6. Inside the Crystal Ball: New Approaches to Predicting the Gasoline Price at the Pump

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inside the Crystal Ball: New Approaches to Predicting the Gasoline Price at the Pump Christiane Baumeister, Bank of Canada Lutz Kilian, University of Michigan Thomas K. Lee, U.S. Energy Information Administration April 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Washington, DC 20585 This paper is released to encourage discussion and critical comment. The analysis and conclusions expressed here are those of the authors and not necessarily those of

  7. Price of Motor Gasoline Through Retail Outlets

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    & Stocks by State (Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Data Series: Retail Price - Motor Gasoline Retail Price - Regular Gasoline Retail Price - Midgrade Gasoline Retail Price...

  8. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-02-01

    This is a special CALiPER report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. It follows similar reports published in 2011 and 2012 (products purchased in 2010 and 2011), and is intended as a continuation that identifies long-term trends. For this report, products were selected to investigate specific hypotheses, rather than represent a sample of the increasingly large retail LED market.

  9. Retailer Energy Alliance Subcommittees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    This fact sheet describes the Retailer Energy Alliances Subcommittees: Lighting and Electrical, Restaurant and Food Preparation, Refrigeration, HVAC, and Whole Building Systems.

  10. Information for Retailers of Lighting Products | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products U.S. retailers who sell lighting products can use the...

  11. Retail Power Marketer

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Retail Power Marketer What is the current address for this entity's principal business office? What is the legal name of the entity that this form is being prepared for? Email: Who is the survey contact's supervisor? -Contact EIA by email at eia-861@eia.gov to correct or update this information First Name: Title: NOTICE: This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other

  12. Dominion Retail Inc (Connecticut) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dominion Retail Inc (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dominion Retail Inc Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 1-888-216-3718 Website: www.dominionenergy.comen Outage...

  13. Retail Replacement Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CALiPER Testing » Application Reports » Retail Replacement Lamps Retail Replacement Lamps Annual CALiPER testing of A19, G25, candelabra, night light, MR16/PAR16, PAR20, and PAR30 replacement lamps - purchased directly from store shelves - offers insights on performance trends from year to year. The report findings offer valuable insights for manufacturers and retailers alike. Retail Lamps Study 3 (48 pages, February 2014) Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality

  14. Category:StandAloneRetail | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IN Duke Energy Indiana Inc.png SVStandAloneRetail Ind... 66 KB SVStandAloneRetail Jackson MS Entergy Mississippi Inc.png SVStandAloneRetail Jac... 63 KB SVStandAloneRetail...

  15. Dominion Retail Inc (Maine) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dominion Retail Inc (Maine) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Dominion Retail Inc Place: Maine Phone Number: 1-866-366-4357 Website: www.dom.com Outage Hotline: 1-866-366-4357...

  16. The calm before the storm. [Retail wheeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studness, C.M.

    1993-05-15

    The right to refuse retail wheeling requests is one of the cornerstones of a utility's monopoly power. Utilities have fought staunchly to preserve it, most recently in preventing retail wheeling from becoming an important issue in the congressional debate over deregulation; the Energy Policy Act of 1992 steered clear of it. For the present, the prohibition of retail wheeling gives utilities enormous power over the retail electric power market. The ability to refuse retail wheeling requests, of course, prevents retail customers from buying power from third parties. This enables a utility to sell retail customers all the power it can generate, at a price that covers its cost plus an allowed return-even if its price exceeds that of power available in the wholesale market. The denial of retail wheeling thus protects a utility's inefficiencies, whose price is ultimately shouldered onto customers through cost-plus electric rates. Allowing retail wheeling would remove the foundation for much of the current monopoly power that utilities enjoy. Third parties could sell power to a utility's retail customers, since the utility would be required to wheel it. Retail customers would be able to bypass the local distribution utility to buy power from the cheapest source available. Market forces would drive pricing rather than the cost-plus ratemaking process. A utility whose electric rates were above market would have to meet the competitive price or lose sales.

  17. Facility Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2011-03-01

    This standard, DOE-STD-1063, Facility Representatives, defines the duties, responsibilities and qualifications for Department of Energy (DOE) Facility Representatives, based on facility hazard classification; risks to workers, the public, and the environment; and the operational activity level. This standard provides the guidance necessary to ensure that DOEs hazardous nuclear and non-nuclear facilities have sufficient staffing of technically qualified facility representatives (FRs) to provide day-to-day oversight of contractor operations.

  18. ,"Motor Gasoline Sales Through Retail Outlets Prices "

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Motor Gasoline Sales Through Retail Outlets Prices ",60,"Annual",2014,"6301984" ,"Release...

  19. Dominion Retail Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Buying Transmission Yes Activity Buying Distribution Yes Activity Wholesale Marketing Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  20. Information for Retailers of Lighting Products | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products Information for Retailers of Lighting Products U.S. retailers who sell lighting products can use the information below to help their customers better understand energy-efficient lighting choices. New information will be added as it becomes available. U.S. retailers are welcome to use parts of these materials in their retail displays. In those cases, please do so without the Department of Energy's name, since we will

  1. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Retailer Business Model Conclusion

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Retailer Business Model Conclusion, Summary of Retailer Insights.

  2. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Delaware) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Delaware) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Delaware References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  3. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Connecticut) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Connecticut) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Connecticut Phone Number: 212-997-8500...

  4. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (District of Columbia...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (District of Columbia) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: District of Columbia References:...

  5. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) ...

  6. Facility Representatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2000 March 2000 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2006 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program web site at http://www.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2006 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy standard is approved for use by

  7. Facility Representatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    063-2011 February 2011 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-2006 April 2006 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2011 ii Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1063-2011 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) standard is

  8. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    869,73104419,70006764,67580676,65057675,62166661,61227325,59925613,100,100,100 "Retail revenue (thousand dollars)" "Residential",3532583.5,3491379.5,3661469.6,3790734,3356042,33475...

  9. CPL Retail Energy, LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 13151 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a...

  10. Texas Retail Energy, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 50046 Utility Location Yes Ownership R ISO Ercot Yes ISO NY Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can help...

  11. Retail wheeling: Is this revolution necessary?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cudahy, R.D.

    1994-12-31

    As of a former state regulator and a once enthusiastic practitioner of public utility law, I find it fascinating to see the latest nostrum to burst on the electric utility scene: retail wheeling. Wheeling became a personal interest in the Texas interconnection fight of the late seventies and may have led to the interconnection and wheeling provision of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA). Retail wheeling contemplates that every electric power customer should be given an opportunity to seek out the lowest cost source of power wherever it can be found. As a practical matter, the drums for retail wheeling are presently being beaten by large industrial users, who believe that they have the capability to find low cost sources and to make advantageous commercial arrangements to acquire electricity. Large industrials have long been fighting the utilities for cheaper electricity, frequently using the threat of self-generation and cogeneration.

  12. Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaOtherRetail Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Other retail Pages using the...

  13. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maine) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maine) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Maine Phone Number: 1-800-437-7645 Website:...

  14. Texas Retail Energy, LLC (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas Retail Energy, LLC (Texas) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Texas Retail Energy, LLC Address: 2001 SE 10th St Place: Bentonville, AR Zip: 72712 Phone Number: (479) 204-0845...

  15. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",6,29,3,9,11,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",1653072,1092343,15588,186056,11,"NA","NA",2947070 "Retail sales

  16. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",7,42,2,4,69,16,3," " "Number of retail customers",11805131,3248291,2193,16376,73,153026,"NA",15225090 "Retail sales

  17. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",2,29,1,28,9,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",1486366,435070,14,622879,9,"NA","NA",2544338 "Retail sales

  18. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,8,"NA","NA",4,29,2," " "Number of retail customers",845007,72702,"NA","NA",4,692239,"NA",1609952 "Retail sales

  19. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",1,9,"NA",1,1,25,1," " "Number of retail customers",276172,65959,"NA",86096,1,27812,"NA",456040 "Retail sales

  20. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,11,2,17,4,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",683856,43864,2,83450,4,"NA","NA",811177 "Retail sales

  1. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",4,41,"NA",26,2,43,3," " "Number of retail customers",1985354,267486,"NA",300844,302,3169795,"NA",5723781 "Retail sales

  2. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",4,118,1,29,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",946301,234421,1,293171,"NA","NA","NA",1473894 "Retail

  3. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",5,30,1,24,2,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",1216704,209426,17,813389,2,"NA","NA",2239538 "Retail sales

  4. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",1,4,"NA",2,"NA",30,6," " "Number of retail customers",37,10538,"NA",2518,"NA",783980,"NA",797073 "Retail sales

  5. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",5,5,"NA",3,7,43,5," " "Number of retail customers",1616182,34095,"NA",205915,7,618710,"NA",2474909 "Retail sales

  6. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",6,40,"NA","NA",8,34,6," " "Number of retail customers",2201824,404811,"NA","NA",13,510563,"NA",3117211 "Retail

  7. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",8,41,"NA",10,3,12,3," " "Number of retail customers",4167904,305481,"NA",319033,3,6595,"NA",4799016 "Retail sales

  8. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",5,124,1,46,5,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",1487785,367230,4,767282,8,"NA","NA",2622309 "Retail sales

  9. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",5,1,2,29,"NA",2,2," " "Number of retail customers",369184,984,20910,195647,"NA",449,"NA",587174 "Retail sales

  10. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",2,9,1,8,1,3,3," " "Number of retail customers",1189594,30352,2,36951,1,9,"NA",1256909 "Retail sales

  11. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,5,"NA",1,1,16,4," " "Number of retail customers",514095,12197,"NA",77880,1,108287,"NA",712460 "Retail sales

  12. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",5,9,"NA",1,25,44,4," " "Number of retail customers",3202218,62911,"NA",11528,25,678906,"NA",3955588 "Retail sales

  13. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,8,1,20,1,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",718354,85240,13,209064,1,"NA","NA",1012672 "Retail sales

  14. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",9,48,"NA",4,5,59,9," " "Number of retail customers",5020899,1278061,"NA",18148,16,1759152,"NA",8076276 "Retail sales

  15. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",8,85,"NA",25,4,34,6," " "Number of retail customers",2312998,374308,"NA",382103,4,2439254,"NA",5508667 "Retail sales

  16. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,18,1,19,1,4,3," " "Number of retail customers",1411786,295114,1,201893,1,595,"NA",1909390 "Retail sales

  17. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",11,35,"NA",13,5,59,9," " "Number of retail customers",3629465,84412,"NA",219222,5,2053710,"NA",5986814 "Retail sales

  18. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",6,36,1,31,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",241333,60042,21,152666,"NA","NA","NA",454062 "Retail

  19. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,61,1,26,1,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",47276,2195950,23,965871,1,"NA","NA",3209121 "Retail sales

  20. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",1,40,1,9,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",822874,236865,7,47341,"NA","NA","NA",1107087 "Retail

  1. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",1,14,"NA",2,2,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",258872,55228,"NA",49162,2,"NA","NA",363264 "Retail

  2. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,41,2,18,2,3,2," " "Number of retail customers",1451599,1650971,10,166079,2,16,"NA",3268677 "Retail sales

  3. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",5,13,1,18,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",196786,35737,5,99235,"NA","NA","NA",331763 "Retail

  4. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",243,1949,6,810,137,145,67," " "Number of retail customers",93012392,21383674,38870,18905267,565,13065447,"NA",146406278 "Retail sales

  5. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4560,1201929.7,"NA","NA","NA",7923662.4 "Percentage of revenue",62.5,18.74,3.59,15.17,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average retail price (centskWh)",9.02,9.15,4.92,11.02,"NA","NA","NA",9.02...

  6. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3,"NA",1063623.3,"NA","NA","NA",3703710.6 "Percentage of revenue",58.49,12.8,"NA",28.72,"NA","NA","NA",100 "Average retail price (centskWh)",7.81,7.9,"NA",8.22,"NA","NA","NA",7.93...

  7. 2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 2,340.0 9.94 Texas Retail Energy, LLC CT Power Marketer 1 87,776 8,143.3 9.28 Town Square Energy CT Power Marketer 7,388 33,128 7,931.7 23.94 TransCanada Power Marketing, Ltd. ...

  8. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Beeson, Tracy A.

    2014-02-01

    The CALiPER program first began investigating LED lamps sold at retail stores in 2010, purchasing 33 products from eight retailers and covering six product categories. The findings revealed a fragmented marketplace, with large disparities in performance of different products, accuracy of manufacturer claims, and offerings from different retail outlets. Although there were some good products, looking back many would not be considered viable competitors to other available options, with too little lumen output, not high enough efficacy, or poor color quality. CALiPER took another look in late 2011purchasing 38 products of five different types from nine retailers and the improvement was marked. Performance was up; retailer claims were more accurate; and the price per lumen and price per unit efficacy were down, although the price per product had not changed much. Nonetheless, there was still plenty of room for improvement, with the performance of LED lamps not yet reaching that of well-established classes of conventional lamps (e.g., 75 W incandescent A19 lamps). Since the second retail lamp study was published in early 2012, there has been substantial progress in all aspects of LED lamps available from retailers. To document this progress, CALiPER again purchased a sample of lamps from retail stores 46 products in total, focusing on A19, PAR30, and MR16 lamps but instead of a random sample, sought to select products to answer specific hypotheses about performance. These hypotheses focused on expanding ranges of LED equivalency, the accuracy of lifetime claims, efficacy and price trends, as well as changes to product designs. Among other results, key findings include: There are now very good LED options to compete with 60 W, 75 W, and 100 W incandescent A19 lamps, and 75 W halogen PAR30 lamps. MR16 lamps have shown less progress, but there are now acceptable alternatives to 35 W, 12 V halogen MR16 lamps and 50 W, 120 V halogen MR16 lamps for some applications. Other uses, such as in enclosed luminaires, may require more development. At the same price point, lamps purchased in 2013 tended to have higher output and slightly higher efficacy than in 2011 or 2010. Over 30% of the products purchased in 2013 exceeded the maximum efficacy measured in 2011 (71 lm/W), with the most efficacious product measured at 105 lm/W. There appears to be increasing consistency in color quality, with a vast majority of products having a CCT of 2700 K or 3000 K and a CRI between 80 and 85. There were also fewer poor performing products tested and more high-performing products available in 2013 than in previous years. The accuracy of equivalency and performance claims was better than in 2011, but remains a concern, with 43% of tested products failing to completely meet their equivalency claim and 20% of products failing to match the manufacturer’s performance data. Although progress has been substantial, on average LED lamps remain more expensive than other energy efficiency lighting technologies -- although some aspects can be superior. Although not universal to all product lines or all product types, the issue of insufficient lumen output from LED lamps is waning. Thus, manufacturers can focus on other issues, such as reducing cost, improving electrical/dimmer compatibility, eliminating flicker, or improving color quality. While these issues are not inherent to all products, they remain a concern for the broader market.

  9. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",17,34,"NA",19,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  10. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",1,"NA","NA","NA","NA",22,1," " "Number of retail

  11. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,"NA","NA",1,2,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  12. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",6,72,"NA",40,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  13. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,137,"NA",42,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  14. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",5,21,"NA",12,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  15. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",4,86,"NA",42,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  16. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities","NA",149,1,10,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  17. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,62,1,31,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  18. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",4,22,"NA",21,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  19. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,16,"NA",13,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  20. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",5,2,"NA",2,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail

  1. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    LBNL-1470E Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool Ranjit Bharvirkar, Grayson Heffner and Charles Goldman Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2009 The work described in this report was funded by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Permitting, Siting and Analysis of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was

  2. Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection This report was prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Chicago Regional Support Office (Purchase Order DE-AP45-97R553188). Funding was provided by the Department of Energy's Office of Power Technologies, Ofiice of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. PDF icon Retail Electric Competition: A Blueprint for Consumer Protection More

  3. Financial Management for Retail Energy Efficiency | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Financial Management for Retail Energy Efficiency Financial Management for Retail Energy Efficiency Lead Performer: Retail Industry Leaders Association (RILA) - Arlington, VA Partners: -- Deloitte - New York, NY -- Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) - Boston, MA -- Institute for Market Transformation (IMT) - Washington, D.C. -- Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - Boston, MA DOE Total Funding: $750,000 Cost Share: $750,000 Project Term: April 1, 2015 - June 30, 2018 Funding Opportunity:

  4. Retail Building Guide for Entrance Energy Efficiency Measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, J.; Kung, F.

    2012-03-01

    This booklet is based on the findings of an infiltration analysis for supermarkets and large retail buildings without refrigerated cases. It enables retail building managers and engineers to calculate the energy savings potential for vestibule additions for supermarkets; and bay door operation changes in large retail stores without refrigerated cases. Retail managers can use initial estimates to decide whether to engage vendors or contractors of vestibules for pricing or site-specific analyses, or to decide whether to test bay door operation changes in pilot stores, respectively.

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    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  7. Innovation for Food Retail: The 50% Advanced Energy Design Guide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    guide includes specialty sections for refrigeration and food service found, not only in ... guide also helps those who build or design retail stores that may include refrigeration. ...

  8. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mexico" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail Sales (megawatthours)",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,," "," "," "

  9. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Alaska" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  10. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Arizona" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  11. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    California" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  12. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Colorado" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  13. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Connecticut" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  14. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Delaware" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  15. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    District of Columbia" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  16. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  17. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  18. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hawaii" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  19. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Idaho" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  20. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Illinois" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  1. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Indiana" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  2. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Iowa" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  3. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kansas" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  4. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Kentucky" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  5. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Louisiana" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  6. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maine" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  7. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Maryland" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  8. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Massachusetts" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  9. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Michigan" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  10. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Minnesota" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  11. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  12. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Missouri" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  13. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Montana" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  14. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nebraska" "Sector",, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  15. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Nevada" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  16. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Hampshire" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  17. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Jersey" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  18. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    York" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  19. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  20. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  1. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Ohio" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  2. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oklahoma" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  3. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Oregon" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  4. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Pennsylvania" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  5. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  6. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  7. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Dakota" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  8. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Tennessee" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  9. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  10. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Utah" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  11. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Vermont" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  12. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Virginia" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  13. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Washington" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  14. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    West Virginia" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  15. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  16. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wyoming" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  17. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector, 1990 through 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    United States" "Sector", 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, 2005, 2004, 2003, 2002, 2001, 2000, 1999, 1998, 1997, 1996, 1995, 1994, 1993, 1992, 1991, 1990,"Percent share 2000","Percent share 2010","Percent share 2013" "Retail sales (megawatthours)"

  18. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Retail Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guopeng; Liu, Bing; Zhang, Jian; Wang, Weimin; Athalye, Rahul A.; Moser, Dave; Crowe, Eliot; Bengtson, Nick; Effinger, Mark; Webster, Lia; Hatten, Mike

    2011-09-19

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Retail Buildings is a component of the Department of Energys Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.

  19. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Florida" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",5,33,"NA",16,1,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",7473876,1396974,"NA",1079234,1,"NA","NA",9950085

  20. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Georgia" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",1,53,"NA",42,1,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",2387727,338375,"NA",1948580,1,"NA","NA",4674683

  1. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mississippi" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",2,23,1,25,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",627484,134811,7,734263,"NA","NA","NA",1496565

  2. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Carolina" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,72,1,31,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",3300103,593690,4,1039246,"NA","NA","NA",4933043

  3. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    North Dakota" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",3,12,1,21,"NA","NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",233453,11071,20,177426,"NA","NA","NA",421970

  4. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Rhode Island" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",2,1,"NA","NA","NA",16,1," " "Number of retail customers",474274,4618,"NA","NA","NA",19537,"NA",498429

  5. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",83,72,"NA",67,13,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",7567394,1818721,"NA",2030847,50,"NA","NA",11417012

  6. Table 9. Retail electricity sales statistics, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Wisconsin" ,"Full service providers",,,,,"Other providers",, "Item","Investor-owned","Public","Federal","Cooperative","Non-utility","Energy","Delivery","Total" "Number of entities",12,82,"NA",24,2,"NA","NA"," " "Number of retail customers",2425518,280677,"NA",259861,2,"NA","NA",2966058

  7. CALiPER Special Summary Report: Retail Replacement Lamp Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-04-01

    CALiPER testing has evaluated many products for commercial lighting markets and found some excellent performers. However, many of these are not available on the retail market. This special testing was undertaken to identify and test solid-state lighting (SSL) replacement lamp products that are available to the general public through retail stores and websites.

  8. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-05-11

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when commercial PV systems represent a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  9. The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-06-24

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  10. The great ``retail wheeling`` illusion, and more productive energy futures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavanagh, R.

    1994-12-31

    This paper sets out the reasons why many environmental and public interest organizations oppose retail wheeling. Cavanagh argues that retail wheeling would destroy incentives for energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy generation--benefits that reduce long-term energy service costs to society as a whole. The current debate over the competitive restructuring of the electric power industry is critical from both economic and environmental perspectives. All attempts to introduce broad-scale retail wheeling in the United States have failed; instead, state regulators are choosing a path that emphasizes competition and choice, but acknowledges fundamental differences between wholesale and retail markets. Given the physical laws governing the movement of power over centrally controlled grids, the choice offered to customers through retail wheeling of electricity is a fiction -- a re-allocation of costs is all that is really possible. Everyone wants to be able to claim the cheapest electricity on the system; unfortunately, there is not enough to go around. By endorsing the fiction of retail wheeling for certain types of customers, regulators would be recasting the retail electricity business as a kind of commodity exchange. That would reward suppliers who could minimize near-term unit costs of electricity while simultaneously destroying incentives for many investments, including cost-effective energy efficiency improvements and renewable energy generation, that reduce long-term energy service costs to society as a whole. This result, which has been analogized unpersuasively to trends in telecommunications and natural gas regulation, is neither desirable nor inevitable. States should go on saying no to retail wheeling in order to be able to create something better: regulatory reforms that align utility and societal interests in pursuing a least-cost energy future. An appendix contains notes on some recent Retail Wheeling Campaigns.

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 2010 Top Supermarkets, by Sales 2010 All Commodity Supermarket Wal-Mart Stores 3,001 Kroger Co. 2,460 Safeway, Inc. 1,461 Supervalu, Inc. 1,504 Ahold USA, Inc. (Stop and Shop, Giant) 746 Publix Super Markets, Inc. 1,035 Delhaize America, Inc. (Food Lion) 1,641 H.E. Butt Grocery Co. (HEB) 291 Meijer Inc. 195 Great Atlantic & Pacific Tea Co. (Pathmark) 373 Note(s): Source(s): All commodity volume in this example represents the "annualized range of the estimated retail sales volume of

  12. NextEra Retail of Texas LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56620 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC ERCOT Yes ISO Ercot Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes This...

  13. Duke Energy Retail Sales, LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a1 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 56502 Utility Location Yes Ownership R Activity Retail Marketing Yes This article is a stub. You can...

  14. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Maryland) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Maryland) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Maryland References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form...

  15. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Massachusetts) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Massachusetts Phone Number: 212-997-8500 Website: www.hess.com Twitter: @HessCorporation Facebook: https:www.facebook.com...

  16. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (Rhode Island) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rhode Island) Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: Rhode Island References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101...

  17. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (New Hampshire) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: New Hampshire Phone Number: 1-800-437-7645 Website: www.hess.com Twitter: @HessCorporation Facebook: https:www.facebook.com...

  18. Net-Zero Energy Retail Store Debuts in Illinois

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Walgreens on November 21 opened a net-zero energy retail store in Evanston, Illinois that it anticipates will generate at least as much energy as it consumes over the course of a year.

  19. DOE Publishes New CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a special report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. While previous reports in...

  20. Mercantile (Retail Other Than Mall) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Other Than Mall) Definition Buildings used for the sale and display of goods other than food. Sub Categories retail store; beer, wine, or liquor store; rental center; dealership or...

  1. Retail Buildings: Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Retail Buildings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-04-01

    Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in retail spaces are poorly understood.

  2. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Business Case for E85 Fuel Retailers on Digg Find

  3. Energy options: Cogen V and retail wheeling alternatives technical conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    The Energy Options technical conference proceedings contains 265 papers, of which 17 were selected for the database. The conference was split into two primary topics: cogeneration and retail wheeling. Subtopics under cogeneration included: the state of cogeneration in the United States, case studies in facility ownership, fuels considerations for tomorrow, and plant design considerations for cogeneration systems. Retail wheeling alternatives subtopics included U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission rulings, end-user options for retail wheeling, deregulation issues, and forecasting of electricity generating costs. Papers not selected for the database, while clearly pertinent topics of interest, consisted of viewgraphs which were judged not to have sufficient technical information and coherence without the corresponding presentation. However, some papers which did consist of viewgraphs were included.

  4. Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A ...

  5. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Contractor/Retailer Business Models

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Business models information focused on remodelers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) contractors, home performance contractors, or retailers.

  6. Mountain Retail Stores Become Showcase for Solar Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mountain Retail Stores Become Showcase for Solar Energy Local Officials, Business Leaders to Gather for Groundbreaking Ceremony For more information contact: e:mail: Public Affairs Golden, Colo., June 7, 1999 — A retail development owner who wants to set an example is helping make possible a new showcase for energy efficient buildings in the Colorado high country. Ground will be broken June 9 on the BigHorn Home Improvement Center in Silverthorne, which will boast a series of "firsts"

  7. CALiPER Exploratory Study Retail Replacement Lamps – 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-04-02

    In 2010, CALiPER conducted a study on LED replacement lamps found in retail stores. The results were less than satisfactory, and many products were classified as being unlikely to meet consumer expectations. In November 2011, CALiPER purchased a new sample of products for a follow-up study, with the intent of characterizing the progress of this essential market segment.

  8. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on retail electricity rates and utility financial viability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodmer, E.; Fisher, R.E.; Hemphill, R.C.

    1995-03-01

    Changes in power contract terms for customers of Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office affect electricity rates for consumers of electric power in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. The impacts of electricity rate changes on consumers are studied by measuring impacts on the rates charged by individual utility systems, determining the average rates in regional areas, and conducting a detailed rate analysis of representative utility systems. The primary focus is an evaluation of the way retail electricity rates for Western`s preference customers vary with alternative pricing and power quantity commitment terms under Western`s long-term contracts to sell power (marketing programs). Retail rate impacts are emphasized because changes in the price of electricity are the most direct economic effect on businesses and residences arising from different Western contractual and operational policies. Retail rates are the mechanism by which changes in cost associated with Western`s contract terms are imposed on ultimate consumers, and rate changes determine the dollar level of payments for electric power incurred by the affected consumers. 41 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. DOE Publishes Long-Term Testing Investigation of Retail Lamps | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Long-Term Testing Investigation of Retail Lamps DOE Publishes Long-Term Testing Investigation of Retail Lamps February 13, 2015 - 2:58pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released another special report on LED lamps that are available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3.2 focuses on lumen depreciation and color shift in a subset of 15 LED A lamps from CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3. The lamps

  10. Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 – Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008

  11. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS FOR ELECTRIC ENERGY Pursuant to Section 1815 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 The Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force The Electric Energy Market Competition Task Force Members: J. Bruce McDonald, Department of Justice Michael Bardee, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission John H. Seesel, Federal Trade Commission David Meyer, Department of Energy Karen Larsen, Department of Agriculture Report Contributors: Robin Allen -

  12. FGD markets & business in an age of retail wheeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, J.C.; Dalton, S.M.

    1995-06-01

    This paper discusses (1) the market and technology outlook for flue gas desulfurization ({open_quotes}FGD{close_quotes}) systems, with particular emphasis on wet systems in North America and the implications of retail wheeling of electricity and emission allowances for the utility industry, and (2) implications for the utility industry of architect/engineering ({open_quotes}A/E{close_quotes}) firm tendencies to reduce greatly the FGD vendor`s scope of award. The paper concludes that (1) the FGD market will be modest domestically and robust offshore over the forecast period (5-10 years), although the utility industry`s response to federal and state air toxics rules and retail wheeling may eventually grow the FGD market domestically beyond that created by compliance with Phase II of the Clean Air Act`s Title IV acid rain program alone, (2) new designs are likely to follow trends established in the past few years, but will likely include advanced processes that use higher velocity and smaller space, and possibly multi-pollutant control to remain competitive, and (3) shrinking of the FGD vendor`s scope may have adverse implications for the utility end-user, while retail wheeling may increase third-party ownership of FGD technology

  13. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers This presentation provides helpful background information on the new legislation and the types of energy-efficient lighting available today. PDF icon Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers More Documents & Publications Interior Lighting Efficiency for Municipalities Lighting Tip

  14. Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov 1 Consumer Light Bulb Changes: Briefing and Resources for Media and Retailers Briefing for Media and Retailers - Lighting eere.energy.gov 2 * Briefing: - To schedule interviews, please contact DOE Public Affairs at 202-586-4940 * Terms: - Lumens: Commonly a measure of brightness (technically "luminous flux") - CFL: Compact Fluorescent Lamp: The curly fluorescent bulbs - LED: Light Emitting Diode: more recently emerging

  15. DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The report follows similar reports published in 2011 and 2012. LED replacement lamps are available through many retail outlets, and CALiPER testing offers insights on performance ...

  16. DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps DOE Publishes Special CALiPER Report on Retail Lamps March 4, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy's CALiPER program has released a special report on LED lamps available through the retail marketplace and targeted toward general consumers. The report follows similar reports published in 2011 and 2012. LED replacement lamps are available through many retail outlets, and CALiPER testing offers insights on performance trends from year

  17. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in ... Especially given the rapid development cycle for LED products, specifiers and purchasers ...

  18. Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Characteristics of LED A Lamps | Department of Energy Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps PDF icon caliper_retail-study_3-1.pdf More Documents & Publications Report 22.1: Photoelectric Performance of LED MR16 Lamps Report 20.3: Stress Testing of LED PAR38 Lamps DOE Booth Presentations from LIGHTFAIR International 2015

  19. Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Operated in Steady-State Conditions | Department of Energy Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions PDF icon Retail Lamps Study 3.2: Lumen and Chromaticity Maintenance of LED A Lamps Operated in Steady-State Conditions (42 pages, December 2014) More Documents & Publications Report 20.4: Lumen and Chromaticity

  20. Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Largest Decline since 2008 | Department of Energy 8 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 Fact #858 February 2, 2015 Retail Gasoline Prices in 2014 Experienced the Largest Decline since 2008 In the second half of 2014, the national average retail price per gallon of gasoline (all grades) fell from a high of $3.77 in June to a low of $2.63 in December - a difference of $1.14 per gallon. This is the largest price drop since the recession of

  1. TEC Working Group Member Organizations Representatives | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Member Organizations Representatives TEC Working Group Member Organizations Representatives PDF icon TEC MEMBER ORGANIZATION REPRESENTATIVES TOPIC GROUP PARTICIPATION February 2006...

  2. Authorizing Official Designated Representative (AODR) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Designated Representative (AODR) Authorizing Official Designated Representative (AODR) student-849822960720.jpg The Authorizing Official Designated Representative (AODR) provides...

  3. Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. (New York) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hess Retail Natural Gas and Elec. Acctg. Place: New York References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File220101 EIA Form 861 Data Utility Id 22509 This article is a...

  4. Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps Caliper Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps PDF icon caliperretail-study...

  5. DOE Awards $15 Million in Technical Assistance to Support Major Retailers,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Financial Institutions and Real Estate Firms to Adopt Energy-Efficient Technologies | Department of Energy 5 Million in Technical Assistance to Support Major Retailers, Financial Institutions and Real Estate Firms to Adopt Energy-Efficient Technologies DOE Awards $15 Million in Technical Assistance to Support Major Retailers, Financial Institutions and Real Estate Firms to Adopt Energy-Efficient Technologies September 26, 2008 - 3:43pm Addthis Awards Encourage Adoption of Energy-Saving

  6. Table 3. Top five retailers of electricity, with end use sectors, 2013

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Texas" "megawatthours" ,"Entity","Type of provider","All sectors","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation" 1,"Reliant Energy Retail Services","Investor-owned",39511303,17784060,3813963,17913280,0 2,"TXU Energy Retail Co LP","Investor-owned",37916867,22545174,5383121,9988572,0 3,"City of San Antonio -

  7. The Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview of Policy,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Practice and Issues | Department of Energy Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview of Policy, Practice and Issues The Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview of Policy, Practice and Issues In this report, the authors studied different facets of crediting mechanisms, and defined five different theoretical models describing different ways competitive suppliers and utilities provide net metering options for their customers. They then provided case studies

  8. Impact of residential PV adoption on Retail Electricity Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, DWH; Adlakha, S; Low, SH; De Martini, P; Chandy, KM

    2013-11-01

    The price of electricity supplied from home rooftop photo voltaic (PV) solar cells has fallen below the retail price of grid electricity in some areas. A number of residential households have an economic incentive to install rooftop PV systems and reduce their purchases of electricity from the grid. A significant portion of the costs incurred by utility companies are fixed costs which must be recovered even as consumption falls. Electricity rates must increase in order for utility companies to recover fixed costs from shrinking sales bases. Increasing rates will, in turn, result in even more economic incentives for customers to adopt rooftop PV. In this paper, we model this feedback between PV adoption and electricity rates and study its impact on future PV penetration and net-metering costs. We find that the most important parameter that determines whether this feedback has an effect is the fraction of customers who adopt PV in any year based solely on the money saved by doing so in that year, independent of the uncertainties of future years. These uncertainties include possible changes in rate structures such as the introduction of connection charges, the possibility of PV prices dropping significantly in the future, possible changes in tax incentives, and confidence in the reliability and maintainability of PV. (C) 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Energy and IAQ Implications of Alternative Minimum Ventilation Rates in California Retail and School Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Fisk, William J.

    2015-01-01

    For a stand-alone retail building, a primary school, and a secondary school in each of the 16 California climate zones, the EnergyPlus building energy simulation model was used to estimate how minimum mechanical ventilation rates (VRs) affect energy use and indoor air concentrations of an indoor-generated contaminant. The modeling indicates large changes in heating energy use, but only moderate changes in total building energy use, as minimum VRs in the retail building are changed. For example, predicted state-wide heating energy consumption in the retail building decreases by more than 50% and total building energy consumption decreases by approximately 10% as the minimum VR decreases from the Title 24 requirement to no mechanical ventilation. The primary and secondary schools have notably higher internal heat gains than in the retail building models, resulting in significantly reduced demand for heating. The school heating energy use was correspondingly less sensitive to changes in the minimum VR. The modeling indicates that minimum VRs influence HVAC energy and total energy use in schools by only a few percent. For both the retail building and the school buildings, minimum VRs substantially affected the predicted annual-average indoor concentrations of an indoor generated contaminant, with larger effects in schools. The shape of the curves relating contaminant concentrations with VRs illustrate the importance of avoiding particularly low VRs.

  10. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To achieve a sizable and self-sustaining market for grid-connected, customer-sited photovoltaic (PV) systems, solar will likely need to be competitive with retail electricity rates. In this report, we examine the impact of retail rate design on the economic value of commercial PV systems in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial customer retail rates currently offered in the state. We find that the specifics of the rate structure, combined with the characteristics of the customer’s underlying load and the size of the PV system, can have a substantial impact on the customer-economics of commercial PV systems.

  11. The political economy of retail wheeling, or how to not re-fight the last war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, A.; Kihm, S.

    1994-04-01

    Disparities in utility rates - observably the result of poor supply-side resource planning - have been small before and will be small once again. Retail wheeling`s promise of short-run gains for a few would, ironically, destroy integrated resource processes in place today that guard against a repeat of yesterday`s planning mistakes. The authors argue that retail wheeling is a troubling answer to a mis-diagnosis of yesterday`s problem. They believe that a variety of other policies offer most of the benefits and few of the risks that retail wheeling poses. These include aggressive wholesale competition, judicious pruning of uneconomic capacity, and serious incorporation of environmental risks into utility planning and regulation.

  12. CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-12-31

    This CALiPER report examines the characteristics of a subset of lamps from CALiPER Retail Lamps Study 3 in more detail. Specifically, it focuses on the dimming, power quality, and flicker characteristics of 14 LED A lamps, as controlled by four different retail-available dimmers.

  13. The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose slightly to $3.90 a gallon on Monday. That's up 8-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Diesel prices were highest in the New England region, at 4.16 a gallon, down a penny from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Rocky Mountain States at $3.68 a gallon, down 1.7

  14. The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose this week The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to $3.93 a gallon on Monday. That's up 2 ½ cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Prices increased in all regions across the U.S. The highest prices were found in the New England region, at 4.18 a gallon, up 2.3 cents from a week ago. Prices were lowest in the Rocky Mountain States at $3.74 a gallon,

  15. Commercial Building Partnership Retail Food Sales Energy Savings Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-01

    The Commercial Building Partnership (CBP) paired selected commercial building owners and operators with representatives of DOE, national laboratories and private sector exports to explore energy efficiency measures across general merchandise commercial buildings.

  16. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Business Models Guide: Contractor/Retailer Description

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The home improvement market includes a range of private-sector entities that currently provide or could offer home energy upgrade services. Most of these entities are remodelers, HVAC (heating, ventilation, and air conditioning) contractors, home performance contractors, or retailers; other actors are present in the sector (such as window installers and insulators), but this analysis focuses on these four main categories.

  17. Property Representatives Lists - HQ | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Property Representatives Lists - HQ Property Representatives Lists - HQ These are the current lists of Headquarters Property Representatives. If you have any questions please contact: Ellen Hall, Office of Logistics Operations, (301) 903-2613. PDF icon Authorized Property Pass Signers List and Accountable Property Representatives List, Effective December 2, 2015 More Documents & Publications Directory Listings AU Functional Area Points of Contact by Office Directors Customer Services

  18. Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity for Light-Duty Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Sun, Y.; Bush, B.

    2014-08-01

    Both hydrogen and plug-in electric vehicles offer significant social benefits to enhance energy security and reduce criteria and greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. However, the rollout of electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) and hydrogen retail stations (HRS) requires substantial investments with high risks due to many uncertainties. We compare retail infrastructure costs on a common basis - cost per mile, assuming fueling service to 10% of all light-duty vehicles in a typical 1.5 million person city in 2025. Our analysis considers three HRS sizes, four distinct types of EVSE and two distinct EVSE scenarios. EVSE station costs, including equipment and installation, are assumed to be 15% less than today's costs. We find that levelized retail capital costs per mile are essentially indistinguishable given the uncertainty and variability around input assumptions. Total fuel costs per mile for battery electric vehicle (BEV) and plug-in hybrid vehicle (PHEV) are, respectively, 21% lower and 13% lower than that for hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV) under the home-dominant scenario. Including fuel economies and vehicle costs makes FCEVs and BEVs comparable in terms of costs per mile, and PHEVs are about 10% less than FCEVs and BEVs. To account for geographic variability in energy prices and hydrogen delivery costs, we use the Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) model and confirm the aforementioned estimate of cost per mile, nationally averaged, but see a 15% variability in regional costs of FCEVs and a 5% variability in regional costs for BEVs.

  19. Facility Representative Program Outstanding at ID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 19, 2007 Facility Representative Program Outstanding at ID Idaho's three DOE Complex-wide Facility Representative of the Year (FROTY) recipients at this year's conference pose for a photo shoot with Elvis. L to R: Dary Newbry 2005 FROTY, Bob Seal 2006 FROTY, Bob Knighten 2004 FROTY Facility representatives (FRs) are the eyes and ears of the federal government at the Idaho National Laboratory. They oversee the people, processes, facilities and systems that ensure safety at INL facilities.

  20. DOE RL Contracting Officer Representatives - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Officer Representatives DOE-RL Contracts/Procurements RL Contracts & Procurements Home Prime Contracts Current Solicitations Other Sources DOE RL Contracting Officers DOE RL Contracting Officer Representatives DOE RL Contracting Officer Representatives Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size CO/COR Contract Number Company Acronym Limitations CAROSINO, ROBERT M DE-AC06-08RL14788 CPRC DE-AC06-08RL14788, CH2M HILL PLATEAU REMEDIATION COMPANY (CHPRC),

  1. Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on Previous

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Experience | Department of Energy Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on Previous Experience Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on Previous Experience The referenced document has been used by the Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) to grant equivalencies to candidates undergoing qualification as a Facility Representative (FR) using the FR Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS). Since the generation of the referenced

  2. Facility Representative of the Year Award

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Facility Representative Award Program is a special award designed to recognize superior or exemplary service by a Facility Representative over a period of one year. This special award program has been established in accordance with the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 331.1C, Employee Performance Management and Recognition Program.

  3. Facility Representative Program, Criteria & Review Approach Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADS) to assist Facility Representatives. Please submit your CRADS for posting by sending them to the HQ FR Program Manager. Please include the subject, date, and a contact person.

  4. Advisory Board Seats New Student Representatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board (ORSSAB) welcomed two new student representatives at its May meeting. Gracie Hall and Julia Riley will serve on the board through April 2014.

  5. Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    12/17/1998 | Department of Energy Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, 12/17/1998 Incentives for the Department's Facility Representative Program, 12/17/1998 The Department's Revised Implementation Plan for Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-3 has once again underscored the Department's commitment to maintaining the technical capability necessary to safely manage and operate our defense nuclear facilities. Attracting and retaining highly

  6. To Own or Lease Solar: Understanding Commercial Retailers' Decisions to Use Alternative Financing Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, D.; Margolis, R.

    2014-12-01

    This report examines the tradeoffs among financing methods for businesses installing onsite photovoltaics (PV). We present case studies of PV financing strategies used by two large commercial retailers that have deployed substantial U.S. PV capacity: IKEA, which owns its PV, and Staples, which purchases power generated from onsite PV systems through power purchase agreements (PPAs). We also analyze the financial considerations that influence any company's choice of PV financing strategy. Our goal in this report is to clarify the financial and institutional costs and benefits of financing strategies and to inform other companies that are considering launching or expanding similar PV programs.

  7. Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Retail Buildings (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in retail spaces are poorly understood.

  8. Business Case for Installing E85 at Retail Stations, Clean Cities Fact Sheet

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    January 2008 Fact Sheet In a business environment where there are up to four gas stations on every major intersection, it's hard for retailers to differentiate themselves from their competitors. One way station owners can distinguish themselves and make a profit is to add alternative fuels, such as E85 (85% ethanol, 15% gasoline), to their product mix. When pricing and availability of the fuel are positive, adding E85 can be a profitable move that can position a station as "green."

  9. E85 Retail Business Case: When and Why to Sell E85

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    E85 Retail Business Case: When and Why to Sell E85 C. Johnson and M. Melendez Technical Report NREL/TP-540-41590 December 2007 NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337

  10. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Retail Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Climate Zone Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 108.9 0.1 9.4 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate

  11. Energy Implications of Retrofitting Retail Sector Rooftop Units with Stepped-Speed and Variable-Speed Functionality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Studer, D.; Romero, R.; Herrmann, L.; Benne, K.

    2012-04-01

    Commercial retailers understand that retrofitting constant-speed RTU fan motors with stepped- or variable-speed alternatives could save significant energy in most U.S. climate zones. However, they lack supporting data, both real-world and simulation based, on the cost effectiveness and climate zone-specific energy savings associated with this measure. Thus, building managers and engineers have been unable to present a compelling business case for fan motor upgrades to upper management. This study uses whole-building energy simulation to estimate the energy impact of this type of measure so retailers can determine its economic feasibility.

  12. CNG in OKC: Improving Efficiency at the Pump and on the Road...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... the city of Dallas has improved the efficiency of more than 200 city-owned buildings, saving 1 million a year in energy costs. | Photo courtesy of the City of Dallas. ...

  13. Top 3 Driving Tools That Will Help Save You Money at the Pump...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -- fuel costs can still add up quickly. If you're one of the millions traveling by car over the holiday weekend, check out three tools that will help you save money on your...

  14. S. 3047: A Bill to amend the antitrust laws in order to preserve and promote wholesale and retail competition in the retail gasoline market. Introduced in the Senate of the United States, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, September 13, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This bill would amend the antitrust laws in order to preserve and promote wholesale and retail competition in the retail gasoline market. The bill defines limits on the purchases required of a retailer from the producer or refiner and defines the exceptions under which any large integrated refiner can operate any motor fuel service station in the US. The Federal Trade Commission is charged with the enforcement.

  15. The New Hampshire retail competition pilot program and the role of green marketing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holt, E.A.; Fang, J.M.

    1997-11-01

    Most states in the US are involved in electric industry restructuring, from considering the pros and cons in regulatory dockets to implementing legislative mandates for full restructuring and retail access for all consumers. Several states and utilities have initiated pilot programs in which multiple suppliers or service providers may compete for business and some utility customers can choose among competing suppliers. The State of New Hampshire has been experimenting with a pilot program, mandated by the State Legislature in 1995 and implemented by the New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission (NHPUC), before it implements full retail access. Green marketing, an attempt to characterize the supplier or service provider as environmentally friendly without referring to the energy resource used to generate electricity, was used by several suppliers or service providers to attract customers. This appeal to environmental consumerism was moderately successful, but it raised a number of consumer protection and public policy issues. This issue brief examines the marketing methods used in New Hampshire and explores what green marketing might mean for the development of renewable energy generation. It also addresses the issues raised and their implications.

  16. Data structures and apparatuses for representing knowledge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hohimer, Ryan E; Thomson, Judi R; Harvey, William J; Paulson, Patrick R; Whiting, Mark A; Tratz, Stephen C; Chappell, Alan R; Butner, Robert S

    2014-02-18

    Data structures and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

  17. Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE-STD-1151-2010 October 2010 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1151-2010 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Office of Health, Safety and Security Approved DOE Technical Standards Web Site at

  18. house of representatives | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    house of representatives | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working

  19. Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharpe, Saxon E

    2007-10-23

    The primary objective of Project Activity ORD-FY04-012, Yucca Mountain Climate Technical Support Representative, was to provide the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) with expertise on past, present, and future climate scenarios and to support the technical elements of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) climate program. The Climate Technical Support Representative was to explain, defend, and interpret the YMP climate program to the various audiences during Site Recommendation and License Application. This technical support representative was to support DOE management in the preparation and review of documents, and to participate in comment response for the Final Environmental Impact Statement, the Site Recommendation Hearings, the NRC Sufficiency Comments, and other forums as designated by DOE management. Because the activity was terminated 12 months early and experience a 27% reduction in budget, it was not possible to complete all components of the tasks as originally envisioned. Activities not completed include the qualification of climate datasets and the production of a qualified technical report. The following final report is an unqualified summary of the activities that were completed given the reduced time and funding.

  20. PWR representative behavior during a LOCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, C.M.

    1981-01-01

    To date, there has been substantial analytical and experimental effort to define the margins between design basis loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) behavior and regulatory limits on maximum fuel rod cladding temperature and deformation. As a result, there is extensive documentation on the modeling of fuel rod behavior in test reactors and design basis LOCA's. However, modeling of that behavior using representative, non-conservative, operating histories is not nearly as well documented in the public literature. Therefore, the objective of this paper is (a) to present calculations of LOCA induced behavior for Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) core representative fuel rods, and (b) to discuss the variability in those calculations given the variability in fuel rod condition at the initiation of the LOCA. This analysis was limited to the study of changes in fuel rod behavior due to different power operating histories. The other two important parameters which affect that behavior, initial fuel rod design and LOCA coolant conditions were held invarient for all of the representative rods analyzed.

  1. Retail Lamps Study 3.1: Dimming, Flicker, and Power Quality Characteristics of LED A Lamps.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Royer, Michael P.; Poplawski, Michael E.; Brown, Charles C.

    2014-12-14

    To date, all three reports in the retail lamps series have focused on basic performance parameters, such as lumen output, efficacy, and color quality. This report goes a step further, examining the photoelectric characteristics (i.e., dimming and flicker) of a subset of lamps from CALiPER Retails Lamps Study 3. Specifically, this report focuses on the dimming, power quality, and flicker characteristics of 14 LED A lamps, as controlled by four different retail-available dimmers. The results demonstrate notable variation across the various lamps, but little variation between the four dimmers. Overall, the LED lamps: ~tended to have higher relative light output compared to the incandescent and halogen benchmark at the same dimmer output signal (RMS voltage). The lamps’ dimming curves (i.e., the relationship between control signal and relative light output) ranged from linear to very similar to the square-law curve typical of an incandescent lamp. ~generally exhibited symmetrical behavior—the same dimming curve—when measured proceeding from maximum to minimum or minimum to maximum control signal. ~mostly dimmed below 10% of full light output, with some exceptions for specific lamp and dimmer combinations ~exhibited a range of flicker characteristics, with many comparing favorably to the level typical of a magnetically-ballasted fluorescent lamp through at least a majority of the dimming range. ~ always exceeded the relative (normalized) efficacy over the dimming range of the benchmark lamps, which rapidly decline in efficacy when they are dimmed. This report generally does not attempt to rank the performance of one product compared to another, but instead focuses on the collective performance of the group versus conventional incandescent or halogen lamps, the performance of which is likely to be the baseline for a majority of consumers. Undoubtedly, some LED lamps perform better—or more similar to conventional lamps—than others. Some perform desirably for one characteristic, but not others. Consumers (and specifiers) may have a hard time distinguishing better-performing lamps from one another; at this time, physical experimentation is likely the best evaluation tool.

  2. Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The petroleum-based transportation fuel system is complex and highly developed, in contrast to the nascent low-petroleum, low-carbon alternative fuel system. This report examines how expansion of the low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure could contribute to deep reductions in petroleum use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions across the U.S. transportation sector. Three low-carbon scenarios, each using a different combination of low-carbon fuels, were developed to explore infrastructure expansion trends consistent with a study goal of reducing transportation sector GHG emissions to 80% less than 2005 levels by 2050.These scenarios were compared to a business-as-usual (BAU) scenario and were evaluated with respect to four criteria: fuel cost estimates, resource availability, fuel production capacity expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion.

  3. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    4 Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Retail Buildings (1) Shell Percent Glass 0.4 Window (U-Factor 0.38-0.69 SHGC 0.40-0.44 Wall R-Value (2) 7.6-15.2 c.i. Roof R-Value Attic 30-60 Insulation Above Deck 15-25 c.i. Lighting Average Power Density (W/ft.^2) 1.3 System and Plant Heating Plant Gas Furnace(>225 kBtuh) 80% Combustion Efficiency Cooling Plant Air conditioner (>135-240 kBtuh) 10.8 EER/11.2 IPLV - 11.0 EER/11.5 IPLV Service Hot Water Gas Storage Water Heater (>75kBtuh) 90%

  4. Microsoft Word - SEC J_Appendix S- Contracting Officer's Representative_s_

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    J, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX S CONTRACTING OFFICER REPRESENTATIVES The following individuals are designated as CORs for the Kansas City Plant Contract. Each is limited to the specific areas listed by his/her name. Contracting Officer Representatives Name Location Limited Area of Responsibility Shoulta, Jeffrey L. KCSO Production & Quality Management Hoopes, Patrick T. KCSO Environment, Safety and Health; Facilities Management; Security and Information Systems Schmidt, Robert E. KCSO Project

  5. Net Metering and Market Feedback Loops: Exploring the Impact of Retail Rate Design on Distributed PV Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darghouth, Nam R.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Mills, Andrew

    2015-01-13

    The substantial increase in deployment of customer-sited solar photovoltaics (PV) in the United States has been driven by a combination of steeply declining costs, financing innovations, and supportive policies. Among those supportive policies is net metering, which in most states effectively allows customers to receive compensation for distributed PV generation at the full retail electricity price. The current design of retail electricity rates and the presence of net metering have elicited concerns that the possible under-recovery of fixed utility costs from PV system owners may lead to a feedback loop of increasing retail prices that accelerate PV adoption and further rate increases. However, a separate and opposing feedback loop could offset this effect: increased PV deployment may lead to a shift in the timing of peak-period electricity prices that could reduce the bill savings received under net metering where time-varying retail electricity rates are used, thereby dampening further PV adoption. In this paper, we examine the impacts of these two competing feedback dynamics on U.S. distributed PV deployment through 2050 for both residential and commercial customers, across states. Our results indicate that, at the aggregate national level, the two feedback effects nearly offset one another and therefore produce a modest net effect, although their magnitude and direction vary by customer segment and by state. We also model aggregate PV deployment trends under various rate designs and net-metering rules, accounting for feedback dynamics. Our results demonstrate that future adoption of distributed PV is highly sensitive to retail rate structures. Whereas flat, time-invariant rates with net metering lead to higher aggregate national deployment levels than the current mix of rate structures (+5% in 2050), rate structures with higher monthly fixed customer charges or PV compensation at levels lower than the full retail rate can dramatically erode aggregate customer adoption of PV (from -14% to -61%, depending on the design). Moving towards time-varying rates, on the other hand, may accelerate near- and medium-term deployment (through 2030), but is found to slow adoption in the longer term (-22% in 2050).

  6. Should utility incumbents be able to extend their brand name to competitive retail markets? An economic perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abel, J.R.; Clements, M.E.

    1998-06-01

    As retail competition begins, at least for the short run, there should be policy restrictions on an incumbent utility`s ability to extend its brand to an affiliated marketer. However, a utility-affiliated marketer should be permitted to compete in a newly deregulated market using a generic or self-developed brand name. If extending a brand name from an incumbent utility to an affiliated marketer does in fact create real barriers to entry in the retail market, competition will be crippled in this market and consumers will suffer. More important, deregulation will appear to have failed in the electric power market--a consequence with effects reaching past the electricity industry to other industries considering deregulation as a viable policy choice. However, if real barriers to entry are not erected by this type of brand name extension, the industry may suffer from lower quality products, less service, and reduced innovation if policymakers prohibit brand name extension.

  7. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings - 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.

    2013-06-01

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-MBBR) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-MBBR is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in retail stores over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-MBBR was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  8. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings - 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonnema, Eric; Leach, Matt; Pless, Shanti

    2013-06-05

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-MBBR) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-MBBR is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in retail stores over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-MBBR was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  9. 1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees 1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees 1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees PDF icon 1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees More Documents & Publications 1999 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees FTCP Members DOE ISM Champions - 2012

  10. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Preprint

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles Preprint M. Melaina National Renewable Energy Laboratory J. Bremson University of California Davis K. Solo Lexidyne, LLC Presented at the 31st USAEE/IAEE North American Conference Austin, Texas November 4-7, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5600-56898 January 2013 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a

  11. Representativeness-based Sampling Network Design for the State...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Representativeness-based Sampling Network Design for the State of Alaska Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Representativeness-based Sampling Network Design for the State...

  12. Representativeness based Sampling Network Design for the State...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Representativeness based Sampling Network Design for the State of Alaska Title: Representativeness-based Sampling Network Design for the State of Alaska Authors: Forrest M. Hoffman...

  13. Representativeness-Based Sampling Network Design for the State...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Representativeness-Based Sampling Network Design for the State of Alaska Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Representativeness-Based Sampling Network...

  14. 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report...

  15. 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report...

  16. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 2010 Top Retail Companies, by Sales # Stores % Change over Chain ($billion) 2009 Revenues 2010 2009 Stores Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. 419.0 3.4% 8,970 6.0% The Kroger Co. 82.2 7.1% 3,605 -0.4% Costco 76.3 9.1% 572 1.1% The Home Depot 68.0 2.8% 2,248 0.2% Walgreen Co. 67.4 6.4% 8,046 7.3% Target Corp. 67.4 3.1% 1,750 0.6% CVS Caremark 57.3 3.6% 7,182 2.2% Best Buy 50.3 1.2% 4,172 3.7% Lowes Cos. 48.8 3.4% 1,749 2.3% Sears Holdings 43.3 -1.6% 4,038 2.2% Source(s): 2010 Revenues % Change over Chain

  17. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.7 Retail Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Energy Benchmarks for Existing Retail Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Miami 1A 0.5 0.7 23.0 25.2 14.3 16.1 Houston 2A 11.6 12.4 16.2 18.9 14.6 16.9 Phoenix 2B 8.3 10.2 17.2 21.3 14.2 17.5 Atlanta 3A 24.9 26.2 9.2 11.2 15.1 17.4 Los Angeles 3B 6.9 7.7 3.3 3.9 13.4 14.1 Las Vegas 3B 15.4 17.9 11.6 14.8 12.7 16.9 San Francisco 3C 22.4 22.5 0.7 1.0 10.6 12.1 Baltimore 4A 43.0 46.9 6.2 7.9 13.3 16.2 Albuquerque 4B 30.2 33.8 5.3

  18. Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year John Martin DOE-ID Facility Representative John Martin DOE-ID Facility Representative of the Year. John Martin was selected as DOE-ID's Facility Representative of the Year and the office's nominee for the 2007 DOE Facility Representative of the Year Award. John was selected from an exceptional field of candidates to represent DOE-ID at the Facility Representative Annual Workshop in Las Vegas this May. Each year the Department of Energy

  19. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Preprint

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles Preprint M. Melaina National Renewable Energy Laboratory J. Bremson University of California Davis K. Solo Lexidyne, LLC Presented at the 31st USAEE/IAEE North American Conference Austin, Texas November 4-7, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5600-56898

  20. FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM STATUS, 6/21/1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Since September, 1993, the Office of Field Management has served as the Department’s corporate advocate for the Facility Representative Program. The Facility Representative (FR) is a critical...

  1. 1999 FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE CONFERENCE June 21 – 25, 1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy will host the Facility Representative Annual Meeting on June 21-25, 1999 at the Alexis Park Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. The meeting will give Facility Representatives and...

  2. 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quarterly Report | Department of Energy Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 1Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from January 2000 to March 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, DOE-STD-1

  3. 4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Quarterly Report | Department of Energy 4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report 4Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from October to December 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements quarterly per the Facility Representatives Standard, 063, and reported

  4. FAQS Reference Guide - Facility Representative | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Facility Representative FAQS Reference Guide - Facility Representative This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the October 2010 edition of DOE-STD-1151-2010, Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard. PDF icon Facility Representative Qualification Standard Reference Guide, October 2010 More Documents & Publications DOE-HDBK-1018/2-93 DOE-HDBK-1018/1-93 DOE-STD-1161-2008

  5. Office of Departmental Representative to DNFSB | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Departmental Representative to DNFSB Office of Departmental Representative to DNFSB Mission The Department Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) provides effective cross-organizational leadership in resolving DNFSB-related technical and management issues necessary to ensure public health and safety. Functions Represents the Secretary and the Associate Deputy Secretary in regular and continuing interactions with the DNFSB(and/or also referred to as Board). Advises

  6. Transportation Energy Futures Series: Alternative Fuel Infrastructure Expansion: Costs, Resources, Production Capacity, and Retail Availability for Low-Carbon Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M. W.; Heath, G.; Sandor, D.; Steward, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Warner, E.; Webster, K. W.

    2013-04-01

    Achieving the Department of Energy target of an 80% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions by 2050 depends on transportation-related strategies combining technology innovation, market adoption, and changes in consumer behavior. This study examines expanding low-carbon transportation fuel infrastructure to achieve deep GHG emissions reductions, with an emphasis on fuel production facilities and retail components serving light-duty vehicles. Three distinct low-carbon fuel supply scenarios are examined: Portfolio: Successful deployment of a range of advanced vehicle and fuel technologies; Combustion: Market dominance by hybridized internal combustion engine vehicles fueled by advanced biofuels and natural gas; Electrification: Market dominance by electric drive vehicles in the LDV sector, including battery electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicles, that are fueled by low-carbon electricity and hydrogen. A range of possible low-carbon fuel demand outcomes are explored in terms of the scale and scope of infrastructure expansion requirements and evaluated based on fuel costs, energy resource utilization, fuel production infrastructure expansion, and retail infrastructure expansion for LDVs. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored transportation-related strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence.

  7. Consumer Convenience and the Availability of Retail Stations as a Market Barrier for Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melaina, M.; Bremson, J.; Solo, K.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of retail stations can be a significant barrier to the adoption of alternative fuel light-duty vehicles in household markets. This is especially the case during early market growth when retail stations are likely to be sparse and when vehicles are dedicated in the sense that they can only be fuelled with a new alternative fuel. For some bi-fuel vehicles, which can also fuel with conventional gasoline or diesel, limited availability will not necessarily limit vehicle sales but can limit fuel use. The impact of limited availability on vehicle purchase decisions is largely a function of geographic coverage and consumer perception. In this paper we review previous attempts to quantify the value of availability and present results from two studies that rely upon distinct methodologies. The first study relies upon stated preference data from a discrete choice survey and the second relies upon a station clustering algorithm and a rational actor value of time framework. Results from the two studies provide an estimate of the discrepancy between stated preference cost penalties and a lower bound on potential revealed cost penalties.

  8. CNS represented at inaugural Energetics Consortium | Y-12 National Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex CNS represented at ... CNS represented at inaugural Energetics Consortium Posted: February 16, 2016 - 6:53pm CNS was well represented at the first National Energetic Materials Consortium. About 70 university researchers and government and industry experts from across the country, including Consolidated Nuclear Security employees, joined forces at the first ever National Energetic Materials Consortium hosted by Texas Tech University. Pantex's Christopher Young said, "There are a

  9. The Representative Concentration Pathways: An Overview (Journal Article) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect The Representative Concentration Pathways: An Overview Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Representative Concentration Pathways: An Overview This paper summarizes the development process and main characteristics of the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs), a set of four new scenarios developed for the climate modeling community as a basis for long-term and near-term modeling experiments. The four RCPs together span the range of year 2100 radiative forcing

  10. CRAD, NNSA - Facility Representatives (FR) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facility Representatives (FR) CRAD, NNSA - Facility Representatives (FR) CRAD for Facility Representatives (FR). Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used to conduct a well-organized and thorough assessment of elements of safety and health programs. CRADs consist of a Performance Objective that identifies the expectation(s) or requirement(s) to be verified, which reflect the complete scope of the assessment; Criteria that provide specifics by which the performance

  11. Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (DNFSB) | Department of Energy Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Departmental Representative to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) The Office of the Departmental Representative ensures effective cross-organizational leadership and coordination to resolve DNFSB-identified technical and management issues as we work to ensure the health, safety, and security of the workers, public, and environment. This web site is an important

  12. UESC Training for Utility Representatives | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    UESC Training for Utility Representatives UESC Training for Utility Representatives January 27, 2016 11:00AM to 1:00PM EST Webinar covers utility energy service contracts (UESC), which allow utilities to provide their Federal agencies with comprehensive energy and water efficiency improvements and demand-reduction services. To enter into a UESC, Federal staff, as well as utility representatives, must understand the legal parameters, contracting requirements, financing options, and other aspects

  13. DOE/Advisory Board Recognize Service of Student Representatives |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy DOE/Advisory Board Recognize Service of Student Representatives DOE/Advisory Board Recognize Service of Student Representatives April 16, 2014 - 12:58pm Addthis The Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board (ORSSAB) and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Office recognized outgoing student representatives Gracie Hall and Julia Riley at the April board meeting. ORSSAB is a federally chartered citizens' panel that provides recommendations to the DOE Oak Ridge

  14. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-04-21

    The Order established procedures governing the selection, appointment and termination of Department of Energy contracting officers and contracting officer representatives. Supersedes DOE O 541.1A.

  15. Dr. Kelli Joseph, NYISO Representing the ISO-RTO Council

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Kelli Joseph, NYISO Representing the ISO-RTO Council July 28, 2014 DOE Quadrennial Energy Review Gas Electric Interdependencies: Coordination Efforts, Regional Issues, and...

  16. On April 25, 2013, several representatives of energy efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Representing compressor manufacturers were Jordan Doria, Mark Krisa, Rob Haseley (Ingersoll Rand), Wayne Perry, Werner Rauer, Stephen Horne and Waheed Chaudury (Kaeser), Gary ...

  17. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    7, 2005 (Next Release on August 24, 2005) Pain At The Pump With retail gasoline prices increasing between August 8 and August 15 by the largest amount ever since EIA instituted its...

  18. In Charlotte, Senior DOE Official to Amplify State of the Union, Call to Give Drivers More Options at the Pump

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Dr. David Danielson will join officials from NASCAR and Sprint Corp. in Charlotte, N.C., to highlight the President’s State of the Union address

  19. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium Box Retail -- 50% Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hale, E. T.; Macumber, D. L.; Long, N. L.; Griffith, B. T.; Benne, K. S.; Pless, S. D.; Torcellini, P. A.

    2008-09-01

    This report provides recommendations that architects, designers, contractors, developers, owners, and lessees of medium box retail buildings can use to achieve whole-building energy savings of at least 50% over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004. The recommendations are given by climate zone and address building envelope, fenestration, lighting systems, HVAC systems, building automation and controls, outside air treatment, service water heating, plug loads, and photovoltaic systems. The report presents several paths to 50% savings, which correspond to different levels of integrated design. These are recommendations only, and are not part of a code or standard. The recommendations are not exhaustive, but we do try to emphasize the benefits of integrated building design, that is, a design approach that analyzes a building as a whole system, rather than as a disconnected collection of individually engineered subsystems.

  20. Learning Based Bidding Strategy for HVAC Systems in Double Auction Retail Energy Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yannan; Somani, Abhishek; Carroll, Thomas E.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a bidding strategy is proposed using reinforcement learning for HVAC systems in a double auction market. The bidding strategy does not require a specific model-based representation of behavior, i.e., a functional form to translate indoor house temperatures into bid prices. The results from reinforcement learning based approach are compared with the HVAC bidding approach used in the AEP gridSMART® smart grid demonstration project and it is shown that the model-free (learning based) approach tracks well the results from the model-based behavior. Successful use of model-free approaches to represent device-level economic behavior may help develop similar approaches to represent behavior of more complex devices or groups of diverse devices, such as in a building. Distributed control requires an understanding of decision making processes of intelligent agents so that appropriate mechanisms may be developed to control and coordinate their responses, and model-free approaches to represent behavior will be extremely useful in that quest.

  1. Utility Energy Service Contracts Training for Utility Representatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar targets Federal staff, as well as utility representatives, and provides an understanding of the legal parameters, contracting requirements, financing options, and other aspects of utility energy service contracts (UESC).

  2. Department of Defense Representatives Visit Hanford to Benchmark Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash., December 16, 2005, Representatives of the Department of Defense's (DoD's) Voluntary Protection Program Center of Excellence (VPP CX) working to reduce injuries at selected (DoD)...

  3. Changes to the Facility Representative Program, 10/26/1999

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Effective October 1, 1999, the Deputy Secretary tasked this office to manage the Facility Representative Program. We look forward to working with you in continuing and improving this very important...

  4. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-04-30

    To establish procedures governing the selection, appointment, and termination of contracting officers and for the appointment of contracting officer representatives. Cancels DOE Order 4200.4A. Canceled by DOE O 541.1A.

  5. Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media Radionuclide Interaction and Transport in Representative Geologic Media The report presents information related to the development of a fundamental understanding of disposal-system performance in a range of environments for potential wastes that could arise from future nuclear fuel cycle alternatives. It addresses selected aspects of the development of computational modeling capability for the

  6. FAQS Job Task Analyses - Facility Representative | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Facility Representative FAQS Job Task Analyses - Facility Representative FAQS Job Task Analyses are performed on the Function Area Qualification Standards. The FAQS Job Task Analyses consists of: Developing a comprehensive list of tasks that define the job such as the duties and responsibilities which include determining their levels of importance and frequency. Identifying and evaluating competencies. Last step is evaluating linkage between job tasks and competencies. PDF icon FAQS JTA -

  7. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

    Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

  8. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for Understanding Sampling Network Coverage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddalena, Damian; Hoffman, Forrest; Kumar, Jitendra; Hargrove, William

    2014-08-01

    Sampling networks rarely conform to spatial and temporal ideals, often comprised of network sampling points which are unevenly distributed and located in less than ideal locations due to access constraints, budget limitations, or political conflict. Quantifying the global, regional, and temporal representativeness of these networks by quantifying the coverage of network infrastructure highlights the capabilities and limitations of the data collected, facilitates upscaling and downscaling for modeling purposes, and improves the planning efforts for future infrastructure investment under current conditions and future modeled scenarios. The work presented here utilizes multivariate spatiotemporal clustering analysis and representativeness analysis for quantitative landscape characterization and assessment of the Fluxnet, RAINFOR, and ForestGEO networks. Results include ecoregions that highlight patterns of bioclimatic, topographic, and edaphic variables and quantitative representativeness maps of individual and combined networks.

  9. Advanced Energy Design Guides Slash Energy Use in Schools and Retail Buildings by 50% (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Results Achievement NREL's Commercial Buildings Group executed advanced energy modeling simulations and optimized the design of schools and retail buildings to develop recommendations that result in 50% energy savings over code. NREL developed the simulation tools and led the committee that produced the guides. Key Result The Advanced Energy Design Guides, based on the work of NREL's researchers, provide owners, contractors, engineers, and architects user-friendly, how-to guidance by

  10. WIPP Representative Selected For National Environmental Justice Advisory Board

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    CARLSBAD, N.M. – Organizers say no similar opportunity or conference exists in America. In April, representatives from federal and state agencies, local governments, tribes, communities, business, academia and other groups will gather in Washington, D.C. for the 2012 National Environmental Justice Conference and Training Program.

  11. Appointment of Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer's Representatives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-10-27

    To establish procedures governing the selection, appointment, and termination of contracting officers and for the appointment of contracting officer's representatives. To ensure that only trained and qualified procurement and financial assistance professionals, within the scope of this Order, serve as contracting officers. Cancels DOE O 541.1. Canceled by DOE O 541.1B.

  12. DOE Representative to World Institute of Nuclear Safety (WINS) | National

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Nuclear Security Administration Representative to World Institute of Nuclear Safety (WINS) | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Library Bios Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters

  13. Processes, data structures, and apparatuses for representing knowledge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hohimer, Ryan E. (West Richland, WA); Thomson, Judi R. (Guelph, CA); Harvey, William J. (Richland, WA); Paulson, Patrick R. (Pasco, WA); Whiting, Mark A. (Richland, WA); Tratz, Stephen C. (Richland, WA); Chappell, Alan R. (Seattle, WA); Butner, R. Scott (Richland, WA)

    2011-09-20

    Processes, data structures, and apparatuses to represent knowledge are disclosed. The processes can comprise labeling elements in a knowledge signature according to concepts in an ontology and populating the elements with confidence values. The data structures can comprise knowledge signatures stored on computer-readable media. The knowledge signatures comprise a matrix structure having elements labeled according to concepts in an ontology, wherein the value of the element represents a confidence that the concept is present in an information space. The apparatus can comprise a knowledge representation unit having at least one ontology stored on a computer-readable medium, at least one data-receiving device, and a processor configured to generate knowledge signatures by comparing datasets obtained by the data-receiving devices to the ontologies.

  14. Howard University Researchers Represented in the E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Howard University Researchers Represented in the E-print Network Researcher/Research Institution Web page Eckberg, William R. - Department of Biology, Howard University http://www.biology.howard.edu/ Faculty/FacultyBios/Eckberg.htm Hindman, Neil - Department of Mathematics, Howard University http://mysite.verizon.net/nhindman/ Sitaraman, Sankar - Department of Mathematics, Howard University http://nature-lover.net/math/R/rp.html

  15. Single-point representative sampling with shrouded probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1993-08-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) prescribed methodologies for sampling radionuclides in air effluents from stacks and ducts at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. Requirements include use of EPA Method 1 for the location of sampling sites and use of American National Standards Institute (ANSI) N13.1 for guidance in design of sampling probes and the number of probes at a given site. Application of ANSI N13.1 results in sampling being performed with multiprobe rakes that have as many as 20 probes. There can be substantial losses of aerosol particles in such sampling that will degrade the quality of emission estimates from a nuclear facility. Three alternate methods, technically justified herein, are proposed for effluent sampling. First, a shrouded aerosol sampling probe should replace the sharp-edged elbowed-nozzle recommended by ANSI. This would reduce the losses of aerosol particles in probes and result in the acquisition of more representative aerosol samples. Second, the rakes of multiple probes that are intended to acquire representative samples through spatial coverage should be replaced by a single probe located where contaminant mass and fluid momentum are both well mixed. A representative sample can be obtained from a well-mixed flow. Some effluent flows will need to be engineered to achieve acceptable mixing. Third, sample extraction should be performed at a constant flow rate through a suitable designed shrouded probe rather than at a variable flow rate through isokinetic probes. A shrouded probe is shown to have constant sampling characteristics over a broad range of stack velocities when operated at a fixed flow rate.

  16. DOE-STD-1063-2000 - Facility Representatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1063-2000 March 2000 Superseding DOE-STD-1063-97 October 1997 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available

  17. Defining And Characterizing Sample Representativeness For DWPF Melter Feed Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shine, E. P.; Poirier, M. R.

    2013-10-29

    Representative sampling is important throughout the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) process, and the demonstrated success of the DWPF process to achieve glass product quality over the past two decades is a direct result of the quality of information obtained from the process. The objective of this report was to present sampling methods that the Savannah River Site (SRS) used to qualify waste being dispositioned at the DWPF. The goal was to emphasize the methodology, not a list of outcomes from those studies. This methodology includes proven methods for taking representative samples, the use of controlled analytical methods, and data interpretation and reporting that considers the uncertainty of all error sources. Numerous sampling studies were conducted during the development of the DWPF process and still continue to be performed in order to evaluate options for process improvement. Study designs were based on use of statistical tools applicable to the determination of uncertainties associated with the data needs. Successful designs are apt to be repeated, so this report chose only to include prototypic case studies that typify the characteristics of frequently used designs. Case studies have been presented for studying in-tank homogeneity, evaluating the suitability of sampler systems, determining factors that affect mixing and sampling, comparing the final waste glass product chemical composition and durability to that of the glass pour stream sample and other samples from process vessels, and assessing the uniformity of the chemical composition in the waste glass product. Many of these studies efficiently addressed more than one of these areas of concern associated with demonstrating sample representativeness and provide examples of statistical tools in use for DWPF. The time when many of these designs were implemented was in an age when the sampling ideas of Pierre Gy were not as widespread as they are today. Nonetheless, the engineers and statisticians used carefully thought out designs that systematically and economically provided plans for data collection from the DWPF process. Key shared features of the sampling designs used at DWPF and the Gy sampling methodology were the specification of a standard for sample representativeness, an investigation that produced data from the process to study the sampling function, and a decision framework used to assess whether the specification was met based on the data. Without going into detail with regard to the seven errors identified by Pierre Gy, as excellent summaries are readily available such as Pitard [1989] and Smith [2001], SRS engineers understood, for example, that samplers can be biased (Gy�s extraction error), and developed plans to mitigate those biases. Experiments that compared installed samplers with more representative samples obtained directly from the tank may not have resulted in systematically partitioning sampling errors into the now well-known error categories of Gy, but did provide overall information on the suitability of sampling systems. Most of the designs in this report are related to the DWPF vessels, not the large SRS Tank Farm tanks. Samples from the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), which contains the feed to the DWPF melter, are characterized using standardized analytical methods with known uncertainty. The analytical error is combined with the established error from sampling and processing in DWPF to determine the melter feed composition. This composition is used with the known uncertainty of the models in the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to ensure that the wasteform that is produced is comfortably within the acceptable processing and product performance region. Having the advantage of many years of processing that meets the waste glass product acceptance criteria, the DWPF process has provided a considerable amount of data about itself in addition to the data from many special studies. Demonstrating representative sampling directly from the large Tank Farm tanks is a difficult, if not unsolvable enterprise due to limited accessibility. However, the consistency and the adequacy of sampling and mixing at SRS could at least be studied under the controlled process conditions based on samples discussed by Ray and others [2012a] in Waste Form Qualification Report (WQR) Volume 2 and the transfers from Tanks 40H and 51H to the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) within DWPF. It is important to realize that the need for sample representativeness becomes more stringent as the material gets closer to the melter, and the tanks within DWPF have been studied extensively to meet those needs.

  18. The Korarchaeota: Archaeal orphans representing an ancestral lineage of life

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elkins, James G.; Kunin, Victor; Anderson, Iain; Barry, Kerrie; Goltsman, Eugene; Lapidus, Alla; Hedlund, Brian; Hugenholtz, Phil; Kyrpides, Nikos; Graham, David; Keller, Martin; Wanner, Gerhard; Richardson, Paul; Stetter, Karl O.

    2007-05-01

    Based on conserved cellular properties, all life on Earth can be grouped into different phyla which belong to the primary domains Bacteria, Archaea, and Eukarya. However, tracing back their evolutionary relationships has been impeded by horizontal gene transfer and gene loss. Within the Archaea, the kingdoms Crenarchaeota and Euryarchaeota exhibit a profound divergence. In order to elucidate the evolution of these two major kingdoms, representatives of more deeply diverged lineages would be required. Based on their environmental small subunit ribosomal (ss RNA) sequences, the Korarchaeota had been originally suggested to have an ancestral relationship to all known Archaea although this assessment has been refuted. Here we describe the cultivation and initial characterization of the first member of the Korarchaeota, highly unusual, ultrathin filamentous cells about 0.16 {micro}m in diameter. A complete genome sequence obtained from enrichment cultures revealed an unprecedented combination of signature genes which were thought to be characteristic of either the Crenarchaeota, Euryarchaeota, or Eukarya. Cell division appears to be mediated through a FtsZ-dependent mechanism which is highly conserved throughout the Bacteria and Euryarchaeota. An rpb8 subunit of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase was identified which is absent from other Archaea and has been described as a eukaryotic signature gene. In addition, the representative organism possesses a ribosome structure typical for members of the Crenarchaeota. Based on its gene complement, this lineage likely diverged near the separation of the two major kingdoms of Archaea. Further investigations of these unique organisms may shed additional light onto the evolution of extant life.

  19. Simulating a Nationally Representative Housing Sample Using EnergyPlus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Asa S.; Lekov, Alex; Lutz, James; Rosenquist, Gregory; Gu, Lixing

    2011-03-04

    This report presents a new simulation tool under development at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This tool uses EnergyPlus to simulate each single-family home in the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS), and generates a calibrated, nationally representative set of simulated homes whose energy use is statistically indistinguishable from the energy use of the single-family homes in the RECS sample. This research builds upon earlier work by Ritchard et al. for the Gas Research Institute and Huang et al. for LBNL. A representative national sample allows us to evaluate the variance in energy use between individual homes, regions, or other subsamples; using this tool, we can also evaluate how that variance affects the impacts of potential policies. The RECS contains information regarding the construction and location of each sampled home, as well as its appliances and other energy-using equipment. We combined this data with the home simulation prototypes developed by Huang et al. to simulate homes that match the RECS sample wherever possible. Where data was not available, we used distributions, calibrated using the RECS energy use data. Each home was assigned a best-fit location for the purposes of weather and some construction characteristics. RECS provides some detail on the type and age of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) equipment in each home; we developed EnergyPlus models capable of reproducing the variety of technologies and efficiencies represented in the national sample. This includes electric, gas, and oil furnaces, central and window air conditioners, central heat pumps, and baseboard heaters. We also developed a model of duct system performance, based on in-home measurements, and integrated this with fan performance to capture the energy use of single- and variable-speed furnace fans, as well as the interaction of duct and fan performance with the efficiency of heating and cooling equipment. Comparison with RECS revealed that EnergyPlus did not capture the heating-side behavior of heat pumps particularly accurately, and that our simple oil furnace and boiler models needed significant recalibration to fit with RECS. Simulating the full RECS sample on a single computer would take many hours, so we used the 'cloud computing' services provided by Amazon.com to simulate dozens of homes at once. This enabled us to simulate the full RECS sample, including multiple versions of each home to evaluate the impact of marginal changes, in less than 3 hours. Once the tool was calibrated, we were able to address several policy questions. We made a simple measurement of the heat replacement effect and showed that the net effect of heat replacement on primary energy use is likely to be less than 5%, relative to appliance-only measures of energy savings. Fuel switching could be significant, however. We also evaluated the national and regional impacts of a variety of 'overnight' changes in building characteristics or occupant behavior, including lighting, home insulation and sealing, HVAC system efficiency, and thermostat settings. For example, our model shows that the combination of increased home insulation and better sealed building shells could reduce residential natural gas use by 34.5% and electricity use by 6.5%, and a 1 degree rise in summer thermostat settings could save 2.1% of home electricity use. These results vary by region, and we present results for each U.S. Census division. We conclude by offering proposals for future work to improve the tool. Some proposed future work includes: comparing the simulated energy use data with the monthly RECS bill data; better capturing the variation in behavior between households, especially as it relates to occupancy and schedules; improving the characterization of recent construction and its regional variation; and extending the general framework of this simulation tool to capture multifamily housing units, such as apartment buildings.

  20. jcpenney retail renovation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Zhang, Jian; Ruiz, Kathleen A.; Wilburn, Matthew S.

    2011-06-30

    JC Penney is a partner with the DOE's Commercial Building Partnerships (CBP) program, working with PNNL to explore energy design measures (EDMs) that may be applied to their building portfolio. A site in Colonial Heights, VA was chosen for a retrofit project; computer modeling predicts 45% improved energy performance compared to baseline operations. This case study reviews EDMs that were selected and their performance as of June 2011.

  1. Tailored Marketing for Low-income and Under-Represented Population...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tailored Marketing for Low-income and Under-Represented Population Segments (201) Tailored Marketing for Low-income and Under-Represented Population Segments (201) Better Buildings ...

  2. Examination of Hydrate Formation Methods: Trying to Create Representative Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kneafsey, T.J.; Rees, E.V.L.; Nakagawa, S.; Kwon, T.-H.

    2011-04-01

    Forming representative gas hydrate-bearing laboratory samples is important so that the properties of these materials may be measured, while controlling the composition and other variables. Natural samples are rare, and have often experienced pressure and temperature changes that may affect the property to be measured [Waite et al., 2008]. Forming methane hydrate samples in the laboratory has been done a number of ways, each having advantages and disadvantages. The ice-to-hydrate method [Stern et al., 1996], contacts melting ice with methane at the appropriate pressure to form hydrate. The hydrate can then be crushed and mixed with mineral grains under controlled conditions, and then compacted to create laboratory samples of methane hydrate in a mineral medium. The hydrate in these samples will be part of the load-bearing frame of the medium. In the excess gas method [Handa and Stupin, 1992], water is distributed throughout a mineral medium (e.g. packed moist sand, drained sand, moistened silica gel, other porous media) and the mixture is brought to hydrate-stable conditions (chilled and pressurized with gas), allowing hydrate to form. This method typically produces grain-cementing hydrate from pendular water in sand [Waite et al., 2004]. In the dissolved gas method [Tohidi et al., 2002], water with sufficient dissolved guest molecules is brought to hydrate-stable conditions where hydrate forms. In the laboratory, this is can be done by pre-dissolving the gas of interest in water and then introducing it to the sample under the appropriate conditions. With this method, it is easier to form hydrate from more soluble gases such as carbon dioxide. It is thought that this method more closely simulates the way most natural gas hydrate has formed. Laboratory implementation, however, is difficult, and sample formation is prohibitively time consuming [Minagawa et al., 2005; Spangenberg and Kulenkampff, 2005]. In another version of this technique, a specified quantity of gas is placed in a sample, then the sample is flooded with water and cooled [Priest et al., 2009]. We have performed a number of tests in which hydrate was formed and the uniformity of the hydrate formation was examined. These tests have primarily used a variety of modifications of the excess gas method to make the hydrate, although we have also used a version of the excess water technique. Early on, we found difficulties in creating uniform samples with a particular sand/ initial water saturation combination (F-110 Sand, {approx} 35% initial water saturation). In many of our tests we selected this combination intentionally to determine whether we could use a method to make the samples uniform. The following methods were examined: Excess gas, Freeze/thaw/form, Freeze/pressurize/thaw, Excess gas followed by water saturation, Excess water, Sand and kaolinite, Use of a nucleation enhancer (SnoMax), and Use of salt in the water. Below, each method, the underlying hypothesis, and our results are briefly presented, followed by a brief conclusion. Many of the hypotheses investigated are not our own, but were presented to us. Much of the data presented is from x-ray CT scanning our samples. The x-ray CT scanner provides a three-dimensional density map of our samples. From this map and the physics that is occurring in our samples, we are able to gain an understanding of the spatial nature of the processes that occur, and attribute them to the locations where they occur.

  3. Setting Whole-Building Absolute Energy Use Targets for the K-12 School, Retail, and Healthcare Sectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leach, M.; Bonnema, E.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2012-08-01

    This paper helps owners' efficiency representatives to inform executive management, contract development, and project management staff as to how specifying and applying whole-building absolute energy use targets for new construction or renovation projects can improve the operational energy performance of commercial buildings.

  4. Healthy Zero Energy Buildings (HZEB) Program - Cross-Sectional Study of Contaminant Levels, Source, Strengths, and Ventilation Rates in Retail Stores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Wanyu R.; Sidheswaran, Meera; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William

    2014-02-01

    This field study measured ventilation rates and indoor air quality parameters in 21 visits to retail stores in California. The data was collected to guide the development of new, science-based commercial building ventilation rate standards that balance the dual objectives of increasing energy efficiency and maintaining acceptable indoor air quality. Data collection occurred between September 2011 and March 2013. Three types of stores participated in this study: grocery stores, furniture/hardware stores, and apparel stores. Ventilation rates and indoor air contaminant concentrations were measured on a weekday, typically between 9 am and 6 pm. Ventilation rates measured using a tracer gas decay method exceeded the minimum requirement of California’s Title 24 Standard in all but one store. Even though there was adequate ventilation according to Title 24, concentrations of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and acrolein exceeded the most stringent chronic health guidelines. Other indoor air contaminants measured included carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), ozone (O{sub 3}), and particulate matter (PM). Concentrations of CO{sub 2} were kept low by adequate ventilation, and were assumed low also because the sampling occurred on a weekday when retail stores were less busy. CO concentrations were also low. The indoor-outdoor ratios of O{sub 3} showed that the first-order loss rate may vary by store trade types and also by ventilation mode (mechanical versus natural). Analysis of fine and ultrafine PM measurements showed that a substantial portion of the particle mass in grocery stores with cooking-related emissions was in particles less than 0.3 μm. Stores without cooking as an indoor source had PM size distributions that were more similar indoors and outdoors. The whole-building emission rates of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and PM were estimated from the measured ventilation rates and indoor and outdoor contaminant concentrations. Mass balance models were then used to determine the ventilation rates, filtration strategies, or source reductions needed to maintain indoor contaminant concentrations below reference levels. Several scenarios of potential concern were considered: (i) formaldehyde levels in furniture/hardware stores, (ii) contaminants associated with cooking (e.g., PM, acrolein, and acetaldehyde) in grocery stores, and (iii) outdoor contaminants (e.g., PM and O{sub 3}) impacting stores that use natural ventilation. Estimated formaldehyde emission rates suggest that retail stores would need to ventilate at levels far exceeding the current Title 24 requirement to lower indoor concentrations below California’s stringent formaldehyde reference level. Given the high costs of providing ventilation but only modest chronic health benefit is expected, effective source control is an attractive alternative, as demonstrated by some retail stores in this study. Predictions showed that grocery stores need MERV 13 air filters, instead of MERV 8 filters that are more commonly used, to maintain indoor PM at levels that meet the chronic health standards for PM. Exposure to acrolein is a potential health concern in grocery stores, and should be addressed by increasing the use of kitchen range hoods or improving their contaminant removal efficiency. In stores that rely on natural ventilation, indoor PM can be a health concern if the stores are located in areas with high outdoor PM. This concern may be addressed by switching to mechanical ventilation when the outdoor air quality is poor, while continuing natural ventilation when outdoor air quality is good.

  5. U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit ...

  6. Josh Allen of Richland Operations Office Named 2014 Facility Representative of the Year

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Congratulations to Josh Allen, Richland Operations Office, the winner of the 2014 DOE Facility Representative of the Year Award!

  7. Secretary Chu to Join Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    National Accelerator Laboratory | Department of Energy Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory Secretary Chu to Join Representatives Lofgren and Honda at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory August 13, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - On Monday, U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will visit the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in Menlo Park, California. Secretary Chu will join Representatives Zoe Lofgren and Mike Honda and Stanford

  8. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations | Department of Energy U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations May 1, 2002 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H.

  9. Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization | Department of Energy The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization Gregory H. Friedman: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the Federal Workforce and Agency Organization April 5 2005 Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Subcommittee on the

  10. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations | Department of Energy Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations May 1, 2003 Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman,

  11. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations | Department of Energy of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations February 26, 2003 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman,

  12. Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations | Department of Energy Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Herbert Richardson: Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations March 4, 2004 Before The U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and

  13. 4Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  14. 1Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  15. 4Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  16. 2Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  17. 3Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  18. 1Q CY2005 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January to March 2005. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  19. 3Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  20. 2Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  1. 4Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators QuarterlyReport covering the period from October to December 2007. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field...

  2. 4Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October to December 2008. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  3. 2Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April through June 2012. Data for these indicators were...

  4. 1Q CY2012 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January through March 2012. Data for these indicators were...

  5. 4Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from October through December 2011. Data for these indicators were...

  6. 3Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from July to September 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  7. 3Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period July  through September 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  8. 4Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period October through December 2010. Data for these...

  9. 3Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the highlights of the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period of July through September 2010. Data for these...

  10. 4Q CY2002 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December 2002. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  11. 2Q CY2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators QuarterlyReport covering the period from April to June 2008. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field elements...

  12. 1Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the Period January through March 2011. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  13. 2Q CY2007 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from April to June 2007. Data for these indicators are gathered by field elements...

  14. 2Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This memorandum summarizes the highlight of, and announces the availablity on-line of, the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators are gathered by Field elements quarterly per...

  15. 3Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Facility Representative Program Indicators (Pis) Quarterly Report attached, covering the period from July to September 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field elements...

  16. 2Q CY2011 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This memorandum summarizes the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period April through June 20 1 1. Data for these indicators were gathered...

  17. Tailored Marketing for Low-income and Under-Represented Population Segments (201)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Tailored Marketing for Low-Income and Under-Represented Population Segments (201), call slides and discussion summary.

  18. Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Moment" for America | Department of Energy Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik Moment" for America Secretary Chu: China's Clean Energy Successes Represent a New "Sputnik Moment" for America November 29, 2010 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - In a speech at the National Press Club, U.S Energy Secretary Steven Chu said that the success of China and other countries in clean energy industries represents a new "Sputnik Moment" for the

  19. DOE Orders Self-Study Program - DOE-STD-1063-2011, Facility Representatives

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    | Department of Energy 63-2011, Facility Representatives DOE Orders Self-Study Program - DOE-STD-1063-2011, Facility Representatives U.S. Department of Energy Orders Self-Study Program DOE-STD-1063-2011, Facility Representatives Familiar Level - August 2011 The familiar level of this module is divided into three sections. The first section addresses the purpose and scope of DOE-STD-1063-2011, the purpose of the FR program, and the duties, responsibilities, and authorities of FRs and other

  20. 3Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  1. 4Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December  2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  2. 2Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June  2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  3. 4Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from October to December  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  4. 3Q CY2004 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report Covering the Period from July to September  2004. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  5. 1Q CY2006 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report covering the period from January  to March 2006. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  6. 3Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from July to September 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  7. 4Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from October to December 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  8. 1Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from January to March 2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  9. 1Q CY2010 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from January to March2010. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  10. 1Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from January to March  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field...

  11. 2Q CY2000 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "The Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report is attached, covering the period from April 2000 to June 2000. Data for these indicators are gathered by the Field...

  12. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House Of Representatives Committee on Energy and ... Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Request to ...

  13. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and ... Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of Energy Testify on ...

  14. 2Q CY2009 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from April to June  2009. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  15. 2Q CY2003 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached is the Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators (PIs) Quarterly Report Covering the Period from April to June  2003. Data for these indicators are gathered by Field elements...

  16. 3Q C&2008 (PDF), Facility Representative Program Performance Indicators Quarterly Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Attached is the Facility Representative (FR) Program Performance Indicators Quarterly  Report covering the period from July to September   2008. Data for these indicators aregathered by Field...

  17. August 20, 2014 meeting with DOE representatives regarding the remand of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the DOE Direct Final Rule as it relates to efficiency standards for non-weatherized gas furnaces | Department of Energy August 20, 2014 meeting with DOE representatives regarding the remand of the DOE Direct Final Rule as it relates to efficiency standards for non-weatherized gas furnaces August 20, 2014 meeting with DOE representatives regarding the remand of the DOE Direct Final Rule as it relates to efficiency standards for non-weatherized gas furnaces This memorandum provides an overview

  18. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations | Department of Energy Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations April 5, 2005 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations Statement of Gregory H. Friedman, Inspector General U.S. Department of

  19. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Government Reform | Department of Energy Government Reform Gregory H. Friedman: Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform March 20, 2003 Before the U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Government Reform Statement of Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General, U.S. Department of Energy Request to testify on the Department of Energy's (Department) contract administration activities. The Department is one of the most contractor dependent agencies in the Federal

  20. WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT. | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT. WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is charged under the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007) with modernizing the nation's electricity grid to improve its reliability and efficiency. As part of this effort, DOE is also responsible for increasing awareness of our nation's Smart Grid. Building upon The Smart Grid: An Introduction, a

  1. Dy-Mn-Si as a representative of family of 'Dy-Transition

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Metal-Si' systems: Its isothermal sections, empirical rProd. Type: FTPules and new rare-earth manganese silicides (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Dy-Mn-Si as a representative of family of 'Dy-Transition Metal-Si' systems: Its isothermal sections, empirical rProd. Type: FTPules and new rare-earth manganese silicides Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dy-Mn-Si as a representative of family of 'Dy-Transition Metal-Si' systems: Its isothermal sections, empirical rProd. Type: FTPules

  2. The Dy-Ni-Si system as a representative of the rare earth-Ni-Si

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    family: Its isothermal section and new rare-earth nickel silicides (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: The Dy-Ni-Si system as a representative of the rare earth-Ni-Si family: Its isothermal section and new rare-earth nickel silicides Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Dy-Ni-Si system as a representative of the rare earth-Ni-Si family: Its isothermal section and new rare-earth nickel silicides The Dy-Ni-Si system has been

  3. U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Visit Research Center in East Hartford | Department of Energy Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu, U.S. Representatives Larson and Courtney to Visit Research Center in East Hartford February 3, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Tomorrow, Friday, February 4, U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu will travel to East Hartford, Conn. to visit United Technologies Research Center, which has received

  4. Fact #734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half of U.S.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Petroleum Imports | Department of Energy 4: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half of U.S. Petroleum Imports Fact #734: July 2, 2012 OPEC Countries Represent Less Than Half of U.S. Petroleum Imports Even though Saudi Arabia is the world's largest producer of petroleum, and OPEC countries produce much of the oil in the global market, the U.S. imports most of its oil from Canada, Mexico and other non-OPEC countries. Petroleum imports from Canada have been increasing since the

  5. Retail Sales Allocation Tool (RSAT)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Expand News & Events Skip navigation links Residential Residential Lighting Energy Star Appliances Consumer Electronics Heat Pump Water Heaters Electric Storage Water...

  6. Retail Prices for Regular Gasoline

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    724 1.730 1.783 1.841 1.961 2.007 1990-2016 East Coast (PADD1) 1.755 1.734 1.738 1.779 1.884 1.938 1992-2016 New England (PADD 1A) 1.798 1.777 1.770 1.778 1.885 1.919 1993-2016 ...

  7. DOE Honors WIPP Representative for Cutting Travel Costs, Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, D.C. – A representative of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, N.M., on Tuesday received the Secretary of Energy’s Appreciation Award for her efforts to improve sustainability and reduce travel costs and the number of fleet vehicles.

  8. Mechanism-based Representative Volume Elements (RVEs) for Predicting Property Degradations in Multiphase Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Wei; Sun, Xin; Li, Dongsheng; Ryu, Seun; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2013-02-01

    Quantitative understanding of the evolving thermal-mechanical properties of a multi-phase material hinges upon the availability of quantitative statistically representative microstructure descriptions. Questions then arise as to whether a two-dimensional (2D) or a three-dimensional (3D) representative volume element (RVE) should be considered as the statistically representative microstructure. Although 3D models are more representative than 2D models in general, they are usually computationally expensive and difficult to be reconstructed. In this paper, we evaluate the accuracy of a 2D RVE in predicting the property degradations induced by different degradation mechanisms with the multiphase solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode material as an example. Both 2D and 3D microstructure RVEs of the anodes are adopted to quantify the effects of two different degradation mechanisms: humidity-induced electrochemical degradation and phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation. The predictions of the 2D model are then compared with the available experimental measurements and the results from the 3D model. It is found that the 2D model, limited by its inability of reproducing the realistic electrical percolation, is unable to accurately predict the degradation of thermo-electrical properties. On the other hand, for the phosphorus poisoning induced structural degradation, both 2D and 3D microstructures yield similar results, indicating that the 2D model is capable of providing computationally efficient yet accurate results for studying the structural degradation within the anodes.

  9. Polytechnic Institute of New York University Researchers Represented in the E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Polytechnic Institute of New York University Researchers Represented in the E-print Network Researcher/Research Institution Web page Aronov, Boris - Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of New York University http://cis.poly.edu/~aronov/research. html Brönnimann, Hervé - Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Polytechnic Institute of New York University http://photon.poly.edu/~hbr/publis. html Chiang, Yi-Jen - Department of Computer Science and

  10. On October 20, 2011, representatives of Howe Corporation, Gade Environmental, an

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    October 20, 2011, representatives of Howe Corporation, Gade Environmental, and Beecon ProfServe met with DOE to discuss the proposed rules EERE-2010 BT-TP-0036 RIN 1904-AC38 Energy Efficiency Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Commercial Ice Makers. The meeting was held at the request of Howe Corporation at the DOE offices in Washington DC. In attendance: Ari Altman, DOE Ashley Armstrong, DOE Robert Bittner, Beecon ProfServe John Cymbalsky, DOE Mary

  11. WHAT THE SMART GRID MEANS TO YOU AND THE PEOPLE YOU REPRESENT.

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    REPRESENT. regulators consumer advocates environmental groups technology providers policymakers ONE of SIX SMART GRID STAKEHOLDER BOOKS A smarter grid can work harder and more efficiently to respond to the needs of all consumers, contain costs and enable clean-energy solutions at scale. regulators utilities 2 DISCLAIMER PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States

  12. DOE-STD-1151-2002; Facility Representative Functional Area Qualification Standard

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1151-2002 April 2002 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823.

  13. 100% MOX BWR experimental program design using multi-parameter representative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise, P.; Fougeras, P.; Cathalau, S.

    2012-07-01

    A new multiparameter representative approach for the design of Advanced full MOX BWR core physics experimental programs is developed. The approach is based on sensitivity analysis of integral parameters to nuclear data, and correlations among different integral parameters. The representativeness method is here used to extract a quantitative relationship between a particular integral response of an experimental mock-up and the same response in a reference project to be designed. The study is applied to the design of the 100% MOX BASALA ABWR experimental program in the EOLE facility. The adopted scheme proposes an original approach to the problem, going from the initial 'microscopic' pin-cells integral parameters to the whole 'macroscopic' assembly integral parameters. This approach enables to collect complementary information necessary to optimize the initial design and to meet target accuracy on the integral parameters to be measured. The study has demonstrated the necessity of new fuel pins fabrication, fulfilling minimal costs requirements, to meet acceptable representativeness on local power distribution. (authors)

  14. Uniprocessor Performance Analysis of a Representative Workload of Sandia National Laboratories' Scientific Applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Laverty

    2005-10-01

    UNIPROCESSOR PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF A REPRESENTATIVE WORKLOAD OF SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES' SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS Master of Science in Electrical Engineering New Mexico State University Las Cruces, New Mexico, 2005 Dr. Jeanine Cook, Chair Throughout the last decade computer performance analysis has become absolutely necessary to maximum performance of some workloads. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) located in Albuquerque, New Mexico is no different in that to achieve maximum performance of large scientific, parallel workloads performance analysis is needed at the uni-processor level. A representative workload has been chosen as the basis of a computer performance study to determine optimal processor characteristics in order to better specify the next generation of supercomputers. Cube3, a finite element test problem developed at SNL is a representative workload of their scientific workloads. This workload has been studied at the uni-processor level to understand characteristics in the microarchitecture that will lead to the overall performance improvement at the multi-processor level. The goal of studying vthis workload at the uni-processor level is to build a performance prediction model that will be integrated into a multi-processor performance model which is currently being developed at SNL. Through the use of performance counters on the Itanium 2 microarchitecture, performance statistics are studied to determine bottlenecks in the microarchitecture and/or changes in the application code that will maximize performance. From source code analysis a performance degrading loop kernel was identified and through the use of compiler optimizations a performance gain of around 20% was achieved.

  15. Accountable Property Representatives List and Property Pass Signer List by Organization, December 2, 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Accountable Property Representatives/Property Pass Authorization 12/2/2015 Employee Authorized Organization Phone APR Primary Property Pass Signer PETEET, LISA J. ALL ORGS (202) 287-5496 √ AGEE, PATTIE M. EM-40 (202) 586-9417 √ AMES, RUSSELL SC-32 (202) 586-1082 √ √ ANDERSON, SUE EM-73 (301) 903-8368 √ √ ATKINSON-HYMAN, DEBRA PA-1 (202) 586-2461 √ √ AUGUSTYN, ANN HG-6 (202) 287-1528 √ BARLETT, DENNIS EE-3C (202) 586-0874 √ BARNES, CLAUDE GC-90 (202) 586-2957 √ √

  16. W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Student Forum | Jefferson Lab W&M Student Elected to Represent American Physical Society's Graduate Student Forum V Gray Valerie Gray, a graduate student at The College of William and Mary and a researcher at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, was chosen this year by American Physical Society members as chair-elect for the APS Forum on Graduate Student Affairs. NEWPORT NEWS, VA, Aug. 8, 2014 - The old adage "If you want something done, give it

  17. Sampling device for withdrawing a representative sample from single and multi-phase flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Apley, Walter J. (Pasco, WA); Cliff, William C. (Richland, WA); Creer, James M. (Richland, WA)

    1984-01-01

    A fluid stream sampling device has been developed for the purpose of obtaining a representative sample from a single or multi-phase fluid flow. This objective is carried out by means of a probe which may be inserted into the fluid stream. Individual samples are withdrawn from the fluid flow by sampling ports with particular spacings, and the sampling parts are coupled to various analytical systems for characterization of the physical, thermal, and chemical properties of the fluid flow as a whole and also individually.

  18. Accountable Property Representatives List and Property Pass Signer List by Organization, March 7, 2016

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Accountable Property Representatives/Property Pass Authorization 3/7/2016 Employee Authorized Organization Phone APR Primary Property Pass Signer PETEET, LISA J. ALL ORGS (202) 287-5496 √ AGEE, PATTIE M. EM-40 (202) 586-9417 √ AMES, RUSSELL SC-32 (202) 586-1082 √ √ ANDERSON, SUE EM-73 (301) 903-8368 √ √ ATKINSON-HYMAN, DEBRA PA-1 (202) 586-2461 √ √ AUGUSTYN, ANN HG-6 (202) 287-1528 √ BARLETT, DENNIS EE-3C (202) 586-0874 √ BARNES, CLAUDE GC-90 (202) 586-2957 √ √

  19. Facility Representatives, DOE-STD-1063-2011, Change Notice 1

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    STD-1063-2011 February 2011 Change Notice 1 March 2012 DOE STANDARD FACILITY REPRESENTATIVES U.S. Department of Energy AREA MGMT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1063-2011 ii Change Notice No. 1 March 2012 Table of Changes Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://www.hss.doe.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ Page/Section Change Foreword Update contact information and internet

  20. An estimated 5% of new protein structures solved today represent a new Pfam family

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mistry, Jaina; Kloppmann, Edda; Rost, Burkhard; Punta, Marco

    2013-11-01

    This study uses the Pfam database to show that the sequence redundancy of protein structures deposited in the PDB is increasing. The possible reasons behind this trend are discussed. High-resolution structural knowledge is key to understanding how proteins function at the molecular level. The number of entries in the Protein Data Bank (PDB), the repository of all publicly available protein structures, continues to increase, with more than 8000 structures released in 2012 alone. The authors of this article have studied how structural coverage of the protein-sequence space has changed over time by monitoring the number of Pfam families that acquired their first representative structure each year from 1976 to 2012. Twenty years ago, for every 100 new PDB entries released, an estimated 20 Pfam families acquired their first structure. By 2012, this decreased to only about five families per 100 structures. The reasons behind the slower pace at which previously uncharacterized families are being structurally covered were investigated. It was found that although more than 50% of current Pfam families are still without a structural representative, this set is enriched in families that are small, functionally uncharacterized or rich in problem features such as intrinsically disordered and transmembrane regions. While these are important constraints, the reasons why it may not yet be time to give up the pursuit of a targeted but more comprehensive structural coverage of the protein-sequence space are discussed.

  1. An analysis of representative heating load lines for residential HSPF ratings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, C. Keith; Shen, Bo; Shrestha, Som S.

    2015-07-01

    This report describes an analysis to investigate representative heating loads for single-family detached homes using current EnergyPlus simulations (DOE 2014a). Hourly delivered load results are used to determine binned load lines using US Department of Energy (DOE) residential prototype building models (DOE 2014b) developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The selected residential single-family prototype buildings are based on the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC 2006) in the DOE climate regions. The resulting load lines are compared with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI)/Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) Standard 210/240 (AHRI 2008) minimum and maximum design heating requirement (DHR) load lines of the heating seasonal performance factor (HSPF) ratings procedure for each region. The results indicate that a heating load line closer to the maximum DHR load line, and with a lower zero load ambient temperature, is more representative of heating loads predicted for EnergyPlus prototype residential buildings than the minimum DHR load line presently used to determine HSPF ratings. An alternative heating load line equation was developed and compared to binned load lines obtained from the EnergyPlus simulation results. The effect on HSPF of the alternative heating load line was evaluated for single-speed and two-capacity heat pumps, and an average HSPF reduction of 16% was found. The alternative heating load line relationship is tied to the rated cooling capacity of the heat pump based on EnergyPlus autosizing, which is more representative of the house load characteristics than the rated heating capacity. The alternative heating load line equation was found to be independent of climate for the six DOE climate regions investigated, provided an adjustable zero load ambient temperature is used. For Region IV, the default DOE climate region used for HSPF ratings, the higher load line results in an ~28% increase in delivered heating load and an ~52% increase in the estimated heating operating cost over that given in the AHRI directory (AHRI 2014).

  2. Representing the thermal state in time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modine, N. A.; Hatcher, R. M.

    2015-05-28

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) provides a powerful and widely used approach to determining thermodynamic properties by integrating the classical equations of motion of a system of atoms. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) provides a powerful and increasingly useful approach to integrating the quantum equations of motion for a system of electrons. TDDFT efficiently captures the unitary evolution of a many-electron state by mapping the system into a fictitious non-interacting system. In analogy to MD, one could imagine obtaining the thermodynamic properties of an electronic system from a TDDFT simulation in which the electrons are excited from their ground state by a time-dependent potential and then allowed to evolve freely in time while statistical data are captured from periodic snapshots of the system. For a variety of systems (e.g., many metals), the electrons reach an effective state of internal equilibrium due to electron-electron interactions on a time scale that is short compared to electron-phonon equilibration. During the initial time-evolution of such systems following electronic excitation, electron-phonon interactions should be negligible, and therefore, TDDFT should successfully capture the internal thermalization of the electrons. However, it is unclear how TDDFT represents the resulting thermal state. In particular, the thermal state is usually represented in quantum statistical mechanics as a mixed state, while the occupations of the TDDFT wavefunctions are fixed by the initial state in TDDFT. We work to address this puzzle by (A) reformulating quantum statistical mechanics so that thermodynamic expectations can be obtained as an unweighted average over a set of many-body pure states and (B) constructing a family of non-interacting (single determinant) TDDFT states that approximate the required many-body states for the canonical ensemble.

  3. A Subbasin-based framework to represent land surface processes in an Earth System Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tesfa, Teklu K.; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Ke, Yinghai; Sun, Yu; Liu, Ying

    2014-05-20

    Realistically representing spatial heterogeneity and lateral land surface processes within and between modeling units in earth system models is important because of their implications to surface energy and water exchange. The traditional approach of using regular grids as computational units in land surface models and earth system models may lead to inadequate representation of lateral movements of water, energy and carbon fluxes, especially when the grid resolution increases. Here a new subbasin-based framework is introduced in the Community Land Model (CLM), which is the land component of the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Local processes are represented assuming each subbasin as a grid cell on a pseudo grid matrix with no significant modifications to the existing CLM modeling structure. Lateral routing of water within and between subbasins is simulated with the subbasin version of a recently-developed physically based routing model, Model for Scale Adaptive River Routing (MOSART). As an illustration, this new framework is implemented in the topographically diverse region of the U.S. Pacific Northwest. The modeling units (subbasins) are delineated from high-resolution Digital Elevation Model while atmospheric forcing and surface parameters are remapped from the corresponding high resolution datasets. The impacts of this representation on simulating hydrologic processes are explored by comparing it with the default (grid-based) CLM representation. In addition, the effects of DEM resolution on parameterizing topography and the subsequent effects on runoff processes are investigated. Limited model evaluation and comparison showed that small difference between the averaged forcing can lead to more significant difference in the simulated runoff and streamflow because of nonlinear horizontal processes. Topographic indices derived from high resolution DEM may not improve the overall water balance, but affect the partitioning between surface and subsurface runoff. More systematic analyses are needed to determine the relative merits of the subbasin representation compared to the commonly used grid-based representation, especially when land surface models are approaching higher resolutions.

  4. Representing the thermal state in time-dependent density functional theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Modine, N. A.; Hatcher, R. M.

    2015-05-28

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) provides a powerful and widely used approach to determining thermodynamic properties by integrating the classical equations of motion of a system of atoms. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) provides a powerful and increasingly useful approach to integrating the quantum equations of motion for a system of electrons. TDDFT efficiently captures the unitary evolution of a many-electron state by mapping the system into a fictitious non-interacting system. In analogy to MD, one could imagine obtaining the thermodynamic properties of an electronic system from a TDDFT simulation in which the electrons are excited from their ground state bymore »a time-dependent potential and then allowed to evolve freely in time while statistical data are captured from periodic snapshots of the system. For a variety of systems (e.g., many metals), the electrons reach an effective state of internal equilibrium due to electron-electron interactions on a time scale that is short compared to electron-phonon equilibration. During the initial time-evolution of such systems following electronic excitation, electron-phonon interactions should be negligible, and therefore, TDDFT should successfully capture the internal thermalization of the electrons. However, it is unclear how TDDFT represents the resulting thermal state. In particular, the thermal state is usually represented in quantum statistical mechanics as a mixed state, while the occupations of the TDDFT wave functions are fixed by the initial state in TDDFT. Two key questions involve (1) reformulating quantum statistical mechanics so that thermodynamic expectations can be obtained as an unweighted average over a set of many-body pure states and (2) constructing a family of non-interacting (single determinant) TDDFT states that approximate the required many-body states for the canonical ensemble. In Section II, we will address these questions by first demonstrating that thermodynamic expectations can be evaluated by averaging over certain many-body pure states, which we will call thermal states, and then constructing TDDFT states that approximate these thermal states. In Section III, we will present some numerical tests of the resulting theory, and in Section IV, we will summarize our main results and discuss some possible future directions for this work.« less

  5. Representing the thermal state in time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Modine, N. A.; Hatcher, R. M.

    2015-05-28

    Classical molecular dynamics (MD) provides a powerful and widely used approach to determining thermodynamic properties by integrating the classical equations of motion of a system of atoms. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) provides a powerful and increasingly useful approach to integrating the quantum equations of motion for a system of electrons. TDDFT efficiently captures the unitary evolution of a many-electron state by mapping the system into a fictitious non-interacting system. In analogy to MD, one could imagine obtaining the thermodynamic properties of an electronic system from a TDDFT simulation in which the electrons are excited from their ground state by a time-dependent potential and then allowed to evolve freely in time while statistical data are captured from periodic snapshots of the system. For a variety of systems (e.g., many metals), the electrons reach an effective state of internal equilibrium due to electron-electron interactions on a time scale that is short compared to electron-phonon equilibration. During the initial time-evolution of such systems following electronic excitation, electron-phonon interactions should be negligible, and therefore, TDDFT should successfully capture the internal thermalization of the electrons. However, it is unclear how TDDFT represents the resulting thermal state. In particular, the thermal state is usually represented in quantum statistical mechanics as a mixed state, while the occupations of the TDDFT wave functions are fixed by the initial state in TDDFT. Two key questions involve (1) reformulating quantum statistical mechanics so that thermodynamic expectations can be obtained as an unweighted average over a set of many-body pure states and (2) constructing a family of non-interacting (single determinant) TDDFT states that approximate the required many-body states for the canonical ensemble. In Section II, we will address these questions by first demonstrating that thermodynamic expectations can be evaluated by averaging over certain many-body pure states, which we will call thermal states, and then constructing TDDFT states that approximate these thermal states. In Section III, we will present some numerical tests of the resulting theory, and in Section IV, we will summarize our main results and discuss some possible future directions for this work.

  6. Clustering method and representative feeder selection for the California solar initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broderick, Robert Joseph; Williams, Joseph R.; Munoz-Ramos, Karina

    2014-02-01

    The screening process for DG interconnection procedures needs to be improved in order to increase the PV deployment level on the distribution grid. A significant improvement in the current screening process could be achieved by finding a method to classify the feeders in a utility service territory and determine the sensitivity of particular groups of distribution feeders to the impacts of high PV deployment levels. This report describes the utility distribution feeder characteristics in California for a large dataset of 8,163 feeders and summarizes the California feeder population including the range of characteristics identified and most important to hosting capacity. The report describes the set of feeders that are identified for modeling and analysis as well as feeders identified for the control group. The report presents a method for separating a utilitys distribution feeders into unique clusters using the k-means clustering algorithm. An approach for determining the feeder variables of interest for use in a clustering algorithm is also described. The report presents an approach for choosing the feeder variables to be utilized in the clustering process and a method is identified for determining the optimal number of representative clusters.

  7. A Control Chart Approach for Representing and Mining Data Streams with Shape Based Similarity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A

    2014-01-01

    The mining of data streams for online condition monitoring is a challenging task in several domains including (electric) power grid system, intelligent manufacturing, and consumer science. Considering a power grid application in which thousands of sensors, called the phasor measurement units, are deployed on the power grid network to continuously collect streams of digital data for real-time situational awareness and system management. Depending on design, each sensor could stream between ten and sixty data samples per second. The myriad of sensory data captured could convey deeper insights about sequence of events in real-time and before major damages are done. However, the timely processing and analysis of these high-velocity and high-volume data streams is a challenge. Hence, a new data processing and transformation approach, based on the concept of control charts, for representing sequence of data streams from sensors is proposed. In addition, an application of the proposed approach for enhancing data mining tasks such as clustering using real-world power grid data streams is presented. The results indicate that the proposed approach is very efficient for data streams storage and manipulation.

  8. Sustainable development: Background an represent policy views for governmental agencies, industry, and other specialty groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerman, J.A.; Silverman, G.S.

    1995-12-01

    Sustainable development is a phrase that has come into common usage without benefit of clear definition or meaning. Usage very much reflects individual and group perspectives: foresters might consider sustainability in terms of maintaining ecological integrity as part of managing forests for wood harvesting, industry might emphasize pollution control, while government agencies may be looking for new ways to exploit resources on a more continuous basis. Perhaps the greatest commonality among groups considering these issues is that {open_quotes}sustainability{close_quotes} has not been attained but that it needs to occur. The National Association of Environmental Professionals (NAEP) agrees that it is critical to the health of the planet that sustainable development be actively pursued and implemented in international, national, regional, and local policies and practices. To contribute to this effort a {open_quotes}white paper{close_quotes} is being prepared. Its purpose is twofold: (1) to review the existing information from the NAEP Sustainable Development Working Group and the literature and through examination of these policies, to clarify the thinking, what is being done, and what is still needed; and (2) to develop a position and action plan. This action plan should direct NAEP`s actions in making a significant contribution to the national dialog. This paper presents the background and results of the review phase of this white paper development. Representative views on sustainable development policy and practice are presented from three perspectives: governmental agencies, industry, and other specialty groups.

  9. Representing northern peatland microtopography and hydrology within the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, X.; Thornton, P. E.; Ricciuto, D. M.; Hanson, P. J.; Mao, J.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Griffiths, N. A.; Bisht, G.

    2015-02-20

    Predictive understanding of northern peatland hydrology is a necessary precursor to understanding the fate of massive carbon stores in these systems under the influence of present and future climate change. Current models have begun to address microtopographic controls on peatland hydrology, but none have included a prognostic calculation of peatland water table depth for a vegetated wetland, independent of prescribed regional water tables. We introduce here a new configuration of the Community Land Model (CLM) which includes a fully prognostic water table calculation for a vegetated peatland. Our structural and process changes to CLM focus on modifications needed to represent the hydrologic cycle of bogs environment with perched water tables, as well as distinct hydrologic dynamics and vegetation communities of the raised hummock and sunken hollow microtopography characteristic of peatland bogs. The modified model was parameterized and independently evaluated against observations from an ombrotrophic raised-dome bog in northern Minnesota (S1-Bog), the site for the Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change experiment (SPRUCE). Simulated water table levels compared well with site-level observations. The new model predicts significant hydrologic changes in response to planned warming at the SPRUCE site. At present, standing water is commonly observed in bog hollows after large rainfall events during the growing season, but simulations suggest a sharp decrease in water table levels due to increased evapotranspiration under the most extreme warming level, nearly eliminating the occurrence of standing water in the growing season. Simulated soil energy balance was strongly influenced by reduced winter snowpack under warming simulations, with the warming influence on soil temperature partly offset by the loss of insulating snowpack in early and late winter. The new model provides improved predictive capacity for seasonal hydrological dynamics in northern peatlands, and provides a useful foundation for investigation of northern peatland carbon exchange.

  10. Development of a Future Representative Concentration Pathway for Use in the IPCC 5th Assessment Earth System Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-12-29

    The representative concentration pathway to be delivered is a scenario of atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and other radiatively important atmospheric species, along with land-use changes, derived from the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). The particular representative concentration pathway (RCP) that the Joint Global Change Research Institute (JGCRI) has been responsible for is a not-to-exceed pathway that stabilizes at a radiative forcing of 4.5Wm-2 in the year 2100.

  11. A Hydro-Economic Approach to Representing Water Resources Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirshen, Paul H.; Strzepek, Kenneth, M.

    2004-01-14

    Grant Number DE-FG02-98ER62665 Office of Energy Research of the U.S. Department of Energy Abstract Many Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) divide the world into a small number of highly aggregated regions. Non-OECD countries are aggregated geographically into continental and multiple-continental regions or economically by development level. Current research suggests that these large scale aggregations cannot accurately represent potential water resources-related climate change impacts. In addition, IAMs do not explicitly model the flow regulation impacts of reservoir and ground water systems, the economics of water supply, or the demand for water in economic activities. Using the International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT) model of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) as a case study, this research implemented a set of methodologies to provide accurate representation of water resource climate change impacts in Integrated Assessment Models. There were also detailed examinations of key issues related to aggregated modeling including: modeling water consumption versus water withdrawals; ground and surface water interactions; development of reservoir cost curves; modeling of surface areas of aggregated reservoirs for estimating evaporation losses; and evaluating the importance of spatial scale in river basin modeling. The major findings include: - Continental or national or even large scale river basin aggregation of water supplies and demands do not accurately capture the impacts of climate change in the water and agricultural sector in IAMs. - Fortunately, there now exist gridden approaches (0.5 X 0.5 degrees) to model streamflows in a global analysis. The gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with national boundaries. This combined with GIS tools, high speed computers, and the growing availability of socio-economic gridded data bases allows assignment of demands to river basins to create hydro-economic zones that respect as much as possible both political and hydrologic integrity in different models. - To minimize pre-processing of data and add increased flexibility to modeling water resources and uses, it is recommended that water withdrawal demands be modeled, not consumptive requirements even though this makes the IAM more complex. - IAMs must consider changes in water availability for irrigation under climate change; ignoring them is more inaccurate than ignoring yield changes in crops under climate change. - Determining water availability and cost in river basins must include modeling streamflows, reservoirs and their operations, and ground water and its interaction with surface water. - Scale issues are important. The results from condensing demands and supplies in a large complex river basin to one node can be misleading for all uses under low flow conditions and instream flow uses under all conditions. Monthly is generally the most accurate scale for modeling river flows and demands. Challenges remain in integrating hydrologic units with political boundaries but the gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with political boundaries. - Using minimal reservoir cost data, it is possible to use basin topography to estimate reservoir storage costs. - Reservoir evaporation must be considered when assessing the usable water in a watershed. Several methods are available to estimate the relationship between aggregated storage surface area and storage volume. - For existing or future IAMs that can not use the appropriate aggregation for water, a water preprocessor may be required due the finer scale of hydrologic impacts.

  12. Construction Control Representative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    (See Frequently Asked Questions for more information). Where would I be working? Western Area Power Administration Rocky Mountain Region Engineering and Construction Field Engineering, (J5600) 5555...

  13. A global approach of the representativity concept: Application on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, N. D.; Blaise, P.; Santamarina, A.

    2013-07-01

    The development of new types of reactor and the increase in the safety specifications and requirements induce an enhancement in both nuclear data knowledge and a better understanding of the neutronic properties of the new systems. This enhancement is made possible using ad hoc critical mock-up experiments. The main difficulty is to design these experiments in order to obtain the most valuable information. Its quantification is usually made by using representativity and transposition concepts. These theories enable to extract some information about a quantity of interest (an integral parameter) on a configuration, but generally a posteriori. This paper presents a more global approach of this theory, with the idea of optimizing the representativity of a new experiment, and its transposition a priori, based on a multiparametric approach. Using a quadratic sum, we show the possibility to define a global representativity which permits to take into account several quantities of interest at the same time. The maximization of this factor gives information about all quantities of interest. An optimization method of this value in relation to technological parameters (over-clad diameter, atom concentration) is illustrated on a high-conversion light water reactor MOX lattice case. This example tackles the problematic of plutonium experiment for the plutonium aging and a solution through the optimization of both the over-clad and the plutonium content. (authors)

  14. DOE-STD-1063-97; DOE Standard Establishing and Maintaining a Facility Representative Program at DOE Facilities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3-97 October 1997 Supersedes DOE-STD-1063-93 DOE STANDARD ESTABLISHING AND MAINTAINING A FACILITY REPRESENTATIVE PROGRAM AT DOE FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA FACR Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (423) 576-8401.

  15. No. 2 Distillate Prices - Through Retail Outlets

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    53 2.467 - - - - 1983-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 1.955 2.455 - - - - 1983-2014 New England (PADD 1A) 2.067 2.531 - - - - 1983-2014 Connecticut 2.023 2.481 - - - - 1983-2014 Maine 2.099 2.540 - - - - 1983-2014 Massachusetts 2.101 2.588 - - - - 1983-2014 New Hampshire 2.035 2.512 - - - - 1983-2014 Rhode Island 2.066 2.507 - - - - 1983-2014 Vermont 2.152 2.598 - - - - 1983-2014 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 1.993 2.488 - - - - 1983-2014 Delaware 1.984 2.488 - - - - 1983-2014 District of Columbia NA

  16. 2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Commercial

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Commercial (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) Alaska Electric Light&Power Co AK Investor Owned 2,253 125,452 12,449.0 9.92 Alaska Power and Telephone Co AK Investor Owned 2,302 38,952 10,341.0 26.55 Alaska Village Elec Coop, Inc AK Cooperative 2,960 62,209 32,334.0 51.98 Anchorage Municipal Light and Power AK Municipal 6,362 879,373 113,515.6 12.91

  17. 2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Industrial

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Industrial (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) Alaska Electric Light&Power Co AK Investor Owned 96 132,889 12,514.0 9.42 Chugach Electric Assn Inc AK Cooperative 7 57,198 6,718.0 11.75 City & Borough of Sitka - (AK) AK Municipal 21 21,003 785.0 3.74 City of Seward - (AK) AK Municipal 125 31,961 5,927.0 18.54 City of Unalaska - (AK) AK Municipal

  18. 2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Residential

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) Alaska Electric Light&Power Co AK Investor Owned 14,115 141,151 16,728.0 11.85 Alaska Power and Telephone Co AK Investor Owned 5,328 24,116 7,301.0 30.27 Alaska Village Elec Coop, Inc AK Cooperative 7,869 35,665 21,188.0 59.41 Anchorage Municipal Light and Power AK Municipal 24,429 133,411 21,435.0

  19. 2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Total

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Total (Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) Alaska Electric Light&Power Co AK Investor Owned 16,464 399,492 41,691.0 10.44 Alaska Power and Telephone Co AK Investor Owned 7,630 63,068 17,642.0 27.97 Alaska Village Elec Coop, Inc AK Cooperative 10,829 97,874 53,522.0 54.68 Anchorage Municipal Light and Power AK Municipal 30,791 1,012,784 134,950.6 13.32

  20. 2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Residential

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Residential (Data from form EIA-861 schedule 4B) Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (cents/kWh) 3 Phases Renewables CA Power Marketer 106 893 50.0 5.60 Commerce Energy, Inc. CA Power Marketer 9,202 83,114 8,285.3 9.97 Marin Clean Energy CA Power Marketer 108,497 598,017 46,270.0 7.74 Sonoma Clean Power Authority CA Power Marketer 23,358 78,149 5,588.9 7.15 Abest Power & Gas, LLC CT Power Marketer 33,887 31,665 2,663.2

  1. Retail Prices for Gasoline, All Grades

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 View History U.S. 2.835 3.576 3.680 3.575 3.437 2.520 1993-2015 East Coast (PADD1) 2.824 3.587 3.695 3.599 3.470 2.483 1993-2015 New England (PADD 1A) 2.864 3.666 3.785 3.692 3.547 2.507 1993-2015 Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) 2.859 3.629 3.763 3.654 3.533 2.559 1993-2015 Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) 2.787 3.535 3.618 3.532 3.401 2.420 1993-2015 Midwest (PADD 2) 2.779 3.532 3.605 3.515 3.360 2.411 1993-2015 Gulf Coast (PADD 3) 2.702 3.423 3.479 3.374 3.216 2.256 1993-2015

  2. 2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Transportation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Entity State Ownership Customers (Count) Sales (Megawatthours) Revenues (Thousands Dollars) Average Price (centskWh) City of North Little Rock - (AR) AR Municipal 1 345 40.0 11.59 ...

  3. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Transportation"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    (Thousands Dollars)","Average Price (centskWh)" "City of North Little Rock - (AR)","AR","Municipal",1,345,40,11.594203 "Entergy Arkansas Inc","AR","Investor ...

  4. Colorado Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Conventional Areas 1.910 1.877 1.849 1.875 1.856 1.844 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.160 2.132 2.100 2.132 2.106 2.097 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.160 2.132 2.100 2.132 2.106...

  5. ,"San Francisco Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...142016" ,"Excel File Name:","petprignddcusy05sfw.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavpetpetprignddcusy05sfw.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information ...

  6. ,"New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...142016" ,"Excel File Name:","petprignddcussnyw.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavpetpetprignddcussnyw.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information ...

  7. ,"Los Angeles Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...142016" ,"Excel File Name:","petprignddcusy05law.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavpetpetprignddcusy05law.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information ...

  8. Retail Prices for Gasoline, All Grades

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    834 1.837 1.887 1.943 2.062 2.109 1993-2016 East Coast (PADD1) 1.898 1.876 1.880 1.918 2.020 2.075 1993-2016 New England (PADD 1A) 1.927 1.906 1.899 1.903 1.999 2.034 1993-2016 ...

  9. Retail Prices for Regular Gasoline - Reformulated Areas

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2.017 1.961 1994-2016 East Coast (PADD1) 1.997 1.975 1.906 1.880 1.850 1.806 1994-2016 New England (PADD 1A) 2.025 1.988 1.934 1.904 1.875 1.827 1994-2016 Central Atlantic (PADD...

  10. Retail Prices for Regular Gasoline - Conventional Areas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1.933 1.922 1990-2016 East Coast (PADD1) 2.075 2.060 2.033 2.029 2.013 2.000 1992-2016 New England (PADD 1A) 2.205 2.197 2.156 2.130 2.106 2.097 1993-2016 Central Atlantic (PADD...

  11. Boston Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1.943 1.905 1.883 1.874 1.878 1.970 2003-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 1.943 1.905 1.883 1.874 1.878 1.970 2003-2016 Regular 1.808 1.765 1.743 1.734 1.744 1.848 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.808 1.765 1.743 1.734 1.744 1.848 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.157 2.131 2.101 2.097 2.081 2.148 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.157 2.131 2.101 2.097 2.081 2.148 2003-2016 Premium 2.349 2.325 2.306 2.294 2.286 2.344 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.349 2.325 2.306 2.294 2.286 2.344

  12. California Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    539 2.431 2.347 2.461 2.495 2.651 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.539 2.431 2.347 2.461 2.495 2.651 1995-2016 Regular 2.486 2.378 2.295 2.406 2.441 2.596 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.486 2.378 2.295 2.406 2.441 2.596 1995-2016 Midgrade 2.605 2.499 2.415 2.536 2.565 2.722 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.605 2.499 2.415 2.536 2.565 2.722 1995-2016 Premium 2.723 2.613 2.528 2.649 2.682 2.839 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.723 2.613 2.528 2.649 2.682 2.839 1995-2016 Diesel (On-Highway)

  13. Chicago Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1.689 1.723 1.852 1.976 2.074 2.276 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 1.689 1.723 1.852 1.976 2.074 2.276 2000-2016 Regular 1.561 1.595 1.726 1.855 1.950 2.154 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.561 1.595 1.726 1.855 1.950 2.154 2000-2016 Midgrade 1.905 1.939 2.057 2.177 2.276 2.466 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.905 1.939 2.057 2.177 2.276 2.466 2000-2016 Premium 2.246 2.283 2.401 2.507 2.619 2.813 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.246 2.283 2.401 2.507 2.619 2.813 2000

  14. Cleveland Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    28 1.670 1.816 1.874 1.958 2.061 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 1.628 1.670 1.816 1.874 1.958 2.061 2003-2016 Regular 1.504 1.546 1.696 1.756 1.838 1.943 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 1.504 1.546 1.696 1.756 1.838 1.943 2003-2016 Midgrade 1.794 1.808 1.968 2.020 2.111 2.207 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 1.794 1.808 1.968 2.020 2.111 2.207 2003-2016 Premium 2.072 2.138 2.260 2.312 2.399 2.496 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.072 2.138 2.260 2.312 2.399 2.496 2003

  15. Denver Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    732 1.645 1.638 1.754 1.891 1.992 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 1.732 1.645 1.638 1.754 1.891 1.992 2000-2016 Regular 1.623 1.536 1.529 1.646 1.781 1.882 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 1.623 1.536 1.529 1.646 1.781 1.882 2000-2016 Midgrade 1.905 1.821 1.808 1.927 2.064 2.166 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 1.905 1.821 1.808 1.927 2.064 2.166 2000-2016 Premium 2.151 2.061 2.055 2.171 2.313 2.413 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.151 2.061 2.055 2.171 2.313 2.413 2000

  16. Florida Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    887 1.857 1.857 1.850 1.972 2.019 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 1.887 1.857 1.857 1.850 1.972 2.019 2003-2016 Regular 1.742 1.715 1.712 1.704 1.835 1.879 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 1.742 1.715 1.712 1.704 1.835 1.879 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.026 1.981 1.995 1.990 2.100 2.148 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.026 1.981 1.995 1.990 2.100 2.148 2003-2016 Premium 2.262 2.232 2.230 2.224 2.328 2.382 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.262 2.232 2.230 2.224 2.328 2.382

  17. Houston Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    649 1.603 1.577 1.639 1.664 1.863 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 1.649 1.603 1.577 1.639 1.664 1.863 2000-2016 Regular 1.516 1.471 1.445 1.507 1.537 1.736 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.516 1.471 1.445 1.507 1.537 1.736 2000-2016 Midgrade 1.813 1.768 1.744 1.799 1.812 2.021 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.813 1.768 1.744 1.799 1.812 2.021 2000-2016 Premium 2.087 2.038 2.012 2.075 2.093 2.285 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.087 2.038 2.012 2.075 2.093 2.285

  18. Los Angeles Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    683 2.550 2.418 2.619 2.625 2.794 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.683 2.550 2.418 2.619 2.625 2.794 2000-2016 Regular 2.634 2.502 2.370 2.570 2.576 2.744 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.634 2.502 2.370 2.570 2.576 2.744 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.736 2.603 2.472 2.674 2.680 2.849 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.736 2.603 2.472 2.674 2.680 2.849 2000-2016 Premium 2.836 2.703 2.572 2.774 2.780 2.949 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.836 2.703 2.572 2.774 2.780 2.94

  19. Massachusetts Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    953 1.908 1.890 1.883 1.882 1.980 2003-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 1.953 1.908 1.890 1.883 1.882 1.980 2003-2016 Regular 1.820 1.770 1.751 1.744 1.746 1.857 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.820 1.770 1.751 1.744 1.746 1.857 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.157 2.122 2.098 2.098 2.084 2.156 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.157 2.122 2.098 2.098 2.084 2.156 2003-2016 Premium 2.332 2.299 2.286 2.277 2.271 2.335 2003-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.332 2.299 2.286 2.277 2.271 2.335

  20. Miami Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2.156 2.141 2.125 2.134 2.182 2.287 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.156 2.141 2.125 2.134 2.182 2.287 2003-2016 Regular 1.983 1.972 1.955 1.967 2.019 2.120 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 1.983 1.972 1.955 1.967 2.019 2.120 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.351 2.331 2.312 2.320 2.364 2.478 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.351 2.331 2.312 2.320 2.364 2.478 2003-2016 Premium 2.584 2.559 2.550 2.550 2.586 2.698 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.584 2.559 2.550 2.550 2.586 2.698 2003

  1. Minnesota Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1.582 1.513 1.680 1.862 1.951 2.045 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 1.582 1.513 1.680 1.862 1.951 2.045 2000-2016 Regular 1.520 1.452 1.623 1.805 1.896 1.990 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 1.520 1.452 1.623 1.805 1.896 1.990 2000-2016 Midgrade 1.667 1.596 1.758 1.940 2.028 2.126 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 1.667 1.596 1.758 1.940 2.028 2.126 2000-2016 Premium 1.885 1.812 1.965 2.142 2.224 2.317 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 1.885 1.812 1.965 2.142 2.224 2.317

  2. New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2.102 2.050 2.042 2.025 2.036 2.095 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.090 2.046 2.039 2.019 2.024 2.085 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.113 2.054 2.045 2.031 2.047 2.104 2000-2016 Regular 1.976 1.921 1.917 1.900 1.910 1.976 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 1.978 1.928 1.930 1.909 1.914 1.983 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.973 1.916 1.905 1.892 1.907 1.969 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.240 2.188 2.177 2.157 2.170 2.220 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 2.194 2.158 2.134 2.115 2.120 2.177

  3. Ohio Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    574 1.646 1.775 1.873 1.951 2.016 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 1.574 1.646 1.775 1.873 1.951 2.016 2003-2016 Regular 1.473 1.545 1.675 1.773 1.851 1.914 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 1.473 1.545 1.675 1.773 1.851 1.914 2003-2016 Midgrade 1.701 1.768 1.899 1.992 2.074 2.138 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 1.701 1.768 1.899 1.992 2.074 2.138 2003-2016 Premium 1.947 2.018 2.145 2.240 2.321 2.393 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 1.947 2.018 2.145 2.240 2.321 2.393 2003

  4. PADD 4 Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    835 1.773 1.754 1.780 1.863 1.946 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 1.835 1.773 1.754 1.780 1.863 1.946 1994-2016 Regular 1.753 1.691 1.673 1.702 1.784 1.867 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 1.753 1.691 1.673 1.702 1.784 1.867 1992-2016 Midgrade 1.936 1.876 1.851 1.872 1.958 2.043 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 1.936 1.876 1.851 1.872 1.958 2.043 1994-2016 Premium 2.143 2.080 2.058 2.080 2.163 2.243 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.143 2.080 2.058 2.080 2.163 2.243 1994-2016 Diesel (On-Highway)

  5. PADD 5 Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2.379 2.283 2.206 2.277 2.313 2.463 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.140 2.066 2.020 2.018 2.054 2.172 1995-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.476 2.372 2.283 2.382 2.418 2.581 1995-2016 Regular 2.312 2.217 2.141 2.208 2.244 2.394 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 2.073 1.998 1.953 1.951 1.987 2.106 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.416 2.312 2.223 2.320 2.356 2.520 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.493 2.398 2.319 2.403 2.434 2.587 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.274 2.207 2.159 2.157 2.191 2.311

  6. San Francisco Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    537 2.488 2.447 2.452 2.505 2.645 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.537 2.488 2.447 2.452 2.505 2.645 2000-2016 Regular 2.486 2.436 2.391 2.396 2.451 2.591 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.486 2.436 2.391 2.396 2.451 2.591 2000-2016 Midgrade 2.601 2.556 2.524 2.530 2.577 2.719 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.601 2.556 2.524 2.530 2.577 2.719 2000-2016 Premium 2.716 2.665 2.638 2.643 2.690 2.829 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 2.716 2.665 2.638 2.643 2.690 2.82

  7. Seattle Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2.185 2.148 2.100 2.107 2.184 2.254 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.185 2.148 2.100 2.107 2.184 2.254 2003-2016 Regular 2.133 2.092 2.051 2.057 2.135 2.206 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.133 2.092 2.051 2.057 2.135 2.206 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.292 2.268 2.202 2.208 2.278 2.347 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.292 2.268 2.202 2.208 2.278 2.347 2003-2016 Premium 2.400 2.373 2.306 2.314 2.389 2.457 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.400 2.373 2.306 2.314 2.389 2.457

  8. Texas Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    663 1.625 1.617 1.646 1.701 1.840 2000-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 1.674 1.635 1.629 1.645 1.695 1.841 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 1.646 1.610 1.599 1.648 1.710 1.839 2000-2016 Regular 1.564 1.527 1.519 1.548 1.604 1.741 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 1.580 1.543 1.537 1.554 1.605 1.748 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.538 1.502 1.491 1.538 1.603 1.732 2000-2016 Midgrade 1.809 1.768 1.759 1.791 1.841 1.989 2000-2016 Conventional Areas 1.821 1.776 1.769 1.784 1.833 1.987

  9. Washington Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    129 2.093 2.064 2.065 2.121 2.226 2003-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.129 2.093 2.064 2.065 2.121 2.226 2003-2016 Regular 2.062 2.024 1.997 2.000 2.060 2.162 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.062 2.024 1.997 2.000 2.060 2.162 2003-2016 Midgrade 2.263 2.235 2.198 2.193 2.239 2.347 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.263 2.235 2.198 2.193 2.239 2.347 2003-2016 Premium 2.401 2.370 2.332 2.331 2.379 2.493 2003-2016 Conventional Areas 2.401 2.370 2.332 2.331 2.379 2.493 2003

  10. Motor Gasoline Sales Through Retail Outlets Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    894 2.319 - - - - 1984-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 1.879 2.300 - - - - 1984-2014 New England (PADD 1A) 1.960 2.377 - - - - 1984-2014 Connecticut 1.943 2.422 - - - - 1984-2014 Maine...

  11. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Industrial"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Resources North Am","CT","Power Marketer",54,162770,12973,7.9701419 "TransCanada Power Marketing, Ltd.","CT","Power Marketer",251,1347975,111807,8.2944417 "Constellation ...

  12. 2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Commercial

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 1,462.0 9.80 Direct Energy Business DC Power Marketer 231 303,926 22,847.6 7.52 Direct Energy Business Marketing, LLC DC Power Marketer 3,861 839,195 63,318.0 7.55 Direct Energy ...

  13. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Commercial"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Direct Energy Business","CT","Power Marketer",843,1285021,101810.5,7.9228666 "Direct Energy Business Marketing, LLC","CT","Power Marketer",561,790495,68978,8.7259249 ...

  14. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Transportation"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "NextEra Energy Services, LLC","CT","Power Marketer",1,78948,6712.4,8.5023053 "Direct Energy Business Marketing, LLC","DC","Power Marketer",1,148128,9306.9,6.283012 "Reliant ...

  15. 2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Industrial

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    CT Power Marketer 251 1,347,975 111,807.0 8.29 Constellation NewEnergy, Inc DC Power Marketer 1 749 56.6 7.56 Direct Energy Business Marketing, LLC DC Power Marketer 1 220,720 ...

  16. 2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Transportation

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    7.95 NextEra Energy Services, LLC CT Power Marketer 1 78,948 6,712.4 8.50 Direct Energy Business Marketing, LLC DC Power Marketer 1 148,128 9,306.9 6.28 Reliant Energy ...

  17. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Total"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... "Town Square Energy","CT","Power Marketer",7388,33128,7931.7,23.942586 "TransCanada Power Marketing, Ltd.","CT","Power Marketer",251,1347975,111807,8.2944417 "Viridian ...

  18. Use of short-term test systems for the prediction of the hazard represented by potential chemical carcinogens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, L.R.; Jones, T.D.; Easterly, C.E.; Walsh, P.J.

    1990-10-01

    It has been hypothesized that results from short-term bioassays will ultimately provide information that will be useful for human health hazard assessment. Historically, the validity of the short-term tests has been assessed using the framework of the epidemiologic/medical screens. In this context, the results of the carcinogen (long-term) bioassay is generally used as the standard. However, this approach is widely recognized as being biased and, because it employs qualitative data, cannot be used to assist in isolating those compounds which may represent a more significant toxicologic hazard than others. In contrast, the goal of this research is to address the problem of evaluating the utility of the short-term tests for hazard assessment using an alternative method of investigation. Chemicals were selected mostly from the list of carcinogens published by the International Agency for Research on Carcinogens (IARC); a few other chemicals commonly recognized as hazardous were included. Tumorigenicity and mutagenicity data on 52 chemicals were obtained from the Registry of Toxic Effects of Chemical Substances (RTECS) and were analyzed using a relative potency approach. The data were evaluated in a format which allowed for a comparison of the ranking of the mutagenic relative potencies of the compounds (as estimated using short-term data) vs. the ranking of the tumorigenic relative potencies (as estimated from the chronic bioassays). Although this was a preliminary investigation, it offers evidence that the short-term tests systems may be of utility in ranking the hazards represented by chemicals which may contribute to increased carcinogenesis in humans as a result of occupational or environmental exposures. 177 refs., 8 tabs.

  19. Long term out-of-pile thermocouple tests in conditions representative for nuclear gas-cooled high temperature reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurie, M.; Fourrez, S.; Fuetterer, M. A.; Lapetite, J. M.

    2011-07-01

    During irradiation tests at high temperature, failure of commercial Inconel 600 sheathed thermocouples is commonly encountered. To understand and remedy this problem, out-of-pile tests were performed with thermocouples in carburizing atmospheres which can be assumed to be at least locally representative for High Temperature Reactors. The objective was to screen those thermocouples which would consecutively be used under irradiation. Two such screening tests have been performed with a set of thermocouples embedded in graphite (mainly conventional Type N thermocouples and thermocouples with innovative sheaths) in a dedicated furnace with helium flushing. Performance indicators such as thermal drift, insulation and loop resistance were monitored and compared to those from conventional Type N thermocouples. Several parameters were investigated: niobium sleeves, bending, thickness, sheath composition, temperature as well as the chemical environment. After the tests, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) examinations were performed to analyze possible local damage in wires and in the sheath. The present paper describes the two experiments, summarizes results and outlines further work, in particular to further analyze the findings and to select suitable thermocouples for qualification under irradiation. (authors)

  20. Characterization of Representative Materials in Support of Safe, Long Term Storage of Surplus Plutonium in DOE-STD-3013 Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narlesky, Joshua E.; Stroud, Mary Ann; Smith, Paul Herrick; Wayne, David M.; Mason, Richard E.; Worl, Laura A.

    2013-02-15

    The Surveillance and Monitoring Program is a joint Los Alamos National Laboratory/Savannah River Site effort funded by the Department of Energy-Environmental Management to provide the technical basis for the safe, long-term storage (up to 50 years) of over 6 metric tons of plutonium stored in over 5,000 DOE-STD-3013 containers at various facilities around the DOE complex. The majority of this material is plutonium that is surplus to the nuclear weapons program, and much of it is destined for conversion to mixed oxide fuel for use in US nuclear power plants. The form of the plutonium ranges from relatively pure metal and oxide to very impure oxide. The performance of the 3013 containers has been shown to depend on moisture content and on the levels, types and chemical forms of the impurities. The oxide materials that present the greatest challenge to the storage container are those that contain chloride salts. Other common impurities include oxides and other compounds of calcium, magnesium, iron, and nickel. Over the past 15 years the program has collected a large body of experimental data on 54 samples of plutonium, with 53 chosen to represent the broader population of materials in storage. This paper summarizes the characterization data, moisture analysis, particle size, surface area, density, wattage, actinide composition, trace element impurity analysis, and shelf life surveillance data and includes origin and process history information. Limited characterization data on fourteen nonrepresentative samples is also presented.

  1. THE SPITZER EXTRAGALACTIC REPRESENTATIVE VOLUME SURVEY: THE ENVIRONMENTS OF HIGH-z SDSS QUASI-STELLAR OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falder, J. T.; Stevens, J. A.; Jarvis, Matt J.; Bonfield, D. G.; Lacy, M.; Farrah, D.; Oliver, S.; Surace, J.; Mauduit, J.-C.; Gonzalez-Solares, E.; Afonso, J.; Cava, A.; Seymour, N.

    2011-07-10

    This paper presents a study of the environments of SDSS quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) in the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS). We concentrate on the high-redshift QSOs as these have not been studied in large numbers with data of this depth before. We use the IRAC 3.6-4.5 {mu}m color of objects and ancillary r-band data to filter out as much foreground contamination as possible. This technique allows us to find a significant (>4{sigma}) overdensity of galaxies around QSOs in a redshift bin centered on z {approx} 2.0 and an (>2{sigma}) overdensity of galaxies around QSOs in a redshift bin centered on z {approx} 3.3. We compare our findings to the predictions of a semi-analytic galaxy formation model, based on the {Lambda}CDM MILLENNIUM simulation, and find for both redshift bins that the model predictions match well the source density we have measured from the SERVS data.

  2. Genome analysis of Elusimicrobium minutum, the first cultivated representative of the Elusimicrobia phylum (formerly Termite Group 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herlemann, D. P. R.; Geissinger, O.; Ikeda-Ohtsubo, W.; Kunin, V.; Sun, H.; Lapidus, A.; Hugenholtz, P.; Brune, A.

    2009-02-01

    The candidate phylum Termite group 1 (TG1), is regularly 1 encountered in termite hindguts but is present also in many other habitats. Here we report the complete genome sequence (1.64 Mbp) of Elusimicrobium minutum strain Pei191{sup T}, the first cultured representative of the TG1 phylum. We reconstructed the metabolism of this strictly anaerobic bacterium isolated from a beetle larva gut and discuss the findings in light of physiological data. E. minutum has all genes required for uptake and fermentation of sugars via the Embden-Meyerhof pathway, including several hydrogenases, and an unusual peptide degradation pathway comprising transamination reactions and leading to the formation of alanine, which is excreted in substantial amounts. The presence of genes encoding lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the presence of a pathway for peptidoglycan formation are consistent with ultrastructural evidence of a Gram-negative cell envelope. Even though electron micrographs showed no cell appendages, the genome encodes many genes putatively involved in pilus assembly. We assigned some to a type II secretion system, but the function of 60 pilE-like genes remains unknown. Numerous genes with hypothetical functions, e.g., polyketide synthesis, non-ribosomal peptide synthesis, antibiotic transport, and oxygen stress protection, indicate the presence of hitherto undiscovered physiological traits. Comparative analysis of 22 concatenated single-copy marker genes corroborated the status of Elusimicrobia (formerly TG1) as a separate phylum in the bacterial domain, which was so far based only on 16S rRNA sequence analysis.

  3. The Impact of Emission and Climate Change on Ozone in the United States under Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Drake, John B.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Liu, Yang

    2013-09-27

    Dynamical downscaling was applied in this study to link the global climate-chemistry model Community Atmosphere Model (CAM-Chem) with the regional models: Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ). Two Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios (RCP 4.5 and RCP 8.5) were used to evaluate the climate impact on ozone concentrations in 2050s. Ozone concentrations in the lower-mid troposphere (surface to ~300 hPa), from mid- to high latitudes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH), show decreasing trends in RCP 4.5 between 2000s and 2050s, with the largest decrease of 4-10 ppbv occurring in the summer and the fall; and increasing trends (2-12 ppbv) in RCP 8.5 resulting from the increased methane emissions. In RCP 8.5, methane emissions increase by ~60% by the end of 2050s, accounting for more than 90% of ozone increases in summer and fall, and 60-80% in spring and winter. Under the RCP 4.5 scenario, in the summer when photochemical reactions are the most active, the large ozone precursor emissions reduction leads to the greatest decrease of downscaled surface ozone concentrations, ranging from 6 to 10 ppbv. However, a few major cities show ozone increases of 3 to 7 ppbv due to weakened NO titration. Under the RCP 8.5 scenario, in winter, downscaled ozone concentrations increase across nearly the entire continental US in winter, ranging from 3 to 10 ppbv due to increased methane emissions and enhanced stratosphere-troposphere exchange (STE). More intense heat waves are projected to occur by the end of 2050s in RCP 8.5, leading to more than 8 ppbv of the maximum daily 8-hour daily average (MDA8) ozone during the heat wave days than other days; this indicates the dramatic impact heat waves exert on high frequency ozone events.

  4. Meeting the Radiative Forcing Targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways in a World with Agricultural Climate Impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Mueller, C.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-02-28

    This study assesses how climate impacts on agriculture may change the evolution of the agricultural and energy systems in meeting the end-of-century radiative forcing targets of the Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). We build on the recently completed ISI-MIP exercise that has produced global gridded estimates of future crop yields for major agricultural crops using climate model projections of the RCPs from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). For this study we use the bias-corrected outputs of the HadGEM2-ES climate model as inputs to the LPJmL crop growth model, and the outputs of LPJmL to modify inputs to the GCAM integrated assessment model. Our results indicate that agricultural climate impacts generally lead to an increase in global cropland, as compared with corresponding emissions scenarios that do not consider climate impacts on agricultural productivity. This is driven mostly by negative impacts on wheat, rice, other grains, and oil crops. Still, including agricultural climate impacts does not significantly increase the costs or change the technological strategies of global, whole-system emissions mitigation. In fact, to meet the most aggressive climate change mitigation target (2.6 W/m2 in 2100), the net mitigation costs are slightly lower when agricultural climate impacts are considered. Key contributing factors to these results are (a) low levels of climate change in the low-forcing scenarios, (b) adaptation to climate impacts, simulated in GCAM through inter-regional shifting in the production of agricultural goods, and (c) positive average climate impacts on bioenergy crop yields.

  5. Table 8. Retail sales, revenue, and average retail price by sector...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,8374110,8204704,7597337,7442490,7146835,6865634,6698105,6176586,6300359,6075079,21,25.3,25.5 "Industrial",16565376,16847755,16993922,16774699,14710294,17038455,17839032,17990009,1...

  6. UESC Training for Utility Representatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Webinar covers utility energy service contracts (UESC), which allow utilities to provide their Federal agencies with comprehensive energy and water efficiency improvements and demand-reduction services.

  7. FAQS Qualification Card Facility Representative

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A key element for the Departments Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA).

  8. PSCAD Modules Representing PV Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

    2013-08-01

    Photovoltaic power plants (PVPs) have been growing in size, and the installation time is very short. With the cost of photovoltaic (PV) panels dropping in recent years, it can be predicted that in the next 10 years the contribution of PVPs to the total number of renewable energy power plants will grow significantly. In this project, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a dynamic modeling of the modules to be used as building blocks to develop simulation models of single PV arrays, expanded to include Maximum Power Point Tracker (MPPT), expanded to include PV inverter, or expanded to cover an entire PVP. The focus of the investigation and complexity of the simulation determines the components that must be included in the simulation. The development of the PV inverter was covered in detail, including the control diagrams. Both the current-regulated voltage source inverter and the current-regulated current source inverter were developed in PSCAD. Various operations of the PV inverters were simulated under normal and abnormal conditions. Symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults were simulated, presented, and discussed. Both the three-phase analysis and the symmetrical component analysis were included to clarify the understanding of unsymmetrical faults. The dynamic model validation was based on the testing data provided by SCE. Testing was conducted at SCE with the focus on the grid interface behavior of the PV inverter under different faults and disturbances. The dynamic model validation covers both the symmetrical and unsymmetrical faults.

  9. Program Analyst (Contracting Officer Representative)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position reports directly to the Office Director for PBPE. The incumbent of this position analyzes, evaluates and/or advises management on the effectiveness of complex and overarching EIA...

  10. U.S. average gasoline prices falling to near $2 in December

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. average gasoline prices falling to near $2 in December U.S. retail gasoline prices are expected to continue falling over the next few months, dropping to a national average near $2 per gallon in December. In its new forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said high gasoline production, cheaper winter-grade gasoline, and lower gasoline demand following this summer's peak driving season will contribute to savings at the pump for consumers. The monthly average price for gasoline

  11. U.S. drivers continue to see low gasoline prices in December

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Nationwide average gasoline price to fall below $2 a gallon in January The national average price of regular gasoline is expected to drop below $2 per gallon this month and hover near the $2 level through most of this year, as lower crude oil prices translate into more savings for consumers at the pump. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration said the retail price for regular-grade gasoline averages $1.90 per gallon in February. That's the lowest level in seven

  12. Average monthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43 by September

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    monthly gasoline price to fall to $3.43 by September The U.S. average monthly retail price of gasoline is expected to decline by about 18 cents per gallon between May and September, according to the new forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The lower price reflects, in part, slightly lower crude oil prices that account for about two-thirds of the cost at the pump. The largest price drops are expected in the Midwest states as refineries serving that region, which had been down

  13. Increases in electric rates in rural areas. Hearing before the Committee on Agriculture, House of Representatives, Ninety-Sixth Congress, Second Session, June 4, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Seven witnesses representing rural electric utilities and cooperatives spoke at a June 4, 1980 hearing to discuss which inflationary factors are increasing rural electric rates. The Committee recognized that the problem is not unique to rural systems. In their testimony, the witnesses noted increasing urbanization of rural areas; the cost of generating plant construction, fuel, and operating expenses; general economic factors of inflation and high interest rates; and regulations as major contributing factors to utility requests for rate increases. The hearing record includes their testimony, additional material submitted for the record, and responses to questions from the subcommittee. (DCK)

  14. Mobil/Marathon takeover. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session, November 19, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The exercise of corporate power and money as well as the effect on energy policy were the underlying issues in a hearing on the proposed merger of Mobil and Marathon oil companies. The use of capital in this way would deny funds for economic recovery and energy development at a time when the oil companies complain that they need more financial incentives. The companies' response in the direction of mergers suggest that deregulation and tax incentives are not developing solutions to energy supply, but are creating new problems. The witnesses included representatives of Ohio, DOE's Office of Competition, and independent oil jobbers and distributors, who argued against the merger. Additional letters and statement from the witnesses follow their testimony. (DCK)

  15. Findings and recommendations of the advisory panel on synthetic fuels. Advisory panel on synthetic fuels. Report for the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    In a report to the US House of Representatives Committee on Science and Technology, the Advisory Panel defines the most critical energy problem facing the US: obtaining a sufficient supply of liquid hydrocarbons for transportation fuel and for other applications where substitution would be difficult, costly, and time-consuming. Any substantial contribution from synthetic fuels must involve the use of coal, oil shale, and biomass, with the raw materials coming from as many different regions of the country as possible. The panel makes recommendations regarding (1) the emphasis of the Department of Energy's synthetic-fuel demonstration program, (2) implementation of a synthetic-fuel production program, and (3) mitigation of the environmental and socioeconomic impacts of synthetic-fuel production. The panel specifically maintains that federal assistance to commercial-scale projects should be available on a competitive basis to those organizations willing to take substantial marketing risks.

  16. H. R. 4805: Internal Revenue Code of 1990. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundredth First Congress, Second Session, May 10, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the U.S. House of Representatives on May 10, 1990 to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986. This bill reduces emissions of carbon dioxide by imposing a tax on certain fuels based on their carbon content. Separate sections are included which impose tax on coal, tax on petroleum, and tax on natural gas. The tax rate on coal will be $3.00 per ton for 1991, $6.00 per ton for 1992, $9.00 per ton for 1993, and $12 per ton for 1994. The tax rate on petroleum will be $.65 per barrel for 1991, $1.30 per barrel for 1992, $1.95 per barrel for 1993, and $2.60 per barrel for 1994. The tax rate on natural gas will be $.08 per MCF for 1991, $.16 per MCF for 1992, $.24 per MCF for 1993, and $.32 per MCF for 1994.

  17. Assessment of G3(MP2)//B3 theory including a pseudopotential for molecules containing first-, second-, and third-row representative elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rocha, Carlos Murilo Romero; Morgon, Nelson Henrique; Custodio, Rogrio; Pereira, Douglas Henrique; Departamento de Cincias Exatas e Biotecnolgicas, Universidade Federal do Tocantins, Campus de Gurupi, 77410-530 Gurupi, Tocantins

    2013-11-14

    G3(MP2)//B3 theory was modified to incorporate compact effective potential (CEP) pseudopotentials, providing a theoretical alternative referred to as G3(MP2)//B3-CEP for calculations involving first-, second-, and third-row representative elements. The G3/05 test set was used as a standard to evaluate the accuracy of the calculated properties. G3(MP2)//B3-CEP theory was applied to the study of 247 standard enthalpies of formation, 104 ionization energies, 63 electron affinities, 10 proton affinities, and 22 atomization energies, comprising 446 experimental energies. The mean absolute deviations compared with the experimental data for all thermochemical results presented an accuracy of 1.4 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3 and 1.6 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3-CEP. Approximately 75% and 70% of the calculated properties are found with accuracy between 2 kcal mol{sup ?1} for G3(MP2)//B3 and G3(MP2)//B3-CEP, respectively. Considering a confidence interval of 95%, the results may oscillate between 4.2 kcal mol{sup ?1} and 4.6 kcal mol{sup ?1}, respectively. The overall statistical behavior indicates that the calculations using pseudopotential present similar behavior with the all-electron theory. Of equal importance to the accuracy is the CPU time, which was reduced by between 10% and 40%.

  18. State Regulators Promote Consumer Choice in Retail Gas Markets

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1996-01-01

    Restructuring of interstate pipeline companies has created new choices and challenges for local distribution companies (LDCs), their regulators, and their customers. The process of separating interstate pipeline gas sales from transportation service has been completed and has resulted in greater gas procurement options for LDCs.

  19. Refiner Prices of Gasoline, All Grades - Through Retail Outlets

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 View History U.S. 1.892 2.306 3.058 3.168 3.068 2.876 1978-2014 East Coast (PADD 1) 1.871 2.291 3.054 3.172 3.058 2.716 1983-2014 New England (PADD...

  20. How Three Retail Buyers Source Large-Scale Solar Electricity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Large-scale, non-utility solar power purchase agreements (PPAs) are still a rarity despite the growing popularity of PPAs across the country. In this webinar, participants will learn more about how...

  1. Hedging effects of wind on retail electric supply costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graves, Frank; Litvinova, Julia

    2009-12-15

    In the short term, renewables - especially wind - are not as effective as conventional hedges due to uncertain volume and timing as well as possibly poor correlation with high-value periods. In the long term, there are more potential hedging advantages to renewables because conventional financial hedges are not available very far in the future. (author)

  2. The Intersection of Net Metering and Retail Choice: An Overview...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    In this report, the authors studied different facets of crediting mechanisms, and defined five different theoretical models describing different ways competitive suppliers and ...

  3. "2014 Retail Power Marketers Sales- Residential"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential" "(Data from form EIA-861 schedule 4B)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Customers (Count)","Sales (Megawatthours)","Revenues (Thousands Dollars)","Average Price (cents/kWh)" "3 Phases Renewables","CA","Power Marketer",106,893,50,5.5991041 "Commerce Energy, Inc.","CA","Power Marketer",9202,83114,8285.3,9.9685973 "Marin Clean

  4. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Commercial"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Commercial" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Customers (Count)","Sales (Megawatthours)","Revenues (Thousands Dollars)","Average Price (cents/kWh)" "Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK","Investor Owned",2253,125452,12449,9.9233173 "Alaska Power and Telephone Co","AK","Investor

  5. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Industrial"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Customers (Count)","Sales (Megawatthours)","Revenues (Thousands Dollars)","Average Price (cents/kWh)" "Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK","Investor Owned",96,132889,12514,9.4168818 "Chugach Electric Assn

  6. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Residential"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Residential" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Customers (Count)","Sales (Megawatthours)","Revenues (Thousands Dollars)","Average Price (cents/kWh)" "Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK","Investor Owned",14115,141151,16728,11.851138 "Alaska Power and Telephone Co","AK","Investor

  7. "2014 Utility Bundled Retail Sales- Total"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A & 4D and EIA-861S)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Customers (Count)","Sales (Megawatthours)","Revenues (Thousands Dollars)","Average Price (cents/kWh)" "Alaska Electric Light&Power Co","AK","Investor Owned",16464,399492,41691,10.436004 "Alaska Power and Telephone Co","AK","Investor

  8. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... In fact, there are some environmental restrictions that ... RM94-20-000). 212 Comments of U.S. Department of Justice, ... by Consumers, ELECTRICITY JOURNAL, Volume 19, N 2006) at ...

  9. Historic utility retail rate information | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    updates) until just recently, so you may not find too much history. Going forward, we hope to make historic rates more organized, using the "supersedes" field to connect historic...

  10. Effects of Demand Response on Retail and Wholesale Power Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chassin, David P.; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2012-07-26

    Demand response has grown to be a part of the repertoire of resources used by utilities to manage the balance between generation and load. In recent years, advances in communications and control technology have enabled utilities to consider continuously controlling demand response to meet generation, rather than the other way around. This paper discusses the economic applications of a general method for load resource analysis that parallels the approach used to analyze generation resources and uses the method to examine the results of the US Department of Energys Olympic Peninsula Demonstration Testbed. A market-based closed-loop system of controllable assets is discussed with necessary and sufficient conditions on system controllability, observability and stability derived.

  11. A Look at Retail and Service Buildings - Index Page

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    the U.S. in 1995. Number of Buildings In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), information is collected separately for service buildings, enclosed malls,...

  12. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Stand-alone retail

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  13. Archived Reference Building Type: Stand-alone retail

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  14. Archived Reference Building Type: Stand-alone retail

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zonesis available for reference.Current versionsare also available.

  15. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Stand-alone retail

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  16. ,"New York City Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...142016" ,"Excel File Name:","petprignddcusy35nyw.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavpetpetprignddcusy35nyw.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information ...

  17. U.S. Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gasoline - All Grades 2.462 2.387 2.260 2.144 2.057 1.872 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.369 2.325 2.188 2.052 1.949 1.788 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas ...

  18. Retail Prices for Diesel (On-Highway) - All Types

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2.235 2.211 1994-2016 East Coast (PADD1) 2.455 2.413 2.372 2.318 2.279 2.260 1994-2016 New England (PADD 1A) 2.527 2.515 2.453 2.397 2.365 2.344 1997-2016 Central Atlantic (PADD...

  19. Reliant Energy Retail Services LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Facebook: https:www.facebook.comreliantenergy Outage Hotline: 1-866-222-7100 Green Button Access: Implemented Green Button Landing Page: www.reliant.comWelcome.d...

  20. TXU Energy Retail Co LP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Green Button Access: Implemented Green Button Landing Page: www.txu.comenresidentia Green Button Reference Page: www.txu.comenresidentia References: EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

  1. Central Atlantic (PADD 1B) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2.016 1.959 1.943 1.938 1.954 2.052 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.088 2.038 2.015 2.017 2.027 2.105 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 1.972 1.911 1.898 1.889 1.910 2.019 1994-2016 Regular 1.879 1.822 1.807 1.802 1.819 1.922 1993-2016 Conventional Areas 1.967 1.917 1.900 1.899 1.910 1.990 1993-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.823 1.762 1.749 1.742 1.762 1.879 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.156 2.091 2.072 2.069 2.084 2.175 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.190 2.124 2.101 2.105 2.113 2.191

  2. East Coast (PADD 1) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    36 1.898 1.876 1.880 1.918 2.020 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 1.928 1.897 1.873 1.884 1.935 2.029 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 1.950 1.899 1.882 1.874 1.891 2.006 1994-2016 Regular 1.794 1.755 1.734 1.738 1.779 1.884 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 1.786 1.755 1.733 1.744 1.798 1.892 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.806 1.755 1.737 1.729 1.749 1.871 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.075 2.033 2.014 2.016 2.053 2.148 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.047 2.010 1.991 1.999 2.049 2.142

  3. Gulf Coast (PADD 3) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    67 1.632 1.631 1.662 1.706 1.850 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 1.673 1.638 1.641 1.666 1.705 1.854 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 1.646 1.610 1.599 1.648 1.710 1.839 1994-2016 Regular 1.561 1.528 1.526 1.559 1.603 1.746 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 1.568 1.536 1.536 1.565 1.603 1.751 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.538 1.502 1.491 1.538 1.603 1.732 1994-2016 Midgrade 1.805 1.764 1.762 1.792 1.834 1.980 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 1.809 1.766 1.767 1.790 1.829 1.977

  4. Lower Atlantic (PADD 1C) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    868 1.843 1.818 1.831 1.896 2.002 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 1.872 1.847 1.823 1.838 1.904 2.004 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 1.818 1.798 1.763 1.760 1.803 1.983 1994-2016 Regular 1.716 1.692 1.667 1.681 1.749 1.856 1993-2016 Conventional Areas 1.722 1.697 1.673 1.689 1.759 1.859 1993-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.658 1.640 1.601 1.594 1.642 1.825 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.005 1.975 1.956 1.963 2.024 2.128 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.004 1.974 1.956 1.965 2.028 2.127

  5. Midwest (PADD 2) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    02 1.606 1.693 1.803 1.896 2.012 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 1.597 1.595 1.682 1.793 1.886 1.984 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 1.636 1.673 1.761 1.869 1.958 2.188 1994-2016 Regular 1.518 1.522 1.609 1.722 1.815 1.929 1992-2016 Conventional Areas 1.517 1.515 1.602 1.716 1.810 1.905 1992-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.529 1.566 1.654 1.764 1.851 2.085 1994-2016 Midgrade 1.747 1.752 1.840 1.943 2.034 2.158 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 1.734 1.733 1.822 1.924 2.015 2.125

  6. New England (PADD 1A) Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    67 1.927 1.906 1.899 1.903 1.999 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.021 1.980 1.963 1.958 1.969 2.042 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 1.954 1.914 1.891 1.884 1.886 1.988 1994-2016 Regular 1.842 1.798 1.777 1.770 1.778 1.885 1993-2016 Conventional Areas 1.903 1.857 1.841 1.832 1.848 1.932 1993-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.827 1.783 1.760 1.754 1.761 1.873 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.170 2.138 2.114 2.110 2.100 2.167 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 2.210 2.181 2.166 2.164 2.167 2.209

  7. U.S. Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    870 1.834 1.837 1.887 1.943 2.062 1993-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 1.773 1.747 1.767 1.817 1.882 1.988 1994-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 2.068 2.010 1.980 2.030 2.067 2.214 1994-2016 Regular 1.759 1.724 1.730 1.783 1.841 1.961 1990-2016 Conventional Areas 1.663 1.638 1.661 1.715 1.782 1.888 1990-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.961 1.904 1.874 1.925 1.964 2.116 1994-2016 Midgrade 2.025 1.984 1.983 2.029 2.081 2.200 1994-2016 Conventional Areas 1.915 1.885 1.902 1.943 2.005 2.114

  8. West Coast less California Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    082 2.009 1.945 1.935 1.974 2.114 1998-2016 All Grades - Conventional Areas 2.140 2.066 2.020 2.018 2.054 2.172 2000-2016 All Grades - Reformulated Areas 1.803 1.737 1.590 1.540 1.592 1.837 1998-2016 Regular 2.012 1.938 1.875 1.865 1.904 2.045 1998-2016 Conventional Areas 2.073 1.998 1.953 1.951 1.987 2.106 2000-2016 Reformulated Areas 1.715 1.647 1.501 1.452 1.504 1.750 1998-2016 Midgrade 2.215 2.149 2.083 2.071 2.109 2.251 1998-2016 Conventional Areas 2.274 2.207 2.159 2.157 2.191 2.311

  9. Retail Infrastructure Costs Comparison for Hydrogen and Electricity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... CLOMB-2 Stewart 2010 Coulomb Shrp ePump PIA 2012 Shorepower, multi-head SCHDR-Evlnk PIA 2013 Schneider Electric EVlink Outdoor model GG-JB PIA 2012 Green Garage Assoc. Juice Bar. ...

  10. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON COMPETITION IN WHOLESALE AND RETAIL MARKETS...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Report to Congress:Impacts of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's Proposal for Standard Market Design 2010 Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering - Staff Report ...

  11. Dominion Retail Inc (New York) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 3763 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Average Rates Residential: 0.0593kWh...

  12. Texas Retail Energy, LLC (New York) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    861 Data Utility Id 50046 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Average Rates Commercial: 0.0507kWh...

  13. New York City Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    2.162 2.147 2.120 2.117 2.109 2.067 2000-2015 Midgrade 2.481 2.467 2.457 2.448 2.440 2.403 2000-2015 Reformulated Areas 2.481 2.467 2.457 2.448 2.440 2.403 2000-2015 Premium...

  14. Kallotenue papyrolyticum gen. nov., sp. nov., a cellulolytic and filamentous thermophile that represents a novel lineage (Kallotenuales ord. nov., Kallotenuaceae fam. nov.) within the class Chloroflexia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, Jesse; Gieler, Brandon; Heisler, Devon; Palisoc, Maryknoll; Williams, Amanda; Dohnalkova, Alice; Ming, Hong; Yu, Tian T.; Dodsworth, Jeremy A.; Li, Wen J.; Hedlund, Brian P.

    2013-08-15

    Several closely-related, thermophilic, and cellulolytic bacterial strains, designated JKG1T, JKG2, JKG3, JKG4, and JKG5, were isolated from a cellulolytic enrichment (corn stover) incubated in the water column of Great Boiling Spring, NV. Strain JKG1T had cells of a diameter of 0.7 - 0.9 ?m and length of ~2.0 ?m that formed non-branched multicellular filaments reaching >300 ?m. Spores were not formed and dense liquid cultures were red. The temperature range for growth was 45-65 C, with an optimum of 55 C. The pH range for growth was 5.6-9.0, with an optimum of 7.5. JKG1T grew as an aerobic heterotroph, utilizing glucose, sucrose, xylose, arabinose, cellobiose, carboxymethylcellulose, filter paper, microcrystalline cellulose, xylan, starch, casamino acids, tryptone, peptone, yeast extract, acetate, citrate, lactate, pyruvate, and glycerol as sole carbon sources, and was not observed to photosynthesize. The cells stained Gram-negative. Phylogenetic analysis using 16S rRNA gene sequences placed the new isolates in the class Chloroflexia, but distant from other cultivated members, with the highest sequence identity of 82.5% to Roseiflexus castenholzii. The major quinone was menaquinone-9; no ubiquinones were detected. The major cellular fatty acids (>5%) were C18:0, anteiso-C17:0, iso-C18:0, and iso-C17:0. C16:0, iso-C16:0, and C17:0. The peptidoglycan amino acids were alanine, ornithine, glutamic acid, serine, and asparagine. Whole-cell sugars included mannose, rhamnose, glucose, galactose, ribose, arabinose, and xylose. Morphological, phylogenetic, and chemotaxonomic results suggest that JKG1T is representative of a new lineage within the class Chloroflexia, which we propose to designate Kallotenue papyrolyticum gen. nov., sp. nov., Kallotenuaceae fam. nov., Kallotenuales ord. nov.

  15. Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs. Volume III (of 4): Characterization and simulation of representative resources. Final report, February 14, 1995--October 13, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbrell, W.C.; Bassiouni, Z.A.; Bourgoyne, A.T.

    1997-01-13

    Significant innovations have been made in seismic processing and reservoir simulation. In addition, significant advances have been made in deviated and horizontal drilling technologies. Effective application of these technologies along with improved integrated resource management methods offer opportunities to significantly increase Gulf of Mexico production, delay platform abandonments, and preserve access to a substantial remaining oil target for both exploratory drilling and advanced recovery processes. In an effort to illustrate the impact that these new technologies and sources of information can have upon the estimates of recoverable oil in the Gulf of Mexico, additional and detailed data was collected for two previously studied reservoirs: a South March Island reservoir operated by Taylor Energy and Gulf of Mexico reservoir operated by Mobil, whose exact location has been blind-coded at their request, and an additional third representative reservoir in the Gulf of Mexico, the KEKF-1 reservoir in West Delta Block 84 Field. The new data includes reprocessed 2-D seismic data, newly acquired 3-D data, fluid data, fluid samples, pressure data, well test data, well logs, and core data/samples. The new data was used to refine reservoir and geologic characterization of these reservoirs. Further laboratory investigation also provided additional simulation input data in the form of PVT properties, relative permeabilities, capillary pressures, and water compatibility. Geologic investigations were also conducted to refine the models of mud-rich submarine fan architectures used by seismic analysts and reservoir engineers. These results were also used, in part, to assist in the recharacterization of these reservoirs.

  16. Spatially Resolved Estimation of Ozone-related Mortality in the United States under Two Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) and their Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young-Min; Zhou, Ying; Gao, Yang; Fu, Joshua S.; Johnson, Brent; Huang, Cheng; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The spatial pattern of the uncertainty in climate air pollution health impact has rarely been studied due to the lack of high-resolution model simulations, especially under the latest Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs). OBJECTIVES: We estimated county-level ozone (O3) and PM2.5 related excess mortality (EM) and evaluated the associated uncertainties in the continental United States in the 2050s under RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. METHODS: Using dynamically downscaled climate model simulations, we calculated changes in O3 and PM2.5 levels at 12 km resolution between the future (2057-2059) and present (2001-2004) under two RCP scenarios. Using concentration-response relationships in the literature and projected future populations, we estimated EM attributable to the changes in O3 and PM2.5. We finally analyzed the contribution of input variables to the uncertainty in the county-level EM estimation using Monte Carlo simulation. RESULTS: O3-related premature deaths in the continental U.S. were estimated to be 1,082 deaths/year under RCP8.5 (95% confidence interval (CI): -288 to 2,453), and -5,229 deaths/year under RCP4.5 (-7,212 to -3,246). Simulated PM2.5 changes resulted in a significant decrease in EM under the two RCPs. The uncertainty of O3-related EM estimates was mainly caused by RCP scenarios, whereas that of PM2.5-related EMs was mainly from concentration-response functions. CONCLUSION: EM estimates attributable to climate change-induced air pollution change as well as the associated uncertainties vary substantially in space, and so are the most influential input variables. Spatially resolved data is crucial to develop effective mitigation and adaptation policy.

  17. Written Statement of Mark Whitney Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Committee on Appropriations United States House of Representatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Written Statement of Mark Whitney Acting Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Committee on Appropriations United States House of Representatives (March 18, 2015)

  18. Written Statement of Dr. Monica Regalbuto Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives (February 11 2016)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Written Statement of Dr. Monica Regalbuto Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management United States Department of Energy Before the Subcommittee on Strategic Forces Committee on Armed Services United States House of Representatives February 11, 2016.

  19. CT head-scan dosimetry in an anthropomorphic phantom and associated measurement of ACR accreditation-phantom imaging metrics under clinically representative scan conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunner, Claudia C.; Stern, Stanley H.; Chakrabarti, Kish; Minniti, Ronaldo; Parry, Marie I.; Skopec, Marlene

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: To measure radiation absorbed dose and its distribution in an anthropomorphic head phantom under clinically representative scan conditions in three widely used computed tomography (CT) scanners, and to relate those dose values to metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in the American College of Radiology CT accreditation phantom.Methods: By inserting optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) in the head of an anthropomorphic phantom specially developed for CT dosimetry (University of Florida, Gainesville), we measured dose with three commonly used scanners (GE Discovery CT750 HD, Siemens Definition, Philips Brilliance 64) at two different clinical sites (Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, National Institutes of Health). The scanners were set to operate with the same data-acquisition and image-reconstruction protocols as used clinically for typical head scans, respective of the practices of each facility for each scanner. We also analyzed images of the ACR CT accreditation phantom with the corresponding protocols. While the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance protocols utilized only conventional, filtered back-projection (FBP) image-reconstruction methods, the GE Discovery also employed its particular version of an adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR) algorithm that can be blended in desired proportions with the FBP algorithm. We did an objective image-metrics analysis evaluating the modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and CNR for images reconstructed with FBP. For images reconstructed with ASIR, we only analyzed the CNR, since MTF and NPS results are expected to depend on the object for iterative reconstruction algorithms.Results: The OSLD measurements showed that the Siemens Definition and the Philips Brilliance scanners (located at two different clinical facilities) yield average absorbed doses in tissue of 42.6 and 43.1 mGy, respectively. The GE Discovery delivers about the same amount of dose (43.7 mGy) when run under similar operating and image-reconstruction conditions, i.e., without tube current modulation and ASIR. The image-metrics analysis likewise showed that the MTF, NPS, and CNR associated with the reconstructed images are mutually comparable when the three scanners are run with similar settings, and differences can be attributed to different edge-enhancement properties of the applied reconstruction filters. Moreover, when the GE scanner was operated with the facility's scanner settings for routine head exams, which apply 50% ASIR and use only approximately half of the 100%-FBP dose, the CNR of the images showed no significant change. Even though the CNR alone is not sufficient to characterize the image quality and justify any dose reduction claims, it can be useful as a constancy test metric.Conclusions: This work presents a straightforward method to connect direct measurements of CT dose with objective image metrics such as high-contrast resolution, noise, and CNR. It demonstrates that OSLD measurements in an anthropomorphic head phantom allow a realistic and locally precise estimation of magnitude and spatial distribution of dose in tissue delivered during a typical CT head scan. Additional objective analysis of the images of the ACR accreditation phantom can be used to relate the measured doses to high contrast resolution, noise, and CNR.

  20. Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) Demonstration Using a Representative Savannah River Site Sludge Simulant On the Large-Size Pilot Platform at the CEA-Marcoule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girold, C.; Delaunay, M.; Dussossoy, J.L.; Lacombe, J. [CEA Marcoule, CEA/DEN/DTCD/SCDV, 30 (France); Marra, S.; Peeler, D.; Herman, C.; Smith, M.; Edwards, R.; Barnes, A.; Stone, M. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Washington Savannah River Company, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC (United States); Iverson, D. [Liquid Waste Operations, Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC), Aiken, SC (United States); Do Quang, R. [AREVA NC, Tour AREVA, 92 - Paris La Defense (France); Tchemitcheff, E. [AREVA Federal Services LLC, Richland Office, Richland, WA (United States); Veyer, C. [Consultant, 59 - Saint Waast la Vallee (France)

    2008-07-01

    The cold-crucible induction melter technology (CCIM) is considered worldwide for industrial implementation to overcome the current limits of high level waste vitrification technologies and to answer future challenges such as: new or difficult sludge compositions, need for improving waste loading, need for high temperatures, and corrosive effluents. More particularly, this technology is being considered for implementation at the US DOE Savannah River site to increase the rate of waste processing while reducing the number of HLW canisters to be produced through increased waste loading and improved waste throughput. A collaborative program involving AREVA, CEA (French Atomic Energy Commission), SRNL (Savannah River National Laboratory) and WSRC (Washington Savannah River Company) has thus been initiated in 2007 to demonstrate vitrification with waste loadings on the order of 50% (versus the current DWPF waste loading of about 35%) with a PUREX-type waste composition (high Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} composition), and to perform two pilot-scale runs on the large size platform equipped with a 650 mm diameter CCIM at the CEA Marcoule. The objectives of the demonstrations were 1) to show the feasibility of processing a representative SRS sludge surrogate using continuous slurry feeding, 2) to produce a glass that would meet the acceptance specifications with an increased waste loading when compared to what is presently achieved at the DWPF, and 3) achieve improved waste throughputs. This presentation describes the platform and the very encouraging results obtained from the demonstration performed at temperatures, specific throughputs and waste loadings that overcome current DWPF limits. Results from the initial exploratory run and second demonstration run include 1) production of a glass product that achieved the targeted glass composition that was more durable than the standard Environmental Assessment (EA) glass, 2) successful slurry feeding of the CCIM, and 3) promising waste processing rates (at 1250 deg. C and 1300 deg. C melt pool temperature) that could result in processing of the Savannah River HLW faster than could be currently achieved with the existing Joule Heated melter in DWPF. In conclusion, this joint effort conducted by CEA, AREVA, SRNL and WSRC led to very encouraging results, demonstrating waste throughputs 44 % that of the DWPF ceramic melter throughput in a 650 mm CCIM melter for the same waste type with a Sludge Batch 3 PUREX-type waste feed flux of 150 L/h/m{sup 2} demonstrated at 1250 deg. C. The very high waste loading (above 52%) allows reducing the amount of glass to be produced by about 27% to treat the same amount of waste when compared to previous DWPF operation for this specific type of feed, since 27 % less glass is needed to immobilize the same amount of waste. It was also demonstrated, for this type of feed, an unusual behavior with regard to nepheline formation, which would require further evaluation for future applications. The product from the baseline demonstration run, with a waste loading of at least 52%, displayed a very good quality. Stabilized operation close to the maximum throughput was demonstrated. Cesium volatility was apparently between 7 and 12 % (based on glass analysis); however this value is only preliminary. This demonstration also allowed the CEA to better understand the SRS slurry feed behavior and to propose adaptations to the platform for any future demonstrations using this type of feed. Finally, use of a large diameter CCIM ({approx}1 meter) may allow faster processing of the SRS HLW than can be achieved with the current DWPF melter. (authors)

  1. H. R. 5904: A Bill to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to provide tax relief to utilities installing acid rain reduction equipment, introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred First Congress, Second Session, October 23, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the US House of Representatives on October 23, 1990 to control acid rain. This legislation focuses on tax credit for equipment to meet acid rain reduction standards, as well as tax-exempt financing of acid rain control property. In addition, a tax credit is issued for minerals used to reduce the sulfur in coal.

  2. Landscape Characterization and Representativeness Analysis for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Number: DE-AC05-00OR22725 Resource Type: Dataset Data Type: Numeric Data Research Org: Climate Change Science Institute (CCSI), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Rdige,...

  3. Drop Testing Representative Multi-Canister Overpacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snow, Spencer D.; Morton, Dana K.

    2015-06-01

    The objective of the work reported herein was to determine the ability of the Multi- Canister Overpack (MCO) canister design to maintain its containment boundary after an accidental drop event. Two test MCO canisters were assembled at Hanford, prepared for testing at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), drop tested at Sandia National Laboratories, and evaluated back at the INEEL. In addition to the actual testing efforts, finite element plastic analysis techniques were used to make both pre-test and post-test predictions of the test MCOs structural deformations. The completed effort has demonstrated that the canister design is capable of maintaining a 50 psig pressure boundary after drop testing. Based on helium leak testing methods, one test MCO was determined to have a leakage rate not greater than 1x10-5 std cc/sec (prior internal helium presence prevented a more rigorous test) and the remaining test MCO had a measured leakage rate less than 1x10-7 std cc/sec (i.e., a leaktight containment) after the drop test. The effort has also demonstrated the capability of finite element methods using plastic analysis techniques to accurately predict the structural deformations of canisters subjected to an accidental drop event.

  4. Facility Representative Qualification Equivalencies Based on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    been revised several times. The purpose of this Memorandum is to provide guidance, Attachment 1, to Qualifying Officials (QO) on how to use the cross-walk, Attachment 2, in...

  5. 1997 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kellar Ken HQ DP-45 (301) 903-8046 kenneth.kellar@dp.doe.gov Kozak Pete SR TRITIUM ... Wade Ken RL TANKS (509) 373-9961 kennethgwade@rl.gov Woodworth Marc SR RSFD ...

  6. 1998 Annual Facility Representative Workshop Attendees

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... (303) 966-7954 (303) 966-8389 brad.ring@rfets.gov Robbins Teresa RF SNMPu (303) 966-3525 (303) 966-5248 teresa.robbins@rfets.gov Robin Ron AL LAAO (505) 667-4548 (505) ...

  7. Arkansas Converter Station Alternative Siting Area Representative...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... ALEX H MUSE LUCIAS E. MEEMAN-SHELBY FOREST Side Park Brunetti Park City Park Brunetti Park John Robbins Field East Hill Park Deermont Park Gaisman Park Elmore Park Rockyford Park ...

  8. Advisory Board Seats New Student Representatives | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Honor Society, and she is involved with Project U, a club that stands against bullying. She is on the girls' powderpuff football team, and in her free time, she enjoys...

  9. Advisory Board Seats New Student Representatives | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the Hardin Valley varsity tennis team the past three years. Sophia is interested in medicine and health sciences and is thinking about a career in medicine. She is currently the...

  10. DOE ORP Contracting Officer Representatives - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carosino 02102010 BNI DE-AC2701RV14136 Bill Hamel 02052013 BNI DE-AC2701RV14136 Ben Harp 07272012 BNI DE-AC2701RV14136 Delmar Noyes 07272012 BNI DE-AC2701RV14136 Gary Olsen...

  11. Understanding and representing natural language meaning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waltz, D.L.; Maran, L.R.; Dorfman, M.H.; Dinitz, R.; Farwell, D.

    1982-12-01

    During this contract period the authors have: (a) continued investigation of events and actions by means of representation schemes called 'event shape diagrams'; (b) written a parsing program which selects appropriate word and sentence meanings by a parallel process known as activation and inhibition; (c) begun investigation of the point of a story or event by modeling the motivations and emotional behaviors of story characters; (d) started work on combining and translating two machine-readable dictionaries into a lexicon and knowledge base which will form an integral part of our natural language understanding programs; (e) made substantial progress toward a general model for the representation of cognitive relations by comparing English scene and event descriptions with similar descriptions in other languages; (f) constructed a general model for the representation of tense and aspect of verbs; (g) made progress toward the design of an integrated robotics system which accepts English requests, and uses visual and tactile inputs in making decisions and learning new tasks.

  12. Hazardous-waste cleanup and enforcement problems: Indiana. Hearing before the Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, Second Session, June 1, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Thirteen witnesses representing the private and public sectors testified at a Seymour, Indiana hearing on hazardous materials at the Seymour Recycling facility and efforts to clean up the site. The facility began operations in 1968, and was closed down in February of 1980; the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had discovered during 1978 that the company was not disposing of its chemical wastes properly. Local concerns focused on why the EPA efforts slowed noticeably in the spring of 1981 and whether the site qualifies for superfund financing. Spokesmen from EPA argued that the slowdown was due to inaction at the state level, but state representatives countered that the problem was a lack of state funds to match federal funding. Other witnesses pursued health and safety issues and the efforts Seymour citizens have made to gain relief. (DCK)

  13. High-speed rail transportation. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Transportation and Hazardous Materials of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, October 16, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    H.R. 1087 would authorize a high speed rail transportation development and commercialization program, establish a national high speed rail transportation policy, and promote development and commercialization of high speed rail transportation by providing Federal guarantees of certain investments in high speed rail transportation facilities. Testimony was heard from representatives of MAGLEV USA, Federal Railroad Administration, National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak), the Office of Technology Assessment, MAGLEV, Inc., National Maglev Initiative, High Speed Rail Association, and the Texas High-Speed Rail Association. Additional information was supplied by the Coalition of Northeastern Governors, Republic Locomotive, Washington State High Speed Ground Transportation, and the Texas High Speed Authority.

  14. Issues relating to overlapping Federal and state responsibilities for the oversight of the Surface Mining Law. Hearing before a Subcommittee of the Committee on Government Operations, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session, October 26, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The hearing was called regarding the responsibilities of the state and Federal government in administering the Federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. With mining taking place in 27 states under a variety of conditions and practices, the Act encourages the states to assume primacy responsibility for regulating coal mining. Once a state's plan is approved, the Federal role becomes one of oversight. This hearing examines Pennsylvania's programs and what happens when there is a disagreement between state and Federal authorities. Testimony is presented from 12 witnesses, representing coal companies, electric power companies, Sierra Club, National Wildlife Federation, Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Resources, and West Virginia.

  15. Tenth anniversary of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977. Oversight hearing before the Subcommittee on Energy and the Environment of the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, House of Representatives, One Hundredth Congress, First Session

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    Testimony was heard from representatives from the Society of American Archeology, the Office of Surface Mining and Reclamation Enforcement, the Office of Environmental Energy Management of Pennsylvania, National Wildlife Federation, Sierra Club, Western Organizations of Resource Councils, Southwest Research and Information Center, West Virginia Highlands Conservancy, Illinois South Project, Concern About Water Loss Due to Mining, Mountain Stream Monitors, Citizens Organized Against Longwalling, Environmental Policy Institute, Kentucky Fair Tax Coalition, Save Our Cumberland Mountains, Navajo Nation, several coal mining companies, the National Coal Association, and Small Coal Operator Advisory Council. Prepared statements from all witnesses plus additional materials are included.

  16. H. R. 3052: This Act may be cited as the Coal Field Water Protection and Replacement Act, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, July 25, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill would amend the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 to provide for the protection of water resources during coal mining operations. Sections of the bill describe probable hydrologic consequences; surface and ground water monitoring plan; performance bonds; protection of water resources for permit approval; effect of underground coal mining operations; inspection and monitoring; penalty for failure of representative of Secretary or state regulatory authority to carry out certain duties; release of performance bond; water rights and replacement; regulations; and state programs.

  17. H. R. 2670: A bill to amend the Solid Waste Disposal Act to regulate ash from municipal solid waste incinerators as a hazardous waste, introduced in the US House of Representatives, One Hundred Second Congress, First Session, June 18, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This bill was introduced into the US House of Representatives on June 18, 1991 to amend the Solid Waste disposal Act to regulate ash from municipal solid waste incinerators as a hazardous waste. When garbage is burned, toxic materials are concentrated in the ash. If the ash is disposed of in a landfill, these toxic materials can contaminate the ground water or surface water by leaching toxic materials from the ash. In addition, disposing of contaminated ash improperly can pose a health hazard. New authority is provided for regulating incinerator ash as a hazardous waste.

  18. Mobil-Marathon and similar oil company mergers. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Fossil and Synthetic Fuels of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session on H. R. 4930

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Subcommittee chairman Phillip R. Sharp's opening statement notes that a wave of large horizontal and vertical mergers are the result of rising oil prices and oil-reserve values, price decontrol, and a relaxation of anti-merger enforcement by the Reagan administration. US merger activity in 1981 had a $20 billion value, half of which involved oil, gas, mining, and mineral companies. Chairman Sharp further notes that the mergers will raise customer costs and eliminate many small companies, which indirectly retards new exploration. H.R. 4930 requires a study of these effects and provides for a moratorium on larger mergers until the study is completed. The testimony of eight witnesses representing oil companies and related groups follows the text of H.R. 4930. Additional material submitted for the record includes a resolution by the Illinois Petroleum Marketers Association expressing their concern about the impact of mergers. (DCK)

  19. Hazardous waste and the stringfellow acid pits. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Natural Resources, Agriculture Research and Environment of the Committee on Science and Technology, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session, April 22, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    California residents and state and federal officials testified at a field hearing in Glen Avon, California on the cleanup operations at the Stringfellow acid pits, an abandoned site, under the Superfund law. Sally Tanner, Chairwoman of the State Assembly Committee on Consumer Protection and Toxic Chemicals, expressed disappointment that the federal program did not match state readiness to solve the problem. The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) failure to use available funds and to listen to public concerns has been frustrating to Californians concerned about health hazards. Other witnesses spoke of the improbability of a complete cleanup because of groundwater migration and flooding in the area. EPA representatives described cleanup procedures at the site. An appendix with additional material submitted for the record follows the testimony of 11 witnesses.

  20. Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Price Data Collection Procedures Every Monday, retail on-highway diesel prices are collected by telephone and fax from a sample of approximately 350 retail diesel outlets, including truck stops and service stations. The data represent the price of ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) which contains less than 15 parts-per-million sulfur. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires that all on-highway diesel sold be ULSD by December 1, 2010 (September 1, 2006 in California). In January 2007, the